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Environment Canada - Supplementary Tables


Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Canadian Group on Earth Observations is a collection of federal departments participating in the international Group on Earth Observations (GEO).

Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada is the lead department by virtue of the identification of the ADM of the Meteorological Service of Canada as the GEO Principal.

Lead department program activity: 2.1 Weather and environmental services for Canadians

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 2003. There are no dedicated funds; this initiative is funded instead from the existing resources envelope (A-Base).

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Provided through the existing resources envelope (A-Base) and in-kind contributions from federal departments.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The GEO seeks to implement the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to allow free and open access to Earth observations for decision- and policy-makers in all countries. In so doing, users such as Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada will be able to better predict the future state of Planet Earth and better warn citizens of the onset of hazardous conditions. See the GEO website for more details: http://www.earthobservations.org/

Shared outcome(s):

  • Enhancing access to Global Earth Observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements;
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international; and
  • Improving evidence-based decision-making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations.

Governance structure(s): Coordination is achieved through the ADM-level Federal Committee on Geomatics and Earth Observation (FCGEO), the DG-level Interdepartmental Coordinating Committee (ICC) and ad hoc working-level committees.

Planning Highlights: Work continues to establish working groups in the Prairies and the Rocky Mountains for better understanding of the water cycle and better predictions of drought, flood and water quality conditions. This is connected to efforts related to the Global Drought Monitoring Initiative. The GEO Plenary held in Istanbul Nov. 16–17 reaffirms the countries’ commitment to the GEOSS. At the plenary, Canada was elected to the GEO Executive Committee for the first time, providing an opportunity to enhance Canada’s leadership role in the GEO. In the coming years, Canada’s active participation will contribute to global efforts in the area of forest carbon tracking and the Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM). In 2012, the Canadian Space Agency will assume the chairmanship of the Committee on Earth Observation  Satellites (CEOS). Canada also plays a key role in the GEO Monitoring and Evaluation Working Group, with EC providing a co-chair and AAFC providing expertise to the group performing the third GEO results evaluation. The interdepartmental ADM-level FCGEO steering committee was formed and is co-chaired by AAFC and NRC and is active in providing direction to make linkages with geomatics initiatives and explore the larger issue of data standard and sharing policies and principles.

Federal Partner:

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
1. Environment Canada Meteorological Service of Canada N/A In-kind contributions of $75K salary and $50K O&M from the existing resources envelope (A‑Base)
$38K G&C
2. Natural Resources Canada a. Earth Sciences Sector $ not available In kind – to be determined
b. Canadian Forest Service $ not available In kind – to be determined
c. Canadian Sensor for Remote Sensing $ not available In kind – to be determined
3. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada a. Science and Technology $ not available In kind – to be determined
b. Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration and Environment $ not available In kind – to be determined
4. Canadian Space Agency a. Earth Observations $ not available In kind – to be determined
5. Fisheries and Oceans Canada a. Science & Technology $ not available In kind – to be determined
6. Health Canada a. Radiation $ not available In kind – to be determined
7. Statistics Canada a. Agriculture $ not available In kind – to be determined
8. Department of Foreign Affairs & International Trade a. Environment $ not available In kind – to be determined

Expected Results: Participation in the GEO by Canadian departments is expected to have benefits in nine areas related to ecosystems, biodiversity, agriculture/forestry, energy production, human health, weather forecasting, climate forecasting, disaster risk reduction and water management. Coordinating open and full access to all available space-based and in-situ earth observations related to these areas will increase the amount and improve the quality of information available to decision and policy-makers at all levels of government and in industry, resulting in better predictions, identification of issues and adaptation and mitigation strategies and overall better management of these areas.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for
All Federal Partners for 2012-2013
$ not available $ to be determined

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:
Danielle Lacasse
Director General, Business Policy Directorate
Meteorological Service of Canada
Environment Canada



Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), approved March 2005 (followed from the 2-year Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP)).

Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).

Lead department program activity: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized (EC); Management Policy Development and Oversight (TBS).

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAP was approved in 2005, with funding of $3.5 billion over 15 years. The first phase of the program ended March 31, 2011. The second phase of the program has been approved, and will run through to March 31, 2016.

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAP is expected to continue for 15 years to March 31, 2020. However, the current policy approval for the second phase ends March 31, 2016.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $2,737.5 million (including PWGSC accommodations charges) to March 31, 2016.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) provides a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites presenting the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2011, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $4.354 billion. Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial departments, the overall program is administered jointly by Environment Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Shared outcome(s): Reduce federal financial liability and risks to human health and the environment, including fish habitat. Increase public confidence in the overall management of federal real property through the effective risk management or remediation of individual federal contaminated sites.

Governance structure(s): The Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by the Director Generals Committee, the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.

Planning Highlights: Phase II will focus remediation efforts on the highest-priority FCSAP sites (including Giant and Faro Mines in the North.) Over the next three years, remediation activities will be conducted on 1,100 sites and site assessments will occur on an estimated 1,650 sites. It is estimated that remediation expenditures in Phase II will reduce liability by up to $1.17 billion for all FCSAP- funded sites.

Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services Contaminated Sites 7,275.6 670.0

Expected results:

AAFC expects to complete its assessment of approximately 5 sites and continue the ongoing remediation of 1 site.


Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Corporate Management and Direction Infrastructure and Environment 3,490.2 0.0

Expected results:

No planned activities for 2012–2013.


Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
NA NA 183.8 0.0

Expected results:

No planned activities for 2012–2013.


Federal Partner: Correctional Service Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services Facilities/Asset Management Services 14,145.8 1,187.4

Expected results:

CSC will complete the assessment of 10 sites and the remediation of 3 sites.


Federal Partner: Environment Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized Asset Remediation and Disposal 57,220.9 4,457.6
Contaminated Sites 74,670.7 6,480.0
Total 131,891.5 10,937.6

Expected results:

Asset Remediation and Disposal: EC will complete the assessment of 35 sites and the remediation of 3 sites. An additional 13 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 11 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

Contaminated Sites (FCSAP Secretariat): In cooperation with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, supports the DG and ADM steering committees and the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG); oversees the project selection process; coordinates funding and reporting processes; manages program communications; and evaluates program performance.

In 2012–2013, the Secretariat will lead the implementation of a new performance measurement framework and a new information management strategy for the program, and will participate in the FCSAP program evaluation to be led by Environment Canada’s Audit & Evaluation Branch.

Contaminated Sites (FCSAP Expert Support): In 2012–2013, Environment Canada Expert Support will continue to provide scientific and technical advice to custodial departments regarding ecological risks at their contaminated sites, and the remediation/risk management strategies that will mitigate or reduce these risks. In addition, guidance, training and tools will be provided to federal custodians to assist them in addressing their contaminated sites.


Federal Partner: Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services Contaminated Sites – FCSAP Projects 94,885.0 6,198.2
FCSAP Expert Support 31,121.9 1,955.4
Total 126,006.9 8,153.6

Expected results:

Contaminated Sites – FCSAP Projects: DFO plans to use its National Departmental Prioritization Tool to allocate funding for remediation/risk management (R/RM) and assessment activities. DFO will select from its approximately 150 identified R/RM sites on the Priority List, and expects to perform assessment work at up to 400 sites.

In 2012–2013, DFO FCSAP Expert Support will conduct the following activities:

  • Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the management of federal contaminated sites that may be impacting, or have the potential to impact, fish or fish habitat.
  • Development of guidance material and provision of training on the management of FCSAP aquatic sites to custodial organizations (e.g. long-term monitoring and site closure of aquatic sites, remediation technologies identified in aquatic site remediation/risk management plans and the Aquatic Sites Framework).
  • Review of project submissions to ensure that the potential impacts to fish and fish habitat have been appropriately considered.
  • Review and evaluation of FCSAP projects to ascertain if, and to what level, the risk to fish and fish habitat has been reduced as a result of custodial actions.

Federal Partner: Health Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
First Nations and Inuit Health First Nations and Inuit Health Protection 7,445.2 0.0
Contaminated Sites Healthy Environments Consumer Safety Branch 62,749.1 4,187.4
Total 70,194.3 4,187.4

Expected results:

No planned activities in 2012–2013 for First Nations and Inuit Health Protection.

In 2012–2013, Healthy Environments Consumer Safety Branch (Health Canada FCSAP Expert Support) will conduct the following activities:

Provision of guidance, training and advice on human health risk assessment and risk management; public involvement and risk communication; review of NCS scoring, human health risk assessments, and remediation plans for projects; participation in interdepartmental national and regional working groups; and human health component of CCME soil quality guidelines.


Federal Partner: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Responsible Federal Stewardship Contaminated Sites Management Program 188,406.4 14,710.4
Northern Land and Resources Contaminated Sites 1,107,927.6 130,567.5
Total 1,296,334.0 145,277.9

Expected results:

AANDC’s Southern Program will complete the assessment of 5 sites and the remediation of 20 sites. An additional 10 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 10 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada will complete the assessment of 15 sites and the remediation of 3 sites. An additional 19 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 34 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: Industry Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Communications Research Centre Canada Contaminated Site Management Program 162.0 54.0

Expected results:

Industry Canada will have ongoing assessment activities at 1 site. CRC will complete partial delineation of offsite contamination in 2012–2013. Completion of the assessment at this site is planned for 2013–2014.


Federal Partner: Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-131
Management of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infrastructure, and properties in the Montréal area NA 23,889.7 13,311.0

Expected results:

Two sites will have ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: Marine Atlantic Inc. (MAI)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Corporate Management FCSAP (Projects) 120.0 0.0

Expected results:

No planned activities for 2012–2013.


Federal Partner: National Capital Commission

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Real Asset Management Land and real asset management 31,829.1 14,705.0

Expected results:

The NCC will have ongoing assessment activities on 15 sites and 7 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: National Defence

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Environmental Protection and Stewardship Contaminated Sites Program 576,147.3 75,310.0

Expected results:

The DND Contaminated Sites Program aims to reduce risks to human health and the environment posed by federal contaminated sites and to reduce the financial liabilities that are associated with those contaminated sites. DND's expected results for 2012–2013 include the assessment of 29 sites and the remediation of 12 sites. An additional 63 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 47 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: National Research Council Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services Environmental Operations 5,257.0 145.0

Expected results:

NRC will complete the assessment of 3 sites. In addition, there will be ongoing assessment activities at 1 site. One site will have ongoing remediation or risk management activities.


Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Corporate Management The provision of relevant and timely policy analysis and advice for decision-making on government priorities and departmental responsibilities 28,858.8 121.0

Expected results:

NRCan will undertake ongoing assessment activities at 4 sites, and no remediation activity, in 2012–2013.


Federal Partner: Parks Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Conserve Heritage Resources Active Management and Restoration 51,551.2 5,914.9

Expected results:

Parks Canada will complete the assessment of 13 sites and the remediation of 3 sites. An additional 8 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 11 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-131
Federal Accommodation & Holdings FCSAP (Projects) 109,300.2 64,956.5
FCSAP (Expert Support) 8,850.0 700.0
Total 118,150.2 65,656.5

Expected results:

FCSAP (Projects): PWGSC will undertake remediation/risk management activities on 16 sites and assessment of 1 or 2 sites.

In 2012–2013, PWGSC FCSAP Expert Support will conduct the following activities:

Development of contaminated site management tools; collection and sharing of innovative and sustainable/green approaches; and informing private sector of likely federal demand for services.


Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Corporate Infrastructure/ Internal Services FCSAP (Projects) 25,605.2 1,116.6

Expected results:

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police plans to complete assessment work on 3 sites and remediation work on 3 sites in 2012–2013.

One site assessment is expected to evolve into a FCSAP remediation project and 9 remediation projects are expected to require ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: Transport Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-131
Sustainable Transportation Development and the Environment Environmental Programs 204,467.1 22,732.9

Expected results:

Transport Canada will complete 4 remediation/risk management projects and will undertake ongoing remediation/risk management activities at 27 sites.


Federal Partner: Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Management Policy Development and Oversight Assets and Acquired Services 5,385.6 527.3

Expected results:

Program co-lead (with Environment Canada).

Ensures consistency with Treasury Board policies on management of federal contaminated sites; advises Environment Canada on monitoring of government-wide progress; maintains the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory; and coordinates planning for the Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop to be held in Toronto, Ontario from April 30 to May 3, 2012.

Total for All Federal Departments

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)* Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
2,720,945.3 370,007.0

*Excluding PWGSC accommodations charges.

1 Reprofile requests could be submitted to TBS later during the year and, pending TBS approval of the reprofile requests, certain objectives as established in the RPP could be impacted.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:
FCSAP Secretariat
Contaminated Sites Division
15th floor, Place Vincent Massey
351 St- Joseph Blvd
Gatineau, QC
K1A 0H3 

819-934-8153


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative

Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada

Lead department program activity: 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2010 (GLAPV resources)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 24, 2012 (end of COA)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $40 million over 5 years from 2010 to 2015 and then ongoing (GLAPV resources)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative (GLBEI) is the name given to Environment Canada’s activities in support of the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes. These activities include negotiation and implementation of the Canada–U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) and Canada–Ontario Agreement (COA) Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem, as well as the implementation of the GLAP, CWAP sediment and coordination of resources envelope (A-base) activities.

The Government of Canada is currently in negotiations with the Government of the United States to amend the Canada–U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

The 2007–2010 Canada–Ontario Agreement (COA) Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem was extended by 15 months to June 24, 2012. Negotiations of the 2012–2017 COA are expected to be completed by the end of 2012.

The Great Lakes Action Plan was renewed for a further 5 years with a commitment to ongoing funding after that (GLAPV). An amount of $8M per year is allocated for Areas of Concern to implement remedial actions to complete the clean-up and restoration in three key areas: fish and wildlife habitat rehabilitation and stewardship; contaminated sediment assessment and remediation; and innovative approaches to improve municipal wastewater effluent quality.

Clean Water Action Plan

Environment Canada’s Clean Water Action Plan (CWAP) includes the Great Lakes sediment remediation initiative. Under this initiative, $48.9M over 8 years through 2015 is provided to complete contaminated sediment management projects in 8 specific Areas of Concerns. Funds are administered through the existing federal GLSF, with one third contributed by each of the federal government, the Province of Ontario and stakeholders. Potential clean-up measures include the construction of containment structures around and over submerged contaminated sediments; the removal, treatment and disposal of sediment; and natural recovery with long-term monitoring. The remediation of contaminated sediment is an essential prerequisite to the longer-term objective of fully restoring environmental quality in Areas of Concern, a commitment under the Canada–U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

Contact information:

Sandra Weston
Director, Great Lakes
Environment Canada

Tel.: 416-739-4404

Clean Air Agenda

Lead department: Environment Canada
Lead department program activity: PA3.2 and PA2.1
Start date: Announced in Budget 2011
End date: March 31, 2016
Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $ 1,519.62 million*

*This figure is incomplete due to Cabinet confidence. The total allocation includes $17.35 million from previous CARA funding for 2011-2012.

1. Overview of Clean Air Agenda

The 2011 Budget announced the renewal of the Clean Air Agenda (CAA) with an investment of $870 million over two years.1 This funding will build on the considerable momentum gained from the investments in the CAA over the period of 2007-2011 which formed part of the Government’s broader efforts to address the challenges of climate change and air pollution, with a view to ensuring a clean and healthy environment for all Canadians.

The Government of Canada continues to advance the CAA, addressing climate change and air pollutants at the domestic, continental and international level. Canada has made significant progress towards meeting its Copenhagen commitment to reduce national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, which translates into 607 megatonnes. To meet its target the Government is pursuing a sector-by-sector regulatory approach, aligned with the United States, where appropriate. This approach includes regulations to address GHG emissions from passenger cars and light-duty trucks and coal-fired electricity generation facilities. Additionally, the Government of Canada is supporting complementary initiatives for adapting to the impacts of climate change. Internationally, as part of it's recent participation at the 17th Conference of the Parties climate change conference in Durban, Canada agreed to a process to negotiate a new climate change agreement that would include binding commitments for all major emitters.

To support Government of Canada efforts to reduce air pollutant emissions, work is being undertaken with provinces, industry and non-governmental organizations to finalize and implement a new national air quality management system that will include new ambient air quality standards for key pollutants, new industrial emissions standards and active management of local air quality by provinces.

As the CAA moves forward, eleven federal departments and agencies provide programming organized within five themes:

  • clean air regulatory agenda (CARA);
  • clean energy;
  • clean transportation;
  • international actions; and,
  • adaptation.

Through CARA, the Government of Canada continues to support the development and implementation of measures to address air quality and climate change. Renewed CARA funding ensures scientific excellence in the development of regulations that strike a balance between improving environmental standards and respecting industry's need for simple, streamlined rules and realistic timelines. This includes support to sustain the scientific research, monitoring, atmospheric modelling, and economic and policy analysis and assessment necessary to develop and assess the impacts of sector-by-sector GHG regulations; finalize a national air quality management system; address transboundary air pollution through the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement (AQA); improve indoor air quality and promote behavioural change among Canadians by extending the Air Quality Health Index.

Clean Energy programming builds on our previous investments by further improving the energy sector’s environmental performance in Canada. Programming supports broad collaboration among industry, universities, governments, and Aboriginal and northern communities, increases stakeholder awareness and clean energy scientific and technical knowledge, and encourages adoption of energy efficient and alternative energy technologies. Investments in cleaner sources of energy will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help balance the need for energy with the need to protect the environment and grow the economy.

Similarly, Clean Transportation programming is focused on encouraging technology updates and making use of regulations and targeted industry incentives to accelerate the development and adoption of next generation clean technologies. Complementing the advancement of innovations, a suite of regulatory initiatives for the aviation, marine, and rail sectors aim to increase efficiencies in the Canadian transportation system, reduce its environmental footprint and support economic growth.

The International Actions programming supports the Government’s strategic response to climate change. Because climate change and air pollution are cross-boundary issues, CAA funding ensures critical work is undertaken through partnerships and negotiations with a wide range of stakeholders - national and international, private and public sector, profit and not-for-profit. Renewed funding also supports commitments to promote Canada-U.S. collaboration on clean energy technologies under the Clean Energy Dialogue (CED).

The funding for Adaptation builds on and extends the investments made over the past four years and will help provinces, territories, municipalities, First Nations and Inuit, and industry develop proactive actions to adapt to the impacts that climate change has and will have on Canada’s economy, health and security, particularly in the North.

2. Shared Outcomes

The renewed CAA continues the collaborative efforts within the federal government and with other jurisdictions to realize health, economic and environmental benefits for Canadians. These efforts will work toward:

  • Reducing the risk to the health of Canadians and the environment from exposure to air pollution;
  • Providing economic benefits and maintaining competitiveness from innovations related to reducing air pollution and addressing climate change; and,
  • Reducing the risk to communities, infrastructure and to the health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change.

3. Governance Structure

In its first four years, the CAA piloted an innovative approach to supporting greater accountability and transparency through a “Horizontal Management Accountability and Reporting Framework” (HMARF). Building on this experience, the HMARF was renewed with a view to also ensuring greater coherency in climate change and clean air reporting through integration with the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and its reporting on the progress the federal government is making towards environmental sustainability.

As outlined in the governance structure (Charter), Environment Canada is continuing its leadership role of the CAA-HMARF. The CAA is governed through a collective of Deputy Ministers and Assistant Deputy Ministers, and through the Federal Sustainable Development interdepartmental committees. Director Generals (DG) continue to provide leadership for each of the five themes and its integration into the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy through the interdepartmental DG’s committee.

4. Highlights for 2012-2013

With respect to CARA, highlights for 2012-2013 include: the implementation of GHG regulations for new light-duty vehicles (2011-2016 model years), and the finalization of regulations for later model years (2017 and beyond), aligned with U.S. standards; the finalization of GHG regulations for new heavy-duty vehicles also aligned with those of the U.S., as well as regulations for coal-fired electricity generation, and the continued development of regulations for other emissions-intensive sectors including natural-gas fired electricity and the oil and gas sector.

