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2014–15 Estimates

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ISSN: 1702-5125
Catalogue No.: BT31-2/2015E-PDF

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada,
as represented by the President of the Treasury Board, 2014

This document can be made available in alternative formats upon request.

Internet: Government of Canada Publications http://publications.gc.ca

CORRIGENDUM

Part I – Government Expenditure Plan

Page I–6 — Major Transfer Payments

The explanatory text should read:

“Excluding Employment Insurance, major transfer payments – significant transfers to other levels of government and transfers to persons – are expected to be $109.5 billion, 76.5% of total estimated transfer payment expenditures. As presented in the table, transfers to other levels of government are projected to total $62.5 billion in 2014–15.”

Annex – Items for inclusion in the Proposed Schedules to the Appropriation Bill

Page A–20 — Justice

The wording to Vote 5 under Justice should read:

“Justice – The grants listed in the Estimates and contributions”

Table of Contents



Part I – Government Expenditure Plan

Introduction

Purpose

Expenditures made by government require the authority of Parliament. That authority is provided in two ways: annual Appropriation Acts, or Supply Bills, that specify the amounts and broad purposes for which funds can be spent; and other specific statutes that authorize payments and set out the amounts and time periods for those payments. The amounts approved in Appropriation Acts are referred to as voted amounts, and the expenditure authorities provided through other statutes are called statutory authorities.

Estimates documents are prepared to support Appropriation Acts. As such, the Estimates provide additional information on voted amounts included in the Appropriation Act. Forecasts of statutory amounts are also presented to provide a broader context.

Links with the Budget

The Budget Plan is a key policy document of the Government, announcing tax changes, new or enhanced programs and anticipated revenues. It also provides an economic forecast. While the Budget, like a Supply Bill, is also a confidence measure, the Budget does not provide parliamentary expenditure authority.

Given the differences in timing of the preparation of the Main Estimates and the Budget, it is not always possible to include emerging priorities and items announced in the Government’s Budget in the Main Estimates. Therefore, to clarify the links between these Estimates and recent funding decisions, this document identifies items announced in a recent federal budget and which appear for the first time in the Estimates. Specifically, the following items were approved in the Economic Action Plan (Budget 2013) and are included in departmental reference levels in 2014–15:

Other items approved in Budget 2013 were identified in the 2013–14 Supplementary Estimates. Future Estimates documents will include other planned expenditures announced in 2013 and subsequent Budgets.

The Estimates and Budget use different accounting methodologies. Estimates, with the focus on authority for payments in a fiscal year, are prepared on a near-cash basis. The Budget’s economic forecast is prepared on a full accrual basis. A more complete explanation of the differences in methodology and a reconciliation between the annual results and amounts included in Estimates are presented in the Notes to the Financial Statements of the Government of Canada included in the Public Accounts. Volume II of Public Accounts presents government expenditures on the same basis as the Estimates, while Volume I of Public Accounts provides financial information corresponding to the Budget.

The Estimates Documents

The Estimates are comprised of three parts:

Part I – Government Expenditure Plan – provides an overview of the Government’s requirements and changes in estimated expenditures from previous fiscal years.

Part II – Main Estimates – supports the appropriation acts with detailed information on the estimated spending and authorities being sought by each federal organization requesting appropriations.

Parts I and II are included in this volume and, in accordance with Standing Orders of the House of Commons, must be tabled on or before March 1.

Part III – Departmental Expenditure Plans – consists of two components:

Supplementary Estimates support Appropriation Acts presented later in the fiscal year. Supplementary Estimates present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or have subsequently been refined to account for developments in particular programs and services.

Changes to the presentation of the 2014–15 Main Estimates

Departments and agencies are presented alphabetically in the Proposed Schedules to the Appropriation Bill, according to the legal name of the department or agency. This has led to a change in vote numbering. This presentation is consistent with Part II and other tables.

Forecast statutory expenditures for Employment Insurance benefits are no longer presented in the Main Estimates. The Employment Insurance Operating Account (a separate account in the accounts of Canada) was established to record all amounts received or paid out under the Employment Insurance Act since January 1, 2009. Financial information for the Employment Insurance Operating Account may be found in Section 4 of Volume 1 of the Public Accounts of Canada.

Estimates to Date now excludes any funding deemed to have been appropriated to a department following the transfer of a portion of the federal public administration.

Summary of Estimates

These Estimates support the government’s request to Parliament for authority to expend through annual appropriations:

These voted expenditures require annual approval from Parliament which is sought through an appropriation bill. The bill provides the specific wording that governs the purpose and conditions under which expenditures can be made and the funds subject to these terms and conditions.

Statutory forecasts represent payments to be made under legislation previously approved by Parliament. Statutory forecasts are included in these Estimates to provide a more complete picture of total estimated expenditures. Of these forecasts, $149.1 billion is for budgetary expenditures including the cost of servicing the public debt. Recoveries on loans, investments and advances are expected to exceed expenditures by $10.1 billion.

Figure 1. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures - Budgetary

The following chart shows a breakdown of budgetary net voted and statutory expenditures as compared to previous Supply and actual expenditures.

Figure 2. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures - Non-budgetary

The following chart shows a breakdown of non-budgetary net voted and statutory expenditures as compared to previous Supply and actual expenditures.

Table 1. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures (billions of dollars)
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted 87.71 87.06 93.94 86.28
Statutory 139.86 145.52 145.16 149.05
Total Budgetary 227.57 232.58 239.09 235.33
Non-budgetary
Voted 0.04 0.07 0.07 0.03
Statutory 63.15 (41.02) (41.02) (10.05)
Total Non-budgetary 63.19 (40.95) (40.95) (10.02)

The following graphs present the voted and statutory components of Main Estimates and a comparison of Main Estimates over the last ten years of Main Estimates.

Figure 3. Long-term comparison of Main Estimates - Budgetary

The following chart presents the voted and statutory components of budgetary expenditures and a comparison of budgetary expenditures included in the last ten years of Main Estimates.

Figure 4. Composition of Estimates and Expenditures - Budgetary

The following chart presents the composition of Estimates by budgetary expenditure type.

Table 2. Composition of Estimates and Expenditures (billions of dollars)
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Transfer Payments 135.12 140.33 143.26 143.17
Operating and capital 66.48 65.12 69.55 65.87
Public Debt 25.98 27.13 26.28 26.30
Total Budgetary 227.57 232.58 239.09 235.33
Non-budgetary
Loans, Investments and Advances 63.19 (40.95) (40.95) (10.02)
Total Non-budgetary 63.19 (40.95) (40.95) (10.02)

Composition of Estimates

The majority of expenditures in 2014–15 will be transfer payments – payments made to other levels of government, individuals and other organizations. Transfer payments make up approximately 60.84% of expenditures or $143.17 billion, operating and capital expenditures account for approximately 27.99% of expenditures or $65.87 billion, while public debt charges are approximately 11.17% of expenditures or $26.30 billion.

Public Debt Charges

Total interest costs are approximately 11.17% of expenditures or $26.3 billion, a projected decrease of $0.8 billion or 3.1% from previous Main Estimates and $0.3 billion more than actual expenditures for 2012–13. The decrease in total interest costs relative to the previous Main Estimates is largely due to assets maturing under the Insured Mortgage Purchase Program in 2013–14, as well as a decrease in the average Government of Canada long-term bond rate that is used to calculate interest on the public sector pension obligations pertaining to service pre April 1, 2000. Total interest costs are comprised of interest on unmatured debt of $18.1 billion and other interest costs of $8.2 billion. Interest on unmatured debt represents the interest resulting from certificates of indebtedness issued by the Government of Canada that have not yet become due. Other interest costs include interest on liabilities for federal public service pension plans, deposit and trust accounts and other specified purpose accounts.

Major Transfer Payments

Figure 5. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3

The following chart presents major transfers payments to other levels of government and to persons.

Figure 6. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3

The following chart presents major transfers payments to other levels of government and to persons.

Figure 7. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3

The following chart presents major transfers payments to other levels of government and to persons.

Table 3. Major Transfer Payments (billions of dollars)
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Transfers to other levels of government
Canada Health Transfer 28.57 30.28 30.28 32.11
Fiscal Equalization 16.10 16.11 16.16 16.67
Canada Social Transfer 11.86 12.22 12.22 12.58
Territorial Financing 3.11 3.29 3.29 3.47
Gas Tax Fund 0 0 0 1.97
Additional Fiscal Equalization to Nova Scotia 0.30 0.25 0.26 0.14
Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia 0.15 0.09 0.09 0.06
Wait Times Reduction Transfer 0.25 0.25 0.25 0
Payment to Ontario related to the Canada Health Transfer 0.09 0 0.01 0
Youth Allowances Recovery (0.74) (0.77) (0.78) (0.82)
Alternative Payments for Standing Programs (3.36) (3.50) (3.54) (3.70)
Total transfers to other levels of government 56.33 58.21 58.24 62.49
Transfers to persons
Elderly Benefits 40.29 42.63 42.63 44.22
Universal Child Care Benefits 2.72 2.79 2.79 2.82
Total transfers to persons 43.02 45.42 45.42 47.04
Total Major Transfer Payments 99.35 103.63 103.67 109.53

Major Transfer Payments

Excluding Employment Insurance, major transfer payments – significant transfers to other levels of government and transfers to persons – are expected to be $109.5 billion, 76.5% of total estimated transfer payment expenditures. As presented in the table, transfers to other levels of government are projected to total $62.5 billion in 2014–15.

As presented in the table, transfers to other levels of government are projected to total $60.5 billion in 2014–15, an increase of $2.3 billion over the previous year’s Main Estimates and $4.2 billion more than actual expenditures in 2012–13.

The Canada Health Transfer (CHT) is a federal transfer provided to provinces and territories in support of health care. Starting in 2014–15, the CHT will be distributed on an equal per capita cash basis. The CHT will increase by $1.8billion from the 2013–14 total to $32.1 billion in 2014–15, primarily as a result of the 6% escalator ($1.8 billion) but also due to the transition to an equal per capita cash allocation ($13.9 million), as legislated in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, 2012. As legislated in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, 2012 the CHT will continue to increase by 6% per year until 2016–17, after which it will grow based on a 3-year moving average of nominal gross domestic product, with funding guaranteed to increase by at least 3% per year. CHT support is subject to the five conditions of the Canada Health Act and the prohibitions against extra-billing and user fees.

Fiscal Equalization refers to unconditional transfer payments to provinces so that they can provide their residents with public services that are reasonably comparable to those in other provinces, at reasonably comparable levels of taxation. The formula was recently reviewed; changes to the Act were included in the Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 1, and changes to the regulations governing this program came into force in December 2013. These payments will be $16.7 billion in 2014–15, an increase of $0.6 billion from the Main Estimates 2013–14 and $0.6 billion more than 2012–13 actual expenditures. The July 2012 Total Transfer Protection (TTP) payments of $679.7 million are included in the 2012–13 expenditures. The July 2013 TTP payments of $55.8 million are included in the 2013–14 Estimates to date. Provided in fiscal years 2010–11 to 2013–14, TTP protected individual provinces against year-over-year declines in their total major cash transfers, including prior year TTP amounts.

The Canada Social Transfer (CST) is a federal transfer to provinces and territories in support of social assistance and social services, post-secondary education, and programs for children. For 2014–15, the 3% increase of $366.5 million to $12.6 billion is a result of the 3% annual growth rate legislated in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, 2012 for 2014–15 and subsequent years.

Territorial Financing payments, provided through the Territorial Formula Financing (TFF) Program, are unconditional federal transfers to the three territorial governments that allow territories to provide their residents a range of public services comparable to those offered by provincial governments, at comparable levels of taxation. The transfers are based on a formula that fills the gap between a proxy of the expenditure requirements and revenue-raising capacity of the territories. The formula was recently reviewed; changes to the Act were included in the Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 1 and changes to the regulations governing this program came into force in December 2013. Applying the new formula, these payments are forecast to be $3.5 billion in 2014–15, $180.9 million higher than the 2013–14 Main Estimates.

Additional Fiscal Equalization Payments to Nova Scotia are payments related to its 2005 Offshore Accord. Following the introduction of a new formula for Equalization in 2007, Nova Scotia was guaranteed that, on a cumulative basis beginning in 2008–09 over the lifetime of the Accord, the new formula would not reduce its Equalization payments and 2005 Offshore Accord payments when compared with what the province would have received under the formula that was in place when it signed its 2005 Offshore Accord. Based on the first calculation of 2014–15, Nova Scotia is entitled to an advance payment of $138.3 million in 2014–15, a decrease of $107.5 million when compared to Main Estimates 2013–14. However, the December 2013 official determination of 2013–14 (upon which payments will be made), is $260.3 million, which is reflected in the Supplementary Estimates (C), 2013–14.

Wait Times Reduction Funding was part of the 2004 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care in which First Ministers committed to achieving reductions in wait times in priority areas such as cancer, heart, diagnostic imaging, joint replacements and sight restoration. Budget 2005 committed to a transfer of $5.5 billion for wait times reduction. Of this amount, $4.25 billion was provided to provinces and territories by way of third-party trusts. The remaining $1.25 billion was paid in bi-monthly installments totaling $250 million per year between 2009–10 and 2013–14.

The Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia is a payment related to its 2005 Offshore Accord. This Accord guaranteed the province that its Equalization payments would not be reduced due to offshore oil and gas revenues that entered the Equalization formula. This is derived by applying the Equalization formula with and without offshore oil and gas revenues and comparing the resulting Equalization payments. For the 2004–05 to 2011–12 period, an upfront payment of $830 million was provided to Nova Scotia in July 2005. This ensured that the province would receive at least that much in Accord compensation over the period. Offset amounts are calculated each year providing 100 percent protection from the inclusion of offshore revenues. In 2011–12, the cumulative draw down exceeded the advance payment. The province is expected to receive $64.5 million for 2014–15, a decrease of $25 million compared with the amount for 2013–14.

The Payment to Ontario Related to the Canada Health Transfer provided for separate payments to Ontario outside of the Canada Health Transfer (CHT) cash envelope for 2009–10 and 2010–11 to ensure its per capita cash entitlements in relation to the CHT are the same as for other Equalization-receiving provinces. The payment for 2009-10 of $489million was a legislated fixed amount, whereas the payment for 2010–11 was formula-based, and payments were re-calculated along with each new CHT estimate. In all there were five calculations. Each recalculation was based on updated personal income tax data received from the Fiscal Policy Division of Finance Canada and the Canada Revenue Agency. The final calculation for this program was made in September 2013. The payment for 2010–11, including all adjustments, was $246.2 million. Amounts shown in 2012–13 and 2013–14 represent the impacts of the official recalculations.

