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2014–15 Estimates


Part II - Main Estimates

Agriculture and Agri-Food

Raison d’être

The Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) was created in 1868 — one year after Confederation — because of the importance of agriculture to the economic, social and cultural development of Canada. Today, the Department helps create the conditions for the long-term profitability, sustainability and adaptability of the Canadian agricultural sector. AAFC supports the sector through initiatives that promote innovation and competitiveness, and that proactively manage risk. The Department’s goal is to position agriculture, agri-food and agri-based product industries to realize their full potential by seizing new opportunities in the growing domestic and global marketplace.

The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 1. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Agriculture and Agri-Food

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 1. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 669,912,504 594,969,595 643,534,340 544,949,432
5 Capital expenditures 27,722,021 27,872,294 27,872,294 27,872,294
10 Grants and contributions 512,905,333 226,495,111 447,925,111 365,352,000
Total voted 1,210,539,858 849,337,000 1,119,331,745 938,173,726
Total Statutory 1,471,019,217 1,342,238,219 1,347,439,362 1,315,023,086
Total budgetary 2,681,559,075 2,191,575,219 2,466,771,107 2,253,196,812

Highlights

The 2014–15 Main Estimates have increased by $61.6 million, compared to the 2013–14 Main Estimates. The 2014–15 fiscal year is the second year of Growing Forward 2, a federal, provincial, territorial five-year agriculture policy framework. This framework supports a shift in focus towards strategic investments that promote innovation, competitiveness and market development initiatives to help producers meet rising demand, both in Canada and internationally, while continuing to proactively manage risk. AAFC has also realigned its business in order to achieve the full annual savings by 2014–15 as announced in Budget 2012. These measures help position the Department to meet its future goals and priorities while contributing to the government’s return to a balanced budget. In addition, the Department is undergoing transformational change to ensure the Department is well positioned to continue to deliver excellence in policy development and advice, program delivery and scientific expertise to Canada’s agricultural sector.

The Department has examined its operations in support of government-wide efforts to find more efficient ways of doing business.

Major changes include:

  • An increase of $207.0 million for the Growing Forward 2 provincial and territorial cost-shared initiatives, which were still being finalized and were therefore not included in the 2013–14 Main Estimates, but rather added through Supplementary Estimates in 2013–14;
  • An increase of $33.9 million for the renewal of support for statutory Business Risk Management programs, which were still being finalized and were therefore not included in the 2013–14 Main Estimates, but rather added through Supplementary Estimates in 2013–14;
  • An increase of $7.5 million for the AgriRisk Initiatives program;
  • A decrease of $70.1 million related to recent savings initiatives;
  • A decrease of $63.5 million related to the completion of initiatives under the Agricultural Flexibility Fund;
  • A decrease of $28.1 million related to an updated forecast for the Advance Payments program under the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act; and
  • A decrease of $23.6 million related to the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs program.

The number of Strategic Outcomes has changed from three to two and programs have been reduced and merged to reflect the focus of Growing Forward 2 on competitiveness, innovation and market development. The new Program Alignment Architecture also reflects the transformational change underway at AAFC as well as machinery of government changes. As a result, the Department’s 2014–15 Main Estimates reflect these changes to the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture. Due to the significance of these changes, the 2012–13 expenditures and the 2013–14 Main Estimates have not been fully allocated to the new Program Alignment Architecture.

AAFC will focus on advancing the following priorities in 2014–15:

  • Support and improve the competitiveness and adaptability of the agriculture, agri-food and agri-based product sector;
  • Maintain and improve access to targeted, key international markets;
  • Generate new knowledge, foster innovation and increase adoption and commercialization of agricultural, agri-food and agri-based products, processes or practices;
  • Continue to improve program and service delivery to respond to client expectations; and
  • Support and engage our workforce to meet current and future work objectives and opportunities.

Please refer to the Department’s 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities for further information.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 2. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A competitive and market-oriented agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk.  
Business Risk Management 1,420,001,333 1,291,031,455 1,297,306,348
Market Access, Negotiations, Sector Competitiveness, and Assurance Systems 0 0 211,533,122
Farm Products Council of Canada 2,998,099 2,659,276 2,483,404
An innovative and sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector.  
Science, Innovation, Adoption and Sustainability 0 0 519,175,818
Industry Capacity 0 0 72,190,745
Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (1,240,186) (421,000) 34,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.Testerester  
Internal Services 327,379,980 279,468,875 150,473,375
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 932,419,849 618,836,613 0
Total 2,681,559,075 2,191,575,219 2,253,196,812

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 3. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant payments for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs program 169,373,315 51,900,000 28,500,000
Grant payments for the Churchill Port Utilisation program 3,776,404 4,600,000 4,600,000
Grants to foreign recipients for participation in international organizations supporting agriculture 1,136,820 883,000 883,000
Grant payments for the AgriRisk Initiatives program 0 0 100,000
Contributions
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Innovation under Growing Forward 2 0 0 100,179,252
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Competitiveness and Market Development under Growing Forward 2 0 0 60,869,892
Contribution payments for the AgriInnovation program under Growing Forward 2 0 60,455,000 60,455,000
Contributions for Cost-Shared Strategic Initiatives programming in Adaptability and Industry Capacity under Growing Forward 2 0 0 44,830,856
Contribution payments for the AgriMarketing program under Growing Forward 2 0 35,500,000 35,500,000
Contributions to support the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation program 27,361,000 26,761,000 10,061,000
Contributions for the AgriRisk Initiatives program 0 0 6,400,000
Contributions in support of the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases program 5,321,592 5,382,000 5,382,000
Contribution payments for the AgriCompetitiveness program under Growing Forward 2 0 3,127,000 3,127,000
Contribution payments for the control of diseases in the hog industry – Phase 2 9,609,313 0 2,000,000
Contribution payments for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs program 800,000 1,600,000 1,600,000
Contributions under the Career Focus program – Youth Employment Strategy 771,958 864,000 864,000

Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada

Raison d’être

Order in Council P.C. 2012-1136 transferred the control and supervision of the remaining activities of the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada to Health, effective September 30, 2012.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 2. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 4. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
- Program expenditures 1,358,235 0 0 0
Total voted 1,358,235 0 0 0
Total Statutory 125,307 0 0 0
Total budgetary 1,483,542 0 0 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 5. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 1,483,542 0 0
Total 1,483,542 0 0

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Raison d’être

Established in 1987 (Part I of the Government Organization Act, Atlantic Canada 1987, R.S.C., 1985, c.41 (4th Supp.), also known as the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Act), the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) is the federal department responsible for the Government of Canada’s economic development efforts in the provinces of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency) is responsible for this organization.

ACOA works to create opportunities for economic growth in Atlantic Canada by helping businesses become more competitive, innovative and productive, by working with diverse communities to develop and diversify local economies, and by championing the strengths of Atlantic Canada. Together, with Atlantic Canadians, we are building a stronger economy.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 3. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 6. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 72,981,202 67,211,348 66,990,951 63,873,388
5 Grants and contributions 233,185,297 225,820,293 236,733,470 216,270,293
Total voted 306,166,499 293,031,641 303,724,421 280,143,681
Total Statutory 9,495,448 6,939,430 6,956,530 8,342,703
Total budgetary 315,661,947 299,971,071 310,680,951 288,486,384

Highlights

ACOA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $288.5 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $280.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $8.3 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

ACOA’s decrease in spending of $22.2 million from 2013–14 Estimates to date to 2014–15 is due to a decrease in operating costs of $3.1 million, a decrease in contributions and other transfer payments of $20.5 million, and an increase of $1.4 million in statutory costs. Factors contributing to the net decrease include:

Impacts of program realignment and efficiencies of $3.4 million resulting from savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review.

Impact of annual in-year authority:

  • A decrease of $1.2 million related to the collection of repayable contributions. An adjustment is required yearly to account for collections in excess of the base amount included in the Main Estimates.

Impacts of funding initiatives and agreements totalling to $17.6 million in 2013–14:

  • A $12.7 million decrease through the final instalment of special funding in support of the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund;
  • A $6.0 million decrease through the final instalment of special funding to support community economic development priorities in New Brunswick, relating to community projects such as the establishment of multifunctional facilities and new recreational infrastructure; and
  • A $1.1 million increase due to the new funding provided for the Economic Development Initiative of the 2013–2018 Federal Strategy for Official Languages.

In 2014–15, the Agency will continue to act as the key federal catalyst for economic development in the Atlantic region. The Agency will continue to support the region’s small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in their efforts to become more innovative, productive and competitive, while helping rural and urban communities create and seize opportunities for economic growth and diversification. ACOA will also continue to help Atlantic Canada’s SMEs explore opportunities for international business development generated by Canada’s Global Markets Action Plan and the newly announced Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement. ACOA will ensure that SMEs are prepared to maximize growth opportunities – including those that will flow from such major projects as our Government’s $38.3 billion shipbuilding strategy and the development of clean and renewable energy at Muskrat Falls.

For further details on ACOA’s planned spending, refer to the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 7. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A competitive Atlantic Canadian economyTesterester  
Enterprise Development 179,856,451 170,201,748 164,581,549
Community Development 88,520,093 91,307,430 87,408,010
Policy, Advocacy and Coordination 12,403,955 10,855,783 11,351,591
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 34,881,448 27,606,110 25,145,234
Total 315,661,947 299,971,071 288,486,384

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 8. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to organizations to promote economic cooperation and development 533,094 2,000,000 2,000,000
Contributions
Contributions under the Business Development Program 136,938,024 100,074,293 112,028,293
Contributions for the Atlantic Innovation Fund 50,327,794 57,649,000 50,000,000
Contributions for the Innovative Communities Fund 27,965,488 44,455,000 39,000,000
Contributions under the Community Futures Program 12,582,399 12,642,000 12,642,000
Contributions under the Atlantic Policy Research Initiatives 583,583 700,000 600,000

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Raison d’être

Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) uses its unique scientific expertise and facilities to ensure that:

  • The Canadian nuclear sector is innovative and productive;
  • Canada’s security and prosperity are supported by nuclear science and innovation;
  • Canadians have a reliable supply of isotopes; and
  • Canada’s federal nuclear sites are clean and healthy environments.

The current mandate for the AECL Nuclear Laboratories flows from the powers given to the Minister of Natural Resources under the Nuclear Energy Act:

  • To undertake research with respect to nuclear energy;
  • To cause nuclear energy to be utilized; and
  • To license, sell or otherwise dispose of discoveries and inventions relating to nuclear energy and collect payments for them.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 4. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 9. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for operating and capital expenditures 341,243,000 102,143,000 378,062,900 102,143,000
Total voted 341,243,000 102,143,000 378,062,900 102,143,000
Total Statutory 210,600,000 108,919,637 108,919,637 0
Total budgetary 551,843,000 211,062,637 486,982,537 102,143,000

Highlights

AECL’s Main Estimates funding of $102.1 million will be used to fund laboratory operations and research and development at Chalk River and to ensure the safe and reliable operation of its nuclear facilities and supporting infrastructure.

Laboratory operations consist of:

  • Laboratory Facilities: The specialized facilities operated under a license issued by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission;
  • Site Support and Municipal Services: Site Support Services: facilities and teams, including engineering, procurement; and
  • maintenance that enable the industrial and scientific activities of the site. Municipal Services: the basic services required for the campus to operate, including landlord functions and water, heat and electricity.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 10. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Be the top worldwide nuclear products and services company. Protect the health and safety of the public, our employees and the environment. Minimize nuclear legacy obligations for future generations.  
Facilities and Nuclear Operations 0 67,006,000 67,006,000
Research and Development 0 35,137,000 35,137,000
Commercial Business 0 108,919,637 0
Waste Management and Decommissioning 0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 551,843,000 0 0
Total 551,843,000 211,062,637 102,143,000

Auditor General

Raison d’être

The Auditor General is an Officer of Parliament, who is independent from the government and reports directly to Parliament. The Office of the Auditor General is the legislative audit office of the federal government and of the three northern territories. The main legislative auditing duties are financial audits, performance audits, special examinations, and sustainable development monitoring activities and environmental petitions. Our audits and studies provide objective information, advice and assurance to Parliament, territorial legislatures, governments and Canadians. With our reports and testimony, we assist parliamentarians and territorial legislators in their work on the authorization and oversight of government spending and operations. The Minister of Finance is responsible for tabling the Auditor General’s administrative reports in Parliament, including the Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Report.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 5. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Auditor General

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 11. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Auditor General
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 78,095,897 74,100,653 74,100,653 67,947,936
Total voted 78,095,897 74,100,653 74,100,653 67,947,936
Total Statutory 10,113,875 10,232,880 10,232,880 9,793,894
Total budgetary 88,209,772 84,333,533 84,333,533 77,741,830

Highlights

The Office of the Auditor General is estimating budgetary expenditures of $77.7 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $67.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $9.8 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total, the Office is estimating a decrease of $6.6 million or 7.8% from the previous Main Estimates primarily due to savings as a result of Budget 2012 Spending Review. Additional information can be found in the Office of the Auditor General’s 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 12. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Auditor General
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Through legislative auditing, we contribute to a well-managed and accountable government for Canadians.  
Legislative Auditing 88,209,772 84,333,533 77,741,830
Total 88,209,772 84,333,533 77,741,830

Canada Border Services Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

The CBSA provides integrated border services that support national security priorities and facilitate the flow of people and goods across the border. Responsibilities include:

  • administering legislation that governs the admissibility of people and goods into and out of Canada;
  • identifying, detaining, and removing people who are inadmissible to Canada;
  • interdicting illegal goods at Canada’s border;
  • protecting food safety, plant and animal health, and Canada’s resource base;
  • administering trade legislation and agreements, including the enforcement of trade remedies that protect Canadian industry;
  • administering a fair and impartial redress mechanism; and
  • collecting duties and taxes on imported goods.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 6. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Border Services Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 13. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Border Services Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,440,742,689 1,396,653,386 1,433,815,896 1,397,915,271
5 Capital expenditures 78,903,178 104,335,441 112,356,588 161,905,641
Total voted 1,519,645,867 1,500,988,827 1,546,172,484 1,559,820,912
Total Statutory 187,710,141 179,164,197 186,156,560 176,570,197
Total budgetary 1,707,356,008 1,680,153,024 1,732,329,044 1,736,391,109

Highlights

CBSA is estimating budgetary expenditures $1.7 billion in 2014–15. Of this amount, $1.6 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $176.6 million represents statutory forecasts related to the Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

CBSA increase in net spending of $56.2 million or 3.35% is due to an increase in Operating expenditures of $1.3 million, an increase in Capital costs of $57.5 million and a decrease of $2.6 million in Statutory expenditures (EBP).

Major items contributing to changes in year-over-year funding levels include increases of:

  • $116.3 million in reprofiles from 2013–14 to 2014–15 to realign project funding such as Refugee Reform, E-Manifest and Arming;
  • $91.4 million of funding for initiatives included in the Beyond the Border Action Plan such as for the modernization of Border Infrastructure, development of a Single Window approach and the Entry/Exit initiative that will enable the Government of Canada to know that an individual has entered or left the country;
  • $6.9 million of Top-up funding for the Temporary Resident and Citizenship programs to keep up with increased volume demands;
  • $2.6 million increase for the eligible funding for all new collective bargaining agreements; and
  • $1.4 million to fund the Toronto 2015 Pan and Parapan American Games

The increases in the 2014–15 Main Estimates are offset by the following decreases:

  • $70.6 million related to the Budget 2012 spending review (last phase);
  • $23.0 million as a result of a transfer to Shared Services Canada (SSC) for expenditures related to End User Devices (software) and the Shared Infrastructure Platform. These costs have been centralized with SSC for all departments and the CBSA’s portion is $3.5 million for the End User Devices and $19.5 million for the Shared Infrastructure Platform;
  • $21.9 million due to decrease in funding requirement for detection equipment;
  • $15.3 million which was received in 2013–14 to complete the definition phase of CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management project;
  • $11.8 million due to an adjustment of the EBP rate decrease from 17.4% to 16.5%;
  • $9.1 million decrease of project funding requirements for the Postal Modernization Initiative;
  • $3.1 million of the project funding requirements reflecting the need in 2014–15 for the Electronic Applications for Enhanced Trusted Trader and Traveler Programs;
  • $2.0 million decrease of project funding requirement to expand the commercial processing facilities at St-Bernard de Lacolle in 2013–14;
  • $1.9 million decrease in funding for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan;
  • $1.9 million transfer from CBSA to Foreign Affair, Trade and Development and International Trade Canada to provide support to departmental staff located at missions abroad;
  • $1.6 million reduction of Travel Costs under the government-wide reduction initiative (Budget 2013).

CBSA is currently reviewing its recording and reporting of expenditures to ensure that program expenditures are not included in internal Services.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 14. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Border Services Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada’s border and Canada’s population is protected from border-related risks.  
Admissibility Determination 586,293,558 630,828,800 681,725,979
Immigration Enforcement 150,469,520 144,658,085 164,911,279
Risk Assessment Program 121,511,557 139,253,528 155,301,134
Revenue and Trade Management 73,463,331 74,836,493 73,918,165
Secure and Trusted Partnerships 31,564,355 46,555,054 42,062,245
Criminal Investigations 26,441,935 23,619,993 23,391,775
Recourse 11,118,094 9,971,032 9,832,518
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 706,493,658 610,430,039 585,248,014
Total 1,707,356,008 1,680,153,024 1,736,391,109

Canada Council for the Arts

Raison d’être

The Canada Council for the Arts (CCA) is a Crown corporation created in 1957 “to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts.” Its grants to artists and arts organizations contribute to a vibrant arts scene in Canada. Its awards celebrate creativity by recognizing exceptional Canadians in the arts, humanities and sciences. The Canada Council Art Bank is a national collection of over 17,000 Canadian contemporary artworks, accessible to the public through rental, loan and outreach programs. The Canadian Commission for UNESCO operates under the general authority of the Canada Council.

The CCA reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 7. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Council for the Arts

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 15. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Council for the Arts
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canada Council for the Arts 181,367,816 180,260,816 181,437,817 182,092,916
Total voted 181,367,816 180,260,816 181,437,817 182,092,916
Total budgetary 181,367,816 180,260,816 181,437,817 182,092,916

Highlights

CCA’s planned expenditures for 2014–15 remain the same as for 2013–14. The CCA is continuing to implement its 2011–2016 Corporate Plan “Strengthening Connections” which has five directions (individual artists, arts organizations, equity, partnership and internal capacity) as well as three cross-cutting themes (public engagement in the arts, synergy and new technologies). Main areas of activity include:

  • Major program reviews, most notably of operating grants, which represent the Council’s largest investment;
  • Continuing work on cross-cutting priorities, including public engagement in the arts, national and international market access and Deaf and Disability Arts; and
  • Improving the Council’s internal capacity, including systems modernization and improved performance measurement.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 16. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Council for the Arts
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A vibrant and dynamic arts sector in Canada.  
Grants and services to support creation, production and dissemination of arts for individuals and organizations 0 159,681,924 161,403,170
Arts promotion to foster public knowledge and appreciation of the Canadian arts and culture 0 8,300,486 8,322,657
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 12,278,406 12,367,089
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 181,367,816 0 0
Total 181,367,816 180,260,816 182,092,916

Canada Industrial Relations Board

Raison d’être

The Canada Industrial Relations Board (the CIRB or the Board) contributes to and promotes a harmonious industrial relations climate in federally regulated sectors and seeks to provide effective and appropriate dispute resolution services for its client community in a fair and timely manner. Established in 1999 to replace the previous Canada Labour Relations Board, the CIRB is an independent, representative, quasi-judicial tribunal, responsible for the interpretation and application of Part I of the Canada Labour Code (the Code), which establishes the framework for collective bargaining, the acquisition and termination of bargaining rights, determination of unfair labour practices and protection of public health and safety in the event of work stoppages affecting essential services. The Board also administers certain provisions of Part II of the Code related to Occupational Health and Safety. Since April 1, 2013, the Board is also responsible for the interpretation and application of Part II of the Status of the Artist Act.