With respect to air quality, highlights for 2012-2013 include: the finalization and approval of the Air Quality Management System in order to start moving to the implementation stage. This includes setting national ambient air quality standards under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) and initiate regulatory development for base-level industrial emission requirements for key sources. Other highlights include the ongoing strengthening of commitments to reduce transboundary air pollution under the AQA, and continued development of control measures for consumer and commercial products. In addition, funding for 2012-2013 will also support the scientific and economic work necessary to advance these measures to address GHGs and air pollution, as well as the continued development and annual reporting of comprehensive inventories of air pollutants and GHGs, through the National Pollutant Release Inventory and National GHG inventory, which is required as part of Canada’s United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) obligations.

Internationally, the federal government will build on areas of consensus through engagement under the UNFCCC and the CED, as well as participate in the G8 and 2012 Major Economies Forum and Clean Energy Ministerial meetings. The Government will also continue to work with the U.S. towards the negotiation of a Particulate Matter Annex to the Canada-U.S. AQA, and through the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council on common objectives related to addressing air emissions. The Government will also continue to advance efforts to address short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs) with the U.S. and other key partners through continued work under the Arctic Council, the UN Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution, the Global Methane Initiative, and the new global initiative to reduce SLCFs, launched in February 2012.

The suite of Clean Energy programming will improve the energy sector’s environmental performance by advancing clean electricity and cleaner energy production, increasing the use of alternative fuels, and improving end-use energy efficiencies. Over 2012-2013, energy efficiency training, adoption of the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings, development and updating of natural gas codes and standards and initial market assessments of oil sands and shale gas will take place. Funding for ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative projects will be approved for government, academic and private sector research and development projects and for demonstration projects with external public and private stakeholders. Clean Energy activities in 2012-2013 will also include the provision of timely advice and information to senior management on clean energy and environmental issues.

Towards Clean Transportation, new standards for nitrogen oxide will be introduced for the aviation sector in Canada through regulatory action (to come into force by the end of 2013), with a new domestic voluntary agreement with the Canadian aviation industry to reduce GHGs. For the marine sector, amendments to the new Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations to limit air pollutants and GHG emissions are expected to come into force. In the rail sector, new air pollutant emission regulations for locomotives and a new domestic voluntary agreement with the Canadian rail industry to limit GHG emissions will be implemented.

The Adaptation programming will fund projects to assist Aboriginal and Northern communities in understanding and adapting to a changing climate, map ecosystems and conduct scenario modelling for some national parks (Wapusk, Ivvavik and Torngat Mountains National Parks), establish codes and standards to protect infrastructure, and help manage mine waste in the North. It will also develop enhanced global and regional climate models and scenarios, expand heat alert and response systems in at-risk communities across Canada, develop information tools and guidelines for preventative public health systems, develop an adaptation toolkit for forest sector decision-makers, and establish an Adaptation Platform to bring together knowledge, capacity and financial resources to efficiently and effectively facilitate adaptation action.

Total Allocation*
for 2011-16
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded.

*This figure is incomplete due to Cabinet confidence. The total allocation
includes $17.35 million from previous CARA funding for 2011-2012.

1,519.62 306.21

1 This figure includes $400 million for the ecoENERGY Retrofit Home program in 2011-2012.

5. Federal Partners

The federal partners for the CAA are: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Health Canada, National Research Council Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Standard Councils Canada (Industry Canada), and Transport Canada.

6. Contact name for the CAA

Paula Brand, Acting Director General,
Sustainable Development Strategy Division, Environment Canada,
10 Wellington St, Gatineau, Quebec, K1A 0H3
Tel: (819) 997-3729, Email: paula.brand@ec.gc.ca

Clean Air Agenda 2012-2013 Horizontal Reports on Plans and Priorities – Theme Report: Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA)

Protecting the health and environment of Canadians is a key Government priority. Emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and air pollutants threaten the health of Canadians, degrade the environment, contribute to climate change and smog and adversely affect the economy. The Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) provides the coordinated framework for Government efforts to reduce GHGs and air pollutant emissions.

With respect to GHGs, in 2009, the Government of Canada committed to reducing national GHG emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, which calculates to 607 megatonnes, and inscribed this target in the Copenhagen Accord. In order to make progress towards this target, the Government is implementing a sector-by-sector regulatory approach to limit emissions from major-emitting sectors of the economy, including transportation, thermal electricity, and other emissions-intensive industrial sectors including oil and gas. Given the highly integrated North American economy, the Government is aligning its regulatory approach with that of United States (U.S.), as appropriate for the Canadian context.

With respect to air quality, the Government is moving forward to implement a national Air Quality Management System (AQMS) in order to further minimize threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution. This system will set Canadian ambient air quality standards, local and regional air quality management and requirements for key sources of industrial emissions. The Government will be working with provinces, territories and stakeholders in order to start moving to implementation stage this year. This includes setting national ambient air quality standards (CAAQS) under Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) and initiate regulatory development for base-level industrial emission requirements (BLIERs) for key sources.

Under CARA, the Government will also address transboundary air pollution by strengthening the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement (AQA), including negotiations towards the inclusion of particulate matter under the AQA as well as collaborative work through U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council. Standards and control measures for emissions from consumer and commercial products will also continue to be developed and implemented.

CARA also supports the related scientific, modelling, monitoring, reporting and economic analysis necessary for policy and regulatory development and to ensure that the measures taken are based on sound science and achieve their intended effects. This includes the provision of comprehensive, annual emissions inventories for both GHGs and air pollutants.

Under CARA, we will continue to take action to improve indoor air quality, and promote positive behavioral change among Canadians to reduce their exposure to air pollutants by extending the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI).

Collectively, the work undertaken as part of CARA cuts across several Government departments--Environment Canada (EC), Health Canada (HC) and the National Research Council (NRC). More details on the key measures under CARA, outlined above, are provided in the sections below.

1. Theme Planning Highlights

With respect to climate change, highlights for 2012-2013 are the development and/or finalization of regulations to reduce GHG emissions from key sectors. This includes the development and finalization of regulations for later model years (2017 and beyond), aligned with U.S. standards; the finalization of GHG regulations for new heavy-duty vehicles also aligned with those of the U.S., and finalization of regulations for coal-fired electricity generation, which will promote the phase-out of traditional coal and transition to low- and non-emitting sources of electricity. There will also be continued development of regulations for other major-emitting sectors of the economy, including for natural-gas fired electricity and oil and gas.

With respect to air quality, an important highlight for 2012-2013 is the finalization and approval of the major elements of the AQMS to be in a position to start implementing the system in 2013. We will proceed to set CAAQS under CEPA. These would replace and be more stringent than current outdated objectives and Canada-wide standards. We will also begin regulatory development for BLIERs for key sources.

Regulations will also be developed and/or amended to reduce pollutants from vehicles and engines. In partnership with the U.S. work will continue to strengthen commitments to reduce transboundary air pollution under the AQA, and through the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council. Control measures will also be developed to limit nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from ethylene production and ethylene based polymer production.

Also, in 2012-2013, Health Canada will take steps to improve indoor air quality including through increasing radon awareness, publishing residential indoor air quality guidelines for priority chemical and biological pollutants as well as technical documents addressing key indoor air sources or issues. Related to this, NRC will assess building material emissions, developing an evaluation protocol and test apparatus for validating an air purification technology, and developing ventilation solutions, as well as releasing practical guides for building operators to improve indoor air quality.

With respect to emissions reporting, a highlight in 2012-2013, EC will launch new versions of the Single Window Reporting (SWR) on-line data collection application for GHG and substances of concern, to contribute to streamlining reporting processes for industry and federal/provincial/territorial governments. Comprehensive inventories of GHGs and pollutants will also be compiled and published, and steps will also be taken to expand the number of communities that receive AQHI readings across the country.

All of these regulatory and control measures will be supported by ongoing science, modelling, monitoring, and economic analysis.

2. Theme Expected Results

Programming within the CARA Theme is clustered around five broad areas of activity: regulations; science; reporting; policy analysis; and, indoor air quality. Collectively, these activities are expected to result in reductions in air pollutants and GHGs.

Regulations

EC supports the development, implementation, administration, compliance promotion and enforcement of a range of regulations and measures to reduce emissions of GHGs and air pollutants from major-emitting sectors and sources.

GHGs

In order to limit GHG emissions from electricity, draft regulations to limit emissions from coal-fired electricity generation were published in the Canada Gazette I in August 2011, and will be finalized in the summer of 2012, and come into force in 2015. In addition, GHG regulations will be developed for natural gas-fired generation.

To further reduce GHG emissions from transportation, EC will continue to implement and administer Passenger Automobile and Light Truck Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations for 2011-2016 model years, and continue to work with the U.S. to finalize regulations for new cars and light trucks for model years 2017 and beyond, as well as new heavy duty vehicles. Drafts of these regulations will be published in Canada Gazette I in 2012, and will be aligned with U.S. standards.

The Government will also initiate the development of regulations to limit GHG emissions from oil and gas and other emission-intensive trade exposed (EITE) industrial sectors. Draft regulations for some oil and gas sub-sectors will be finalized in 2012.

Air pollutants

As part of the finalization of the AQMS, in order to ensure a good level of performance from the major industrial sectors that is nationally consistent, the Minister of the Environment has committed to working with his provincial and territorial colleagues and stakeholders to developing a suite of BLIERs. The multi-stakeholders process will complete its work in early 2012, and regulatory development will be initiated for a number of sectors.

In addition to the BLIERs, CAAQS for particulate matter and ozone will also be finalized and incorporated as objectives under section 54 and 55 of the CEPA, 1999. Work will also begin on the research to support establishing CAAQS for other pollutants of interest such as NOx.

To limit air pollutants from transportation, EC will continue to develop and implement new emissions standards that aim to reduce air pollutants for on-road and off-road vehicles and engines. This will include the development of draft regulations for off-road large spark-ignition engines and new on-road vehicle and engine emission regulations to align with U.S. standards.