The Youth Allowance Recovery relates to tax points transferred to the province of Quebec for the Youth Allowance program, which has since expired. The equivalent value of the tax point reduction is recovered each year from the province of Quebec. The change in recoveries for the Youth Allowances Recovery Program is entirely due to year-over-year changes to the value of federal personal income taxes, the recovery being a percentage of these taxes. For 2014–15, the forecast recovery of $815.9 million is $45.6 million higher than the initial 2013–14 forecast in Main Estimates and $38.3 million higher than the forecast in the 2013–14 Supplementary Estimates (C) due to higher forecast levels of federal personal income taxes.

Alternative Payments for Standing Programs represent recoveries from Quebec of an additional tax point transfer above and beyond the tax point transfer traditionally computed under the Canada Health Transfer (CHT), the Canada Social Transfer (CST) and the Youth Allowances Recovery. The change in recoveries for the Alternative Payments for Standing Programs is entirely due to year-over-year changes to the value of federal personal income taxes, the recovery being a percentage of these taxes. For 2014–15, the forecast recovery of $3.7 billion is $203.0 million higher than the forecast in the 2013–14 Main Estimates and $166.6 million higher than that in 2013–14 Supplementary Estimates (C) due to higher forecast levels of federal personal income taxes.

Transfers to Persons

Excluding Employment Insurance, transfers to persons are projected to be $47.0 billion in 2014–15, an increase of $1.6billion over the 2013–14 Main Estimates and $4.0 billion more than actual expenditures in 2012–13.

Elderly benefits include Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement, and Allowance payments. Elderly benefit payments are expected to be $44.2 billion in 2014–15, an increase of $1.6 billion over the 2013–14 Main Estimates and $3.9 billion more than actual expenditures in 2012–13.

Universal Child Care benefits provide families with resources to support childcare choices, and are paid to families in monthly instalments of $100 per child under the age of six. Universal child care benefit payments are forecast to be $2.8 billion in 2014–15, an increase of $31.0 million over the 2013–14 Main Estimates and $94.3 million more than actual expenditures in 2012–13.

Estimates by Organization

One hundred thirty-three organizations are represented in the 2014–15 Estimates. More information about each organization can be found in Part II – Main Estimates.

Figure 8. Estimates by Organization -

Estimates by Organization -

Figure 9. Estimates by Organization -

Estimates by Organization -

Figure 10. Estimates by Organization -

Estimates by Organization -

Table 4. Estimates by Organization (dollars)
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Agriculture and Agri-Food 2,681,559,075 2,191,575,219 2,466,771,107 2,253,196,812
Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada 1,483,542 0 0 0
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency 315,661,947 299,971,071 310,680,951 288,486,384
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 551,843,000 211,062,637 486,982,537 102,143,000
Auditor General 88,209,772 84,333,533 84,333,533 77,741,830
Canada Border Services Agency 1,707,356,008 1,680,153,024 1,732,329,044 1,736,391,109
Canada Council for the Arts 181,367,816 180,260,816 181,437,817 182,092,916
Canada Industrial Relations Board 12,786,116 13,553,965 13,553,965 13,363,956
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 2,086,397,954 2,100,578,000 2,100,578,000 2,097,353,000
Canada Post Corporation 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Canada Revenue Agency 4,318,468,143 4,276,823,253 4,018,152,726 3,861,256,109
Canada School of Public Service 97,265,227 98,464,321 98,464,321 85,490,028
Canadian Air Transport Security Authority 513,369,000 598,286,200 598,286,200 591,626,313
Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal 1,513,390 0 0 0
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 1,106,519,060 1,064,769,060 1,064,769,060 1,038,018,212
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety 5,457,315 4,971,152 4,971,152 5,059,041
Canadian Commercial Corporation 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204
Canadian Dairy Commission 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,985,810 3,610,936
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency 27,948,825 31,006,012 31,006,012 30,964,106
Canadian Food Inspection Agency 782,055,725 687,885,404 725,341,196 619,327,735
Canadian Grain Commission 37,134,246 22,167,708 37,568,653 16,383,894
Canadian Heritage 1,247,427,555 1,317,225,666 1,321,559,229 1,390,049,987
Canadian Human Rights Commission 24,383,176 22,461,289 22,461,289 22,099,726
Canadian Human Rights Tribunal 4,219,609 4,521,383 4,521,383 4,532,525
Canadian Institutes of Health Research 997,052,742 967,653,157 997,506,549 984,951,962
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat 5,155,480 6,035,504 6,035,504 5,957,163
Canadian International Development Agency 3,409,557,434 3,159,329,240 3,159,329,240 0
Canadian International Trade Tribunal 11,501,327 9,893,541 9,893,541 9,476,739
Canadian Museum for Human Rights 56,935,796 31,700,000 31,700,000 21,700,000
Canadian Museum of History 64,364,831 57,418,730 58,918,730 63,430,033
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 9,976,473 18,450,000 18,450,000 9,900,000
Canadian Museum of Nature 34,370,062 25,834,904 25,834,904 26,127,096
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency 52,388,610 51,791,133 53,442,608 30,945,766
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission 139,699,154 132,901,485 135,737,179 131,637,295
Canadian Polar Commission 1,317,735 2,576,669 2,576,669 2,576,360
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission 14,733,761 11,206,858 11,206,859 10,586,699
Canadian Security Intelligence Service 496,420,949 513,007,839 516,966,806 516,236,757
Canadian Space Agency 320,245,415 488,680,928 488,680,928 462,447,174
Canadian Tourism Commission 71,495,802 57,832,802 57,832,802 57,972,388
Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board 31,656,277 29,568,209 30,509,431 29,042,391
Canadian Transportation Agency 28,700,844 27,660,522 27,660,522 27,650,622
Chief Electoral Officer 119,580,193 115,854,117 115,854,117 97,110,432
Citizenship and Immigration 1,523,325,468 1,655,418,818 1,640,588,995 1,385,441,063
Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs 485,102,600 497,675,214 498,375,214 511,708,846
Communications Security Establishment 414,494,557 422,207,847 443,746,558 829,131,918
Copyright Board 2,508,985 3,127,995 3,127,995 3,116,312
Correctional Service of Canada 2,642,999,211 2,597,613,691 2,602,274,955 2,334,682,392
Courts Administration Service 65,584,207 68,490,773 68,490,773 68,044,743
Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec 296,429,346 254,931,372 305,734,765 247,840,617
Employment and Social Development 48,434,964,624 50,525,088,121 50,593,566,774 51,670,772,727
Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation 60,667,000 51,763,000 52,848,000 49,536,000
Environment 989,655,462 959,359,318 978,101,322 932,167,330
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario 241,720,967 222,812,766 242,644,766 206,764,115
Finance 83,640,601,446 87,611,841,751 86,942,591,829 87,615,730,739
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada 53,993,571 51,402,907 51,402,907 49,189,312
First Nations Statistical Institute 2,028,410 0 0 0
Fisheries and Oceans 1,777,105,244 1,668,889,385 1,788,860,917 1,605,310,848
Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development 2,394,879,111 2,311,648,594 2,630,065,344 5,349,525,157
Governor General 20,828,891 20,047,931 20,047,931 19,987,719
Hazardous Materials Information Review Commission 4,885,371 3,732,855 3,732,855 0
Health 3,821,158,086 3,292,207,430 3,694,369,005 3,657,312,088
House of Commons 429,936,971 428,770,693 444,998,301 413,725,137
Immigration and Refugee Board 134,258,443 122,919,932 122,919,932 121,060,649
Indian Affairs and Northern Development 8,095,142,342 7,904,970,562 8,675,285,390 8,053,975,405
Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission 11,818,315 9,686,945 9,748,946 2,069,718
Industry 1,357,582,718 1,160,225,456 1,290,937,539 1,077,743,513
International Development Research Centre 156,223,043 225,390,066 225,631,734 188,019,646
International Joint Commission (Canadian Section) 6,507,498 6,741,805 6,741,805 6,746,957
Justice 733,982,848 657,476,767 672,180,746 630,587,874
Library and Archives of Canada 118,923,232 98,346,695 99,041,196 95,864,788
Library of Parliament 44,427,951 42,949,558 42,949,558 41,970,007
Marine Atlantic Inc. 184,876,000 154,430,000 154,430,000 127,484,000
Military Grievances External Review Committee 5,850,236 6,695,009 6,695,009 6,730,577
Military Police Complaints Commission 5,301,489 5,615,071 10,920,967 5,618,520
National Arts Centre Corporation 35,601,174 33,796,174 34,121,175 34,219,186
National Battlefields Commission 9,623,141 8,588,323 9,248,323 14,151,109
National Capital Commission 108,833,873 116,457,834 116,457,834 88,366,659
National Defence 19,978,190,131 17,985,310,381 18,679,276,405 18,661,554,387
National Energy Board 69,545,641 62,436,291 74,816,291 71,316,050
National Film Board 68,751,861 62,890,037 62,890,037 59,912,241
National Gallery of Canada 48,830,762 43,426,120 43,426,120 43,770,723
National Museum of Science and Technology 31,517,304 26,491,340 26,491,340 26,862,194
National Research Council of Canada 804,804,912 820,009,430 889,100,440 896,432,878
National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy 5,443,398 0 0 0
Natural Resources 1,966,810,964 2,767,014,238 2,780,935,421 2,534,650,611
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council 1,075,981,272 1,045,058,973 1,068,005,966 1,063,174,249
Northern Pipeline Agency 1,920,142 3,123,930 3,123,930 750,000
Office of Infrastructure of Canada 3,752,656,392 3,924,705,788 4,149,167,829 3,321,597,771
Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying 4,745,314 4,423,541 4,423,541 4,432,300
Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages 21,134,016 23,871,668 23,871,668 20,776,952
Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner 2,285,719 2,112,886 2,112,886 2,024,288
Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner 6,453,449 7,035,401 7,035,401 6,938,405
Office of the Co-ordinator, Status of Women 29,728,186 29,617,167 31,425,518 29,607,730
Office of the Correctional Investigator 4,576,386 4,676,785 4,676,785 4,659,652
Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions 163,366,823 162,429,112 166,206,461 167,815,874
Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner 5,542,996 5,674,899 5,674,899 5,426,234
Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (312,736) 909,369 909,369 142,763,529
Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada 37,831,536 43,629,683 43,629,683 35,521,413
Old Port of Montreal Corporation Inc. 24,472,000 24,472,000 24,472,000 0
Parks Canada Agency 630,547,591 597,035,269 629,929,875 612,465,134
Parole Board of Canada 46,511,790 48,679,516 48,679,516 47,128,994
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board 8,056,803 10,944,073 10,944,073 10,927,030
PPP Canada Inc. 287,450,000 265,200,000 265,200,000 9,500,000
Privy Council 130,232,441 123,409,904 126,967,871 118,806,989
Public Health Agency of Canada 619,656,229 579,236,460 612,546,137 614,696,685
Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness 584,273,778 440,910,923 1,364,058,230 1,122,768,356
Public Service Commission 95,730,066 89,949,594 90,453,595 83,693,487
Public Service Labour Relations Board 13,634,340 13,774,423 13,774,423 13,745,412
Public Service Staffing Tribunal 5,108,807 5,443,445 5,443,445 5,481,116
Public Works and Government Services 2,737,533,257 2,617,975,950 2,860,944,387 2,664,123,913
Registry of the Competition Tribunal 1,736,812 2,331,323 2,331,323 2,345,306
Registry of the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal 1,659,741 1,834,375 1,834,375 1,845,622
Registry of the Specific Claims Tribunal 2,137,613 1,005,559 2,858,806 2,897,525
Royal Canadian Mounted Police 3,124,399,359 2,758,076,493 2,764,963,952 2,625,976,343
Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee 1,595,595 934,412 1,644,413 961,418
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Public Complaints Commission 8,011,001 5,425,682 10,145,960 10,010,382
Security Intelligence Review Committee 2,901,273 2,766,304 2,766,304 2,786,799
Senate Ethics Officer 649,631 788,294 934,294 1,166,750
Shared Services Canada 1,381,149,095 1,398,106,056 1,601,607,647 1,473,323,577
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council 696,432,583 682,749,959 696,015,689 691,750,165
Standards Council of Canada 10,318,993 9,729,000 9,729,000 11,729,000
Statistics Canada 519,891,309 400,620,413 442,243,678 379,555,524
Supreme Court of Canada 31,219,818 30,656,211 30,774,824 31,389,794
Telefilm Canada 102,968,394 99,622,354 99,622,354 95,363,072
The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited 18,185,400 13,000,000 14,338,293 21,040,000
The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc. 109,054,244 203,590,000 274,566,409 146,168,159
The Senate 88,881,788 92,517,029 92,517,029 91,485,177
Transport 1,332,478,169 1,512,018,362 1,537,388,434 1,655,682,494
Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada 1,584,918 1,419,871 1,419,871 1,416,074
Treasury Board Secretariat 2,762,026,013 5,662,899,768 7,508,518,714 7,364,924,114
Veterans Affairs 3,486,227,841 3,637,899,334 3,658,192,549 3,576,978,766
Veterans Review and Appeal Board 11,963,471 11,556,729 11,556,729 10,887,938
VIA Rail Canada Inc. 419,958,000 187,783,000 439,383,000 183,061,756
Western Economic Diversification 183,718,483 178,700,849 192,374,182 158,907,952
Total Budgetary 227,573,339,967 232,578,373,332 239,094,802,645 235,334,374,675
Non-budgetary
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (3,471,553,310) (41,866,564,000) (41,866,564,000) (10,880,408,000)
Canadian Dairy Commission 69,215,982 0 0 0
Canadian International Development Agency 93,401,393 81,595,260 81,595,260 0
Citizenship and Immigration (979,983) 0 0 0
Correctional Service of Canada 145 0 0 0
Employment and Social Development 980,677,937 760,632,426 760,632,426 779,981,475
Finance 65,474,622,297 2 2 1
Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (2,945,824) 0 1 50,082,306
Indian Affairs and Northern Development 43,894,658 70,303,000 70,303,000 25,903,000
Industry 0 800,000 800,000 800,000
National Defence 600,814 0 0 0
Public Works and Government Services 2,762,866 0 0 0
Veterans Affairs 208 0 0 0
Total Non-budgetary 63,189,697,183 (40,953,233,312) (40,953,233,311) (10,023,641,218)

Structure of these Estimates

Votes

The basic structural units of the Estimates are the Votes. The following kinds of Votes appear in the Estimates:

A program expenditures vote is used when there is no requirement for either a separate “capital expenditures” vote or a “grants and contributions” vote because neither equals or exceeds $5 million. In this case, all expenditures are charged to the one vote.

An operating expenditures vote is used when there is also a requirement for either a “capital expenditures” vote or a “grants and contributions” vote or both; that is, when expenditures of either type equal or exceed $5 million. Where they do not, the appropriate expenditures are included in the “program expenditures” vote.