The Minister of Labour is responsible for the Canada Industrial Relations Board.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 8. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Industrial Relations Board

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 17. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Industrial Relations Board
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 11,335,040 11,916,532 11,916,532 11,823,711
Total voted 11,335,040 11,916,532 11,916,532 11,823,711
Total Statutory 1,451,076 1,637,433 1,637,433 1,540,245
Total budgetary 12,786,116 13,553,965 13,553,965 13,363,956

Highlights

In pursuing its mandate, the CIRB seeks to achieve the following strategic outcome: Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code and professional relations in sectors regulated by Part II of the Status of the Artist Act. In order to achieve this objective, the Board will continue to focus its efforts on maintaining its current rate of disposition of new cases so as to ensure that a backlog does not recur. This will be achieved through effective case management and proactive mediation assistance at all stages of a case. The CIRB will also proactively seek resolution of matters that best meets the needs of the parties to a dispute through mediation assistance by regional staff and Board members.

The Board will focus on two initiatives in 2014–15:

  • In Budget 2012, the CIRB was assigned the responsibility of administering the Status of the Artist Act. The CIRB implemented the transition during 2013–14 and has undertaken a full review of the procedural regulations to ensure policies and procedures under the Act are aligned with the Board’s practices. It is expected that this work will continue into 2014–15 as the new regulations are drafted and implemented, and steps are taken to inform the client community.
  • It is essential to the CIRB’s ability to deliver on its mandate economically, efficiently and effectively, that it embrace and maximise new technologies with a view to improving document and information management and delivery of services. The CIRB actively participated in the Treasury Board Secretariat-led initiative aimed at identifying and contracting for a common case management system. In the year ahead, the CIRB will focus its efforts on a transition to the new common system that will build on synergies between similar organizations and mitigate the pressures associated with an aging system and its costly renewal.

The decrease in the Board’s Estimates is mainly due to the transitional funding provided in 2013–14 to compensate the Board for its planned additional responsibilities related to the Status of the Artist Act that is not being renewed in 2014–15. The variance between 2012–13 expenditures and 2013–14 Estimates is directly related to the transitional funding received in 2013–14 to compensate the Board for its planned additional responsibilities related to the Status of the Artist Act.

More information on the Board’s plans and priorities can be found in the Board’s 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities, available on CIRB’s Website.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 18. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Industrial Relations Board
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code and professional relations in sectors regulated by the Status of the Artist Act.  
Adjudication and Dispute Resolution Program 9,103,648 9,905,354 9,678,448
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 3,682,468 3,648,611 3,685,508
Total 12,786,116 13,553,965 13,363,956

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Raison d’être

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) is Canada’s national housing agency. Established as a federal Crown corporation in 1946 to help address post-war housing shortages, its role has evolved as Canadians’ needs have changed. Today, CMHC works closely with provinces, territories and the private and not-for-profit sectors to help lower-income Canadians access affordable, better quality housing. CMHC also helps Aboriginal Canadians meet their distinct housing needs.

CMHC’s role in housing finance — providing mortgage loan insurance and securitization guarantee products — contributes to the health and stability of Canada’s housing finance system and facilitates access to financing for housing across the country. This includes loans for housing in small and rural communities, rental housing and for nursing and retirement homes.

CMHC also promotes the efficiency of the Canadian housing system through research, market analysis and information transfer.

CMHC is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Employment and Social Development.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 9. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 10. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 19. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Reimbursement under the provisions of the National Housing Act and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Act 2,086,397,954 2,100,578,000 2,100,578,000 2,097,353,000
Total voted 2,086,397,954 2,100,578,000 2,100,578,000 2,097,353,000
Total budgetary 2,086,397,954 2,100,578,000 2,100,578,000 2,097,353,000
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory (3,471,553,310) (41,866,564,000) (41,866,564,000) (10,880,408,000)
Total non-budgetary (3,471,553,310) (41,866,564,000) (41,866,564,000) (10,880,408,000)

Highlights

CMHC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.1 billion in 2014–15 and non-budgetary net repayments of $10.9 billion. Included in the budgetary expenditures is $253.1 million related to the first year of the five-year extension of funding under the Investment in Affordable Housing and $70 million in funding for housing in Nunavut, as announced in the Economic Action Plan 2013. Major changes are summarized below.

A net budgetary decrease of $3.2 million from the 2013–14 Main Estimates is due primarily to the following:

  • A decrease of $78.1 million due to the results of the Budget 2012 spending review;
  • An increase of $70.0 million in funding for housing in Nunavut;
  • An increase of $4.0 million for additional housing construction and rehabilitation On-Reserve. This funding allows for new commitment activity to assist First Nations in the construction, purchase and rehabilitation of suitable, adequate and affordable rental housing as well as providing financial assistance to repair substandard homes to a minimum level of health and safety.

A non-budgetary increase of $31.0 billion is due to lower net repayments under the Crown Borrowing Program resulting from lower loan repayments under the Insured Mortgage Purchase Program (IMPP). The majority of the IMPP repayments took place in 2013–14. The 2014–15 repayments represent the final obligations under this program.

As Canada’s national housing agency, CMHC plays a significant role in administering federal investments in social housing through agreements with provinces and territories and First Nation communities. CMHC also provides federal funding towards renovation programs so that needed repairs or rehabilitation could be undertaken for seniors, persons with disabilities, victims of family violence and others who could otherwise not afford adequate and suitable housing.

CMHC is the only source of comprehensive market analysis information serving both industry and consumers. Its research and information transfer activities on key housing issues have been instrumental in helping Canadians make more informed housing choices. These activities also support industry in the planning, designing, construction operation and maintenance of housing, and assist the public policy decision-making process. Better information contributes to the stability, effectiveness and efficiency of housing markets.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in CMHC’s Summary of the Corporate Plan, available on its website.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 20. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadians in need have access to affordable housing.  
Funding Under Long-Term Commitments for Existing Social Housing 1,706,035,149 1,752,401,000 1,681,525,000
Funding for New Commitments of Affordable Housing 320,772,707 293,702,000 361,820,000
Housing Support 4,845,345 7,574,000 7,474,000
Canada has a stable, competitive and innovative housing system.  
Market Analysis Information 18,036,004 23,902,000 25,078,000
Housing Policy, Research and Information Transfer 30,522,299 22,999,000 21,456,000
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 6,186,450 0 0
Total 2,086,397,954 2,100,578,000 2,097,353,000

Table 21. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadians in need have access to affordable housing.  
Funding Under Long-Term Commitments for Existing Social Housing (207,757,942) (387,216,000) (313,739,000)
Funding for New Commitments of Affordable Housing 0 500,000 500,000
Housing Support (111,422,844) (159,778,000) (133,125,000)
Canada has a stable, competitive and innovative housing system.  
Insured Mortgage Purchase Program (3,152,372,524) (41,320,070,000) (10,434,044,000)
Total (3,471,553,310) (41,866,564,000) (10,880,408,000)

Canada Post Corporation

Raison d’être

Canada Post Corporation has a mandate to provide an efficient, effective and quality-driven postal service to Canadians, to be profitable, and to maintain and increase the value of the Corporation for Canadians.

The Minister of Transport is responsible for this organization.

Under the terms of the Canada Post Corporation Act, the Corporation is mandated to operate the postal service on a financially self-sustaining basis. In addition to core postal service, Canada Post also delivers certain public policy programs for the Government.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 11. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Post Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 22. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Post Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canada Post Corporation for special purposes 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Total voted 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Total budgetary 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000

Highlights

Canada Post Corporation receives an annual appropriation of $22.2 million from the Government for the delivery of Parliamentary mail and materials for the use of the blind, which are sent free of postage under the Act. This appropriation helps to offset the financial impact of these programs on the corporation.

Parliamentary Mail

The Canada Post Corporation Act allows for the free mailing of letters between Canadians and the Governor General, Members of Parliament, the Speakers of the Senate and House of Commons, the Parliamentary Librarian and the Ethics Commissioner. Under the Act members of the House of Commons are also allowed up to four free householder (Unaddressed Admail) mailings to their constituents in any calendar year.

Materials for the Use of the Blind

The Canada Post Corporation Act provides for free mailing of materials for the blind. Today, thousands of visually impaired Canadians and many libraries across the country, including that of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, send talking books and other materials free of charge.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 23. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Post Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Compensation for the provision of Parliamentary mail and Materials for the use of the blind services, which are sent free of postage under the Canada Post Corporation Act.  
Concessionary Governmental Services 0 22,210,000 22,210,000
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 22,210,000 0 0
Total 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000

Canada Revenue Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of National Revenue is responsible for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The CRA is responsible for administering, assessing, and collecting hundreds of billions of dollars in taxes annually. The tax revenue it collects is used by federal, provincial, territorial and First Nations governments to fund the programs and services that contribute to the quality of life of Canadians. The CRA also uses its federal infrastructure to deliver billions of dollars in benefits, tax credits, and other services that support the economic and social well-being of Canadian families, children and persons with disabilities. In carrying out its mandate, the CRA strives to ensure that Canadians:

  • pay their required share of taxes;
  • receive their rightful share of entitlements; and
  • are provided with an impartial and responsive review of contested decisions.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 12. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Revenue Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 24. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Revenue Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures, contributions and recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan and the Employment Insurance Act 3,265,374,223 3,046,330,734 3,039,745,085 2,877,504,675
5 Capital expenditures and recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan and the Employment Insurance Act 45,812,715 73,081,967 73,081,967 72,447,985
Total voted 3,311,186,938 3,119,412,701 3,112,827,052 2,949,952,660
Total Statutory 1,007,281,205 1,157,410,552 905,325,674 911,303,449
Total budgetary 4,318,468,143 4,276,823,253 4,018,152,726 3,861,256,109

Highlights

CRA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $3.9 billion in 2014-2015. Of this amount, $3.0 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $0.9 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total the Agency is expecting a decrease of $415.6 million or 9.7% from previous Main Estimates, which is the net result of various increases offset by certain planned decreases.

The CRA budgets will be increasing by $53.7 million due to the following:

  • $22.3 million for collective agreements;
  • $17.0 million for the upgrade of the personal income tax processing system;
  • $8.0 million in payments under the Children’s Special Allowance Act for eligible children in the care of agencies and foster parents;
  • $5.4 million for the implementation and administration of various tax measures announced in the 2012 Federal Budget; and
  • $1.0 million for government advertising programs.

The above mentioned increases are offset by the following decreases totalling $469.3 million due to the following:

  • $203.0 million related to the disbursements to provinces under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act;
  • $119.0 million in savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review;
  • $57.6 million in savings identified as part of the Budget 2013 Targeted Review;
  • $20.0 million decrease related to contributions to employee benefit plans;
  • $19.7 million related to adjustments to accommodation and real property services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada;
  • $18.7 million related to the transfer of the end-user device software budget as well as adjustments to funding previously transferred to Shared Services Canada;
  • $12.4 million in the spending of revenues received through the conduct of its operations primarily attributable to reductions in initiatives administered on behalf of Canada Border Services Agency and the province of Ontario;
  • $9.2 million related to the planned decrease in funding for the administration of the Harmonized Sales Tax for Ontario, British Columbia and the Affordable Living Tax Credit for Nova Scotia;
  • $6.9 million related to the return of funding previously provided for the ongoing administration of the Harmonized Sales Tax in British Columbia;
  • $2.1 million in savings identified as part of the Budget 2013 to reduce travel costs; and
  • $0.7 million for various initiatives announced in the 2010 and 2011 Federal Budgets.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 25. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Revenue Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Taxpayers meet their obligations and Canada’s revenue base is protected.  
Reporting Compliance 1,170,473,553 1,015,345,341 1,054,502,522
Assessment of Returns and Payment Processing 643,799,856 595,716,794 597,018,261
Collections and Returns Compliance 512,217,726 427,902,247 440,164,211
Taxpayer and Business Assistance 453,280,238 538,836,440 350,017,682
Appeals 192,046,153 178,609,564 194,334,428
Eligible families and individuals receive timely and accurate benefit payments.  
Benefit Programs 383,719,460 382,509,653 390,354,003
Taxpayers and benefit recipients receive an independent and impartial review of their service-related complaints.  
Taxpayers’ Ombudsman 2,622,557 3,098,063 3,167,366
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 960,308,600 1,134,805,151 831,697,636
Total 4,318,468,143 4,276,823,253 3,861,256,109

Canada School of Public Service

Raison d’être

The Canada School of Public Service (CSPS) is the common learning service provider for the Public Service of Canada. CSPS has a legislative mandate to provide a range of learning activities to build individual and organizational capacity and management excellence within the Public Service. It has one strategic goal, to ensure public servants have the common knowledge and leadership and management competencies required to effectively serve Canada and Canadians.

The President of the Treasury Board is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 13. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada School of Public Service

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 26. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada School of Public Service
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 45,452,288 42,231,200 42,231,200 39,921,868
Total voted 45,452,288 42,231,200 42,231,200 39,921,868
Total Statutory 51,812,939 56,233,121 56,233,121 45,568,160
Total budgetary 97,265,227 98,464,321 98,464,321 85,490,028

Highlights

CSPS is estimating budgetary expenditures of $85.5 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $39.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $45.6 million represents statutory authority that does not require additional approval and is provided for information purposes.

A decrease of $13 million in spending is expected in 2014–15 primarily due to the reduction of expenditures for salaries and professional and special services.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities available at: http://www.csps-efpc.gc.ca/about_us/currentreport/index-eng.aspx.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 27. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada School of Public Service
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Public Servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.  
Foundational Learning 48,891,757 55,958,215 41,636,392
Organizational Leadership Development 8,482,245 10,546,028 10,686,736
Public Sector Management Innovation 9,499,142 9,178,036 9,248,810
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 30,392,083 22,782,042 23,918,090
Total 97,265,227 98,464,321 85,490,028

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

Raison d’être

The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) is a Crown corporation with the mandate to protect the public by securing critical elements of the air transportation system as assigned by the Government of Canada. CATSA’s goal is to provide a professional, effective, efficient and consistent level of security screening services, at or above the standards set by Transport Canada, its regulator. Fully funded by parliamentary appropriations, CATSA is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Transport. CATSA’s vision is to excel as a world leader in air transportation security through its service to passengers, its people and its partnerships.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 14. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 28. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority for operating and capital expenditures 513,369,000 598,286,200 598,286,200 591,626,313
Total voted 513,369,000 598,286,200 598,286,200 591,626,313
Total budgetary 513,369,000 598,286,200 598,286,200 591,626,313

Highlights

CATSA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $591.6 million in 2014–15, which requires approval by Parliament. The planned expenditures are $6.7 million, or approximately 1.1% lower compared to $598.3 million in the 2013–14 Main Estimates.

The CATSA’s planned operating expenditures for 2014–15 of $473.5 million are $16.5 million or approximately 3.6% higher compared to $457.0 million in the 2013–14 Main Estimates. The increase in the operating budget is mainly a result of CATSA being granted financial flexibilities over the past few years to reallocate funds to better align with its cash flow requirements. This will allow CATSA to partially accommodate annual contractual increases in 2014–15.

The CATSA’s planned capital expenditures for 2014–15 of $118.2 million are $23.2 million or approximately 16.4% lower compared to $141.3 million in the 2013–14 Main Estimates. The year-over-year variance is attributable to capital spending associated with the deployment of CATSA’s new Hold Baggage Screening system which is based on a 10-year deployment schedule. Deployment of the new Hold Baggage Screening system remains on target to be completed in fiscal year 2019–20.

As set out in its 2013–14 to 2017–18 Corporate Plan Summary, CATSA’s funding priorities for 2014–15 will continue to focus on the delivery of its screening services and the ongoing implementation of its Hold Baggage Screening capital deployment plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 29. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Screening programs at designated Canadian airports protect the travelling public.  
Pre-Board Screening 0 310,270,544 319,300,039
Hold Baggage Screening 0 222,210,656 199,229,096
Non-Passenger Screening 0 13,360,000 17,043,000
Restricted Area Identity Card 0 3,763,000 4,126,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 48,682,000 51,928,178
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 513,369,000 0 0
Total 513,369,000 598,286,200 591,626,313

Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal

Raison d’être

Pursuant to a decision to accelerate by one year the provision in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, the Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal ceased its operations as of April 1, 2013.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 15. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 30. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
- Program expenditures 1,321,541 0 0 0
Total voted 1,321,541 0 0 0
Total Statutory 191,849 0 0 0
Total budgetary 1,513,390 0 0 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 31. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 1,513,390 0 0
Total 1,513,390 0 0

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Raison d’être

As defined by the 1991 Broadcasting Act, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (the Corporation), as the national public broadcaster, should provide radio and television services incorporating a wide range of programming that informs, enlightens and entertains. The programming provided by the Corporation should:

  • be predominantly and distinctively Canadian;
  • reflect Canada and its regions to national and regional audiences, while serving the special needs of those regions;
  • actively contribute to the flow and exchange of cultural expression;
  • be in English and in French, reflecting the different needs and circumstances of each official language community, including the particular needs and circumstances of English and French linguistic minorities;
  • strive to be of equivalent quality in English and French;
  • contribute to shared national consciousness and identity;
  • be made available throughout Canada by the most appropriate and efficient means and as resources become available for the purpose; and
  • reflect the multicultural and multiracial nature of Canada.

The Corporation reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 16. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 32. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for operating expenditures 999,484,060 956,913,060 956,913,060 929,278,212
5 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for working capital 4,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000
10 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for capital expenditures 103,035,000 103,856,000 103,856,000 104,740,000
Total voted 1,106,519,060 1,064,769,060 1,064,769,060 1,038,018,212
Total budgetary 1,106,519,060 1,064,769,060 1,064,769,060 1,038,018,212

Highlights

The Corporation’s 2014–15 Main Estimates are $1,038.0 million versus the 2013–14 Main Estimates of $1,064.8 million. The reduction of $26.8 million for 2014–15 is due to Budget 2012 spending review of $45.5 million, offset by salary inflation funding of $18.7 million.

Following results of the Departmental Spending Review included in Budget 2012, the Federal Government reduced the Corporation’s appropriation by $115 million over three years. The Corporation’s operating funding was reduced by $27.8 million in 2012–13 (deducted from the supplementary funds of $60.0 million received since 2001–02). In 2013–14, the operating appropriation was reduced by $69.6 million (annual supplementary funds of $60.0 million were eliminated completely and the difference of $9.6 million was reduced from the base operating appropriation). For 2014–15 and ongoing years, the Corporation’s operating appropriation will be reduced by an additional $45.5 million to finally arrive at a total reduction of $115.0 million per Budget 2012.

2014–15 will mark Year 4 of the Corporation’s five-year strategic plan, Strategy 2015: Everyone, Every way. The vision at the heart of the strategy is to be the recognized leader in expressing Canadian culture and to enrich democratic life of all Canadians.

Four guiding principles support the Corporation’s vision:

  • The creation and delivery of original, innovative, high-quality Canadian content.
  • That reflects and draws together all Canadians.
  • Actively engaging audiences.
  • While being cost-effective and accountable.

Three strategic thrusts drive our performance:

  • More Distinctly Canadian: Network programming and national public spaces;
  • More Regional: Regional presence and community spaces; and
  • More Digital: New platforms and digital spaces.

Despite ongoing challenges, the Corporation continues to implement its 2015 objectives. Further details of the Corporation’s performance and progress since the launch of Strategy 2015 can be found in the Corporation’s Annual Reports and Corporate Plans.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 33. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A national public broadcasting service exists that is primarily Canadian in content and connects citizens to the Canadian experience.  
Television, Radio and Digital Services 0 1,013,116,348 991,634,833
Transmission and Distribution of Programs 0 45,118,862 40,238,810
Specialty Channels for Specific Audiences 0 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 6,533,850 6,144,569
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 1,106,519,060 0 0
Total 1,106,519,060 1,064,769,060 1,038,018,212

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

Raison d’être

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) was founded by an Act of Parliament in 1978 with a mandate to promote health and safety in the workplace and to enhance the physical and mental health of working Canadians. CCOHS operates under the legislative authority of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Act S.C., 1977–78, c. 29 which was passed by unanimous vote in the Canadian Parliament. The purpose of this Act is to promote the fundamental right of Canadians to a healthy and safe working environment by creating a national institute (CCOHS) concerned with the study, encouragement and co-operative advancement of occupational health and safety. CCOHS functions as an independent departmental corporation under Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act and is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Labour. Its funding is derived from a combination of appropriations, cost recoveries and collaboration with the provinces. It is expected that a portion of the budget will be funded through cost recoveries from the creation, production, and worldwide sales of fee-for-service and revenue generating occupational health and safety products and services.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 17. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 34. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,353,993 3,853,172 3,853,172 3,978,250
Total voted 4,353,993 3,853,172 3,853,172 3,978,250
Total Statutory 1,103,322 1,117,980 1,117,980 1,080,791
Total budgetary 5,457,315 4,971,152 4,971,152 5,059,041

Highlights

CCOHS’s planned expenditures remain the same as last year. CCOHS will focus its efforts on providing a wide range of needed, relevant and practical information, resources and training that assist Canadians to improve health and safety. CCOHS will work with Canadian and global partners to develop the resources and tools that will improve health and safety and contribute to making Canada’s workplaces safe and more productive.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 35. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Improved workplace conditions and practices that enhance the health, safety, and well being of working Canadians.  
Occupational health and safety information development, delivery services and tripartite collaboration 3,006,921 2,189,806 2,251,329
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 2,450,394 2,781,346 2,807,712
Total 5,457,315 4,971,152 5,059,041

Canadian Commercial Corporation

Raison d’être

The Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) is governed by its enacting legislation, the 1946 Canadian Commercial Corporation Act. The Act outlines CCC’s broad mandate, which is to assist in the development of trade by helping Canadian exporters access markets abroad and by helping foreign buyers obtain goods from Canada. The legislation also provides CCC with a range of powers, including the ability to export goods from Canada either as principal or as agent in such a manner and to such an extent as it deems appropriate. As a result, CCC negotiates and executes bilateral government-to-government procurement arrangements, facilitating export transactions on behalf of Canadian exporters.