EC will continue to collaborate with Ontario and other provincial jurisdictions to develop control measures for consumer and commercial products. Specifically, EC is working to expand the collection of Portable Fuel Containers (PFC) and replacing them with VOC low-emitting PFCs through the government/industry “Fuel Can Flip - Fuel Can Retirement” program. Work will be undertaken to develop controls for asphalt cutbacks and emulsified asphalt and aerosol coatings. A risk management strategy will be developed for the Motor Vehicle Assembly sector. As part of work on existing regulations, EC will provide information on regulatory obligations and develop a training curriculum related to Volatile Organic Compound Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings Regulations and Volatile Organic Compound Concentration Limits for Automotive Refinishing Products Regulations. Information on regulatory obligations will be provided to the regulated community for 2-Butoxyethanol Regulations.

In addition to developing regulatory measures, CARA includes Compliance Promotion and Enforcement related activities as required. This includes compliance promotion activities and tools, such as officer training and information management systems for new regulations, as well as on-going compliance support, administration, monitoring, reporting, evaluation and enforcement of existing regulations for both GHGs and air pollutants to ensure that regulations are correctly implemented and achieving their intended results.

EC’s activities to provide Analysis in Support of Regulations will include: economic analysis, including for the Regulatory Impact Assessment Statements required for each regulation (GHG and BLIERS); legal analysis; and, advice and technical support to environmental assessments.

Science

EC and HC scientific activities provide the foundation for development, implementation, and assessment of regulations and other measures to reduce domestic GHG and air pollutant emissions. Science activities inform the setting of appropriate emissions targets and ambient air quality standards, as well as appropriate regulatory options and the assessment of the effectiveness of such measures. Scientific research, modelling and monitoring activities also ensure that decision-makers have the necessary information on air emission sources and trends, ambient levels and trends of air pollutants and GHGs, impacts on the environment and human health, and the forecasted benefits of regulatory actions.

EC’s Atmospheric Research, Monitoring and Modelling scientific area provides information and advice for policy and regulatory activities, and accountability for air pollutant emission reductions and reporting requirements. Emphasis will be placed on supporting the AQMS by monitoring and measuring sources of regional and national ambient air pollutants and conducting and improving air quality modelling. This program will also inform Canadian positions and commitments related to international agreements (such as the Canada-U.S. AQA) and the nature of global influences on Canadian air quality. More specifically, new targeted science on GHG and aerosols (including black carbon) will provide the basis for the development, implementation and evaluation of emission targets, regulations, emissions verification and compliance mechanisms. Scientific achievements will include: trend analysis of regional scale GHG observations and improved characterization of Canadian carbon sources and sinks; improved characterization of current and past aerosol concentrations and their attribution to anthropogenic and natural sources; and, improved representation of aerosols in the Canadian Earth System Model. EC will also work collaboratively with HC to conduct air quality science and modelling using an integrated multi-pollutant approach to assess the effectiveness of air quality management actions in meeting objectives, goals and targets.

HC’s activities contribute to atmospheric research, monitoring and modelling area in support of the AQMS (described above). HC will conduct exposure and health risk assessments for key air pollutants. A sector-based, multi-pollutant approach will assess the health risks posed by the range of pollutants emitted by individual industrial sectors. These activities will provide a health basis to support implementation of CAAQS and air quality management actions under the AQMS, by federal/provincial/territorial jurisdictions.  In 2012-2013, research will also identify and quantify the socio-economic impacts of air pollution exposure, improve analytical tools to assess the impact of current or proposed air quality strategies and regulations, and conduct health-benefit analysis of ongoing and planned air quality regulatory or policy actions.

HC and EC also direct their scientific efforts in the Health and Environmental Impacts of Air Pollutants area. EC’s activities characterize the impacts of air pollution on ecosystems and wildlife in order to evaluate the impact of regulations and inform regulatory development. In 2012-2013, EC will conduct activities such as the field sampling program of plants, soils, lake sediments and lake food webs in specific regions; contribute to National Acid Deposition Assessment; and quantify air pollution effects on the chemistry and biology of aquatic. EC will also continue to improve its modeling capacity by including other pollutants and more temporal information in order to help predict the ecosystem impacts and benefits.

HC will conduct health risk assessments and health-benefit studies in support of regulation development, specifically for transportation regulations on areas such as marine diesel or vehicle fuels. HC will also conduct exposure studies on emissions from transportation and studies on toxicity and the health effects of transportation emissions. These activities support the establishment of effective and efficient transportation and fuel regulations and management strategies to reduce emissions of GHGs and air pollutants from regulated sectors while maintaining competitiveness in those sectors.

In 2012-2013, EC will complete an assessment of mercury in the Canadian environment including human exposure, communicate the findings to stakeholders, and begin assessing the current and projected future state of acid deposition impacts on the Canadian environment. EC will also provide science advice for international policy forums such as the Arctic Council, and, provide support for national and international atmospheric science programs and assessments such as International Panel on Climate Change Assessments. These activities support the scientific assessments of the health and environmental risks associated with air emissions and the potential benefits of reduced emissions which underpin several of the theme’s immediate outcomes.

HC research to identify and quantify the relationship between air pollution and negative health impacts will help establish the ‘exposure-response functions’ used to predict the health benefits from improved air quality. These benefits will then be quantified in economic terms so they can be compared with the costs of regulatory action thus allowing the government to estimate the net impacts of actions taken under AQMS such as setting CAAQS.

The EC Oil Sands Science activities provide information and advice to determine the impact of air emissions from the oil sands sector on the ecosystem and the air that Canadians breathe. This includes working collaboratively with the Government of Alberta, the Wood Buffalo Environmental Association and other local stakeholders to measure priority air contaminants and metals to set baselines and establish trends, understanding the deposition and atmospheric transport of these contaminants, utilizing air quality models to predict impacts of oil sands development, and improving our air quality modelling to support policy needs. EC will initiate a short-term scientific study to characterize airborne and ground level ambient concentrations of criteria air contaminants in the oil sands region in order to advance knowledge on the oil sands air pollution mix, to evaluate emissions inventories, and to compare data with current satellite retrieval technology. Also, EC will install long-term monitoring sites in or near areas that are highly sensitive to acid deposition in order to understand the aerial contribution to the ecosystem and to determine atmospheric transport to and from the oil sands regions. The new sites will complement the existing air quality monitoring efforts underway. EC will utilize and improve existing modelling capacity to help in the deployment of measurement platforms and equipment, predict impacts of the oil sands development and support policy needs.

Reporting

Reporting activities are critical to sustaining and improving mechanisms to track and report national GHG and air pollutant emissions, and supporting the domestic and international reporting commitments concerning air pollutants and GHGs.

Under the CARA in the area of Data Collection and Reporting for GHGs, EC develops comprehensive inventories of GHGs for both sources and sinks and reports annually as part of Canada’s UNFCCC obligations. Information for GHG emissions is available in the National Inventory Report and through the GHG Emissions Reporting Program. Data and methods to estimate, model and quantify both emissions and removals of GHGs are developed and implemented, and analyses to understand the drivers and trends are prepared. These activities provide Canadians with information about GHGs on a national, provincial and regional basis.

EC and HC collaborate in the area of Data Collection and Reporting for Atmospheric Pollutants in support of the Government of Canada’s domestic and international obligations related to air pollution. Information on over 300 pollutants related to releases to air, land and water, disposals and transfers off site for recycling will be collected from more than 8500 facilities and be published online by EC. Air pollutant inventories and trends for key air pollutants contributing to smog, acid rain and/or poor air quality, selected heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants will be compiled for 2011 based on facility-reported data and emission estimates for other sources such as motor vehicles, residential heating, forest fires and agriculture. This information will support the AQMS, the annual submission to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe and the Canada-U.S. AQA.

EC is also working toward using a harmonized SWR system for CARA reporting and data collection programs. Security plans including analysis and documentation for privacy and security policies for SWR data collection, storage and transfer, as well as user information are expected to be completed.  In 2012-2013, EC will complete numerous other activities that support reducing reporting burden for regulated sectors for GHG and toxics under the National Pollutant Release Inventory.

EC and HC seek to expand the AQHI as a national, health-based communications tool for current and forecasted local air quality and to increase Canadians’ knowledge of actions to protect their health and reduce pollution. EC expects that accessibility to forecasts will be enhanced through improved dissemination systems including internet (Weather Office), Automatic Telephone Answering Devices, social media and the development of partnerships with national media providers in locations where the AQHI is available. EC will also partner with provincial and municipal jurisdictions to strengthen internal capacity for the continuation of AQHI into the future and to promote AQHI to Canadians. As well, EC will continue to improve forecast quality through the development of methodologies and tools to optimize the use of data from different sources, improve modelling capabilities and research to allow for future expansion of the AQHI to rural communities with sparse monitoring capacity. In partnership with HC, EC will continue negotiations with provincial partners to further the national roll-out of the AQHI and will begin negotiations with territorial Governments to expand the AQHI to select communities in the North. As well, HC will partner with provincial and public health programs to support local and regional implementation and promotion of AQHI, develop partnerships with media, develop and promote outreach materials to health professionals and conduct research on links between AQHI and clinical cardiovascular outcomes. This work supports the outcomes for providing provinces with increased access to AQHI, raising awareness of strategies and tools to reduce exposure to air pollutants, and changing the behaviours of Canadians to reduce exposure and improve their health.

Policy Analysis

EC and HC provide strategic policy and economic analysis, advice, and coordination, to support effective and efficient action on air pollution and GHG emissions. EC’s climate change policy-related activities will provide the strategic policy analysis, advice, and coordination for the development of cross-cutting elements of regulatory development, notably reporting and compliance mechanisms. Policy analysis activities will also support the coordination of processes related to cabinet briefings and approvals, such as the preparation of Memoranda to Cabinet. Policy analysis further incorporates the coordination of various stakeholder consultation and engagement mechanisms, including consultations under the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Working Group on Domestic Climate Change; the Technical and Process Working Groups for the development of oil and gas regulations, which includes representatives from industry and provinces; the Federal / Provincial / Territorial Oil & Gas Working Group and the Deputy Minister-level Consultative Steering Committee with provinces and territories.