A capital expenditures vote is used when capital expenditures equal or exceed $5 million. Expenditure items in a “capital expenditures” vote would include items expected to exceed $10,000 for the acquisition of land, buildings and works, as well as the acquisition of machinery and equipment, or for purposes of constructing or creating assets, where a department expects to draw upon its own labour and materials, or employs consultants or other services or goods. Reduced thresholds may be applied for different capital expenditure classes at the departmental level.

A grants and contributions vote is used when grants and/or contributions expenditures equal or exceed $5 million. It should be noted that the inclusion of a grant, contribution or other transfer payment item in the Estimates imposes no requirement to make a payment, nor does it give a prospective recipient any right to the funds. It should also be noted that in the vote wording, the meaning of the word “contributions” is considered to include “other transfer payments” because of the similar characteristics of each.

A non-budgetary vote, identified by the letter “L”, provides authority for spending in the form of loans or advances to, and investments in, Crown corporations; and loans or advances for specific purposes to other governments, international organizations or persons or corporations in the private sector.

Where it is necessary to appropriate funds for a payment to a Crown corporation or for the expenditures of a legal entity that is part of a larger program, a separate vote is established. Where this is the case, a separate vote structure is established for each. A legal entity for these purposes is defined as a unit of government operating under an Act of Parliament and responsible directly to a Minister.

To support the Treasury Board in performing its statutory responsibilities for managing the government’s financial, human and materiel resources, a number of special authorities are required. These authorities are described in the vote wording found in the Proposed Schedules to the Appropriation Bill.

Presentation by Organization

The individual organizational presentation is made up of various sections, as explained below. Where a section is not appropriate, it does not appear in the presentation.

Raison d’être – This section provides a brief explanation of why the organization exists and the benefits it provides to Canadians.

Organizational Estimate – This section shows, by Vote, the amounts included in the organization’s Main Estimates. For information purposes, the section also includes a summary of statutory forecasts. Abbreviated Vote wordings are used in this section. Complete vote wording is shown in the Proposed Schedules to the Appropriation Bill following Part II, and detailed statutory forecasts are found in the on-line annex.

Information on 2012–13 actual expenditures and 2013–14 Estimates to Date are included to provide context for the 2014–15 amounts. The 2012–13 actual expenditures are taken from the 2012–13 Public Accounts of Canada. 2013–14 Estimates to Date is the sum of the amounts presented in the 2013–14 Main Estimates and increases sought through the 2013–14 Supplementary Estimates A, B and C. Estimates to date also excludes any funding deemed to have been appropriated to a department following the transfer of a portion of the federal administration. Allocations from Treasury Board Central Votes are made through-out the year and the expenditure authority provided by these allocations is not included in Estimates to Date.

The 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture is used for the tables presenting information by Strategic Outcome and Program. If there has been a change in the Architecture, amounts for previous years have not been reclassified to the new structure and are reported as “Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture”.

Highlights – In this section, the department, agency or Crown Corporation provides an explanation of the major item or items that give rise to a year-over-year financial change in Main Estimates, or, where there has not been a material year-over-year change, the department or agency may reference priorities in the Report on Plans and Priorities or Corporate Plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program – This table shows budgetary expenditures at the Strategic Outcome and Program levels of the department’s 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture. Additional information on nature of expenditure by Program is provided in the on-line annex.

Transfer Payments – If applicable, this table provides a listing of transfer payments for the upcoming year. A transfer payment is a grant, contribution or other payment made for the purpose of furthering program objectives but for which no goods or services are received. Details on transfer payments made in a previous year can be found in Volumes 2 and 3 of the Public Accounts of Canada.

In-year information on expenditure authorities is available in departmental Quarterly Financial Reports, and final expenditure authority and actual expenditures for a fiscal year are reported in the Public Accounts of Canada.

Changes to these Estimates

The purpose of this section is to provide the reconciliation of these Estimates with the previous year’s Main Estimates in the following areas:

Changes to Government Organization and Structure

Following the tabling of the 2013–14 Main Estimates on February 25, 2013 and pursuant to the Public Service Rearrangement and Transfer of Duties Act, these changes were made.

Supplementary Estimates (A), 2013–14:

Supplementary Estimates (B), 2013–14:

Supplementary Estimates (C), 2013–14:

These Main Estimates:

Changes in Voted Authorities

This sub-section lists Votes which contain specific authorities that differ from those included in the previous year’s Main Estimates as well as new expenditure authorities appearing for the first time. In light of the House of Commons Speaker’s rulings in 1981, the government has made a commitment that the only legislation that will be enacted through the Estimates process, other than cases specifically authorized by Statute, will be previous Appropriation Acts. Proposed changes to existing wording are underlined for ease of reference.

Canadian Heritage
Vote 1 wording was modified by adding “and the Capital Experience Program”.
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
Vote 1 wording was modified by adding “Unsolicited Telecommunications Fees Regulations”.
Citizenship and Immigration
Vote 1 wording was modified by adding “and, pursuant to paragraph 29.1(2)(a) of the Financial Administration Act, authority to expend revenues received in a fiscal year from, and to offset related expenditures incurred in the fiscal year arising from the provision of services related to International Experience Canada,”.
Correctional Service of Canada
Vote 1 wording was modified by adding “(c) the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) National Infrastructure Contribution program”.
Employment and Social Development
Vote 1 wording was modified by removing "and the Specified Purpose Account for the administration of the Millennium Excellence Awards".
Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development
Votes 1 and 10 wording were extensively modified following the amalgamation with the Canadian International Development Agency. Vote L20 wording was modified with the following “may not exceed $245,000,000 for the purpose of contributions to the international financial institutions over a period commencing on April 1, 2014 and ending on March 31, 2015”.
Health
Vote 10 wording was modified by adding “in the form of monetary payments or the provision of goods or services.
Library and Archives of Canada
Vote 1 wording was modified by removing "and contributions" and named "Program expenditures". Votes 1 and 5 were amalgamated.
National Energy Board (Vote 1);
Northern Pipeline Agency (Vote 1);
Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada (Vote 5); and
Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commission (Vote 1).
Vote wording was modified by adding “and contributions”.
National Film Board
Vote 1 wording was modified by removing "the grants listed in the Estimates".
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
Vote 1 wording was modified by adding “and, pursuant to paragraph 29.1(2)(a) of the Financial Administration Act, authority to expend revenues received during the fiscal year, to offset expenditures incurred in the fiscal year, arising from the provision of internal support services to other organizations”.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Vote 1 wording was modified by adding “and, pursuant to paragraph 29.1(2)(a) of the Financial Administration Act, authority to expend revenues received during the fiscal year, to offset expenditures incurred in the fiscal year, arising from the provision of internal support services to other organizations”.


Part II - Main Estimates

Agriculture and Agri-Food

Raison d’être

The Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) was created in 1868 — one year after Confederation — because of the importance of agriculture to the economic, social and cultural development of Canada. Today, the Department helps create the conditions for the long-term profitability, sustainability and adaptability of the Canadian agricultural sector. AAFC supports the sector through initiatives that promote innovation and competitiveness, and that proactively manage risk. The Department’s goal is to position agriculture, agri-food and agri-based product industries to realize their full potential by seizing new opportunities in the growing domestic and global marketplace.

The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 1. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Agriculture and Agri-Food

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 1. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 669,912,504 594,969,595 643,534,340 544,949,432
5 Capital expenditures 27,722,021 27,872,294 27,872,294 27,872,294
10 Grants and contributions 512,905,333 226,495,111 447,925,111 365,352,000
Total voted 1,210,539,858 849,337,000 1,119,331,745 938,173,726
Total Statutory 1,471,019,217 1,342,238,219 1,347,439,362 1,315,023,086
Total budgetary 2,681,559,075 2,191,575,219 2,466,771,107 2,253,196,812

Highlights

The 2014–15 Main Estimates have increased by $61.6 million, compared to the 2013–14 Main Estimates. The 2014–15 fiscal year is the second year of Growing Forward 2, a federal, provincial, territorial five-year agriculture policy framework. This framework supports a shift in focus towards strategic investments that promote innovation, competitiveness and market development initiatives to help producers meet rising demand, both in Canada and internationally, while continuing to proactively manage risk. AAFC has also realigned its business in order to achieve the full annual savings by 2014–15 as announced in Budget 2012. These measures help position the Department to meet its future goals and priorities while contributing to the government’s return to a balanced budget. In addition, the Department is undergoing transformational change to ensure the Department is well positioned to continue to deliver excellence in policy development and advice, program delivery and scientific expertise to Canada’s agricultural sector.

The Department has examined its operations in support of government-wide efforts to find more efficient ways of doing business.

Major changes include:

The number of Strategic Outcomes has changed from three to two and programs have been reduced and merged to reflect the focus of Growing Forward 2 on competitiveness, innovation and market development. The new Program Alignment Architecture also reflects the transformational change underway at AAFC as well as machinery of government changes. As a result, the Department’s 2014–15 Main Estimates reflect these changes to the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture. Due to the significance of these changes, the 2012–13 expenditures and the 2013–14 Main Estimates have not been fully allocated to the new Program Alignment Architecture.

AAFC will focus on advancing the following priorities in 2014–15:

Please refer to the Department’s 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities for further information.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 2. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A competitive and market-oriented agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk.  
Business Risk Management 1,420,001,333 1,291,031,455 1,297,306,348
Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems 0 0 211,533,122
Farm Products Council of Canada 2,998,099 2,659,276 2,483,404
An innovative and sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector.  
Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability 0 0 519,175,818
Industry Capacity 0 0 72,190,745
Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (1,240,186) (421,000) 34,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.Testerester  
Internal Services 327,379,980 279,468,875 150,473,375
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 932,419,849 618,836,613 0
Total 2,681,559,075 2,191,575,219 2,253,196,812

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 3. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant payments for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs program 169,373,315 51,900,000 28,500,000
Grant payments for the Churchill Port Utilisation program 3,776,404 4,600,000 4,600,000
Grants to foreign recipients for participation in international organizations supporting agriculture 1,136,820 883,000 883,000
Grant payments for the AgriRisk Initiatives program 0 0 100,000
Contributions
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Innovation under Growing Forward 2 0 0 100,179,252
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Competitiveness and Market Development under Growing Forward 2 0 0 60,869,892
Contribution payments for the AgriInnovation program under Growing Forward 2 0 60,455,000 60,455,000
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Adaptability and Industry Capacity under Growing Forward 2 0 0 44,830,856
Contribution payments for the AgriMarketing program under Growing Forward 2 0 35,500,000 35,500,000
Contributions to support the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation program 27,361,000 26,761,000 10,061,000
Contributions for the AgriRisk Initiatives program 0 0 6,400,000
Contributions in support of the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases program 5,321,592 5,382,000 5,382,000
Contribution payments for the AgriCompetitiveness program under Growing Forward 2 0 3,127,000 3,127,000
Contribution payments for the control of diseases in the hog industry – Phase 2 9,609,313 0 2,000,000
Contribution payments for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs program 800,000 1,600,000 1,600,000
Contributions under the Career Focus program – Youth Employment Strategy 771,958 864,000 864,000

Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada

Raison d’être

Order in Council P.C. 2012-1136 transferred the control and supervision of the remaining activities of the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada to Health, effective September 30, 2012.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 2. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 4. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
- Program expenditures 1,358,235 0 0 0
Total voted 1,358,235 0 0 0
Total Statutory 125,307 0 0 0
Total budgetary 1,483,542 0 0 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 5. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 1,483,542 0 0
Total 1,483,542 0 0

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Raison d’être

Established in 1987 (Part I of the Government Organization Act, Atlantic Canada 1987, R.S.C., 1985, c.41 (4th Supp.), also known as the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Act), the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) is the federal department responsible for the Government of Canada’s economic development efforts in the provinces of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency) is responsible for this organization.

ACOA works to create opportunities for economic growth in Atlantic Canada by helping businesses become more competitive, innovative and productive, by working with diverse communities to develop and diversify local economies, and by championing the strengths of Atlantic Canada. Together, with Atlantic Canadians, we are building a stronger economy.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 3. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 6. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 72,981,202 67,211,348 66,990,951 63,873,388
5 Grants and contributions 233,185,297 225,820,293 236,733,470 216,270,293
Total voted 306,166,499 293,031,641 303,724,421 280,143,681
Total Statutory 9,495,448 6,939,430 6,956,530 8,342,703
Total budgetary 315,661,947 299,971,071 310,680,951 288,486,384

Highlights

ACOA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $288.5 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $280.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $8.3 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

ACOA’s decrease in spending of $22.2 million from 2013–14 Estimates to date to 2014–15 is due to a decrease in operating costs of $3.1 million, a decrease in contributions and other transfer payments of $20.5 million, and an increase of $1.4 million in statutory costs. Factors contributing to the net decrease include:

Impacts of program realignment and efficiencies of $3.4 million resulting from savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review.

Impact of annual in-year authority:

Impacts of funding initiatives and agreements totalling to $17.6 million in 2013–14:

In 2014–15, the Agency will continue to act as the key federal catalyst for economic development in the Atlantic region. The Agency will continue to support the region’s small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in their efforts to become more innovative, productive and competitive, while helping rural and urban communities create and seize opportunities for economic growth and diversification. ACOA will also continue to help Atlantic Canada’s SMEs explore opportunities for international business development generated by Canada’s Global Markets Action Plan and the newly announced Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement. ACOA will ensure that SMEs are prepared to maximize growth opportunities – including those that will flow from such major projects as our Government’s $38.3 billion shipbuilding strategy and the development of clean and renewable energy at Muskrat Falls.

For further details on ACOA’s planned spending, refer to the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 7. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A competitive Atlantic Canadian economyTesterester  
Enterprise Development 179,856,451 170,201,748 164,581,549
Community Development 88,520,093 91,307,430 87,408,010
Policy, Advocacy and Coordination 12,403,955 10,855,783 11,351,591
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 34,881,448 27,606,110 25,145,234
Total 315,661,947 299,971,071 288,486,384

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 8. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to organizations to promote economic cooperation and development 533,094 2,000,000 2,000,000
Contributions
Contributions under the Business Development Program 136,938,024 100,074,293 112,028,293
Contributions for the Atlantic Innovation Fund 50,327,794 57,649,000 50,000,000
Contributions for the Innovative Communities Fund 27,965,488 44,455,000 39,000,000
Contributions under the Community Futures Program 12,582,399 12,642,000 12,642,000
Contributions under the Atlantic Policy Research Initiatives 583,583 700,000 600,000

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Raison d’être

Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) uses its unique scientific expertise and facilities to ensure that:

The current mandate for the AECL Nuclear Laboratories flows from the powers given to the Minister of Natural Resources under the Nuclear Energy Act:

Organizational Estimates

Figure 4. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 9. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for operating and capital expenditures 341,243,000 102,143,000 378,062,900 102,143,000
Total voted 341,243,000 102,143,000 378,062,900 102,143,000
Total Statutory 210,600,000 108,919,637 108,919,637 0
Total budgetary 551,843,000 211,062,637 486,982,537 102,143,000

Highlights

AECL’s Main Estimates funding of $102.1 million will be used to fund laboratory operations and research and development at Chalk River and to ensure the safe and reliable operation of its nuclear facilities and supporting infrastructure.