CCC reports to Parliament through the Minister of International Trade.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 18. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Commercial Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 36. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Commercial Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Commercial Corporation 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204
Total voted 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204
Total budgetary 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204

Highlights

CCC is estimating vote budgetary expenditures of $15.7 million in 2014–15 which require approval by Parliament. The funding will be used to facilitate sales of goods and services from Canadian exporters to the U.S Department of Defence in support of the North American Defence Industrial Base.

On all other export transactions, CCC charges fees for service. These fees support CCC’s other expenditures.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 37. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Commercial Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Enhanced market access for Canadian exporters to complex international public sector markets.  
Defence 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204
Emerging and Developing Markets 0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 0 0 0
Total 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,654,204

Canadian Dairy Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Dairy Commission (CDC) is a federal Crown corporation created in 1966 through the Canadian Dairy Commission Act. It reports to Parliament through the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. Its legislated objectives are twofold: to provide efficient producers of milk and cream with the opportunity of obtaining a fair return for their labour and investment; and to provide consumers of dairy products with a continuous and adequate supply of dairy products of high quality.

The CDC plays a central facilitating role for the multi-billion dollar Canadian dairy industry. Federal-provincial agreements now provide the authority for many of the programs and activities that the CDC employees administer and facilitate on a day-to-day basis. The CDC strives to balance and serve the interests of all dairy stakeholders — producers, processors, further processors, exporters, consumers and governments.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 19. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 20. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 38. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,985,810 3,610,936
Total voted 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,985,810 3,610,936
Total budgetary 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,985,810 3,610,936
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory 69,215,982 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 69,215,982 0 0 0

Highlights

The Canadian milk supply management system rests on three pillars: production management, price setting and import controls. The CDC is directly involved in the administration of two of the three pillars (production management and price setting) via the establishment of industrial milk quota and support prices.

The CDC administers the three revenue pooling and market sharing pools that exist among milk producers. Monthly, the CDC receives data from provincial milk marketing boards and calculates the payment transfers between provinces to equalize returns and adjusts quota allocations to provinces to account for the sharing of markets.

To ensure a steady supply of dairy products on the Canadian market, the CDC operates the Domestic Seasonality Programs. To ensure that milk components for which there is no outlet on the domestic market are removed in a timely fashion, the CDC operates the Surplus Removal Program. Furthermore, in order to promote the use of dairy products and ingredients in processed foods, the CDC operates the Dairy Marketing Program.

In addition, the CDC, on the industry’s behalf, administers the Special Milk Class Permit Program (SMCPP) and the Dairy Innovation Program. The parameters of these programs are decided by the industry.

The CDC imports the tariff rate quota of butter and sells this butter to participants in the SMCPP through butter manufacturers. Profits that the CDC generates by this activity are used to finance initiatives that provide benefits to the industry. Examples of these initiatives are graduate scholarships in Canadian establishments and the validation of dairy farms under the Canadian Quality Milk Program, an on-farm quality assurance program.

The CDC also controls the subsidized exports of Canadian dairy products through the issuance of export permits. This permit system has been put in place to ensure that Canadian exports of dairy products do not exceed the limits imposed on Canada by the World Trade Organization (WTO) for subsidized exports.

No significant changes are expected in the programs that the CDC administers in fiscal year 2014–15. Further details can be found in the Canadian Dairy Commission’s Corporate Plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 39. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
To enhance the vitality of the Canadian dairy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders.  
Administer milk supply management system 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,610,936
Total 4,086,096 3,985,810 3,610,936

Table 40. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
To enhance the vitality of the Canadian dairy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders.  
Administer milk supply management system 69,215,982 0 0
Total 69,215,982 0 0

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of the Environment is responsible for this organization.

Environmental assessment contributes to informed decision making in support of sustainable development. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency delivers high-quality environmental assessments and serves as the centre of expertise within the federal government on environmental assessment.

Additional information can be found in the Agency’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 21. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 41. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 26,140,619 28,142,126 28,142,126 28,227,786
Total voted 26,140,619 28,142,126 28,142,126 28,227,786
Total Statutory 1,808,206 2,863,886 2,863,886 2,736,320
Total budgetary 27,948,825 31,006,012 31,006,012 30,964,106

Highlights

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency’s 2014–15 Main Estimates of $31.0 million are similar to the Agency’s 2013–14 Main Estimates.

The Agency’s 2012–13 actual expenditures of $27.9 million are $3.0 million less than the 2014–15 Main Estimates. The difference is mainly attributable the Agency’s operating budget lapse and to lower than expected payments under the Participant Funding Program due to transition from the former Canadian Environmental Assessment Act to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012.

The renewal of funding programs that are sunsetting at the end of 2014–15 will be subject to government decision and will be reflected in future Main Estimates.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 42. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
High quality and timely environmental assessments of major projects to protect the environment and support economic growth.  
Environmental Assessment Delivery Program 15,029,356 19,274,780 17,032,000
Environmental Assessment Policy Program 3,045,780 4,263,059 4,871,106
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 9,873,689 7,468,173 9,061,000
Total 27,948,825 31,006,012 30,964,106

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 43. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions for the support of public participation in the environmental assessment review process – Participant Funding Program 1,993,668 4,469,000 4,469,500
Contribution to the Province of Quebec – James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement 245,500 246,000 245,500

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Raison d’être

The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada’s largest science-based regulatory agency. It has approximately 7,120 employees working across Canada, in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada’s people, environment, and economy.

CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services to:

  • prevent and manage food safety risks;
  • protect plant resources from pests, diseases and invasive species;
  • prevent and manage animal and zoonotic diseases;
  • contribute to consumer protection; and
  • contribute to market access for Canada’s food, plants, and animals.

CFIA bases its activities on science, effective management of risk, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its objectives.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 22. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Food Inspection Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 44. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures and contributions 598,623,500 534,383,158 563,381,169 470,029,881
5 Capital expenditures 31,533,159 17,815,785 22,166,374 24,264,263
Total voted 630,156,659 552,198,943 585,547,543 494,294,144
Total Statutory 151,899,066 135,686,461 139,793,653 125,033,591
Total budgetary 782,055,725 687,885,404 725,341,196 619,327,735

Highlights

The Government is committed to ensuring that Canadian families have confidence in the food they buy and eat. As announced on October 9th, 2013, the three bodies of the Canadian food safety regime - the CFIA, Health Canada, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) fall under the responsibility of the Minister of Health. This reporting change brings all federal food safety authorities under one Minister with the goal of creating a stronger system with better collaboration and communication.

The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food will continue to be responsible for the CFIA’s non-food safety agricultural activities, including economic and trade issues, as well as important animal health and plant protection work. As such, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food will continue to oversee the CFIA in exercising these responsibilities.

The 2014–15 Main Estimates for the CFIA total $619.3 million, a decrease of $68.6 million from the 2013–14 Main Estimates of $687.9 million. The major items included in this decrease are:

  • A decrease of $45.8 million due to implementation of savings measures announced in Budget 2012;
  • A decrease of $41.5 million related to sunsetting of program funding in 2014–15 for which the CFIA plans to seek renewal: $36.9 million related to resources received to continue a comprehensive strategy for managing Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in Canada and $4.6 million related to resources to support the implementation of measures to enhance international pork marketing; and,
  • A decrease of $3.0 million related to the sunsetting of resources transferred from Health Canada to fund the cost of enforcement of the proposed regulatory amendments related to enhanced allergen labelling.

These decreases are offset by:

  • An increase of $14.7 million related to the renewal of resources to enhance the CFIA’s ability to prevent, detect and respond to food-borne illness outbreaks. These resources were first approved in Budget 2009 for three years and were renewed in Budget 2012 for an additional four years;
  • An increase of $5.2 million to establish inspection verification teams to oversee the performance of the food safety system; and,
  • An increase of $2.9 million related to the Canada Border Services Agency led Single Window Initiative and Trusted Traders and Trusted Travellers program initiative, as outlined in the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

The 2013–14 Estimates to Date are approximately $37.4 million higher than the 2013–14 Main Estimates. This increase can be explained by resources received via Supplementary Estimates (B), which were approved by Parliament.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities available at http://www.inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/accountability/reports-to-parliament/eng/1299845094675/1299845189161

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 45. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base.  
Food Safety Program 353,600,998 312,185,374 320,103,652
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program 175,425,417 131,587,718 89,781,512
Plant Resources Program 88,983,164 84,260,734 75,006,452
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements 33,338,750 31,697,693 25,382,494
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 130,707,396 128,153,885 109,053,625
Total 782,055,725 687,885,404 619,327,735

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 46. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions in support of the Federal Assistance Program 1,461,771 700,000 707,000
Contributions to the provinces in accordance with the Rabies Indemnification Regulations of the Governor in Council of amounts not exceeding two-fifths of the amounts paid by the provinces to owners of animals dying as a result of rabies infection 0 112,000 112,000

Canadian Grain Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) is a federal government agency that administers the provisions of the Canada Grain Act (CGA). The CGC’s mandate as set out in the CGA is to, in the interests of the grain producers, establish and maintain standards of quality for Canadian grain and regulate grain handling in Canada, to ensure a dependable commodity for domestic and export markets. CGC’s vision is to be “A leader in delivering excellence and innovation in grain quality and quantity assurance, research, and producer protection”. The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for the CGC.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 23. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Grain Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 47. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Grain Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 31,629,611 21,582,235 34,030,661 7,537,076
Total voted 31,629,611 21,582,235 34,030,661 7,537,076
Total Statutory 5,504,635 585,473 3,537,992 8,846,818
Total budgetary 37,134,246 22,167,708 37,568,653 16,383,894

Highlights

The CGC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $16.4 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $7.5 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $8.9 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. $6.4 million of the statutory amount is to support severance payments. The remaining $2.5 million is to support employee benefit plan obligations.

The decrease in net authority of $5.8 million from 2013–14 Main Estimates is due to:

  • The decrease of $16.8 million to transition the CGC to a sustainable funding model as identified in Budget 2012;
  • The increase of $3.1 million to support employees affected by work force adjustment; and
  • The increase in access to the CGC Revolving Fund surplus of $7.9 million for severance obligations.

The current CGC funding structure is based on budgetary authorities that are comprised of both statutory and voted authorities. The statutory authorities include employee benefit plan authority for appropriation funded positions and the CGC revolving fund authority which allows the CGC to re-spend fees that it has collected. The voted authority is Vote 1 – Program Expenditures which includes annual appropriation authority and any ad hoc appropriation authority for the fiscal year.

A revolving fund was set up for the CGC in 1995 with the expectation that the CGC would be largely self-funded through fees for service. The CGC updated its user fee structure on August 1, 2013 to become self-funded. The CGC transitioned to its new fee structure in 2013–14 and revenues are expected to increase to $54.1 million in 2014–15.

Additional information can be found in the CGC’s Reports on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 48. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Grain Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canada’s grain is safe, reliable and marketable and Canadian grain producers are properly compensated for grain deliveries to licensed grain companies.  
Grain Quality Research Program 11,055,383 5,282,058 6,666,018
Quality Assurance Program 7,979,898 8,307,568 6,140,408
Quantity Assurance Program (331,197) 2,480,557 1,529,609
Producer Protection Program 3,380,408 1,203,892 278,359
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 15,049,754 4,893,633 1,769,500
Total 37,134,246 22,167,708 16,383,894

Canadian Heritage

Raison d’être

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

The Department of Canadian Heritage and Canada’s major national cultural institutions play a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians. We work together to support culture, arts, heritage, official languages, citizenship and participation, in addition to Aboriginal, youth, and sport initiatives.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 24. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Heritage

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 49. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Heritage
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 178,306,584 162,928,160 165,068,924 178,337,991
5 Grants and contributions 1,041,770,492 1,131,552,460 1,133,745,259 1,187,709,835
Total voted 1,220,077,076 1,294,480,620 1,298,814,183 1,366,047,826
Total Statutory 27,350,479 22,745,046 22,745,046 24,002,161
Total budgetary 1,247,427,555 1,317,225,666 1,321,559,229 1,390,049,987

Highlights

The Department of Canadian Heritage is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1.39 billion in 2014–15. Of this amount, $1.37 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $24.0 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. This is an increase of $72.8 million when compared to the 2013–14 Main Estimates.

The net increase is a combination of an increase of $15.4 million in Vote 1 (Operating expenditures), an increase of $56.1 million in Vote 5 (Grants and contributions) and an increase of $1.3 million in statutory forecasts. The increase of $15.4 million in Vote 1 is mainly due to:

  • An increase of $14.2 million for the transfer of the Capital Experience Program from the National Capital Commission; and
  • An increase of $1.8 million for the transfer from Public Works and Government Services Canada for a reduction in accommodation requirements.

The increase of $56.1 million in Vote 5 is mainly due to:

  • An increase of $71.6 million for the 2015 Pan-Am Games;
  • An increase of $3.9 million for the renewal of the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality;
  • A decrease of $4.7 million for the Aboriginal Peoples’ Program;
  • A decrease of $4.0 million for the Hosting Program due to the reprofile for the 2013 Canada Games Travel;
  • A decrease of $3.7 million for the bicentennial commemoration of the War of 1812;
  • A decrease of $3.0 million for the Sport Support Program - ParticipAction and Le Grand défi Pierre Lavoie due to the program funding that was scheduled to sunset at the end of fiscal year 2013–14; and
  • A decrease of $2.0 million for TV5 due to a portion of the program funding that was scheduled to sunset at the end of fiscal year 2013–14.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 50. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Heritage
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.  
Official Languages 359,434,835 348,369,118 353,135,274
Attachment to Canada 79,587,588 56,919,095 64,436,036
Engagement and Community Participation 47,473,128 46,062,796 44,583,276
Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.  
Cultural Industries 304,377,508 299,943,524 302,346,433
Arts 117,834,528 117,779,195 116,604,709
Heritage 40,005,590 40,332,638 39,577,341
Canadians participate and excel in sport.  
Sport 224,955,539 332,917,526 398,057,989
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 73,758,839 74,901,774 71,308,929
Total 1,247,427,555 1,317,225,666 1,390,049,987

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 51. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Heritage
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to the Canada Periodical Fund 69,975,611 72,775,054 72,775,054
Grants in support of the Development of Official-Language Communities Program 7,642,617 33,322,973 33,322,973
Grants to the Athlete Assistance Program 27,364,917 28,000,000 28,000,000
Grants to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund 15,947,335 19,038,432 19,038,432
Grants in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program 9,636,449 14,355,000 14,355,000
Grants to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund 8,440,812 10,500,000 10,500,000
Grants to the Canada Book Fund 1,521,806 8,300,000 8,300,000
Grant to TV5 Monde 6,375,084 8,500,000 8,000,000
Grants in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program 6,449,660 7,300,000 8,000,000
Grants in support of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program 395,793 5,599,842 5,599,842
Grants under the Museums Assistance Program 2,136,187 4,663,680 4,663,680
Grants to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund 1,716,070 3,000,000 3,000,000
Grants to the Canada Music Fund 0 2,000,000 2,000,000
Grants to support the Aboriginal Peoples’ Program 82,604 1,340,000 1,340,000
Grants in support of the Canada History Fund 0 1,150,060 1,150,060
Grants to the Lieutenant-Governors of the provinces of Canada toward defraying the costs incurred in the exercise of their duties:      
Quebec 147,372 147,372 147,372
Ontario 95,000 105,627 105,627
British Columbia 97,814 97,814 97,814
Newfoundland 77,590 77,590 77,590
Alberta 75,940 75,940 75,940
Manitoba 73,762 73,762 73,762
Saskatchewan 73,758 73,758 73,758
Nova Scotia 64,199 64,199 64,199
New Brunswick 62,947 62,947 62,947
Prince Edward Island 57,071 57,071 57,071
Grants in support of Innovative Youth Exchange Projects 0 100,000 100,000
Contributions
Contributions for the Hosting Program 33,072,773 146,109,211 213,752,765
Contributions in support of the Development of Official-Language Communities Program 216,896,354 188,349,017 191,099,017
Contributions for the Sport Support Program 149,848,063 145,815,064 142,815,064
Contributions to support the Canada Media Fund 134,146,077 134,146,077 134,146,077
Contributions in support of the Enhancement of Official Languages Program 115,753,432 105,923,289 105,923,289
Contributions to the Canada Book Fund 34,872,656 28,366,301 28,366,301
Contributions to the Canada Arts Training Fund 22,450,000 22,779,440 22,779,440
Contributions to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund 24,783,550 24,358,613 22,508,613
Contributions to the Canada Music Fund 24,681,586 20,789,231 21,939,231
Contributions to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund 20,166,597 18,472,742 18,472,742
Contributions in support of the Exchanges Canada Initiative 17,562,353 17,686,359 17,686,359
Contributions to support the Aboriginal Peoples’ Program 15,938,791 16,209,757 11,514,078
Contributions under the Museums Assistance Program 12,407,263 11,076,284 11,076,284
Contributions in support of the Canada History Fund 4,898,042 2,937,330 5,037,330
Contributions in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program 8,610,758 3,300,000 3,300,000
Contributions to Fathers of Confederation Buildings Trust, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 3,000,000 3,005,000 3,005,000
Contributions to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund 5,239,242 2,933,773 2,993,273
Contributions to TV5 4,981,587 4,460,900 2,960,900
Contributions in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program 15,014,376 7,194,367 2,494,367
Contributions to the Canada Periodical Fund 2,215,848 1,999,544 1,999,544
Contributions to support the Youth Take Charge Program 4,177,209 3,453,023 1,453,023
Contributions in support of the Court Challenges Program 495,000 1,406,017 1,406,017

Canadian Human Rights Commission

Raison d’être

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Human Rights Commission was established in 1977 under Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act in accordance with the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). The Commission leads the administration of the CHRA and ensures compliance with the Employment Equity Act (EEA). The CHRA prohibits discrimination and the EEA promotes equality in the workplace. Both laws apply the principles of equal opportunity and non-discrimination to federal government departments and agencies, Crown corporations, and federally regulated private sector organizations.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 25. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 52. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Human Rights Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 21,475,813 19,861,118 19,861,118 19,639,234
Total voted 21,475,813 19,861,118 19,861,118 19,639,234
Total Statutory 2,907,363 2,600,171 2,600,171 2,460,492
Total budgetary 24,383,176 22,461,289 22,461,289 22,099,726

Highlights

The Canadian Human Rights Commission is estimating budgetary expenditures of $22.1 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $19.6 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $2.5 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The variance between 2012–13 expenditures and 2013–14 Main Estimates and the variance between 2013–14 and 2014–15 Main Estimates is mainly due to funding received for the repeal of section 67 of the Canadian Human Right Act (CHRA). This funding decreased and will sunset in March 2014.