In addition, as part of the Government’s climate change approach, EC will also provide strategic policy analysis on short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs), including black carbon, to support Canada’s engagement in various regional and international fora, including under the Arctic Council and negotiations under the Gothenburg Protocol to the UN Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. Analysis will also inform and support the development of an SLCF strategy and domestic measures to address SLCFs.

EC’s Atmospheric Pollutants Policy-related activities will include the finalization of the major elements of the AQMS.  A multi-stakeholder consultation process facilitates the development and implementation of comprehensive air management frameworks and will complete its work in 2012. This will also include the policy coordination for the endorsement of the AQMS from the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment. This will also support the work required for the CAAQS for ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) to be drafted and published in CGI in 2012. EC will continue to work collaboratively with provinces and territories to finalize the BLIERs for 14 sectors and 3 equipment types and 2 cross sectoral processes. Regulatory drafting will be initiated for some BLIERs in this fiscal year. Coordination and policy advice for the overall governance of the system, including reporting will also be finalized. Also, to contribute towards the development and finalization of the AQMS, in 2012-2013, HC will complete a draft health risk assessment for outdoor air pollutants (such as carbon monoxide and coarse particulate matter) to support and develop proposals for CAAQS. HC will also conduct exposure and health effects studies for air pollutants to support additional CAAQS development and review. This work will support the implementation of actions to ensure that Canadian jurisdictions meet ambient air quality standards.

To effectively manage transboundary pollution, EC will continue its work with the US under the Canada-U.S. AQA as well as through the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council, to realize common objectives to address air pollution. Under the AQA, Canada, in collaboration with the U.S., will prepare the 2012 biennial progress report that summarizes key actions undertaken by Canada and the U.S. within the last two years to address transboundary air pollution under the Agreement. Canada will also host the 2012 annual meeting of Canada-U.S. Air Quality Committee which is responsible for administering work under the Agreement.

EC’s Cross-Cutting Analysis supports policy development related to air pollutants and GHGs. Economic modeling will be undertaken to explore actions that reinforce the regulatory agenda, while promoting environmental reduction through non-regulatory compliance mechanism. Economic modelling, analysis and research will be undertaken to ensure informed federal decision-making on policy approaches to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions and to analyze the cumulative impact of proposed measures on industry and consumers, as well as the competitiveness impacts of proposed measures. This also includes activities under the Clean Air Agenda Results Management Secretariat which provides integrated planning and performance reporting on the CAA. It also contributes to the implementation of the Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulations by providing coordinated departmental training and advice to EC’s regulatory community on regulatory development and approval processes.

EC’s coordination and engagement activities provide strategic support to the overall development of policy. At the federal level, the coordination activities are focused on engagement of key federal departments and agencies and the establishment of mechanisms to ensure high quality and timely submissions that facilitate the cabinet approval process. Engagement of stakeholder through Federal, Provincial and Territorial and stakeholder committees will also be undertaken. These committees provide essential input into the development and construction of the government’s analytical tools and emission baselines, and to overall policy development.

Indoor Air Quality

HC and NRC work together to improve Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and protect the health of Canadians by developing knowledge, guidelines, codes of practice, mitigation measures, product standards and communication initiatives, in order to reduce exposure to indoor air contaminants.

HC’s Indoor Air Quality Management – Biological and Chemical Contaminants activities aim to decrease risk to health through the development of tools to improve indoor air quality and through increased knowledge among individual Canadians, business and governments about health risks posed by indoor air pollutants and ways to reduce these risks. HC will conduct health risk assessments on priority pollutants, produce technical documents on key indoor issues, evaluate potential interventions to improve indoor air quality and conduct studies on indoor pollutant toxicity to support health-based evaluation of product emissions.

HC’s Indoor Air Quality Management – Radioactive Contaminants activities aim to increase awareness and knowledge of Canadians to the dangers associated with cumulative exposure to radon and how to limit this exposure through activities including marketing, social media, conferences and events. HC will also collaborate with provincial, territorial and other key stakeholders to ensure tools and resources are available to Canadians. As well, radon testing of federal buildings will be completed in identified high-risk radon prone areas to facilitate government compliance with the Canada Labour Code. National Radon Laboratory operations will be maintained, including advice and technical expertise to partners in government, industry and the public. The Canadian Radon Certification Program will continue and new radon mitigation solutions will be evaluated as they become available and documented in peer-reviewed publications.

NRC’s Indoor Air Quality Strategies and Solutions work aims to reduce exposure of Canadians to key indoor pollutants through three activities: source control, improved ventilation/air distribution strategies, and air purification technologies. In 2012-2013, NRC will test the off-gassing of VOC’s from a representative set of building materials and consumer products through a validated fast screening method. NRC will also develop an evaluation protocol and build two laboratory test elements for the evaluation of three promising air purification technologies. In 2012-2013, NRC will design - in partnership with HC - a field study to validate and optimize mitigation strategies for reducing pollutant transfer from garages. Study design will be based on experimental results obtained in a newly built garage attached to NRC’s Indoor Air Research Laboratory (IARL). Radon mitigation scenarios will also be validated in the IARL. The Canadian Committee on Indoor Air Quality in Buildings, a balanced stakeholder committee, will develop three guidance documents to support building operators and tenants of commercial and residential buildings in addressing and mitigating IAQ problems and implementing appropriate solutions.

3. Theme Financial Information

Federal Partner Programs Total Allocation*
for 2011-16
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded and may not add.

*The following EC programs include previous CARA funding for 2011-2012: Atmospheric Pollutants Policy, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement, Data Collection and Reporting for GHGs, Electricity Regulations, Emission-Intensity Trade-Exposed (EITE) Regulations, Greenhouse Gas Policy, Health and Environmental Impacts of Air Pollutants, and Oil and Gas Regulations.

Environment Canada
Analysis in Support of Regulations 25.96 5.47
Atmospheric Pollutants Policy 17.96 3.04
Atmospheric Research, Monitoring and Modelling 90.45 18.21
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 33.63 6.72
Consumer and Commercial Products Regulations 5.68 2.06
Cross-Cutting Analysis 15.74 3.13
Cross-Cutting Data Collection and Reporting 15.32 3.02
Data Collection and Reporting for Atmospheric Pollutants 41.52 8.48
Data Collection and Reporting for GHGs 41.61 7.63
Electricity Regulations 7.93 2.69
Emissions-Intensive Trade-Exposed (EITE) Regulations 21.34 7.13
Greenhouse Gas Policy 31.21 4.60
Health and Environmental Impacts of Air Pollutants 15.52 2.91
Oil and Gas Regulations 17.80 6.24
Oil Sands Science 14.21 2.84
Science Integration, Accountability and Benefits of Action 3.73 0.87
Transportation Regulations 45.14 8.56
Subtotal 444.76 93.58
 
Health Canada
Atmospheric Pollutants Policy 25.88 5.18
Atmospheric Research, Monitoring and Modelling 29.60 5.92
Data Collection and Reporting for Atmospheric Pollutants 13.42 2.68
Health and Environmental Impacts of Air Pollutants 13.08 2.62
Indoor Air Quality Management - Biological and Chemical Contaminants 9.29 1.86
Indoor Air Quality Management - Radioactive Contaminants 30.49 6.10
Science Integration, Accountability and Benefits of Action 15.49 3.10
Subtotal 137.25 27.45
 
National Research Council of Canada
Indoor Air Quality Strategies and Solutions 9.00 1.80
Subtotal 9.00 1.80
Theme Total 591.01 122.83

Clean Air Agenda 2012-2013 Horizontal Reports on Plans and Priorities - Theme Report: Clean Energy

Early in 2010, under the Copenhagen Accord, the Government of Canada committed to reducing national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, which calculates to 607 megatonnes. The development and use of cleaner sources of energy is key to Canada's future prosperity and energy security. Given that the production and consumption of energy accounts for 80% of Canada's GHG emissions, cleaner energy, as a complement to broader GHG regulations, is essential for achieving Canada's GHG emissions reductions target.

The suite of clean energy programs included within this Theme seek to improve the energy sector's environmental performance by advancing clean electricity and cleaner energy production, increasing the use of alternative fuels, and improving end-use energy efficiencies. Ultimately, work undertaken in this Theme by contributing departments Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) aims to reduce GHG emissions, while maintaining Canada's economic advantage and creating jobs for Canadians.

In the short term, clean energy scientific and technological knowledge will be developed and shared with stakeholders. Stakeholders will also be encouraged to collaborate in developing, delivering, and increasing their capacity to use cleaner sources of energy and energy efficient products, processes, practices or services.

1. Theme Planning Highlights

Following the launch of new Clean Energy initiatives in 2011, the focus in 2012-2013 is to implement the second year of the activities and to continue to work to strengthen and expand Canada's commitment to clean energy. Key deliverables in 2012-2013 include: energy efficiency training; 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings; development and updating of natural gas codes and standards; and, market assessments of oil sands and shale gas. Funding for ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative projects will be approved for government, academic and private sector research and development projects and for demonstration projects with external public and private stakeholders. In 2012-2013, NRCan, as part of the Marine Renewable Energy Enabling Measures program, will produce a report about regulatory approaches to offshore renewable energy management in other countries.

2. Theme Expected Results

The Clean Energy Policy program will provide ongoing analysis, advice, recommendations, and coordination on clean energy and environmental issues in support of policy and program development and decision-making. This includes providing advice to senior management and developing information products (such as briefing material and research and analysis) to ensure that decision-makers have access to timely advice and information. The program will also remain engaged in domestic carbon capture and storage (CCS) policy activities, such as providing technical expertise and policy advice from an NRCan perspective to Alberta's CCS Regulatory Framework Assessment. Through the development and deployment of fact sheets and other outreach tools (such as assessments, best practices) the program will provide fact-based information regarding the oil sands, shale gas and other unconventional energy sources to Canadians, key stakeholders and foreign governments.