Laboratory operations consist of:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 10. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Be the top worldwide nuclear products and services company. Protect the health and safety of the public, our employees and the environment. Minimize nuclear legacy obligations for future generations.  
Facilities and Nuclear Operations 0 67,006,000 67,006,000
Research and Development 0 35,137,000 35,137,000
Commercial Business 0 108,919,637 0
Waste Management and Decommissioning 0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 551,843,000 0 0
Total 551,843,000 211,062,637 102,143,000

Auditor General

Raison d’être

The Auditor General is an Officer of Parliament, who is independent from the government and reports directly to Parliament. The Office of the Auditor General is the legislative audit office of the federal government and of the three northern territories. The main legislative auditing duties are financial audits, performance audits, special examinations, and sustainable development monitoring activities and environmental petitions. Our audits and studies provide objective information, advice and assurance to Parliament, territorial legislatures, governments and Canadians. With our reports and testimony, we assist parliamentarians and territorial legislators in their work on the authorization and oversight of government spending and operations. The Minister of Finance is responsible for tabling the Auditor General’s administrative reports in Parliament, including the Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Report.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 5. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Auditor General

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 11. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Auditor General
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 78,095,897 74,100,653 74,100,653 67,947,936
Total voted 78,095,897 74,100,653 74,100,653 67,947,936
Total Statutory 10,113,875 10,232,880 10,232,880 9,793,894
Total budgetary 88,209,772 84,333,533 84,333,533 77,741,830

Highlights

The Office of the Auditor General is estimating budgetary expenditures of $77.7 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $67.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $9.8 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total, the Office is estimating a decrease of $6.6 million or 7.8% from the previous Main Estimates primarily due to savings as a result of Budget 2012 Spending Review. Additional information can be found in the Office of the Auditor General’s 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 12. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Auditor General
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Through legislative auditing, we contribute to a well-managed and accountable government for Canadians.  
Legislative Auditing 88,209,772 84,333,533 77,741,830
Total 88,209,772 84,333,533 77,741,830

Canada Border Services Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

The CBSA provides integrated border services that support national security priorities and facilitate the flow of people and goods across the border. Responsibilities include:

Organizational Estimates

Figure 6. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Border Services Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 13. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Border Services Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,440,742,689 1,396,653,386 1,433,815,896 1,397,915,271
5 Capital expenditures 78,903,178 104,335,441 112,356,588 161,905,641
Total voted 1,519,645,867 1,500,988,827 1,546,172,484 1,559,820,912
Total Statutory 187,710,141 179,164,197 186,156,560 176,570,197
Total budgetary 1,707,356,008 1,680,153,024 1,732,329,044 1,736,391,109

Highlights

CBSA is estimating budgetary expenditures $1.7 billion in 2014–15. Of this amount, $1.6 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $176.6 million represents statutory forecasts related to the Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

CBSA increase in net spending of $56.2 million or 3.35% is due to an increase in Operating expenditures of $1.3 million, an increase in Capital costs of $57.5 million and a decrease of $2.6 million in Statutory expenditures (EBP).

Major items contributing to changes in year-over-year funding levels include increases of:

The increases in the 2014–15 Main Estimates are offset by the following decreases:

CBSA is currently reviewing its recording and reporting of expenditures to ensure that program expenditures are not included in internal Services.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 14. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Border Services Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada’s border and Canada’s population is protected from border-related risks.  
Admissibility Determination 586,293,558 630,828,800 681,725,979
Immigration Enforcement 150,469,520 144,658,085 164,911,279
Risk Assessment Program 121,511,557 139,253,528 155,301,134
Revenue and Trade Management 73,463,331 74,836,493 73,918,165
Secure and Trusted Partnerships 31,564,355 46,555,054 42,062,245
Criminal Investigations 26,441,935 23,619,993 23,391,775
Recourse 11,118,094 9,971,032 9,832,518
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 706,493,658 610,430,039 585,248,014
Total 1,707,356,008 1,680,153,024 1,736,391,109

Canada Council for the Arts

Raison d’être

The Canada Council for the Arts (CCA) is a Crown corporation created in 1957 “to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts.” Its grants to artists and arts organizations contribute to a vibrant arts scene in Canada. Its awards celebrate creativity by recognizing exceptional Canadians in the arts, humanities and sciences. The Canada Council Art Bank is a national collection of over 17,000 Canadian contemporary artworks, accessible to the public through rental, loan and outreach programs. The Canadian Commission for UNESCO operates under the general authority of the Canada Council.

The CCA reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 7. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Council for the Arts

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 15. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Council for the Arts
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canada Council for the Arts 181,367,816 180,260,816 181,437,817 182,092,916
Total voted 181,367,816 180,260,816 181,437,817 182,092,916
Total budgetary 181,367,816 180,260,816 181,437,817 182,092,916

Highlights

CCA’s planned expenditures for 2014–15 remain the same as for 2013–14. The CCA is continuing to implement its 2011–2016 Corporate Plan “Strengthening Connections” which has five directions (individual artists, arts organizations, equity, partnership and internal capacity) as well as three cross-cutting themes (public engagement in the arts, synergy and new technologies). Main areas of activity include:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 16. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Council for the Arts
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A vibrant and dynamic arts sector in Canada.  
Grants and services to support creation, production and dissemination of arts for individuals and organizations 0 159,681,924 161,403,170
Arts promotion to foster public knowledge and appreciation of the Canadian arts and culture 0 8,300,486 8,322,657
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 12,278,406 12,367,089
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 181,367,816 0 0
Total 181,367,816 180,260,816 182,092,916

Canada Industrial Relations Board

Raison d’être

The Canada Industrial Relations Board (the CIRB or the Board) contributes to and promotes a harmonious industrial relations climate in federally regulated sectors and seeks to provide effective and appropriate dispute resolution services for its client community in a fair and timely manner. Established in 1999 to replace the previous Canada Labour Relations Board, the CIRB is an independent, representative, quasi-judicial tribunal, responsible for the interpretation and application of Part I of the Canada Labour Code (the Code), which establishes the framework for collective bargaining, the acquisition and termination of bargaining rights, determination of unfair labour practices and protection of public health and safety in the event of work stoppages affecting essential services. The Board also administers certain provisions of Part II of the Code related to Occupational Health and Safety. Since April 1, 2013, the Board is also responsible for the interpretation and application of Part II of the Status of the Artist Act.

The Minister of Labour is responsible for the Canada Industrial Relations Board.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 8. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Industrial Relations Board

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 17. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Industrial Relations Board
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 11,335,040 11,916,532 11,916,532 11,823,711
Total voted 11,335,040 11,916,532 11,916,532 11,823,711
Total Statutory 1,451,076 1,637,433 1,637,433 1,540,245
Total budgetary 12,786,116 13,553,965 13,553,965 13,363,956

Highlights

In pursuing its mandate, the CIRB seeks to achieve the following strategic outcome: Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code and professional relations in sectors regulated by Part II of the Status of the Artist Act. In order to achieve this objective, the Board will continue to focus its efforts on maintaining its current rate of disposition of new cases so as to ensure that a backlog does not recur. This will be achieved through effective case management and proactive mediation assistance at all stages of a case. The CIRB will also proactively seek resolution of matters that best meets the needs of the parties to a dispute through mediation assistance by regional staff and Board members.

The Board will focus on two initiatives in 2014–15:

The decrease in the Board’s Estimates is mainly due to the transitional funding provided in 2013–14 to compensate the Board for its planned additional responsibilities related to the Status of the Artist Act that is not being renewed in 2014–15. The variance between 2012–13 expenditures and 2013–14 Estimates is directly related to the transitional funding received in 2013–14 to compensate the Board for its planned additional responsibilities related to the Status of the Artist Act.

More information on the Board’s plans and priorities can be found in the Board’s 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities, available on CIRB’s Website.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 18. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Industrial Relations Board
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code and professional relations in sectors regulated by the Status of the Artist Act.  
Adjudication and Dispute Resolution Program 9,103,648 9,905,354 9,678,448
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 3,682,468 3,648,611 3,685,508
Total 12,786,116 13,553,965 13,363,956

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Raison d’être

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) is Canada’s national housing agency. Established as a federal Crown corporation in 1946 to help address post-war housing shortages, its role has evolved as Canadians’ needs have changed. Today, CMHC works closely with provinces, territories and the private and not-for-profit sectors to help lower-income Canadians access affordable, better quality housing. CMHC also helps Aboriginal Canadians meet their distinct housing needs.

CMHC’s role in housing finance — providing mortgage loan insurance and securitization guarantee products — contributes to the health and stability of Canada’s housing finance system and facilitates access to financing for housing across the country. This includes loans for housing in small and rural communities, rental housing and for nursing and retirement homes.

CMHC also promotes the efficiency of the Canadian housing system through research, market analysis and information transfer.

CMHC is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Employment and Social Development.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 9. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 10. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 19. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Reimbursement under the provisions of the National Housing Act and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Act 2,086,397,954 2,100,578,000 2,100,578,000 2,097,353,000
Total voted 2,086,397,954 2,100,578,000 2,100,578,000 2,097,353,000
Total budgetary 2,086,397,954 2,100,578,000 2,100,578,000 2,097,353,000
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory (3,471,553,310) (41,866,564,000) (41,866,564,000) (10,880,408,000)
Total non-budgetary (3,471,553,310) (41,866,564,000) (41,866,564,000) (10,880,408,000)

Highlights

CMHC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.1 billion in 2014–15 and non-budgetary net repayments of $10.9 billion. Included in the budgetary expenditures is $253.1 million related to the first year of the five-year extension of funding under the Investment in Affordable Housing and $70 million in funding for housing in Nunavut, as announced in the Economic Action Plan 2013. Major changes are summarized below.

A net budgetary decrease of $3.2 million from the 2013–14 Main Estimates is due primarily to the following:

A non-budgetary increase of $31.0 billion is due to lower net repayments under the Crown Borrowing Program resulting from lower loan repayments under the Insured Mortgage Purchase Program (IMPP). The majority of the IMPP repayments took place in 2013–14. The 2014–15 repayments represent the final obligations under this program.

As Canada’s national housing agency, CMHC plays a significant role in administering federal investments in social housing through agreements with provinces and territories and First Nation communities. CMHC also provides federal funding towards renovation programs so that needed repairs or rehabilitation could be undertaken for seniors, persons with disabilities, victims of family violence and others who could otherwise not afford adequate and suitable housing.

CMHC is the only source of comprehensive market analysis information serving both industry and consumers. Its research and information transfer activities on key housing issues have been instrumental in helping Canadians make more informed housing choices. These activities also support industry in the planning, designing, construction operation and maintenance of housing, and assist the public policy decision-making process. Better information contributes to the stability, effectiveness and efficiency of housing markets.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in CMHC’s Summary of the Corporate Plan, available on its website.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 20. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadians in need have access to affordable housing.  
Funding Under Long-Term Commitments for Existing Social Housing 1,706,035,149 1,752,401,000 1,681,525,000
Funding for New Commitments of Affordable Housing 320,772,707 293,702,000 361,820,000
Housing Support 4,845,345 7,574,000 7,474,000
Canada has a stable, competitive and innovative housing system.  
Market Analysis Information 18,036,004 23,902,000 25,078,000
Housing Policy, Research and Information Transfer 30,522,299 22,999,000 21,456,000
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 6,186,450 0 0
Total 2,086,397,954 2,100,578,000 2,097,353,000

Table 21. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadians in need have access to affordable housing.  
Funding Under Long-Term Commitments for Existing Social Housing (207,757,942) (387,216,000) (313,739,000)
Funding for New Commitments of Affordable Housing 0 500,000 500,000
Housing Support (111,422,844) (159,778,000) (133,125,000)
Canada has a stable, competitive and innovative housing system.  
Insured Mortgage Purchase Program (3,152,372,524) (41,320,070,000) (10,434,044,000)
Total (3,471,553,310) (41,866,564,000) (10,880,408,000)

Canada Post Corporation

Raison d’être

Canada Post Corporation has a mandate to provide an efficient, effective and quality-driven postal service to Canadians, to be profitable, and to maintain and increase the value of the Corporation for Canadians.

The Minister of Transport is responsible for this organization.

Under the terms of the Canada Post Corporation Act, the Corporation is mandated to operate the postal service on a financially self-sustaining basis. In addition to core postal service, Canada Post also delivers certain public policy programs for the Government.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 11. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Post Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 22. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Post Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canada Post Corporation for special purposes 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Total voted 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Total budgetary 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000

Highlights

Canada Post Corporation receives an annual appropriation of $22.2 million from the Government for the delivery of Parliamentary mail and materials for the use of the blind, which are sent free of postage under the Act. This appropriation helps to offset the financial impact of these programs on the corporation.

Parliamentary Mail

The Canada Post Corporation Act allows for the free mailing of letters between Canadians and the Governor General, Members of Parliament, the Speakers of the Senate and House of Commons, the Parliamentary Librarian and the Ethics Commissioner. Under the Act members of the House of Commons are also allowed up to four free householder (Unaddressed Admail) mailings to their constituents in any calendar year.

Materials for the Use of the Blind

The Canada Post Corporation Act provides for free mailing of materials for the blind. Today, thousands of visually impaired Canadians and many libraries across the country, including that of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, send talking books and other materials free of charge.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 23. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Post Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Compensation for the provision of Parliamentary mail and Materials for the use of the blind services, which are sent free of postage under the Canada Post Corporation Act.  
Concessionary Governmental Services 0 22,210,000 22,210,000
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 22,210,000 0 0
Total 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000

Canada Revenue Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of National Revenue is responsible for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The CRA is responsible for administering, assessing, and collecting hundreds of billions of dollars in taxes annually. The tax revenue it collects is used by federal, provincial, territorial and First Nations governments to fund the programs and services that contribute to the quality of life of Canadians. The CRA also uses its federal infrastructure to deliver billions of dollars in benefits, tax credits, and other services that support the economic and social well-being of Canadian families, children and persons with disabilities. In carrying out its mandate, the CRA strives to ensure that Canadians:

Organizational Estimates

Figure 12. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Revenue Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 24. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Revenue Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures, contributions and recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan and the Employment Insurance Act 3,265,374,223 3,046,330,734 3,039,745,085 2,877,504,675
5 Capital expenditures and recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan and the Employment Insurance Act 45,812,715 73,081,967 73,081,967 72,447,985
Total voted 3,311,186,938 3,119,412,701 3,112,827,052 2,949,952,660
Total Statutory 1,007,281,205 1,157,410,552 905,325,674 911,303,449
Total budgetary 4,318,468,143 4,276,823,253 4,018,152,726 3,861,256,109

Highlights

CRA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $3.9 billion in 2014-2015. Of this amount, $3.0 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $0.9 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total the Agency is expecting a decrease of $415.6 million or 9.7% from previous Main Estimates, which is the net result of various increases offset by certain planned decreases.