Over the next year, the Commission will focus on:

  • Identifying the cases involving Aboriginal women, prioritizing those cases and targeting litigation activities, where it is in the public interest to do so;
  • Fostering dialogue and understanding among stakeholders to identify strategies to help overcome barriers that limit access to human rights justice for the most vulnerable, especially Aboriginal women;
  • Leading collaboration with key partners to advance progress on systemic human rights issues; and,
  • Reviewing the Management Results and Resources Structure to better reflect the Commission’s focus on promotion and protection;

Further detail can be found in the Commission’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 53. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Equality, respect for human rights and protection from discrimination by fostering understanding of, and compliance with, the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Employment Equity Act by federally regulated employers and service providers, as well as the public they serve.  
Human Rights Dispute Resolution Program 9,241,670 8,997,200 9,532,800
Human Rights Knowledge Development and Dissemination Program 4,123,976 3,440,600 3,436,700
Discrimination Prevention Program 4,224,128 4,000,200 3,188,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 6,793,402 6,023,289 5,942,226
Total 24,383,176 22,461,289 22,099,726

Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

Raison d’être

The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal is a an administrative tribunal that hears complaints of discrimination referred by the Canadian Human Rights Commission and determines whether the activities complained of violate the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). The purpose of the CHRA is to protect individuals from discrimination and to promote equal opportunity. The Tribunal also decides cases brought under the Employment Equity Act (EEA) and, pursuant to section 11 of the CHRA, determines allegations of wage disparity between men and women doing work of equal value in the same establishment.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 26. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 54. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 3,858,108 4,117,747 4,117,747 4,145,232
Total voted 3,858,108 4,117,747 4,117,747 4,145,232
Total Statutory 361,501 403,636 403,636 387,293
Total budgetary 4,219,609 4,521,383 4,521,383 4,532,525

Highlights

The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal is a small, permanent administrative tribunal comprising a full-time Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson, and up to 13 full- or part-time members. The Chairperson is the chief executive officer of the Tribunal and is supported by the Executive Director and Registrar who is responsible for registry operations and internal services

As a key mechanism of human rights protection in Canada, the Tribunal gives effect to the Canadian ideals of pluralism, equity, diversity and social inclusion. It provides a forum where human rights complaints can be scrutinized and resolved and provides definitive interpretations on important issues of discrimination. The primary result of the Tribunal’s program is that complainants can air their grievances and achieve closure in a respectful, impartial forum. Moreover, respondents are able to test the validity of allegations made in a quasi-judicial setting. In the longer term, Tribunal decisions create meaningful legal precedents for use by employers, service providers and Canadians at large.

The Tribunal has an ongoing planning challenge in that the Tribunal’s sole function is to inquire into matters referred to it under the Employment Equity Act (EEA) and matters referred by the Canadian Human Rights Commission under the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). As such, the Tribunal’s operational activities are driven by external demands that it can only react to rather than anticipate. Legislative changes the CHRA and other enabling legislations, increase complexity of cases, increase number of unrepresented parties and being a demand-driven organization all have an impact on the Tribunal’s ability to predict its workload.

Complaints alleging discriminatory funding by the Federal Government of various services on-reserve are starting to be referred to the Tribunal. These cases can pose unique challenges such as: the need to respect cultural practices and beliefs; access to justice challenges; the possible involvement of inter-jurisdictional agreements and other instruments; and the characterization of “funding” in the context of the Canadian Human Rights Act.

Another identifiable factor contributing to the Tribunal’s unpredictable workload is the effect of the repeal of section 67 of the CHRA. The Tribunal is only now starting to deal with discrimination claims in respect of decisions made pursuant to the Indian Act. It is too soon to see what the volume of these cases will be, however, it is possible that they will present the Tribunal with novel statutory interpretation challenges in giving due regard to First Nations legal traditions and customary laws.

A third factor contributing to the Tribunal’s unpredictable workload is that more and more complainants and respondents are representing themselves or designating individuals who are not lawyers to represent them. These individuals or their representatives may not be familiar with the issue identification procedures and disclosure rules, or be able to comply with them in a timely fashion. The logistics and procedural complexities associated with non- represented parties, including trying to navigate a quasi-judicial process, leads to increased numbers of motions and rulings, cancelling or rescheduling hearing dates, all of which has an effect on the scheduling of other cases.

All of these factors contribute to the increase pressures on the Tribunal’s financial and human resources levels and will most likely continue to affect its backlog of cases.

Internal services make a critical contribution to the achievement of the Tribunal’s singular primary program. Like small departments and other micro-agencies, the Tribunal continually faces pressure to respond to, or implement various government-wide management initiatives while managing its operating and salary budget in line with government-wide budget restraints, which are likely to remain in place for some time. The Tribunal will continue to actively seek horizontal opportunities and interdepartmental partnerships to achieve efficiencies.

Financially, approximately 60% of its $4.5 million operating budget is for salaries and benefits, 82% of which is directly attributable to our core program. Of the remaining $1.8 million in Operations and Maintenance, 50% is directly related to the adjudicative process such as per diem costs for part-time members, travel, facility rentals for hearings and mediation activities, translation of decisions and rulings and legal support for members.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 55. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Individuals have access, as determined by the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Employment Equity Act, to fair and equitable adjudication of human rights and employment equity cases that are brought before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal.  
Hearings of complaints before the Tribunal 1,971,469 2,282,382 2,589,784
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 2,248,140 2,239,001 1,942,741
Total 4,219,609 4,521,383 4,532,525

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Raison d’être

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is the Government of Canada’s health research funding agency. The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization. It was created in June 2000 by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Act (Bill C-13) with a mandate “to excel, according to internationally accepted standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health care system.”

CIHR’s mandate seeks to transform health research in Canada by:

  • Funding both investigator–initiated research, as well as research on targeted priority areas;
  • Building research capacity in under-developed areas and training the next generation of health researchers; and
  • Focusing on knowledge translation that facilitates the application of the results of research and their transformation into new policies, practices, procedures, products and services.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 27. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Institutes of Health Research

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 56. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 50,146,637 46,367,765 47,091,280 47,112,396
5 Grants 940,773,074 915,350,465 944,401,906 932,143,424
Total voted 990,919,711 961,718,230 991,493,186 979,255,820
Total Statutory 6,133,031 5,934,927 6,013,363 5,696,142
Total budgetary 997,052,742 967,653,157 997,506,549 984,951,962

Highlights

CIHR is implementing, in 2014–15, a new Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), consisting of one Strategic Outcome along with three Programs.

CIHR’s new Strategic Outcome “Canada is a world leader in the creation, dissemination and application of health research knowledge” aligns with its mandate and vision of long-term, enduring benefits to the lives of Canadians and health care system, and is also linked to priorities of the Government of Canada. The three Programs, “Investigator-Initiated Health Research”, “Priority-Driven Health Research” and “Internal Services”, highlight CIHR’s priority to fund both the best ideas from health researchers, as well as targeted research to address challenges facing Canadians and the health care system.

CIHR is estimating budgeting expenditures of $985.0 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $979.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $5.7 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The budgeting expenditures of $985.0 million in 2014–15 represent a variance of $12.5 million, or 1.3%, from the 2013–14 Estimates-to-date (including Main and Supplementary Estimates) of $997.5 million. This variance is temporary, and is due to the following:

  • A decrease of $10.2 million in the Tri-Agency Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research (CECR) program. Funding for this program is allocated to the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and CIHR after each competition and varies depending on the recipients’ alignment with the research mandate and priorities of the respective agencies. In 2013–14, CIHR was allocated a total of $12.1 million for both the fourth and fifth competitions, and a minimum of $1.9 million in 2014–15 for the fifth and upcoming competition;
  • A decrease of $1.2 million in the Tri-Agency Business-Led Networks of Centres of Excellence program. As for CECR, funding is allocated after each competition. Funding for this program in 2013–14 was $4.3 million and temporarily decreases to a minimum of $3.1 million in 2014–15; and
  • A net decrease of $0.8 million due to funding received from other departments for partnerships activities ending in 2013–14.

The remaining variance of $0.3 million is due to various other program funding adjustments.

It should be noted that both the 2013–14 Estimates-to-date and 2014–15 budgeting expenditures include the $15 million resulting from Budget 2013 for the Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research.

CIHR’s spending for 2014–15 is expected to increase as new funding will be allocated to CIHR for Tri-Agency programs once the results of future competitions are available, and as new and/or renewal of existing partnership activities materialize.

Further details on CIHR’s 2014–15 planned spending is available in CIHR’s 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 57. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canada is a world leader in the creation, dissemination and application of health research knowledge.  
Investigator-Initiated Health Research 0 0 729,381,763
Priority-Driven Health Research 0 0 252,550,887
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 27,836,076 24,267,510 3,019,312
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 969,216,666 943,385,647 0
Total 997,052,742 967,653,157 984,951,962

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 58. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants for research projects and personnel support 852,842,284 839,864,065 853,303,075
Networks of Centres of Excellence 24,113,000 22,589,400 22,589,400
Canada Graduate Scholarships 21,029,999 21,250,000 21,250,000
Institute support grants 13,000,000 13,000,000 13,000,000
Canada Excellence Research Chairs 7,000,000 8,400,000 8,400,000
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships 8,286,263 8,350,000 8,350,000
Business–Led Networks of Centres of Excellence 4,281,528 1,737,000 3,106,027
Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research 10,040,000 0 1,880,000
Industrial Research Chairs for Colleges 80,000 160,000 160,000
College and Community Innovation Program 100,000 0 104,922

Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat

Raison d’être

The President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada is responsible for this organization. The Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat (CICS), established pursuant to an agreement reached at the May 1973 First Ministers’ Conference, is an agency of the federal, provincial and territorial governments. Its mandate is to provide administrative support and planning services for intergovernmental conferences of First Ministers, Ministers and Deputy Ministers.

These intergovernmental conferences are a key instrument for consultation and negotiation among the different orders of governments and assist in the development of national and/or provincial/territorial policies. They are a critical component of the workings of the Canadian federation and represent a core principle of our democratic society.

By skilfully executing the logistical planning and delivery of these meetings, CICS not only relieves governments of the administrative process burden but also allows them to greatly benefit from significant cost efficiencies and economies of scale.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 28. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 59. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 4,829,776 5,597,587 5,597,587 5,548,958
- Pursuant to subsection 25(2) of the Financial Administration Act, to write-off from the Accounts of Canada debts due to Her Majesty in right of Canada amounting to $57 related to an unrecoverable debt 57 0 0 0
Total voted 4,829,833 5,597,587 5,597,587 5,548,958
Total Statutory 325,647 437,917 437,917 408,205
Total budgetary 5,155,480 6,035,504 6,035,504 5,957,163

Highlights

The CICS’s 2014–15 expenditures remain approximately the same as the previous year. The 2014–15 funding will be utilized to address the following priorities:

  • Implement the necessary initiatives to enhance and expand strategic partnerships;
  • Adopt the appropriate tools to transform our service delivery model;
  • Review and adapt management practices to increase efficiencies; and
  • Continue to build a capable, confident and high performing workforce.

Our 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities will contain more details regarding our priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 60. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Senior-level intergovernmental conference services are professionally and successfully delivered.  
Conference Services 3,344,606 4,179,031 4,026,878
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 1,810,874 1,856,473 1,930,285
Total 5,155,480 6,035,504 5,957,163

Canadian International Development Agency

Raison d’être

Division 12 of Part 3 of the Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 1 states that the Canadian International Development Agency is amalgamated with Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, effective June 26, 2013.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 29. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 30. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 61. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian International Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
- Operating expenditures 194,095,452 171,101,774 171,101,774 0
- Grants and contributions 2,860,377,838 2,719,266,590 2,719,266,590 0
Total voted 3,054,473,290 2,890,368,364 2,890,368,364 0
Total Statutory 355,084,144 268,960,876 268,960,876 0
Total budgetary 3,409,557,434 3,159,329,240 3,159,329,240 0
Non-budgetary
Voted
- Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, payments to international financial institutions – Issuance and payment of demand notes 0 1 1 0
- Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, payments to international financial institutions – Capital subscriptions 0 1 1 0
Total voted 0 2 2 0
Total Statutory 93,401,393 81,595,258 81,595,258 0
Total non-budgetary 93,401,393 81,595,260 81,595,260 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 62. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 3,409,557,434 3,159,329,240 0
Total 3,409,557,434 3,159,329,240 0

Table 63. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 93,401,393 81,595,260 0
Total 93,401,393 81,595,260 0

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

Raison d’être

The Canadian International Trade Tribunal (the Tribunal) provides Canadian and international businesses with access to fair, transparent and timely resolution of trade remedy cases, customs and excise tax appeals and inquiries into federal procurement complaints. At the request of the Government of Canada, the Tribunal provides advice on tariff, trade and general economic matters.

The Minister of Finance is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 31. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian International Trade Tribunal

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 64. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian International Trade Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 10,307,575 8,660,195 8,660,195 8,305,445
Total voted 10,307,575 8,660,195 8,660,195 8,305,445
Total Statutory 1,193,752 1,233,346 1,233,346 1,171,294
Total budgetary 11,501,327 9,893,541 9,893,541 9,476,739

Highlights

The Tribunal’s overriding priority for 2014–15 is to deliver on its various mandates by hearing cases and making sound decisions on matters that fall within its jurisdiction. In so doing, the Tribunal supports a fair marketplace in Canada, maintains its strong reputation both in Canada and throughout the world as a fair and independent decision maker and complies with its legislative requirements.

The Tribunal will also continue to pursue initiatives aimed at further improving its capacity to deliver on its legislative mandates in order to provide efficient and reliable services to its stakeholders.

The decreasing trend in the Tribunal’s spending from 2012–13 to 2014–15 can be explained by a few key events. First, in 2012–13, the Tribunal received additional funding of $1.3 million to retrofit its accommodation. Second, the Tribunal has gone through a very busy case schedule that required additional resources for part of 2012–13 and for all of 2013–14. Lastly, in 2014–15 and for future years, the Tribunal’s budget will be reduced by $0.5 million as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review. Please refer to the Tribunal’s Web site for further details on its 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities at http://www.citt-tcce.gc.ca.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 65. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian International Trade Tribunal
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Fair, timely and transparent disposition of international trade cases, procurement cases and government-mandated inquiries within the Tribunal’s jurisdiction.  
Adjudication of Trade Cases (quasi-judicial role) 8,395,969 7,321,221 7,012,787
General Economic Inquiries and References (advisory role) 115,013 98,935 94,767
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 2,990,345 2,473,385 2,369,185
Total 11,501,327 9,893,541 9,476,739

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Raison d’être

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) was created in 2008 through an amendment to the Museums Act, which established the Museum as the first national museum to be created since 1967 and the first to be located outside of the National Capital Region. The Museum’s mandate is “to explore the subject of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, in order to enhance the public’s understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 32. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum for Human Rights

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 66. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights for operating and capital expenditures 56,935,796 31,700,000 31,700,000 21,700,000
Total voted 56,935,796 31,700,000 31,700,000 21,700,000
Total budgetary 56,935,796 31,700,000 31,700,000 21,700,000

Highlights

The operating appropriations for 2014–15 are $21.7 million, the same amount that was received in 2013–14. In 2013–14 $10 million in capital appropriations were also received representing the final payment of the $35 million advance of appropriations that was approved in 2012–13. Accordingly no further capital appropriations will be received in 2014–15.

The 2014–15 fiscal year marks a period of significant transition for the Museum as it begins full-time operations and welcomes its first visitors from across Canada and abroad.

The Museum is forecasting a balanced budget for 2014–15. The Museum will open on September 20, 2014 and is projected to receive 100,000 visitors. Membership sales will be launched in April 2014 with 4,556 individual, family and corporate memberships projected to be sold. Public programming will begin upon opening with education programming beginning in January 2015. The 2014–15 fiscal year will be a challenging year due to the overlap of costs related to the completion of operational readiness initiatives with costs to operate the Museum and therefore there are no contingencies budgeted in the 2014–15 operating budget.

CMHR will continue to experience significant change over the planning period as it transitions from a construction project to a fully operational museum. The focus for 2014–15 will be to:

  • Complete the capital project including gallery fit-up and exhibit fabrication and installation;
  • Complete the development of the infrastructure, content, and programs for inauguration;
  • Implement marketing strategies and continue awareness campaigns, including the Museum’s web presence and online experience;
  • Hire and train the operational front-line staff;
  • Test all aspects of the visitor experience during soft opening to ensure operational readiness to open the Museum to the public;
  • Begin to generate earned revenue through admission, membership fees, programming, rental of facilities and retail sales;
  • Begin to deliver the public and education programs;
  • Transition from being under development to operating a Museum;
  • Deliver a memorable and successful inaugural opening; and
  • Welcome the public to the Museum beginning September 20, 2014 and deliver a visitor experience that inspires reflection and dialogue and encourages repeat visitation to the Museum.

To support the realization of the long-term corporate objectives, an increase in staffing numbers is planned over the next two years to fully staff Museum operations for the inaugural opening and beyond.

A thorough review of the staffing plan was completed during 2013–14 to align the organizational structure with the Museum’s mandate and metanarrative. The review included benchmarking and expert consultation. There are still many unknowns for this Museum – the first new national museum in over 40 years and the first newly built national museum outside of the National Capital Region. The number of visitors, the level of interpretation visitors may want, the demand for tours and other programming could vary significantly from the assumptions in the budget. A variable staffing plan incorporating a significant number of part-time positions is being implemented that will provide the flexibility to increase or decrease the number of visitor facing staff as required.

Leading up to opening, project related staff has been hired on term assignments and these positions will drop off as the capital project is completed. Project related staff includes researcher assistants, interpretive planners, writers, editors, exhibit project managers, and new media project coordinators.

The forecasted increase in operations staff in 2013–14 is largely in the areas of Earned Revenue, Visitor Services, Security, and Learning and Programming in order to deliver on the following:

  • Install and test the technology required to market and sell general admission, group tours, memberships, retail point of sale system, and facility rentals;
  • Develop policies and procedures for all aspects of earned revenue and visitor services;
  • Book facility rentals;
  • Develop and implement a complete volunteer program including recruitment of volunteers for inauguration;
  • Security for the new building after takeover from the Construction Manager; and
  • Education and public programs.

Staffing will increase in 2014–15 due to the requirements of operating the Museum including full-time and part-time Program Interpreters who will provide in-gallery interpretation as well as deliver education and public programs, part-time Hosts, IT and exhibit staff.

Staffing costs make up 46% of the budget in 2014–15. This compares favourably with the other national museums where the staffing costs range from 43% to 55%.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 67. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Enhanced knowledge of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, in order to enhance the public’s understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue.  
Museum Content and Program 0 10,577,000 9,462,000
Accommodation 0 14,129,000 6,305,000
Stewardship and Corporate Management 0 6,994,000 5,933,000
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 56,935,796 0 0
Total 56,935,796 31,700,000 21,700,000

Canadian Museum of History

Raison d’être

The Canadian Museum of History is a Crown corporation established by the Museums Act (Statutes of Canada 2013, Chapter 38) which came into force on December 12, 2013. The Act states that the role of the corporation is “to enhance Canadians’ knowledge, understanding and appreciation of events, experiences, people and objects that reflect and have shaped Canada’s history and identity, and also to enhance their awareness of world history and cultures.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 33. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of History

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 68. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of History
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum of History for operating and capital expenditures 64,364,831 57,418,730 58,918,730 63,430,033
Total voted 64,364,831 57,418,730 58,918,730 63,430,033
Total budgetary 64,364,831 57,418,730 58,918,730 63,430,033

Highlights

On December 12, 2013, federal legislation was enacted which transformed the Canadian Museum of Civilization into the Canadian Museum of History.

Under its revised mandate, the Museum will tell the story of Canada and its people more comprehensively, inclusively and candidly than ever before. It will do so by focusing greater attention on the people, events and experiences that have shaped our country’s development, define the Canadian experience and underpin our national identity. The Museum will also continue to present special exhibitions exploring world history and cultures, and permanent exhibitions illuminating the historical achievements and continuing contributions of Canada’s First Peoples.

The museum’s Main Estimates for 2014–15 is $63.4 million, an increase of $6.0 million from the 2013–14 Main Estimates. The increase is due to:

  • An increase of $5.5 million for the creation of the Canadian Museum of History;
  • An increase of $681 thousand for the impact of collective agreements signed in 2013–14; and
  • A decrease of $170 thousand in funding for the British Columbia treaty negotiations process.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 69. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of History
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for human cultural achievements and human behaviour through collections of historical and cultural objects, exhibitions, programs and research reflecting a Canadian perspective.  
Accommodation 0 27,454,000 29,808,000
Exhibit, Educate and Communicate 0 15,244,000 19,552,000
Collect and Research 0 12,646,000 12,370,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 2,074,730 1,700,033
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 64,364,831 0 0
Total 64,364,831 57,418,730 63,430,033

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Raison d’être

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 was established in 2010 through an amendment to the Museums Act.