The ecoENERGY Efficiency program focuses on activities that increase knowledge, awareness, and capacity in energy efficiency, including training, publications, partnerships and agreements. For example, the program will support training sessions on energy efficient products and practices for over 170,000 individuals. As well, knowledge and awareness will be increased through Project Reports that identify energy management opportunities for four facilities in the industrial sector and through the introduction of the Most Efficient ENERGY STAR program in Canada. The program will also support partnerships and collaborations that develop or deliver energy efficient products, practices, or services through approximately 25 partnerships and/or collaborative arrangements. Finally, the program will foster the adoption of energy efficient technologies, products, and practices as 12 regional programs will use NRCan-developed housing standards and systems, and two provinces/territories will adopt the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings or equivalent. Together, these activities will lead to an estimated 11 petajoules of energy being saved.

The ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels program will support two committees that will be actively working on developing and updating codes and standards for natural gas vehicles. As well, the program will initiate international and domestic formal engagements with alternative fuels stakeholders and will put in place two agreements with natural gas local support networks to bring the right decision-making tools to potential markets. Through these efforts, knowledge and collaboration in the area of alternative transportation fuels will be increased.

The ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative's program increases clean energy knowledge and stakeholder awareness through the funding of research and projects that support academia, industry and the public sector in producing and using energy in a more clean and efficient way. Activities funded will be in five strategic priority areas: energy efficiency; clean electricity and renewable fuels; bioenergy; electrification of transportation; and, unconventional oil and gas. This initiative is a key component of the Government of Canada's actions to achieve real emissions reductions, while maintaining Canada's economic advantage and its ability to create jobs for Canadians. In 2012-2013, funding for ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative projects will be approved for government, academic and private sector research and development projects and for demonstration projects with external public and private stakeholders.

The Marine Renewable Energy Enabling Measures program will develop a set of federal policy options and recommendations for administering marine renewable energy in the federal offshore by determining related requirements and stakeholders' views.

AANDC's ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program supports GHG reduction measures in Aboriginal and northern communities, with an emphasis on off-grid communities that currently use diesel generators to produce electricity and heat. Funded projects include feasibility studies of renewable energy projects (e.g., wind, small hydro, solar, and biomass), and design and construction of energy projects into community buildings (e.g., solar heating, ground source heat pumps, high efficiency heating systems). This program directly reduces energy sector GHG emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities. Success for this program will be indicated by the number of projects funded and resulting projected reductions in GHG emissions over a 20-year project lifecycle. In 2012-2013, the program will support pre-feasibility and feasibility studies of 5-10 renewable energy projects (e.g., wind, small hydro, solar, biomass), and design and construction of 5-10 energy projects integrated with community buildings (e.g., solar heating, ground source heat pumps, and high efficiency heating systems).

3. Theme Financial Information

Federal Partner Programs Total Allocation
for 2011-16
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded and may not add.

*ecoENERGY Retrofit Home program is a one year program for 2011-2012

**Funding is for 2011-2013

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities 19.63 3.93
Subtotal 19.63 3.93
 
Natural Resources Canada
Clean Energy Policy 4.66** 2.33
ecoENERGY Efficiency 190.11 38.01
ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels 1.35** 0.57
ecoENERGY Innovative Initiative 96.10** 63.87
ecoENERGY Retrofit Home* 400.00 N/A
Marine Renewable Energy Enabling Measures 3.83 0.81
Subtotal 696.04 105.59
Theme Total 715.67 109.52

Clean Air Agenda 2012-2013 Horizontal Reports on Plans and Priorities – Theme Report: Clean Transportation

The Clean Transportation Theme supports the Government of Canada’s commitment to reduce national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, which calculates to 607 megatonnes. This Theme aims to reduce emissions of air pollutants and GHGs from transportation activities through promoting new clean transportation technologies, implementing voluntary agreements, and developing of standards and regulations.

Ultimately, work undertaken within this Theme by contributing departments (Transport Canada (TC) and Environment Canada (EC)) supports reducing air pollutants and GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Adoption of clean transportation technologies will improve emissions intensity for air pollutants and GHG emissions.

In the short term, initiatives will regulate segments of the transportation sector and target other segments of the transportation sector to participate in non-regulatory voluntary emission reduction agreements. Clean transportation projects will also be completed as per funding agreements.

1. Theme Planning Highlights

The key deliverables expected in 2012-2013 are: implement domestic nitrogen oxide standards in the aviation sector; implement Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations; publish the amendments to the Sulphur in Diesel Fuel Regulation; and, implement a new air pollutant emission regulation for locomotives. TC will also support EC in the economic analysis, assessment of technological performance, and consultations for the development of heavy-duty and light-duty vehicle emission regulations.

Examples of other activities for 2012-2013 include: developing or implementing voluntary agreements to reduce GHG emissions with the Canadian aviation industry and Canadian rail industry; conducting safety and performance testing on heavy-duty and light-duty vehicle technologies; completing a draft of an internal model that identifies inputs and methodologies in Canadian supply chains, data gaps, and mitigation strategies; advancing work on the Truck Reservation Systems project at Port Metro Vancouver; and, supporting the installation of marine shore power facilities at Ports.

2. Theme Expected Results

Through the Aviation Sector Regulatory Initiative Canada will contribute to the development of international air pollutant and GHG emission standards, global targets, possible market-based mechanisms, and best practice operational measures at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Domestically, Canada will support aviation emission reductions through the development and implementation of new or amended regulatory frameworks to limit nitrogen oxide and CO2 emissions (planned to come into effect starting in 2013 and 2015, respectively depending on results). A new domestic voluntary agreement with the Canadian aviation industry for the reduction of GHG emissions will also be negotiated. It will form the basis of a Canadian Action Plan to reduce these emissions, for submission to ICAO in June 2012. Canada will engage in research that provides scientific support to regulatory development; improves scientific understanding of emissions at altitude and examines the short and long-term impacts of aviation emissions with regards to climate change and regional and local air quality, as well as technological and operational challenges to addressing these emissions, taking into account safety, security and economic considerations.

Through TC and EC’s Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative Canada will contribute to the development and implementation of new international emission standards as well as a framework, technical measures, and possible market-based measures to reduce GHG emissions at the International Maritime Organization (IMO). In 2012-2013, EC will continue to support TC at the IMO and undertake scientific and technical analyses to support the domestic implementation of international IMO air pollutant and GHG emission standards.

The Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative will also result in the development and implementation of new or amended Canadian regulations, along with effective compliance and oversight regimes, to address emissions from ships. Amendments to TC’s new Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations to limit air pollutant emissions are expected to enter into force August 1, 2012.

These regulations will be complemented by amendments to the sulphur in diesel fuel regulations led by EC under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 which will support TC’s implementation of the North America Emissions Control Area (ECA). The new amendments for diesel fuel will ensure that fuel suppliers can provide the fuel required for the implementation of the North American ECA in accordance with the international commitments under Annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL). EC and TC will continue work on an emissions inventory analysis to assess current and future ship emissions (GHGs and air pollutants).

Canada will engage in research that examines new technologies and practices that can be used for emission reduction or emission measurement.

The Rail Sector Regulatory Initiative is expected to result in new or amended regulatory frameworks, along with effective compliance and oversight regimes, to limit emissions from locomotives. New air pollutant regulations are planned for 2012-2013. Work will also begin on measures to address GHG emissions in collaboration with the United States. This initiative is also expected to result in domestic emission reductions from a voluntary agreement for addressing GHG emissions. Canada will engage in research on new and emerging technologies in the rail sector, including assessments of how they perform from a safety, economic and environmental perspective.

Through the Support for Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations program, TC will support EC efforts through analysis and advice on safety and competitiveness impacts in the development of GHG emission regulations for new heavy-duty vehicles (buses and trucks), and in the preparation of future GHG emission regulations for new light-duty vehicles (passenger automobiles and light trucks).

The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II Initiative will test, evaluate and provide expert technical information on the environmental and safety performance of advanced light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty vehicle technologies such as advanced tires. The technical findings will: inform the development of EC’s light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty vehicle GHG emission regulations; guide the proactive development of new or revised safety regulations, standards, codes and guidelines (under the authority of the Motor Vehicle Safety Act administered by Transport Canada); and, support the development of non-regulatory industry codes and standards that anchor the market and industry efforts to integrate new vehicle technologies.

The Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative will quantify the carbon footprint of each of Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors. This program is expected to result in research and data that will help the freight transportation sector and governments to demonstrate the carbon performance of Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors and make transportation decisions that limit GHG emissions. This program will develop an internal model that includes an identification of inputs and methodologies relevant to Canadian supply chains, as well as specific data gaps and mitigation strategies.

The Truck Reservation System Program will provide funding to support the deployment of truck reservation systems at Canada’s largest container ports, primarily focusing on Vancouver, Montreal, and Halifax. These systems will use technologies to improve efficiency in the movement of trucks into and out of terminal facilities at container ports and reduce truck idling.

The Shore Power Technology for Ports Program will provide funding to support the installation of marine shore power facilities at Canadian coastal or Great Lakes ports for all types of commercial vessels (cruise, container, and bulk). Marine shore power is a leading edge technology that allows ships to plug into the local electrical grid to power the vessel while at port, thereby avoiding the use of diesel auxiliary engines which consume fuel and produce GHG and air pollutant emissions.

3. Theme Financial Information

Federal Partner Programs Total Allocation
for 2011-13
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded and may not add.

For further information, see:

Environment Canada
Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative 4.22 2.39
Subtotal 4.22 2.39
 
Transport Canada
Aviation Sector Regulatory Initiative 5.05 2.97
ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II Initiative 12.84 8.25
Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative 0.56 0.41
Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative 8.28 4.81
Rail Sector Regulatory Initiative 5.68 4.03
Shore Power Technology for Ports Program 0.94 0.49
Support for Vehicle GHG Emissions Regulations 3.86 2.26
Truck Reservation System Program 1.78 1.72
Subtotal 38.99 24.94
Theme Total 43.21 27.34

Clean Air Agenda 2012-2013 Horizontal Reports on Plans and Priorities – Theme Report: International Actions

The International Actions Theme supports the Government of Canada’s broad efforts to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and address climate change by participating in international partnerships and negotiations, and by ensuring international obligations are met.