The CRA budgets will be increasing by $53.7 million due to the following:

The above mentioned increases are offset by the following decreases totalling $469.3 million due to the following:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 25. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Revenue Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Taxpayers meet their obligations and Canada’s revenue base is protected.  
Reporting Compliance 1,170,473,553 1,015,345,341 1,054,502,522
Assessment of Returns and Payment Processing 643,799,856 595,716,794 597,018,261
Collections and Returns Compliance 512,217,726 427,902,247 440,164,211
Taxpayer and Business Assistance 453,280,238 538,836,440 350,017,682
Appeals 192,046,153 178,609,564 194,334,428
Eligible families and individuals receive timely and accurate benefit payments.  
Benefit Programs 383,719,460 382,509,653 390,354,003
Taxpayers and benefit recipients receive an independent and impartial review of their service-related complaints.  
Taxpayers’ Ombudsman 2,622,557 3,098,063 3,167,366
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 960,308,600 1,134,805,151 831,697,636
Total 4,318,468,143 4,276,823,253 3,861,256,109

Canada School of Public Service

Raison d’être

The Canada School of Public Service (CSPS) is the common learning service provider for the Public Service of Canada. CSPS has a legislative mandate to provide a range of learning activities to build individual and organizational capacity and management excellence within the Public Service. It has one strategic goal, to ensure public servants have the common knowledge and leadership and management competencies required to effectively serve Canada and Canadians.

The President of the Treasury Board is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 13. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada School of Public Service

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 26. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada School of Public Service
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 45,452,288 42,231,200 42,231,200 39,921,868
Total voted 45,452,288 42,231,200 42,231,200 39,921,868
Total Statutory 51,812,939 56,233,121 56,233,121 45,568,160
Total budgetary 97,265,227 98,464,321 98,464,321 85,490,028

Highlights

CSPS is estimating budgetary expenditures of $85.5 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $39.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $45.6 million represents statutory authority that does not require additional approval and is provided for information purposes.

A decrease of $13 million in spending is expected in 2014–15 primarily due to the reduction of expenditures for salaries and professional and special services.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities available at: http://www.csps-efpc.gc.ca/about_us/currentreport/index-eng.aspx.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 27. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada School of Public Service
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Public Servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.  
Foundational Learning 48,891,757 55,958,215 41,636,392
Organizational Leadership Development 8,482,245 10,546,028 10,686,736
Public Sector Management Innovation 9,499,142 9,178,036 9,248,810
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 30,392,083 22,782,042 23,918,090
Total 97,265,227 98,464,321 85,490,028

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

Raison d’être

The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) is a Crown corporation with the mandate to protect the public by securing critical elements of the air transportation system as assigned by the Government of Canada. CATSA’s goal is to provide a professional, effective, efficient and consistent level of security screening services, at or above the standards set by Transport Canada, its regulator. Fully funded by parliamentary appropriations, CATSA is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Transport. CATSA’s vision is to excel as a world leader in air transportation security through its service to passengers, its people and its partnerships.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 14. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 28. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority for operating and capital expenditures 513,369,000 598,286,200 598,286,200 591,626,313
Total voted 513,369,000 598,286,200 598,286,200 591,626,313
Total budgetary 513,369,000 598,286,200 598,286,200 591,626,313

Highlights

CATSA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $591.6 million in 2014–15, which requires approval by Parliament. The planned expenditures are $6.7 million, or approximately 1.1% lower compared to $598.3 million in the 2013–14 Main Estimates.

The CATSA’s planned operating expenditures for 2014–15 of $473.5 million are $16.5 million or approximately 3.6% higher compared to $457.0 million in the 2013–14 Main Estimates. The increase in the operating budget is mainly a result of CATSA being granted financial flexibilities over the past few years to reallocate funds to better align with its cash flow requirements. This will allow CATSA to partially accommodate annual contractual increases in 2014–15.

The CATSA’s planned capital expenditures for 2014–15 of $118.2 million are $23.2 million or approximately 16.4% lower compared to $141.3 million in the 2013–14 Main Estimates. The year-over-year variance is attributable to capital spending associated with the deployment of CATSA’s new Hold Baggage Screening system which is based on a 10-year deployment schedule. Deployment of the new Hold Baggage Screening system remains on target to be completed in fiscal year 2019–20.

As set out in its 2013–14 to 2017–18 Corporate Plan Summary, CATSA’s funding priorities for 2014–15 will continue to focus on the delivery of its screening services and the ongoing implementation of its Hold Baggage Screening capital deployment plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 29. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Screening programs at designated Canadian airports protect the travelling public.  
Pre-Board Screening 0 310,270,544 319,300,039
Hold Baggage Screening 0 222,210,656 199,229,096
Non-Passenger Screening 0 13,360,000 17,043,000
Restricted Area Identity Card 0 3,763,000 4,126,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 48,682,000 51,928,178
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 513,369,000 0 0
Total 513,369,000 598,286,200 591,626,313

Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal

Raison d’être

Pursuant to a decision to accelerate by one year the provision in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, the Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal ceased its operations as of April 1, 2013.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 15. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 30. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
- Program expenditures 1,321,541 0 0 0
Total voted 1,321,541 0 0 0
Total Statutory 191,849 0 0 0
Total budgetary 1,513,390 0 0 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 31. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 1,513,390 0 0
Total 1,513,390 0 0

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Raison d’être

As defined by the 1991 Broadcasting Act, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (the Corporation), as the national public broadcaster, should provide radio and television services incorporating a wide range of programming that informs, enlightens and entertains. The programming provided by the Corporation should:

The Corporation reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 16. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 32. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for operating expenditures 999,484,060 956,913,060 956,913,060 929,278,212
5 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for working capital 4,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000
10 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for capital expenditures 103,035,000 103,856,000 103,856,000 104,740,000
Total voted 1,106,519,060 1,064,769,060 1,064,769,060 1,038,018,212
Total budgetary 1,106,519,060 1,064,769,060 1,064,769,060 1,038,018,212

Highlights

The Corporation’s 2014–15 Main Estimates are $1,038.0 million versus the 2013–14 Main Estimates of $1,064.8 million. The reduction of $26.8 million for 2014–15 is due to Budget 2012 spending review of $45.5 million, offset by salary inflation funding of $18.7 million.

Following results of the Departmental Spending Review included in Budget 2012, the Federal Government reduced the Corporation’s appropriation by $115 million over three years. The Corporation’s operating funding was reduced by $27.8 million in 2012–13 (deducted from the supplementary funds of $60.0 million received since 2001–02). In 2013–14, the operating appropriation was reduced by $69.6 million (annual supplementary funds of $60.0 million were eliminated completely and the difference of $9.6 million was reduced from the base operating appropriation). For 2014–15 and ongoing years, the Corporation’s operating appropriation will be reduced by an additional $45.5 million to finally arrive at a total reduction of $115.0 million per Budget 2012.

2014–15 will mark Year 4 of the Corporation’s five-year strategic plan, Strategy 2015: Everyone, Every way. The vision at the heart of the strategy is to be the recognized leader in expressing Canadian culture and to enrich democratic life of all Canadians.

Four guiding principles support the Corporation’s vision:

Three strategic thrusts drive our performance:

Despite ongoing challenges, the Corporation continues to implement its 2015 objectives. Further details of the Corporation’s performance and progress since the launch of Strategy 2015 can be found in the Corporation’s Annual Reports and Corporate Plans.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 33. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A national public broadcasting service exists that is primarily Canadian in content and connects citizens to the Canadian experience.  
Television, Radio and Digital Services 0 1,013,116,348 991,634,833
Transmission and Distribution of Programs 0 45,118,862 40,238,810
Specialty Channels for Specific Audiences 0 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 6,533,850 6,144,569
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 1,106,519,060 0 0
Total 1,106,519,060 1,064,769,060 1,038,018,212

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

Raison d’être

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) was founded by an Act of Parliament in 1978 with a mandate to promote health and safety in the workplace and to enhance the physical and mental health of working Canadians. CCOHS operates under the legislative authority of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Act S.C., 1977–78, c. 29 which was passed by unanimous vote in the Canadian Parliament. The purpose of this Act is to promote the fundamental right of Canadians to a healthy and safe working environment by creating a national institute (CCOHS) concerned with the study, encouragement and co-operative advancement of occupational health and safety. CCOHS functions as an independent departmental corporation under Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act and is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Labour. Its funding is derived from a combination of appropriations, cost recoveries and collaboration with the provinces. It is expected that a portion of the budget will be funded through cost recoveries from the creation, production, and worldwide sales of fee-for-service and revenue generating occupational health and safety products and services.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 17. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 34. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,353,993 3,853,172 3,853,172 3,978,250
Total voted 4,353,993 3,853,172 3,853,172 3,978,250
Total Statutory 1,103,322 1,117,980 1,117,980 1,080,791
Total budgetary 5,457,315 4,971,152 4,971,152 5,059,041

Highlights

CCOHS’s planned expenditures remain the same as last year. CCOHS will focus its efforts on providing a wide range of needed, relevant and practical information, resources and training that assist Canadians to improve health and safety. CCOHS will work with Canadian and global partners to develop the resources and tools that will improve health and safety and contribute to making Canada’s workplaces safe and more productive.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 35. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Improved workplace conditions and practices that enhance the health, safety, and well being of working Canadians.  
Occupational health and safety information development, delivery services and tripartite collaboration 3,006,921 2,189,806 2,251,329
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 2,450,394 2,781,346 2,807,712
Total 5,457,315 4,971,152 5,059,041

Canadian Commercial Corporation

Raison d’être

The Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) is governed by its enacting legislation, the 1946 Canadian Commercial Corporation Act. The Act outlines CCC’s broad mandate, which is to assist in the development of trade by helping Canadian exporters access markets abroad and by helping foreign buyers obtain goods from Canada. The legislation also provides CCC with a range of powers, including the ability to export goods from Canada either as principal or as agent in such a manner and to such an extent as it deems appropriate. As a result, CCC negotiates and executes bilateral government-to-government procurement arrangements, facilitating export transactions on behalf of Canadian exporters.

CCC reports to Parliament through the Minister of International Trade.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 18. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Commercial Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 36. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Commercial Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Commercial Corporation 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204
Total voted 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204
Total budgetary 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204

Highlights

CCC is estimating vote budgetary expenditures of $15.7 million in 2014–15 which require approval by Parliament. The funding will be used to facilitate sales of goods and services from Canadian exporters to the U.S Department of Defence in support of the North American Defence Industrial Base.

On all other export transactions, CCC charges fees for service. These fees support CCC’s other expenditures.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 37. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Commercial Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Enhanced market access for Canadian exporters to complex international public sector markets.  
Defence 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204
Emerging and Developing Markets 0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 0 0 0
Total 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204

Canadian Dairy Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Dairy Commission (CDC) is a federal Crown corporation created in 1966 through the Canadian Dairy Commission Act. It reports to Parliament through the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. Its legislated objectives are twofold: to provide efficient producers of milk and cream with the opportunity of obtaining a fair return for their labour and investment; and to provide consumers of dairy products with a continuous and adequate supply of dairy products of high quality.

The CDC plays a central facilitating role for the multi-billion dollar Canadian dairy industry. Federal-provincial agreements now provide the authority for many of the programs and activities that the CDC employees administer and facilitate on a day-to-day basis. The CDC strives to balance and serve the interests of all dairy stakeholders — producers, processors, further processors, exporters, consumers and governments.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 19. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 20. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 38. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,985,810 3,610,936
Total voted 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,985,810 3,610,936
Total budgetary 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,985,810 3,610,936
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory 69,215,982 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 69,215,982 0 0 0

Highlights

The Canadian milk supply management system rests on three pillars: production management, price setting and import controls. The CDC is directly involved in the administration of two of the three pillars (production management and price setting) via the establishment of industrial milk quota and support prices.

The CDC administers the three revenue pooling and market sharing pools that exist among milk producers. Monthly, the CDC receives data from provincial milk marketing boards and calculates the payment transfers between provinces to equalize returns and adjusts quota allocations to provinces to account for the sharing of markets.

To ensure a steady supply of dairy products on the Canadian market, the CDC operates the Domestic Seasonality Programs. To ensure that milk components for which there is no outlet on the domestic market are removed in a timely fashion, the CDC operates the Surplus Removal Program. Furthermore, in order to promote the use of dairy products and ingredients in processed foods, the CDC operates the Dairy Marketing Program.

In addition, the CDC, on the industry’s behalf, administers the Special Milk Class Permit Program (SMCPP) and the Dairy Innovation Program. The parameters of these programs are decided by the industry.

The CDC imports the tariff rate quota of butter and sells this butter to participants in the SMCPP through butter manufacturers. Profits that the CDC generates by this activity are used to finance initiatives that provide benefits to the industry. Examples of these initiatives are graduate scholarships in Canadian establishments and the validation of dairy farms under the Canadian Quality Milk Program, an on-farm quality assurance program.

The CDC also controls the subsidized exports of Canadian dairy products through the issuance of export permits. This permit system has been put in place to ensure that Canadian exports of dairy products do not exceed the limits imposed on Canada by the World Trade Organization (WTO) for subsidized exports.

No significant changes are expected in the programs that the CDC administers in fiscal year 2014–15. Further details can be found in the Canadian Dairy Commission’s Corporate Plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 39. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
To enhance the vitality of the Canadian dairy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders.  
Administer milk supply management system 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,610,936
Total 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,610,936

Table 40. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
To enhance the vitality of the Canadian dairy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders.  
Administer milk supply management system 69,215,982 0 0
Total 69,215,982 0 0

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of the Environment is responsible for this organization.

Environmental assessment contributes to informed decision making in support of sustainable development. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency delivers high-quality environmental assessments and serves as the centre of expertise within the federal government on environmental assessment.

Additional information can be found in the Agency’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 21. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 41. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 26,140,619 28,142,126 28,142,126 28,227,786
Total voted 26,140,619 28,142,126 28,142,126 28,227,786
Total Statutory 1,808,206 2,863,886 2,863,886 2,736,320
Total budgetary 27,948,825 31,006,012 31,006,012 30,964,106

Highlights

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency’s 2014–15 Main Estimates of $31.0 million are similar to the Agency’s 2013–14 Main Estimates.

The Agency’s 2012–13 actual expenditures of $27.9 million are $3.0 million less than the 2014–15 Main Estimates. The difference is mainly attributable the Agency’s operating budget lapse and to lower than expected payments under the Participant Funding Program due to transition from the former Canadian Environmental Assessment Act to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012.