The mandate of the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 is “to explore the theme of immigration to Canada in order to enhance public understanding of the experiences of immigrants as they arrived in Canada, of the vital role immigration has played in the building of Canada and of the contributions of immigrants to Canada’s culture, economy and way of life.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 34. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 70. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 for operating and capital expenditures 9,976,473 18,450,000 18,450,000 9,900,000
Total voted 9,976,473 18,450,000 18,450,000 9,900,000
Total budgetary 9,976,473 18,450,000 18,450,000 9,900,000

Highlights

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 is estimating budgetary expenditures of $9.9 million in 2014–15 which require approval by Parliament.

This represents a decrease in capital expenditures of $8.55 million from the 2013–14 Main Estimates due to the partial completion of the expansion capital projects including the refit of current and new exhibition spaces, the fabrication and installation of new exhibits and the preparations for the launch of the new museum in May 2015 which will tangibly showcase the national mandate of the Museum.

For further details on the Museum’s plan and priorities, please refer to our 2014–15 to 2018–19 Corporate Plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 71. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadians are engaged in building and exploring the stories, themes and history of Canadian immigration as it continues to unfold.  
Accommodations 0 12,791,000 4,958,420
Visitor Experience and Connections 0 2,740,000 2,360,090
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 2,919,000 2,581,490
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 9,976,473 0 0
Total 9,976,473 18,450,000 9,900,000

Canadian Museum of Nature

Raison d’être

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Museum of Nature (the Museum) became a Crown corporation on July 1, 1990 through the Museums Act with the mandate to increase, throughout Canada and internationally, interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for the natural world by establishing, maintaining and developing for research and posterity, a collection of natural history objects, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, and by demonstrating the natural world, the knowledge derived from it and the understanding it represents.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 35. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Nature

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 72. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Nature
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Museum of Nature for operating and capital expenditures 34,370,062 25,834,904 25,834,904 26,127,096
Total voted 34,370,062 25,834,904 25,834,904 26,127,096
Total budgetary 34,370,062 25,834,904 25,834,904 26,127,096

Highlights

In 2014–15, the Museum will begin to advance a new strategic plan that leverages its research and collections strengths in arctic knowledge and species discovery. New approaches to the design and delivery of visitor experiences will enable the Museum to attract and inspire new audiences. These new engaging experiences will lead to higher memberships, higher membership renewal and will provide a foundation for enhanced fundraising. Overall higher levels of engagement will lead to a better understanding of and connection with Canada’s natural world.

Strategic Objective #1:

Create a Centre for Arctic Knowledge and Exploration that transforms people’s understanding of Canada’s arctic and its relationship with Canada as a country in a 21st century global context.

  • Launch new arctic alliances and content that position the Museum nationally and internationally;
  • Launch the newly formulated Centre for Arctic Knowledge and Exploration;
  • Unveil an Arctic sculpture and associated programming; and
  • Launch the Arctic gallery and associated programming and research.

Strategic Objective #2:

Create a Centre for Species Discovery and Change that transforms peoples understanding of the relevance of species diversity to their lives now and in the future.

  • Lead Canada’s membership and participation in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF);
  • Launch the newly formulated Centre for Species Discovery and Change;
  • Unveil the regions of Canada gardens at the Victoria Memorial Museum Building;
  • Position the Museum leadership in species discovery at national and international conferences such as International Union for Conservation of Nature world congress; and
  • Launch a national media campaign profiling research expertise.

Strategic Objective #3:

Create a Centre for Nature Inspiration and Engagement that transforms people’s expectations of the Museum as a destination for discussion, connection and exploration with nature’s past, present and future that advances understanding and respect for Canada’s natural world.

  • Launch an annual award recognizing excellence in nature inspiration;
  • Launch the global summit on nature inspiration to share new approaches to inspiring engagement with nature and our natural future;
  • Launch commercial products piloted in the Centre for Nature Inspiration and Engagement in markets across Canada; and
  • Launch a national salon series in collaboration with a major partner – giving nature a voice across Canada.

Strategic Objective #4:

Position the Natural Heritage Campus as a centre of excellence in collections management and knowledge creation, advancement and sharing by becoming a collections collaborator with institutions around the world seeking to collect, preserve, digitize and disseminate specimens that document the nature of Canada.

  • Launch a public awareness campaign highlighting the role and achievements of Museum scientists and collection management staff in promoting the understanding and respect of Canada’s natural world;
  • Launch the collections digitization and access project aligned with the Museum’s role with GBIF thus leveraging its technology in providing greater online access to its collections and knowledge;
  • Launch a digital /IT network upgrade to increase the Museum’s capacity and improve access to support new digital nature experiences;
  • Attract and house signature collections from public and private sources;
  • Participate in, and collaborate with national and international research and collections management organizations; and
  • Animate the Campus through public programmes.

Strategic Objective #5:

Create a sustainable business enterprise model of operation that leverages the Museum’s strategic imperatives: knowledge and discovery, inspiration and engagement, presence, performance and advancement.

  • Position the Museum as a fundamental element of the national capital experience;
  • Launch a collaborative national museums positioning campaign leading up to 2017;
  • Launch a fundraising program in support of the arctic and species discovery initiatives;
  • Systematize the contribution margin model for enterprise management; and
  • Launch a program to develop the skills/competencies and human capacity needed to advance and maintain a sustainable museum enterprise.

These five strategic objectives will be managed through the five program activities of the Museum: Public Education, Collections Management and Research, Internal Services, and Accommodation which includes the ongoing operations and maintenance of the Museum’s two facilities.

An increase of $292,192 or 1% from previous Main Estimates is due to compensation adjustments.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 73. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Nature
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for the natural world through collections of natural history objects, public education programmes and research reflecting a special but not exclusive perspective on Canada.  
Accommodation 0 10,102,904 10,434,000
Public education programmes 0 4,730,000 6,261,000
Research 0 3,319,000 3,259,000
Collections management 0 1,651,000 1,695,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 6,032,000 4,478,096
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 34,370,062 0 0
Total 34,370,062 25,834,904 26,127,096

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

Raison d’être

Contributing to jobs and growth in Canada, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) works to develop a diversified, sustainable and dynamic economy across Canada’s three territories. It does this by delivering funding programs to Northerners and Aboriginal people, guiding resource development and major projects across the North through the Northern Projects Management Office, undertaking research to support the development of evidence-based policies, advocating for Northern economic prosperity and diversification, and collaborating with and aligning the efforts of other federal departments, territorial governments, Aboriginal organizations, and industry.

The Minister of the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 36. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 74. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 12,720,066 12,103,359 13,555,127 11,231,366
5 Contributions 38,365,705 38,664,119 38,664,119 18,641,803
Total voted 51,085,771 50,767,478 52,219,246 29,873,169
Total Statutory 1,302,839 1,023,655 1,223,362 1,072,597
Total budgetary 52,388,610 51,791,133 53,442,608 30,945,766

Highlights

CanNor is estimating budgetary expenditures of $30.9 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $29.8 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.1 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In 2014–15, Aboriginal economic development programming will continue to focus on supporting business development and the opportunities before communities today; this will be complemented by the Northern Adult Basic Education Program.

Responsible resource development is critical to the success of Canada’s North. CanNor’s Northern Projects Management Office is expanding its work with communities and industry to position Canada’s North as a world-class resource development destination where prosperity for Northerners and benefits for Canadians are a single goal. This is highlighted by new 3-year funding for this program starting in 2013–14.

Compared to the previous year, the Strategic Investments in Northern Economic Development program ($20 million) and the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund ($3.2 million in 2013–14) sunset in 2013–14. Sunsetting programs are subject to government decisions to extend or enhance funding.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 75. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Developed and diversified territorial economies that support prosperity for all Northerners.  
Economic Development 0 0 22,256,695
Policy and Alignment 0 0 4,256,120
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 7,316,314 6,522,014 4,432,950
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 45,072,296 45,269,119 0
Total 52,388,610 51,791,133 30,945,765

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 76. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions to support Aboriginal participation in the northern economy 0 0 10,800,000
Contributions for advancing adult basic education in Canada’s territories 6,604,803 6,507,119 6,604,803
Contributions for promoting regional development in Canada’s three territories 17,715,435 18,157,000 1,237,000

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

Raison d’être

The Minister of Natural Resources is responsible for this organization.

In 1946, Parliament passed the Atomic Energy Control Act and established the Atomic Energy Control Board, providing it with the power to regulate all nuclear activities related to the development and use of atomic energy in Canada.

More than half a century later, in May 2000, the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) came into effect and established the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) as the successor to the Atomic Energy Control Board, with responsibilities and authorities to regulate an industry that spans all segments of the nuclear fuel cycle and a wide range of industrial, medical and academic uses of nuclear substances.

Additional information can be found in the CNSC’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 37. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 77. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 37,676,689 34,976,638 37,771,011 36,578,266
Total voted 37,676,689 34,976,638 37,771,011 36,578,266
Total Statutory 102,022,465 97,924,847 97,966,168 95,059,029
Total budgetary 139,699,154 132,901,485 135,737,179 131,637,295

Highlights

CNSC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $131.6 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $36.6 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $95.0 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 1, the CNSC received statutory authority – pursuant to paragraph 21(3) of the NSCA – to spend during a fiscal year any revenues that it receives in the current or previous fiscal year through the conduct of its operations. The CNSC receives its revenues from regulatory fees for licences and applications charged in accordance with the CNSC Cost Recovery Fees Regulations.

In addition to the statutory authority, the CNSC is also funded through the voted budgetary authority from Parliament – Vote 1 – Program expenditures. Voted authority provides funding for activities exempt from paying fees under the CNSC Cost Recovery Fees Regulations (i.e., hospitals and universities), as these entities exist for the public good. Additionally, fees are not charged for activities that result from Canada’s obligations that do not provide a direct benefit to identifiable licensees. These include activities with respect to Canada’s international obligations (including non-proliferation activities), public responsibilities such as emergency management and public information programs, and the updating of the NSCA and its associated regulations.

Contributions to the employee benefit plans are statutory budgetary authorities.

In 2014–15, the CNSC’s Main Estimates show a decrease in net spending of $1.3 million or 1.0% when compared to 2013–14 Main Estimates. The decrease is the result of a decrease in statutory expenditures of $2.9 million or 2.9% partially offset by an increase in voted expenditures in the amount of $1.6 million or 4.6%.

The decrease in statutory expenditures is due to reduced regulatory demands related to the decommissioning of the Hydro-Québec’s Gentilly – 2 nuclear generating station facility as well as a reduction in the employee benefit contribution.

The increase in voted expenditures is mainly due to the termination of management reserve repayments to the Treasury Board Secretariat for investments made in the CNSC’s facilities infrastructure as well as funding received to support the Single Window Initiative – the horizontal initiative to streamline government import regulations and border processes for commercial trade. The increase is offset by an additional transfer to Shared Services Canada for workplace technology device software and a transfer to Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development to support CNSC personnel on missions abroad.

Additional information can be found in the CNSC’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 78. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and public confidence in the nuclear regulatory regime’s effectiveness.  
Compliance Program 41,778,894 36,550,986 38,703,659
Licensing and Certification Program 25,304,007 28,505,451 26,179,983
Regulatory Framework Program 29,682,743 25,193,526 26,049,097
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 42,933,510 42,651,522 40,704,556
Total 139,699,154 132,901,485 131,637,295

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 79. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to enable the research, development and management of activities that contribute to the objectives of the Research and Support Program 75,000 75,000 75,000
Contributions
Participant Funding Program 105,602 925,000 925,000
Contributions to enable the research, development and management of activities that contribute to the objectives of the Research and Support Program, and the Canadian Safeguards Support Program 1,270,980 770,000 770,000

Canadian Polar Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Polar Commission (CPC) is responsible for monitoring, promoting and disseminating knowledge of the polar regions; contributing to public awareness of the importance of polar science to Canada; enhancing Canada’s international profile as a circumpolar nation; and recommending polar science policy direction to government. The Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 38. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Polar Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 80. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Polar Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 1,220,138 2,433,726 2,433,726 2,439,807
Total voted 1,220,138 2,433,726 2,433,726 2,439,807
Total Statutory 97,597 142,943 142,943 136,553
Total budgetary 1,317,735 2,576,669 2,576,669 2,576,360

Highlights

CPC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.6 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $2.4 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $137 thousand represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

CPC continues to manage its grant programs: the Northern Scientific Training Program including the funding to the Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies, the Centenary Medal Commemorating the International Polar year 1882-1883 also known as the Northern Scientific Award and the Canadian Polar Commission Scholarship Award.

The CPC will continue to host conferences and workshops, to publish information on subjects of relevance to polar research, to build and maintain polar knowledge networks and to work closely with other governmental and non-governmental agencies to promote and support Canadian study of the polar regions.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 81. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Polar Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Increased Canadian polar knowledge.  
Research Facilitation and Communication 988,110 2,095,074 2,095,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 329,625 481,595 481,360
Total 1,317,735 2,576,669 2,576,360

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 82. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Polar Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to individuals, organizations, associations and institutions to support research and activities relating to the polar regions 0 1,086,000 1,086,000
Contributions
Contributions to individuals, organizations, associations and institutions to support research and activities relating to the polar regions 10,000 10,000 10,000

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an administrative tribunal that regulates and supervises Canadian broadcasting, and telecommunications in the public interest, as well as contributes to protecting Canadians from unsolicited communications.

The CRTC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 39. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 83. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 8,411,912 4,403,550 4,403,551 3,945,670
Total voted 8,411,912 4,403,550 4,403,551 3,945,670
Total Statutory 6,321,849 6,803,308 6,803,308 6,641,029
Total budgetary 14,733,761 11,206,858 11,206,859 10,586,699

Highlights

CRTC is estimating net budgetary expenditures of $10.6 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $3.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $6.6 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total, the CRTC is estimating a decrease in net spending of $0.6 million from the previous Main Estimates. Factors contributing to the net decrease include:

  • A decrease of $0.4 million in program spending for activities related to Canada’s anti-spam legislation. This amount relates to re-profiled funding that ended in 2013–14; and
  • A decrease of $0.2 million for statutory budgetary expenditures related to employee benefits plans.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 84. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadians have access to a world-class communication system.  
Protection within the Communication System 0 0 4,170,720
Connection to the Communication System 0 6,266,034 2,220,989
Canadian Content Creation 0 2,461,665 1,892,757
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 3,843,738 2,479,159 2,302,233
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 10,890,023 0 0
Total 14,733,761 11,206,858 10,586,699

Canadian Security Intelligence Service

Raison d’être

As per the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) Act, the mandate of CSIS is to collect, analyze and retain information and intelligence on activities suspected of constituting threats to the security of Canada, and to report to and advise the government. CSIS is responsible for the collection of national security intelligence inside and outside Canada; the collection of foreign intelligence within Canada; and for security screening assessments for federal government employees, refugees, immigration and citizenship applicants, and some other sectors such as the Canadian nuclear industry.

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for CSIS.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 40. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Security Intelligence Service

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 85. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 450,434,151 464,636,769 468,595,736 468,824,514
Total voted 450,434,151 464,636,769 468,595,736 468,824,514
Total Statutory 45,986,798 48,371,070 48,371,070 47,412,243
Total budgetary 496,420,949 513,007,839 516,966,806 516,236,757

Highlights

The 2014–15 Main Estimates for CSIS are $516.2 million, a net increase of $3.2 million from 2013–14. The major changes are as follows:

  • An increase of $11.4 million in support of Canada’s national security and the safety of Canadians;
  • A decrease of $4.3 million due to Budget 2012 spending review;
  • A decrease of $3.4 million due to collective bargaining adjustments; and
  • A decrease of $0.5 million due to the return of funding received for maintenance of parking facilities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 86. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Intelligence is used to protect the security and safety of Canada and its citizens.  
Intelligence Program 454,883,201 445,826,087 447,649,011
Security Screening Program 41,537,748 67,181,752 68,587,746
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 0 0 0
Total 496,420,949 513,007,839 516,236,757

Canadian Space Agency

Raison d’être

The mandate of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is "to promote the peaceful use and development of space, to advance the knowledge of space through science and to ensure that space science and technology provide social and economic benefits for Canadians".

The CSA is carrying out its mandate in collaboration with Canadian industry, academia, Government of Canada organizations and other international space agencies or organizations.

The founding legislation voted in 1990 attributed four main functions to the CSA:

  • Assisting the Minister in the coordination of the space policies and programs;
  • Planning and implementing programs and projects related to scientific or industrial space research and development, and application of space technology;
  • Promoting the transfer and diffusion of space technology to and throughout Canadian industry; and,
  • Encouraging commercial exploitation of space capabilities, technology, facilities and systems.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 41. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Space Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 87. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Space Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 168,611,889 171,614,805 171,614,805 155,266,004
5 Capital expenditures 110,576,477 272,688,412 272,688,412 257,955,633
10 Grants and contributions 30,669,125 33,630,000 33,630,000 39,306,853
Total voted 309,857,491 477,933,217 477,933,217 452,528,490
Total Statutory 10,387,924 10,747,711 10,747,711 9,918,684
Total budgetary 320,245,415 488,680,928 488,680,928 462,447,174

Highlights

The Canadian Space Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $462.4 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $452.5 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $9.9 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The variation in total authorities available between fiscal years 2013–14 and 2014–15 represents a net decrease of$26.2 million. This variation is mainly due to:

  • A decrease of $25.3 million mainly related to the RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM). The current year over year decrease reflects different cash flow requirements and previous years’ reprofiling of funds as well as the reduction of the additional funding provided for RCM.
  • A decrease of $4.8 million due to the savings measures related to Budget 2012 spending review;
  • A decrease of $0.4 million related to a transfer to Shared Services Canada for Workplace Technology Devices (WTD) formerly End User Devices; and
  • An increase of $ 2.4 million related to the forecasted cash flow requirements for the Contributions to the Canada/European Space Agency Cooperation Agreement. In previous years, funds for this activity have been reprofiled to account for different cash flow requirements, resulting in the current year over year increase.
  • An increase of $3.3 million related to the forecasted cash flow requirements for the Class Contribution Program to Support research, awareness and learning in space science and technology;
  • A decrease of $0.8 million related to the Employee benefit rate adjustments;
  • A decrease of $0.4 million related to the forecasted cash flow requirements for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project and the Cassiope Program. In previous years funds for some activities have been reprofiled to account for different cash flow requirements resulting in the current year over year decrease; and
  • A decrease of $0.2 million related to the Economic Action Plan 2013 “Reducing travel costs through the use of technology”.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 88. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Space Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canada’s exploration of space, provision of space services and development of its space capacity meet the nation’s needs for scientific knowledge, innovation and information.  
Space Data, Information and Services 130,830,203 288,783,916 256,908,528
Space Exploration 87,496,584 95,406,830 96,586,363
Future Canadian Space Capacity 52,480,907 58,528,146 62,772,518
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 49,437,721 45,962,036 46,179,765
Total 320,245,415 488,680,928 462,447,174

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 89. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Canadian Space Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Class Grant Program to Support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology 6,223,626 6,395,000 6,535,000
Contributions
Contributions to the Canada/European Space Agency Cooperation Agreement 23,279,404 24,935,000 27,373,853
Class Contribution Program to Support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology 1,016,095 2,050,000 5,398,000

Canadian Tourism Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) is Canada’s national tourism marketing organization. A Crown corporation wholly owned by the Government of Canada, the CTC’s purpose is to sustain a vibrant and profitable tourism industry by marketing Canada as an internationally competitive, premier four-season tourism destination where travelers can indulge in extraordinary experiences. Reporting to Parliament through the Minister of Industry, the CTC’s legislative requirements are outlined in the Canadian Tourism Commission Act. Through collaboration and partnerships with the private sector, as well as with the governments of Canada, the provinces and territories, the CTC works with the tourism sector to maintain Canada’s competitiveness and generate wealth for Canadians by stimulating demand for Canada’s visitor economy. Additional information can be found in the CTC’s 2014–2018 Corporate Plan.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 42. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Tourism Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 90. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Tourism Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Canadian Tourism Commission 71,495,802 57,832,802 57,832,802 57,972,388
Total voted 71,495,802 57,832,802 57,832,802 57,972,388
Total budgetary 71,495,802 57,832,802 57,832,802 57,972,388

Highlights

The CTC was created in 1995, as a Special Operating Agency within Industry Canada, and in 2001, became a Crown corporation pursuant to the Canadian Tourism Commission Act. The CTC reports to Parliament via the Minister of Industry. The CTC is Canada’s national tourism marketing organization mandated to sustain a vibrant and profitable Canadian tourism industry; market Canada as a desirable tourist destination; support a cooperative relationship between the private sector and the governments of Canada, the provinces and the territories with respect to Canadian tourism; and provide information about Canadian tourism to the private sector and to the governments of Canada, the provinces and the territories.