Ultimately, work undertaken in this Theme by the contributing departments (Environment Canada (EC), Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)) aims to ensure that international actions to address climate change are fair, effective and comprehensive, and that clean energy innovations result in global and domestic economic and environmental benefits. This includes ensuring our negotiating strategies and domestic policies are aligned with the United States (U.S.). For example, Canada’s recent participation at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of the Parties in Durban supported agreement to a process to negotiate a new climate change regime that would include binding commitments for all major emitters.

In the short term, these programs will ensure Canada meets its financial and reporting obligations arising from participation in international climate change agreements and organizations. Key domestic stakeholders will be engaged to enable Canada’s objectives to be advanced. This Theme will also promote GHG emissions reduction technology and mitigation and adaptation efforts in partner countries including developing countries.

1. Theme Planning Highlights

Early in 2010, under the Copenhagen Accord of the UNFCCC, the Government of Canada committed to reducing national GHG emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, which calculates to 607 megatonnes. This target is aligned with the reduction target set by the U.S. under the same agreement. The Accord represents an important step in the development of a single, new international climate change agreement, and is consistent with Canada’s negotiating objectives. This commitment was reaffirmed in the 2010 Cancun agreements. In 2011, Canada agreed to participate in the negotiations of a new climate change regime by 2015 as set out in the Durban Platform. Canada will contribute to the development of the Durban Platform and continue to implement commitments under the Copenhagen Accord and Cancun Agreements which includes supporting mitigation and adaptation actions by developing countries.

In 2012-2013, EC, DFAIT and NRCan will continue to participate in international climate change negotiations and will advance Canada’s interests through a range of high-level climate change discussions including those within the context of the UNFCCC, the Major Economies Forum, Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) and others. In addition, EC will host the international Conference of Global Methane Initiative (GMI) in collaboration with other public and private partners. EC will also launch the Short-Lived Climate Forcers (SLCFs) Global Initiative and will work with NRCan to develop a Clean Energy Dialogue Action Plan II in 2012-2013. DFAIT will also support these efforts and will work with the UNFCCC Secretariat to ensure that Canada’s contribution to UNFCCC’s core budget is made in a timely manner (the Clean Air Agenda provides $477,000 of Canada’s contribution). NRCan will provide strategic policy advice on key global climate change developments related to NRCan’s mandate, including energy, technology and forestry, and support the development of climate technology policies and positions.

2. Theme Expected Results

Theme programming has been clustered within three groups of activity: international participation/negotiations; international climate change obligations; and, continuing the engagement and alignment with the U.S.

International Participation and Negotiations

EC, DFAIT and NRCan work together to provide a whole of government approach to Canada’s participation in international negotiations, policy analysis and development, and bilateral and multilateral engagement relating to climate change under the UNFCCC process and within other international fora.

Further to the Durban Platform, EC’s International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations program will be actively engaged in the international negotiations for developing a new global climate change regime under the UNFCCC including participation at the 18th UNFCCC Climate Conference of the Parties in Qatar, December 2012. Canada will continue to implement the Copenhagen Accord, Cancun Agreements, and Durban outcomes. This will include support of mitigation and adaptation actions by developing countries. As part of Canada’s overall international climate change activities, EC will also continue to support international clean technology efforts through a range of programs including the GMI, SLCFs, and bilateral partnerships such as the Canada China Working Group (CCWG) and the Canada Mexico Partnership (CMP). DFAIT will also participate, with EC, on the CCWG, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the CMP. These efforts support outcomes at the final, intermediate and immediate levels about international cooperation on climate change and clean energy to ensure engagement in international climate change discussions while advancing Canada’s climate change priorities.

Through its International Climate Participation and Negotiations program, DFAIT will continue to participate in the UNFCCC negotiations towards the goal of reaching a fair, effective and comprehensive climate change agreement. In these negotiations DFAIT will continue to lead on certain issues. Additionally, DFAIT will continue to provide support to the Prime Minister, Ministers and Senior Officials for their participation in other international processes, including the G8, G20, the Commonwealth, and La Francophonie. DFAIT will continue to lead the integration of climate change issues into broader foreign policy priorities. DFAIT will continue to lead on bilateral and multilateral outreach through Canada’s network of diplomatic missions abroad on issues related to climate change. DFAIT will also continue to provide support and training to DFAIT staff to strengthen the knowledge of Foreign Service Officers on climate change issues, to allow them to engage effectively on these issues with foreign counterparts.

NRCan’s International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations program provides strategic policy advice to Government of Canada decision makers on key global climate change developments and other issues related to NRCan’s mandate. NRCan’s program supports the development of climate technology policies and positions that are aligned with Canada’s interests. The program also advances Canada’s international climate change objectives in a range of high-level climate change-related fora, including the UNFCCC and the CEM. Canada’s engagement in the CEM facilitates clean technology collaboration with major economies, including the U.S. and China. The program will lead Canada's participation in international initiatives on Carbon Capture Storage (CCS). NRCan will also work on forest carbon issues through contributing to international negotiations on GHG accounting and reporting rules for forest carbon, conducting analysis of key forest carbon options that contribute to climate change mitigation, and continuing to develop Canada’s National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System. This system will provide forest-related information for Canada's 2013 National GHG Inventory Report to the UNFCCC. NRCan will engage with domestic stakeholders on forest carbon management and the role of forests in meeting Canada’s mitigation goals under international agreements.

International Climate Change Obligations

EC and DFAIT support Canada in meeting international obligations under the UNFCCC and Canada’s participation in several scientific organizations including the Inter American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI) and IPCC

EC’s International Climate Obligations activities include supporting IAI, an intergovernmental organization dedicated to augmenting global climate change research capacity and collaboration in the Americas, and, providing information in a useful and timely manner to policy makers. Canada is one of 19 member states of the lAI and a primary financial contributor. Canada's IAI membership enables Canada to influence the facilitation of scientific networks across North and South America and capacity building in Latin America. Many Canadian researchers benefit from the IAI through individual grants or collaborative activities on scientific issues important to a region. As well, Canada contributes funds to support the IPCC in assessing scientific, technical and socio-economic information that is key to understanding the risks of climate change and options for response.

Under its International Climate Obligations program, DFAIT will work with the UNFCCC secretariat to ensure that Canada’s assessed contribution to the core budget of the UNFCCC is paid in a timely fashion. Canada’s assessed contributions are part of the core budget for the UNFCCC that is negotiated by all Parties to the Convention. Funds are directed as per decisions by the Conference of the Parties. The provision of these funds is required as part of Canada’s obligations as a Party to the UNFCCC, and has allowed Canada to remain a participant in good standing. These funds combined with the contributions of other countries will enable the UNFCCC to continue to hold negotiating sessions in order to make progress towards a successful outcome including a post 2020 agreement.

Continue to Engage and Align with the U.S.

NRCan and EC work collaboratively with the U.S. Department of Energy to advance the Clean Energy Dialogue (CED). The overall objective of the CED is to enhance bilateral collaboration in the development and deployment of clean energy technologies in order to reduce GHG emissions and address climate change challenges.

The CED Secretariat housed within EC conducts research and analysis to identify opportunities for collaboration with the U.S. in the research, development and deployment of clean energy technologies; and monitors and analyzes relevant initiatives to reduce GHG emissions (domestically, continentally and globally). The CED Secretariat also engages with its U.S. counterpart in the Department of Energy and with key stakeholders to identify ways to facilitate and advance the implementation and delivery of CED projects and initiatives that will be identified in the Action Plan ll currently under development. The CED Secretariat works to advance the overall objectives of the CED; and, will prepare and deliver progress reports on the implementation of CED projects and initiatives outlined in CED Action Plan II.

In 2012-2013, the three CED working groups will implement the initiatives included in the CED Action Plan II. Under the Clean Energy Research & Development and Energy Efficiency working group, co-chaired by EC and NRCan, activities may include further analyses of Canada-U.S. dialogue in support of biofuels and bioenergy research and development. It is anticipated that NRCan will focus on implementation of projects on marine energy, transportation, buildings and communities and energy efficiency.

In 2012-2013, NRCan will continue to lead the CCS and the Electricity Grid working groups. Activities are expected to include, among others, technical collaboration on research, development and demonstration of CCS, sharing of best practices on CCS communications and public engagement, advancing smart grid technologies, and realizing the potential of power storage technologies.

3. Theme Financial Information

Federal Partner Programs Total Allocation
for 2011-13
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded and may not add.

Environment Canada
Engagement and Alignment with U.S. 1.69 0.85
International Climate Change Obligations 0.68 0.34
International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations 9.33 4.53
Subtotal 11.70 5.72
 
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
International Climate Change Obligations 0.95 0.48
International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations 2.84 1.42
Subtotal 3.79 1.90
 
Natural Resources Canada
Engagement and Alignment with U.S. 2.30 1.15
International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations (includes Forestry) 6.18 3.09
Subtotal 8.48 4.24
Theme Total 23.97 11.85

Clean Air Agenda 2012-2013 Horizontal Reports on Plans and Priorities – Theme Report: Adaptation

The Adaptation Theme focuses on supporting complementary initiatives for adapting to the impacts of climate change, rather than on reducing GHG emissions. These initiatives seek to reduce risk to communities, infrastructure and the health and safety of Canadians while realizing economic benefits and maintaining competitiveness from innovations responding to climate change.

The Adaptation Theme is comprised of programs from nine federal departments and agencies: Environment Canada (EC); Natural Resources Canada (NRCan); Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC); Health Canada (HC); Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC); Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO); Parks Canada Agency (PCA); Standards Council of Canada (SCC); and, Transport Canada (TC). The Theme is organized into four program streams: enhancing science foundations in order to assess and predict climate change impacts; enhancing public health and safety; building resilience in the North and climate sensitive Aboriginal communities; and, enhancing competitiveness in climate sensitive economic sectors.

Ultimately, work undertaken in this Theme by the contributing departments aims to reduce the vulnerability of individuals, communities, industry and regions to the impacts of climate change, while also building capacity to adapt through planning and taking action.

In the short term, programs will support communities and sectors in recognizing the need for adaptation and assess their risks and opportunities arising from climate change. Based on this knowledge, adaptation measures and plans to address these risks and take advantage of these opportunities will be identified and shared.