The renewal of funding programs that are sunsetting at the end of 2014–15 will be subject to government decision and will be reflected in future Main Estimates.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 42. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
High quality and timely environmental assessments of major projects to protect the environment and support economic growth.  
Environmental Assessment Delivery Program 15,029,356 19,274,780 17,032,000
Environmental Assessment Policy Program 3,045,780 4,263,059 4,871,106
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 9,873,689 7,468,173 9,061,000
Total 27,948,825 31,006,012 30,964,106

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 43. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions for the support of public participation in the environmental assessment review process – Participant Funding Program 1,993,668 4,469,000 4,469,500
Contribution to the Province of Quebec – James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement 245,500 246,000 245,500

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada’s largest science-based regulatory agency. It has approximately 7,120 employees working across Canada, in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada’s people, environment, and economy.

CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services to:

CFIA bases its activities on science, effective management of risk, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 22. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Food Inspection Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 44. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures and contributions 598,623,500 534,383,158 563,381,169 470,029,881
5 Capital expenditures 31,533,159 17,815,785 22,166,374 24,264,263
Total voted 630,156,659 552,198,943 585,547,543 494,294,144
Total Statutory 151,899,066 135,686,461 139,793,653 125,033,591
Total budgetary 782,055,725 687,885,404 725,341,196 619,327,735

Highlights

The Government is committed to ensuring that Canadian families have confidence in the food they buy and eat. As announced on October 9th, 2013, the three bodies of the Canadian food safety regime - the CFIA, Health Canada, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) fall under the responsibility of the Minister of Health. This reporting change brings all federal food safety authorities under one Minister with the goal of creating a stronger system with better collaboration and communication.

The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food will continue to be responsible for the CFIA’s non-food safety agricultural activities, including economic and trade issues, as well as important animal health and plant protection work. As such, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food will continue to oversee the CFIA in exercising these responsibilities.

The 2014–15 Main Estimates for the CFIA total $619.3 million, a decrease of $68.6 million from the 2013–14 Main Estimates of $687.9 million. The major items included in this decrease are:

These decreases are offset by:

The 2013–14 Estimates to Date are approximately $37.4 million higher than the 2013–14 Main Estimates. This increase can be explained by resources received via Supplementary Estimates (B), which were approved by Parliament.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities available at http://www.inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/accountability/reports-to-parliament/eng/1299845094675/1299845189161

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 45. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.  
Food Safety Program 353,600,998 312,185,374 320,103,652
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 175,425,417 131,587,718 89,781,512
Plant Resources Program 88,983,164 84,260,734 75,006,452
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 33,338,750 31,697,693 25,382,494
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 130,707,396 128,153,885 109,053,625
Total 782,055,725 687,885,404 619,327,735

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 46. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions in support of the Federal Assistance Program 1,461,771 700,000 707,000
Contributions to the provinces in accordance with the Rabies Indemnification Regulations of the Governor in Council of amounts not exceeding two-fifths of the amounts paid by the provinces to owners of animals dying as a result of rabies infection 0 112,000 112,000

Canadian Grain Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) is a federal government agency that administers the provisions of the Canada Grain Act (CGA). The CGC’s mandate as set out in the CGA is to, in the interests of the grain producers, establish and maintain standards of quality for Canadian grain and regulate grain handling in Canada, to ensure a dependable commodity for domestic and export markets. CGC’s vision is to be “A leader in delivering excellence and innovation in grain quality and quantity assurance, research, and producer protection”. The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for the CGC.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 23. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Grain Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 47. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Grain Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 31,629,611 21,582,235 34,030,661 7,537,076
Total voted 31,629,611 21,582,235 34,030,661 7,537,076
Total Statutory 5,504,635 585,473 3,537,992 8,846,818
Total budgetary 37,134,246 22,167,708 37,568,653 16,383,894

Highlights

The CGC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $16.4 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $7.5 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $8.9 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. $6.4 million of the statutory amount is to support severance payments. The remaining $2.5 million is to support employee benefit plan obligations.

The decrease in net authority of $5.8 million from 2013–14 Main Estimates is due to:

The current CGC funding structure is based on budgetary authorities that are comprised of both statutory and voted authorities. The statutory authorities include employee benefit plan authority for appropriation funded positions and the CGC revolving fund authority which allows the CGC to re-spend fees that it has collected. The voted authority is Vote 1 – Program Expenditures which includes annual appropriation authority and any ad hoc appropriation authority for the fiscal year.

A revolving fund was set up for the CGC in 1995 with the expectation that the CGC would be largely self-funded through fees for service. The CGC updated its user fee structure on August 1, 2013 to become self-funded. The CGC transitioned to its new fee structure in 2013–14 and revenues are expected to increase to $54.1 million in 2014–15.

Additional information can be found in the CGC’s Reports on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 48. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Grain Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canada’s grain is safe, reliable and marketable and Canadian grain producers are properly compensated for grain deliveries to licensed grain companies.  
Grain Quality Research Program 11,055,383 5,282,058 6,666,018
Quality Assurance Program 7,979,898 8,307,568 6,140,408
Quantity Assurance Program (331,197) 2,480,557 1,529,609
Producer Protection Program 3,380,408 1,203,892 278,359
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 15,049,754 4,893,633 1,769,500
Total 37,134,246 22,167,708 16,383,894

Canadian Heritage

Raison d’être

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

The Department of Canadian Heritage and Canada’s major national cultural institutions play a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians. We work together to support culture, arts, heritage, official languages, citizenship and participation, in addition to Aboriginal, youth, and sport initiatives.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 24. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Heritage

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 49. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Heritage
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 178,306,584 162,928,160 165,068,924 178,337,991
5 Grants and contributions 1,041,770,492 1,131,552,460 1,133,745,259 1,187,709,835
Total voted 1,220,077,076 1,294,480,620 1,298,814,183 1,366,047,826
Total Statutory 27,350,479 22,745,046 22,745,046 24,002,161
Total budgetary 1,247,427,555 1,317,225,666 1,321,559,229 1,390,049,987

Highlights

The Department of Canadian Heritage is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1.39 billion in 2014–15. Of this amount, $1.37 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $24.0 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. This is an increase of $72.8 million when compared to the 2013–14 Main Estimates.

The net increase is a combination of an increase of $15.4 million in Vote 1 (Operating expenditures), an increase of $56.1 million in Vote 5 (Grants and contributions) and an increase of $1.3 million in statutory forecasts. The increase of $15.4 million in Vote 1 is mainly due to:

The increase of $56.1 million in Vote 5 is mainly due to:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 50. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Heritage
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.  
Official Languages 359,434,835 348,369,118 353,135,274
Attachment to Canada 79,587,588 56,919,095 64,436,036
Engagement and Community Participation 47,473,128 46,062,796 44,583,276
Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.  
Cultural Industries 304,377,508 299,943,524 302,346,433
Arts 117,834,528 117,779,195 116,604,709
Heritage 40,005,590 40,332,638 39,577,341
Canadians participate and excel in sport.  
Sport 224,955,539 332,917,526 398,057,989
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 73,758,839 74,901,774 71,308,929
Total 1,247,427,555 1,317,225,666 1,390,049,987

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 51. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Heritage
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to the Canada Periodical Fund 69,975,611 72,775,054 72,775,054
Grants in support of the Development of Official-Language Communities Program 7,642,617 33,322,973 33,322,973
Grants to the Athlete Assistance Program 27,364,917 28,000,000 28,000,000
Grants to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund 15,947,335 19,038,432 19,038,432
Grants in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program 9,636,449 14,355,000 14,355,000
Grants to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund 8,440,812 10,500,000 10,500,000
Grants to the Canada Book Fund 1,521,806 8,300,000 8,300,000
Grant to TV5 Monde 6,375,084 8,500,000 8,000,000
Grants in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program 6,449,660 7,300,000 8,000,000
Grants in support of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program 395,793 5,599,842 5,599,842
Grants under the Museums Assistance Program 2,136,187 4,663,680 4,663,680
Grants to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund 1,716,070 3,000,000 3,000,000
Grants to the Canada Music Fund 0 2,000,000 2,000,000
Grants to support the Aboriginal Peoples’ Program 82,604 1,340,000 1,340,000
Grants in support of the Canada History Fund 0 1,150,060 1,150,060
Grants to the Lieutenant-Governors of the provinces of Canada toward defraying the costs incurred in the exercise of their duties:      
Quebec 147,372 147,372 147,372
Ontario 95,000 105,627 105,627
British Columbia 97,814 97,814 97,814
Newfoundland 77,590 77,590 77,590
Alberta 75,940 75,940 75,940
Manitoba 73,762 73,762 73,762
Saskatchewan 73,758 73,758 73,758
Nova Scotia 64,199 64,199 64,199
New Brunswick 62,947 62,947 62,947
Prince Edward Island 57,071 57,071 57,071
Grants in support of Innovative Youth Exchange Projects 0 100,000 100,000
Contributions
Contributions for the Hosting Program 33,072,773 146,109,211 213,752,765
Contributions in support of the Development of Official-Language Communities Program 216,896,354 188,349,017 191,099,017
Contributions for the Sport Support Program 149,848,063 145,815,064 142,815,064
Contributions to support the Canada Media Fund 134,146,077 134,146,077 134,146,077
Contributions in support of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program 115,753,432 105,923,289 105,923,289
Contributions to the Canada Book Fund 34,872,656 28,366,301 28,366,301
Contributions to the Canada Arts Training Fund 22,450,000 22,779,440 22,779,440
Contributions to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund 24,783,550 24,358,613 22,508,613
Contributions to the Canada Music Fund 24,681,586 20,789,231 21,939,231
Contributions to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund 20,166,597 18,472,742 18,472,742
Contributions in support of the Exchanges Canada Initiative 17,562,353 17,686,359 17,686,359
Contributions to support the Aboriginal Peoples’ Program 15,938,791 16,209,757 11,514,078
Contributions under the Museums Assistance Program 12,407,263 11,076,284 11,076,284
Contributions in support of the Canada History Fund 4,898,042 2,937,330 5,037,330
Contributions in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program 8,610,758 3,300,000 3,300,000
Contributions to Fathers of Confederation Buildings Trust, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 3,000,000 3,005,000 3,005,000
Contributions to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund 5,239,242 2,933,773 2,993,273
Contributions to TV5 4,981,587 4,460,900 2,960,900
Contributions in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program 15,014,376 7,194,367 2,494,367
Contributions to the Canada Periodical Fund 2,215,848 1,999,544 1,999,544
Contributions to support the Youth Take Charge Program 4,177,209 3,453,023 1,453,023
Contributions in support of the Court Challenges Program 495,000 1,406,017 1,406,017

Canadian Human Rights Commission

Raison d’être

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Human Rights Commission was established in 1977 under Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act in accordance with the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). The Commission leads the administration of the CHRA and ensures compliance with the Employment Equity Act (EEA). The CHRA prohibits discrimination and the EEA promotes equality in the workplace. Both laws apply the principles of equal opportunity and non-discrimination to federal government departments and agencies, Crown corporations, and federally regulated private sector organizations.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 25. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 52. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Human Rights Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 21,475,813 19,861,118 19,861,118 19,639,234
Total voted 21,475,813 19,861,118 19,861,118 19,639,234
Total Statutory 2,907,363 2,600,171 2,600,171 2,460,492
Total budgetary 24,383,176 22,461,289 22,461,289 22,099,726

Highlights

The Canadian Human Rights Commission is estimating budgetary expenditures of $22.1 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $19.6 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $2.5 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The variance between 2012–13 expenditures and 2013–14 Main Estimates and the variance between 2013–14 and 2014–15 Main Estimates is mainly due to funding received for the repeal of section 67 of the Canadian Human Right Act (CHRA). This funding decreased and will sunset in March 2014.

Over the next year, the Commission will focus on:

Further detail can be found in the Commission’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 53. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Equality, respect for human rights and protection from discrimination by fostering understanding of, and compliance with, the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Employment Equity Act by federally regulated employers and service providers, as well as the public they serve.  
Human Rights Dispute Resolution Program 9,241,670 8,997,200 9,532,800
Human Rights Knowledge Development and Dissemination Program 4,123,976 3,440,600 3,436,700
Discrimination Prevention Program 4,224,128 4,000,200 3,188,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 6,793,402 6,023,289 5,942,226
Total 24,383,176 22,461,289 22,099,726

Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

Raison d’être

The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal is a an administrative tribunal that hears complaints of discrimination referred by the Canadian Human Rights Commission and determines whether the activities complained of violate the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). The purpose of the CHRA is to protect individuals from discrimination and to promote equal opportunity. The Tribunal also decides cases brought under the Employment Equity Act (EEA) and, pursuant to section 11 of the CHRA, determines allegations of wage disparity between men and women doing work of equal value in the same establishment.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 26. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 54. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 3,858,108 4,117,747 4,117,747 4,145,232
Total voted 3,858,108 4,117,747 4,117,747 4,145,232
Total Statutory 361,501 403,636 403,636 387,293
Total budgetary 4,219,609 4,521,383 4,521,383 4,532,525

Highlights

The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal is a small, permanent administrative tribunal comprising a full-time Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson, and up to 13 full- or part-time members. The Chairperson is the chief executive officer of the Tribunal and is supported by the Executive Director and Registrar who is responsible for registry operations and internal services

As a key mechanism of human rights protection in Canada, the Tribunal gives effect to the Canadian ideals of pluralism, equity, diversity and social inclusion. It provides a forum where human rights complaints can be scrutinized and resolved and provides definitive interpretations on important issues of discrimination. The primary result of the Tribunal’s program is that complainants can air their grievances and achieve closure in a respectful, impartial forum. Moreover, respondents are able to test the validity of allegations made in a quasi-judicial setting. In the longer term, Tribunal decisions create meaningful legal precedents for use by employers, service providers and Canadians at large.

The Tribunal has an ongoing planning challenge in that the Tribunal’s sole function is to inquire into matters referred to it under the Employment Equity Act (EEA) and matters referred by the Canadian Human Rights Commission under the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). As such, the Tribunal’s operational activities are driven by external demands that it can only react to rather than anticipate. Legislative changes the CHRA and other enabling legislations, increase complexity of cases, increase number of unrepresented parties and being a demand-driven organization all have an impact on the Tribunal’s ability to predict its workload.

Complaints alleging discriminatory funding by the Federal Government of various services on-reserve are starting to be referred to the Tribunal. These cases can pose unique challenges such as: the need to respect cultural practices and beliefs; access to justice challenges; the possible involvement of inter-jurisdictional agreements and other instruments; and the characterization of “funding” in the context of the Canadian Human Rights Act.