In 2012, the CTC took part in the comprehensive review by the Government of Canada as outlined in Budget 2012, to return to balanced budgets over the medium-term. Budget 2012 mandated a reduction on the CTC’s appropriations by $14.2 million starting in 2013–14 (Canada’s Action Plan 2012). This adjustment resulted in the CTC’s core appropriations (i.e. excluding one-time funding for special programs) of $57.8 million starting in 2013–14. Since the CTC’s budget is organized by calendar year, this appropriation will translate into an annual appropriation $57.8 million for 2014. Consistent with this decision, the CTC’s activities are aligned to focus resources on markets of strategic importance to Canada’s tourism industry.

The CTC’s corporate strategy as outlined in the 2014–2018 Corporate Plan is:

Goal:

  • To grow tourism export revenue for Canada in markets offering the highest return and where the Canada brand leads.

Strategic Themes:

  • Generate demand for Canada’s visitor economy;
  • Deliver branded platforms to help Canadian tourism businesses sell Canada; and
  • Advance corporate excellence and efficiency.

Operational Objectives:

  • Seed the 2017 Youth Program;
  • Explore options for broader business events consistent with Canada’s trade agenda;
  • Further develop branded platforms for industry in the interest of both immediate and potential returns;
  • Work to more holistically define the value of the CTC to industry beyond traditional return on investment measures; and
  • Continue ongoing work on efficiencies.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 91. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Tourism Commission
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canadian economy benefits from strong tourism demand from Canadian Tourism Commission’s (CTC) markets.  
Marketing and Sales 0 45,974,802 46,045,252
Tourism Research and Communications 0 3,644,000 3,321,766
Experiential Product Development 0 1,092,000 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 7,122,000 8,605,370
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 71,495,802 0 0
Total 71,495,802 57,832,802 57,972,388

Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board

Raison d’être

The Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board is referred to as the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) in its day-to-day activities. The TSB is an independent agency created in 1990 by an Act of Parliament. It operates at arm’s length from other government departments and agencies to ensure that there are no real or perceived conflicts of interest. TSB’s sole objective is to advance air, marine, rail and pipeline transportation safety. This mandate is fulfilled by conducting independent investigations into selected transportation occurrences to identify the causes and contributing factors and the safety deficiencies evidenced by an occurrence. TSB then makes recommendations to reduce or eliminate any such safety deficiencies and reports publicly on its investigations.

The Leader of the Government in the House of Commons is the designated minister for the purposes of tabling the TSB’s administrative reports in Parliament, such as the Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Report. The TSB forms part of the Privy Council portfolio of departments and agencies.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 43. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 92. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 28,046,242 26,063,130 26,926,352 25,757,380
Total voted 28,046,242 26,063,130 26,926,352 25,757,380
Total Statutory 3,610,035 3,505,079 3,583,079 3,285,011
Total budgetary 31,656,277 29,568,209 30,509,431 29,042,391

Highlights

The TSB is estimating budgetary expenditures of $29.0 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $25.7 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $3.3 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. The organization’s funding through Main Estimates has decreased from 2013–14 by $0.5 million, due to savings of $1.3 million identified as part of the Budget 2012 spending review and offset by an increase in funding for collective bargaining adjustments.

The TSB operational activities have remained consistent over the last few years and for the planning horizon. Significant variances between the TSB’s funding in Main Estimates and actual year-end expenditures are explained by additional sources of funding. The department receives additional funding through transfers from Treasury Board votes for the carry-forward of unused funds from the previous year, for collective bargaining adjustments, and for severance and parental benefits paid during the year. The TSB may also receive additional funding from Parliament through Supplementary Estimates for funding pressures created by the investigation of a significant transportation occurrence (e.g. Lac-Mégantic, Quebec).

In 2014–15, the TSB will continue to strive to be a world leader in influencing changes that advance transportation safety. This vision statement will be achieved by focusing on four strategic objectives: responding, managing, communicating and advocating. This four-pronged approach provides a clear framework to guide investments and activities for the planning horizon. Details on the TSB’s priorities will be available in its 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 93. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Risks to the safety of the transportation system are reduced.  
Air Investigations 13,670,313 13,128,285 12,778,652
Rail Investigations 4,703,146 4,730,913 4,646,783
Marine Investigations 5,831,259 4,730,913 4,646,782
Pipeline Investigations 457,077 443,524 580,848
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 6,994,482 6,534,574 6,389,326
Total 31,656,277 29,568,209 29,042,391

Canadian Transportation Agency

Raison d’être

The Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) is an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal and economic regulator. It makes decisions and determinations on a wide range of matters within the federal transportation system under the authority of Parliament, as set out in the Canada Transportation Act and other legislation.

Our mandate includes:

  • economic regulation, to provide approvals, issue licences, permits and certificates of fitness, and make decisions on a wide range of matters involving federal air, rail and marine transportation;
  • dispute resolution, to resolve complaints about federal transportation services, rates, fees and charges; and
  • accessibility, to ensure Canada’s national transportation system is accessible to all persons, particularly those with disabilities.

Additional information can be found in the Agency’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

The Minister of Transport is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 44. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 94. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Transportation Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 25,289,763 24,153,322 24,153,322 24,299,370
Total voted 25,289,763 24,153,322 24,153,322 24,299,370
Total Statutory 3,411,081 3,507,200 3,507,200 3,351,252
Total budgetary 28,700,844 27,660,522 27,660,522 27,650,622

Highlights

The CTA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $27.7 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $24.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $3.4 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

CTA’s planned expenditures remain approximately the same as the previous year. In 2014–15, CTA will launch its third strategic plan and will carry out the activities related to the priorities below:

Service Excellence: The Agency is recognized for its service innovation and excellence.

Regulatory Effectiveness: The regulatory regime meets the needs of Canadians and enhances the competitiveness and accessibility of the national transportation system.

High-Performing Organization: The Agency has engaged, skilled and knowledgeable employees who are supported by effective and efficient systems and services.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 95. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Agency
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Transparent, fair and timely dispute resolution and economic regulation of the national transportation system.  
Economic Regulation 12,878,593 11,940,173 11,760,314
Adjudication and Alternative Dispute Resolution 8,337,217 8,464,881 8,978,938
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 7,485,034 7,255,468 6,911,370
Total 28,700,844 27,660,522 27,650,622

Chief Electoral Officer

Raison d’être

The Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, commonly known as Elections Canada, is an independent, non-partisan agency that reports directly to Parliament. Its mandate is to be prepared to conduct a federal general election, by-election or referendum; to administer the political financing provisions of the Canada Elections Act; to monitor compliance with and enforce electoral legislation; and to carry out investigations into allegations that would amount to offences under the Act. The agency is also mandated to conduct voter education and information programs, and to provide support to the independent commissions in charge of adjusting the boundaries of federal electoral districts following each decennial census. As well, the agency may carry out studies on alternative voting methods and, with the approval of parliamentarians, test online voting processes for future use during electoral events.

The Leader of the Government in the House of Commons is the designated minister for the purpose of tabling the Chief Electoral Officer’s administrative reports in Parliament, including the Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Report.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 45. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Chief Electoral Officer

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 96. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Chief Electoral Officer
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 30,303,722 30,081,305 30,081,305 30,538,285
Total voted 30,303,722 30,081,305 30,081,305 30,538,285
Total Statutory 89,276,471 85,772,812 85,772,812 66,572,147
Total budgetary 119,580,193 115,854,117 115,854,117 97,110,432

Highlights

Elections Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $97.1 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $30.5 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $66.6 million represents statutory forecasts and is provided for information purposes.

Overall for 2014–15, the agency is estimating a net decrease of $18.7 million, or 16.2%, from the 2013–14 Estimates to Date. This decrease is explained as follows:

  • a $9.3 million decrease in statutory authority as a result of the agency completing in 2013–14 the office consolidation project (part of Internal Services);
  • a $7.4 million decrease in statutory authority as the quarterly allowances to political parties are being phased out (part of the Regulation of Electoral Activities program);
  • a $2.5 million decrease in statutory authority as a result of the agency concluding in 2013–14 the redistribution of electoral districts and prior years’ elections (part of the Electoral Operations program); and
  • a $0.5 million increase in program expenditures (voted) as a result of the recently ratified collective agreements (impacts all programs).

Additional information can be found in the agency’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

The 2013–14 Main Estimates and Estimates to Date exclude funding for the following statutory items:

  • the conduct of the by-elections in Labrador (Newfoundland and Labrador), Bourassa (Quebec), Brandon–Souris (Manitoba), Provencher (Manitoba) and Toronto Centre (Ontario) (part of the Electoral Operations program); and
  • the implementation of the redistribution of electoral districts (part of the Electoral Operations program).

The disposition of all authorities will be available in the agency’s 2013–14 Departmental Performance Report and the Public Accounts.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 97. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Chief Electoral Officer
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
An Accessible Electoral Framework that Canadians Trust and Use.  
Electoral Operations 37,009,414 36,641,312 34,938,217
Regulation of Electoral Activities 37,509,163 28,072,002 19,959,354
Electoral Engagement 7,860,678 8,939,136 8,441,546
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 37,200,938 42,201,667 33,771,315
Total 119,580,193 115,854,117 97,110,432

Citizenship and Immigration

Raison d’être

In the first years after Confederation, Canada’s leaders had a powerful vision: to connect Canada by rail and make the West the world’s breadbasket as a foundation for the country’s economic prosperity. This vision meant quickly populating the Prairies, leading the Government of Canada to establish its first national immigration policies. Immigrants have been a driving force in Canada’s nationhood and its economic prosperity – as farmers settling lands,

as workers in factories fuelling industrial growth, as entrepreneurs and as innovators helping Canada to compete in the global, knowledge-based economy.

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) selects foreign nationals as permanent and temporary residents and offers Canada’s protection to refugees. The Department develops Canada’s admissibility policy, which sets the conditions for entering and remaining in Canada; it also conducts, in collaboration with its partners, the screening of potential permanent and temporary residents to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. Fundamentally, the Department builds a stronger Canada by helping immigrants and refugees settle and integrate into Canadian society and the economy, and by encouraging and facilitating Canadian citizenship. To achieve this, CIC operates 27 in-Canada points of service and 70 points of service in 63 countries.

The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 46. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Citizenship and Immigration

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 47. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Citizenship and Immigration

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 98. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Citizenship and Immigration
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 515,970,062 552,534,566 553,709,977 556,389,499
5 Grants and contributions 933,201,547 949,945,536 983,147,626 976,456,536
- Debt write-off – Immigration loans 439,586 0 0 0
- Passport Canada Revolving Fund – Transfer to Citizenship and Immigration 0 0 1 0
- Debt write-off – Immigration loans 0 0 806,220 0
- Passport Canada Revolving Fund – Reduced Drawdown Authority 0 0 1 0
Total voted 1,449,611,195 1,502,480,102 1,537,663,825 1,532,846,035
Total Statutory 73,714,273 152,938,716 102,925,170 (147,404,972)
Total budgetary 1,523,325,468 1,655,418,818 1,640,588,995 1,385,441,063
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory (979,983) 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary (979,983) 0 0 0

Highlights

CIC’s budgetary Main Estimates for 2014–15 of $1,385.4 million, represent a net decrease of $270 million from the previous year.

The following are the highlights of this change:

  • An increase of $45.5 million for new funding to keep up with increased volume demands in the Citizenship and Temporary Resident programs;
  • An increase of $35.5 million to the Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on immigration;
  • An increase of $13.1 million for new funding to develop and implement the Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) program commitment under the Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness Action Plan;
  • An increase of $4.2 million in new funding for language training for newcomers and official language minority communities under the Roadmap for Canada’s Official Languages;
  • An increase of $3.1 million for new funding to implement the Entry/Exit project and Radio Frequency Identification technology as set out in the Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness Action Plan;
  • An increase of $3.0 million for contribution funding under the Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants Program to support Canada’s Migrant Smuggling Prevention Strategy;
  • A decrease of $254.2 million due to statutory adjustments related to the Passport Canada revolving fund;
  • A decrease of $48.3 million in statutory funding to return fees for certain Federal Skilled Worker applications;
  • A decrease of $29.7 million in funding to implement the use of biometrics in the temporary visa program;
  • A decrease of $13.9 million due to the impact of Budget 2012 measures;
  • A decrease of $6.5 million in funding to modernize the immigration system and manage the backlog;
  • A decrease of $5.5 million in funding for visa implementation in Mexico;
  • A decrease of $5.2 million related to funding transferred to Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development related to the International Experience Canada program which provides opportunities for Canadians and non-Canadians, aged 18-35, to travel and gain work experience in each other’s countries for up to two years;
  • A decrease of $4.6 million in funding the sharing of immigration information with the United States;
  • A decrease of $4.0 million due to employee benefit plan costs and other minor funding adjustments;
  • A decrease of $2.5 million related to funding transferred to Shared Services Canada for workplace technology device software.

Further information can be found in the Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/publications/rpp/index.asp

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 99. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Citizenship and Immigration
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.  
Newcomer Settlement and Integration 950,739,681 973,358,823 1,002,954,353
Citizenship for Newcomers and all Canadians 46,583,524 43,950,801 109,789,678
Multiculturalism for Newcomers and all Canadians 15,120,234 14,256,922 13,208,032
Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada's economy.  
Permanent Economic Residents 40,200,532 135,224,145 80,799,944
Temporary Economic Residents 20,617,661 22,315,694 34,918,556
Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted.  
Family and Discretionary Immigration 48,674,101 42,452,802 46,863,229
Refugee Protection 30,301,402 35,148,822 35,205,049
Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians.  
Migration Control and Security Management 76,410,491 87,096,376 84,966,649
Health Protection 59,616,808 60,620,439 58,356,894
Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda 3,282,924 3,120,542 8,156,032
Passport 0 0 (254,192,238)
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 231,778,110 237,873,452 164,414,885
Total 1,523,325,468 1,655,418,818 1,385,441,063

Table 100. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Citizenship and Immigration
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.  
Newcomer Settlement and Integration (979,983) 0 0
Total (979,983) 0 0

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 101. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Citizenship and Immigration
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration 284,501,000 284,501,000 319,967,000
Grants in support of the Multiculturalism Program 1,250,352 3,000,000 3,000,000
Grant for Migration Policy Development 348,976 350,000 350,000
Contributions
Settlement Program 585,511,769 596,872,002 588,197,002
Resettlement Assistance 50,738,858 58,202,768 54,922,768
Contributions in support of the Multiculturalism Program 6,673,122 5,521,316 5,521,316
Global Assistance to Irregular Migrants 0 0 3,000,000
International Organization for Migration 1,488,745 1,454,000 1,454,000
Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research 39,753 44,450 44,450

Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs

Raison d’être

The Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs (FJA) provides services to the Canadian judiciary and promotes judicial independence. The Minister of Justice is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 48. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 102. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs – Operating expenditures 8,523,525 7,837,158 8,537,158 8,643,425
5 Canadian Judicial Council – Operating expenditures 1,463,552 1,517,452 1,517,452 1,513,611
Total voted 9,987,077 9,354,610 10,054,610 10,157,036
Total Statutory 475,115,523 488,320,604 488,320,604 501,551,810
Total budgetary 485,102,600 497,675,214 498,375,214 511,708,846

Highlights

The FJA Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $511.7 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $10.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $501.5 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The total spending for the department shows a continual increase over the planning period.

A net increase of $14.0 million from 2013–14 Main Estimates is due mainly to $13.3 million for an increase in the number of judicial appointments, an increase in the overall average in the amounts of pensions being paid to pensioners in accordance with the Judges Act , as well as a provision for a salary increase to federally appointed judges. The remaining $0.7 million represents an increase to FJA’s operating budget for legal obligations.

Please refer to the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities for additional information.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 103. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
An independent and efficient Federal Judiciary.  
Payments Pursuant to the Judges Act 474,217,220 487,534,826 500,885,033
Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada 8,352,983 7,613,383 8,454,448
Canadian Judicial Council 1,657,597 1,672,727 1,642,565
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 874,800 854,278 726,800
Total 485,102,600 497,675,214 511,708,846

Communications Security Establishment

Raison d’être

As mandated by the National Defence Act, the Communications Security Establishment’s (CSE) Signals Intelligence program provides foreign intelligence that addresses the Government of Canada’s vital interests in defence, security, and international affairs through the collection, processing, analysis and reporting of intelligence. The Signals Intelligence program also helps protect the electronic information and information infrastructures of importance to the Government of Canada, and provides technical and operational assistance to federal law enforcement and security agencies.

CSE’s Information Technology Security program provides advice, guidance, and services to help ensure the protection of electronic information and information systems of importance to the Government of Canada.

The Minister of National Defence is responsible for CSE.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 49. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Communications Security Establishment

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 104. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Communications Security Establishment
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 382,112,733 388,818,662 409,796,599 796,802,239
Total voted 382,112,733 388,818,662 409,796,599 796,802,239
Total Statutory 32,381,824 33,389,185 33,949,959 32,329,679
Total budgetary 414,494,557 422,207,847 443,746,558 829,131,918

Highlights

CSE is estimating budgetary expenditures of $829.1 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $796.8 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $32.3 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Main Estimates for the department are $829.1 million, which includes:

  • A one-time increase of $300.0 million for a contract payment related to delivery of CSE’s new facility in 2014;
  • An increase of $100.8 million for contract payments in 2014–15 which includes maintenance of CSE’s new facility, built through a public-private partnership; and
  • An increase of $6.1 million in support of CSE’s mandate.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 105. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Communications Security Establishment
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
CSE’s foreign signals intelligence and technical security capabilities advance and protect Canada’s vital interests.  
Signals Intelligence 287,898,173 277,812,763 598,535,605
Information Technology Security 126,596,384 144,395,084 230,596,313
Total 414,494,557 422,207,847 829,131,918

Copyright Board

Raison d’être

The Copyright Board is an economic regulatory body empowered to establish, either mandatorily or at the request of an interested party, the royalties to be paid for the use of copyrighted works, when the administration of such copyright is entrusted to a collective-administration society. The Board also has the right to supervise agreements between users and licensing bodies and issues licences when the copyright owner cannot be located.

The Minister of Industry is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 50. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Copyright Board

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 106. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Copyright Board
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 2,265,653 2,826,682 2,826,682 2,829,969
Total voted 2,265,653 2,826,682 2,826,682 2,829,969
Total Statutory 243,332 301,313 301,313 286,343
Total budgetary 2,508,985 3,127,995 3,127,995 3,116,312

Highlights

The Copyright Board of Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $3.1 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $2.8 million requires approval by Parliament and the remaining $286.3 thousand represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Copyright Board of Canada will continue to ensure balanced decision-making and provide proper incentive for the creation and use of copyrighted works. The Board will also examine possible avenues to improve its practices and procedures, with the aim of streamlining them and reduce uncertainty, while safeguarding fairness of process.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 107. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Copyright Board
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Fair decision-making to provide proper incentives for the creation and use of copyrighted works.  
Copyright Tariff Setting and Issuance of Licences 2,032,278 2,533,676 2,524,213
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 476,707 594,319 592,099
Total 2,508,985 3,127,995 3,116,312

Correctional Service of Canada

Raison d’être

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for the Correctional Service of Canada.

The purpose of the federal correctional system, as defined by law, is to contribute to the maintenance of a just, peaceful and safe society by carrying out sentences imposed by courts through the safe and humane custody and supervision of offenders; and by assisting the rehabilitation of offenders and their reintegration into the community as law-abiding citizens through the provision of programs in penitentiaries and in the community (Corrections and Conditional Release Act, s.3).

The Correctional Service of Canada, as part of the criminal justice system and respecting the rule of law, contributes to public safety by actively encouraging and assisting offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.