1. Theme Planning Highlights

In 2012-2013, several programs will fund projects to assist Aboriginal and northern communities in understanding and adapting to the changing climate. A call for research proposals will be sent to eligible northern communities, and Aboriginal communities and organizations to increase collaboration on climate change adaptation. Other northern initiatives include: ecosystem mapping and scenario modelling for select national parks; development of codes and standards related to northern infrastructure; and, the provision of new information for managing mine wastes in the North. Nationally, other programs will: provide foundational science-based information on Canada’s changing climate and future (physical) impacts; expand heat alert and response systems in at-risk communities across Canada; develop information tools and guidelines to support  preventative public health systems, develop an adaptation toolkit for forest sector decision-makers; and, engage with national industry organizations on risks and opportunities created by the changing climate for natural resource sectors. By Spring 2013, a climate change infectious disease toolkit will be developed to enhance the ability of the public health professionals and provincial and territorial governments to respond rapidly to vector- and water-borne disease events, and reduce and mitigate the occurrence of infectious diseases in general. In 2012-2013, four Large Basin Assessments for each of Canada’s three oceans and its inland waters will be completed.

2. Theme Expected Results

The adaptation programs complement each other in working on shared areas of focus: enhancing the science foundation to understand and predict climate and assess climate change impacts; enhancing public health and safety; building resilience in the North and climate-sensitive Aboriginal communities; and, enhancing the competitiveness of climate-sensitive economic sectors and systems across Canada.

Enhancing the Science Foundation

EC, DFO and PCA programs are working to address gaps in understanding the impacts and risks posed by climate change and to better understand ecological changes in Canada’s marine and northern terrestrial ecosystems.

EC’s Climate Change Prediction and Scenarios Program provides knowledge, scientific expertise, information and tools that are accessible to Canadians to improve their ability to adapt to climate change and variability from seasonal to decadal time scales, supporting federal, provincial, territorial and community adaptation planning and decision-making. It also provides policy analysis and research for issues associated with climate change adaptation, including implementation of the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework. Specifically, EC ensures Canada’s national climate modelling program is maintained through enhancements to and operation of global and regional climate models, and develops and improves climate change scenarios (including climate extremes). It also, ensures specialized information on climate extremes for infrastructure design, codes and standards are developed and/or updated. EC contributes to the IPCC and provide analysis, support and advice on climate change impacts and adaptation issues to senior officials.

DFO’s Aquatic Climate Change Adaptation Services Program will: conduct ocean and inland water risk assessments; initiate a research program to increase understanding of climate change impacts in relation to the Department’s mandate responsibilities; and, facilitate tool development, all in support of the Department in delivering on its three strategic outcomes. Four Large Basin Assessments (three oceans and inland waters) will focus on climate change impacts and vulnerabilities and will inform the Department’s program decision-makers, policy-makers and planners of the needs for adaptation, identify and prioritize risks and opportunities, and identify available options to adapt to climate change. Assessments are scheduled for completion in the fall of fiscal year 2012-2013 and will be used to inform competitive programs in fiscal 2013-2014. Funding proposals for research and tool development to be undertaken next fiscal year will be accepted and reviewed by the end of March, 2012. One technical committee will facilitate the work required for completion of the Large Basin Assessments and another will review proposals under the competitive funds.

PCA’s Understanding Climate-Driven Ecological Changes in Canada’s North program consults with park co-management boards, conducts process-based ecosystem mapping, and completes scenarios modeling and reporting to help communities understand the risks to important ecological services such as the availability of important country foods, recognize the need for adaptation, and discuss options for action. For example, by 2013 ecosystem mapping of Wapusk, Ivvavik and Torngat Mountains National Parks will be completed. PCA will also link key climate drivers to changing ecosystem composition and structure, and discuss how these changes might impact other ecosystem components (such as caribou and other species) and the ecological integrity of parks. This program supports communities in assessing the risks and opportunities arising from climate change, and provides them with options for adapting.

Enhancing Public Health and Safety

HC and the PHAC work to enable Canadians and existing systems (e.g., emergency response) to effectively respond to health-related climate risks.

PHAC’s Preventative Public Health Systems and Adaptation to a Changing Climate program informs decision-making in the public health system and develops adaptation strategies to prevent and mitigate the occurrence of disease, and increase Canadians’ capacity to prevent infectious diseases. Activities include: collecting information and developing tools about infectious diseases related to climate change; researching public health and water-borne and insect illness; developing scenario-based projections on the impacts of climate change on food and water safety; and, assessing the burden of gastrointestinal illness on vulnerable communities in the North.

HC’s Heat Alert and Response Systems (HARS) program aims to reduce the vulnerability of Canadians to extreme heat by promoting development of HARS in at-risk communities. The 2012-2013 year will represent the first heat season associated with the renewed program so efforts will be targeted to get research underway, negotiate contracts and agreements, and establish needed partnerships. Efforts will focus around expanding HARS to new at-risk communities, building capacity among target stakeholder groups, and conducting research to support information sharing, launching the Heat-Health Network, and the release of an on-line continuing education program for healthcare professionals accredited by the College of Family Physicians of Canada.  For example, guidelines will be developed to support public health and emergency management professionals in identifying community-specific thresholds for triggering heat alerts.

Building Resilience in the North

AANDC, SCC and HC support the development of safe, sustainable and prosperous northern and climate-sensitive Aboriginal communities through programs that assess climate risks and enable planning for adaptation, and integrate climate risks into codes and standards for northern infrastructure.

AANDC’s Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners will reduce vulnerability to climate change by supporting the assessment of, and adaptation to, climate change impacts in Aboriginal and northern communities. This program will work collaboratively with other government departments, Aboriginal organizations and communities to build capacity within communities to carry out vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning. Up to $250,000 in funding is available for each project to conduct vulnerability assessments, develop tools/methods/best practices, develop adaptation plans and share knowledge. The program aims to fund 10 projects in its first year and ultimately fund 90 projects over the life of the program.

AANDC and SCC will collaborate to deliver the Integrating Adaptation into Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure program. The Program will develop Codes, Standards and Related Instruments (CSRIs) to support more resilient infrastructure at a community level. 

AANDC and SCC will work together to support the Northern Advisory Committee.  In consultation with northern practitioners, committee members will confirm the climatic impacts and infrastructure categories requiring immediate attention. The committee will assess gaps and needs and identify international best management practices available for integrating climate change into CSRIs. In early 2012, SCC’s program will initiate a standardization process for the key infrastructure priority areas. It is anticipated that 3 to 5 new and/or revised CSRIs will be completed and capacity to implement these CSRIs will be built over the next 5 years.

In partnership with northern First Nations, Inuit and other organizations, HC’s Climate Change and Health Adaptation for Northern First Nations and Inuit Communities program supports communities in assessing their risks from climate change and developing appropriate adaptation measures to reduce these risks. Community-based research projects will focus on understanding climate change and health impacts, developing responses, communicating results and incorporating local and traditional knowledge.

HC will also increase collaboration on climate change adaptation by enhancing websites and training and utilizing webinars and teleconferencing through partnerships and agreements with key organizations such as the Assembly of First Nations and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Dene Nation, the Council of Yukon First Nations, governments and academia.

Enhancing the Competitiveness

NRCan and TC work to help decision-makers across all levels of government and stakeholder groups understand the relevance of climate change to their operations and equip them with appropriate tools and information.

NRCan’s Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate program will deliver information and share expertise to improve the ability of decision-makers in Canada’s regions and targeted economic sectors to adapt. The Earth Sciences Sector will establish an Adaptation Platform to bring together knowledge, capacity and financial resources to efficiently and effectively facilitate adaptation action. In 2012-2013 it will establish a series of working groups that will address topics such as coastal management, economic analysis, and measuring progress on adaptation. The Mining and Metals Sector will deliver a report and a technical seminar to improve knowledge on the climate change impacts on mine waste management and effluent treatment in the North and offer practical adaptation technologies. The Canadian Forest Service’s project involves development of an adaptation toolkit, a prioritized list of indicators, and an initial tracking system that will improve the ability to track impacts of climate change for Canada’s forest sector.

TC’s Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative will study, develop, and implement innovative science-based technologies to help improve the resiliency and adaptability of existing and future northern transportation infrastructure to ensure the safety, efficiency and environmental sustainability of that infrastructure. Partnerships with other federal government departments, territorial and provincial governments, academia and industry will ensure that the limited northern resources are maximized and that knowledge, best practices and adaptive solutions are shared amongst stakeholders. In 2012-2013, this initiative will bring together stakeholders through networks, workshops and discussion groups to share relevant knowledge and identify themes where gaps exist on specific problems such as increased ground water flow and airstrip and marine infrastructure vulnerabilities. Short and long-term knowledge gap studies and needs assessments will also be conducted in consultation with territorial governments.

3. Theme Financial Information

Federal Partner Programs Total Allocation
for 2011-16
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded and may not add.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners 19.72 4.36
Integrating Adaptation into Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure 0.94 0.19
Subtotal 20.65 4.55
 
Environment Canada
Climate Change Prediction and Scenarios Program 28.82 5.76
Subtotal 28.82 5.76
 
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Aquatic Climate Change Adaptation Services Program 16.42 5.14
Subtotal 16.42 5.14
 
Health Canada
Climate Change and Health Adaptation for Northern First Nations and Inuit Communities 9.86 2.32
Heat Alert and Response Systems 7.91 1.68
Subtotal 17.76 4.00
 
Natural Resources Canada
Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate 34.94 7.99
Subtotal 34.94 7.99
 
Parks Canada
Understanding Climate-Driven Ecological Changes in Canada's North 2.30 0.51
Subtotal 2.30 0.51
 
Public Health Agency of Canada
Preventative Public Health Systems and Adaptation to a Changing Climate 11.45 3.13
Subtotal 11.45 3.13
 
Standards Council of Canada
Integrating Adaptation into Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure 2.50 0.50
Subtotal 2.50 0.50
 
Transport Canada
Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative 10.90 3.10
Subtotal 10.90 3.10
Theme Total 145.75 34.68