Another identifiable factor contributing to the Tribunal’s unpredictable workload is the effect of the repeal of section 67 of the CHRA. The Tribunal is only now starting to deal with discrimination claims in respect of decisions made pursuant to the Indian Act. It is too soon to see what the volume of these cases will be, however, it is possible that they will present the Tribunal with novel statutory interpretation challenges in giving due regard to First Nations legal traditions and customary laws.

A third factor contributing to the Tribunal’s unpredictable workload is that more and more complainants and respondents are representing themselves or designating individuals who are not lawyers to represent them. These individuals or their representatives may not be familiar with the issue identification procedures and disclosure rules, or be able to comply with them in a timely fashion. The logistics and procedural complexities associated with non- represented parties, including trying to navigate a quasi-judicial process, leads to increased numbers of motions and rulings, cancelling or rescheduling hearing dates, all of which has an effect on the scheduling of other cases.

All of these factors contribute to the increase pressures on the Tribunal’s financial and human resources levels and will most likely continue to affect its backlog of cases.

Internal services make a critical contribution to the achievement of the Tribunal’s singular primary program. Like small departments and other micro-agencies, the Tribunal continually faces pressure to respond to, or implement various government-wide management initiatives while managing its operating and salary budget in line with government-wide budget restraints, which are likely to remain in place for some time. The Tribunal will continue to actively seek horizontal opportunities and interdepartmental partnerships to achieve efficiencies.

Financially, approximately 60% of its $4.5 million operating budget is for salaries and benefits, 82% of which is directly attributable to our core program. Of the remaining $1.8 million in Operations and Maintenance, 50% is directly related to the adjudicative process such as per diem costs for part-time members, travel, facility rentals for hearings and mediation activities, translation of decisions and rulings and legal support for members.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 55. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Individuals have access, as determined by the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Employment Equity Act, to fair and equitable adjudication of human rights and employment equity cases that are brought before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal.  
Hearings of complaints before the Tribunal 1,971,469 2,282,382 2,589,784
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 2,248,140 2,239,001 1,942,741
Total 4,219,609 4,521,383 4,532,525

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Raison d’être

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is the Government of Canada’s health research funding agency. The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization. It was created in June 2000 by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Act (Bill C-13) with a mandate “to excel, according to internationally accepted standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health care system.”

CIHR’s mandate seeks to transform health research in Canada by:

Organizational Estimates

Figure 27. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Institutes of Health Research

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 56. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 50,146,637 46,367,765 47,091,280 47,112,396
5 Grants 940,773,074 915,350,465 944,401,906 932,143,424
Total voted 990,919,711 961,718,230 991,493,186 979,255,820
Total Statutory 6,133,031 5,934,927 6,013,363 5,696,142
Total budgetary 997,052,742 967,653,157 997,506,549 984,951,962

Highlights

CIHR is implementing, in 2014–15, a new Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), consisting of one Strategic Outcome along with three Programs.

CIHR’s new Strategic Outcome “Canada is a world leader in the creation, dissemination and application of health research knowledge” aligns with its mandate and vision of long-term, enduring benefits to the lives of Canadians and health care system, and is also linked to priorities of the Government of Canada. The three Programs, “Investigator-Initiated Health Research”, “Priority-Driven Health Research” and “Internal Services”, highlight CIHR’s priority to fund both the best ideas from health researchers, as well as targeted research to address challenges facing Canadians and the health care system.

CIHR is estimating budgeting expenditures of $985.0 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $979.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $5.7 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The budgeting expenditures of $985.0 million in 2014–15 represent a variance of $12.5 million, or 1.3%, from the 2013–14 Estimates-to-date (including Main and Supplementary Estimates) of $997.5 million. This variance is temporary, and is due to the following:

The remaining variance of $0.3 million is due to various other program funding adjustments.

It should be noted that both the 2013–14 Estimates-to-date and 2014–15 budgeting expenditures include the $15 million resulting from Budget 2013 for the Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research.

CIHR’s spending for 2014–15 is expected to increase as new funding will be allocated to CIHR for Tri-Agency programs once the results of future competitions are available, and as new and/or renewal of existing partnership activities materialize.

Further details on CIHR’s 2014–15 planned spending is available in CIHR’s 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 57. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canada is a world leader in the creation, dissemination and application of health research knowledge.  
Investigator-Initiated Health Research 0 0 729,381,763
Priority-Driven Health Research 0 0 252,550,887
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 27,836,076 24,267,510 3,019,312
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 969,216,666 943,385,647 0
Total 997,052,742 967,653,157 984,951,962

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 58. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants for research projects and personnel support 852,842,284 839,864,065 853,303,075
Networks of Centres of Excellence 24,113,000 22,589,400 22,589,400
Canada Graduate Scholarships 21,029,999 21,250,000 21,250,000
Institute support grants 13,000,000 13,000,000 13,000,000
Canada Excellence Research Chairs 7,000,000 8,400,000 8,400,000
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships 8,286,263 8,350,000 8,350,000
Business–Led Networks of Centres of Excellence 4,281,528 1,737,000 3,106,027
Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research 10,040,000 0 1,880,000
Industrial Research Chairs for Colleges 80,000 160,000 160,000
College and Community Innovation Program 100,000 0 104,922

Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat

Raison d’être

The President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada is responsible for this organization. The Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat (CICS), established pursuant to an agreement reached at the May 1973 First Ministers’ Conference, is an agency of the federal, provincial and territorial governments. Its mandate is to provide administrative support and planning services for intergovernmental conferences of First Ministers, Ministers and Deputy Ministers.

These intergovernmental conferences are a key instrument for consultation and negotiation among the different orders of governments and assist in the development of national and/or provincial/territorial policies. They are a critical component of the workings of the Canadian federation and represent a core principle of our democratic society.

By skilfully executing the logistical planning and delivery of these meetings, CICS not only relieves governments of the administrative process burden but also allows them to greatly benefit from significant cost efficiencies and economies of scale.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 28. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 59. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,829,776 5,597,587 5,597,587 5,548,958
- Pursuant to subsection 25(2) of the Financial Administration Act, to write-off from the Accounts of Canada debts due to Her Majesty in right of Canada amounting to $57 related to an unrecoverable debt 57 0 0 0
Total voted 4,829,833 5,597,587 5,597,587 5,548,958
Total Statutory 325,647 437,917 437,917 408,205
Total budgetary 5,155,480 6,035,504 6,035,504 5,957,163

Highlights

The CICS’s 2014–15 expenditures remain approximately the same as the previous year. The 2014–15 funding will be utilized to address the following priorities:

Our 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities will contain more details regarding our priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 60. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Senior-level intergovernmental conference services are professionally and successfully delivered.  
Conference Services 3,344,606 4,179,031 4,026,878
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 1,810,874 1,856,473 1,930,285
Total 5,155,480 6,035,504 5,957,163

Canadian International Development Agency

Raison d’être

Division 12 of Part 3 of the Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 1 states that the Canadian International Development Agency is amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, effective June 26, 2013.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 29. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 30. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 61. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian International Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
- Operating expenditures 194,095,452 171,101,774 171,101,774 0
- Grants and contributions 2,860,377,838 2,719,266,590 2,719,266,590 0
Total voted 3,054,473,290 2,890,368,364 2,890,368,364 0
Total Statutory 355,084,144 268,960,876 268,960,876 0
Total budgetary 3,409,557,434 3,159,329,240 3,159,329,240 0
Non-budgetary
Voted
- Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, payments to international financial institutions – Issuance and payment of demand notes 0 1 1 0
- Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, payments to international financial institutions – Capital subscriptions 0 1 1 0
Total voted 0 2 2 0
Total Statutory 93,401,393 81,595,258 81,595,258 0
Total non-budgetary 93,401,393 81,595,260 81,595,260 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 62. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 3,409,557,434 3,159,329,240 0
Total 3,409,557,434 3,159,329,240 0

Table 63. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 93,401,393 81,595,260 0
Total 93,401,393 81,595,260 0

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

Raison d’être

The Canadian International Trade Tribunal (the Tribunal) provides Canadian and international businesses with access to fair, transparent and timely resolution of trade remedy cases, customs and excise tax appeals and inquiries into federal procurement complaints. At the request of the Government of Canada, the Tribunal provides advice on tariff, trade and general economic matters.

The Minister of Finance is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 31. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian International Trade Tribunal

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 64. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian International Trade Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 10,307,575 8,660,195 8,660,195 8,305,445
Total voted 10,307,575 8,660,195 8,660,195 8,305,445
Total Statutory 1,193,752 1,233,346 1,233,346 1,171,294
Total budgetary 11,501,327 9,893,541 9,893,541 9,476,739

Highlights

The Tribunal’s overriding priority for 2014–15 is to deliver on its various mandates by hearing cases and making sound decisions on matters that fall within its jurisdiction. In so doing, the Tribunal supports a fair marketplace in Canada, maintains its strong reputation both in Canada and throughout the world as a fair and independent decision maker and complies with its legislative requirements.

The Tribunal will also continue to pursue initiatives aimed at further improving its capacity to deliver on its legislative mandates in order to provide efficient and reliable services to its stakeholders.

The decreasing trend in the Tribunal’s spending from 2012–13 to 2014–15 can be explained by a few key events. First, in 2012–13, the Tribunal received additional funding of $1.3 million to retrofit its accommodation. Second, the Tribunal has gone through a very busy case schedule that required additional resources for part of 2012–13 and for all of 2013–14. Lastly, in 2014–15 and for future years, the Tribunal’s budget will be reduced by $0.5 million as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review. Please refer to the Tribunal’s Web site for further details on its 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities at http://www.citt-tcce.gc.ca.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 65. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian International Trade Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Fair, timely and transparent disposition of international trade cases, procurement cases and government-mandated inquiries within the Tribunal’s jurisdiction.  
Adjudication of Trade Cases (quasi-judicial role) 8,395,969 7,321,221 7,012,787
General Economic Inquiries and References (advisory role) 115,013 98,935 94,767
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 2,990,345 2,473,385 2,369,185
Total 11,501,327 9,893,541 9,476,739

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Raison d’être

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) was created in 2008 through an amendment to the Museums Act, which established the Museum as the first national museum to be created since 1967 and the first to be located outside of the National Capital Region. The Museum’s mandate is “to explore the subject of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, in order to enhance the public’s understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 32. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum for Human Rights

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 66. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights for operating and capital expenditures 56,935,796 31,700,000 31,700,000 21,700,000
Total voted 56,935,796 31,700,000 31,700,000 21,700,000
Total budgetary 56,935,796 31,700,000 31,700,000 21,700,000

Highlights

The operating appropriations for 2014–15 are $21.7 million, the same amount that was received in 2013–14. In 2013–14 $10 million in capital appropriations were also received representing the final payment of the $35 million advance of appropriations that was approved in 2012–13. Accordingly no further capital appropriations will be received in 2014–15.

The 2014–15 fiscal year marks a period of significant transition for the Museum as it begins full-time operations and welcomes its first visitors from across Canada and abroad.

The Museum is forecasting a balanced budget for 2014–15. The Museum will open on September 20, 2014 and is projected to receive 100,000 visitors. Membership sales will be launched in April 2014 with 4,556 individual, family and corporate memberships projected to be sold. Public programming will begin upon opening with education programming beginning in January 2015. The 2014–15 fiscal year will be a challenging year due to the overlap of costs related to the completion of operational readiness initiatives with costs to operate the Museum and therefore there are no contingencies budgeted in the 2014–15 operating budget.

CMHR will continue to experience significant change over the planning period as it transitions from a construction project to a fully operational museum. The focus for 2014–15 will be to:

To support the realization of the long-term corporate objectives, an increase in staffing numbers is planned over the next two years to fully staff Museum operations for the inaugural opening and beyond.

A thorough review of the staffing plan was completed during 2013–14 to align the organizational structure with the Museum’s mandate and metanarrative. The review included benchmarking and expert consultation. There are still many unknowns for this Museum – the first new national museum in over 40 years and the first newly built national museum outside of the National Capital Region. The number of visitors, the level of interpretation visitors may want, the demand for tours and other programming could vary significantly from the assumptions in the budget. A variable staffing plan incorporating a significant number of part-time positions is being implemented that will provide the flexibility to increase or decrease the number of visitor facing staff as required.

Leading up to opening, project related staff has been hired on term assignments and these positions will drop off as the capital project is completed. Project related staff includes researcher assistants, interpretive planners, writers, editors, exhibit project managers, and new media project coordinators.

The forecasted increase in operations staff in 2013–14 is largely in the areas of Earned Revenue, Visitor Services, Security, and Learning and Programming in order to deliver on the following:

Staffing will increase in 2014–15 due to the requirements of operating the Museum including full-time and part-time Program Interpreters who will provide in-gallery interpretation as well as deliver education and public programs, part-time Hosts, IT and exhibit staff.

Staffing costs make up 46% of the budget in 2014–15. This compares favourably with the other national museums where the staffing costs range from 43% to 55%.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 67. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Enhanced knowledge of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, in order to enhance the public’s understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue.  
Museum Content and Program 0 10,577,000 9,462,000
Accommodation 0 14,129,000 6,305,000
Stewardship and Corporate Management 0 6,994,000 5,933,000
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 56,935,796 0 0
Total 56,935,796 31,700,000 21,700,000

Canadian Museum of History

Raison d’être

The Canadian Museum of History is a Crown corporation established by the Museums Act (Statutes of Canada 2013, Chapter 38) which came into force on December 12, 2013. The Act states that the role of the corporation is “to enhance Canadians’ knowledge, understanding and appreciation of events, experiences, people and objects that reflect and have shaped Canada’s history and identity, and also to enhance their awareness of world history and cultures.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 33. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of History

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 68. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of History
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum of History for operating and capital expenditures 64,364,831 57,418,730 58,918,730 63,430,033
Total voted 64,364,831 57,418,730 58,918,730 63,430,033
Total budgetary 64,364,831 57,418,730 58,918,730 63,430,033

Highlights

On December 12, 2013, federal legislation was enacted which transformed the Canadian Museum of Civilization into the Canadian Museum of History.

Under its revised mandate, the Museum will tell the story of Canada and its people more comprehensively, inclusively and candidly than ever before. It will do so by focusing greater attention on the people, events and experiences that have shaped our country’s development, define the Canadian experience and underpin our national identity. The Museum will also continue to present special exhibitions exploring world history and cultures, and permanent exhibitions illuminating the historical achievements and continuing contributions of Canada’s First Peoples.

The museum’s Main Estimates for 2014–15 is $63.4 million, an increase of $6.0 million from the 2013–14 Main Estimates. The increase is due to:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 69. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of History
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for human cultural achievements and human behaviour through collections of historical and cultural objects, exhibitions, programs and research reflecting a Canadian perspective.  
Accommodation 0 27,454,000 29,808,000
Exhibit, Educate and Communicate 0 15,244,000 19,552,000
Collect and Research 0 12,646,000 12,370,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 2,074,730 1,700,033
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 64,364,831 0 0
Total 64,364,831 57,418,730 63,430,033

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Raison d’être

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 was established in 2010 through an amendment to the Museums Act.