Additional information can be found in the organization’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 51. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 52. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 108. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Correctional Service of Canada
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,968,711,838 2,008,952,406 2,014,055,169 1,913,020,536
5 Capital expenditures 437,736,337 355,544,519 355,103,020 184,244,519
Total voted 2,406,448,175 2,364,496,925 2,369,158,189 2,097,265,055
Total Statutory 236,551,036 233,116,766 233,116,766 237,417,337
Total budgetary 2,642,999,211 2,597,613,691 2,602,274,955 2,334,682,392
Non-budgetary
Voted
- Loans to individuals under mandatory supervision and parolees through the Parolees’ Loan Account 145 0 0 0
Total voted 145 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 145 0 0 0

Highlights

The Correctional Service of Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2,334.7 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $2,097.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $237.4 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. This represents a net decrease of $262.9 million from 2013–14 Main Estimates.

The forecast for the next few years is decreasing. This trend is largely attributed to projected inmate population growth which has not materialized with respect to the implementation of the Tackling Violent Crime Act and the Truth in Sentencing Act and the savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review.

The major changes are as follows:

  • An increase of $1.6 million for signed collective agreements;
  • A net decrease of $121.8 million associated with the Tackling Violent Crime Act and the Truth in Sentencing Act (composed of a decrease of $122.1 million in capital and an increase of $0.3 million in operating funds);
  • A decrease of $111.5 million related to savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review;
  • A net decrease of $26.7 million related to the department’s allocation of the employer’s share of Employee Benefit Plan;
  • A decrease of $2.4 million for a transfer to Shared Services Canada related to procurement of workplace technology device software;
  • A decrease of $0.9 million related to Government Wide Travel Reduction; and
  • A net decrease of $1.2 million related to other adjustments.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 109. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in communities and in institutions, contribute to public safety.  
Custody 1,739,638,255 1,564,435,167 1,471,011,448
Correctional Interventions 457,038,705 507,230,641 465,029,970
Community Supervision 117,648,594 157,124,262 93,399,963
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 328,673,657 368,823,621 305,241,011
Total 2,642,999,211 2,597,613,691 2,334,682,392

Table 110. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Correctional Service of Canada
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders in communities and in institutions, contribute to public safety.  
Correctional Interventions 145 0 0
Total 145 0 0

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 111. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Correctional Service of Canada
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant to the University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine for a psychiatric residency seat 85,412 160,001 160,000
Grant to the University of Saskatchewan for Forensic Research Centre 120,000 122,000 122,000
Contributions
Correctional Services of Canada’s National Infrastructure Contribution Program 0 0 4,700,000

Courts Administration Service

Raison d’être

The Courts Administration Service (CAS) was established in 2003 with the coming into force of the Courts Administration Service Act. The role of CAS is to provide effective and efficient judicial registry and corporate services to four superior courts of record – the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada. The Act enhances judicial independence by placing administrative services at arm’s length from the Government of Canada and enhances greater accountability for the use of public money.

The Minister of Justice is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 53. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Courts Administration Service

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 112. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Courts Administration Service
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 58,571,802 61,325,338 61,325,338 61,260,445
Total voted 58,571,802 61,325,338 61,325,338 61,260,445
Total Statutory 7,012,405 7,165,435 7,165,435 6,784,298
Total budgetary 65,584,207 68,490,773 68,490,773 68,044,743

Highlights

The CAS is estimating budgetary expenditures of $68.0 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $61.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $6.8 million represents the statutory funding forecast that does not require additional approval and is provided for information purposes.

The core programs of the CAS have remained relatively constant over the years. Nevertheless, CAS’ reference levels have been impacted by legislative changes affecting the workload of the federal courts as well as various government initiatives. The activities that have caused the majority of the variations in reference levels include:

  • Renewal of the Division 9 proceedings of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) aimed at addressing challenges in the management of security inadmissibility cases, protecting classified information in immigration proceedings, and obtaining diplomatic assurances of safety for inadmissible individuals facing a risk of torture;
  • Introduction of changes to the refugee determination process established in Bill C-11 in 2010, An Act to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Federal Courts Act;
  • A reprofile of funding from future fiscal years approved in 2011–12, to be repaid over five years, which enabled CAS to construct a new data centre and address information technology infrastructure rust-out;
  • Savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review; and
  • Collective bargaining settlements negotiated by the Government of Canada for the whole of the Public Service.

The decrease in the 2014–15 Main Estimates compared to 2013–14 is mainly related to the Budget 2012 Spending Review, offset by compensation in related to collective agreements.

The main variance from 2012–13 expenditures to 2014–15 Main Estimates is associated with funding for the implementation of An Act to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Federal Courts Act. This funding is available within the Main Estimates, but related expenditures are contingent upon the appointment of judges. There were no judicial appointments in 2012–13. The remaining impact of the Budget 2012 Spending Review is applied to CAS reference levels in 2014–15.

More details on important trends and variances can be found in the CAS 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities, as well as the Financial Statements Discussion and Analysis and the Quarterly Financial Reports.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 113. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Courts Administration Service
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
The public has timely and fair access to the litigation processes of the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court, the Court Martial Appeal Court of Canada and the Tax Court of Canada.  
Registry Services 25,400,192 26,700,966 26,673,348
Judicial Services 21,125,246 22,397,714 22,379,302
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 19,058,769 19,392,093 18,992,093
Total 65,584,207 68,490,773 68,044,743

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Raison d’être

Under its Act, the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec’s (the Agency) mission is to “promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate”.

The Agency contributes to the growth of Quebec regions’ economy by promoting start-ups and business development. It also supports the efforts of regional engagement and attraction of investments intended to increase the prosperity of Quebec’s economy.

Through its business offices, the Agency’s presence is well-rooted in all Quebec regions. It provides financial support to enterprises, predominantly small and medium-sized enterprises, as well as non-profit organizations.

The Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 54. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 114. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 43,194,294 38,535,171 39,720,159 37,907,218
5 Grants and contributions 247,508,999 211,466,912 260,895,889 205,309,446
Total voted 290,703,293 250,002,083 300,616,048 243,216,664
Total Statutory 5,726,053 4,929,289 5,118,717 4,623,953
Total budgetary 296,429,346 254,931,372 305,734,765 247,840,617

Highlights

The budgetary expenditures of the Agency amount to $247.8 million for 2014–15. These expenditures will support business development, regional economic development and the strengthening of community economies including internal services.

Planned expenditures reflect a decline of $7.1 million (or 3%) compared to the previous year.

The decrease mainly stems from the termination of funding for several temporary initiatives such as the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund and the Program to Fund Construction of a Gas Pipeline Between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines.

On the other hand, the Agency has received additional funding for the implementation of the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities reliant on Chrysotile and for the Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative.

Business Development: The Agency will continue to foster the development of businesses by supporting entrepreneurship and business performance. To contribute to Quebec’s economic growth, one of the Agency’s priorities consists of maintaining and supporting businesses’ evolution. More specifically, the Agency will support entrepreneurship by nurturing enterprise creation and start-up. It will also support the competitiveness of businesses by focusing on their productivity and expansion, innovation and technology transfer, commercialization and exports projects.

Regional Economic Development: The Agency will also continue to support regional economic development by fostering regional engagement in economic development and stimulating investment in various regions of Quebec. To this end, the Agency will continue to encourage the regions’ efforts in obtaining collective facilities to exploit or enhance their assets. It will also promote regional assets with a view to increase tourist spending and attract investment.

Strengthening Community Economies: To strengthen communities’ economy, the Agency will continue its support through the Community Futures Program. It will continue to act as an operational partner with Infrastructure Canada in managing various programs in Quebec. Through temporary initiatives, the Agency will continue to support economic activity in Quebec communities in order to stabilize or strengthen their economy. Furthermore, major interventions of the Agency in 2014–15 consist in strengthening the economies of the regions and communities with targeted temporary support through the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities reliant on Chrysotile and through the economic recovery of the city of Lac-Megantic following the rail tragedy.

Internal Services: Internal Services, which include Governance and Management Support, Resource Management Services, and Asset Management Services, will continue to support program implementation in the Agency. In connection with Internal Services, one of the Agency’s priorities is to continue its modernization and transfor mation to increase its efficiency through: (i) the simplification and modernization of processes and tools to provide more accessible programs delivery to its clients; (ii) the continuation of the implementation of departmental initiatives and government-wide transformation; and (iii) the implementation of concrete measures to build the public service of tomorrow.

Additional information regarding the authorities, mandate and programs of the Agency are available in the Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 115. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.  
Business Development 130,483,270 152,565,372 146,609,271
Regional Economic Development 44,054,296 39,283,744 48,507,928
Strengthening Community Economies 102,808,455 48,271,536 38,816,648
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 19,083,325 14,810,720 13,906,770
Total 296,429,346 254,931,372 247,840,617

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 116. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants under the Quebec Economic Development Program 50,000 1,500,000 1,650,000
Contributions
Contributions under the Quebec Economic Development Program 203,654,608 180,998,894 174,691,428
Contributions under the Community Futures Program 28,613,133 28,968,018 28,968,018

Employment and Social Development

Raison d’κtre

The Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister of Labour are responsible for this organization.

The mission of Employment and Social Development (ESDC) is to build a stronger and more competitive Canada, to support Canadians in making choices that help them live productive and rewarding lives, and to improve Canadians’ quality of life. The Department delivers a range of programs and services that affect Canadians throughout their lives through three business lines: programs that support employment and social development, the Labour Program, and Service Canada.

ESDC provides seniors with basic income security, supports unemployed workers, helps students finance their post-secondary education, and assists parents who are raising young children. The Labour Program is responsible for labour laws and policies in federally regulated workplaces. Service Canada helps citizens access ESDC's programs, as well as other Government of Canada programs and services, at close to 600 points of service across the country. Additional information can be found in the organization’s Report on Plan and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 55. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Employment and Social Development

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 56. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Employment and Social Development

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 117. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Employment and Social Development
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 654,522,570 626,536,688 631,933,247 571,067,134
5 Grants and contributions 1,704,013,699 1,761,893,292 1,821,358,192 1,227,675,995
- Debt write-off — Canada Student Loans 226,838,073 0 0 0
Total voted 2,585,374,342 2,388,429,980 2,453,291,439 1,798,743,129
Total Statutory 45,849,590,282 48,136,658,141 48,140,275,335 49,872,029,598
Total budgetary 48,434,964,624 50,525,088,121 50,593,566,774 51,670,772,727
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory 980,677,937 760,632,426 760,632,426 779,981,475
Total non-budgetary 980,677,937 760,632,426 760,632,426 779,981,475

Highlights

ESDC is planning budgetary expenditures on programs and services totaling $51.7 billion in 2014–15, of which $49.9 billion, or more than 96%, will directly benefit Canadians through the Old Age Security Program, the Universal Child Care Benefit and other statutory transfer payment programs.

Of the total amount of planned expenditures, $1.8 billion requires approval from Parliament. The remaining $49.9 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The 2014–15 planned spending represents an increase of $3.3 billion, or 7%, when compared to the 2012–13 actual budgetary expenditures of $48.4 billion. This increase is mostly explained by an increase to Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement payments resulting from the aging population and the planned increase in the average monthly benefit amount.

When compared to the 2013–14 budgetary Main Estimates of $50.5 billion, the 2014–15 planned expenditures represent a net increase of $1.2 billion. This increase is primarily associated with statutory items. In particular, the forecasted Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement payments are $43.7 billion and represent an increase of $1.2 billion and $387 million respectively, explained by changes in the average rates of payment and in the number of beneficiaries. Other factors contributing to the increase include:

  • An increase of $77.3 million in the Canada Student Grants to qualifying full and part-time students pursuant to the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act attributed to the growth rate assumption from the Office of Chief Actuary;
  • An increase of $31.0 million to the Universal Child Care Benefit based on an increased number of children entitled to the benefit;
  • An increase of $19.0 million in Canada Education Savings Grant payments due to more families saving for their children’s post-secondary education;
  • An increase of $14.5 million in the payments related to the direct financing arrangement under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act mainly due to an increase to repayment assistance costs that consider the latest Office of Chief Actuary projections for borrowers in repayment; and
  • A $14.5 million increase to the Canada Disability Savings Grants and Bonds which is due to a steady increase in total registered plans and participation in the program.

These increases are offset by decreases in Vote 1 and Vote 5. In terms of Vote 1 – Operating expenditures, the department plans to spend $571.1 million in 2014–15. This represents a decrease of $55.4 million from 2013–14 Main Estimates of $626.5 million. The decrease is mainly attributable to the Department’s savings initiatives as announced in Budget 2012, which are focused on making government operations leaner and more efficient while preserving fundamental programs, services and transfers for Canadian individuals and families.

As for Vote 5 – Grants and Contributions, the 2014–15 Main Estimates is $1,228 million. This funding level includes the Homelessness Partnering Strategy, as confirmed in the Economic Action Plan (Budget 2013). However, the overall decrease of $534 million from the 2013–14 Main Estimates is mainly attributable to the expiry of the Labour Market Agreements program. Economic Action Plan 2013 announced that the Government would transform skills training in Canada through the introduction of the Canada Job Grant, as part of the renewal of the Labour Market Agreements in 2014–15. Negotiations are currently under way to renew and transform the program consistent with this commitment.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 118. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Employment and Social Development
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.  
Income Security 40,557,943,884 42,957,048,790 44,557,391,657
Social Development 2,996,545,951 3,030,089,548 3,052,032,587
A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market.  
Learning 2,274,086,340 2,138,031,740 2,235,678,253
Skills and Employment 1,902,275,248 1,700,168,749 1,159,480,484
Service Excellence for Canadians.  
Integrity and Processing 139,033,788 163,141,327 168,143,571
Citizen-Centred Service 130,627,625 102,628,074 118,978,951
Safe, fair and productive workplaces and cooperative workplace relations.  
Labour 141,638,166 155,474,827 154,124,966
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 292,813,622 278,505,066 224,942,258
Total 48,434,964,624 50,525,088,121 51,670,772,727

Table 119. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Employment and Social Development
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market.  
Learning 980,677,937 760,632,426 779,981,475
Total 980,677,937 760,632,426 779,981,475

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 120. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Employment and Social Development
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Apprenticeship Grants 101,705,000 114,552,200 114,552,200
New Horizons for Seniors Program 69,382,923 36,340,000 36,340,000
Grants to not-for-profit, for-profit, and aboriginal organizations, municipal, provincial and territorial governments for adult learning, literacy and essential skills 125,840 18,300,000 18,300,000
Grants to non-profit organizations for activities eligible for support through the Social Development Partnerships Program 7,150,883 14,275,000 14,775,000
Enabling Accessibility Fund Small Projects Grant 14,387,529 0 13,650,000
Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children 4,200 10,000,000 10,000,000
Labour Funding Program 1,948,232 1,203,000 1,703,000
Grants to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal governments, Band/tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations, public health and educational institutions, Rιgies rιgionales, for-profit enterprises, research organizations and research institutes to carry out research on homelessness to help communities better understand and more effectively address homelessness issues 1,892,781 750,000 250,000
Named grants for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development 97,513 100,000 100,000
Contributions
Payments to provinces, territories, municipalities, other public bodies, organizations, groups, communities, employers and individuals for the provision of training and/or work experience, the mobilization of community resources, and human resource planning and adjustment measures necessary for the efficient functioning of the Canadian labour market 538,752,478 607,476,600 635,962,672
Contributions to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal governments, Band/tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations, public health and educational institutions, Rιgies rιgionales, for-profit enterprises, research organizations and research institutes to support activities to help alleviate and prevent homelessness across Canada and to carry out research on homelessness to help communities better understand and more effectively address homelessness issues 112,276,770 133,582,094 108,050,000
Contributions to provincial/territorial governments, band councils, tribal councils, Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy agreement holders, municipal governments, not-for-profit organizations, professional associations, business and private sector organizations, consortia, industry groups, unions, regulatory bodies, ad-hoc associations, public health institutions, school boards, universities, colleges, CEGEPs, sector councils, and cross-sectoral councils to support enhanced productivity and competitiveness of Canadian workplaces by supporting investment in and recognition and utilization of skills 37,730,673 27,144,123 27,144,123
Contributions to organizations to support the development of human resources, economic growth, job creation and retention in official language minority communities 11,999,582 0 12,000,000
Payments to provinces, territories, municipalities, other public bodies, organizations, groups, communities, employers and individuals for the provision of training and/or work or business experience, the mobilization of community resources and human resource planning and adjustment measures necessary for the social development of Canadians and other participants in Canadian life 6,544,882 5,840,000 5,840,000
Contributions to not-for-profit, for-profit, and aboriginal organizations, municipal, provincial and territorial governments for adult learning, literacy and essential skills 11,621,888 5,209,000 5,209,000
Payments to non-profit organizations to develop national or provincial/territorial/regional educational and awareness activities to help reduce the incidence of elder abuse and fraud 2,814,928 1,800,000 1,800,000
Other Transfer Payments
Payments to provinces and territories under the Multilateral Framework for Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities 218,251,611 222,000,000 222,000,000

Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation

Raison d’κtre

Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation (ECBC) is a federal Crown corporation that promotes and coordinates economic development throughout Cape Breton Island and a portion of mainland Nova Scotia in and around the town of Mulgrave.

In addition to its own programs, ECBC is also responsible for the delivery of programs of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency on Cape Breton Island and the programs of the former Cape Breton Development Corporation.

ECBC is the principal federal entity for commercial and community economic development on Cape Breton Island and in Mulgrave.

The Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency) is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 57. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 121. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Payments to the Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation 60,667,000 51,763,000 52,848,000 49,536,000
Total voted 60,667,000 51,763,000 52,848,000 49,536,000
Total budgetary 60,667,000 51,763,000 52,848,000 49,536,000

Highlights

ECBC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $49.5 million in 2014–15 which requires approval by Parliament.

A decrease of $3.3 million from total 2013–14 Estimates based on the following:

  • There are over 395 former employees participating in a number of Early Retirement Incentive Plans which were negotiated in the past through the collective bargaining process in response to downsizing and mine closures. The cost for these plans will decrease annually over the next 8 years as recipients reach age 65. The Early Retirement Incentive Plans are scheduled to expire in 2022.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 122. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A competitive and sustainable Cape Breton economy.  
Human Resource Obligations 0 36,449,000 32,194,000
Environmental Stewardship 0 6,664,000 8,692,000
Commercial Development 0 3,362,000 3,150,000
Property Development 0 2,401,000 2,400,000
Community Development 0 1,303,000 1,460,000
Policy and Advocacy 0 250,000 250,000
Regional Service Delivery 0 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 0 1,334,000 1,390,000
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 60,667,000 0 0
Total 60,667,000 51,763,000 49,536,000

Environment

Raison d’κtre

The Minister of the Environment is responsible for this organization.

Environment Canada is the lead federal department for a wide range of environmental issues affecting Canadians. The Department also plays a stewardship role in achieving and maintaining a clean, safe and sustainable environment. Environment Canada addresses issues through monitoring, research, policy development, service delivery to Canadians, regulations, enforcement of environmental laws, advancement of clean technologies and strategic partnerships. The Department’s programs focus on a clean environment by minimizing threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution; a safe environment by equipping Canadians to make informed decisions on weather, water and climate conditions; and a sustainable environment by conserving and restoring Canada’s natural environment. The Department’s program focus reflects the increasingly evident interdependence between environmental sustainability and economic well-being.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 58. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Environment

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 123. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Environment
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 725,061,714 701,254,526 697,001,155 687,165,091
5 Capital expenditures 46,622,606 51,922,400 52,116,216 52,789,150
10 Grants and contributions 103,654,358 117,353,468 119,598,662 107,286,053
Total voted 875,338,678 870,530,394 868,716,033 847,240,294
Total Statutory 114,316,784 88,828,924 109,385,289 84,927,036
Total budgetary 989,655,462 959,359,318 978,101,322 932,167,330

Highlights

The significant variances between Environment Canada’s 2012–13 actual expenditures and the 2013–14 Main Estimates are mainly due to adjustments and transfers during the fiscal year. These include the operating and capital carry forwards, the reimbursement of paylist expenditures and the statutory payment to Nature Conservancy of Canada. These in-year changes will also be reflected in the 2013–14 actual expenditures.

Compared with the 2013–14 Main Estimates, Environment Canada’s 2014–15 Main Estimates show a planned spending decrease of $27.2 million or 2.8% of which $14.1 million is in Operating, $10.1 million is in Grants and Contributions and $3.9 million in the Employee Benefit Plan. These decreases are offset by an increase of $0.9 million in Capital.

The major decreases are:

  • A decrease in funding of $22.3 million related to savings from Budget 2012 spending review;
  • A decrease in funding for Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) – Next Generation Biofuels Fund of $25.0 million, offset by new funding for SDTC – Sustainable Development Technology Fund of $12.5 million;
  • A decrease of $12.6 million related to a transfer to Shared Services Canada;
  • A decrease in funding of $7.4 million for the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda;
  • A decrease in funding of $5.1 million related to the adjustment of rates for the Employee Benefit Plan; and
  • A decrease in funding of $2.7 million for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan.

These decreases are offset by an increase of $35.4 million related to three programs:

  • An increase of $19.1 million for the clean-up of the Great Lakes, including Randle Reef in Hamilton Harbour;
  • An increase of $8.5 million for parts one and two of the first phase of a strategy to implement a world class prevention, preparedness and response regime for oil spills from ships;
  • An increase of $7.6 million to renew the Lake Simcoe/South-eastern Georgian Bay Clean-Up Fund announced in Budget 2012;
  • Other small increases totalling a net amount of $0.2 million.

For information related to 2013–14 Estimates to date, please refer to the 2013–14 Supplementary Estimates (B) and (C).

For further details on trends, please refer to the Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 124. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Environment
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.  
Sustainable Ecosystems 67,500,282 66,589,903 92,013,642
Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat 124,279,701 99,530,109 91,592,394
Water Resources 108,552,181 96,788,965 91,196,857
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Wildlife 16,695,292 16,623,597 15,821,926
Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.  
Climate Change and Clean Air 157,525,949 179,283,757 154,813,450
Substances and Waste Management 79,295,781 73,874,896 75,747,789
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution 41,707,206 43,773,701 38,324,642
Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, waterand climate conditions.  
Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians 167,695,081 158,545,334 165,962,548
Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users 23,048,760 25,547,830 25,266,280
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 203,355,229 198,801,226 181,427,802
Total 989,655,462 959,359,318 932,167,330

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 125. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Environment
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant to the Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology 0 50,000,000 37,500,000
Grants for the implementation of the Montreal Protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer 2,652,067 2,000,000 2,800,000
Grant in support of weather and environmental services for Canadians 40,000 44,000 44,000
Contributions
Contributions in support of Sustainable Ecosystems 8,143,654 11,719,738 15,602,348
Contributions in support of Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat 12,974,482 13,037,175 14,213,902
Habitat Stewardship Contribution Program 9,464,259 11,769,000 11,769,000
Contributions in support of Climate Change and Clean Air 39,030,461 9,346,572 8,126,572
EcoAction 2000 – Community Funding Initiative 4,141,003 4,525,000 4,525,000
Contributions for the Science Horizons Youth Internship and the International Environmental Youth Corp programs 1,693,556 3,069,000 3,069,000
Contribution for Canada’s share of the Commission of Environmental Co-operation budget 3,101,100 3,230,000 2,930,000
Contributions in support of Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians 14,908,822 2,171,019 2,177,492
Assessed contribution to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) 2,204,583 2,167,785 2,167,785
Contributions in support of Substances and Waste management 1,690,706 1,751,364 1,260,219
Contributions in support of Water Resources 1,418,098 1,099,595 604,595
Assessed contribution to the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention) 168,061 198,220 206,140
Assessed contribution to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) 172,621 190,000 190,000
Assessed contribution to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 98,562 100,000 100,000

Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario

Raison d’κtre

As Canada’s most populous region – home to more than 12 million residents living in 288 communities – southern Ontario is a key contributor to the Canadian economy. In 2009, the Government of Canada created the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario). To fulfill its mandate, FedDev Ontario supports the competitiveness, innovation, and diversification of southern Ontario’s economy by: delivering strategic investments to businesses, not-for-profit organizations and communities; establishing and strengthening collaborative partnerships with key economic stakeholders; and representing the region’s interests at the national level.

FedDev Ontario’s mandate was renewed in Budget 2013 for another five years with an investment of $920 million between 2014-2019 allowing the Agency to continue to apply its various roles (co-investor, convener, champion and delivery agent) to support jobs, growth and long-term prosperity in southern Ontario.

The Minister of State for the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 59. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 126. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 26,645,913 24,774,560 24,774,560 26,037,429
5 Grants and contributions 212,041,526 194,888,410 214,718,410 177,631,522
Total voted 238,687,439 219,662,970 239,492,970 203,668,951
Total Statutory 3,033,528 3,149,796 3,151,796 3,095,164
Total budgetary 241,720,967 222,812,766 242,644,766 206,764,115

Highlights

FedDev Ontario is estimating budgetary expenditures of $206.8 million in 2014–15. Of this amount, $203.7 million requires voted approval by Parliament. The remaining $3.1 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

FedDev Ontario’s planned spending in 2014–15 will be dedicated to the delivery of programs and support through internal services to help achieve the Agency’s strategic outcome. For 2014–15, the Agency anticipates spending$177.6 million in grants and contributions while requiring $29.1 million in operating costs to support program delivery and internal service areas. These totals are net of the changes to funding levels announced in Budget 2012, which includes reductions to operating and transfer payment funds in 2014–15 and future years.

FedDev Ontario will deliver its core contribution budget for 2014–15 through the Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives (four initiatives designed to support innovation, business growth and productivity, and regional diversification). In addition, FedDev Ontario will also administer the Advanced Manufacturing Fund, the Community Futures Program, the Eastern Ontario Development Program and the Economic Development Initiative.

In total, FedDev Ontario is estimating a decrease of $16 million or 7% from its 2013–14 Main Estimates.

Significant year-over-year changes in funding:

A net decrease of $17.3 million in transfer payments, which includes:

  • No further funding for the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund, which represents a drop of $24.8 million; and
  • A decrease of $1.5 million in grants to the Corporation of the City of Brantford; and
  • Increased funding of $8 million to support the restoration and revitalization of Massey Hall and $972 thousand for the Economic Development Initiative.

A net increase of $1.3 million in operating funds, which includes:

  • $1.8 million increase for the transfer of Canada Business Ontario to FedDev Ontario;
  • $0.1 million increase for the delivery of the Economic Development Initiative;
  • Offset by $0.6 million decrease due to Budget 2012 spending review.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 127. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A Competitive Southern Ontario Economy.  
Technological Innovation 56,576,259 62,760,436 79,171,993
Business Development 131,523,159 90,406,932 77,643,433
Community Economic Development 34,609,151 55,397,113 34,102,802
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 19,012,398 14,248,285 15,845,887
Total 241,720,967 222,812,766 206,764,115

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 128. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions for Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives 175,542,810 144,141,318 115,773,898
Contributions for the Advanced Manufacturing Fund 0 0 40,000,000
Contributions under the Community Futures Program 11,207,788 11,285,992 11,285,992
Contributions under the Eastern Ontario Development Program 13,195,957 13,200,000 9,600,000
Contributions under the Economic Development Initiative – Official Languages 864,358 0 971,632

Finance

Raison d’κtre

The Department of Finance Canada contributes to a strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians. It does so by monitoring developments in Canada and around the world to provide first-rate analysis and advice to the Government of Canada and by developing and implementing fiscal and economic policies that support the economic and social goals of Canada and its people. The Department also plays a central role in ensuring that government spending is focused on results and delivers value for taxpayer dollars. The Department interacts extensively with other federal organizations and acts as an effective conduit for the views of participants in the economy from all parts of Canada.

The Minister of Finance is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 60. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Finance

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 61. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Finance

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 129. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Finance
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 119,468,990 111,169,165 118,905,259 114,981,053
5 Grants and contributions 15,002,006 5,035,000 9,235,000 5,035,000
- Authority for amount of financial assistance to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development for the Agriculture Advance Market Commitment pursuant to Subsection 8(2) of the Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act 0 1 1 0
- To amend subsection 14(1) of the Canadian Securities Regulation Regime Transition Office Act 0 0 1 0
Total voted 134,470,996 116,204,166 128,140,261 120,016,053
Total Statutory 83,506,130,450 87,495,637,585 86,814,451,568 87,495,714,686
Total budgetary 83,640,601,446 87,611,841,751 86,942,591,829 87,615,730,739
Non-budgetary
Voted
L10 Authority for amount of demand notes to the International Development Association pursuant to Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act 0 1 1 1
Total voted 0 1 1 1
Total Statutory 65,474,622,297 1 1 0
Total non-budgetary 65,474,622,297 2 2 1

Highlights

Finance is estimating budgetary expenditures of $87.6 billion in 2014–15. Of this amount, $120 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $87.5 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information only.

A spending increase of $3.9 million from the 2013–14 Main Estimates to 2014–15 Main Estimates is due mainly to the following increases and decreases. A net increase of $0.1 million in statutory votes is mainly attributable to:

  • Canada Health Transfer – The increase of $1.831 billion reflects the 6% annual increased funding commitment in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, 2012. This program will increase by 6% per year until 2016–17, after which it will grow based on a 3-year moving average of nominal gross domestic product, with funding guaranteed to increase by at least 3% per year;
  • Fiscal Equalization – The increase of $564.1 million reflects the increase due to the 3.5% gross domestic product-based escalator applied to the 2013–14 level;
  • Canada Social Transfer – The increase of $366.5 million reflects the 3% annual increased funding commitment in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, 2012;
  • Territorial Financing – The increase of $180.9 million is a result of new and updated data entering the formula for Territorial Formula Financing;
  • Canadian Securities Regulation Regime Transition Office (CSTO) – The increase of $9.1 million reflects the anticipated transfer to the CSTO in 2014–15 to fulfill its mandate of assisting in the establishment of a Canadian securities regulation regime and a Canadian regulatory authority;
  • Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia – The decrease of $25 million is due to the decline in offshore revenues received by Nova Scotia;
  • Youth Allowance Recovery – The increase in recovery of $45.6 million results from an increase in the estimated value of personal income tax points;
  • Additional Fiscal Equalization to Nova Scotia – The reduction of $107.5 million in this program, which ensures that there is no reduction in Equalization and 2005 Offshore Accord Offset Payments due to the new formula for Equalization (2007), is due to higher growth of combined Equalization and 2005 Offshore Accord payments in the new formula compared to the formula which was in place prior to 2007;
  • Alternative Payments for Standing Programs – The increase in recoveries in the amount of $203 million results from an increase in the value of personal income tax points;
  • Wait Times Reduction Transfer – The reduction of $250 million relates to the sun setting of this program in 2013–14;
  • Interest on Unmatured Debt – The reduction of $254 million is largely due to assets maturing under the Insured Mortgage Purchase Program in 2013–14;
  • Other Interest Costs – The reduction of $583 million is due to a decrease in the average Government of Canada long-term bond rate, which is used to calculate interest on the public sector pension obligations pertaining to service pre-April 1, 2000; and
  • Payments to Provinces Regarding Sales Tax Harmonization – The decrease of $1.481 billion reflects the completion of scheduled payments to Quebec and Prince Edward Island under the Comprehensive Integrated Tax Coordination Agreements.

A net increase of $3.8 million in Vote 1, Operating expenditures is mainly attributable to:

  • Government initiatives – temporary increase of $6.6 million (the transition to a Common Securities Regulator($3.0 million); the development of a Comprehensive Legislative Financial Consumer Code ($1.7 million); supporting the G-20 Framework Working Group ($0.6 million); implementing the Venture Capital Action Plan ($0.5 million); maintaining the strength of Canada’s financial system ($0.4 million); and the Corporate Asset Management Review ($0.4 million);
  • Transfer to Shared Services Canada – permanent decrease of $1.3 million for workplace technology device software and corporate information management/information technology;
  • Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative (TWRI) – decrease of $587 thousand corresponding to the sunsetting of the TWRI program;
  • Budget 2011 sunsetting initiatives – decrease of $436 thousand related to Goods and Services Tax (GST) Technical issues and legislative and regulatory drafting and printing activities; and
  • Savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review – permanent decrease of $428 thousand.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 130. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Finance
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians.  
Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs 57,360,555,306 60,227,888,029 61,060,094,305
Treasury and Financial Affairs 26,148,248,975 27,260,500,000 26,419,500,000
Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework 81,328,189 73,407,718 86,840,289
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 50,468,976 50,046,004 49,296,145
Total 83,640,601,446 87,611,841,751 87,615,730,739

Table 131. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Finance
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A strong economy and sound public finances for Canadians.  
Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs 109,030,173 2 1
Treasury and Financial Affairs 65,365,592,124 0 0
Total 65,474,622,297 2 1

Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments

Table 132. Listing of the 2014–15 Transfer Payments - Finance
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contribution to the Harbourfront Centre 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000
Research and Policy Initiatives Assistance 15,000 35,000 35,000
Other Transfer Payments
Total Statutory 57,313,175,500 60,222,853,029 61,064,194,305

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

Raison d’κtre

The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) is Canada’s financial intelligence unit. The Centre exists to assist in the detection, prevention and deterrence of money laundering and the financing of terrorist activities. FINTRAC’s “value-added” financial intelligence products and compliance functions are a unique contribution to the public safety of Canadians and to the protection of the integrity of Canada’s financial system.

FINTRAC is an independent agency that operates at arm’s length from the law enforcement agencies and other entities to which it is authorized to disclose financial intelligence. It reports to the Minister of Finance, who is in turn accountable to Parliament for the activities of the Centre. FINTRAC was established by, and operates within, the ambit of the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (PCMLTFA) and its regulations.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 62. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 133. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Program expenditures 48,879,599 45,744,322 45,744,322 43,803,658
Total voted 48,879,599 45,744,322 45,744,322 43,803,658
Total Statutory 5,113,972 5,658,585 5,658,585 5,385,654
Total budgetary 53,993,571 51,402,907 51,402,907 49,189,312

Highlights

FINTRAC is one of several domestic partners in Canada’s Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime, which also includes the Department of Finance as the policy lead, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Canada Revenue Agency, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, the Department of Justice, and Public Safety Canada. FINTRAC is also part of the Egmont Group, an international network of financial intelligence units that collaborate and exchange information to combat money laundering and terrorist activity financing.

FINTRAC’s role is to facilitate the detection, prevention and deterrence of money laundering and terrorist activity financing by engaging in the following activities:

  • Receiving financial transaction reports and voluntary information on money laundering and terrorist activity financing in accordance with the legislation and regulations;
  • Safeguarding personal information under its control;
  • Ensuring compliance of reporting entities with the legislation and regulations;
  • Maintaining a registry of money services businesses in Canada;
  • Producing financial intelligence relevant to investigations of money laundering, terrorist activity financing and threats to the security of Canada;
  • Researching and analyzing data from a variety of information sources that shed light on trends and patterns in money laundering and terrorist activity financing; and
  • Enhancing public awareness and understanding of money laundering and terrorist activity financing.

In order to enhance FINTRAC’s ability to ensure compliance with PCMLTFA and to meet its responsibilities related to tax evasion becoming a predicate offence to money laundering, the Centre received funding via Budget 2010. In 2012–13, this funding was $10.5 million. In 2013–14, funding decreased to $10.0 million and will stabilize at $8.0 million in 2014–15 and ongoing. In fiscal year 2013–14 and ongoing, FINTRAC’s financial resources fully reflect the saving measures announced in Budget 2012.

FINTRAC’s headquarters are located in Ottawa, with three regional offices in Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver having specific mandates related to compliance with the PCMLTFA.

For further details regarding FINTRAC, its operations and its use of funds, please refer to the 2014–15 Reports on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 134. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
A Canadian financial system resistant to money laundering and terrorist financing.  
Financial Intelligence Program 22,673,503 21,846,235 20,905,458
Compliance Program 23,068,382 21,846,235 20,905,458
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.  
Internal Services 8,251,686 7,710,437 7,378,396
Total 53,993,571 51,402,907 49,189,312

First Nations Statistical Institute

Raison d’κtre

Division 49 of the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act announced that First Nations Statistical Institute would cease its operations. Order of the Governor in Council SI/2013-38 fixed the date as April 1, 2013.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 63. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - First Nations Statistical Institute

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 135. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - First Nations Statistical Institute
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
- Payments to the First Nations Statistical Institute for operating expenditures 2,028,410 0 0 0
Total voted 2,028,410 0 0 0
Total budgetary 2,028,410 0 0 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 136. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - First Nations Statistical Institute
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Funds not allocated to the 2014–15 Program Alignment Architecture 2,028,410 0 0
Total 2,028,410 0 0

Fisheries and Oceans

Raison d’κtre

Fisheries and Oceans Canada supports strong economic growth in our marine and fisheries sectors and contributes to a prosperous economy through global commerce by supporting exports and advancing safe maritime trade. The department supports the innovation needed for a knowledge-based economy through research in expanding sectors such as aquaculture and biotechnology. The department contributes to a clean and healthy environment and sustainable aquatic ecosystems for Canadians through habitat protection, oceans management, and ecosystems research. A safe and secure Canada relies on the maritime security, safe navigation, a presence in our waters, and the effective search and rescue services that the Canadian Coast Guard provides. The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 64. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Fisheries and Oceans

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Table 137. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Fisheries and Oceans
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2013–14 Estimates To Date 2014–15 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures 1,241,000,803 1,119,719,113 1,212,742,807 1,101,569,625
5 Capital expenditures 307,868,372 360,102,196 354,756,113 325,273,149
10 Grants and contributions 88,186,047 59,091,192 88,234,171 57,853,950
Total voted 1,637,055,222 1,538,912,501 1,655,733,091 1,484,696,724
Total Statutory 140,050,022 129,976,884 133,127,826 120,614,124
Total budgetary 1,777,105,244 1,668,889,385 1,788,860,917 1,605,310,848

Highlights

Fisheries and Oceans Canada has three mandated strategic outcomes, which are:

  • Economically prosperous maritime sectors and fisheries;
  • Sustainable aquatic ecosystems; and,
  • Safe and secure waters.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1.6 billion in 2014–15. Compared to 2013–14, Main Estimates have decreased by $63.6 million. Major changes include:

  • An increase of $32.0 million for the procurement of Canadian Coast Guard offshore science vessels;
  • An increase of $24.3 million to strengthen the prevention, preparedness and response regime to oil spills from ships (phase 1, parts 1 and 2);
  • An increase of $10.5 million for the renewal of the Sustainable Aquaculture Program;
  • A decrease of $45.2 million related to savings measures as part of Budget 2012 spending review;
  • A decrease of $36.8 million related to the acquisition of mid-shore patrol vessels;
  • A decrease of $30.2 million related to Canadian Coast Guard vessel life extensions and mid-life modernizations;
  • A decrease of $5.4 million related to Targeted Review measures, as announced in Budget 2013; and,
  • A decrease of $5.0 million related to completion of the initiative to support Quebec and Atlantic Canada lobster harvesters as well as the Quebec and Atlantic Canada lobster fishery.

For additional information, please see the Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 138. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Fisheries and Oceans
  2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Main Estimates 2014–15 Main Estimates
Safe and Secure Waters.  
Fleet Operational Readiness 431,657,999 477,114,152 434,001,300
Shore-Based Asset Readiness 137,714,376 109,646,331 114,469,108
Marine Communications and Traffic Services 52,570,352 45,502,287 39,400,851
Search and Rescue Services 38,113,431 34,173,775 30,359,815
Hydrographic Products and Services 30,368,076 26,590,333 26,671,207
Canadian Coast Guard College 15,886,367 10,912,075 12,928,545
Maritime Security 6,614,796 8,337,583 9,240,284
Ocean Forecasting 17,282,396 9,547,026 8,799,464
Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries.  
Integrated Fisheries Management 120,395,929 144,397,270 132,448,762
Small Craft Harbours 111,762,240 97,933,771 94,277,242
Aboriginal Strategies and Governance 85,309,398 56,875,763 54,778,338
Marine Navigation 51,599,881 42,360,512 34,167,537
Salmonid Enhancement Program 29,034,212 29,688,187 29,597,995
Sustainable Aquaculture Program 34,288,659 20,674,443 29,222,400
International Engagement 14,033,632 14,972,643 14,882,983
Aquatic Animal Health 6,015,341 5,772,301 5,564,900
Biotechnology and Genomics 3,327,949 3,576,752 2,918,827
Climate Change Adaptation Program 0 3,119,554 2,310,465
Territorial Delineation 3,944,254 2,180,095 742,607
Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems.  
Compliance and Enforcement 107,321,670 105,381,968 101,372,908
Fisheries Protection 59,662,859 58,417,049 62,943,218
Oceans Management 37,284,599 30,062,652 38,351,812
Species at Risk Management 22,438,827 23,641,311 22,350,000
Environmental Response Services 11,147,469 10,346,850