The mandate of the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 is “to explore the theme of immigration to Canada in order to enhance public understanding of the experiences of immigrants as they arrived in Canada, of the vital role immigration has played in the building of Canada and of the contributions of immigrants to Canada’s culture, economy and way of life.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 34. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 70. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 for operating and capital expenditures 9,976,473 18,450,000 18,450,000 9,900,000
Total voted 9,976,473 18,450,000 18,450,000 9,900,000
Total budgetary 9,976,473 18,450,000 18,450,000 9,900,000

Highlights

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 is estimating budgetary expenditures of $9.9 million in 2014–15 which require approval by Parliament.

This represents a decrease in capital expenditures of $8.55 million from the 2013–14 Main Estimates due to the partial completion of the expansion capital projects including the refit of current and new exhibition spaces, the fabrication and installation of new exhibits and the preparations for the launch of the new museum in May 2015 which will tangibly showcase the national mandate of the Museum.

For further details on the Museum’s plan and priorities, please refer to our 2014–15 to 2018–19 Corporate Plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 71. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadians are engaged in building and exploring the stories, themes and history of Canadian immigration as it continues to unfold.  
Accommodations 0 12,791,000 4,958,420
Visitor Experience and Connections 0 2,740,000 2,360,090
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 2,919,000 2,581,490
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 9,976,473 0 0
Total 9,976,473 18,450,000 9,900,000

Canadian Museum of Nature

Raison d’être

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Museum of Nature (the Museum) became a Crown corporation on July 1, 1990 through the Museums Act with the mandate to increase, throughout Canada and internationally, interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for the natural world by establishing, maintaining and developing for research and posterity, a collection of natural history objects, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, and by demonstrating the natural world, the knowledge derived from it and the understanding it represents.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 35. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Nature

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 72. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Nature
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum of Nature for operating and capital expenditures 34,370,062 25,834,904 25,834,904 26,127,096
Total voted 34,370,062 25,834,904 25,834,904 26,127,096
Total budgetary 34,370,062 25,834,904 25,834,904 26,127,096

Highlights

In 2014–15, the Museum will begin to advance a new strategic plan that leverages its research and collections strengths in arctic knowledge and species discovery. New approaches to the design and delivery of visitor experiences will enable the Museum to attract and inspire new audiences. These new engaging experiences will lead to higher memberships, higher membership renewal and will provide a foundation for enhanced fundraising. Overall higher levels of engagement will lead to a better understanding of and connection with Canada’s natural world.

Strategic Objective #1:

Create a Centre for Arctic Knowledge and Exploration that transforms people’s understanding of Canada’s arctic and its relationship with Canada as a country in a 21st century global context.

Strategic Objective #2:

Create a Centre for Species Discovery and Change that transforms peoples understanding of the relevance of species diversity to their lives now and in the future.

Strategic Objective #3:

Create a Centre for Nature Inspiration and Engagement that transforms people’s expectations of the Museum as a destination for discussion, connection and exploration with nature’s past, present and future that advances understanding and respect for Canada’s natural world.

Strategic Objective #4:

Position the Natural Heritage Campus as a centre of excellence in collections management and knowledge creation, advancement and sharing by becoming a collections collaborator with institutions around the world seeking to collect, preserve, digitize and disseminate specimens that document the nature of Canada.

Strategic Objective #5:

Create a sustainable business enterprise model of operation that leverages the Museum’s strategic imperatives: knowledge and discovery, inspiration and engagement, presence, performance and advancement.

These five strategic objectives will be managed through the five program activities of the Museum: Public Education, Collections Management and Research, Internal Services, and Accommodation which includes the ongoing operations and maintenance of the Museum’s two facilities.

An increase of $292,192 or 1% from previous Main Estimates is due to compensation adjustments.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 73. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Nature
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for the natural world through collections of natural history objects, public education programmes and research reflecting a special but not exclusive perspective on Canada.  
Accommodation 0 10,102,904 10,434,000
Public education programmes 0 4,730,000 6,261,000
Research 0 3,319,000 3,259,000
Collections management 0 1,651,000 1,695,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 6,032,000 4,478,096
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 34,370,062 0 0
Total 34,370,062 25,834,904 26,127,096

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

Raison d’être

Contributing to jobs and growth in Canada, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) works to develop a diversified, sustainable and dynamic economy across Canada’s three territories. It does this by delivering funding programs to Northerners and Aboriginal people, guiding resource development and major projects across the North through the Northern Projects Management Office, undertaking research to support the development of evidence-based policies, advocating for Northern economic prosperity and diversification, and collaborating with and aligning the efforts of other federal departments, territorial governments, Aboriginal organizations, and industry.

The Minister of the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 36. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 74. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 12,720,066 12,103,359 13,555,127 11,231,366
5 Contributions 38,365,705 38,664,119 38,664,119 18,641,803
Total voted 51,085,771 50,767,478 52,219,246 29,873,169
Total Statutory 1,302,839 1,023,655 1,223,362 1,072,597
Total budgetary 52,388,610 51,791,133 53,442,608 30,945,766

Highlights

CanNor is estimating budgetary expenditures of $30.9 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $29.8 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.1 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In 2014–15, Aboriginal economic development programming will continue to focus on supporting business development and the opportunities before communities today; this will be complemented by the Northern Adult Basic Education Program.

Responsible resource development is critical to the success of Canada’s North. CanNor’s Northern Projects Management Office is expanding its work with communities and industry to position Canada’s North as a world-class resource development destination where prosperity for Northerners and benefits for Canadians are a single goal. This is highlighted by new 3-year funding for this program starting in 2013–14.

Compared to the previous year, the Strategic Investments in Northern Economic Development program ($20 million) and the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund ($3.2 million in 2013–14) sunset in 2013–14. Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend or enhance funding.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 75. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Developed and diversified territorial economies that support prosperity for all Northerners.  
Economic Development 0 0 22,256,695
Policy and Alignment 0 0 4,256,120
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 7,316,314 6,522,014 4,432,950
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 45,072,296 45,269,119 0
Total 52,388,610 51,791,133 30,945,765

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 76. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions to support Aboriginal participation in the northern economy 0 0 10,800,000
Contributions for advancing adult basic education in Canada’s territories 6,604,803 6,507,119 6,604,803
Contributions for promoting regional development in Canada’s three territories 17,715,435 18,157,000 1,237,000

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

Raison d’être

The Minister of Natural Resources is responsible for this organization.

In 1946, Parliament passed the Atomic Energy Control Act and established the Atomic Energy Control Board, providing it with the power to regulate all nuclear activities related to the development and use of atomic energy in Canada.

More than half a century later, in May 2000, the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) came into effect and established the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) as the successor to the Atomic Energy Control Board, with responsibilities and authorities to regulate an industry that spans all segments of the nuclear fuel cycle and a wide range of industrial, medical and academic uses of nuclear substances.

Additional information can be found in the CNSC’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 37. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 77. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 37,676,689 34,976,638 37,771,011 36,578,266
Total voted 37,676,689 34,976,638 37,771,011 36,578,266
Total Statutory 102,022,465 97,924,847 97,966,168 95,059,029
Total budgetary 139,699,154 132,901,485 135,737,179 131,637,295

Highlights

CNSC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $131.6 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $36.6 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $95.0 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 1, the CNSC received statutory authority – pursuant to paragraph 21(3) of the NSCA – to spend during a fiscal year any revenues that it receives in the current or previous fiscal year through the conduct of its operations. The CNSC receives its revenues from regulatory fees for licences and applications charged in accordance with the CNSC Cost Recovery Fees Regulations.

In addition to the statutory authority, the CNSC is also funded through the voted budgetary authority from Parliament – Vote 1 – Program expenditures. Voted authority provides funding for activities exempt from paying fees under the CNSC Cost Recovery Fees Regulations (i.e., hospitals and universities), as these entities exist for the public good. Additionally, fees are not charged for activities that result from Canada’s obligations that do not provide a direct benefit to identifiable licensees. These include activities with respect to Canada’s international obligations (including non-proliferation activities), public responsibilities such as emergency management and public information programs, and the updating of the NSCA and its associated regulations.

Contributions to the employee benefit plans are statutory budgetary authorities.

In 2014–15, the CNSC’s Main Estimates show a decrease in net spending of $1.3 million or 1.0% when compared to 2013–14 Main Estimates. The decrease is the result of a decrease in statutory expenditures of $2.9 million or 2.9% partially offset by an increase in voted expenditures in the amount of $1.6 million or 4.6%.

The decrease in statutory expenditures is due to reduced regulatory demands related to the decommissioning of the Hydro-Québec’s Gentilly – 2 nuclear generating station facility as well as a reduction in the employee benefit contribution.

The increase in voted expenditures is mainly due to the termination of management reserve repayments to the Treasury Board Secretariat for investments made in the CNSC’s facilities infrastructure as well as funding received to support the Single Window Initiative – the horizontal initiative to streamline government import regulations and border processes for commercial trade. The increase is offset by an additional transfer to Shared Services Canada for workplace technology device software and a transfer to Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development to support CNSC personnel on missions abroad.

Additional information can be found in the CNSC’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 78. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and public confidence in the nuclear regulatory regime’s effectiveness.  
Compliance Program 41,778,894 36,550,986 38,703,659
Licensing and Certification Program 25,304,007 28,505,451 26,179,983
Regulatory Framework Program 29,682,743 25,193,526 26,049,097
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 42,933,510 42,651,522 40,704,556
Total 139,699,154 132,901,485 131,637,295

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 79. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to enable the research, development and management of activities that contribute to the objectives of the Research and Support Program 75,000 75,000 75,000
Contributions
Participant Funding Program 105,602 925,000 925,000
Contributions to enable the research, development and management of activities that contribute to the objectives of the Research and Support Program, and the Canadian Safeguards Support Program 1,270,980 770,000 770,000

Canadian Polar Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Polar Commission (CPC) is responsible for monitoring, promoting and disseminating knowledge of the polar regions; contributing to public awareness of the importance of polar science to Canada; enhancing Canada’s international profile as a circumpolar nation; and recommending polar science policy direction to government. The Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 38. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Polar Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 80. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Polar Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 1,220,138 2,433,726 2,433,726 2,439,807
Total voted 1,220,138 2,433,726 2,433,726 2,439,807
Total Statutory 97,597 142,943 142,943 136,553
Total budgetary 1,317,735 2,576,669 2,576,669 2,576,360

Highlights

CPC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.6 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $2.4 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $137 thousand represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

CPC continues to manage its grant programs: the Northern Scientific Training Program including the funding to the Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies, the Centenary Medal Commemorating the International Polar year 1882-1883 also known as the Northern Scientific Award and the Canadian Polar Commission Scholarship Award.

The CPC will continue to host conferences and workshops, to publish information on subjects of relevance to polar research, to build and maintain polar knowledge networks and to work closely with other governmental and non-governmental agencies to promote and support Canadian study of the polar regions.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 81. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Polar Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Increased Canadian polar knowledge.  
Research Facilitation and Communication 988,110 2,095,074 2,095,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 329,625 481,595 481,360
Total 1,317,735 2,576,669 2,576,360

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 82. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Polar Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to individuals, organizations, associations and institutions to support research and activities relating to the polar regions 0 1,086,000 1,086,000
Contributions
Contributions to individuals, organizations, associations and institutions to support research and activities relating to the polar regions 10,000 10,000 10,000

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an administrative tribunal that regulates and supervises Canadian broadcasting, and telecommunications in the public interest, as well as contributes to protecting Canadians from unsolicited communications.

The CRTC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 39. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 83. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 8,411,912 4,403,550 4,403,551 3,945,670
Total voted 8,411,912 4,403,550 4,403,551 3,945,670
Total Statutory 6,321,849 6,803,308 6,803,308 6,641,029
Total budgetary 14,733,761 11,206,858 11,206,859 10,586,699

Highlights

CRTC is estimating net budgetary expenditures of $10.6 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $3.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $6.6 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total, the CRTC is estimating a decrease in net spending of $0.6 million from the previous Main Estimates. Factors contributing to the net decrease include:

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 84. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadians have access to a world-class communication system.  
Protection within the Communication System 0 0 4,170,720
Connection to the Communication System 0 6,266,034 2,220,989
Canadian Content Creation 0 2,461,665 1,892,757
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 3,843,738 2,479,159 2,302,233
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 10,890,023 0 0
Total 14,733,761 11,206,858 10,586,699

Canadian Security Intelligence Service

Raison d’être

As per the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) Act, the mandate of CSIS is to collect, analyze and retain information and intelligence on activities suspected of constituting threats to the security of Canada, and to report to and advise the government. CSIS is responsible for the collection of national security intelligence inside and outside Canada; the collection of foreign intelligence within Canada; and for security screening assessments for federal government employees, refugees, immigration and citizenship applicants, and some other sectors such as the Canadian nuclear industry.

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for CSIS.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 40. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Security Intelligence Service

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 85. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 450,434,151 464,636,769 468,595,736 468,824,514
Total voted 450,434,151 464,636,769 468,595,736 468,824,514
Total Statutory 45,986,798 48,371,070 48,371,070 47,412,243
Total budgetary 496,420,949 513,007,839 516,966,806 516,236,757

Highlights

The 2014–15 Main Estimates for CSIS are $516.2 million, a net increase of $3.2 million from 2013–14. The major changes are as follows:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 86. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Intelligence is used to protect the security and safety of Canada and its citizens.  
Intelligence Program 454,883,201 445,826,087 447,649,011
Security Screening Program 41,537,748 67,181,752 68,587,746
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 0 0 0
Total 496,420,949 513,007,839 516,236,757

Canadian Space Agency

Raison d’être

The mandate of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is "to promote the peaceful use and development of space, to advance the knowledge of space through science and to ensure that space science and technology provide social and economic benefits for Canadians".

The CSA is carrying out its mandate in collaboration with Canadian industry, academia, Government of Canada organizations and other international space agencies or organizations.

The founding legislation voted in 1990 attributed four main functions to the CSA:

Organizational Estimates

Figure 41. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Space Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 87. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Space Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 168,611,889 171,614,805 171,614,805 155,266,004
5 Capital expenditures 110,576,477 272,688,412 272,688,412 257,955,633
10 Grants and contributions 30,669,125 33,630,000 33,630,000 39,306,853
Total voted 309,857,491 477,933,217 477,933,217 452,528,490
Total Statutory 10,387,924 10,747,711 10,747,711 9,918,684
Total budgetary 320,245,415 488,680,928 488,680,928 462,447,174

Highlights

The Canadian Space Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $462.4 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $452.5 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $9.9 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The variation in total authorities available between fiscal years 2013–14 and 2014–15 represents a net decrease of$26.2 million. This variation is mainly due to: