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ARCHIVED - 2012-13 RPPs - Horizontal Initiatives

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Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) and Canadian Polar Commission

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement — Health Supports component

Name of lead department(s): Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Lead department program activity: Residential Schools Resolution

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: September 2003 (RHSP), July 2004 (Crisis Line)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013 (RHSP) October 31, 2013 (Crisis Line)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $226,786,069

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AANDC's Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector supports former students in crisis by funding the National Indian Residential School Crisis Line, a national, 24-hour toll-free support service (1-866-925-4419) operated by trained Aboriginal crisis counselors. AANDC is also responsible for coordinating the verification of program eligibility, and ensuring that Health Canada is aware of dates for Independent Assessment Process hearings and Truth and Reconciliation and Commemoration events as they arise, so that health supports can be provided to former students in a seamless fashion.

Health Canada's Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program (IRS RHSP), a component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) ensures that former students of Indian residential schools and their families can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse through all phases of the IRSSA. The RHSP components include: cultural support services provided by Elders; emotional support services provided by Resolution Health Support Workers (RHSWs); professional counselling; and assistance with the cost of transportation to access counseling, Elder, and/or Traditional Healer services.

Shared outcome(s): The IRSSA Health Supports component works toward the achievement of two outcomes:

  • Eligible former students of Indian residential schools and their families have access to mental health and emotional support services.
  • Eligible former students of Indian residential schools can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse.

Governance structure(s): AANDC is responsible for the overall implementation of the IRSSA and is working in partnership with Health Canada to coordinate and provide services for former Indian residential school students throughout all phases of the IRSSA.

Planning Highlights: The Health Supports component will:

  • continue to deliver professional, paraprofessional and cultural supports to former Indian residential school students and their families through the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program;
  • provide former Indian residential school students and their families with access to a 24-hour national crisis line;
  • undertake communications activities to ensure that the health supports program is well-known; and
  • strengthen research, knowledge and training initiatives to ensure that health supports are well-suited to meet the needs of Indian residential school students, their families and communities.

Federal Partner: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-2012
Residential Schools Resolution Indian Residential Schools Crisis Line $23,938,069 $4,132,000 
Total $23,938,069 $4,132,000

Expected Results by program: Demand-driven health supports are provided to former Indian residential school students and their families through all phases of the IRSSA.

Federal Partner: Health Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-2012
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program $202,848,000 $8,865,000
Total $202,848,000 $8,865,000

Expected results by program: Demand-driven health supports are provided to former Indian residential school students and their families through all phases of the IRSSA.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-2012
$226,786,069 $12,997,000

Contact information:

Health Canada:
Andrea Challis
Manager, Indian Residential School Resolution Health Support Program
Mental Health and Addictions Division
Community Programs Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
Phone: (613) 952-1377
andrea.challis@hc-sc.gc.ca

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada:
Alia Butt
A/Director
Policy and Reconciliation Directorate
Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Tel.: 613-996-2603
alia.butt@aandc-aadnc.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Aboriginal Economic Development Strategic Partnerships Initiative (SPI)

Name of lead department(s): Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Lead department program activity: Under AANDC's program activity architecture, the Strategic Partnerships Initiative is categorized under the Strategic Outcome entitled “The Land and Economy”.  The Program Activity for the Initiative is entitled “Aboriginal Economic Development”.

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 17, 2010

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: on-going

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $85.5 million over five years (total G&C and O&M)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Strategic Partnerships Initiative (SPI) is a program intended to support Aboriginal participation in the economy, with a particular focus on forestry, fisheries, mining, energy and agriculture. A key component of the new Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development, SPI enables more than a dozen partnering federal departments and agencies to provide a coordinated federal response to existing and emerging Aboriginal economic development opportunities.

SPI builds partnerships among federal departments, Aboriginal communities, provincial and territorial governments and the private sector to help Aboriginal Canadians take advantage of complex market-driven opportunities in key sectors of the economy. The initiative's funding is intended to fill gaps that cannot be addressed by existing programs.

SPI fosters a whole-of-government approach to Aboriginal economic development by enabling federal partners to align investments and resources around shared objectives. The program helps eliminate funding gaps in existing federal programming that could otherwise limit or exclude Aboriginal involvement in emerging economic development opportunities.

The initiative also helps to build closer partnerships with non-federal partners, including provincial and territorial governments, the private sector and Aboriginal individuals, organizations, businesses and communities. These partnerships will help bring together the people and resources required for Aboriginal communities to take advantage of opportunities in key sectors of the economy.

Shared outcome(s): The SPI is designed to ensure a horizontal approach to federal investments which will: ensure that federal investments are aligned and targeted toward market-driven opportunities; that the Government of Canada is able to anticipate, plan for, and engage in opportunities; and that the Government of Canada is able to maximize the results of federal investments and be better positioned to lever funds from non-federal sources. Additionally, the SPI will create the possibility of a single window approach (shared application, monitoring and reporting) to federal investments in shared priorities and, where there are gaps in programming, a dedicated source of funds can be accessed to make contributions to recipients.

Governance structure(s): Central to the governance structure of the SPI is the Federal Coordination Committee for Aboriginal Economic Development (FCC). The FCC validates and prioritizes opportunities for a whole-of-government approach to investment under the SPI. The FCC also identifies relevant federal departments and agencies who will work together to develop work plans with Aboriginal groups to advance these opportunities.

Planning Highlights: SPI will enter its third year of delivery in the 2012-2013 fiscal year. The majority of sector investments are based on 3 year strategies which will conclude at the end of the upcoming fiscal year. This provides an opportunity to begin considering updated approaches and new opportunities in order to respond to emerging opportunities for federal collaboration (such as pipelines, potash, etc).

Federal Partner: There are 13 signatories to the Treasury Board Submission for the Aboriginal Economic Development Strategic Partnerships Initiative:

  • Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  • Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
  • Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
  • Industry Canada, including FedNor
  • Natural Resources Canada
  • Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
  • Parks Canada
  • Status of Women Canada
  • Western Economic Diversification Canada

Expected results: Strategic investments under SPI are expected to report on: number of formal partnerships established with federal and non-federal partners under SPI; number of agreements and dollar value of non federal funds leveraged from partners under SPI and number of Aboriginal communities participating as proponents or partners in economic opportunities under SPI per sector.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-2012
$71.4M over 5 years G&C $14.450M for SPI

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada:
Gerry Huebner
Manager
Strategic Partnerships Initiatives
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Tel.: 819-953-4108
Gerry.Huebner@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

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Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Flexibility Fund

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity:

The Agricultural Flexibility Fund (AgriFlexibility) contributes to several program activities within AAFC: On-Farm Action; Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems; Trade and Market Development; Science, Innovation and Adoption; and Agri-Business Development.

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 18, 2009

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2014

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $313.4 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Agricultural Flexibility Fund is a five-year fund that helps implement new initiatives, both federally and in partnership with provinces, territories and industry. AgriFlexibility will improve the sector's competitiveness and assist the sector adapt to pressures through non-business risk-management measures to take advantage of existing and emerging opportunities to address market pressures. These initiatives are consistent with Canada's international trade interests and obligations, complement measures being implemented under the Growing Forward policy framework, and contribute to a competitive and sustainably profitable Canadian agricultural and agri-food sector.

Three federal-only initiatives under AgriFlexibility have been announced and are at various stages of implementation. They are: Livestock Auction Traceability Initiative (LATI); AgriProcessing Initiative (API); and Canada Brand Advocacy Initiative.

Also funded under the Agricultural Flexibility Fund is a study to provide national and current baseline estimates on the prevalence and concentrations of Campylobacter and Salmonella in broiler chicken. This study undertaken by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) will be useful in the development of pathogen reduction programs, and serve as benchmarks against which the industry could measure the effectiveness of its Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points (HACCP) programs and/or intervention measures over time.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

Shared outcomes:

The Agricultural Flexibility Fund shared outcomes are:

  • Producers/partners/industry implement actions to improve their environmental practices.
  • Producers/partners/industry implement actions to reduce their costs of production.
  • Food safety, biosecurity, traceability, and risk management measures are improved.
  • Agri-processors upgrade their capacity.

The CFIA baseline study contributes to the following shared outcome: food safety, biosecurity, traceability, and risk management measures are improved.

Governance structure:

Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) questions related to AgriFlexibility are discussed at the FPT Policy Assistant Deputy Ministers' (ADM) Committee.

The Director General Policy and Programs Management Committee reviews proposals and makes a recommendation to one of the Corporate Executive Committees: the Policy and Programs Management Committee (PPMC) or Horizontal Management Committee (HMC). It is comprised of Directors General from across the Department and is co-chaired by the Director General of Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate, Farm Financial Programs Branch and the Director General, Innovation Directorate, Research Branch. This Committee reviews proposals and makes a recommendation to PPMC or HMC.

Through a memorandum of understanding between the CFIA and AAFC, the Agriculture Transformation Program Directorate monitors the progress of the CFIA baseline study by reviewing progress reports produced by the Agency every six months against specific deliverables and performance indicators.

Planning Highlights:

In 2012-13, AAFC plans to continue delivering AgriFlexibility, its three federal-only and one federal-provincial initiative. The three federal-only initiatives are the LATI, API, Canada Brand Advocacy Initiative, and the federal-provincial initiative is the Interprovincial Meat Hygiene Pilot Project.

Federal Partner: AAFC

Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Various program activities Agricultural Flexibility Fund 311.4 93.5
Total 311.4 93.5

For more information, visit: Agricultural Flexibility Fund

Expected results by program:

Producers/partners/industry implement actions to improve their environmental practices

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Number of actions implemented by producers to improve their environmental practices - AAFC's Target is 279 by March 31, 2014.

Producers/partners/industry implement actions to reduce their costs of production

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Number of initiatives positively impacting profitability and competitiveness – AAFC's Target is eight by March 31, 2014.

Improved food safety, biosecurity, traceability, and risk management measures

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Number of food safety plans and programs being developed - Target is five by March 31, 2014.

Increase in the number of agri-processing facilities adopting new technologies and processes

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Number of agri-processing facilities adopting new technologies and processes - AAFC's Target is 35 over the life of this program (2009-14) - Target for 2012-13 is five.

Increased exports of Canadian product in selected markets with growth opportunities

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Increase in export value (baseline is 2008) exports valued at $302 million for Mexico and $1.1 billion for Japan) of consumer-oriented products as measured from the start of Canada Brand Advisory activities - Target is 4% of 2008 exports by March 31, 2013 for Mexico and Japan.

Maintained exports of Canadian products in threatened markets

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Percentage dollars of export value of selected products (as measured immediately prior to the threat's impact on exports) that is maintained - Target is 75% by March 31, 2013.

Agri-industry implement actions to respond to market threats and/or take advantage of emerging market opportunities

Performance Indicators and Targets:

  • Number of initiatives addressing significant market issues – Target is four initiatives to address market issues in ten countries by March 31, 2013.
  • Number of new products created – Target is 13 by March 31, 2013.

Increase in value-chain efforts focussed on innovation and/or adaptation

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Number of value-chains developed – Target is three by March 31, 2014.

Enhanced traceability capabilities at high-risk, high through-put co-mingling sites

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • The percentage of targeted co-mingling sites participating in the program that enhanced their facility's traceability capabilities (there are 1,327 targeted sites and it is estimated that approximately 416 will participate) – Target is 95% of participants by March 31, 2014.

Maintain or increase value-chain innovation and adaptation; producers/partners exploit existing and develop new opportunities

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Number of innovations developed – Target is 112 by March 31, 2014.

Federal Partner: CFIA

Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Food Safety Program Meat and Poultry 2.0 1.5
Total 2.0 1.5

Planned spending in the above table is as per the Memorandum of Understanding beween AAFC and CFIA.

Expected results by program:

The CFIA baseline study contributes to the following shared outcome: food safety, biosecurity, traceability, and risk management measures are improved.


($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
313.4 95.0

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Expected results are the same as those of federal partners.

Contact information:

Lynn McGuire, Director
Adaptation Division
Farm Financial Programs Branch
Room 242, Floor 8, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0C5
613-773-1905

Note:

Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved Treasury Board Submissions. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan Element of Growing Forward

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $94.9 million over five years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

This initiative targets four specific regulatory issues that were identified by stakeholders, namely: 1) health claims, novel foods and ingredients; 2) food fortification; 3) minor use pesticides and pesticide risk reduction; and 4) veterinary drugs. The Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan supports the general principles of the Government of Canada's Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation. The Plan addresses the development of regulatory frameworks based on the accumulation of sound science, as well as advancing the transparency, timeliness, responsiveness, efficiency, public interest, and government collaboration to minimize regulatory burden for stakeholders.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

Shared outcome:

Addressing key regulatory obstacles to promoting a competitive and innovative sector, while protecting and advancing the public interest.

Governance structure:

Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between AAFC and Health Canada set out the roles and responsibilities for the management of this initiative. The Deputy Ministers of the two departments oversee the governance process that includes the following levels of management in accordance with the MOUs:

  • An Assistant Deputy Ministers' (ADM) Committee oversees the management of the MOUs and reports back to the Deputy Ministers.
  • Joint Management Committees (JMCs), composed of directors general or equivalent level representatives, have been established to manage the implementation of the MOUs and report semi-annually to the ADM Committee

Planning Highlights:

Work under the Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan aims to improve and modernize key aspects of the regulatory system in each of the four priority areas (see Description of the Horizontal Initiative above), while reducing the regulatory burden to promote innovation and improve competitiveness within the agriculture and agri-food sector.

AAFC is committed to helping industry understand and follow regulatory processes and requirements, including responding to scientific data requirements of submissions to Health Canada. Concerning minor-use pesticides, AAFC's plans involve identifying and prioritizing pest management needs, conducting trials, determining the concentration of pesticide residue, compiling data, drafting reports, and assembling regulatory submissions. Under the pesticide risk reduction program, AAFC will work with stakeholders to develop and implement pesticide risk reduction strategies, prioritize biopesticides needs, and develop and divulge pesticide risk reduction tools, practices and techniques. With regard to health claims, novel foods and ingredients, AAFC's plans include working with industry and research and regulatory communities to facilitate information collection, analysis and exchange, as well as undertaking and coordinating collaborative scientific research.

Health Canada's activities are focussed on streamlining regulatory processes and improving submission review times, and developing policy and regulatory frameworks, to better address priorities of the sector while maintaining health and safety standards. More specifically, Health Canada will continue to evaluate and register minor use pesticides that meet the needs identified by growers. In the veterinary drugs area, the Department's work will involve undertaking regulatory harmonization initiatives with international agencies, improving regulatory processes for generic and new drugs, and establishing maximum residue limits for older drugs. With respect to health claims, novel foods, ingredients, and food fortification, Health Canada's plans include developing and implementing targeted policies, regulations and pre-market processes.

AAFC and Health Canada have established interdepartmental working groups for the initiatives in which they are partnering. These groups develop business cases, work plans, performance objectives and targets, and budget and expenditure reports. They report to their respective JMCs.

Federal Partner: AAFC

Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to the totals shown.
Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction 36.2 9.0
Health Claims, Novel Foods and Ingredients 16.1 3.6
Total 52.4 12.5

Expected results by program:

Minor Use Pesticides

Improved competitive parity of the agriculture and agri-food sector with regard to pest management, with 170 new minor uses of pesticides registered by Pest Management Regulatory Agency, based on a national list of grower-selected pest management priority projects and data for regulatory submissions.

Pesticide Risk Reduction

Two pesticide risk reduction strategy documents will be developed by March 31, 2013, leading to an improved sustainability and competitive parity of the agriculture and agri-food sector and increase grower awareness of and adoption of safer pest management practices and products.

Health Claims, Novel Foods, and Ingredients

An enhanced sector ability to navigate the food regulatory system through an improved understanding of regulatory processes/requirements, demonstrated by 75% of sector respondents who indicate an increased ability to navigate the regulatory system; and 10 new, innovative and safe food products and three claims, focusing on health benefits.

This will be achieved by the production of regulatory-issue/impact documents, literature reviews and research-gap lists, the collection of data and evidence to address priority knowledge gaps, the establishment and continuation of domestic and international science networks, and sector guidance and communication, which will lead to complete and substantiated sector regulatory submissions.

Federal Partner: Health Canada

Federal Partner Program Activities Names of Programs for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to the totals shown.
Pesticide Regulation Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction 16.0 4.0
Health Products Veterinary Drugs 5.0 1.2
Food and Nutrition Health Claims, Novel Foods and Ingredients 17.4 3.5
Food Fortification 4.3 1.0
Total 42.6 9.7

Expected results by program:

Minor Use Pesticides

Improved competitive parity of the agriculture and agri-food sector with regard to pest management evidenced by the number of new minor uses of pesticides which are registered or available for use in Canada 

This will be achieved by actively participating and providing feedback to applicants on minor use pesticide submission requirements, streamlining data requirements and regulatory processes, and reviewing minor use submissions under a dedicated stream. In addition, the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, a branch of Health Canada, will partner with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate the joint regulatory submissions of the Minor Uses Pesticide Program and its U.S. equivalent, the Interregional Research Project No.4.

Veterinary Drugs

An increased availability of veterinary drugs for food-producing animals in Canada, including the establishment of Maximum Residue Limits for older drugs, by maintaining recent gains in the end-to-end review time for new drug submissions, and enhancing the Minor Use Minor Species (MUMS) sector's ability to navigate and understand the regulatory processes and requirements for MUMS drugs

This will be achieved by providing information and guidance to industry, enhancing policies and regulatory frameworks to streamline generic drug approvals, facilitate access to MUMS products, increasing scientific capacity to review drug submissions, and harmonizing the technical requirements for veterinary drug submissions with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other international agencies. This will be supported by optimal use of international information including scientific reviews of veterinary drugs, and by encouraging AAFC's involvement in supporting the development of submissions for MUMS as is done in the pesticides sector.

Health Claims, Novel Foods and Ingredients

Modernized and efficient policy and regulatory approaches and pre-market processes; and new, innovative and safe food products and claims, focussing on health benefits

This will be evidenced by the development and implementation of regulatory tools such as policies, regulations and pre-market processes, the development of manuals, reports, and consultations, and work-sharing agreements, and enhanced policy/regulatory/process engagement with industry, consumers and international partners.

Food Fortification

New, innovative and safe food products introduced in the Canadian market, resulting from the development of informed fortification business/marketing plans by industry that meet government requirements, as well as the development and implementation of regulatory tools such as policies, standards and/or regulations for the management of safe fortified foods which meet industry and consumer needs, and which are based on accurate Canadian data

This will be evidenced by the establishment of a system of pre-market approval of industry submissions for foods fortified with vitamin and minerals on a discretionary basis that is practical, predictable, transparent, and timely. This will also be evidenced by dedication of staff to manage the review and assessment of the safety of fortified foods and issue Temporary Marketing Authorization Letters, and an enhanced knowledge-base supporting the development of approaches to manage fortified foods.


($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
94.9 22.2

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners: Not applicable

Contact information:

Lynn Stewart, Director
Food Regulatory Issues Division
Sector Development and Analysis Directorate
Market and Industry Services Branch
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Room 242, Floor 2, Tower 5
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0C5
613-773-0153

Note:

AAFC's Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved Treasury Board Submissions Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInsurance

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: AgriInsurance contributions are statutory and ongoing.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriInsurance aims to reduce the financial impact on producers of production losses caused by uncontrollable natural perils.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and the Federal-Provincial AgriInsurance Agreement.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriInsurance
AgriInsurance in British Columbia
AgriInsurance in Alberta
AgriInsurance in Saskatchewan
AgriInsurance in Manitoba
AgriInsurance in Ontario
AgriInsurance in Québec
AgriInsurance in New Brunswick
AgriInsurance in Nova Scotia
AgriInsurance in Prince Edward Island
AgriInsurance in Newfoundland

Shared outcome:

The shared outcome is that the financial impacts of production losses are mitigated by providing effective insurance protection.

Governance structure:

AgriInsurance is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM Program Activity.

AgriInsurance is a provincial program to which the federal government contributes financially under the Federal-Provincial AgriInsurance Agreement. The program is administered provincially in all provinces. The federal and provincial (FP) governments cost-share a portion of the premium costs together with program participants (generally 36% federal, 24% provincial and 40% producer). Governments also fully cost-share the administrative costs of the program (60:40 federal-provincial).

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT BRM Policy Working Group and FP AgriInsurance Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Planning Highlights:

Work is underway to develop the next Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) agricultural policy framework, the successor to Growing Forward, as set out in the Saint Andrews Statement that was endorsed by FPT Ministers in July 2011. FPT governments and industry stakeholder engagement sessions are planned for 2012 with a focus on the development of program options, including the next generation of BRM programming, that support the priorities identified for the new FPT agricultural policy framework.

The federal government will continue to work to ensure producers have access to affordable and comprehensive insurance coverage. The federal government will also continue working with the provinces and delivery agencies to develop new insurance options for agricultural products, including livestock, forage and horticultural crops.

Governments and industry stakeholder engagement sessions are planned for 2012, during which there will be a focus on the development of program options that support the policy priorities identified for a new FPT agricultural policy framework.

The development of the new generation of BRM programming will also take into consideration the results of recent evaluations and audits. The Departmental Audit and Evaluation Office undertook a review of AgriInsurance. The review was expected to be completed by June 2012.

Federal Partner: AAFC

Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Business Risk Management AgriInsurance Ongoing 412.5
Total Ongoing 412.5

Expected results by program:

Production losses are mitigated by providing effective insurance protection.

Performance Indicators and Targets:

  • Producers feel that AgriInsurance provides effective insurance to mitigate production losses – Target is more than 70% of surveyed producers.
  • Value of insured production compared to the total value of all agricultural products eligible for insurance – Target is 60% by March 31, 2013.
  • Value of agricultural products eligible for insurance compared to the value of all agricultural products – Target is 85% by March 31, 2013.
  • Operational documents ready for provincial review within a turn-around time of 30 days – Target is 80% by March 31, 2013.
  • Provincial program proposals processed within a turn-around time of 30 days – Target is 90% by March 31, 2013.
  • Provincial claims processed within a turn-around time of 30 calendar days or 20 business days – Target is 80% by March 31, 2013.

($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13

Ongoing

412.5


Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Planning and development activities are done jointly with the provinces. Therefore, the expected results are the same, but the achieved results will vary by province.

Contact information:

Rosser Lloyd, A/Director General
Business Risk Management – Program Development
Room 241, Floor 3, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0C5
613-773-2116

Note:

Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates. Planned spending amounts include the federal cost-share of each province’s direct administration costs of its respective programming. This program is statutory and demand-driven; therefore actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability and AgriInvest. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInvest

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriInvest grants and contributions are statutory and ongoing.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriInvest allows producers to self-manage, through producer-government savings accounts, the first 15% of their margin losses for a production year and make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues. Under the program, annual producer deposits of up to 1.5% of their allowable net sales are matched by government deposits. Government deposits are cost-shared 60:40 by federal and provincial/territorial governments. AgriInvest provides coverage for small income declines. AgriStability, another program in the suite of BRM programs, assists producers in managing larger losses.

AgriInvest provides producers with a secure, accessible, predictable, and bankable source of income assistance to address small drops in farm income and manage on-farm risks.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal-Provincial-Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

AgriInvest (except Quebec)
AgriInvest in Québec (La Financière agricole du Québec)

Shared outcome:

The shared outcome for this initiative is that producers have the flexibility in managing small financial risks.

Governance structure:

The AgriInvest program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM Program Activity. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are shared by the federal government, the provinces and the Yukon Territory on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

For the 2008 program year, the AgriInvest program was delivered by the federal government in all provinces except Quebec. Producer deposits and matching contributions were made to the accounts held by the federal government. Starting with the 2009 program year, producers opened and made their deposits into AgriInvest accounts at an approved financial institution of their choice. Any balance in their AgriInvest account held by the federal government was transferred to the financial institution account. In Quebec, the AgriInvest program is, and will continue to be, delivered provincially by La Financière agricole du Québec.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Planning Highlights:

Work is underway to develop the next FPT agricultural policy framework, the successor to Growing Forward, as set out in the Saint Andrews Statement that was endorsed by FPT Ministers in July 2011. FPT governments and industry stakeholder engagement sessions are planned for 2012 with a focus on the development of program options, including the next generation of BRM programming, that support the priorities identified for the new FPT agricultural policy framework.

The development of the new generation of BRM programming will also take into consideration the results of recent evaluations and audit. The departmental Audit and Evaluation Office undertook a review of income stability tools for BRM programs, including AgriInvest. The review was expected to be completed by June 2012.

The Office of the Auditor General (OAG) tabled a report in the House of Commons on November 22, 2011, which included a chapter on Payments to Producers. The audit covered the AgriStability and AgriInvest Programs. The report noted the progress the Department had made in developing a performance measurement framework for the BRM programming with the provinces. The report did, however, indicate that improvements were needed on the collection and reporting of performance information, including the information related to the processing times for AgriInvest.

The Department is currently collecting information on the processing times for AgriInvest and will report the results in the 2011-12 Departmental Performance Report. It will continue to work with the provinces to refine the performance measurement framework for the BRM programs.

Federal Partner: AAFC

Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Business Risk Management AgriInvest Ongoing 160.4
Total Ongoing 160.4

Expected results by program:

In partnership with the provinces and territories, AAFC has put in place a set of performance indicators and targets for the suite of BRM programs. Officials will use these performance indicators and targets to closely monitor and report on the performance of the BRM programs and ensure they are meeting their objectives.

Producers have the flexibility in managing small financial risks.

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Percentage of AgriInvest producers receiving AgriStability payments and making withdrawals from their AgriInvest saving accounts - Target is at least 60% by March 31, 2013.

Producers use program account balances to address income declines or to make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues.

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Percentage of producers indicating that they use their funds to address income declines or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues - Target is at least 75% of producers surveyed by March 31, 2013.

Application processing

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Timeliness of application processing to issuance of deposit notice (AAFC Delivery) – Percentage processed within 45 days. Target is 80% by March 31, 2013.

($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
Ongoing 160.4

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

Contact information:

Rosser Lloyd, A/Director General
Business Risk Management – Program Development
Room 241, Floor 3, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0C5
613-773-2116

Note:

Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved Treasury Board Submissions. This program is statutory and demand-driven; therefore actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability and AgriInsurance. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriStability

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriStability grants and contributions are statutory and ongoing.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriStability is a margin-based program that provides support when producers experience large farm income losses, which result in drops in their margins (eligible farm income less eligible farm expenses) for a program year of more than 15% relative to their average margins from previous years (i.e., their reference margins). Thus, a payment is triggered under the program when producers' program year margins drop below 85% of their reference margins. AgriStability also includes coverage for negative margins, as well as mechanisms to advance to participants a portion of their expected payments during the year when significant declines in incomes are expected (interim payments and Targeted Advance Payments). AgriStability assists producers in managing large losses. AgriInvest, another program in the suite of BRM programs, provides coverage for smaller income declines.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal-Provincial-Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriStability
AgriStability in British Columbia
AgriStability in Alberta
AgriStability in Saskatchewan
AgriStability in Ontario
AgriStability in Quebec
AgriStability in Prince Edward Island

Shared outcome:

The shared outcome for this initiative is that the short-term impacts of large income losses are mitigated.

Governance structure:

The AgriStability program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FPT) Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM Program Activity. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are shared by the federal government and the provinces/territory on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

In British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Quebec, and Prince Edward Island, the AgriStability program is delivered provincially. The AgriStability program is administered by the federal government for Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Yukon Territory.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Planning Highlights:

Work is underway to develop the next FPT agricultural policy framework, the successor to Growing Forward, as set out in the Saint Andrews Statement that was endorsed by FPT Ministers in July 2011. FPT governments and industry stakeholder engagement sessions are planned for 2012 with a focus on the development of program options, including the next generation of BRM programming, that support the priorities identified for the new FPT agricultural policy framework.

The development of the new generation of BRM programming will also take into consideration the results of recent evaluations and audits. The departmental Audit and Evaluation Office undertook a review of income stability tools, including AgriStability. The review was expected to be completed by June 2012.

The Office of the Auditor General (OAG) tabled a report in the House of Commons on November 22, 2011, which included a chapter on Payments to Producers. The audit covered the AgriStability and AgriInvest Programs. The report noted that the Department has made progress on design issues, but the long standing challenges with timeliness of payments remain. The report noted that the Department followed a sound process for the transfer of AgriStability delivery to British Columbia and Saskatchewan. The report noted the work done with the provinces in developing a performance framework for BRM programming and suggested further improvements.

Potential adjustments to improve timeliness of AgriStability payments under a new FPT agricultural policy framework are being considered. AAFC will also continue to work with the provinces to refine the performance measurement framework for the BRM programs.

Federal Partner: AAFC

Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Business Risk Management AgriStability Ongoing 591.0
Total Ongoing 591.0

Expected results by program:

In partnership with the provinces and territories, AAFC has put in place a set of performance indicators and targets for the suite of BRM programs. Officials will use these performance indicators and targets to closely monitor and report on the performance of the BRM programs and ensure they are meeting their objectives.

Short-term impacts of large income losses are mitigated.

Performance Indicators and Targets:

  • Participants' farm market revenues compared to total farm market revenues - Target is 75% of total farm market revenues that are covered by the program by March 31, 2013.
  • Participants' production margin with payments compared to reference margin - Target is that program payments bring producers' margins up to 65% of reference margin on average by March 31, 2013.
  • Timeliness of final application processing (AAFC Delivery): Percentage of applications processed within 75 days – Target is 75% by March 31, 2013.

($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
Ongoing 591.0

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

Contact information:

Rosser Lloyd, A/Director General
Business Risk Management – Program Development
Room 241, Floor 3, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0C5
613-773-2116

Note:

Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved Treasury Board Submissions. This program is statutory and demand-driven; therefore actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriInvest and AgriInsurance. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada’s Rural Partnership

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Rural and Co-operatives Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Start date under the Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2008
(Original start date under Agricultural Policy Framework: April 1, 2003)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$52.9 million over five years (including in-year transfers)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Canada's Rural Partnership (CRP) leads an integrated, government-wide approach through which the government aims to co-ordinate its economic, social, environmental, and cultural policies towards the goal of economic and social development and renewal of rural Canada.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of an innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector and the Government of Canada's outcome of An Innovative and Knowledge-Based Economy.

Shared outcomes:

  • Collaboration between rural communities and stakeholders to address barriers and challenges to local development
  • Information and tools used by rural communities and regions, as well as other government departments, to develop local amenities and other assets
  • New economic activities in rural Canada

Governance structure:

The CRP is managed by the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat. It contributes to raising awareness and inclusion of rural Canada in federal policies and programs, as well as engaging government and non-government partners to stimulate economic development in rural Canada. The mechanisms for achieving this include:

  • the Rural Development Network, which brings together over 250 members from 41 federal-provincial-territorial government departments and agencies to achieve greater information sharing, collaboration and coordination on rural issues, with a view of developing better integrated policies and programs for rural Canadians;
  • the Community Development Program, which offers funding to assist rural and northern regions to obtain information and access or develop the expertise, tools and processes needed to respond to challenges and opportunities and to become more competitive and generate economic activities; and
  • the Community Information Database, a free web-based resource that provides comprehensive and reliable information on economic, social and demographic factors at the community level, to support decision-making and action.

In each province and territory, these efforts are reinforced by Rural Teams, comprised of federal government representatives and, in most cases, members from the provincial or territorial government, and sectoral stakeholders.

Moreover, the Secretariat is an active participant in the National Rural Research Network, which brings together research partners from both academia and government to focus on enhancing knowledge about rural issues to better inform policy making.

Planning Highlights:

Through its networks, teams and programming, CRP will stimulate collaborative approaches with all levels of government and non-government organizations to assist rural communities to: enhance the competitiveness of rural regions; foster the transformation of local ideas and untapped assets into innovative sustainable economic activities; and help develop new economic opportunities from existing natural and cultural amenities.

Federal Partner: AAFC - Rural and Co-operatives Development

Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
AAFC – Rural and Co-operatives Development Canada's Rural Partnership 52.9 10.3
Total 52.9 10.3

Expected results by program:

Rural communities and regions are using information and tools to develop local amenities and other assets.

Contribution agreements for community development and knowledge building projects

Contributing activities by AAFC:

  • Support and facilitate innovative rural development by developing, transferring and mobilizing knowledge

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Number of communities that identified and assessed their local natural and cultural amenities - Target is 50 by March 31, 2013.
($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
52.9 10.3

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Not applicable

Contact information:

Michaela Huard, Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
Room 125, Floor 2, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0C5
613-773-2916

Note:

AAFC's Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved Treasury Board Submissions. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Co-operative Development Initiative

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Rural and Co-operatives Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Start date under the Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2008
(Original start date under Agricultural Policy Framework: April 1, 2003)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$23.6 million over five years (including in-year transfers)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Co-operatives Secretariat provides advice on policies and programs affecting co-operatives and builds partnerships within the federal government and with industry, provinces and other key stakeholders to support the development of co-operatives. The Secretariat manages a grants and contributions program, the Co-operative Development Initiative, which includes:

  • providing advisory services and funding innovative co-operative projects, delivered by the co-operative sector; and
  • funding research to build knowledge contributing to co-operative development.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of an innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector and the Government of Canada's outcome of An Innovative and Knowledge-Based Economy.

Shared outcomes:

  • Access to services across the country creates an enabling environment for co-operative development and growth
  • More and stronger co-operatives respond to public policy challenges
  • Canadians are better able to utilize the co-operative model to meet their economic and social needs

Governance structure:

The Co-operatives Secretariat, now an integral part of the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat, was created as a focal point between Canadian co-operatives and federal departments and agencies. It has instituted mechanisms to raise awareness and inclusion of co-operatives in federal policies and programs, as co-operatives can be a vehicle to help government achieve its goals. These include dialogue and collaboration with key federal departments as well as with provincial counterparts and the sector.

Planning Highlights:

The Co-operatives Secretariat will continue to manage a partnership agreement with two national co-operative associations for the delivery of the Co-operative Development Initiative with the objective of enhancing the contribution of co-operatives to meeting the economic and social needs of Canadians.

The Secretariat will explore opportunities to engage other departments in ensuring the co-operative approach is considered as a tool in delivering their mandates, leveraging the International Year of Co-operatives (2012) for interdepartmental collaboration.

The Secretariat will also collaborate with provinces in the area of research on co-operatives with a view to developing a common research agenda and enhancing knowledge sharing.

The Secretariat will continue to collect and analyze data to produce a final Performance Measurement Strategy report for the program (2009-2013).

Federal Partner: AAFC - Rural and Co-operatives Development

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
AAFC - Rural and Co-operatives Development Co-operative Development Initiative 23.6 4.7
Total 23.6 4.7

Expected results by program:

Innovative co-operative projects are implemented.

Contributing activities by AAFC:

  • strengthening partnership with the co-operative sector associations
  • providing funding for advisory services and for projects that respond to public policy priorities; and
  • funding strategic research and knowledge-building proposals

Performance Indicator and Target:

  • Number of innovative co-operatives development projects implemented by community partners – Target is 25 projects by March 31, 2013.

($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
23.6 4.7

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

AAFC partners with co-operative sector organizations that act as delivery agents. The above-noted expected results and measures are to be achieved by these organizations.

Contact information:

Michaela Huard, Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
Room 125, Floor 2, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0C5
613-773-2916

Note:

AAFC's Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved Treasury Board Submissions. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Growing Forward non-BRM Cost-Shared Programs (formerly known as Growing Forward Program Initiatives Development)

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2009

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$31.8 million over four years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Two separate Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) between AAFC and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) set out the general terms, roles and responsibilities for the management and funding of the various components of the Canadian Integrated Food Safety Initiative (CIFSI) funded under AAFC's Growing Forward framework agreement, in respect of the Growing Forward non-BRM Cost-Shared Programs. The following initiatives are delivered by CFIA, in collaboration with AAFC:

  1. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support element under the National Food Safety Systems component of the Canadian Integrated Food Safety Initiative: The CFIA-led System Recognition element will provide government recognition of on-farm and post-farm food safety systems developed by national (or equivalent) industry organizations. CFIA will continue to develop and deliver food safety system recognition programs. Under the Scientific and Technical Support element, CFIA will continue to provide scientific and technical advice to support food safety system development based on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP).

  2. National Biosecurity Standards Development: The National Biosecurity Standards Development will allow CFIA to focus on developing nationally consistent plant and animal biosecurity standards. These standards will be developed with industry, commodity organizations, and provinces. Once the biosecurity standards are approved by CFIA, they will become the national biosecurity standard for that particular commodity.

  3. Development of Traceability National Information Portal (TNIP) formally known as the Traceability Information Sharing Solution element under the Developing National Traceability Systems component of the CIFSI: The Traceability Information Sharing Solution is a tool that will allow authorized users to search the databases of industry and government partners simultaneously for traceability information to effectively address animal disease situations and food safety issues. Funding allocations were used to develop materials necessary to define and document the high-level requirements and initial project planning and definition which led to and included preliminary project approval. Effective project approval was achieved on December 8, 2011, and included project implementation, close-out and operations.

    These initiatives are managed through joint leadership between CFIA and AAFC and coordinated through the Traceability Management Office.

  4. Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure element under the Developing National Traceability Systems component of the CIFSI: The Traceability Management Office will be established to collaboratively undertake the work relating to the overall government legislative and regulatory infrastructure necessary to put traceability authorities, agreements and protocols in place. The allocation of funding to CFIA will be used to develop the legislative and regulatory infrastructure for the initiative.

    These initiatives link to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risks and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

Shared outcomes:

These initiatives contribute to the following strategic outcome of AAFC:

  • a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk.

These initiatives contribute to the following strategic outcomes of CFIA:

  • a safe and sustainable plant and animal resource base; and
  • public health risks associated with the food supply and transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized and managed.

Governance structure:

The overall administration of the two MOUs is delegated to:

Growing Forward Program Initiatives Development

  • i. For AAFC:
    • Director General – Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
    • Director General – Policy Development and Analysis Directorate
    • Director General – Sector Development and Analysis Directorate
  • ii. For CFIA:
    • Executive Director – Food Safety and Consumer Protection Directorate
    • Executive Director – Animal Health Directorate, Programs
    • Executive Director – Plant Health and Biosecurity
    • Vice President – Information Management and Information Technology
    • Executive Director – Domestic Policy Directorate

Development of Traceability National Information Portal

  • iii. For AAFC:
    • Director General – Sector Development and Analysis Directorate
    • Director General – Strategic Management, Information Services Branch
  • iv. For CFIA:
    • Associate Vice-President – Strategic Projects and Integration
    • Vice President – Information Management and Information Technology
    • Executive Director – Domestic Policy Directorate

Planning Highlights:

Government-recognized and science-based food safety, biosecurity and traceability standards, practices and systems developed and implemented at the farm and agri-business levels will help to prevent the spread of animal and plant diseases. This will reduce costs associated with responses to disease outbreaks, help continue and enhance market access, and allow the sector to better respond to increasing demands for assurances of food safety. In turn, this will strengthen domestic and international consumers' confidence in Canada as a source for safe products.

Key targets or expected results include:

  • Government program for the review of national on-farm food safety programs completely operational;
  • Government program for the review of national post-farm food safety programs developed and operational;
  • Development of National Biosecurity Standards for priority commodity groups;
  • Development of the Traceability Management Office's legislative and regulatory Infrastructure; and
  • Development of National Traceability Information Portal that will allow authorized users to search the databases of industry and government partners simultaneously for traceability information to effectively address animal disease situations and food safety issues.

Federal Partner: AAFC

Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Note: Since CFIA is delivering these programs with funds transferred from AAFC, total allocations, planned spending and expected results are reflected in the CFIA table below.
Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support N/A - funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA
National Biosecurity Standards Development N/A - funds transferred to CFIA N/A - funds transferred to CFIA
Development of Traceability National Information Portal formally known as Traceability Information Sharing Solution N/A - funds transferred to CFIA N/A - funds transferred to CFIA
Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure N/A - funds transferred to CFIA N/A - funds transferred to CFIA
Total N/A - funds transferred to CFIA N/A - funds transferred to CFIA

Expected results by program:

Refer to Expected Results listed under the CFIA table below.

Federal Partner: CFIA

Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to the totals shown.
Food Safety and Nutrition Risks CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support 6.5 1.1
Animal Health Risks and Production Systems National Biosecurity Standards Development 9.3 2.8
Plant Health Risks and Production Systems
Animal Health Risk and Production Systems Development of Traceability National Information Portal formally known as Traceability Information Sharing Solution 12.7 5.7
Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure 3.3 0.9
Total 31.8 10.5

Expected results by program:

CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support:

  • Continuous improvement of the On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program and the Post-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program;
  • Ongoing technical review and assessment of on-farm and post-farm food safety programs for recognition; and
  • Scientific and technical support provided as needed to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders

National Biosecurity Standards Development:

  • Environmental scan of current state of biosecurity within a commodity sector;
  • National agri-commodity biosecurity standards developed;
  • Production and dissemination of standards; and
  • Production and dissemination of education and training material

Development of the Traceability National Information Portal also known as Traceability Information Sharing Solution:

  • Implementation and launch of the National Traceability Information Portal
  • Project close-out; and
  • Post-launch operations

Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure:

  • Establish a national legislative framework for traceability including parliamentary processes and final approval;
  • Establish implementation activities for new legislation;
  • Ongoing amendment and continuous improvement for a regulatory framework for traceability; and
  • Continue to initiate privacy impact assessments
($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
31.8 10.5

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Not applicable

Contact information:

Linda Parsons, Director General
Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
Farm Financial Programs Branch
Room 220, Floor 8, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0C5
613-773-1900

Note:

AAFC's Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved Treasury Board Submissions. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

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Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: International Business Development Agreement (IBDA)

Name of Lead Department: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

Lead Department Program Activity: Enterprise Development (program sub-activity: International Business Development)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2011

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2016

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $7,000,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): In May 1994, ACOA entered into an agreement (the Canada/Atlantic Provinces Agreement on International Business Development, also known as the IBDA) with the four Atlantic Provinces, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and Industry Canada to “undertake specific measures to optimize regional coordination on a pan-Atlantic scale and combine limited resources to coordinate trade-related activities.” Since its launch, the agreement has been extended five times (in 1997, 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2011) for a total investment of $34 million. Funding is cost-shared 70/30 by the federal (through ACOA) and provincial governments. The commitment to this agreement, with the increased funding allocation, attests to both the IBDA’s positive results and its significance for the future of the region’s international business development.

The IBDA supports ACOA’s International Business Development (IBD) program sub-activity by coordinating efforts of federal, provincial and private-sector organizations in pursuing international business opportunities. This aligns well with Canada’s Global Commerce Strategy, which aims to strengthen the country’s position in international markets, and reinforces Canada’s image internationally as a preferred business partner and premier investment destination.

More information can be found on the IBDA website.

Shared Outcomes: The primary shared outcomes for the IBDA partners since the agreement’s inception are listed below.

  • Increased number of new exporters
  • Existing exporters reporting sales to new markets
  • Existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets

Since 1994, the Agency and its partners have administered over 255 projects involving over 5,000 Atlantic Canadian companies. The IBDA has helped 198 companies to begin exporting, 459 exporters to increase their export sales, and 333 exporters to expand into new markets. In addition to the above outcomes, this new extension will:

  • assist exporters in targeting emerging markets such as Brazil, India and China;
  • support universities and research establishments to expand their revenues from international commercialization;
  • support clients to source new technologies or processes;
  • support foreign direct investment; and
  • support Canadian direct investment abroad.

Governance Structure: ACOA is the lead organization for this initiative and houses the secretariat responsible for administering the agreement. A management committee, comprising a representative of each partner, is responsible for planning and managing the agreement’s programs and the evaluation of projects.

Partners include:

Federal departments and agencies (70% funding)

  • ACOA (lead department)
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (non-funding partner)
  • Industry Canada (non-funding partner)

Provincial governments (30% funding)

  • Business New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia Business Inc.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Innovation, Business and Rural Development
  • Prince Edward Island Department of Innovation and Advanced Learning

Planning Highlights: The IBDA will continue to build on its accomplishments to date, its extensive experience and lessons learned to contribute further to sustained growth in international business for the Atlantic region. Through its four key elements, the IBDA will:

  • expose sectors and companies to export market opportunities and ensure that they are well prepared, with the capability, knowledge and information required to develop international business;
  • develop longer term strategies and implementation plans for international business development and undertake research on companies’ needs and best practices;
  • assist sectors and companies by obtaining market intelligence and contacts, identifying international market opportunities and applying this knowledge to trade development activities; and
  • undertake business activities that support sector export development strategies and contribute to contacts, alliances and ultimately sales for both existing and new exporters.

The agreement is administered by a management committee made up of all seven partners: ACOA, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, Industry Canada and the four Atlantic Provinces. The committee’s responsibilities include approving all projects, establishing procedures and guidelines, monitoring the budget, and reporting results to the appropriate government levels. A secretariat, housed at ACOA’s head office, oversees day-to-day operations.

Funding is sourced from ACOA’s Business Development Program (70%) and the provincial governments (30%), with New Brunswick providing 11%; Nova Scotia, 11%; Newfoundland and Labrador, 5%; and Prince Edward Island, 3%.

Federal Partner: ACOA (lead department)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Enterprise Development Business Development Program – International Business Development Agreement 7.0 1.4

Expected Results, by Program: In April 2011, the IBDA adopted the results indicators listed below.

  • Number of projects undertaken
  • Value of contributions or funding extended

Outputs include:

  • Number of clients who participated in promotional activities sessions
  • Number of research and/or market intelligence reports completed
  • Number of clients who participated in learning and skills development activities
  • Number of matchmaking meetings
  • Percentage of clients satisfied with matchmaking services
  • Number of clients who participated in ACOA-assisted international events
  • Percentage of clients satisfied with participation in international events
  • Volume (average range) of sales reported
  • Number of foreign direct investment opportunities identified (FDI leads)

Outcomes include:

  • Number of SMEs starting to export
  • Number of SMEs exporting to new markets
  • Number of SMEs increasing export sales to existing markets
  • Number of occasions when clients sourced a more competitive product or service
  • Number of SMEs, universities and research establishments expanding their revenues from international commercialization
  • Number of clients who identified/adopted new technologies or processes
  • Number of foreign direct investment transactions completed (deals closed), where ACOA’s support contributed to the project’s fruition
  • Number of Canadian Direct Investments Abroad (CDIA)

Federal Partner: Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
International Commerce N/A 0 0

Expected Results, by Program: Same as ACOA

Federal Partner: Industry Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services N/A 0 0

Expected Results, by Program: Same as ACOA


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$7,000,000 $1,400,000

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners: Same as ACOA

Contact Information:
Michel Têtu
Director General, International Business Development
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 6051
Moncton, New Brunswick
E1C 9J8
Tel: 506-851-6496
Email: Michel.Tetu@acoa-apeca.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership (ACTP)

Name of Lead Department: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

Lead Department Program Activity: Community Development

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 2012 (tentative)

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2015

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): Approval is pending.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): In 1994, ACOA entered into a three-year international tourism marketing agreement (the Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership) with the four provincial tourism industry associations and the provincial departments responsible for tourism in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. The agreement was renewed in 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2009 for consecutive three-year terms.

The ACTP is dedicated to promoting Atlantic Canada as a leading vacation destination in priority markets in the mid-Atlantic and New England regions of the United States and in the United Kingdom. It enables the four Atlantic provinces to penetrate markets that are inaccessible individually; generates marketing economies and efficiencies at the consumer, travel trade and media-relations levels; and creates significant opportunities for regional tourism synergies.

Since its inception, the ACTP’s international marketing efforts have generated more than $654 million in export revenues for tourism SMEs in Atlantic Canada. Its efficiencies are demonstrated by a return-on-investment of almost $15 for every $1 invested in marketing.

The 2012-15 ACTP is a $19.95-million agreement that supports:

  • fully-integrated consumer, trade and media relations marketing strategies based on sound market research, economies of scale, and commonality;
  • funding that is incremental to provincial marketing budgets;
  • the preservation of provincial brand equity;
  • marketing activities being dictated by the marketplace;
  • clear and responsive measurement systems of benefit to all four Atlantic provinces; and
  • end-of-agreement project evaluations.

Funding of the partnership is shared as follows: ACOA $9,975,000 (50%), Provinces $6,585,000 (33%) and industry $3,390,000 (17%).

Additional information can be found on the ACTP website.

Shared Outcomes: ACTP directly supports the Federal Tourism Strategy’s strategic priority of “increasing awareness of Canada as a premier tourist destination” and ACOA’s Growth Strategy for Tourism. It exemplifies the strategic outcomes for ACOA's priority of increasing revenues, profits, investments and wages. The ACTP’s outcomes aim to:

  • increase Atlantic Canada’s competitiveness in targeted markets;
  • promote regional co-operation (federal, provincial, industry);
  • promote incremental marketing activities;
  • achieve economies of scale in marketing;
  • raise awareness of Atlantic Canada as a “top-of-mind” destination; and
  • increase tourism arrivals and tourism revenues for the four Atlantic provinces.

Governance Structure: The activities of the ACTP are managed by a ten-person management committee, consisting of the ACOA vice-president responsible for tourism, the director general of Tourism Atlantic, the four provincial deputy ministers responsible for tourism, and the four tourism industry association presidents (or their permanent designates). Management committee decisions are made by consensus. Six members constitute a quorum, provided that all four provinces are represented, with both government and industry present, and ACOA.

The management committee is responsible for the administration and management of the agreement, the allocation of annual budgets on a per-market basis, the approval of annual program work plans and budgets, and the evaluation of program activities. It oversees the work of a marketing committee, develops and oversees a communications policy, and provides program interpretation and dispute resolution.

At the national level, the Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) is the lead organization in marketing Canada to the world. Collaborations with the CTC in markets of common interest advance the competitiveness and economic benefits derived from tourism, both regionally and nationally. To achieve greater coherence supporting Canada’s Federal Tourism Strategy and the long-term growth and competitiveness of Canada’s tourism industry, a senior representative from the CTC sits ex-officio on the management committee.

Planning Highlights: The 2012-15 ACTP maintains an international focus by continuing to pursue priority markets in the mid-Atlantic and New England regions of the United States and in the United Kingdom. Each year the marketing committee researches and prepares fully integrated consumer advertising, as well as travel trade and media relations strategies, all for the management committee’s approval. These strategies are implemented by program managers who report directly to the marketing committee.

In the U.S., the ACTP will expand its efforts by building on and enhancing the brand equity of provincial and industry partners in priority lifestyle markets in the mid-Atlantic and New England regions. Overseas, a regional Atlantic Canada brand will be delivered into developmental markets in the U.K.

Marketing budgets will be expended against fully integrated marketing activities in targeted U.S. and U.K. markets. This may include special events in concert with traditional and non-traditional consumer, trade, media relations and digital marketing strategies (e.g. social media, pay-per-click). In order to maximize efficiencies, the ACTP’s marketing activities in all market segments use tactics common to all four Atlantic provinces. All advertising and promotional materials include a mechanism that provides prospective travellers with access to information on all four provinces as a means of promoting the tourism products and experiences available throughout Atlantic Canada.

Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Community Development Atlantic Investment Partnership II Tourism 9.975 3.325

Expected Results, by Program: The 2012-15 ACTP is expected to generate $10 in incremental economic activity for every $1 invested in marketing. The ACTP’s marketing activities are expected to generate $41.67 million in export revenues in each year of the partnership. The three-year revenue target is $125.01 million in incremental revenues for small and medium-sized tourism enterprises in Atlantic Canada.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$9,975,000  $3,325,000 

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners: Tourism revenue of $10 for every $1 invested in marketing.

Contact Information:
Rob McCloskey
Director General, Tourism Atlantic
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 40
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
C1A 7K2
Telephone: 902-626-2479
Email: Rob.Mccloskey@acoa-apeca.gc.ca


Top of Page

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Table A: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: CFIA: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-04 (enhanced programming)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Building on work commenced in the early 1990's, the BSE program protects human and animal health by: conducting surveillance, research and risk assessments concerning BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs); minimizing the risk of exposure to infected materials; maintaining consumer confidence through the assessment of the effectiveness of risk mitigation measures and the presence of implemented measures to control any potential outbreaks; supporting market access for cattle, beef and related products through the promotion and explanation of Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments concerning human exposure to BSE and other TSEs, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) also performs surveillance and targeted supporting research in this area. The CFIA enforces requirements that: specified risk material (SRM) are removed from the animal feed chain and the human food chain; monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country; monitors the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance); verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place; and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the Veterinarians Abroad Program) to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program. AAFC has been involved in supporting, stabilizing and repositioning Canada's beef and cattle industry, including through the provision of compensation payments to stakeholders impacted by BSE in Canada.

Year Departments Funding Period Intent of Funds
2003-04 CFIA, AAFC, HC 2003-04 to 2007-08 - measures to secure the future of the Canadian beef industry
2003-04 CFIA 2003-04 to 2007-08 - removal of SRM from the food chain and re-entry into export markets (referred to as the Enhanced BSE Initiative)
2004-05 CFIA, AAFC 2004-05 to 2008-09 - repositioning of the Canadian beef and cattle industry to operate on a profitable and sustainable basis
2004-05 CFIA 2004-05 to 2005-06 - strengthening of animal feed restrictions
2005-06 CFIA 2005-06 to 2008-09 - additional measures to address critical pressures facing the ruminant industry
2006-07 CFIA 2006-07 - continuation of the Agency's work concerning the enhanced feed ban
2007-08 CFIA On-going - implementation of enhanced feed ban restrictions
2008-09 CFIA 2008-09 - extend sunsetting elements of the Enhanced BSE Initiative
2009-10 CFIA, PHAC, HC 2009-10 to 2013-14 - continuation of work on core BSE activities

Shared outcome(s): Contributing to human and animal health protection, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

Governance structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for the delivery of the BSE Program. In 2008, a summary evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program was conducted, which noted that the program's governance should be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication conrcerning BSE-related activities, both internally and with other partner organizations. The CFIA accepted this recommendation and agreed to develop improved governance model options, to facilitate horizontal dialogue that is consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives. In 2010, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's overall governance approach more in line with evolving business needs. The new governance structure focuses on the importance of sharing information internally and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure business line perspectives are integrated into decision making, three senior executive-level committees are supported by four committees: Animal Health, Plant, Food and Horizontal Management.

Planning Highlights: For 2012-13, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the BSE Program to current standards, as well as improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.

Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Internal Services

SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain $91.5M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $9.5M
Import Controls $2.8M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $0.3M
BSE Surveillance $159.9M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $15.4M
Cattle Identification $29.2M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $2.8M
Export Certification $53.2M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $5.7M
Technical Market Access Support $44.1M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $5.0M
Enhanced Feed Ban $241.0M (2004-05 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing $26.6M
Establishment Review $2.3M (2004-05 to 2006-07) $0.0M
Oversupply of Aged Cattle $0.3M (2004-05) $0.0M
Meat Inspection Reform $9.2M (2005-06 to 2007-08) $0.0M
Total $633.5M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing $65.3M

Expected results by program:

SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain:

Outcome: Safe food.

Output/Activities: Compliance with current regulations / continuation of the enforcement and verification of SRM removal, handling, and disposal by CFIA inspection staff.
Indicator3: Compliance rate of industry for removal of SRM.
Targets and Tracking3: 100% Compliance, Internal program files/ & documents

Import Controls:

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

Output/Activities: Up-to-date import controls / review and update current import policies and conditions for BSE as required, to reflect changes to international standards and evolving science.
Indicator3: # of import policies verified and updated as required
Targets and Tracking3: 25%/year
Indicator3: BSE Import Policy is verified and updated as required
Targets and Tracking3: annually, when the OIE updates the lists

BSE Surveillance:

Outcome: Safe animals and food.

Output/Activities: Measure of BSE level and distribution in cattle population/Analyze options to redesign the BSE surveillance program and consult with stakeholders to explore further targeting of surveillance.
Indicator3: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population.
Targets: Testing 30,000 samples from the high risk category of cattle is the minimum national target.

Targets:3 Internal files/documents/ databases (LSTS, provincial lab data, National Livestock Identification Database, Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network)

Cattle Identification:

Outcomes:

  • Governments and other entities make informed decisions to manage animal and related human health issues
  • Risk to Canadian livestock resource base are mitigated
  • Canadian livestock sector is compliant with regulations

Output/Activities:

Activity: Inspections, compliance verification, investigations and enforcement actions

Output: Compliance verification and enforcement strategy; Inspection reports; Data quality audits; Trace-out reports; Letters of non-compliance; Administrative penalties; Prosecutions

Activity: Develop and administer program and related policies

Output: Regulations; program and related policies; privacy impact assessment; threat risk assessment; Administrator agreement; tools for CFIA staff (e.g. program related policy, positions, manuals, SoPs, etc.)

Indicators, Targets and Tracking3:

Indicator: Number and development status of inspection tools in place

Target: Training, tools and materials are relevant and up to date

Indicator: Number of inspectors trained

Target: All inspectors verifying compliance are trained

Indicator: Ratio of non-compliance versus number of Compliance Verification System (CVS) tasks carried out by CFIA staff expressed as a percentage

Target: 95% compliance

Indicator: Percentage of response to disease and epidemiological investigations that are completed within service standards.

Target: 100%

Export Certification:

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Output/Activities: Export Certificate / continue provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries.
Indicator3: Independent assessment reviews.
Targets and Tracking3: Currently being revised

Indicator3: # of quality assurance program developed and certified
Targets and Tracking3: as requested

Technical Market Access Support:

Outcome: Maintain and improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Output/Activities: Increased market demand and confidence / continue the establishment and maintenance of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence concerning international policies and standards development.

Indicator3: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.

Targets and Tracking3: an ongoing record of markets that are open, and the Exports of Canadian Beef and Cattle

Enhanced Feed Ban:

Outcome: Safe feed, fertilizer, animals and food.

Output/Activities: Compliance with EFB regulations / continue enforcement of enhanced feed ban restrictions.

Indicator3: Trends in compliance with regulations associated with the enhanced feed ban, including SRM removal, handling and disposal; trends in the proportion of feed mills and renderers using prohibited materials/SRM and producing ruminant feeds.

Targets and Tracking3: Currently being revised

Federal Partner: Health Canada (HC)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Health Products

Risk Assessment and Targeted Research $44.0M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $2.6M
Compliance and Enforcement4 $1.0M (2003-04 to 2007-08) $0.0M
Product Assessment4 $6.2M (2003-04 to 2007-08) $0.0M
Tracking and Tracing4 $3.1M (2003-04 to 2007-08) $0.0M

Food and Nutrition

Risk Assessment and Targeted Research $18.1M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $3.6M
Total $72.4M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $6.2M

Expected results by program:

Risk Assessment and Targeted Research:

Immediate Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance

Performance Indicators and Targets*: Number of direct consultations/visits with stakeholders as a result of Canadian expertise; Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by HC staff on BSE/TSE topics; Number of research citations related to BSE/TSE peer reviewed publications produced by HC; Number and description of new knowledge shared with CFIA and PHAC on BSE/TSE; Number of reviewed master files and product license applications which may contain ingredients sourced from animals and which may be susceptible to BSE/TSE

Immediate Outcome: Increased knowledge-based decision-making

Performance Indicators and Targets*: Number and type of recommended and /or implemented changes to directives, regulations, policies and procedures as a result of the identification of issues/gaps Number of times BSE/TSE issues are raised at internal risk management meetings

Intermediate Outcome: Reduced risk of acquiring TSEs associated with animal-sourced ingredients in the food and products regulated by HC.

Performance Indicators and Targets*: Number of documented human TSE cases in Canada; number of reported cases of variant Cruetzfeldt Jakob Disease in humans

*Note: The above performance information was extracted from Health Canada's revised 2011 draft Performance Measurement Framework for BSE; targets have yet to be determined.

Federal Partner: Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Surveillance and Population Health Assessment

Public Health Surveillance

Prion Diseases Program $7.9M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $0.8M
Total $7.9M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $0.8M

Expected results by program:

Surveillance and Research for Human TSEs:

Outcome: Risks of human TSEs in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

Output/Activities: Continued, detailed, case-by-case, laboratory-based investigation of all human TSEs across Canada; improved methods and strategies for efficient case investigation; surveillance data; research publications; provision of policy advice for food safety, healthcare safety and international trade.

Indicator: Alignment of PHAC data from human TSE surveillance with international benchmarks; application of policy advice in decision-making.

Targets and Tracking: TBD


Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Food Safety and Biosecurity Systems (FSBRMS)

Facilitating the Disposal of Specified Risk Material (SRM) $79.9M (2006-07 to 2009-10) $0.0M
Establishment $276.0M (2003-04) $0.0M
Implementation $36.0M (2003-04) $0.0M
Tracking and Tracing Systems $7.8M (2003-04 to 2004-05) $0.0M
Transitional Industry Support Program $934.6M (2003-04) $0.0M
Accelerating Implementation of Traceability in Livestock and Meat Sources $16.1M (2004-05 to 2006-07) $0.0M
Farm Income Payment Program $999.9M (2004-05 to 2005-06) $0.0M
Cull Animal Program $202.4M (2003-04 to 2005-06) $0.0M
Loan Loss $38.4M (2004-05 to 2008-09) $0.0M
Feeder/Fed Cattle Set-Aside Program $296.3M (2004-05 to 2005-06) $0.0M
Total $2,887.3M (2003-04 to 2009-10) $0.0M

Expected results by program: A summary outlining expected results for AAFC is not included in the RPP as their resources sunsetted in 2008–09.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing $72.3M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Colleen Barnes
Executive Director
Domestic Policy Directorate
(613) 773-5901

Public Health Agency of Canada
Dr. Michael B. Coulthart
Director
Prion Diseases Program
(204) 789-6026

Health Canada
Geoff Middleton
Manager Accountability
Policy, Planning, International Affairs Directorate (PPIAD)
(613) 954-2039

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
John Ross
Director
Animal Industry Division
(613) 773-0220

3 A trial period of the CFIA's performance measurement framework for BSE is currently being completed, which includes the effectiveness of the draft key indicators for certain program elements (as indicated above). Targets and tracking methods have not yet been finalized for certain program elements.

The purpose of the Enterprise Operational Reporting/Performance Management Reporting Solution (EOR/PMRS) complementary projects are to develop more robust program-level reporting solutions for performance indicators and targets, to enable the Agency to report reliably for specific program objectives, and to improve program decision making. This 5-year initiative will be completed in 2013, at which time 15 programs will have developed Performance Measurement Frameworks, key performance indicators, performance targets and improved reporting capabilities. Animal Health and Meat Hygiene are being inducted into EOR/PMRS this fiscal year. Feed and Fertilizer programs have been inducted into EOR/PMRS, and are doing on-going testing and refinement of indicators and targets. A great deal of progress has been made in terms of reporting capacity for inducted programs, but at this time, indicators and targets for all the programs in the BSE initiative have not yet been identified.

4 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08

5 Due to rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.


Table B: National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)


Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Lead department program activity: CFIA: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program DFO: Aquatic Animal Health

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $59.0M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $10.4M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The NAAHP's goal is to protect Canada's aquatic animal resources and productivity by preventing the introduction and spread of aquatic animal diseases, and by maintaining the seafood industry's competitiveness in international markets. This is in line with the Government of Canada's priority to protect Canada's natural resources and economic stability. The Agency's priority in this area is a safe and sustainable animal aquatic resource base.

Shared outcome(s): Sustainable Aquatic Resource Productivity and Internationally Competitive Aquatic Animal Resource Base Industry, which will allow trade to continue and expand.

Governance structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for delivery of the NAAHP in collaboration with DFO; respective federal roles and responsibilities are outlined in a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The Animal Health Business Line and the Horizontal Steering Committee for Aquatic Animal Health are responsible for monitoring financial governance within the CFIA budget. At the Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FPT) level, the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers (CCFAM) has oversight over the program through a working group with the CFIA. There is also an industry/Federal/Provincial/Territorial advisory committee, the Aquatic Animal Health Committee, which meets annually to guide the development of the program.

Planning Highlights: The implementation of the NAAHP is on-going; this includes the implementation of the import controls for aquatic animals under the Health of Animals Regulations, which came into effect December 10, 2011. Prior to full enforcement of the Regulations, there will be a one-year transition period supported by a Stream of Commerce Policy from December 2011 to December 2012. The development and implementation of surveillance initiatives in support of domestic or international trade, and development of domestic trade permitting the safe movement of susceptible species of finfish, molluscs, and crustaceans within Canada will also continue, and further consultations will be conducted. Other program functions will also be conducted, including: certifying aquatic animals exports, engaging in emergency disease response activities, developing risk assessments, and performance of disease surveillance plans.

Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Internal Services

National Aquatic Animal Health Programs $32.1M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $6.3M ongoing $6.3M
Total $32.1M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $6.3M ongoing $6.3M

Expected results by program:

Implementation of the Aquatic Animal Health Import Program for 405 regulated species including documentation development (policies and procedures); commodity-specific conditions for the issuance of permits; inspection and sampling plans for high risk commodities; implementation of quarantine procedures and inspections. Implementation of the Aquatic Animal Health Compartmentalization Program to support trade (import and export) in aquatic animals and replace Fisheries and Oceans Canada's Fish Health Protection Regulations which was amended to accommodate the implementation of amendments to the Health of Animals Regulations on December 10th, 2011.

Discussions with stakeholders and right holders for Surveillance Delivery, Emergency Response, domestic movement permission, and Delineation of Domestic Disease Control zones.

Conduct of aquatic animal health risk assessments and country evaluations related to: import/ export; aquatic animal health diseases; scientific advice; and, evaluation of the disease status of countries, zones and regions.

Development of survey plans to support domestic control and trade.

Develop and implement plans to host foreign country audits (EU and Chile).

NAAHP integration into priority Information Management Information Technology (IM/IT) systems & linkage to Fisheries and Oceans Canada's Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) interfaces.

Changes to CFIA IMIT systems to accommodate the NAAHP, including updates to Import Permit System (IPS) / Automated Import Requirement System (AIRS) / Enterprise Reporting System (COGNOS) implementation.

Outcome 1: Certification of aquatic animal commodities exported from Canada to meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Output/Activities: Negotiation of export certificates based on importing country requirements; documentation development for the delivery of each certificate; development of training modules to support delivery of export inspection and certification of aquatic animals; training of Animal Health operations staff to deliver the program; analysis of industry trends and modifications to the system to meet new trade requirements and evolving country health statuses; publication of domestic disease status at the national, regional, and compartment level; performance of sampling required for export delivery; negotiations for continued and new market access.

Indicator: Development of negotiated certificates and dossiers to support market access; development of technical arrangements to support market access. Number of new certificates negotiated.

Target: Historical trends of certificates issued, new certificates negotiated and trade market access issues. An adequate number of staff is trained to perform inspections and issue certificate.

Outcome 2: Protection of the National Aquatic Animal Health Resources

Output/Activities: Develop a zonation and national movement permitting program, and a licensing program which are phased-in. Training will be required for aquatic animal inspection and sample submissions. Develop survey plans to support domestic control and trade as required.

Indicator: Development of the zonation and national movement permitting program, and a licensing program which will be phased-in. Development of survey plans to support domestic control and international trade as required. Successful use of survey information and data for negotiations and technical arrangements.

Target: Historical trends of trade market access issues.

Outcome 3: Implementation of the Import and Compartmentalization Programs.

Output/Activities: Changes to CFIA IMIT systems to accommodate the NAAHP, including updates to Import Permit System (IPS) / Automated Import Requirement System (AIRS) / Enterprise Reporting System (COGNOS) implementation. Implement import controls (permits and zoosanitary certificates) for aquatic animals regulated under the Health of Animals Regulations, which came into effect December 10, 2011. Develop import conditions for all 405 species and related commodities. Negotiate export/zoosanitary certification by foreign countries to meet Canada's new import requirements. Analyze import data from CBSA to evaluate resources for program implementation, and readjust design as required. Conduct import data analysis to reveal trends in terms of the delivery of import permits. Implement the Aquatic Animal Health Compartmentalization Program to support trade (import and export) in aquatic animals.

Indicator: Number of technical arrangements and export certificates negotiated with trade partners that meet Canada's new import requirements. Number of import permits issued, as compared to the number of regulated animal imports (total transactions) to determine potential compliance issues for 2012-2013. Program redesign and regulatory amendments as necessary to support program delivery with NAAHP-allocated resources.

Target: Development of technical arrangements and negotiated export certificates for 80% of regulated aquatic animals and commodities imported.

Federal Partner: Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Aquatic Animal Health

National Aquatic Animal Program $26.9M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $4.0M ongoing $4.0M
Total $26.9M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $4.0M ongoing $4.0M

Expected results by program:

DFO's NAAHP laboratories use standards and tracking systems that meet international requirements such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) 17025 Standard for Laboratory Accreditation, and World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) standards for diagnostic testing.

Outcome 1: Diagnostic tests validated to World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Requirements

Output/Activities: Ongoing development and validation of diagnostic tests required to support NAAHP program activities. Priority disease list established collaboratively with the CFIA

Indicator: Validated test methods incorporated into National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System diagnostic repertoire for the priority disease.
Target: End of Fiscal Year 2012-13

Outcome 2: Operational Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)

Output/Activities: Implementation and development of LIMS to facilitate tracking and management of sample testing and reporting.

Indicator: LIMS is fully operational.
Target: April 2012

Outcome 3: DFO NAAHP Laboratories are accredited to ISO 17025 Standards

Output/Activities: Accredited laboratories can demonstrate compliance to internationally accepted standards. Laboratories are implementing controls and will be assessed individually as they are ready.

Indicator: One of three diagnostic laboratories has received ISO accreditation.
Target: End of Fiscal Year 2012-13

Outcome 4: Ensure adequate capacity for diagnostic testing

Output/Activities: In collaboration with the CFIA, establish a network of third-party testing laboratories to support NAAHP program activities.

Indicator: Network of approved provincial, territorial, and private laboratories providing specific diagnostic services.
Target: End of Fiscal Year 2012-13

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$59.0M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $10.4M ongoing $10.4M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Controlling aquatic animal diseases

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Cornelius Kiley
Director
Aquatic Animal Health Division
(613) 773-7028

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Stephen J. Stephen
Director
Biotechnology and Aquatic Animal Health Science
(613) 990-0292


Table C: Invasive Alien Species (IAS)


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Invasive Alien Species (IAS)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Plant Resources Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-11

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $95.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $19.0M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Invasive alien species (IAS) are species introduced through human action from outside their natural distribution (past or present), that threaten the environment, economy, or society - including human health. Annually, IAS results in billions of dollars in direct losses, control costs, increased production costs and lost market access. The annual impact of IAS is estimated to be as much as $20 billion to the forest sector, $7 billion for aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes, and $2.2 billion for invasive plants alone in the agricultural sector. IAS have gained international attention as globalization, climate change, and international trade increases have elevated IAS introduction risks.

In recognition of the fact that responding to IAS is a shared responsibility, An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada was adopted in 2004 by federal, provincial and territorial resource ministers as a national coordinated approach toward prevention and management of IAS. The Strategy's objective is to initiate implementation of priority objectives (i.e. prevention, early detection and rapid response to new invaders, and management of established and spreading invaders), which will be met via work contributions in five thematic areas: Risk Analysis, Science and Technology, Legislation, Regulation and Policy, Engaging Canadians and International Cooperation. Environment Canada is the lead for invasive animal species; Fisheries and Oceans Canada leads the aquatic invasive species issues; the Canadian Food Inspection Agency leads for invasive plants and other plant pests; and Natural Resources Canada leads for forest pests.

Budget 2010 allocated $19 million per year to Environment Canada, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, National Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to continue the implementation of the Government of Canada's IAS Strategy as well as for the maintenance and enhancement of advances made in the previous five years in terms of invasive alien species activities. Ongoing implementation of the IAS Strategy is critical for the continuation of the protection of Canada's ecosystems and resource-based economy.

Shared outcome(s): Continuing the implementation of the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada is essential for the protection of Canada's aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; this includes the protection of native biological diversity, as well as domestic plants and animals, from the risks of invasive alien species. The key outcome of the Strategy is to make Canada a leader in the prevention and management of IAS in a manner that ensures environmental sustainability, economic competitiveness and societal well-being.

Governance structure(s): The government-wide IAS Strategy involves Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Departments and agencies are committed to ongoing collaboration for IAS issues. At a federal-level, coordination continues to be discussed through the Directors' General Interdepartmental Committee on Invasive Alien Species. Inter-jurisdictionally, federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) cooperation for IAS issues continues under the auspices of the annual joint meeting of Resource Ministers' Councils for Wildlife, Forests, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Endangered Species, as well as within associated meetings with Deputy Ministers and Assistant Deputy Ministers. The Minister of Agriculture is the lead federal Minister responsible for responding to invasive alien plants and plant pests; efforts are on-going to seek the full engagement of federal, provincial, and territorial Ministers of agriculture and facilitate their participation in addressing invasive alien species.

Planning Highlights: For 2012-13, the key horizontal plans and are to: continue to develop, advance and implement concrete and practical prevention, detection, response and management activities for the IAS strategy; continue to enhance coordination mechanisms across species, jurisdictions and issues.

Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Plant Resources Program

Internal Services

Risk Analysis $15.5M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $3.1M ongoing $2.9M
Science and Technology $33.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $6.6M ongoing $4.2M
Legislation, Regulation and Policy $6.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $1.2M ongoing $1.2M
Engaging Canadians $3.5M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.7M ongoing $0.7M
International Cooperation $2.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.4M ongoing $0.4M
Total $60.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $12.0M ongoing $9.4M

Expected results by program:

Risk Analysis:

The development and use of risk assessment tools and models to identify potential IAS and their associated pathways of introduction. These activities also include the design and implementation of appropriate programs to prevent, detect and manage current and potential IAS risks and pathways.

Outcomes: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed in a risk-based manner.

Outputs/Activities: The CFIA will continue to identify highest-risk potential IASs, their pathways, and appropriate means by which to mitigate identified risks by continuing to conduct pest and weed risk analyses, developing import controls and initial response to early detections. For example, pathways of focus for 2012-2013 include pet toys, grain, ethno-botanical (food and medicinal plants) and internet sales.

The Agency will also continue to facilitate risk identification and analysis information-sharing among federal and provincial partners to ensure efficient information generation and communication.

Indicator: To Be Developed (TBD)*
Target: To Be Developed (TBD).

Science and Technology:

Information gathering, the performance of verification activities and the development of scientific tools and expertise, and program delivery to support the prevention, early detection and rapid response to IAS.

Outcomes: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Outputs/Activities: The Agency will support IAS prevention, detection and response through continued efforts to develop scientific tools and expertise. Projects on-going for 2012-2013 include: development of weed molecular identification methods and reference sequence databases; genetic barcoding of invasive plant-eating beetles for rapid pest identification; pest diagnostics; illustrated identification; Lucid Key; genetic barcode and trans-Pacific capacity building for Emerald Ash Borer and its relatives; weed biology and seed identification features for Chinese weedy species that are a risk to Canadian biosecurity.

The CFIA will also minimize the impact of IAS introductions by continued foresight projects and early detection efforts, such as import monitoring and inspection, and continuing to develop diagnostic methods and tools for the rapid and accurate identification of high risk IAS. Specific activities include the development of invasive weed seed identification fact sheets; acquisition of reference material for IAS species that are or will be regulated in the near future; monitoring of seed and grain samples to determine the presence and frequency of alien weed species; inspection and auditing of facilities importing grain and other plant products.

The CFIA will continue to work with North American and international scientific partners towards the improvement of our current IAS detection tools, and the offshore evaluation of new methods for organisms not present in North America.

Domestically, the CFIA will continue to work with Provincial and municipal partners on collaborative IAS plant pest surveys. Domestic regulatory response plans, including surveys, inspection and monitoring will continue to be developed and delivered for specific pests such as jointed goatgrass.

Indicator: To Be Developed (TBD)*
Target: To Be Developed (TBD).

Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Creating and updating legislation, regulations, policies and programs to support the effective implementation of CFIA commitment to the IAS Strategy.

Outcomes: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed, and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Outputs/Activities: The Agency will continue legislative framework modernization by updating regulations, creating new ones and harmonizing approaches (where possible) in consultation with stakeholders.

To ensure consistency with international standards and legislated mandate, the CFIA will continue to develop new science-based programs and policies as well as to update existing ones, while focusing on higher risk pathways of introduction. These will support the implementation and delivery of associated import and domestic measures to protect Canada's resource base from potential IAS.

The CFIA will continue to collaborate with federal and provincial partners to coordinate implementation of An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada, to maintain strong lines of communication, engage stakeholders, and contribute to interdepartmental governance as well as strengthening internal governance across branches.

Indicator: To Be Developed (TBD)*
Target: To Be Developed (TBD).

Engaging Canadians:

Increase public awareness and access to IAS information, prevention, and control strategies, as well as activities that seek to maintain partnerships with governments and stakeholders.

Outcomes: Increased stakeholder and partner cooperation, and stakeholder and partner awareness of plants and plant pests, and compliance with policies and regulations.

Output/Activities: The Agency will continue to work collaboratively with stakeholders and government partners to raise awareness about IAS, their potential pathways and associated policies and programs, thereby promoting early reporting of IAS, best management practices and compliance with regulations to reduce risks to Canada's plant resources. The CFIA will continue to develop and participate in IAS training and outreach sessions for municipal and provincial staff as well as regional IAS organizations. The former will be supported by inspection tools and publications intended to broaden surveillance reach.

Broad stakeholder consultation will continue, and cooperation will be sought when new policies and programs - such as the invasive plants program - are implemented.

Indicator: TBD*
Target: TBD*

International Cooperation:

Collaborate with key international phytosanitary organizations and trading partners to reduce risks of IAS introduction from imported products, and to maintain access to foreign markets for Canadian exports through the development and implementation of harmonized standards and guidelines.

Outcomes: Increased international engagement, cooperation and awareness of invasive species and compliance with policies and regulations. A key objective of international cooperation is ensuring that international standards and processes reflect Canadian interests.

Output/Activities:

The CFIA will continue its active participation in the establishment of international standards, negotiations and bilateral meetings with key trading partners to mitigate IAS introduction risks through trade pathways, and the maintenance of access to foreign markets. The CFIA anticipates enhanced sharing of risk analysis information, notification, and discussion of new policies and programs as well as approach harmonization where appropriate and feasible.

Indicator: TBD*
Target: TBD*

*Note: The CFIA, DFO, EC, and NRCan will report ongoing implementation and effectiveness of the Strategy through their respective annual Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports. In addition, the CFIA, DFO, EC, and NRCan will develop an approach to assess IAS Strategy performance for Canada, in which indicators and targets are expected to be jointly reviewed by the four partners.

Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2012-13

Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources

Risk Analysis $3.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.6M ongoing $0.6M
Science and Technology $5.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $1.0M ongoing $1.0M
Legislation, Regulation and Policy $1.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.2M ongoing $0.2M
Engaging Canadians $0.5M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.1M ongoing $0.1M
International Cooperation $0.5M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.1M ongoing $0.1M
Total $10.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $2.0M ongoing $2.0M

Expected Results by program as per (13):

Risk Analysis:

Increased capacity to identify and address forest invasive alien species risks, and to prevent their introduction.

Outcome: Increased capacity to identify and address forest invasive alien species risks, and to prevent their introduction.

Outputs/Activities: NRCan will continue to improve the understanding of forest invasive alien species pathways: assessment of human-assisted introduction, and the impact of invasive alien forest pests; the  development of national risk analysis models; an historical database of forest alien species in Canadian forests and national and cross-border risk maps for forest invasive alien species.

Indicator and Target: TBD*

Science and Technology:

Knowledge of forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology, and ecology is improved.
Likelihood of establishment or spread of forest alien forest species is minimized and their impacts are mitigated.

Outcome 1: Knowledge of forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology, and ecology is improved.

Outputs/Activities: Continued engagement in scientific research to address knowledge gaps in taxonomy, biology, ecology, distribution, pest-host and forest-pathogen relationships, including the development and testing of molecular and genetic tools to identify non-native insects.

Indicator and Target: TBD*

Outcome 2: Likelihood of establishment or spread of forest alien forest species is minimized and their impacts are mitigated.

Outputs/Activities: Production of detection, diagnostic and surveillance tools and strategies, including molecular, pheromone and chemical attractant methods for forest invasive alien species. The development of response tools and methods, including communication to responsible agencies of scientific recommendations to address the control and eradication of forest invasive alien species.

Indicator and Target: TBD*

Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Decision-making related to forest invasive alien species management by regulatory agencies and other organizations is informed by scientific and policy expertise.
Canadian positions in national and international discussions on phytosanitary matters are informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Outcome 1: Decision-making related to forest invasive alien species management by regulatory agencies and other organizations is informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Outputs/Activities: Provision of Science and policy expertise on forest invasive alien species prevention, detection and response are provided to regulatory agencies and other federal Departments, Provinces and Territories, Municipalities Industry and First Nations. Development of a decision framework for forest invasive species decisions has been initiated and is ongoing in partnership with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and stakeholders. Availability of risk information is being enhanced.

Indicator and Target: TBD*

Outcome 2: Canadian positions in national and international discussions on phytosanitary trade issues are informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Outputs/Activities: Continued provision of scientific and policy advice to support phytosanitary trade negotiations and the development of national and international forest phytosanitary standards. Development of training material and guidance for implementation of phytosanitary standards and forest education. Continued communication to the forest sector of strategies to reduce barriers to the international trade of forest products.

Indicator and Target: TBD*

Engaging Canadians:

Scientific information about forest invasive alien species is made available to agencies, researchers and the public.

Outcome: Scientific information on FIAS is made available to agencies, researchers and the public.

Outputs/Activities: The CanFIAS Database will be enhanced and expanded with new functionalities and information. The database will be made available to the National Forest Pest Strategy partners before global release. A communications strategy for release will be developed which will involve publication and presentations aimed at enabling all end-users to utilize information to develop strategic knowledge.

Indicator and Target: TBD*

International Cooperation:

International cooperation is facilitated with phytosanitary organizations and trading partners.

Outcome: International cooperation is facilitated with phytosanitary organizations and trading partners.

Outputs/Activities: Continued engagement in international forest sector consultation, development of research and analysis to respond to Canadian export trade issues and develop national and international phytosanitary standards that reduce global movement of forest pests. Knowledge transfer support for science-based decision-making in terms of international fora to facilitate international cooperation, reduce pest threats to Canadian forests, and minimize disruption of Canadian forest products by phytosanitary concerns.

Indicator and Target: TBD*

*Note: A review of Natural Resources Canada's performance measurement framework for Forest Invasive Alien Species will be undertaken. Targets and tracking methods have not yet been determined.

Federal Partner: Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Science for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Risk Analysis $2.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.4M ongoing $0.4M
Science and Technology $5.1M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $1.02M ongoing $1.02M
Legislation, Regulation and Policy $1.1M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.21M ongoing $0.21M
Engaging Canadians $0.4M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.09M ongoing $0.09M
International Cooperation $11.4M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $2.28M ongoing $2.28M
Total $20.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $4.0M ongoing $4.0M

Expected results by program:

Risk Analysis:

Risk analysis for priority species and pathways.

Science and Technology:

Decision makers are provided with information in order to manage species and pathways in a risk-based manner.

Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Fisheries and Oceans is developing a regulatory proposal under the Fisheries Act, which will seek to prevent the introduction of new aquatic invasive species, as well as enable management and control activities. Cooperation and coordination with provincial and territorial partners on this regulatory proposal is underway via the National Aquatic Invasive Species Committee under the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers.

Work is underway to refine the regulatory proposal including addressing issues related to policy, legal, and implementation.

Engaging Canadians:

Stakeholders and partners are aware of activities that can mitigate the risk of aquatic invasive species.

Canadians will be consulted on the AIS regulatory proposal as part of the regulatory process.

International Cooperation:

The impact of Sea Lamprey is effectively managed in the Great Lakes.

Canada is involved in international discussions to address the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species.

Federal Partner: Environment Canada (EC)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat

Engaging Canadians-Invasive Alien Species Partnership Program $5.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $1.0M ongoing $1.0M
Total $5.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $1.0M ongoing $1.0M

Expected results by program:

As per the Updated 2012-13 Departmental Program Performance Framework:

Expected Result: Canadians increasingly participate in priority activities set out in An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada (IASSC).

Indicator: Number of participants in IASPP funded projects (Target: 1000)

Output: Funding for locally-initiated projects that meet eligibility criteria

Indicator: Ratio of funding leveraged from non-federal partners for program funding (Target: Partner $ : Federal $ = 3:1)

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$95.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $19.0M ongoing $16.4M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Wendy Asbil
National Manager
Invasive Alien Species and Domestic Program
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
(613) 773-7236

National Research Council of Canada
Jacques Gagnon
Director
Science Policy Division
(613) 990-5827

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Sophie Foster
Science Advisor, Aquatic Invasive Species Program
Environment and Biodiversity Science
(613) 990-9480

Environment Canada
Elizabeth Roberts
Manager
Conservation Partnerships and Programs
(819) 934-5277


Table D: Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Plum Pox Management and Monitoring Program (PPMMP)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Plant Resources Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $17.2M (2011-12 to 2015-16)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Plum Pox Virus (PPV) is a viral plant disease that infects Prunus species including peach, plum, apricots and other stone fruit plants. PPV does not affect human or animal health but reduces fruit yields, mottles leaves, and causes visual symptoms on stone fruit which thus reduces their marketability. The virus is spread locally by aphids (an insect) and through the movement of infected propagative material, including live trees of all age classes, rootstock, bud wood, cuttings or other green branches and twigs, and tissue cultures.

PPV was first discovered in Ontario and Nova Scotia in 2000. The Government of Canada responded in 2001 with a three-year, $49.3 million PPV program to suppress PPV, and to evaluate the feasibility of eradication. Based on the recommendations of a PPV International Expert Panel (IEP), the seven-year, Plum Pox Eradication Program (PPEP) was launched in 2004 ($85 million) and augmented in 2007 with an additional $58.6 million totaling $143.6 million in federal and Ontario government funding. The PPEP expired on March 31, 2011.

Eradication of PPV has been achieved in six of the seven quarantine areas established at the beginning of the eradication program. These six quarantine areas are Blenheim, Fonthill, Stoney Creek and Vittoria in Ontario, and the Annapolis Valley and Wolfville in Nova Scotia. All of the regions continue to be surveyed and monitored, and no new virus cases have been found outside the Niagara region. Although eradication was not achieved in Niagara, the infection rate has been reduced from 1.9% of tree samples to less than 0.02% in 2010.

By implementing a PPV monitoring and management strategy, PPV will remain in the Niagara region in perpetuity, thus the industry will need to manage the risks it poses to production and marketability of products.

The PPMMP consists of regulatory plant protection activities and, for the first five years of the program, significant research to develop PPV risk mitigation tools and educational and awareness program components to build the capacity within the industry to implement best management practices.

CFIA and Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC) funding was obtained from Budget 2011 which allocated $17.2 million over five years for the PPMMP, whose goal is to be a management and monitoring strategy to contain and prevent the spread of plum pox.

Shared outcome(s): The outcome of the Government's PPMMP is to fulfill the Government of Canada's plant protection obligations and international responsibilities through measures to mitigate the spread of PPV to other regions of Canada and internationally. The PPMMP's other outcome is to facilitate industry management of PPV.

Governance structure(s): The CFIA's PPMMP activities and deliverables are managed and governed by the Plant Health Business Line Committee as PPV is an established, regulated plant pest requiring ongoing decision making to protect Canada's plant resource base. Also, AAFC's A-Base activities are managed and governed by a committee of Science Directors from the Research Branch who report to the Director General of Science Operations. The DG has the final "sign-off" authority for AAFC Research Branch activities including PPMMP. An AAFC Science Director has been assigned as responsible for ensuring PPV research activities are implemented, managed and reported as required.

A PPV Steering Group (PPV-SG), consisting of CFIA and AAFC director-level officials, was established for the first five years to make recommendations about program delivery to the above CFIA and AAFC governance committees. The PPV-SG liaises with internal and external stakeholders as required, including international plant protection bodies, to provide updates and seek input about program and research parameters at stakeholder conferences and meetings. After a period of five years, when AAFC's role in the PPMMP has concluded, CFIA's Plant Health Business Line Committee will be responsible for managing the PPMMP on an ongoing basis.

Planning Highlights: For 2012/13, the key horizontal plans are: implement appropriate sampling and detection of Plum Pox Virus host material to update, as required, the quarantine area boundary; enforce restrictions to mitigate the spread of Plum Pox Virus; and undertake research activities to improve the regulatory program.

Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Plant Resources Program

Internal Services

Monitoring and Detection $4.2M (2011-12 to 2015-16) $1.0M
Regulatory Enforcement $4.6M (2011-12 to 2015-16) $1.0M
PPV Regulatory Research $1.1M (2011-12 to 2015-16) $0.3M
PPV Suppression Research $0.7M (2011-12 to 2015-16) $0.2M
Total $10.6M (2011-12 to 2015-16) $2.5M

Expected results by program:

Monitoring, Detection:

Outcome:

Mitigate the spread of PPV to other regions of Canada and internationally.

Outputs/activities:

Monitoring activities will be performed by the CFIA to confirm and adjust Niagara area quarantine boundaries as necessary. In accordance with NAPPO guidelines, the CFIA will conduct detection activities annually, by taking samples along the Niagara quarantine area perimeter. Laboratory testing of samples to determine the presence of PPV will be conducted by the CFIA. To detect whether PPV has spread beyond the quarantine area, samples will be collected annually from commercial orchards and nurseries from PPV-susceptible species in other regions of Ontario, Nova Scotia, Quebec, and British Columbia.

Indicator:

Established quarantine areas and areas with PPV-susceptible species will determine the location where sampling will occur. Samples will be collected from specific species (peach, plum, nectarine, apricot) located inside and outside of the quarantine area.

Target:

An estimated 22,850 samples will be taken and tested annually until 2015 and reduced to 17,000 samples in 2016 and ongoing.

Outcome:

Mitigate the spread of PPV to other regions of Canada and internationally.

Outputs/Activities:

Through its inspection activities, the CFIA will monitor and assess the compliance of regulated parties with the PPMMP regulatory requirements. Monitoring activities include issuing movement certificates for regulated material (dormant root stock, seedlings, seeds, and plant material for research) and conducting audits and compliance verifications of retail outlets, nurseries and other facilities that may sell, distribute or propagate susceptible Prunus species. When non-compliance is identified, the CFIA will take the most appropriate response to obtain compliance in view of factors such as potential or actual harm, the compliance history of the regulated party, and intent.

To help maintain a lower level of virus prevalence within the quarantine area, the prohibition and restriction to propagate regulated Prunus plants within the quarantine area will continue. The prohibition of propagation will ensure that only PPV-free, or certified clean stock (planting material that is free of all viruses including PPV) is used within the Niagara quarantine zone.

Indicator:

Growers, residents and retailers within the quarantine area.

Target:

Annual inspection of a sub-set of growers, residents and retailers to determine if movement of material or propagation has occurred. Property scouting will commence during the 2012-13 fiscal year which will determine the number of properties to be annually scouted.

PPV Regulatory Research

Outcomes:

Restrain the prevalence of PPV in the Niagara region, mitigate the spread of PPV to other regions of Canada and internationally.

Outputs/Activities:

To support the clean stock program, a research project will be conducted by the CFIA to develop strategies for eliminating PPV from rootstock; this program supports the enforcement of the prohibition on propagation. The most effective method(s) to eliminate PPV from infected nursery stock materials will be evaluated so that desirable foreign varieties may become eligible for use by industry through clean stock services.

Regulatory research will also develop improved detection tools and more extensive knowledge about PPV to support PPV surveillance, monitoring and detection. CFIA research projects include characterizing genetic variation within individual strains of PPV found in Canada, monitoring the introduction of new strains, and mapping the movement of the virus within Canada.

Beyond 2016, the CFIA will conduct similar research, such as evaluating the host range for newly discovered strains of PPV to determine the range of Prunus hosts to be regulated in Canada. This research will ensure that the ongoing regulatory program remains effective in mitigating the spread of PPV.

Indicator:

In total, three indicators are identified: 1) protocol for the production of virus-free nursery stock for domestic and export clean stock programs using virus elimination techniques; 2) genetic maps to understand the movement of PPV strains and isolates, to allow for continuous improvement of regulatory surveillance protocols; and 3) identification of any new strains and isolates of PPV not previously reported in Canada along with protocols for their detection.

The requirement of a comprehensive list of host plants for new strains of PPV detected in Canada to enhance surveillance protocols and industry.

Target:

Other than creating a protocol for virus elimination, the genetic map and identification of new strains are dependant on the number of samples collected that test positive. Host range target is variable depending on the identification of new strains and isolates in Canada during routine surveillance activities.

PPV Suppression Research

Outcomes:

Screening of foreign plant material for pests and diseases and conduct pre-evaluation.

Outputs/Activities:

AAFC will identify foreign varieties with potential resistance to PPV. The CFIA has phytosanitary measures in place to mitigate pest movement into Canada from imported products. The CFIA will screen identified foreign plant material in order for its use in growth trials in Canada.

Indicator:

Plant material identified by AAFC and imported into Canada.

Target:

Variable, based on the number of identified potential candidate varieties and laboratory capacity.

Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Science, Innovation and Adoption

PV Regulatory Research $0.4M (2011-12 to 2013-14) $.15M
Virus Resistance Research $3.0M (2011-12 to 2015-16) $.65M
PPV Suppression Research $2.9M (2011-12 to 2015-16) $.65M
Education and Awareness Activities $0.3M (2011-12 to 2015-16) $.15M
Total $6.6M (2011-12 to 2015-16) $1.6M

Expected results by program:

Industry Management of PPV:

Outcomes:

Immediate Outcomes

Immediate outcomes are enhanced PPV best management tools, PPV resistant varieties, and improved methods for industry detection of PPV. Research findings will contribute to PPMMP educational and awareness activities.

Intermediate outcomes

Intermediate outcomes are that industry will be equipped and positioned to effectively contain PPV within the Niagara region and moderate the prevalence of PPV in the Niagara region.

Virus Resistant Research - Outcomes

Research will develop virus resistance strategies to help protect against PPV and manage the virus in the long term. Specific research projects that support virus resistance include 1) developing a new PPV resistant peach tree line through gene silencing (switching off a gene to make susceptible hosts resistant to infection); 2) developing transferable resistance in rootstock that can be transmitted through grafting to existing fruit trees; and 3) developing a virus vector which will act like a vaccine to induce resistance by gene silencing.

Indicator:

Knowledge and technology about how to induce PPV resistance in peach trees; Knowledge about the gene expression of PPV infection, for use by plant breeders in public/private peach breeding programs. Peach germplasm resistance to PPV for transfer to public/private peach breeding programs; PPV resistant plum germplasm for transfer to public/private plum breeding programs; New knowledge to prevent PPV infection of non-infected peach germplasm in the field.

Target:

Development of a peach line with genetic resistance to PPV; Development of genetic resistance to PPV through use of root-stocks; Development of a PPV vaccine; Knowledge about PPV-host-tree interactions for the development of new technologies to combat PPV and related viruses

PPV Suppression Research - Implementation Plan

PPV suppression will be pursued through research to reduce PPV transmission in orchards. Research projects include assessing practices and processes to suppress PPV transmission by aphids, specifically the use of oil sprays on Prunus plant leaves; evaluating the influence of tree variety and age on the level of seasonal resistance to natural infection by aphids; determining the efficacy of newly registered insecticides on the transmission of PPV, which will result in the development of guidelines for application for use by industry; examining the impact of PPV infection in young peach tree growth, hardiness and productivity in subsequent years; and evaluating foreign material for use in Canada (in collaboration with the CFIA).

Education and Awareness Activities

Outcomes

Immediate outcomes

Immediate outcomes are increased industry understanding and awareness of PPV best management practices.

Intermediate outcomes

Intermediate outcomes are increased industry uptake of PPV management, which will also help to prevent the spread of PPV.

Implementation Plan

Several activities will be conducted to increase industry knowledge and awareness of PPV management practices, and facilitate the transition from eradication to long term management. These activities will be conducted in collaboration with OMAFRA, which is responsible for providing PPV management crop advice and training to Ontario growers and nurseries. AAFC will also liaise with the OTFPMB and the Canadian Nursery Landscape Association (CNLA) to develop and promote an effective educational and awareness campaign.

Currently, the industry has very little information about the spread and risks of managing PPV. As such, educational services will be pursued for the first five years of the program. AAFC will collaborate with OMAFRA to distribute information to Ontario tender fruit industry members about PPV best management practices by publishing pamphlets and articles. An AAFC-OMAFRA fact sheet and web postings related to PPV management will provide information about the disease, including symptom recognition, proper use of treatments, virus testing methods, and service provider contact information.

In addition to publications, best management practices will be shared with producers by delivering presentations at grower meetings, conferences and information sessions. European tender fruit producers and crop advisors who have experience managing the disease will be invited to participate in the conferences, meetings and information sessions to leverage their expertise. Information and research findings will also be provided by local crop advisors and researchers.

During field tours, hands-on training and practical demonstrations will be conducted to increase the efficacy of the education and awareness campaign. Producers will be shown how to recognize PPV symptoms and properly apply treatments.

In 2015-16, AAFC will transfer the additional knowledge and specific recommendations to enhance best management practices acquired through the research projects to OMAFRA and industry stakeholders.

PPV Regulatory Research

Outcomes:

Restrain the prevalence of PPV in the Niagara region, and mitigate the spread of PPV to other regions of Canada and internationally.

Outputs/Activities:

Regulatory research will also develop improved detection tools by AAFC and more extensive knowledge about PPV to support PPV surveillance, monitoring and detection. CFIA research projects include characterizing genetic variation within individual strains of PPV found in Canada, monitoring for the introduction of new strains, and mapping virus movement within Canada.

AAFC will conduct research to develop a more sensitive broad spectrum diagnostic tool to detect PPV and determine the most efficient sampling methodology for that tool's user. Upon its completion, the diagnostic tool technology will be transferred to Canadian private laboratories and the CFIA for the regulatory program.

Indicator:

AAFC indicator will be production and purification of PPV proteins for use in a more sensitive test (tool) to detect PPV infection in the field; this technology will be transferred for use by CFIA.

Target:

Targets of AAFC research include:

  1. Production and purification of high levels of PPV protein
  2. Development of a PPV detection system
  3. Assessment of the sensitivity and breadth of detection for PPV strains
  4. Determination of most efficient sampling methodology for PPV detection

PPV Suppression Research:

Outcomes:

Contain PPV in the Niagara quarantine area by implementing measures to mitigate the spread of PPV to the rest of Canada and internationally. Generate new knowledge and transfer this knowledge of PPV management by industry to maintain industry viability and profitability (Best Management Practices).

Outputs/Activities:

Commercial orchards will be surveyed to establish a database of both infected and healthy trees for use in research study. Limited studies will be performed on young peach trees using containment room conditions. Annual collection of samples and data from these sites will be used to assess the effects of PPV on tree physiology, growth, yield, and viability to inform the improved development of management recommendations to the industry.

Beyond 2016, the CFIA will conduct research, such as evaluating the host range for newly discovered strains of PPV, to determine the range of Prunus hosts to be regulated in Canada. This research will ensure that ongoing regulatory programs remain effective in mitigating PPV spread.

Indicator:

New knowledge, recommendations, and tangible tools to improve best management practices such as the use of oil sprays to manage PPV spread within orchards, and information on susceptibility and impact of PPV of different tree varieties. In particular these studies will help identify periods of maximal susceptibility of trees to PPV so that targeted oil or antifeedant applications can be made. Research findings will be presented at grower conferences, expert panel meetings and workshops, scientific meetings, and published in both grower newsletters and scientific journals. Research findings will be transferred to provincial extension personnel, and posted on an industry website.

Target:

Research will be conducted on:

The use of horticultural oils to minimize aphid transmission of PPV and to examine possible phytotoxicity on foliage and fruit when applied in close proximity to other commercially used pesticides

The efficacy of antifeedants or excitants in preventing aphid transmission of PPV

The impact of PPV on peach tree productivity, viability, and symptom expression

The use of organic or mineral amendments, and plant growth regulators as a management practice.

Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Anthony Parker
A/Director - Horticulture Division
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
(613) 773-7188

Trent Herman
A/National Manager - Greenhouse and Nursery
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
(613) 773-7630

Eric Wierenga
Horticulture Specialist - Greenhouse and Nursery
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
(519) 826-2843

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Gary Whitfield
Science Director - Environmental Health
Science Centres Directorate
(519) 738-1218

Lorne Stobbs
Research Scientist - Vineland
(905) 562-4113(241)


Table E: Food Safety Modernization (FSM)


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Food Safety Modernization (FSM)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead department program activity: Food Safety Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-16

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $99.8M (new funding) and $40.0M (internal reallocation) (2011-12 to 2015-16)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The CFIA was created in 1997 to enhance food safety systems through the consolidation of inspection and quarantine services that were being delivered by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Health Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Industry Canada. The current inspection system comprises numerous independent inspection delivery models.

In Budget 2011, the Government of Canada committed funding amounting to $96.8 million to the CFIA to improve and modernize its food safety inspection system. A number of CFIA initiatives were identified to modernize Canada's food safety inspection system. In support of Agency modernization initiatives, HC received $3.0M of this funding for enhanced health risk assessment capacity.

The main objectives of this modernization initiative are to move the CFIA away from a system of independent commodity-specific inspection approaches and inspector training, and paper-based record keeping and interactions with stakeholders, to that of a single-inspection approach consistent across the food safety program, supported by standardized training, technology information solutions, enhanced proactive science capacity and improved service to stakeholders.

The plan consists of three elements:

  • a) inspection system modernization, including the development of an improved inspection model which will provide standardized activities across the food program, national training for inspectors, enhanced listeria control in high risk ready-to-eat foods, enhanced HC health risk assessment capacity in support of CFIA modernization activities, and the development of an electronic service delivery platform;
  • b) supporting risk-based decision making through enhanced scientific capacity, including a proposal for a food laboratory network, enhanced capacity for scientific testing and improved facilities and equipment; and
  • c) increasing efficiency through improved information management and information technology, including data storage and back-up capacity; enhanced connectivity and more support for inspector tools such as wireless devices, and laptops.

Shared outcome(s): Modernize CFIA's inspection system by providing up-to-date and relevant training and necessary technology support. This shared outcome will address the increasing complexity of inspection associated with industry advancements in food production, and international advancements to improve food safety systems.

Governance structure(s): The CFIA has imposed an internal governance framework for the delivery of activities related to Food Safety Modernization. The CFIA's Senior Management Committee, chaired by the President, will provide direction for initiatives, and is accountable for overall implementation. Three VP-level advisory committees responsible for each of the three elements (inspection system modernization, science and IM/IT) will report to the Agency's Senior Management Committee, and will be accountable for ensuring activities are on track and on budget. Each will operate individual governance structures, led by a business sponsor and a dedicated Project Manager, with representation from all implicated areas. The Project Governance and Investment Board provides the forum to ensure horizontal integration between the three elements.

Planning Highlights: For 2012-13, consultations will be held for the drafting of an improved inspection delivery model. Project approval will be sought for the IM/IT solution to support the implementation of the draft model, as well as the electronic service delivery platform. The electronic service delivery platform project team will develop the required project documentation for project approval, and work with stakeholders will be initiated to develop detailed business requirements. With respect to the implementation of Health Canada's Listeria policy for non-meat ready-to-eat food, the Agency will continue staffing actions to provide additional inspection staff for inspection activities in high-risk areas, validate new laboratory methodologies for Listeria in non-meat commodities, and analyze additional food and environmental samples. A new core training program will be piloted for new inspection staff. CFIA subject matter experts will also provide refresher training to existing staff to keep inspectors current with emerging trends and developments related to their work. Adjustments to the core training program will occur as the new inspection model is developed and refined. The Agency will strengthen its information integration capability by introducing Agency-wide data standards. Planning will commence for desktop operating system and tools upgrading and standardization, as well as increasing data storage and backup capacity.

To enhance scientific capacity in 2012-13, the CFIA will assemble a small team to work in collaboration with partners and explore with experts the concepts, processes and mechanisms available to conduct a laboratory systems analysis of the Canadian food laboratory system. Partners will be engaged in exploring data and information requirements and opportunities in anticipation of future feasibility assessments, with respect to the use of existing, or in the creation of an IM/IT platform for secure data sharing. The Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories sub-projects at the GTA and St. Hyacinthe Food laboratories will move into the Project Planning stage with the award of contracts for the Engineering/Design phase of the projects. This will provide support to move to the execution stage of the projects with construction beginning in 2013-14. Additionally, highly skilled scientists will be hired in targeted laboratories.

Federal Partner:

Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Food Safety Program

Inspection Modernization $100.2 (2011-12 to 2015-16) $16.2M
Enhancing Scientific Capacity $19.8M (2011-12 to 2015-16) $2.4M

Internal Services

Improved IM/IT $16.8M (2012-13 to 2015-16) $3.8M
Total $136.8M (2011-12 to 015-16) $22.4M

Expected results by program:

Inspection System Modernization

Improved Inspection Delivery Model:

Development of improved inspection delivery model and IM/IT solutions to support the model.

Outcome: The development of an improved inspection delivery model, with supporting IM/IT solutions that will result in the improved management of food safety risks.

Outputs/activities: A single food inspection program will be developed, supported by IM/IT solutions for food inspection. The improved inspection delivery model will include standard collection, reporting and analysis across food commodities and will provide a more consistent inspection and enforcement approach for regulated parties.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)*
Target: To be developed (TBD)*

Verifying Compliance with HC's Revised Listeria Policy

Outcome: Fewer illnesses caused by Listeria monocytogenes resulting from the consumption of high-risk, non-meat RTE foods.

Outputs and Activities: The Agency will enhance inspection and testing activities to verify industry control of Listeria in all high-risk, non-meat Ready to Eat (RTE) food. The Agency will increase the number of inspections and samples taken and analyzed, and provide technical support for risk assessments resulting from positive findings. Sampling data will be used to support risk-based decision making. Industry will be encouraged to implement preventative Listeria control programs. New Listeria testing methods will be validated and trend analysis will be developed.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)*
Target: To be developed (TBD)*

Electronic Service Delivery Platform

Outcome: The CFIA can interact with business and international trading partners in an effective, transparent and timely fashion.

Outputs and Activities: The Agency will develop an electronic service delivery platform (ESDP) to enable regulated parties to more readily access CFIA programs and information. Secure service delivery applications will be developed and integrated within an electronic portal. The first deliverable under the ESDP will be electronic export certification.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)*
Target: To be developed (TBD)*

Recruitment and Training of Inspectors

Outcome: Recruitment and training process for inspections within the CFIA will be designed to meet the requirements of the modernized inspection model.

Outputs and Activities: A comprehensive national recruitment, selection and training strategy based on a core, competency-based curriculum for inspection staff will be developed. Core training to new recruits as well as enhanced ongoing training for existing inspection staff will be provided.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)*
Target: To be developed (TBD)*

Enhanced Scientific Capacity

Developing a Laboratory Network Strategy

Outcome: Improved CFIA food laboratory capacity and improved ability to detect and respond to food safety related hazards.

Outputs and Activities: Collaborative opportunities between partners will be identified. Best practices from existing laboratory networks will be reviewed and an analysis of gaps and needs within the food laboratory system will be completed. A commitment from partners to build and implement a food laboratory network will be sought. Feasibility studies describing a system to share laboratory information will be completed. A plan and steps to implement a food laboratory network will be developed and put in place.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)
Target: To be developed (TBD)

Modernizing Equipment and Laboratories

Outcome: Improved CFIA food laboratory capacity to detect and respond to food safety related hazards.

Outputs and Activities: Laboratory expansion and renovation of targeted laboratories will be completed. Laboratory equipment will be upgraded with the procurement of modern testing equipment.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)
Target: To be developed (TBD)

Enhancing Laboratory Response Capacity

Outcome: The CFIA is able to detect and respond faster to food safety hazards.

Outputs and Activities: The number of highly skilled scientists in targeted laboratories will be enhanced through hiring additional scientists. New rapid, scientific, and sensitive food safety testing methods will be developed.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)
Target: To be developed (TBD)

Improved IM/IT

Outcome: Foundational IM/IT elements in place to support business needs in the delivery of the food safety management risks.

Outputs and Activities: Increase connectivity for front line staff. Acquisition and deployment of modern devices to inspection staff. Provide the Agency and Agency staff with stable and up-to-date information management and integration capabilities. Negotiate with Shared Services Canada for the provision of additional data storage and backup capacity.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)
Target: To be developed (TBD)

*Note: A review of the CFIA's performance measurement framework for Food Safety Modernization is currently being undertaken, which has included the development of draft key indicators for certain program elements (as indicated above). Targets and tracking methods have not yet been determined. A Performance Measurement Strategy will be finalized.

Federal Partner: Health Canada (HC)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Food Safety and Nutrition

Enhancing Health Risk Assessment Capacity to Support CFIA Food Safety Inspection Activities $2.6M (2012-13 to 2015-16) $517K
Total $2.6M (2012-13 to 2015-16) $517K

Expected results by program:

Inspection System Modernization

Enhanced Health Risk Assessment Capacity:

Outcome 1: CFIA-led food safety investigations will be supported by timely health risk assessments that will further support swift action being taken to minimize/mitigate the potential exposure of Canadians to hazards in food and the number of associated illnesses.

Outputs/Activities: Health Canada will build additional flexibility in its health risk assessment capacity to sustain its current level of service through hiring of additional employees, ongoing training, review and analysis of health risk assessment activities, and the proactive development of new policies and guidelines, where appropriate.

Indicator: To be developed (TBD)
Target: To be developed (TBD)

Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Vance McEachern
Executive Director
Inspection Modernization
(613) 773-7031

or

Jennifer McLean
Project Manager
Inspection Modernization Office
(613) 773-7176

Health Canada
Amanda Whitfield
Senior Policy Analyst
Director General's Office, Food Directorate
(613) 948-2761

Top of Page

Canadian Heritage

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-13: Acting for the Future

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Heritage

Lead department program activity: Official Languages

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1,109.8 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008-13: Acting for the Future (Roadmap) is a Government of Canada policy statement that includes a number of initiatives to strengthen and promote linguistic duality. Fifteen federal institutions have received funds for sectoral programs and activities related to official languages. The Roadmap contributes to the attainment of a strategic outcome for Canadian Heritage (Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity) and to the Government of Canada’s outcome (A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion).

Two of key components of the Roadmap are the implementation of an accountability framework and a coordinated government-wide approach to official languages. The Roadmap is a component of the Official Languages Program (OLP), as defined and approved by the Committee of Deputy Ministers on Official Languages in December 2004.

Web site: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/slo-ols/strat-eng.cfm

Shared outcome(s):
Three levels of outcomes have been established.
Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in the official language of choice.
Three intermediate outcomes:

  • Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English‑speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in the official language of choice.
  • Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
  • Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.

Eight immediate outcomes:

  • Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
  • Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
  • Improved social and economic development of official‑language minority communities.
  • Strengthened capacity of language industries.
  • Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
  • Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
  • Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
  • Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.

Governance structure(s):
The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for the coordination of the implementation of the Roadmap. The Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) (Canadian Heritage) supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages in this implementation and is responsible for the coordination of the accountability of the Roadmap. The OLS especially gathers financial and non-financial information from the partners to present planning and reporting of the initiatives of the Roadmap.
This function of the OLS is established in the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework which also presents the activities and results structure, the governance structure, as well as the roles and responsibilities of departments and different interdepartmental committees, while also identifying the relevant operational issues concerning the implementation of the Roadmap.
The OLS will also support the governance of the Official Languages Program through various mechanisms and committees: the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages, the Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages Executive Committee, and the Official Languages Program Interdepartmental Coordination Steering Committee.

Planning Highlights:
2012-13 is the last year of the Roadmap’s implementation. A number of initiatives, such as the “Youth Initiative” from Canadian Heritage, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s study and the “Expanding Universities' Access to Language Learning” initiative from the Canada School of Public Service, are already wrapped up, whereas a large number of other initiatives are on their way to completion.
As planned, in 2012-13, the individual summative evaluations of the Roadmap’s initiatives will be finalized. They are conducted separately by each partner’s evaluation unit. It is also planned that the horizontal summative evaluation of the Roadmap, started in 2012-13 by Canadian Heritage’s Office of the Chief Audit Evaluation Executive, will be finalized in 2012-13.
In 2012-13, preparing the follow-up to the Roadmap is continuing in order to support the development and linguistic vitality of official-language minority communities and the promotion of official languages.

Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in the language of choice.

Intermediate outcome 1: Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English‑speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in the language of choice.

Immediate outcome 1.1: Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.

Federal Partner: Justice Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs

Contraventions Act Fund

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved capacity to carry on judicial activities and to deliver extrajudicial services related to federal contraventions in both official languages.
$47.46 M $9.5 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Continued and increased access to justice services in both official languages through the implementation of the Contraventions Act in Newfoundland and Labrador and Saskatchewan.

Federal Partner: Justice Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services

Contraventions Act Fund

$1.92 M $0.4 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Non applicable.

Federal Partner: Justice Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs

Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training)

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Increased capacity of partners and the Department to implement solutions relating to access to justice in both official languages.
$38.02 M $8.7 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Implementation of the pan-Canadian study on justice training needs in both official languages by, notably, investing in training in legal French for Provincial Court Judges, who deal with 99% of proceedings in criminal matters and by widening the training offered to other stakeholders working in the justice system.
Better access to justice services in both official languages by increasing the capacity of the justice system and its stakeholders to offer services in both official languages by supporting projects that will result in direct services to the people, such as, the Association des juristes d’expression française de l’Ontario (AJEFO)’s project “CliquezJustice.ca”, projects from Éducaloi and proximity services offered by other partners.

Federal Partner: Justice Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services

Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training)

$1.89 M $0.4 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Non applicable.

Immediate Outcome 1.2: Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.

Federal Partner: Health Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Canadian Health System
Official- language minority community development

Training, Networks and Access to Health Services

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) Increased number of health professionals to meet health service needs of official-language minority communities in both official languages.
2) Increased coordination and integration of health services for official-language minority communities within institutions and communities.
3) Increased partnerships, interaction of networks in provincial, territorial health systems.
4) Increased awareness among stakeholders that networks are a focal point for addressing health concerns of official-language minority communities.
5) Increased dissemination and uptake of knowledge best practices to address health concerns of official-language minority communities.

$174.3 M $39.6 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
In 2012-13, Health Canada will manage 26 funding agreements that were initiated with community-based stakeholders in 2009-10. These agreements, amounting to $38.3 M in 2012-13, will all conclude in March 2013 and support the following activities:
- Health Networking: $5.0 M;
- Training and Retention of Health Professionals: $24.5 M;
- Official Languages Health Projects for English and French linguistic minority communities: $8.8 M.
During 2012-13, Health Canada will complete a summative evaluation of its Official Languages Health Contribution Program that will assess its relevance and performance (effectiveness, efficiency and economy) as required by the Federal Accountability Act and by the 2009 Government of Canada Policy on Evaluation.

Immediate Outcome 1.3: Improved social and economic development of official‑language minority communities.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Minority-Language Education –
Component: Support to Second-Language and Minority-Language Education

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Increased access of official-language minority communities to quality education in their language in their milieu.
$280.0 M $56.0 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Maintain investments levels to provinces and territories for programs and activities that promote access to a minority language education.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Minority-Language Education –
Component: Official-language Monitors

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved access of official-language minority communities to a quality education in their language and milieu.
$5.2 M $1.0 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Maintain investments in the Odyssée program which allows students to work as language assistants in minority-language schools.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Minority-Language Education –
Component: Summer Language Bursaries

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved access of official-language minority communities to a first-rate education in their language in their environment.
$1.7 M $0.3 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Support the Destination Clic program to maintain its yearly enrolment. This program helps young francophones outside Quebec enrich their first language while discovering new communities in Canada.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Community vitality – Component: Youth Initiatives

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language.

2) Increased capacity of official-language minority communities to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially for youth).
$10.5 M Non applicable

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Nothing in 2012-13. The initiative was for 2009-10 only.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Community vitality – Component: Support to Official-language Minority Communities

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved capacity of official-language minority communities to live in their own language in their milieu and improved access to a range of programs and services offered in their language.
$22.5 M $4.5 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Continued investment in the creation, improvement and delivery of activities and services intended for official language minority communities to promote a sense of belonging within the communities.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Community vitality – Component: Intergovernmental Cooperation

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Increased access of official-language minority communities to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.
$22.5 M $4.5 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Continued investment in federal-provincial / territorial agreements on minority-language services.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Community vitality –Component: Cultural Development Funds

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) Increased access to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.
2) Increased capacity of official-language minority communities to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially in culture).

$14.0 M $3.5 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Continue to support cultural projects to strengthen the cultural and artistic activities and cultural expression of official-language minority communities.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Social Development

Strengthening Non Governmental Organizations’ means for Early Childhood Development

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

The capacity of Non Governmental Organizations working in the area of early childhood in minority environments will be increased.
$4.0 M $0.8 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
The implemented National Framework for Collaboration on Early Childhood Development in Minority Francophone Communities in Canada will be firmly entrenched through continued facilitation and coordinating activities to enhance collaboration and networking of official-language minority communities.
Further, there will be:
- Final refinement of Early Childhood Development tools, completed through feedback received in the evaluation and from users of the tools;
- Development of a sustainability plan to continue the work in communities beyond the funding period.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Skills and Employment

Family Literacy Initiative

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Community stakeholders can act in the area of family literacy, and tools and support are available and used by those members of official-language minority communities that need them.
$7.5 M $1.8 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Results of eleven research projects will be available. These projects are to identify literacy needs and specific tools required for targeted groups such as Francophone immigrant women living in remote communities, parents from Francophone military families, exogamous families, new parents, parents with precarious situations living in rural and urban environments, grand-parents, seasonal workers, fathers, immigrants and refugees.
Eleven new family literacy models will be developed and piloted with the targeted groups.
The creation of eleven new partnerships with various provincial and territorial stakeholders to increase networking and knowledge sharing.
Evaluation tools and frameworks will be developed and utilized to report on results through the pilot projects.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Social Development

Child Care Pilot Project

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

New knowledge on child care services for minority Francophone communities.
$13.5 M

$2.7 M

A portion of the 2012-13 money could be spent on other research projects to better understand issues relating to official- language minority communities

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Research reports on the impact of the French-language preschool program on the development and readiness to learn of children, one year and two years after the end of the preschool program, will be completed.
The last data collection activities (evaluations of children and surveys of parents) will be undertaken to measure the impacts of the program.
Under the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), there will be an oversampling of official language minority communities to have a better comprehension of how individuals of official language minority communities are ready to face the challenges of the knowledge economy.

Federal Partner: Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Settlement and Integration of Newcomers

Recruitment and integration of immigrants

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

French-speaking immigrants obtain reinforced services of establishment in official-language minority communities.
$20.0 M $4.5 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
For 2012–13, Citizenship and Immigration Canada will maintain its existing activities in order to foster immigration to Francophone Minority Communities. In addition, Citizenship and Immigration Canada will consolidate its efforts in implementing the priorities of the Strategic Plan to Foster Immigration to Francophone Minority Communities.
More specifically, Citizenship and Immigration Canada will work towards:
- Increasing coordination, cooperation and research activities among the main stakeholders;
- Adopting a focused approach in supporting the vitality of Francophone Minority Communities through immigration;
- Employment based promotion and recruitment activities;
- Maintaining enhanced settlement services (Enhanced planning / coordination via Local Immigration Partnerships / Réseaux en immigration francophone interface; Targeted services for French-speaking immigrants facing significant barriers);
- Delivering pre-arrival services for French-speaking immigrants;
- Use the evaluation’s recommendations to further support Francophone immigration to Francophone Minority Communities.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Official Languages

Broadcasting Policy and Programs

Canadian Radio-Television Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) Study

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) CRTC report is issued on the availability and quality of broadcasting services to English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada.

2) The findings of the report will inform policy and decision-making on the availability and quality of broadcasting services in English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada.
Non-monetary Non applicable

Expected Results for 2012-13:
The report has been published.

Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Community Development

Support to francophone immigration in New-Brunswick

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Enhanced capacity to support francophone immigration in New Brunswick.
$10.0 M $5.3 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
To maintain support for Francophone Immigration in New Brunswick through:
- Project funding for the Population Growth Division;
- Project support of the four immigration welcoming centers;
- Delivery of Outreach activities in the community.

Federal Partner: Industry Canada – FedNor, and Industry Canada – Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Community, Economic and Regional Development (of Ontario)

Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of official-language minority communities.
$10.5 M $0.6 M

$0.4 M

$0.6 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Industry Canada(FedNor) (13 projects):
- Official language minority communities businesses in northern Ontario attract investors;
- Official language minority communities businesses in northern Ontario create jobs.

Industry Canada:
- Funding of and participation in research and analysis projects related to official language minority communities’ economic development.

FedDev Ontario:
In 2012-13, FedDev Ontario will continue to support official-language minority communities in southern Ontario through all of its programming, but especially through the Economic Development Initiative. With respect to the Economic Development Initiative, FedDev Ontario will be targeting its efforts in three key areas:
- Support Francophone youth to work in their home communities;
- Provide tailored business counselling to Francophone businesses (especially in the larger urban centres);
- Provide micro loans to Francophone businesses.

Federal Partner: Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Northern Economy

Economic Development Initiative

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.
$0.4 M $0.1 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Funding is expected to be allocated via a proposal-driven process in 2012-13.
This funding is expected to support the social and economic development of official-language minority communities in the territories.

Federal Partner: Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Northern Economy

Economic Development Initiative

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.
$0.4 M $0.1 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Funding is expected to be allocated via a proposal-driven process in 2012-13.
This funding is expected to support the social and economic development of official-language minority communities in the territories.

Federal Partner: Canada Economic Development for Quebec regions

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Community Development

Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of official-language minority communities.
$10.2 M $3.3 M
(grants and contributions)

Expected Results for 2012-13:
In line with the Agency’s mandate, these projects must foster economic diversification or business growth. They may, for instance, be projects reinforcing:
- Local economic planning within a community;
- Community facilities that have an impact on economic development;
- Tourism;
- Entrepreneurship;
- Creation and development of Small and Medium Enterprises;
- International market development;
- Innovation and its commercialization;
- Value chain management (enhancement of productivity and production management).

Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Research and Analysis

Community Economic Planning, Development and Adjustment

Business Development and Entrepreneurship

Innovation

Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of official-language minority communities.
$3.2 M $0.6 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Completion of two projects with the official-language minority communities in the Western provinces.

Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Community Development

Economic Development
Initiative

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of official-language minority communities.
$6.2 M $2.5 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Commit balance of funds available for Economic Development Initiative projects in Atlantic Canada.
Monitor projects to ensure that expenditures occur as planned.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Skills and Employment Enabling Fund for Official-Language Minority Communities

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) Contribute to synergies among Government of Canada programming relevant to official-language minority communities; Contribution recipients are informed and contribute to knowledge building and program/policy issues; Knowledge shared among federal partners, contribution recipients and official-language minority communities.
2) Program results are available to inform management and program policy issues.
3) Official-language minority communities’ access to Government of Canada programs and services.
4) Collaborative arrangements.
$69.0 M $13.8 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
National Committees for economic development and employability continue to work together to promote the involvement of community partners and federal information sharing.
The Interdepartmental Research Committee on Economic Development of official-language minority communities (IRCCED) will continue the work of research coordination at the federal level (Official-language minority communities) in economic development by enabling federal departments to share and collaborate on these issues, while identifying priorities for future research.
Based on the results of the action research pilot project on the economic integration of Francophone immigrants, the Enabling Fund will explore the implementation of the next steps.
The Enabling Fund will continue to complement existing federal programs by creating favorable conditions for economic development and human resources and providing support to develop the capacities of official-language minority communities on leadership, governance and capacity for implementation.
The program will continue to improve its tools to standardize accountability of recipient organizations to realize the achievement of tangible results and maximize the information gathered.
In collaboration with the recipients of the Enabling Fund, the program will continue to implement the self-assessment tool on the community economic development capacity of official-language minority communities. The implementation will be an ongoing process over the coming years.
The program will conclude contribution agreements with fourteen official-language minority community organizations responsible for fostering community economic development and human resources. These agreements come into force on April 1st, 2012.

Intermediate Result 2: Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.

Immediate Result 2.1: Strengthened capacity of language industries.

Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Linguistic Management and Services

University Scholarships Program in Translation

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Scholarships help encourage students to pursue post-secondary studies in translation, interpretation and terminology.
$8.0 M $2.8 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Continued increase in the number of students enrolled in a translation program in Canada.
Increase in the number of graduates from a translation program in Canada.

Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Linguistic Management and Services

Language Industry Initiative

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Funded projects help enhance the capacity, diversity and effectiveness of the language sector.
$10.0 M $3.2 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Continued increase in the degree of participation of businesses and non-profit organizations in activities organized by those promoting projects for the Canadian language sector.
Increase in the number of internships for students enrolled in a translation program in Canada.
Increase in the number of translation service providers in Public Works and Government Services Canada supplier directory.

Federal Partner: Research Council of Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Interactive Languages Technologies

Languages Technologies Research Centre (LTRC)
Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) Collaboration with key partners in the implementation of a Research & Development strategy responsive to industry needs.
2) Research competency in the target domains recognized globally.
3) Transfer of knowledge and technology.
$10.0 M $2.0 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
For result 1:
Number of collaborative agreements and memoranda of understanding: 2.
Number of innovative translation aid tools and content management tools for multilingual and multicultural content developed or in the process of development: 2.
3 seminars (Institute for Information Technology (IIT) / Language Technologies Research Centre (LTRC) / Language Industry Association (AILIA)) and 8 presentations at the national level.

For result 2:
Number of citations by peers from the scientific community: 290.
1 internal and 1 external award received from NRCC.
Number of invitation of Canadian and foreign researchers: 1.
Number of students at post-doctoral, doctoral and master's degree received / trained: 1.
Number of tasks on the editorial boards of journals, number of leadership roles in program committees of international conferences, number of reviews of articles for journals and scientific conferences:
- 5 scientific journal articles written;
- 1 management of a program committee or subcommittee of international conferences;
- 40 reviews of papers submitted to journals and scientific conferences.
Number of scientific articles, patents, and licensing of research:
- 15 scientific papers;
- 1 Patent Application;
- 1 Research licences.

For result 3:
Number and value of Research & Development collaborative agreements:
- Number of agreements: 2;
- Cumulative value: $350,000.
Number and value of commercial and technology evaluation licences:
- Number: 1;
- Cumulative revenues: $50,000.
Number of participations in exchange activities with partners and businesses (e.g. LTRC, AILIA, trade shows, etc.): Regular participation according to organized events (80% participation rate).
Number of pilot projects with institutional and industrial partners: 2.

Immediate Result 2.2: Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.

Federal Partner: Public Works and Governmental Services Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Linguistic Management and Services

Canada Language Portal

Result for 2008-13 Roadmap:

Canadians have better access to quality language resources in both official languages.
$16.0 M $3.4 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Develop new games, articles and headlines for the “Magazine” section of the Portal.
Include new language tools in the “Collection” section of the Portal.
Conclude co‑operation agreements with Canadian organizations on enhancing the Portal.
Add hyperlinks to external on‑line linguistic resources.

Federal Partner: Canada School of Public Service

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Foundational learning
Official Languages Learning

Language retention services

Expanding Universities’ Access to Language Learning

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Increased access to language training products to Canadians through new partnerships with Canadian universities.
$2.5 M Non applicable

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Nothing in 2012-13. Pilot ends on March 31, 2012.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Learning of a Second Language – Component: Support to Second-Language and Minority-Language Education

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Increased access of official-language minority communities to quality education in their language in their milieu.
$190.0 M $38.0 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Maintain investments to provinces and territories for programs and activities that promote the learning of French and English as a second official language.
Maintain or increase the proportion of Canadians who learns French and English as a second official language.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Learning of a Second Language – Component: Summer Language Bursaries

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved access of official-language minority communities to a first-rate education in their language in their environment.
$38.3 M $7.7 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Ensure that bursary holders benefit entirely from of the Explore program. This program offers a cultural exchange that helps students perfect their understanding and competencies of their second official language.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Learning of a Second Language – Component: Official-language Monitors

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.
$14.8 M $3.0 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Ensure the number of participants in the Odyssée program is maintained. This program allows students to work as Second language assistants in classrooms across the country.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Youth Initiatives – Promotion of the linguistic duality

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language.
$2.0 M Non applicable

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Nothing in 2012-13. The initiative was for 2009-10 only.

Immediate Result 2.3: Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Cultural Industries

National Translation Program for Book Publishing

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
$5.0 M $1.0 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Funding is allocated to book publishers for eligible translations.
Official language translations of books by Canadian authors are undertaken with support from the National Translation Program for Book Publishing.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Cultural Industries

Musical Showcase Program for Artists from Official-language Communities

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
$4.5 M $1.0 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Music showcases are organized and presented.
Artists from official-language minority communities perform at these showcases.
Artists from official-language minority communities are exposed to a larger audience.
Official-language minority communities have access to more music showcases in their language.

Intermediate Result 3: Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.

Immediate Result 3.1: Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).

Federal Partner: Justice Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Legal Services to Government

Accountability and Coordination Framework

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Support to ministers with statutory or sectoral responsibilities for official languages and to work with them.
$2.18 M $0.4 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Continue training and awareness activities in order to increase knowledge of language rights.
Continue providing high quality and useful legal advice to partners.
Continue monitoring official language issues that could affect the federal government.

Federal Partner: Justice Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services

Accountability and Coordination Framework

$0.15 M $0.03 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Non applicable.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage (Official Languages Secretariat)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Official Languages

Accountability and Coordination Framework

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:
1) The Government of Canada has official languages strategies.
2) The partners are supported in the implementation of their official languages initiatives.
3) The quality of information on results (financial and non-financial) provided by the partners is improved.
4) The results of the research on official languages are communicated to the partners.
5) The Minister of Official Languages is advised on official languages files.
$13.5 M $1.7 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Support to Minister responsible for Official Languages and senior officials in elaborating timely documentation and in insisting on quality assurance of given information and strategic advice.
Conclusion of the implementation of the Roadmap by organizing regular meetings of interdepartmental committees of various levels, by consulting with the partners, by coordinating the collection of information for ministerial reports, by sharing timely financial and non-financial information.
Preparing the follow-up to the Roadmap.

Immediate Result 3.2: Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.

Federal Partner: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer 1

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13

Human Resources Management – Establishing Directions

Centre of excellence

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Linguistic duality is reinforced in the federal public service.
$17.0 M $3.4 M

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Finalization of the review of official languages policy instruments in order to harmonize them with the human resources management regime currently in place.
Elaboration of a streamlined and coordinated data and information collection approach for Treasury Board Secretariat and the department of Canadian Heritage.
Support for the development and review of policy instruments from other policy centres for everything related to official languages.
Production of policy interpretations on horizontal issues.
Follow-up on the state of official languages in institutions subject to the Official Languages Act as part of the official languages risk-based annual review exercise.
An assessment of the status of official languages in institutions subject to the Management Accountability Framework.
An Annual Report on Official Languages to Parliament that provides a portrait of the Official Languages Program.
Follow-up on the preparation of the Regulations re-application exercise based on the upcoming 10-year census data (the data will be known in October 2012).
Finalization of the Regulations Management System.

Federal Partner: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Human Resources Management – Enabling Infrastructure

 

   

Expected Results for 2012-13:
Horizontal support for institutions through two Official Languages Advisory Committees, the Network of Official Languages Champions, the Annual Conference of Official Languages Champions and the Best Practices Forum, as well as tools facilitating the management of official languages in institutions.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$ 1,109.8 M $ 233.03 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Non applicable.

Contact information: Isabelle Delage (819) 997-0622

1 In February 2009, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer has been created. It aggregates the Canada Public Service Agency and some parts of Treasury Board Secretariat related to compensation and human resources.


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Department of Finance Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of horizontal initiative: Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime

Name of lead department(s): Department of Finance Canada

Lead department program activity: Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework

Start date of the horizontal initiative: June 2000

End date of the horizontal initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $690.6 million†

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime had its origins in 2000 when the National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering (NICML) was established as part of the government's ongoing efforts to combat money laundering in Canada. Legislation adopted that year, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act, created a mandatory reporting system for suspicious financial transactions, large cross-border currency transfers, and certain prescribed transactions. The legislation also established the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) to collect and analyze these financial transaction reports and to disclose pertinent information to law enforcement and intelligence agencies. In December 2001, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act was amended to include measures to fight terrorist financing activities, and renamed the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act.

Also in 2001, the NICML was expanded and its name was formally changed to “Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime.” In December 2006, Bill C-25 amended the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act to further align Canada's legislation with international anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing standards as set out by the Financial Action Task Force, and respond to areas of domestic risk. The amendments included enhanced client identification requirements, the creation of a registration regime for money services businesses, and the establishment of an administrative and monetary penalties regime to deal with lesser infractions of the Act.

Shared outcome(s): To detect and deter money laundering and the financing of terrorist activities and to facilitate the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences.

Governance structure(s): Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime is a horizontal initiative comprising both funded and non-funded partners. The funded partners are the Department of Finance Canada, the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canada Revenue Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The non-funded partners are Public Safety Canada, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions, and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. An interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister-level group and working group, consisting of all partners and led by the Department of Finance Canada, has been established to direct and coordinate the government's efforts to combat money laundering and terrorist financing activities. In addition, the Department also chairs a Public/Private Sector Advisory Committee. This broad-based advisory committee is composed of both public and private sector representatives who provide general guidance for Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime.

Planning highlights: The priorities for Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime partners will continue to focus on the following key objectives: detecting, deterring and preventing money laundering and terrorist financing and facilitating the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences. Each partner plays a key role in the Regime, and a coordinated effort is a priority.

Federal partner: Department of Finance Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
201213
Financial Sector Policy Policy Development and Oversight of Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime 3.9 0.3
Total 3.9  0.3 

Expected results by program:

The Department of Finance Canada will continue its effective oversight of Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime. The Department will also focus on the following areas:

  • Monitoring the financial sector for money laundering and terrorist financing risks and other emerging illicit financing risks;
  • Participating in strategic domestic and international policy development activities that support the government’s commitments to the Regime, including continuing work with respect to proposed amendments to the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Regulations on ascertaining identity;
  • Working to address the recommendations from the 10-year Treasury Board-mandated evaluation of the Regime;
  • Heading the Canadian delegation to participate as an active member in the Financial Action Task Force and the Asia/Pacific Group on Money Laundering, as a Cooperative and Supporting Nation to the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force, and as an observer on the Financial Action Task Force of South America Against Money Laundering;
  • Implementing the Budget 2010 measure related to counter-measures to tackle illicit financing;
  • Assessing the findings of the five-year Parliamentary Review of the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act; and
  • Continued participation in horizontal initiatives related to national security led by Public Safety Canada.

Federal Partner: Department of Justice Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
201213
Justice policies, laws and programs Criminal Law Policy Section (CLPS) and International Assistance Group (IAG) 7.3 0.1
Total 7.3  0.1 

Expected results by program:

The International Assistance Group (IAG) and the Criminal Law Policy Section (CLPS) of the Department of Justice Canada (which is part of the Justice Litigation Branch) play a significant role in the Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime. For 2011–12, it is anticipated that the IAG and the CLPS will use the resources they receive to carry out work related to the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), including attending FATF-related international meetings and providing advice in relation to FATF to Canadian Regime partners. These tasks may include support and attendance of the meetings of the subgroups of the FATF, for example, the Working Group on Evaluation and Implementation, and FATF-Style Regional Bodies, including the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force and the “GAFISUD,” the Financial Action Task Force body of South America Against Money Laundering. Resources will also be allocated to ensure that the CLPS’s continued involvement in policy development relating to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, the Human Rights Law Section will continue to participate, as required, with respect to constitutional issues raised in relation to proposed amendments or in the course of prosecutions.

Federal Partner: Public Prosecution Service of Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
201213
Drug, Criminal Code and terrorism prosecution program Drug, Criminal Code and terrorism prosecution program 16.1 2.3
Total 16.1  2.3 

Expected results by program:

For 2012–13, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) will continue to provide legal advice and support to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and other law enforcement agencies over the course of investigations related to the proceeds of crime, money laundering and terrorist financing provisions of the Criminal Code as well as the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act, and to undertake prosecutions that arise out of those investigations. In addition, the PPSC will continue to provide Regime-related training to law enforcement personnel and prosecutors, and to support policy development and coordination. Finally, the PPSC will support the work of the Financial Action Task Force, as required.

Federal Partner: The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
201213
Financial Intelligence Program Financial Intelligence Program   24.0
Compliance Program Compliance Program   24.0
Total 403.6  48.0 

Expected results by program:

Financial Intelligence Program

The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada’s (FINTRAC’s) Financial Intelligence Program produces trusted and valued financial intelligence products, including tactical case disclosures on suspected money laundering, terrorist activity financing and other threats to the security of Canada, as well as strategic intelligence such as money laundering and terrorist financing trends reports, country and group-based financial intelligence assessments, and vulnerability assessments of emerging financial technologies or services. The program’s products are relied on and sought after by Canadian law enforcement at the federal, provincial and municipal levels, by counterpart agencies and domestic and international intelligence bodies, and by policy and decision makers working to identify emerging issues and vulnerabilities in the Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime.

In 2012–13, FINTRAC will continue to provide its partners, policy makers and other interested parties with timely and relevant financial intelligence products that contribute to the public safety of Canadians, and will strive to disrupt the ability of criminals and terrorist groups that seek to abuse Canada’s financial system while reducing the profit incentive of organized crime.

Compliance Program

As part of Canada’s Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime, FINTRAC seeks to counter money laundering and terrorist financing by improving the compliance behaviours of reporting entities with obligations under Part 1 of the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act and related regulations, which include obligations for reporting, record keeping, identity verification and other requirements.

For 2012–13, FINTRAC will continue to use a risk-based approach to ensure that non-compliance with legislative obligations among reporting entities is detected and addressed through reporting and compliance assessments, as well as ensuring that reporting entities receive timely and accurate responses to their inquiries for information.

Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
201213
Federal policing Money Laundering Units 87.2 7.0
Anti-Terrorist Financing Units Regime 37.6 5.0
Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodations 3.9 0.6
Total 128.7  12.6 

Expected results by program:

Money Laundering Units

In 2012, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police will realign its Anti-Money Laundering Teams to high-risk locations identified by national threat assessments. These realigned resources will be based in Ottawa, Calgary, Montreal, Vancouver and Toronto and will use financial criminal intelligence to initiate, based on priority, major projects and investigations.

Anti-Terrorist Financing Units

Through the gathering and analysis of financial intelligence, the Anti-Terrorist Financing team will focus on converting financial criminal intelligence into proactive investigations for the Anti-Terrorist Financial Investigative Units, thus enhancing the ability to detect and deter terrorist financing activities. The Anti-Terrorist Financing team will continue to work closely with domestic partners to further criminal investigations of terrorist financing and will participate and contribute to international forums such as the Financial Action Task Force and international law-enforcement working groups on terrorist financing.

Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
201213
Special Enforcement Program (SEP) Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime 28.2 2.2
Charities – Public Safety and Anti-Terrorism Combatting Terrorist Resourcing Through Charities 20.5 4.4
Total 48.7  6.6 

Expected results by program:

Special Enforcement Program

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) is focusing on the following three key areas: participating in committees and initiatives that aim to manage and strengthen Canada’s Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime; continuing to enhance operational relationships with the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) and other Regime partners; and conducting analysis related to money laundering and tax avoidance and evasion, which includes conducting compliance action focused on individuals and entities that are participating in money laundering and terrorist financing activities.

In 2012–13, the Special Enforcement Program (SEP) will continue to process all disclosures from FINTRAC on a priority basis. The SEP will thoroughly review all disclosures received from FINTRAC and select for compliance actions those with identifiable tax and collection potential. The projected number of audits will remain at 90 cases, with a projected federal tax recovery of $9,000,000.  Given the complexity of the files received from FINTRAC, the lengthy amount of time required to complete these cases and the fact that the number of referrals continues to increase, the number of audits SEP can complete in 2012–13 may be impacted. These factors will also potentially impact the federal tax recovery for these cases.

Information will be gathered from the FINTRAC disclosures and resulting compliance actions for intelligence purposes in an effort to identify trends that could positively impact the quality and success of future compliance actions.

Charities – Public Safety and Anti-Terrorism

The CRA has responsibility for administering the registration system for charities under the Income Tax Act. The existence of a strong regulatory deterrence against terrorist abuse of charities contributes to suppressing the financing of terrorism in Canada and to protecting and preserving the social cohesion and well-being of Canadians. The CRA's regulatory oversight of charities has been strengthened by the enactment of complementary measures under the Charities Registration (Security Information) Act and the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act and by changes to the Income Tax Act that authorize broader information sharing between anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing agencies. Under these authorities, intelligence provided to the CRA assists in its mandate to protect the integrity of the registration system for charities and information disclosed by the CRA can be used for investigative purposes. In 2011–12, the CRA will continue to consolidate its capacity to identify and respond to cases involving possible links to terrorism by implementing new systems to support decisions, refining risk management tools, developing a privacy management framework and bringing regulatory actions to the attention of Canadians.

Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
201213
Risk assessment Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime   1.5
Admissibility determination Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime   4.6
Internal services Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime   1.6
Total 89.8  7.7 

Expected results by program:

Risk Assessment

  • Continue to be involved in tactical and strategic analysis and assessments of intelligence related to money laundering and terrorist financing activities.
  • Participate in the exchange of currency seizure information to assist in the investigation or prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing activity offences with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
  • Participate in joint forces operations with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and other government departments. Several specific operations exemplify the high level of cooperation between Regime partners and related international agencies.

Admissibility Determinations

  • Border services officers (BSOs) maintain the responsibility to enforce the physical cross-border reporting obligation, including the examination of baggage and conveyances, and to question and search individuals for unreported or falsely reported currency and monetary instruments.
  • BSOs continue to seize currency and monetary instruments that have not been reported and that are greater than the reporting threshold. Seized non-reported currency and monetary instruments are forfeited with no terms of release when BSOs suspect that the seized currency or monetary instruments are proceeds of crime or funds for use in terrorist financing activities. In all other instances, the seized amount will be returned upon payment of a penalty. BSOs are trained to recognize various monetary instruments and potential instances of non-compliance.
  • Dedicated Cross-Border Currency Reporting Teams will continue to be an integral part of the Canada Border Services Agency’s outbound enforcement effort.
  • The Currency Detector Dogs Service will continue to play an important role in the detection of unreported currency that may be related to money laundering or terrorist financing.

Internal Services

  • Provide functional direction to the regions regarding the administration and enforcement of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act.
  • Provide critical strategic planning, priority setting and coordination for the Cross-Border Currency Reporting Program.
  • Continue to work closely with other key government departments on matters related to money laundering and terrorist financing.
  • Continue to be involved in international conferences and workshops that require the presence of cross-border law enforcement expertise.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012–13
$698.1 million $77.6 million

† Certain organizations that are partners in Canada’s Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime are exempt from reporting; therefore, the figures presented in the table may not add up to the total amount allocated.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Non applicable

Contact information:

Rachel Grasham
Chief, Financial Crimes Section
Phone: 613-943-2883

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Department of Justice Canada

Erratum

Subsequent to tabling in Parliament and online publication of the 2012–13 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Department of Justice determined that its Horizontal Initiatives Supplementary lnformation Table contained two errors. The total planned spending for all federal partners at the end of the table was miscalculated and incorrectly entered as $117.1M, where it should have read $108.8M, in both English and French. In addition, the title in English for this table should have read "Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for "2012–13" and not "2011–12". The HTML versions of the Horizontal Initiatives Supplementary Information Table have been updated to include the correct information.

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Anti-Drug Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Department of Justice Canada

Lead department program activity: Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-131

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2016-17 and Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date)2: $527.8 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS) was launched by the Government of Canada in 2007, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Its goal is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The prevention action plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use, and to develop and implement community-based interventions & initiatives to prevent illicit drug use. The treatment action plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The enforcement action plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

Shared outcome(s):

  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced impacts of illicit drug use through prevention and treatment efforts; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.

Governance structure(s):

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section of the Department of Justice Canada.

The Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC), which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources. The ADMSC prepares questions for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by the Department of Public Safety Canada, oversees the implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy and the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The Communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy including, making decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative and ensuring coordination of communication.

Planning Highlights:

For 2012-13, the 12 federal partner departments and agencies involved in the National Anti-Drug Strategy will continue to focus on contributing to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency, and reduce the production and distribution of illicit drugs. In response to the recommendations from the Strategy's impact evaluation, Strategy partners will devise new ways to disseminate knowledge, improve communication among the three Action Plans, review the governance structure, and develop a Performance Measurement Strategy. In addition, since Bill C-10 has received Royal Assent, the Strategy partners involved in responding to the impact of mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug offences are now able to access funds which had been set aside in a frozen allotment.

The following tables present the expected results for each federal partner's program activities.

Federal Partner: Department of Justice Canada


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
A1 – Stewardship of the Canadian Legal Framework a. Drug Treatment Courts $18.2 M $3.6 M Link 1
b. Youth Justice Fund

(Treatment Action Plan)
$7.9 M $1.6 M Link 2
c. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.2 M $0.2 M Link 3
C1 – Internal Services d. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.1 M $0.2 M
e. National Anti-Drug Strategy $0.2 M $0.0 M Support programs
Total $28.5 M $5.7 M  

*Note: Amounts include Employee Benefit Plan (EBP) premiums and exclude Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court clients.

Link 2:

  • To work collaboratively with interested provinces and territories as well as other stakeholders in order to identify gaps in drug treatment programs for youth in the justice system.
  • To introduce, pilot and evaluate a number of drug treatment options for youth involved in the youth justice system in communities.
  • To share knowledge of the piloted drug treatment programs and promising practices with provinces and territories as well as other interested stakeholders.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Projects on Treatment Services & Program Enhancements
  • Enhanced capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Increased availability of & access to effective treatment services & programs for targeted populations in areas of need
  • Improved treatment systems, programs & services to address illicit drug dependency in targeted populations in areas of need

Link 3:

Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

  • exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • maintaining the NADS Governance Structure;
  • leading and coordinating all NADS communications activities; and
  • taking lead responsibility for accountability, evaluation and performance reporting.

Federal Partner: Health Canada


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
3.4.3 Controlled Substances b. Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF)

(Prevention Action Plan)
$57.5 M $11.5 M Link 1
3.4 Substance Use and Abuse c. Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP)

(Treatment Action Plan)
$80.4 M $27.6 M Link 2
3.1.1.2 First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions d. National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP)

(Treatment Action Plan)
$45.5 M $9.1 M Link 3
3.4.3 Controlled Substances e. Office of Controlled Substances

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$25.5 M $5.1 M Link 4
f. Drug Analysis Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$17.0 M $3.4 M Link 5
$4.5 M3 $0.9 M3
Total $230.4 M $57.6 M  

*Note: Amounts include EBP premiums and Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

DSCIF plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit drug use. The program's success and progress will be measured by the level/nature of acquired or improved knowledge/skills to avoid illicit drug use within the targeted population, and will be measured by evidence that capacity changes are influencing decision-making and behaviors around illicit drug use and associated consequences in targeted populations.

DSCIF also plans to strengthen community responses to illicit drug issues in targeted areas, and will measure their progress based on the type/nature of ways that community responses have been strengthened in targeted areas. For example, the adoption/integration of evidence-informed/best practices within the targeted areas will indicate the program's contribution to this outcome.

Link 2:

DTFP plans to increase availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for at-risk youth in areas of need. The Program's success and progress will be measured by the type/nature of treatment services and supports that have been made available by end of FY and will be measured by the program/service utilization trends associated with their populations and areas of need.

DTFP will also seek to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency of affected Canadians. The Program's success and progress in this plan will be measured by the extent to which treatment system improvements have been made; perceptions of stakeholders; and, the extent to which uptake/integration of evidence-informed practices has occurred.

Link 3:

First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) plans to increase the availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need. The progress of this plan will be measured by the nature of new or enhanced services that have been made available through funding in targeted areas and are based on research or best practices. FNIHB also plans to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency in First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need. The progress of this plan will be measured by:

  • the proportion of treatment facilities accredited;
  • the proportion of addictions counsellors in treatment centres who are certified;
  • the changes in stakeholder perceptions regarding the extent to which treatment services have been improved in Strategy-supported investment areas; and
  • the types of collaborative/partnerships with Aboriginal organizations to strengthen systems, programs and services.

Link 4:

The Office of Controlled Substances (OCS) plans to reduce the risk of diversion of precursor chemicals by using Strategy funding to improve processes for the issuance of precursor licenses and permits. This will include reviewing and streamlining guidance provided to regulated parties involved in carrying out activities with precursor chemicals, and to law enforcement regarding the application for authorization to dispose of seized controlled substances. The OCS will also strengthen the inspection program through the development of a quality assurance component to ensure consistency in inspections across the country. This includes the development of standardized tools with a national scope (ie. policies, directives, inspection reports, monitoring letters and standard operating procedures etc.). This framework will contribute to increased capacity in the control and monitoring of controlled substances and precursor chemicals. It will also include improving the tools used to record losses and thefts reported to the OCS by regulated parties.

Link 5:

Drug Analysis Services (DAS) plans to improve drug enforcement intelligence and evidence. The success and progress of this plan will be measured by the perceptions of stakeholders regarding the benefit and timeliness of DAS contribution to police response/court. Drug Analysis Services also plans to increase safety in dismantling illicit drug operations. The success and progress of this plan will be measured by the number and nature of injuries to law enforcement officers and other first responders during the investigation and dismantling of illegal drug operations, and will also be measured by the level of additional risk to the environment as a result of investigation and dismantling of illegal drug operations.

Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
1.4 Health and Health Services Advances Research on Drug Treatment Model

(Treatment Action Plan)
$4.9 M $1.0M Link 1
Total $4.9 M $1.0 M  

*Note: Amounts exclude EBP and Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

Continue to improve the state of knowledge and its translation with respect to treatment and understanding of the consequences of illicit drug use.

To address this, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is continuing in 2012-13 the funding of the Three teams, which were funded in 2008-2009 for five years. Funding is continuing in 2012-13 for the following objectives:

  • to generate high-quality research that addresses an important health and disease, health care or health system problem or issue which is best approached through a collaborative team;
  • to provide superior research training and mentorship environments; and
  • to produce new knowledge and the translation of research findings into improvements in the health of Canadians and the Canadian health care system.

CIHR will be launching a new Catalyst competition in 2012-13 as the first step to the development of a Canadian Intervention Research Network in Addiction in the following years of NADS funding. The objectives are:

  • to facilitate team formation, as a first step towards the pursuit of more comprehensive funding opportunities by researchers and addiction treatment providers and to generate preliminary observations, data or knowledge demonstrating integrated approaches of research; and
  • to generate high impact results and/or innovative research proposals, research tools, techniques, devices, inventions, or methodologies.

A third workshop for CIHR activities under NADS will be held in fall 2012. CIHR will be inviting the team grants to present their ongoing work, as well as the grantees from the current and previous catalyst and knowledge synthesis grants. The objectives of the meeting are:

  • share current knowledge and research results;
  • establish networking of researchers and partners (federal departments, provincial agencies, Non-governmental organizations [NGOs]); and
  • identify knowledge translation opportunities and provide feedback to CIHR.

Following this meeting, CIHR will be preparing a report highlighting the activities of CIHR during the first five years of NADS funding.

Federal Partner: Department of Public Safety Canada


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
3. Law Enforcement a. National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$3.9 M $0.8 M Link 1
5. Internal Services $0.1 M $0.0 M Link 2
Total $4.0 M $0.8 M  

*Note: Amounts include EBP premiums and Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies.

Link 2:

Support the work of the program by providing key corporate services.

Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
1.1.2.7 a. Drug and Organized Crime Awareness Services

(Prevention Action Plan)
$14.5 M $2.9 M Link 1
3.5.2 Community and Youth Programs b. National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program

(Treatment Action Plan)
$0.0 M $0.0 M Link 2
1.1.2.9 c. Marijuana and Clandestine Lab Teams/Proceeds of Crime

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$112.5 M $22.5 M Link 3
Total $127.0 M $25.4 M  

*Note: Amounts include EBP premiums and exclude Accommodation premiums of $0.5 M ongoing

Link 1:

Increase awareness of the impact drugs and organized crime have on communities and individuals by leveraging media outlets and public events to strengthen our messaging and reaching a broader base.

Enhance our organizational ability to provide first class prevention and awareness programs, by ensuring our training cadre possess the requisite level of facilitation and communication skills.

Link 2:

Item Sunset in 2011-12 – Pending Budget Announcement

Link 3:

Expanded international and national cooperation toward greater collaboration in conducting joint investigations with a particular focus on disrupting organized crime networks. Greater engagement of government and non government stakeholders, including community groups in combating and reducing the impact of clandestine labs.

Enhanced ability to detect and investigate clandestine labs through increased training of Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) employees.

Federal Partner: Correctional Service Canada


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
3.0 Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of provincial Offenders

(Minimum Mandatory Penalties)
$30.5 M $6.1 M Link 1
Total $30.5 M2 $6.1 M2  

*Note: Amounts include EBP premiums and exclude Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

Timely case preparation; rate of offenders successfully reintegrated into the community.

Federal Partner: Parole Board of Canada


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions

(Minimum Mandatory Penalties)
$6.5 M $1.3 M Link 1
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability

(Minimum Mandatory Penalties)
$2.5 M $0.5 M Link 2
Internal Services Internal Services $2.0 M $0.4 M Support programs
Total $11.0 M3 $2.2 M3  

*Note: Amounts include EBP premiums and Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

This funding will provide the Parole Board of Canada (PBC) the capacity for effective management of its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. PBC will collect information and report on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated a as result of new legislative provisions (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole).

Link 2:

This funding will provide the PBC the capacity for provision of information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings and individuals who seek access to decision registry in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. In a similar manner, PBC will report on the extent of involvement of victims, and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by PBC.

Effective management of both these responsibilities will contribute to public safety and reinforce public confidence in the justice system.

Federal Partner: Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
1.1 Drug, Criminal Code, and terrorism prosecution program a. Prosecution and prosecution-related services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$17.0 M $3.4 M Link 1
b. Prosecution of serious drug offences under the Controlled Drugs
and Substances
Act (CDSA)


(Minimum Mandatory Penalties)
$41.5 M3 To be determined3 Link 2
2.1 Internal Services Enforcement Action Plan $2.5 M $0.5 M  
Total $61.0 M $3.9 M  

*Note: Amounts include EBP and Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA in response to the workload generated by the enhanced RCMP dedicated anti-drug teams and criminal intelligence and technical operations support staff.

Link 2:

Provision of prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations, and prosecution of drug charges under the CDSA resulting from the Minimum Mandatory Penalties.

Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Risk Assessment Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$9.9 M $1.6 M Link 1
Link 2
Link 3
Admissibility Determination $0.4 M
Internal Services Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$8.1 M $1.6 M Link 4
Total 18.0 M $3.6 M  

*Note: Amounts include EBP and Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

Continue to increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illicit drug issues relative to the border.

Link 2:

Continue to increase intelligence support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the strategy.

Link 3:

Continue to improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the Strategy to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting and information sharing related to illicit drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the Strategy as they relate to the border.

Link 4:

Continuation of additional sampling, analysis and increased use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry.

Federal Partner: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
1.2 Diplomacy and Advocacy Annual Voluntary Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD)

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.5 M $0.9 M Link 1
Link 2
Total $4.5 M $0.9 M  

*Note: Amounts exclude EBP and Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

Improved capacity of UNODC to fulfill its mandate in their fight against illicit drugs and international crime at the global level.

Link 2:

Improved capacity of CICAD to fulfill its mandate in the fight against illicit drugs in the Americas.

Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
4 Reporting Compliance Special Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$5.0 M $1.0 M Link 1
Total $5.0 M $1.0 M  

*Note: Amounts include EBP and Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

Expected results for 2012-2013 fiscal year:

  • 25 audits of taxpayers involved in production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re)assessments of $3,000,000 of federal taxes.
  • Leads for audits will result from referrals from the RCMP and other law enforcement agencies involved in enforcement activities of illegal drug use, production and distribution.
  • Emphasis will be placed on intelligence-led, strategic file selection in an effort to reduce the profitability of illegal / criminal activities in this sector.

Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
1.7 Specialized Programs and Services Forensic Accounting Management Group

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$3.0 M $0.6 M Link 1
Total $3.0 M $0.6 M  

*Note: Amounts include EBP and Accommodation premiums

Link 1:

Increased operational capacity to provide forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.

Federal Partner: Financial Transactions and Analysis Centre of Canada


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions) Expected Results
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
2004113 Detection and deterrence of money laundering and terrorist financing Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$0.0 M $0.0 M Link 1
Total $0.0 M $0.0 M  

Link 1:

2012-2013 begins the period for which FINTRAC becomes an unfunded partner within the NADS Initiative. However, given the importance of the NADS Initiative, FINTRAC has internally reallocated resources to continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions. This intelligence will be produced as FINTRAC will continue to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of our partners (as per FINTRAC's strategic priorities).


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$527.8 M $108.8 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Jennifer Goldstone
A/Head, National Anti-Drug Strategy
Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section
(613) 954-2864
Jennifer.Goldstone@justice.gc.ca



  • 1 The National Anti-Drug Strategy was launched in 2007 and the total allocation for all federal partners from 2007-08 to 2011-12 was $578.6M. Fiscal year 2012-13 is the start date of the current reporting cycle.

  • 2 The amount for the 2012-13 planned spending and the total allocation might not add up due to the rounding.

  • 3 Funding to implement Mandatory Minimum Penalties (MMPs) for serious drug offences was approved on September 27, 2007 and held in a frozen allotment contingent to Bill C-10 receiving Royal Assent, which happened on March 13, 2012. The departments / agencies involved in responding to the impact of mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug offences are now able to access these funds. The amounts to be accessed and the results will be reported in the 2012-13 Departmental Performance Report (DPR).
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Environment Canada

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Canadian Group on Earth Observations is a collection of federal departments participating in the international Group on Earth Observations (GEO).

Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada is the lead department by virtue of the identification of the ADM of the Meteorological Service of Canada as the GEO Principal.

Lead department program activity: 2.1 Weather and environmental services for Canadians

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 2003. There are no dedicated funds; this initiative is funded instead from the existing resources envelope (A-Base).

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Provided through the existing resources envelope (A-Base) and in-kind contributions from federal departments.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The GEO seeks to implement the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to allow free and open access to Earth observations for decision- and policy-makers in all countries. In so doing, users such as Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada will be able to better predict the future state of Planet Earth and better warn citizens of the onset of hazardous conditions. See the GEO website for more details: http://www.earthobservations.org/

Shared outcome(s):

  • Enhancing access to Global Earth Observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements;
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international; and
  • Improving evidence-based decision-making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations.

Governance structure(s): Coordination is achieved through the ADM-level Federal Committee on Geomatics and Earth Observation (FCGEO), the DG-level Interdepartmental Coordinating Committee (ICC) and ad hoc working-level committees.

Planning Highlights: Work continues to establish working groups in the Prairies and the Rocky Mountains for better understanding of the water cycle and better predictions of drought, flood and water quality conditions. This is connected to efforts related to the Global Drought Monitoring Initiative. The GEO Plenary held in Istanbul Nov. 16–17 reaffirms the countries’ commitment to the GEOSS. At the plenary, Canada was elected to the GEO Executive Committee for the first time, providing an opportunity to enhance Canada’s leadership role in the GEO. In the coming years, Canada’s active participation will contribute to global efforts in the area of forest carbon tracking and the Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM). In 2012, the Canadian Space Agency will assume the chairmanship of the Committee on Earth Observation  Satellites (CEOS). Canada also plays a key role in the GEO Monitoring and Evaluation Working Group, with EC providing a co-chair and AAFC providing expertise to the group performing the third GEO results evaluation. The interdepartmental ADM-level FCGEO steering committee was formed and is co-chaired by AAFC and NRC and is active in providing direction to make linkages with geomatics initiatives and explore the larger issue of data standard and sharing policies and principles.

Federal Partner:

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
1. Environment Canada Meteorological Service of Canada N/A In-kind contributions of $75K salary and $50K O&M from the existing resources envelope (A‑Base)
$38K G&C
2. Natural Resources Canada a. Earth Sciences Sector $ not available In kind – to be determined
b. Canadian Forest Service $ not available In kind – to be determined
c. Canadian Sensor for Remote Sensing $ not available In kind – to be determined
3. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada a. Science and Technology $ not available In kind – to be determined
b. Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration and Environment $ not available In kind – to be determined
4. Canadian Space Agency a. Earth Observations $ not available In kind – to be determined
5. Fisheries and Oceans Canada a. Science & Technology $ not available In kind – to be determined
6. Health Canada a. Radiation $ not available In kind – to be determined
7. Statistics Canada a. Agriculture $ not available In kind – to be determined
8. Department of Foreign Affairs & International Trade a. Environment $ not available In kind – to be determined

Expected Results: Participation in the GEO by Canadian departments is expected to have benefits in nine areas related to ecosystems, biodiversity, agriculture/forestry, energy production, human health, weather forecasting, climate forecasting, disaster risk reduction and water management. Coordinating open and full access to all available space-based and in-situ earth observations related to these areas will increase the amount and improve the quality of information available to decision and policy-makers at all levels of government and in industry, resulting in better predictions, identification of issues and adaptation and mitigation strategies and overall better management of these areas.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for
All Federal Partners for 2012-2013
$ not available $ to be determined

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:
Danielle Lacasse
Director General, Business Policy Directorate
Meteorological Service of Canada
Environment Canada



Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), approved March 2005 (followed from the 2-year Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP)).

Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).

Lead department program activity: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized (EC); Management Policy Development and Oversight (TBS).

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAP was approved in 2005, with funding of $3.5 billion over 15 years. The first phase of the program ended March 31, 2011. The second phase of the program has been approved, and will run through to March 31, 2016.

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAP is expected to continue for 15 years to March 31, 2020. However, the current policy approval for the second phase ends March 31, 2016.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $2,737.5 million (including PWGSC accommodations charges) to March 31, 2016.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) provides a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites presenting the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2011, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $4.354 billion. Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial departments, the overall program is administered jointly by Environment Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Shared outcome(s): Reduce federal financial liability and risks to human health and the environment, including fish habitat. Increase public confidence in the overall management of federal real property through the effective risk management or remediation of individual federal contaminated sites.

Governance structure(s): The Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by the Director Generals Committee, the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.

Planning Highlights: Phase II will focus remediation efforts on the highest-priority FCSAP sites (including Giant and Faro Mines in the North.) Over the next three years, remediation activities will be conducted on 1,100 sites and site assessments will occur on an estimated 1,650 sites. It is estimated that remediation expenditures in Phase II will reduce liability by up to $1.17 billion for all FCSAP- funded sites.

Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services Contaminated Sites 7,275.6 670.0

Expected results:

AAFC expects to complete its assessment of approximately 5 sites and continue the ongoing remediation of 1 site.


Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Corporate Management and Direction Infrastructure and Environment 3,490.2 0.0

Expected results:

No planned activities for 2012–2013.


Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
NA NA 183.8 0.0

Expected results:

No planned activities for 2012–2013.


Federal Partner: Correctional Service Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services Facilities/Asset Management Services 14,145.8 1,187.4

Expected results:

CSC will complete the assessment of 10 sites and the remediation of 3 sites.


Federal Partner: Environment Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized Asset Remediation and Disposal 57,220.9 4,457.6
Contaminated Sites 74,670.7 6,480.0
Total 131,891.5 10,937.6

Expected results:

Asset Remediation and Disposal: EC will complete the assessment of 35 sites and the remediation of 3 sites. An additional 13 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 11 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

Contaminated Sites (FCSAP Secretariat): In cooperation with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, supports the DG and ADM steering committees and the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG); oversees the project selection process; coordinates funding and reporting processes; manages program communications; and evaluates program performance.

In 2012–2013, the Secretariat will lead the implementation of a new performance measurement framework and a new information management strategy for the program, and will participate in the FCSAP program evaluation to be led by Environment Canada’s Audit & Evaluation Branch.

Contaminated Sites (FCSAP Expert Support): In 2012–2013, Environment Canada Expert Support will continue to provide scientific and technical advice to custodial departments regarding ecological risks at their contaminated sites, and the remediation/risk management strategies that will mitigate or reduce these risks. In addition, guidance, training and tools will be provided to federal custodians to assist them in addressing their contaminated sites.


Federal Partner: Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services Contaminated Sites – FCSAP Projects 94,885.0 6,198.2
FCSAP Expert Support 31,121.9 1,955.4
Total 126,006.9 8,153.6

Expected results:

Contaminated Sites – FCSAP Projects: DFO plans to use its National Departmental Prioritization Tool to allocate funding for remediation/risk management (R/RM) and assessment activities. DFO will select from its approximately 150 identified R/RM sites on the Priority List, and expects to perform assessment work at up to 400 sites.

In 2012–2013, DFO FCSAP Expert Support will conduct the following activities:

  • Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the management of federal contaminated sites that may be impacting, or have the potential to impact, fish or fish habitat.
  • Development of guidance material and provision of training on the management of FCSAP aquatic sites to custodial organizations (e.g. long-term monitoring and site closure of aquatic sites, remediation technologies identified in aquatic site remediation/risk management plans and the Aquatic Sites Framework).
  • Review of project submissions to ensure that the potential impacts to fish and fish habitat have been appropriately considered.
  • Review and evaluation of FCSAP projects to ascertain if, and to what level, the risk to fish and fish habitat has been reduced as a result of custodial actions.

Federal Partner: Health Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
First Nations and Inuit Health First Nations and Inuit Health Protection 7,445.2 0.0
Contaminated Sites Healthy Environments Consumer Safety Branch 62,749.1 4,187.4
Total 70,194.3 4,187.4

Expected results:

No planned activities in 2012–2013 for First Nations and Inuit Health Protection.

In 2012–2013, Healthy Environments Consumer Safety Branch (Health Canada FCSAP Expert Support) will conduct the following activities:

Provision of guidance, training and advice on human health risk assessment and risk management; public involvement and risk communication; review of NCS scoring, human health risk assessments, and remediation plans for projects; participation in interdepartmental national and regional working groups; and human health component of CCME soil quality guidelines.


Federal Partner: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Responsible Federal Stewardship Contaminated Sites Management Program 188,406.4 14,710.4
Northern Land and Resources Contaminated Sites 1,107,927.6 130,567.5
Total 1,296,334.0 145,277.9

Expected results:

AANDC’s Southern Program will complete the assessment of 5 sites and the remediation of 20 sites. An additional 10 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 10 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada will complete the assessment of 15 sites and the remediation of 3 sites. An additional 19 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 34 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: Industry Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Communications Research Centre Canada Contaminated Site Management Program 162.0 54.0

Expected results:

Industry Canada will have ongoing assessment activities at 1 site. CRC will complete partial delineation of offsite contamination in 2012–2013. Completion of the assessment at this site is planned for 2013–2014.


Federal Partner: Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-131
Management of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infrastructure, and properties in the Montréal area NA 23,889.7 13,311.0

Expected results:

Two sites will have ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: Marine Atlantic Inc. (MAI)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Corporate Management FCSAP (Projects) 120.0 0.0

Expected results:

No planned activities for 2012–2013.


Federal Partner: National Capital Commission

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Real Asset Management Land and real asset management 31,829.1 14,705.0

Expected results:

The NCC will have ongoing assessment activities on 15 sites and 7 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: National Defence

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Environmental Protection and Stewardship Contaminated Sites Program 576,147.3 75,310.0

Expected results:

The DND Contaminated Sites Program aims to reduce risks to human health and the environment posed by federal contaminated sites and to reduce the financial liabilities that are associated with those contaminated sites. DND's expected results for 2012–2013 include the assessment of 29 sites and the remediation of 12 sites. An additional 63 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 47 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: National Research Council Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services Environmental Operations 5,257.0 145.0

Expected results:

NRC will complete the assessment of 3 sites. In addition, there will be ongoing assessment activities at 1 site. One site will have ongoing remediation or risk management activities.


Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Corporate Management The provision of relevant and timely policy analysis and advice for decision-making on government priorities and departmental responsibilities 28,858.8 121.0

Expected results:

NRCan will undertake ongoing assessment activities at 4 sites, and no remediation activity, in 2012–2013.


Federal Partner: Parks Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Conserve Heritage Resources Active Management and Restoration 51,551.2 5,914.9

Expected results:

Parks Canada will complete the assessment of 13 sites and the remediation of 3 sites. An additional 8 sites will have ongoing assessment activities and 11 sites will have ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-131
Federal Accommodation & Holdings FCSAP (Projects) 109,300.2 64,956.5
FCSAP (Expert Support) 8,850.0 700.0
Total 118,150.2 65,656.5

Expected results:

FCSAP (Projects): PWGSC will undertake remediation/risk management activities on 16 sites and assessment of 1 or 2 sites.

In 2012–2013, PWGSC FCSAP Expert Support will conduct the following activities:

Development of contaminated site management tools; collection and sharing of innovative and sustainable/green approaches; and informing private sector of likely federal demand for services.


Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Corporate Infrastructure/ Internal Services FCSAP (Projects) 25,605.2 1,116.6

Expected results:

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police plans to complete assessment work on 3 sites and remediation work on 3 sites in 2012–2013.

One site assessment is expected to evolve into a FCSAP remediation project and 9 remediation projects are expected to require ongoing remediation activities.


Federal Partner: Transport Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-131
Sustainable Transportation Development and the Environment Environmental Programs 204,467.1 22,732.9

Expected results:

Transport Canada will complete 4 remediation/risk management projects and will undertake ongoing remediation/risk management activities at 27 sites.


Federal Partner: Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ thousands)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Management Policy Development and Oversight Assets and Acquired Services 5,385.6 527.3

Expected results:

Program co-lead (with Environment Canada).

Ensures consistency with Treasury Board policies on management of federal contaminated sites; advises Environment Canada on monitoring of government-wide progress; maintains the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory; and coordinates planning for the Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop to be held in Toronto, Ontario from April 30 to May 3, 2012.

Total for All Federal Departments

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)* Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
2,720,945.3 370,007.0

*Excluding PWGSC accommodations charges.

1 Reprofile requests could be submitted to TBS later during the year and, pending TBS approval of the reprofile requests, certain objectives as established in the RPP could be impacted.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:
FCSAP Secretariat
Contaminated Sites Division
15th floor, Place Vincent Massey
351 St- Joseph Blvd
Gatineau, QC
K1A 0H3 

819-934-8153


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative

Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada

Lead department program activity: 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2010 (GLAPV resources)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 24, 2012 (end of COA)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $40 million over 5 years from 2010 to 2015 and then ongoing (GLAPV resources)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative (GLBEI) is the name given to Environment Canada’s activities in support of the restoration and protection of the Great Lakes. These activities include negotiation and implementation of the Canada–U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) and Canada–Ontario Agreement (COA) Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem, as well as the implementation of the GLAP, CWAP sediment and coordination of resources envelope (A-base) activities.

The Government of Canada is currently in negotiations with the Government of the United States to amend the Canada–U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

The 2007–2010 Canada–Ontario Agreement (COA) Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem was extended by 15 months to June 24, 2012. Negotiations of the 2012–2017 COA are expected to be completed by the end of 2012.

The Great Lakes Action Plan was renewed for a further 5 years with a commitment to ongoing funding after that (GLAPV). An amount of $8M per year is allocated for Areas of Concern to implement remedial actions to complete the clean-up and restoration in three key areas: fish and wildlife habitat rehabilitation and stewardship; contaminated sediment assessment and remediation; and innovative approaches to improve municipal wastewater effluent quality.

Clean Water Action Plan

Environment Canada’s Clean Water Action Plan (CWAP) includes the Great Lakes sediment remediation initiative. Under this initiative, $48.9M over 8 years through 2015 is provided to complete contaminated sediment management projects in 8 specific Areas of Concerns. Funds are administered through the existing federal GLSF, with one third contributed by each of the federal government, the Province of Ontario and stakeholders. Potential clean-up measures include the construction of containment structures around and over submerged contaminated sediments; the removal, treatment and disposal of sediment; and natural recovery with long-term monitoring. The remediation of contaminated sediment is an essential prerequisite to the longer-term objective of fully restoring environmental quality in Areas of Concern, a commitment under the Canada–U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

Contact information:

Sandra Weston
Director, Great Lakes
Environment Canada

Tel.: 416-739-4404

Clean Air Agenda

Lead department: Environment Canada
Lead department program activity: PA3.2 and PA2.1
Start date: Announced in Budget 2011
End date: March 31, 2016
Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $ 1,519.62 million*

*This figure is incomplete due to Cabinet confidence. The total allocation includes $17.35 million from previous CARA funding for 2011-2012.

1. Overview of Clean Air Agenda

The 2011 Budget announced the renewal of the Clean Air Agenda (CAA) with an investment of $870 million over two years.1 This funding will build on the considerable momentum gained from the investments in the CAA over the period of 2007-2011 which formed part of the Government’s broader efforts to address the challenges of climate change and air pollution, with a view to ensuring a clean and healthy environment for all Canadians.

The Government of Canada continues to advance the CAA, addressing climate change and air pollutants at the domestic, continental and international level. Canada has made significant progress towards meeting its Copenhagen commitment to reduce national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, which translates into 607 megatonnes. To meet its target the Government is pursuing a sector-by-sector regulatory approach, aligned with the United States, where appropriate. This approach includes regulations to address GHG emissions from passenger cars and light-duty trucks and coal-fired electricity generation facilities. Additionally, the Government of Canada is supporting complementary initiatives for adapting to the impacts of climate change. Internationally, as part of it's recent participation at the 17th Conference of the Parties climate change conference in Durban, Canada agreed to a process to negotiate a new climate change agreement that would include binding commitments for all major emitters.

To support Government of Canada efforts to reduce air pollutant emissions, work is being undertaken with provinces, industry and non-governmental organizations to finalize and implement a new national air quality management system that will include new ambient air quality standards for key pollutants, new industrial emissions standards and active management of local air quality by provinces.

As the CAA moves forward, eleven federal departments and agencies provide programming organized within five themes:

  • clean air regulatory agenda (CARA);
  • clean energy;
  • clean transportation;
  • international actions; and,
  • adaptation.

Through CARA, the Government of Canada continues to support the development and implementation of measures to address air quality and climate change. Renewed CARA funding ensures scientific excellence in the development of regulations that strike a balance between improving environmental standards and respecting industry's need for simple, streamlined rules and realistic timelines. This includes support to sustain the scientific research, monitoring, atmospheric modelling, and economic and policy analysis and assessment necessary to develop and assess the impacts of sector-by-sector GHG regulations; finalize a national air quality management system; address transboundary air pollution through the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement (AQA); improve indoor air quality and promote behavioural change among Canadians by extending the Air Quality Health Index.

Clean Energy programming builds on our previous investments by further improving the energy sector’s environmental performance in Canada. Programming supports broad collaboration among industry, universities, governments, and Aboriginal and northern communities, increases stakeholder awareness and clean energy scientific and technical knowledge, and encourages adoption of energy efficient and alternative energy technologies. Investments in cleaner sources of energy will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help balance the need for energy with the need to protect the environment and grow the economy.

Similarly, Clean Transportation programming is focused on encouraging technology updates and making use of regulations and targeted industry incentives to accelerate the development and adoption of next generation clean technologies. Complementing the advancement of innovations, a suite of regulatory initiatives for the aviation, marine, and rail sectors aim to increase efficiencies in the Canadian transportation system, reduce its environmental footprint and support economic growth.

The International Actions programming supports the Government’s strategic response to climate change. Because climate change and air pollution are cross-boundary issues, CAA funding ensures critical work is undertaken through partnerships and negotiations with a wide range of stakeholders - national and international, private and public sector, profit and not-for-profit. Renewed funding also supports commitments to promote Canada-U.S. collaboration on clean energy technologies under the Clean Energy Dialogue (CED).

The funding for Adaptation builds on and extends the investments made over the past four years and will help provinces, territories, municipalities, First Nations and Inuit, and industry develop proactive actions to adapt to the impacts that climate change has and will have on Canada’s economy, health and security, particularly in the North.

2. Shared Outcomes

The renewed CAA continues the collaborative efforts within the federal government and with other jurisdictions to realize health, economic and environmental benefits for Canadians. These efforts will work toward:

  • Reducing the risk to the health of Canadians and the environment from exposure to air pollution;
  • Providing economic benefits and maintaining competitiveness from innovations related to reducing air pollution and addressing climate change; and,
  • Reducing the risk to communities, infrastructure and to the health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change.

3. Governance Structure

In its first four years, the CAA piloted an innovative approach to supporting greater accountability and transparency through a “Horizontal Management Accountability and Reporting Framework” (HMARF). Building on this experience, the HMARF was renewed with a view to also ensuring greater coherency in climate change and clean air reporting through integration with the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and its reporting on the progress the federal government is making towards environmental sustainability.

As outlined in the governance structure (Charter), Environment Canada is continuing its leadership role of the CAA-HMARF. The CAA is governed through a collective of Deputy Ministers and Assistant Deputy Ministers, and through the Federal Sustainable Development interdepartmental committees. Director Generals (DG) continue to provide leadership for each of the five themes and its integration into the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy through the interdepartmental DG’s committee.

4. Highlights for 2012-2013

With respect to CARA, highlights for 2012-2013 include: the implementation of GHG regulations for new light-duty vehicles (2011-2016 model years), and the finalization of regulations for later model years (2017 and beyond), aligned with U.S. standards; the finalization of GHG regulations for new heavy-duty vehicles also aligned with those of the U.S., as well as regulations for coal-fired electricity generation, and the continued development of regulations for other emissions-intensive sectors including natural-gas fired electricity and the oil and gas sector.

With respect to air quality, highlights for 2012-2013 include: the finalization and approval of the Air Quality Management System in order to start moving to the implementation stage. This includes setting national ambient air quality standards under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) and initiate regulatory development for base-level industrial emission requirements for key sources. Other highlights include the ongoing strengthening of commitments to reduce transboundary air pollution under the AQA, and continued development of control measures for consumer and commercial products. In addition, funding for 2012-2013 will also support the scientific and economic work necessary to advance these measures to address GHGs and air pollution, as well as the continued development and annual reporting of comprehensive inventories of air pollutants and GHGs, through the National Pollutant Release Inventory and National GHG inventory, which is required as part of Canada’s United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) obligations.

Internationally, the federal government will build on areas of consensus through engagement under the UNFCCC and the CED, as well as participate in the G8 and 2012 Major Economies Forum and Clean Energy Ministerial meetings. The Government will also continue to work with the U.S. towards the negotiation of a Particulate Matter Annex to the Canada-U.S. AQA, and through the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council on common objectives related to addressing air emissions. The Government will also continue to advance efforts to address short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs) with the U.S. and other key partners through continued work under the Arctic Council, the UN Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution, the Global Methane Initiative, and the new global initiative to reduce SLCFs, launched in February 2012.

The suite of Clean Energy programming will improve the energy sector’s environmental performance by advancing clean electricity and cleaner energy production, increasing the use of alternative fuels, and improving end-use energy efficiencies. Over 2012-2013, energy efficiency training, adoption of the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings, development and updating of natural gas codes and standards and initial market assessments of oil sands and shale gas will take place. Funding for ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative projects will be approved for government, academic and private sector research and development projects and for demonstration projects with external public and private stakeholders. Clean Energy activities in 2012-2013 will also include the provision of timely advice and information to senior management on clean energy and environmental issues.

Towards Clean Transportation, new standards for nitrogen oxide will be introduced for the aviation sector in Canada through regulatory action (to come into force by the end of 2013), with a new domestic voluntary agreement with the Canadian aviation industry to reduce GHGs. For the marine sector, amendments to the new Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations to limit air pollutants and GHG emissions are expected to come into force. In the rail sector, new air pollutant emission regulations for locomotives and a new domestic voluntary agreement with the Canadian rail industry to limit GHG emissions will be implemented.

The Adaptation programming will fund projects to assist Aboriginal and Northern communities in understanding and adapting to a changing climate, map ecosystems and conduct scenario modelling for some national parks (Wapusk, Ivvavik and Torngat Mountains National Parks), establish codes and standards to protect infrastructure, and help manage mine waste in the North. It will also develop enhanced global and regional climate models and scenarios, expand heat alert and response systems in at-risk communities across Canada, develop information tools and guidelines for preventative public health systems, develop an adaptation toolkit for forest sector decision-makers, and establish an Adaptation Platform to bring together knowledge, capacity and financial resources to efficiently and effectively facilitate adaptation action.

Total Allocation*
for 2011-16
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded.

*This figure is incomplete due to Cabinet confidence. The total allocation
includes $17.35 million from previous CARA funding for 2011-2012.

1,519.62 306.21

1 This figure includes $400 million for the ecoENERGY Retrofit Home program in 2011-2012.

5. Federal Partners

The federal partners for the CAA are: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Health Canada, National Research Council Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Standard Councils Canada (Industry Canada), and Transport Canada.

6. Contact name for the CAA

Paula Brand, Acting Director General,
Sustainable Development Strategy Division, Environment Canada,
10 Wellington St, Gatineau, Quebec, K1A 0H3
Tel: (819) 997-3729, Email: paula.brand@ec.gc.ca

Clean Air Agenda 2012-2013 Horizontal Reports on Plans and Priorities – Theme Report: Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA)

Protecting the health and environment of Canadians is a key Government priority. Emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and air pollutants threaten the health of Canadians, degrade the environment, contribute to climate change and smog and adversely affect the economy. The Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) provides the coordinated framework for Government efforts to reduce GHGs and air pollutant emissions.

With respect to GHGs, in 2009, the Government of Canada committed to reducing national GHG emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, which calculates to 607 megatonnes, and inscribed this target in the Copenhagen Accord. In order to make progress towards this target, the Government is implementing a sector-by-sector regulatory approach to limit emissions from major-emitting sectors of the economy, including transportation, thermal electricity, and other emissions-intensive industrial sectors including oil and gas. Given the highly integrated North American economy, the Government is aligning its regulatory approach with that of United States (U.S.), as appropriate for the Canadian context.

With respect to air quality, the Government is moving forward to implement a national Air Quality Management System (AQMS) in order to further minimize threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution. This system will set Canadian ambient air quality standards, local and regional air quality management and requirements for key sources of industrial emissions. The Government will be working with provinces, territories and stakeholders in order to start moving to implementation stage this year. This includes setting national ambient air quality standards (CAAQS) under Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) and initiate regulatory development for base-level industrial emission requirements (BLIERs) for key sources.

Under CARA, the Government will also address transboundary air pollution by strengthening the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement (AQA), including negotiations towards the inclusion of particulate matter under the AQA as well as collaborative work through U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council. Standards and control measures for emissions from consumer and commercial products will also continue to be developed and implemented.

CARA also supports the related scientific, modelling, monitoring, reporting and economic analysis necessary for policy and regulatory development and to ensure that the measures taken are based on sound science and achieve their intended effects. This includes the provision of comprehensive, annual emissions inventories for both GHGs and air pollutants.

Under CARA, we will continue to take action to improve indoor air quality, and promote positive behavioral change among Canadians to reduce their exposure to air pollutants by extending the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI).

Collectively, the work undertaken as part of CARA cuts across several Government departments--Environment Canada (EC), Health Canada (HC) and the National Research Council (NRC). More details on the key measures under CARA, outlined above, are provided in the sections below.

1. Theme Planning Highlights

With respect to climate change, highlights for 2012-2013 are the development and/or finalization of regulations to reduce GHG emissions from key sectors. This includes the development and finalization of regulations for later model years (2017 and beyond), aligned with U.S. standards; the finalization of GHG regulations for new heavy-duty vehicles also aligned with those of the U.S., and finalization of regulations for coal-fired electricity generation, which will promote the phase-out of traditional coal and transition to low- and non-emitting sources of electricity. There will also be continued development of regulations for other major-emitting sectors of the economy, including for natural-gas fired electricity and oil and gas.

With respect to air quality, an important highlight for 2012-2013 is the finalization and approval of the major elements of the AQMS to be in a position to start implementing the system in 2013. We will proceed to set CAAQS under CEPA. These would replace and be more stringent than current outdated objectives and Canada-wide standards. We will also begin regulatory development for BLIERs for key sources.

Regulations will also be developed and/or amended to reduce pollutants from vehicles and engines. In partnership with the U.S. work will continue to strengthen commitments to reduce transboundary air pollution under the AQA, and through the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council. Control measures will also be developed to limit nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from ethylene production and ethylene based polymer production.

Also, in 2012-2013, Health Canada will take steps to improve indoor air quality including through increasing radon awareness, publishing residential indoor air quality guidelines for priority chemical and biological pollutants as well as technical documents addressing key indoor air sources or issues. Related to this, NRC will assess building material emissions, developing an evaluation protocol and test apparatus for validating an air purification technology, and developing ventilation solutions, as well as releasing practical guides for building operators to improve indoor air quality.

With respect to emissions reporting, a highlight in 2012-2013, EC will launch new versions of the Single Window Reporting (SWR) on-line data collection application for GHG and substances of concern, to contribute to streamlining reporting processes for industry and federal/provincial/territorial governments. Comprehensive inventories of GHGs and pollutants will also be compiled and published, and steps will also be taken to expand the number of communities that receive AQHI readings across the country.

All of these regulatory and control measures will be supported by ongoing science, modelling, monitoring, and economic analysis.

2. Theme Expected Results

Programming within the CARA Theme is clustered around five broad areas of activity: regulations; science; reporting; policy analysis; and, indoor air quality. Collectively, these activities are expected to result in reductions in air pollutants and GHGs.

Regulations

EC supports the development, implementation, administration, compliance promotion and enforcement of a range of regulations and measures to reduce emissions of GHGs and air pollutants from major-emitting sectors and sources.

GHGs

In order to limit GHG emissions from electricity, draft regulations to limit emissions from coal-fired electricity generation were published in the Canada Gazette I in August 2011, and will be finalized in the summer of 2012, and come into force in 2015. In addition, GHG regulations will be developed for natural gas-fired generation.

To further reduce GHG emissions from transportation, EC will continue to implement and administer Passenger Automobile and Light Truck Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations for 2011-2016 model years, and continue to work with the U.S. to finalize regulations for new cars and light trucks for model years 2017 and beyond, as well as new heavy duty vehicles. Drafts of these regulations will be published in Canada Gazette I in 2012, and will be aligned with U.S. standards.

The Government will also initiate the development of regulations to limit GHG emissions from oil and gas and other emission-intensive trade exposed (EITE) industrial sectors. Draft regulations for some oil and gas sub-sectors will be finalized in 2012.

Air pollutants

As part of the finalization of the AQMS, in order to ensure a good level of performance from the major industrial sectors that is nationally consistent, the Minister of the Environment has committed to working with his provincial and territorial colleagues and stakeholders to developing a suite of BLIERs. The multi-stakeholders process will complete its work in early 2012, and regulatory development will be initiated for a number of sectors.

In addition to the BLIERs, CAAQS for particulate matter and ozone will also be finalized and incorporated as objectives under section 54 and 55 of the CEPA, 1999. Work will also begin on the research to support establishing CAAQS for other pollutants of interest such as NOx.

To limit air pollutants from transportation, EC will continue to develop and implement new emissions standards that aim to reduce air pollutants for on-road and off-road vehicles and engines. This will include the development of draft regulations for off-road large spark-ignition engines and new on-road vehicle and engine emission regulations to align with U.S. standards.

EC will continue to collaborate with Ontario and other provincial jurisdictions to develop control measures for consumer and commercial products. Specifically, EC is working to expand the collection of Portable Fuel Containers (PFC) and replacing them with VOC low-emitting PFCs through the government/industry “Fuel Can Flip - Fuel Can Retirement” program. Work will be undertaken to develop controls for asphalt cutbacks and emulsified asphalt and aerosol coatings. A risk management strategy will be developed for the Motor Vehicle Assembly sector. As part of work on existing regulations, EC will provide information on regulatory obligations and develop a training curriculum related to Volatile Organic Compound Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings Regulations and Volatile Organic Compound Concentration Limits for Automotive Refinishing Products Regulations. Information on regulatory obligations will be provided to the regulated community for 2-Butoxyethanol Regulations.

In addition to developing regulatory measures, CARA includes Compliance Promotion and Enforcement related activities as required. This includes compliance promotion activities and tools, such as officer training and information management systems for new regulations, as well as on-going compliance support, administration, monitoring, reporting, evaluation and enforcement of existing regulations for both GHGs and air pollutants to ensure that regulations are correctly implemented and achieving their intended results.

EC’s activities to provide Analysis in Support of Regulations will include: economic analysis, including for the Regulatory Impact Assessment Statements required for each regulation (GHG and BLIERS); legal analysis; and, advice and technical support to environmental assessments.

Science

EC and HC scientific activities provide the foundation for development, implementation, and assessment of regulations and other measures to reduce domestic GHG and air pollutant emissions. Science activities inform the setting of appropriate emissions targets and ambient air quality standards, as well as appropriate regulatory options and the assessment of the effectiveness of such measures. Scientific research, modelling and monitoring activities also ensure that decision-makers have the necessary information on air emission sources and trends, ambient levels and trends of air pollutants and GHGs, impacts on the environment and human health, and the forecasted benefits of regulatory actions.

EC’s Atmospheric Research, Monitoring and Modelling scientific area provides information and advice for policy and regulatory activities, and accountability for air pollutant emission reductions and reporting requirements. Emphasis will be placed on supporting the AQMS by monitoring and measuring sources of regional and national ambient air pollutants and conducting and improving air quality modelling. This program will also inform Canadian positions and commitments related to international agreements (such as the Canada-U.S. AQA) and the nature of global influences on Canadian air quality. More specifically, new targeted science on GHG and aerosols (including black carbon) will provide the basis for the development, implementation and evaluation of emission targets, regulations, emissions verification and compliance mechanisms. Scientific achievements will include: trend analysis of regional scale GHG observations and improved characterization of Canadian carbon sources and sinks; improved characterization of current and past aerosol concentrations and their attribution to anthropogenic and natural sources; and, improved representation of aerosols in the Canadian Earth System Model. EC will also work collaboratively with HC to conduct air quality science and modelling using an integrated multi-pollutant approach to assess the effectiveness of air quality management actions in meeting objectives, goals and targets.

HC’s activities contribute to atmospheric research, monitoring and modelling area in support of the AQMS (described above). HC will conduct exposure and health risk assessments for key air pollutants. A sector-based, multi-pollutant approach will assess the health risks posed by the range of pollutants emitted by individual industrial sectors. These activities will provide a health basis to support implementation of CAAQS and air quality management actions under the AQMS, by federal/provincial/territorial jurisdictions.  In 2012-2013, research will also identify and quantify the socio-economic impacts of air pollution exposure, improve analytical tools to assess the impact of current or proposed air quality strategies and regulations, and conduct health-benefit analysis of ongoing and planned air quality regulatory or policy actions.

HC and EC also direct their scientific efforts in the Health and Environmental Impacts of Air Pollutants area. EC’s activities characterize the impacts of air pollution on ecosystems and wildlife in order to evaluate the impact of regulations and inform regulatory development. In 2012-2013, EC will conduct activities such as the field sampling program of plants, soils, lake sediments and lake food webs in specific regions; contribute to National Acid Deposition Assessment; and quantify air pollution effects on the chemistry and biology of aquatic. EC will also continue to improve its modeling capacity by including other pollutants and more temporal information in order to help predict the ecosystem impacts and benefits.

HC will conduct health risk assessments and health-benefit studies in support of regulation development, specifically for transportation regulations on areas such as marine diesel or vehicle fuels. HC will also conduct exposure studies on emissions from transportation and studies on toxicity and the health effects of transportation emissions. These activities support the establishment of effective and efficient transportation and fuel regulations and management strategies to reduce emissions of GHGs and air pollutants from regulated sectors while maintaining competitiveness in those sectors.

In 2012-2013, EC will complete an assessment of mercury in the Canadian environment including human exposure, communicate the findings to stakeholders, and begin assessing the current and projected future state of acid deposition impacts on the Canadian environment. EC will also provide science advice for international policy forums such as the Arctic Council, and, provide support for national and international atmospheric science programs and assessments such as International Panel on Climate Change Assessments. These activities support the scientific assessments of the health and environmental risks associated with air emissions and the potential benefits of reduced emissions which underpin several of the theme’s immediate outcomes.

HC research to identify and quantify the relationship between air pollution and negative health impacts will help establish the ‘exposure-response functions’ used to predict the health benefits from improved air quality. These benefits will then be quantified in economic terms so they can be compared with the costs of regulatory action thus allowing the government to estimate the net impacts of actions taken under AQMS such as setting CAAQS.

The EC Oil Sands Science activities provide information and advice to determine the impact of air emissions from the oil sands sector on the ecosystem and the air that Canadians breathe. This includes working collaboratively with the Government of Alberta, the Wood Buffalo Environmental Association and other local stakeholders to measure priority air contaminants and metals to set baselines and establish trends, understanding the deposition and atmospheric transport of these contaminants, utilizing air quality models to predict impacts of oil sands development, and improving our air quality modelling to support policy needs. EC will initiate a short-term scientific study to characterize airborne and ground level ambient concentrations of criteria air contaminants in the oil sands region in order to advance knowledge on the oil sands air pollution mix, to evaluate emissions inventories, and to compare data with current satellite retrieval technology. Also, EC will install long-term monitoring sites in or near areas that are highly sensitive to acid deposition in order to understand the aerial contribution to the ecosystem and to determine atmospheric transport to and from the oil sands regions. The new sites will complement the existing air quality monitoring efforts underway. EC will utilize and improve existing modelling capacity to help in the deployment of measurement platforms and equipment, predict impacts of the oil sands development and support policy needs.

Reporting

Reporting activities are critical to sustaining and improving mechanisms to track and report national GHG and air pollutant emissions, and supporting the domestic and international reporting commitments concerning air pollutants and GHGs.

Under the CARA in the area of Data Collection and Reporting for GHGs, EC develops comprehensive inventories of GHGs for both sources and sinks and reports annually as part of Canada’s UNFCCC obligations. Information for GHG emissions is available in the National Inventory Report and through the GHG Emissions Reporting Program. Data and methods to estimate, model and quantify both emissions and removals of GHGs are developed and implemented, and analyses to understand the drivers and trends are prepared. These activities provide Canadians with information about GHGs on a national, provincial and regional basis.

EC and HC collaborate in the area of Data Collection and Reporting for Atmospheric Pollutants in support of the Government of Canada’s domestic and international obligations related to air pollution. Information on over 300 pollutants related to releases to air, land and water, disposals and transfers off site for recycling will be collected from more than 8500 facilities and be published online by EC. Air pollutant inventories and trends for key air pollutants contributing to smog, acid rain and/or poor air quality, selected heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants will be compiled for 2011 based on facility-reported data and emission estimates for other sources such as motor vehicles, residential heating, forest fires and agriculture. This information will support the AQMS, the annual submission to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe and the Canada-U.S. AQA.

EC is also working toward using a harmonized SWR system for CARA reporting and data collection programs. Security plans including analysis and documentation for privacy and security policies for SWR data collection, storage and transfer, as well as user information are expected to be completed.  In 2012-2013, EC will complete numerous other activities that support reducing reporting burden for regulated sectors for GHG and toxics under the National Pollutant Release Inventory.

EC and HC seek to expand the AQHI as a national, health-based communications tool for current and forecasted local air quality and to increase Canadians’ knowledge of actions to protect their health and reduce pollution. EC expects that accessibility to forecasts will be enhanced through improved dissemination systems including internet (Weather Office), Automatic Telephone Answering Devices, social media and the development of partnerships with national media providers in locations where the AQHI is available. EC will also partner with provincial and municipal jurisdictions to strengthen internal capacity for the continuation of AQHI into the future and to promote AQHI to Canadians. As well, EC will continue to improve forecast quality through the development of methodologies and tools to optimize the use of data from different sources, improve modelling capabilities and research to allow for future expansion of the AQHI to rural communities with sparse monitoring capacity. In partnership with HC, EC will continue negotiations with provincial partners to further the national roll-out of the AQHI and will begin negotiations with territorial Governments to expand the AQHI to select communities in the North. As well, HC will partner with provincial and public health programs to support local and regional implementation and promotion of AQHI, develop partnerships with media, develop and promote outreach materials to health professionals and conduct research on links between AQHI and clinical cardiovascular outcomes. This work supports the outcomes for providing provinces with increased access to AQHI, raising awareness of strategies and tools to reduce exposure to air pollutants, and changing the behaviours of Canadians to reduce exposure and improve their health.

Policy Analysis

EC and HC provide strategic policy and economic analysis, advice, and coordination, to support effective and efficient action on air pollution and GHG emissions. EC’s climate change policy-related activities will provide the strategic policy analysis, advice, and coordination for the development of cross-cutting elements of regulatory development, notably reporting and compliance mechanisms. Policy analysis activities will also support the coordination of processes related to cabinet briefings and approvals, such as the preparation of Memoranda to Cabinet. Policy analysis further incorporates the coordination of various stakeholder consultation and engagement mechanisms, including consultations under the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Working Group on Domestic Climate Change; the Technical and Process Working Groups for the development of oil and gas regulations, which includes representatives from industry and provinces; the Federal / Provincial / Territorial Oil & Gas Working Group and the Deputy Minister-level Consultative Steering Committee with provinces and territories.

In addition, as part of the Government’s climate change approach, EC will also provide strategic policy analysis on short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs), including black carbon, to support Canada’s engagement in various regional and international fora, including under the Arctic Council and negotiations under the Gothenburg Protocol to the UN Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. Analysis will also inform and support the development of an SLCF strategy and domestic measures to address SLCFs.

EC’s Atmospheric Pollutants Policy-related activities will include the finalization of the major elements of the AQMS.  A multi-stakeholder consultation process facilitates the development and implementation of comprehensive air management frameworks and will complete its work in 2012. This will also include the policy coordination for the endorsement of the AQMS from the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment. This will also support the work required for the CAAQS for ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) to be drafted and published in CGI in 2012. EC will continue to work collaboratively with provinces and territories to finalize the BLIERs for 14 sectors and 3 equipment types and 2 cross sectoral processes. Regulatory drafting will be initiated for some BLIERs in this fiscal year. Coordination and policy advice for the overall governance of the system, including reporting will also be finalized. Also, to contribute towards the development and finalization of the AQMS, in 2012-2013, HC will complete a draft health risk assessment for outdoor air pollutants (such as carbon monoxide and coarse particulate matter) to support and develop proposals for CAAQS. HC will also conduct exposure and health effects studies for air pollutants to support additional CAAQS development and review. This work will support the implementation of actions to ensure that Canadian jurisdictions meet ambient air quality standards.

To effectively manage transboundary pollution, EC will continue its work with the US under the Canada-U.S. AQA as well as through the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council, to realize common objectives to address air pollution. Under the AQA, Canada, in collaboration with the U.S., will prepare the 2012 biennial progress report that summarizes key actions undertaken by Canada and the U.S. within the last two years to address transboundary air pollution under the Agreement. Canada will also host the 2012 annual meeting of Canada-U.S. Air Quality Committee which is responsible for administering work under the Agreement.

EC’s Cross-Cutting Analysis supports policy development related to air pollutants and GHGs. Economic modeling will be undertaken to explore actions that reinforce the regulatory agenda, while promoting environmental reduction through non-regulatory compliance mechanism. Economic modelling, analysis and research will be undertaken to ensure informed federal decision-making on policy approaches to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions and to analyze the cumulative impact of proposed measures on industry and consumers, as well as the competitiveness impacts of proposed measures. This also includes activities under the Clean Air Agenda Results Management Secretariat which provides integrated planning and performance reporting on the CAA. It also contributes to the implementation of the Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulations by providing coordinated departmental training and advice to EC’s regulatory community on regulatory development and approval processes.

EC’s coordination and engagement activities provide strategic support to the overall development of policy. At the federal level, the coordination activities are focused on engagement of key federal departments and agencies and the establishment of mechanisms to ensure high quality and timely submissions that facilitate the cabinet approval process. Engagement of stakeholder through Federal, Provincial and Territorial and stakeholder committees will also be undertaken. These committees provide essential input into the development and construction of the government’s analytical tools and emission baselines, and to overall policy development.

Indoor Air Quality

HC and NRC work together to improve Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and protect the health of Canadians by developing knowledge, guidelines, codes of practice, mitigation measures, product standards and communication initiatives, in order to reduce exposure to indoor air contaminants.

HC’s Indoor Air Quality Management – Biological and Chemical Contaminants activities aim to decrease risk to health through the development of tools to improve indoor air quality and through increased knowledge among individual Canadians, business and governments about health risks posed by indoor air pollutants and ways to reduce these risks. HC will conduct health risk assessments on priority pollutants, produce technical documents on key indoor issues, evaluate potential interventions to improve indoor air quality and conduct studies on indoor pollutant toxicity to support health-based evaluation of product emissions.

HC’s Indoor Air Quality Management – Radioactive Contaminants activities aim to increase awareness and knowledge of Canadians to the dangers associated with cumulative exposure to radon and how to limit this exposure through activities including marketing, social media, conferences and events. HC will also collaborate with provincial, territorial and other key stakeholders to ensure tools and resources are available to Canadians. As well, radon testing of federal buildings will be completed in identified high-risk radon prone areas to facilitate government compliance with the Canada Labour Code. National Radon Laboratory operations will be maintained, including advice and technical expertise to partners in government, industry and the public. The Canadian Radon Certification Program will continue and new radon mitigation solutions will be evaluated as they become available and documented in peer-reviewed publications.

NRC’s Indoor Air Quality Strategies and Solutions work aims to reduce exposure of Canadians to key indoor pollutants through three activities: source control, improved ventilation/air distribution strategies, and air purification technologies. In 2012-2013, NRC will test the off-gassing of VOC’s from a representative set of building materials and consumer products through a validated fast screening method. NRC will also develop an evaluation protocol and build two laboratory test elements for the evaluation of three promising air purification technologies. In 2012-2013, NRC will design - in partnership with HC - a field study to validate and optimize mitigation strategies for reducing pollutant transfer from garages. Study design will be based on experimental results obtained in a newly built garage attached to NRC’s Indoor Air Research Laboratory (IARL). Radon mitigation scenarios will also be validated in the IARL. The Canadian Committee on Indoor Air Quality in Buildings, a balanced stakeholder committee, will develop three guidance documents to support building operators and tenants of commercial and residential buildings in addressing and mitigating IAQ problems and implementing appropriate solutions.

3. Theme Financial Information

Federal Partner Programs Total Allocation*
for 2011-16
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded and may not add.

*The following EC programs include previous CARA funding for 2011-2012: Atmospheric Pollutants Policy, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement, Data Collection and Reporting for GHGs, Electricity Regulations, Emission-Intensity Trade-Exposed (EITE) Regulations, Greenhouse Gas Policy, Health and Environmental Impacts of Air Pollutants, and Oil and Gas Regulations.

Environment Canada
Analysis in Support of Regulations 25.96 5.47
Atmospheric Pollutants Policy 17.96 3.04
Atmospheric Research, Monitoring and Modelling 90.45 18.21
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 33.63 6.72
Consumer and Commercial Products Regulations 5.68 2.06
Cross-Cutting Analysis 15.74 3.13
Cross-Cutting Data Collection and Reporting 15.32 3.02
Data Collection and Reporting for Atmospheric Pollutants 41.52 8.48
Data Collection and Reporting for GHGs 41.61 7.63
Electricity Regulations 7.93 2.69
Emissions-Intensive Trade-Exposed (EITE) Regulations 21.34 7.13
Greenhouse Gas Policy 31.21 4.60
Health and Environmental Impacts of Air Pollutants 15.52 2.91
Oil and Gas Regulations 17.80 6.24
Oil Sands Science 14.21 2.84
Science Integration, Accountability and Benefits of Action 3.73 0.87
Transportation Regulations 45.14 8.56
Subtotal 444.76 93.58
 
Health Canada
Atmospheric Pollutants Policy 25.88 5.18
Atmospheric Research, Monitoring and Modelling 29.60 5.92
Data Collection and Reporting for Atmospheric Pollutants 13.42 2.68
Health and Environmental Impacts of Air Pollutants 13.08 2.62
Indoor Air Quality Management - Biological and Chemical Contaminants 9.29 1.86
Indoor Air Quality Management - Radioactive Contaminants 30.49 6.10
Science Integration, Accountability and Benefits of Action 15.49 3.10
Subtotal 137.25 27.45
 
National Research Council of Canada
Indoor Air Quality Strategies and Solutions 9.00 1.80
Subtotal 9.00 1.80
Theme Total 591.01 122.83

Clean Air Agenda 2012-2013 Horizontal Reports on Plans and Priorities - Theme Report: Clean Energy

Early in 2010, under the Copenhagen Accord, the Government of Canada committed to reducing national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, which calculates to 607 megatonnes. The development and use of cleaner sources of energy is key to Canada's future prosperity and energy security. Given that the production and consumption of energy accounts for 80% of Canada's GHG emissions, cleaner energy, as a complement to broader GHG regulations, is essential for achieving Canada's GHG emissions reductions target.

The suite of clean energy programs included within this Theme seek to improve the energy sector's environmental performance by advancing clean electricity and cleaner energy production, increasing the use of alternative fuels, and improving end-use energy efficiencies. Ultimately, work undertaken in this Theme by contributing departments Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) aims to reduce GHG emissions, while maintaining Canada's economic advantage and creating jobs for Canadians.

In the short term, clean energy scientific and technological knowledge will be developed and shared with stakeholders. Stakeholders will also be encouraged to collaborate in developing, delivering, and increasing their capacity to use cleaner sources of energy and energy efficient products, processes, practices or services.

1. Theme Planning Highlights

Following the launch of new Clean Energy initiatives in 2011, the focus in 2012-2013 is to implement the second year of the activities and to continue to work to strengthen and expand Canada's commitment to clean energy. Key deliverables in 2012-2013 include: energy efficiency training; 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings; development and updating of natural gas codes and standards; and, market assessments of oil sands and shale gas. Funding for ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative projects will be approved for government, academic and private sector research and development projects and for demonstration projects with external public and private stakeholders. In 2012-2013, NRCan, as part of the Marine Renewable Energy Enabling Measures program, will produce a report about regulatory approaches to offshore renewable energy management in other countries.

2. Theme Expected Results

The Clean Energy Policy program will provide ongoing analysis, advice, recommendations, and coordination on clean energy and environmental issues in support of policy and program development and decision-making. This includes providing advice to senior management and developing information products (such as briefing material and research and analysis) to ensure that decision-makers have access to timely advice and information. The program will also remain engaged in domestic carbon capture and storage (CCS) policy activities, such as providing technical expertise and policy advice from an NRCan perspective to Alberta's CCS Regulatory Framework Assessment. Through the development and deployment of fact sheets and other outreach tools (such as assessments, best practices) the program will provide fact-based information regarding the oil sands, shale gas and other unconventional energy sources to Canadians, key stakeholders and foreign governments.

The ecoENERGY Efficiency program focuses on activities that increase knowledge, awareness, and capacity in energy efficiency, including training, publications, partnerships and agreements. For example, the program will support training sessions on energy efficient products and practices for over 170,000 individuals. As well, knowledge and awareness will be increased through Project Reports that identify energy management opportunities for four facilities in the industrial sector and through the introduction of the Most Efficient ENERGY STAR program in Canada. The program will also support partnerships and collaborations that develop or deliver energy efficient products, practices, or services through approximately 25 partnerships and/or collaborative arrangements. Finally, the program will foster the adoption of energy efficient technologies, products, and practices as 12 regional programs will use NRCan-developed housing standards and systems, and two provinces/territories will adopt the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings or equivalent. Together, these activities will lead to an estimated 11 petajoules of energy being saved.

The ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels program will support two committees that will be actively working on developing and updating codes and standards for natural gas vehicles. As well, the program will initiate international and domestic formal engagements with alternative fuels stakeholders and will put in place two agreements with natural gas local support networks to bring the right decision-making tools to potential markets. Through these efforts, knowledge and collaboration in the area of alternative transportation fuels will be increased.

The ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative's program increases clean energy knowledge and stakeholder awareness through the funding of research and projects that support academia, industry and the public sector in producing and using energy in a more clean and efficient way. Activities funded will be in five strategic priority areas: energy efficiency; clean electricity and renewable fuels; bioenergy; electrification of transportation; and, unconventional oil and gas. This initiative is a key component of the Government of Canada's actions to achieve real emissions reductions, while maintaining Canada's economic advantage and its ability to create jobs for Canadians. In 2012-2013, funding for ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative projects will be approved for government, academic and private sector research and development projects and for demonstration projects with external public and private stakeholders.

The Marine Renewable Energy Enabling Measures program will develop a set of federal policy options and recommendations for administering marine renewable energy in the federal offshore by determining related requirements and stakeholders' views.

AANDC's ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program supports GHG reduction measures in Aboriginal and northern communities, with an emphasis on off-grid communities that currently use diesel generators to produce electricity and heat. Funded projects include feasibility studies of renewable energy projects (e.g., wind, small hydro, solar, and biomass), and design and construction of energy projects into community buildings (e.g., solar heating, ground source heat pumps, high efficiency heating systems). This program directly reduces energy sector GHG emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities. Success for this program will be indicated by the number of projects funded and resulting projected reductions in GHG emissions over a 20-year project lifecycle. In 2012-2013, the program will support pre-feasibility and feasibility studies of 5-10 renewable energy projects (e.g., wind, small hydro, solar, biomass), and design and construction of 5-10 energy projects integrated with community buildings (e.g., solar heating, ground source heat pumps, and high efficiency heating systems).

3. Theme Financial Information

Federal Partner Programs Total Allocation
for 2011-16
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded and may not add.

*ecoENERGY Retrofit Home program is a one year program for 2011-2012

**Funding is for 2011-2013

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities 19.63 3.93
Subtotal 19.63 3.93
 
Natural Resources Canada
Clean Energy Policy 4.66** 2.33
ecoENERGY Efficiency 190.11 38.01
ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels 1.35** 0.57
ecoENERGY Innovative Initiative 96.10** 63.87
ecoENERGY Retrofit Home* 400.00 N/A
Marine Renewable Energy Enabling Measures 3.83 0.81
Subtotal 696.04 105.59
Theme Total 715.67 109.52

Clean Air Agenda 2012-2013 Horizontal Reports on Plans and Priorities – Theme Report: Clean Transportation

The Clean Transportation Theme supports the Government of Canada’s commitment to reduce national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, which calculates to 607 megatonnes. This Theme aims to reduce emissions of air pollutants and GHGs from transportation activities through promoting new clean transportation technologies, implementing voluntary agreements, and developing of standards and regulations.

Ultimately, work undertaken within this Theme by contributing departments (Transport Canada (TC) and Environment Canada (EC)) supports reducing air pollutants and GHG emissions from the transportation sector. Adoption of clean transportation technologies will improve emissions intensity for air pollutants and GHG emissions.

In the short term, initiatives will regulate segments of the transportation sector and target other segments of the transportation sector to participate in non-regulatory voluntary emission reduction agreements. Clean transportation projects will also be completed as per funding agreements.

1. Theme Planning Highlights

The key deliverables expected in 2012-2013 are: implement domestic nitrogen oxide standards in the aviation sector; implement Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations; publish the amendments to the Sulphur in Diesel Fuel Regulation; and, implement a new air pollutant emission regulation for locomotives. TC will also support EC in the economic analysis, assessment of technological performance, and consultations for the development of heavy-duty and light-duty vehicle emission regulations.

Examples of other activities for 2012-2013 include: developing or implementing voluntary agreements to reduce GHG emissions with the Canadian aviation industry and Canadian rail industry; conducting safety and performance testing on heavy-duty and light-duty vehicle technologies; completing a draft of an internal model that identifies inputs and methodologies in Canadian supply chains, data gaps, and mitigation strategies; advancing work on the Truck Reservation Systems project at Port Metro Vancouver; and, supporting the installation of marine shore power facilities at Ports.

2. Theme Expected Results

Through the Aviation Sector Regulatory Initiative Canada will contribute to the development of international air pollutant and GHG emission standards, global targets, possible market-based mechanisms, and best practice operational measures at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Domestically, Canada will support aviation emission reductions through the development and implementation of new or amended regulatory frameworks to limit nitrogen oxide and CO2 emissions (planned to come into effect starting in 2013 and 2015, respectively depending on results). A new domestic voluntary agreement with the Canadian aviation industry for the reduction of GHG emissions will also be negotiated. It will form the basis of a Canadian Action Plan to reduce these emissions, for submission to ICAO in June 2012. Canada will engage in research that provides scientific support to regulatory development; improves scientific understanding of emissions at altitude and examines the short and long-term impacts of aviation emissions with regards to climate change and regional and local air quality, as well as technological and operational challenges to addressing these emissions, taking into account safety, security and economic considerations.

Through TC and EC’s Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative Canada will contribute to the development and implementation of new international emission standards as well as a framework, technical measures, and possible market-based measures to reduce GHG emissions at the International Maritime Organization (IMO). In 2012-2013, EC will continue to support TC at the IMO and undertake scientific and technical analyses to support the domestic implementation of international IMO air pollutant and GHG emission standards.

The Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative will also result in the development and implementation of new or amended Canadian regulations, along with effective compliance and oversight regimes, to address emissions from ships. Amendments to TC’s new Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations to limit air pollutant emissions are expected to enter into force August 1, 2012.

These regulations will be complemented by amendments to the sulphur in diesel fuel regulations led by EC under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 which will support TC’s implementation of the North America Emissions Control Area (ECA). The new amendments for diesel fuel will ensure that fuel suppliers can provide the fuel required for the implementation of the North American ECA in accordance with the international commitments under Annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL). EC and TC will continue work on an emissions inventory analysis to assess current and future ship emissions (GHGs and air pollutants).

Canada will engage in research that examines new technologies and practices that can be used for emission reduction or emission measurement.

The Rail Sector Regulatory Initiative is expected to result in new or amended regulatory frameworks, along with effective compliance and oversight regimes, to limit emissions from locomotives. New air pollutant regulations are planned for 2012-2013. Work will also begin on measures to address GHG emissions in collaboration with the United States. This initiative is also expected to result in domestic emission reductions from a voluntary agreement for addressing GHG emissions. Canada will engage in research on new and emerging technologies in the rail sector, including assessments of how they perform from a safety, economic and environmental perspective.

Through the Support for Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations program, TC will support EC efforts through analysis and advice on safety and competitiveness impacts in the development of GHG emission regulations for new heavy-duty vehicles (buses and trucks), and in the preparation of future GHG emission regulations for new light-duty vehicles (passenger automobiles and light trucks).

The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II Initiative will test, evaluate and provide expert technical information on the environmental and safety performance of advanced light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty vehicle technologies such as advanced tires. The technical findings will: inform the development of EC’s light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty vehicle GHG emission regulations; guide the proactive development of new or revised safety regulations, standards, codes and guidelines (under the authority of the Motor Vehicle Safety Act administered by Transport Canada); and, support the development of non-regulatory industry codes and standards that anchor the market and industry efforts to integrate new vehicle technologies.

The Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative will quantify the carbon footprint of each of Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors. This program is expected to result in research and data that will help the freight transportation sector and governments to demonstrate the carbon performance of Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors and make transportation decisions that limit GHG emissions. This program will develop an internal model that includes an identification of inputs and methodologies relevant to Canadian supply chains, as well as specific data gaps and mitigation strategies.

The Truck Reservation System Program will provide funding to support the deployment of truck reservation systems at Canada’s largest container ports, primarily focusing on Vancouver, Montreal, and Halifax. These systems will use technologies to improve efficiency in the movement of trucks into and out of terminal facilities at container ports and reduce truck idling.

The Shore Power Technology for Ports Program will provide funding to support the installation of marine shore power facilities at Canadian coastal or Great Lakes ports for all types of commercial vessels (cruise, container, and bulk). Marine shore power is a leading edge technology that allows ships to plug into the local electrical grid to power the vessel while at port, thereby avoiding the use of diesel auxiliary engines which consume fuel and produce GHG and air pollutant emissions.

3. Theme Financial Information

Federal Partner Programs Total Allocation
for 2011-13
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded and may not add.

For further information, see:

Environment Canada
Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative 4.22 2.39
Subtotal 4.22 2.39
 
Transport Canada
Aviation Sector Regulatory Initiative 5.05 2.97
ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles II Initiative 12.84 8.25
Gateway Carbon Footprint Initiative 0.56 0.41
Marine Sector Regulatory Initiative 8.28 4.81
Rail Sector Regulatory Initiative 5.68 4.03
Shore Power Technology for Ports Program 0.94 0.49
Support for Vehicle GHG Emissions Regulations 3.86 2.26
Truck Reservation System Program 1.78 1.72
Subtotal 38.99 24.94
Theme Total 43.21 27.34

Clean Air Agenda 2012-2013 Horizontal Reports on Plans and Priorities – Theme Report: International Actions

The International Actions Theme supports the Government of Canada’s broad efforts to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and address climate change by participating in international partnerships and negotiations, and by ensuring international obligations are met.

Ultimately, work undertaken in this Theme by the contributing departments (Environment Canada (EC), Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)) aims to ensure that international actions to address climate change are fair, effective and comprehensive, and that clean energy innovations result in global and domestic economic and environmental benefits. This includes ensuring our negotiating strategies and domestic policies are aligned with the United States (U.S.). For example, Canada’s recent participation at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of the Parties in Durban supported agreement to a process to negotiate a new climate change regime that would include binding commitments for all major emitters.

In the short term, these programs will ensure Canada meets its financial and reporting obligations arising from participation in international climate change agreements and organizations. Key domestic stakeholders will be engaged to enable Canada’s objectives to be advanced. This Theme will also promote GHG emissions reduction technology and mitigation and adaptation efforts in partner countries including developing countries.

1. Theme Planning Highlights

Early in 2010, under the Copenhagen Accord of the UNFCCC, the Government of Canada committed to reducing national GHG emissions to 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, which calculates to 607 megatonnes. This target is aligned with the reduction target set by the U.S. under the same agreement. The Accord represents an important step in the development of a single, new international climate change agreement, and is consistent with Canada’s negotiating objectives. This commitment was reaffirmed in the 2010 Cancun agreements. In 2011, Canada agreed to participate in the negotiations of a new climate change regime by 2015 as set out in the Durban Platform. Canada will contribute to the development of the Durban Platform and continue to implement commitments under the Copenhagen Accord and Cancun Agreements which includes supporting mitigation and adaptation actions by developing countries.

In 2012-2013, EC, DFAIT and NRCan will continue to participate in international climate change negotiations and will advance Canada’s interests through a range of high-level climate change discussions including those within the context of the UNFCCC, the Major Economies Forum, Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) and others. In addition, EC will host the international Conference of Global Methane Initiative (GMI) in collaboration with other public and private partners. EC will also launch the Short-Lived Climate Forcers (SLCFs) Global Initiative and will work with NRCan to develop a Clean Energy Dialogue Action Plan II in 2012-2013. DFAIT will also support these efforts and will work with the UNFCCC Secretariat to ensure that Canada’s contribution to UNFCCC’s core budget is made in a timely manner (the Clean Air Agenda provides $477,000 of Canada’s contribution). NRCan will provide strategic policy advice on key global climate change developments related to NRCan’s mandate, including energy, technology and forestry, and support the development of climate technology policies and positions.

2. Theme Expected Results

Theme programming has been clustered within three groups of activity: international participation/negotiations; international climate change obligations; and, continuing the engagement and alignment with the U.S.

International Participation and Negotiations

EC, DFAIT and NRCan work together to provide a whole of government approach to Canada’s participation in international negotiations, policy analysis and development, and bilateral and multilateral engagement relating to climate change under the UNFCCC process and within other international fora.

Further to the Durban Platform, EC’s International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations program will be actively engaged in the international negotiations for developing a new global climate change regime under the UNFCCC including participation at the 18th UNFCCC Climate Conference of the Parties in Qatar, December 2012. Canada will continue to implement the Copenhagen Accord, Cancun Agreements, and Durban outcomes. This will include support of mitigation and adaptation actions by developing countries. As part of Canada’s overall international climate change activities, EC will also continue to support international clean technology efforts through a range of programs including the GMI, SLCFs, and bilateral partnerships such as the Canada China Working Group (CCWG) and the Canada Mexico Partnership (CMP). DFAIT will also participate, with EC, on the CCWG, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the CMP. These efforts support outcomes at the final, intermediate and immediate levels about international cooperation on climate change and clean energy to ensure engagement in international climate change discussions while advancing Canada’s climate change priorities.

Through its International Climate Participation and Negotiations program, DFAIT will continue to participate in the UNFCCC negotiations towards the goal of reaching a fair, effective and comprehensive climate change agreement. In these negotiations DFAIT will continue to lead on certain issues. Additionally, DFAIT will continue to provide support to the Prime Minister, Ministers and Senior Officials for their participation in other international processes, including the G8, G20, the Commonwealth, and La Francophonie. DFAIT will continue to lead the integration of climate change issues into broader foreign policy priorities. DFAIT will continue to lead on bilateral and multilateral outreach through Canada’s network of diplomatic missions abroad on issues related to climate change. DFAIT will also continue to provide support and training to DFAIT staff to strengthen the knowledge of Foreign Service Officers on climate change issues, to allow them to engage effectively on these issues with foreign counterparts.

NRCan’s International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations program provides strategic policy advice to Government of Canada decision makers on key global climate change developments and other issues related to NRCan’s mandate. NRCan’s program supports the development of climate technology policies and positions that are aligned with Canada’s interests. The program also advances Canada’s international climate change objectives in a range of high-level climate change-related fora, including the UNFCCC and the CEM. Canada’s engagement in the CEM facilitates clean technology collaboration with major economies, including the U.S. and China. The program will lead Canada's participation in international initiatives on Carbon Capture Storage (CCS). NRCan will also work on forest carbon issues through contributing to international negotiations on GHG accounting and reporting rules for forest carbon, conducting analysis of key forest carbon options that contribute to climate change mitigation, and continuing to develop Canada’s National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System. This system will provide forest-related information for Canada's 2013 National GHG Inventory Report to the UNFCCC. NRCan will engage with domestic stakeholders on forest carbon management and the role of forests in meeting Canada’s mitigation goals under international agreements.

International Climate Change Obligations

EC and DFAIT support Canada in meeting international obligations under the UNFCCC and Canada’s participation in several scientific organizations including the Inter American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI) and IPCC

EC’s International Climate Obligations activities include supporting IAI, an intergovernmental organization dedicated to augmenting global climate change research capacity and collaboration in the Americas, and, providing information in a useful and timely manner to policy makers. Canada is one of 19 member states of the lAI and a primary financial contributor. Canada's IAI membership enables Canada to influence the facilitation of scientific networks across North and South America and capacity building in Latin America. Many Canadian researchers benefit from the IAI through individual grants or collaborative activities on scientific issues important to a region. As well, Canada contributes funds to support the IPCC in assessing scientific, technical and socio-economic information that is key to understanding the risks of climate change and options for response.

Under its International Climate Obligations program, DFAIT will work with the UNFCCC secretariat to ensure that Canada’s assessed contribution to the core budget of the UNFCCC is paid in a timely fashion. Canada’s assessed contributions are part of the core budget for the UNFCCC that is negotiated by all Parties to the Convention. Funds are directed as per decisions by the Conference of the Parties. The provision of these funds is required as part of Canada’s obligations as a Party to the UNFCCC, and has allowed Canada to remain a participant in good standing. These funds combined with the contributions of other countries will enable the UNFCCC to continue to hold negotiating sessions in order to make progress towards a successful outcome including a post 2020 agreement.

Continue to Engage and Align with the U.S.

NRCan and EC work collaboratively with the U.S. Department of Energy to advance the Clean Energy Dialogue (CED). The overall objective of the CED is to enhance bilateral collaboration in the development and deployment of clean energy technologies in order to reduce GHG emissions and address climate change challenges.

The CED Secretariat housed within EC conducts research and analysis to identify opportunities for collaboration with the U.S. in the research, development and deployment of clean energy technologies; and monitors and analyzes relevant initiatives to reduce GHG emissions (domestically, continentally and globally). The CED Secretariat also engages with its U.S. counterpart in the Department of Energy and with key stakeholders to identify ways to facilitate and advance the implementation and delivery of CED projects and initiatives that will be identified in the Action Plan ll currently under development. The CED Secretariat works to advance the overall objectives of the CED; and, will prepare and deliver progress reports on the implementation of CED projects and initiatives outlined in CED Action Plan II.

In 2012-2013, the three CED working groups will implement the initiatives included in the CED Action Plan II. Under the Clean Energy Research & Development and Energy Efficiency working group, co-chaired by EC and NRCan, activities may include further analyses of Canada-U.S. dialogue in support of biofuels and bioenergy research and development. It is anticipated that NRCan will focus on implementation of projects on marine energy, transportation, buildings and communities and energy efficiency.

In 2012-2013, NRCan will continue to lead the CCS and the Electricity Grid working groups. Activities are expected to include, among others, technical collaboration on research, development and demonstration of CCS, sharing of best practices on CCS communications and public engagement, advancing smart grid technologies, and realizing the potential of power storage technologies.

3. Theme Financial Information

Federal Partner Programs Total Allocation
for 2011-13
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded and may not add.

Environment Canada
Engagement and Alignment with U.S. 1.69 0.85
International Climate Change Obligations 0.68 0.34
International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations 9.33 4.53
Subtotal 11.70 5.72
 
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
International Climate Change Obligations 0.95 0.48
International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations 2.84 1.42
Subtotal 3.79 1.90
 
Natural Resources Canada
Engagement and Alignment with U.S. 2.30 1.15
International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations (includes Forestry) 6.18 3.09
Subtotal 8.48 4.24
Theme Total 23.97 11.85

Clean Air Agenda 2012-2013 Horizontal Reports on Plans and Priorities – Theme Report: Adaptation

The Adaptation Theme focuses on supporting complementary initiatives for adapting to the impacts of climate change, rather than on reducing GHG emissions. These initiatives seek to reduce risk to communities, infrastructure and the health and safety of Canadians while realizing economic benefits and maintaining competitiveness from innovations responding to climate change.

The Adaptation Theme is comprised of programs from nine federal departments and agencies: Environment Canada (EC); Natural Resources Canada (NRCan); Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC); Health Canada (HC); Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC); Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO); Parks Canada Agency (PCA); Standards Council of Canada (SCC); and, Transport Canada (TC). The Theme is organized into four program streams: enhancing science foundations in order to assess and predict climate change impacts; enhancing public health and safety; building resilience in the North and climate sensitive Aboriginal communities; and, enhancing competitiveness in climate sensitive economic sectors.

Ultimately, work undertaken in this Theme by the contributing departments aims to reduce the vulnerability of individuals, communities, industry and regions to the impacts of climate change, while also building capacity to adapt through planning and taking action.

In the short term, programs will support communities and sectors in recognizing the need for adaptation and assess their risks and opportunities arising from climate change. Based on this knowledge, adaptation measures and plans to address these risks and take advantage of these opportunities will be identified and shared.

1. Theme Planning Highlights

In 2012-2013, several programs will fund projects to assist Aboriginal and northern communities in understanding and adapting to the changing climate. A call for research proposals will be sent to eligible northern communities, and Aboriginal communities and organizations to increase collaboration on climate change adaptation. Other northern initiatives include: ecosystem mapping and scenario modelling for select national parks; development of codes and standards related to northern infrastructure; and, the provision of new information for managing mine wastes in the North. Nationally, other programs will: provide foundational science-based information on Canada’s changing climate and future (physical) impacts; expand heat alert and response systems in at-risk communities across Canada; develop information tools and guidelines to support  preventative public health systems, develop an adaptation toolkit for forest sector decision-makers; and, engage with national industry organizations on risks and opportunities created by the changing climate for natural resource sectors. By Spring 2013, a climate change infectious disease toolkit will be developed to enhance the ability of the public health professionals and provincial and territorial governments to respond rapidly to vector- and water-borne disease events, and reduce and mitigate the occurrence of infectious diseases in general. In 2012-2013, four Large Basin Assessments for each of Canada’s three oceans and its inland waters will be completed.

2. Theme Expected Results

The adaptation programs complement each other in working on shared areas of focus: enhancing the science foundation to understand and predict climate and assess climate change impacts; enhancing public health and safety; building resilience in the North and climate-sensitive Aboriginal communities; and, enhancing the competitiveness of climate-sensitive economic sectors and systems across Canada.

Enhancing the Science Foundation

EC, DFO and PCA programs are working to address gaps in understanding the impacts and risks posed by climate change and to better understand ecological changes in Canada’s marine and northern terrestrial ecosystems.

EC’s Climate Change Prediction and Scenarios Program provides knowledge, scientific expertise, information and tools that are accessible to Canadians to improve their ability to adapt to climate change and variability from seasonal to decadal time scales, supporting federal, provincial, territorial and community adaptation planning and decision-making. It also provides policy analysis and research for issues associated with climate change adaptation, including implementation of the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework. Specifically, EC ensures Canada’s national climate modelling program is maintained through enhancements to and operation of global and regional climate models, and develops and improves climate change scenarios (including climate extremes). It also, ensures specialized information on climate extremes for infrastructure design, codes and standards are developed and/or updated. EC contributes to the IPCC and provide analysis, support and advice on climate change impacts and adaptation issues to senior officials.

DFO’s Aquatic Climate Change Adaptation Services Program will: conduct ocean and inland water risk assessments; initiate a research program to increase understanding of climate change impacts in relation to the Department’s mandate responsibilities; and, facilitate tool development, all in support of the Department in delivering on its three strategic outcomes. Four Large Basin Assessments (three oceans and inland waters) will focus on climate change impacts and vulnerabilities and will inform the Department’s program decision-makers, policy-makers and planners of the needs for adaptation, identify and prioritize risks and opportunities, and identify available options to adapt to climate change. Assessments are scheduled for completion in the fall of fiscal year 2012-2013 and will be used to inform competitive programs in fiscal 2013-2014. Funding proposals for research and tool development to be undertaken next fiscal year will be accepted and reviewed by the end of March, 2012. One technical committee will facilitate the work required for completion of the Large Basin Assessments and another will review proposals under the competitive funds.

PCA’s Understanding Climate-Driven Ecological Changes in Canada’s North program consults with park co-management boards, conducts process-based ecosystem mapping, and completes scenarios modeling and reporting to help communities understand the risks to important ecological services such as the availability of important country foods, recognize the need for adaptation, and discuss options for action. For example, by 2013 ecosystem mapping of Wapusk, Ivvavik and Torngat Mountains National Parks will be completed. PCA will also link key climate drivers to changing ecosystem composition and structure, and discuss how these changes might impact other ecosystem components (such as caribou and other species) and the ecological integrity of parks. This program supports communities in assessing the risks and opportunities arising from climate change, and provides them with options for adapting.

Enhancing Public Health and Safety

HC and the PHAC work to enable Canadians and existing systems (e.g., emergency response) to effectively respond to health-related climate risks.

PHAC’s Preventative Public Health Systems and Adaptation to a Changing Climate program informs decision-making in the public health system and develops adaptation strategies to prevent and mitigate the occurrence of disease, and increase Canadians’ capacity to prevent infectious diseases. Activities include: collecting information and developing tools about infectious diseases related to climate change; researching public health and water-borne and insect illness; developing scenario-based projections on the impacts of climate change on food and water safety; and, assessing the burden of gastrointestinal illness on vulnerable communities in the North.

HC’s Heat Alert and Response Systems (HARS) program aims to reduce the vulnerability of Canadians to extreme heat by promoting development of HARS in at-risk communities. The 2012-2013 year will represent the first heat season associated with the renewed program so efforts will be targeted to get research underway, negotiate contracts and agreements, and establish needed partnerships. Efforts will focus around expanding HARS to new at-risk communities, building capacity among target stakeholder groups, and conducting research to support information sharing, launching the Heat-Health Network, and the release of an on-line continuing education program for healthcare professionals accredited by the College of Family Physicians of Canada.  For example, guidelines will be developed to support public health and emergency management professionals in identifying community-specific thresholds for triggering heat alerts.

Building Resilience in the North

AANDC, SCC and HC support the development of safe, sustainable and prosperous northern and climate-sensitive Aboriginal communities through programs that assess climate risks and enable planning for adaptation, and integrate climate risks into codes and standards for northern infrastructure.

AANDC’s Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners will reduce vulnerability to climate change by supporting the assessment of, and adaptation to, climate change impacts in Aboriginal and northern communities. This program will work collaboratively with other government departments, Aboriginal organizations and communities to build capacity within communities to carry out vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning. Up to $250,000 in funding is available for each project to conduct vulnerability assessments, develop tools/methods/best practices, develop adaptation plans and share knowledge. The program aims to fund 10 projects in its first year and ultimately fund 90 projects over the life of the program.

AANDC and SCC will collaborate to deliver the Integrating Adaptation into Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure program. The Program will develop Codes, Standards and Related Instruments (CSRIs) to support more resilient infrastructure at a community level. 

AANDC and SCC will work together to support the Northern Advisory Committee.  In consultation with northern practitioners, committee members will confirm the climatic impacts and infrastructure categories requiring immediate attention. The committee will assess gaps and needs and identify international best management practices available for integrating climate change into CSRIs. In early 2012, SCC’s program will initiate a standardization process for the key infrastructure priority areas. It is anticipated that 3 to 5 new and/or revised CSRIs will be completed and capacity to implement these CSRIs will be built over the next 5 years.

In partnership with northern First Nations, Inuit and other organizations, HC’s Climate Change and Health Adaptation for Northern First Nations and Inuit Communities program supports communities in assessing their risks from climate change and developing appropriate adaptation measures to reduce these risks. Community-based research projects will focus on understanding climate change and health impacts, developing responses, communicating results and incorporating local and traditional knowledge.

HC will also increase collaboration on climate change adaptation by enhancing websites and training and utilizing webinars and teleconferencing through partnerships and agreements with key organizations such as the Assembly of First Nations and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Dene Nation, the Council of Yukon First Nations, governments and academia.

Enhancing the Competitiveness

NRCan and TC work to help decision-makers across all levels of government and stakeholder groups understand the relevance of climate change to their operations and equip them with appropriate tools and information.

NRCan’s Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate program will deliver information and share expertise to improve the ability of decision-makers in Canada’s regions and targeted economic sectors to adapt. The Earth Sciences Sector will establish an Adaptation Platform to bring together knowledge, capacity and financial resources to efficiently and effectively facilitate adaptation action. In 2012-2013 it will establish a series of working groups that will address topics such as coastal management, economic analysis, and measuring progress on adaptation. The Mining and Metals Sector will deliver a report and a technical seminar to improve knowledge on the climate change impacts on mine waste management and effluent treatment in the North and offer practical adaptation technologies. The Canadian Forest Service’s project involves development of an adaptation toolkit, a prioritized list of indicators, and an initial tracking system that will improve the ability to track impacts of climate change for Canada’s forest sector.

TC’s Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative will study, develop, and implement innovative science-based technologies to help improve the resiliency and adaptability of existing and future northern transportation infrastructure to ensure the safety, efficiency and environmental sustainability of that infrastructure. Partnerships with other federal government departments, territorial and provincial governments, academia and industry will ensure that the limited northern resources are maximized and that knowledge, best practices and adaptive solutions are shared amongst stakeholders. In 2012-2013, this initiative will bring together stakeholders through networks, workshops and discussion groups to share relevant knowledge and identify themes where gaps exist on specific problems such as increased ground water flow and airstrip and marine infrastructure vulnerabilities. Short and long-term knowledge gap studies and needs assessments will also be conducted in consultation with territorial governments.

3. Theme Financial Information

Federal Partner Programs Total Allocation
for 2011-16
($ millions)
Planned Spending
for 2012-13
($ millions)

Figures exclude Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation costs, and are rounded and may not add.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners 19.72 4.36
Integrating Adaptation into Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure 0.94 0.19
Subtotal 20.65 4.55
 
Environment Canada
Climate Change Prediction and Scenarios Program 28.82 5.76
Subtotal 28.82 5.76
 
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Aquatic Climate Change Adaptation Services Program 16.42 5.14
Subtotal 16.42 5.14
 
Health Canada
Climate Change and Health Adaptation for Northern First Nations and Inuit Communities 9.86 2.32
Heat Alert and Response Systems 7.91 1.68
Subtotal 17.76 4.00
 
Natural Resources Canada
Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate 34.94 7.99
Subtotal 34.94 7.99
 
Parks Canada
Understanding Climate-Driven Ecological Changes in Canada's North 2.30 0.51
Subtotal 2.30 0.51
 
Public Health Agency of Canada
Preventative Public Health Systems and Adaptation to a Changing Climate 11.45 3.13
Subtotal 11.45 3.13
 
Standards Council of Canada
Integrating Adaptation into Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure 2.50 0.50
Subtotal 2.50 0.50
 
Transport Canada
Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative 10.90 3.10
Subtotal 10.90 3.10
Theme Total 145.75 34.68

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Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Horizontal Initiative—Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of lead department(s): Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Lead department program activity: International Policy Advice and Integration, Diplomacy and Advocacy

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 2, 2005; operationalized September 18, 2006

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1.13 billion

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Sourced from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, GPSF funds the operations of the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) and is used to conduct international assistance programming in fragile and conflict-affected states such as Afghanistan, Haiti and Sudan. START and GPSF were originally created to fill a policy, institutional and funding gap between CIDA humanitarian and long-term development assistance and National Defence and the Canadian Forces (DND) military and training assistance. START has effectively played a role and established itself as a platform to facilitate whole-of-government engagement as well as policy development, where appropriate. In recent years, an increasing number of other government departments, such as Public Safety Canada (PS), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Correctional Service Canada (CSC), Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and Department of Justice Canada have actively participated in stabilization and reconstruction initiatives as well as crisis response activities at the behest of DFAIT/START.

GPSF programming provides timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges that implicate Canadian interests and reflect Canadian foreign policy priorities. GPSF programming includes both transfer and non-transfer payments. Non-transfer payment programming is the funding mechanism DFAIT uses to work closely with federal departments to provide beneficiary states and civilian components of multilateral peace operations with critical expertise in the areas of security and justice system reform.

Shared outcome(s): The ultimate shared outcome is peace, security, and the safety and well-being of those living in priority fragile or conflict-affected states, through effective stabilization and reconstruction programming. Specific expected results are:

  • Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations
  • Strengthened institutions and civil society in affected states
  • Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations
  • Strengthened international frameworks for addressing crisis situations

Governance structure(s): GPSF is managed by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START). To ensure policy coherence and avoid duplication, various interdepartmental and intradepartmental committees (DM, ADM and DG levels) are called upon as required to inform and guide emerging priority-setting exercises and implement Cabinet-mandated priorities in the whole-of-government context. START is located in the International Security Branch of DFAIT (IFM), which is responsible for START's financial, human and physical resources.

Planning Highlights: Although security and governance remain paramount issues, Canada's engagement in Afghanistan has now shifted from Kandahar to the national level. In 2012-13, horizontal initiatives in Afghanistan will focus on providing expert support from CBSA and CSC to enhance the capacity of border management and corrections officials in these states. In Haiti, GPSF will seek to provide expert support from relevant government departments within the framework of renewed Canadian commitment to Haiti through to 2016-17.

In 2012-13, START will also continue to work with partners from other government departments to further develop broader frameworks for funding and managing civilian deployments to crisis situations in recognition of the growing demand for Canadian government expertise to respond to crises internationally.

Federal Partner: Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13*
PA 1: International Policy Advice and Integration


PA 2: Diplomacy and Advocacy
Global Peace and Security Program 1,134.90 125.70
Global Peace and Operations Program
Glyn Berry Program for Peace and Security
Total 1,134.90 125.70

*Includes Vote 1 (operating and salary) and Vote 10 (grants and contributions) funds.

Expected results for federal partner programs, above:

  • Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations
  • Strengthened institutions and civil society in affected states
  • Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations
  • Strengthened international frameworks for addressing crisis situations
Federal Partner: National Defence and the Canadian Forces (DND)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)1 Planned Spending for
2012-13
PA: n/a Global Peace and Operations Program   0.25
Total   0.25

Expected results for Global Peace and Operations Program:

  • Strengthen Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations;
  • Strengthened institutions in affected states.

DND officers strengthen Canada's response capacity and ability to enhance security and stability in affected states by providing training and operational support, such as, for example, to peacekeeping operations.

Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
PA 1: Federal and International Operations International Police Peacekeeping Program   23.90
Canadian Police Arrangement
Total   23.90

Expected results for the International Police Peacekeeping Program and Canadian Police Arrangement:

  • Strengthen Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations;
  • Strengthen international responses to specific crisis situations;
  • Strengthen institutions in affected states.

In 2012-13, GPSF is planning to support the deployment of up to 250 police officers to various international police peacekeeping and peace operations, mainly in Haiti, Afghanistan and Sudan. This will enhance international capacity to promote comprehensive and sustainable rule of law through the re-establishment of effective public institutions such as law enforcement and judicial systems. Through the deployment of police officers, Canada helps to rebuild and strengthen police services in fragile and conflict-affected states by supporting and strengthening the capacity of national and local police forces to maintain law and order and contribute to a safe and stable environment.

Federal Partner: Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
PA: n/a Delivery of International Assistance under the CCC/DFAIT Memorandum of Understanding   0.50
Total   0.50

Expected results for the delivery of international assistance under the CCC/DFAIT memorandum of understanding:

  • Strengthen Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations.

The efficient procurement of goods and services enables Canada to rapidly respond to crises and provide in-kind support to fragile states for reconstruction and stabilization initiatives.

Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
PA: N/A Operations in Afghanistan   0.64
Total   0.64

Expected results for operations in Afghanistan:

  • Strengthen Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations;
  • Strengthen institutions in affected states.

In 2012-13, GPSF is planning to deploy one or two Canadian customs and border experts to Afghanistan. These customs and border experts will provide training and technical expertise to officials in Afghanistan, thereby strengthening customs and border management.

Federal Partner: Correctional Service of Canada (CSC)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
PA 1: Correctional Interventions Operations in Afghanistan and stabilization and reconstruction in Haiti   3.00
Total   3.00

Expected results for operations in Afghanistan and stabilization and reconstruction in Haiti:

  • Strengthen Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations;
  • Strengthen institutions in affected states.

In 2012-13, GPSF is planning to deploy one senior corrections advisor to Afghanistan and up to 25 corrections officials to Haiti. The deployment to Afghanistan and Haiti of Canadian corrections experts, who provide training and technical expertise in prison administration and operations to national personnel, supports Canada's contribution to the strengthening of correctional institutions' capacity in these affected states, thus ensuring that these institutions cultivate a modern correctional system and adhere to international standards.

Federal Partner: Department of Justice/Public Prosecutions
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
PA: n/a Stabilization and reconstruction in Haiti   0.30
Total   0.30

Expected results by program as per for the stabilization and reconstruction programs in Haiti:

  • Strengthen Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations;
  • Strengthen institutions in affected states.

Pending an assessment by the Department of Justice on the justice sector in Haiti, GPSF anticipates deploying one or two justice experts to Haiti. These justice experts would provide training and technical support, strengthening the capacity of personnel in Haiti's judicial institutions.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012–2013
($ millions)
There are no fixed annual allocations for other government departments and future years' allocations are not predetermined. 28.34

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Elissa Golberg
Director General, START Secretariat
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
Tel.: 613-665-6689
Email: Marie.Gervais-Vidricaire@international.gc.ca

Notes:

1 There are no fixed annual allocations for OGDs and future years' allocations are not predetermined.

Top of Page

Health Canada

Horizontal Initiatives



Horizontal Initiative 1

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Substance Use and Abuse

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 2007

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Funding for the initiative is ongoing but the current policy authority ends March 31, 2012. Further information is not available at this time.

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $419.6M - Funding for the initiative is ongoing but the current policy authority ends March 31, 2012. Further information is not available at this time.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The FTCS establishes a framework for a comprehensive, fully-integrated, and multi-faceted approach to tobacco control. It is driven by the longstanding commitment of the Government of Canada to reduce the serious and adverse health effects of tobacco for Canadians. It focuses on four mutually reinforcing components: prevention, cessation, protection, and product regulation.

8. Shared outcome(s): The long-term outcome of the FTCS is to reduce tobacco-related disease and death in Canada.

9. Governance structure(s): N/A

10. Planning Highlights: Among ongoing activities, the Department will continue the enforcement of provisions of the Cracking Down on Tobacco Marketing Aimed at Youth Act (2009) and will continue to implement the new labelling requirements for cigarettes and little cigars, including larger health warning messages, and a pan-Canadian quitline number and a web address to encourage Canadians to quit smoking.

11. Federal Partner(s):

Health Canada (HC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
Substance Use and Abuse FTCS Total from 2007-08
to 2012-13
322.2M
52.5M
Total 322.2M 52.5M

Public Safety Canada (PSC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
Law Enforcement Strategies FTCS Total from 2007-08
to 2012-13
3.7M
0.6M
Total 3.7M 0.6M

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
RCMP FTCS Total from 2007-08
to 2012-13
 
Police Operations   4.9M 0.8M
Canadian Law Enforcement Services   5.4M 0.9M
Total 10.3M 1.7M

Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
ODPP FTCS Total from 2007-08
to 2012-13
11.9M
2.0M
Total 11.9M 2.0M

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
Taxpayers and Business Assitance  FTCS Total from 2007-08
to 2012-13
5.3M
0.9M
Total 5.3M 0.9M

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
CBSA - Risk Assessment FTCS Total from 2007-08
to 2012-13
 
CBSA - Admissibility Determination  FTCS   0.2M
Total 67.7* 2.6M

*Approximately $2M was deducted from the total allocation to date as well as the ongoing total since 2011-12, as a result of Strategic Review reductions.  Also, of the $7.9M in yearly funding received by CBSA, $4.3M is related to compensation for revenue lost (loss of Duty Free Licensing) and is allocated to other Agency activities.

Expected results by program:

Federal Partners - Total Program Spending ($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13

Notes:

  • All allocation figures include EBP and PWGSC Accommodations costs.
  • HC total allocation figures are final budget allocations, which factors in all permanent reductions by the end of each fiscal year.
Total from 2007-08 to 2012-13 60.3M

12. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

13. Contact information:

Cathy A. Sabiston
Director General
Controlled Substances and Tobacco Directorate
Health Canada
Telephone: 613-941-1977

Horizontal Initiative 2

Defence of Canada Against Third-Party Claims in Tobacco Litigation

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Defence of Canada Against Third-Party Claims in Tobacco Litigation

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Substance Use and Abuse

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-2013

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $45.738 million

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The purpose of this horizontal initiative is to defend Canada against third party claims in tobacco litigation. The source of funding for this initiative is:

  • $34,878,000 over three fiscal years from the fiscal framework in Budget 2010 ($29,742,000 for Health Canada and $5,136,000 for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada);
  • Up to $9,000,000 from Health Canada's existing reference levels ($3,000,000 in 2010-11, $3,000,000 in 2011-12, and $3,000,000 in 2012-13); and
  • Up to $1,860,000 from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's existing reference levels ($1,100,000 in 2010-11, $380,000 in 2011-12, and $380,000 in 2012-13).

8. Shared outcome(s):

  • To defend Canada against third party claims in tobacco litigation; and,
  • To meet all our legal obligations in a timely manner.

9. Governance structure(s): The major stakeholders are Health Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Justice Canada. While acting within their respective mandates, the defence effort is coordinated by the Interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee on Tobacco Litigation. The committee is co-chaired by the three departments and ensures the management of issues and finances.

10. Planning Highlights: In light of the favorable decision of the Supreme Court of Canada in July 2011, and with the guidance and support from Justice Canada, Health Canada and Agriculture Canada will continue to defend Canada against third-party claims in all tobacco litigation as required.

11. Federal Partner(s):

Health Canada (HC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
PA 2.5 Substance Use and Abuse Defence of Canada Against Third-Party Claims in Tobacco Litigation 29.742 from new funding
9.0 (up to) from existing reference levels
8.641 from new funding
3.0 (up to) from existing reference levels
Total 38.742 11.641

Expected results by program: Canada is defended against third-party claims in tobacco litigation and has met its legal obligations.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
Internal Services Defence of Canada Against Third-Party Claims in Tobacco Litigation 5.136 from new funding
1.860 (up to) from existing reference levels
1.936 from new funding
0.380 (up to) from existing reference levels
Total 6.996 2.316

Expected results by program: Canada is defended against third-party claims in tobacco litigation and has met its legal obligations.

12. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

13. Contact information:

Louis Proulx
A/Director
Health Canada Litigation Support Office
99 Metcalfe
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9
Telephone: 613-957-3659

Horizontal Initiative 3

FCSAP to Protect Human Health From Environmental Contaminants

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: FCSAP to Protect Human Health from Environmental Contaminants

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Sustainable Environmental Health

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2008-2009

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-2013

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $84.6M

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Recent surveys show that Canadians are concerned about environmental contaminants. There is a clear need to ensure that Canadians have credible information on the impact of chemicals in the environment and the steps that they should take as a result.

The Government has already taken steps to address environmental contaminants through the Chemicals Management Plan and the Clean Air Agenda, focusing on substances which have known potential for harming human health and the environment. Both industry and stakeholders have been supportive of these initiatives but continue to insist that decisions be made based on scientific evidence. This requires mechanisms such as monitoring, surveillance and research to ensure that the effectiveness of interventions to address known potential risks can be assessed and that emerging risks can be detected.

The FCSAP to Protect Human Health from Environmental Contaminants is designed to further protect the health of Canadians from environmental contaminants while increasing the knowledge-base on contaminant levels and potential impacts on health, in particular:

  • to foster awareness and provide information for Canadians to take action;
  • to identify and monitor trends in exposures to contaminants and potentials
  • association with health problems such as asthma, congenital anomalies and developmental disorders; and
  • to better understand the association between contaminants and illness.

$13.1M has been allocated to Health Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 to develop an Environmental Health Guide for Canadians, as well as tailored guides for First Nations and Inuit communities. The objective of the guide is to help make Canadians aware of the risks that harmful environmental contaminants may pose to their health along with direct actions that they can take to reduce these risks and improve their health. The Guide, Hazardcheck, was published March 1, 2010. The First Nations and Inuit Guides, Your Health at Home, were published on May 7, 2010 and April 11, 2011 respectively.

$54.5M has been allocated to Statistics Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 towards conducting the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) and $5.6M from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 for Health Canada to conduct the First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative (FNBI). The CHMS is used to collect information from Canadians about their general health and lifestyles and includes collection of blood and urine specimens to be tested for environmental contaminants among other things. The CHMS will not provide data on First Nations on-reserve or Inuit communities. Data for First Nations' peoples on reserve will be captured under the First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative.

$5.9M has been allocation to the Public Health Agency of Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 to enhance surveillance of congenital anomalies.

$5.5M has been allocation to the Public Health Agency of Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 to conduct surveillance of developmental disorders.

8. Shared outcome(s): Reduce health risks to Canadians (particularly vulnerable populations) from environmental contaminants.

9. Governance structure(s): All FCSAP initiatives take advantage of governance and management structures already established for ongoing government programs such as: the Canadian Population Health Statistics Program, the Chemicals Management Plan, the Healthy Living and Chronic Disease initiative of the Public Health Agency of Canada, as well as components of existing national surveillance systems developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada in partnership with stakeholders.

Each program within Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada will be fully responsible for the management of initiatives they are leading within the FCSAP. Consultations and stakeholder involvement will be governed through consultative structures and interdepartmental committees already established.

A tripartite governance structure between Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada will be used to oversee the implementation of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). The CHMS will use the existing Canadian Population Health Statistics Program as a governance structure, which includes senior officials from all three federal organizations.

10. Planning Highlights:

Environmental Health Guide for Canadians

The Environmental Health Guide for Canadians has been developed with partners across the Health Portfolio and with the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation to raise awareness among Canadians about environmental hazards and to inform them of what they can do to reduce their exposure to these risks such ascarbon monoxide, mould, radon, second-hand smoke, and lead.

A public awareness and education campaign was launched in March 2010 to promote the new Environmental Health guide and to raise awareness of the link between health and the environment. To complement on-line tactics (blogger outreach, twitter and Facebook posts), public engagement events were held at 121 retail locations over 2 consecutive weekends in October and November 2011, thereby educating Canadians on the environmental issues that could impact their health.

Activities for 2012-13 are currently being planned to build on the momentum generated by the campaign. This will include an environmental health product focusing on seniors aged 65+, an exploration of partnerships with various non-Governmental and private sector collaborators, and ongoing public relations and outreach activities. Program evaluation will also be undertaken.

The First Nations Environmental Health Guide-Your Health at Home, What you can do is available on the Health Canada web site and has been mailed out to First Nations communities across Canada. Also available on the Health Canada web site are the First Nations and Inuit youth guides and activity booklets, and the Inuit Home Guide. The First Nations Spring/Summer outdoor guide will be posted on the Health Canada Website by the beginning of the 2012-13 fiscal year. These materials will also be distributed to communities across Canada.

In addition, the First Nations Fall/Winter Guide and Inuit seasonal guides were developed in 2011/12 and planned distribution will take place during the 2012/13 fiscal year. These guides will be supported through targeted public awareness and education activities, including radio advertising, online advertising (Facebook, Google and YouTube), print public service announcements, a youth art contest, a pilot project with the Aboriginal People's Television Network, activity booklets for teens and kids, and social media (Facebook and Twitter).

First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative

The First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative (FNBI) is a partnership between Health Canada and the Assembly of First Nations. It is a health survey which seeks to establish baseline information on human exposure to environmental contaminants for First Nations' people on reserve. The survey contains a household questionnaire, direct physical measurements, and biospecimen collection (blood and urine). The environmental chemicals that will be measured include: metals, PCBs, pesticides, phthalates, perfluorinated compounds, etc. This Initiative was developed to complement the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), which excludes First Nations' people on reserve. 

In 2011-12, laboratory results from the pilot project were received. Based on the operational and logistical findings from the pilot project, the full-scale health survey was conducted in 13 randomly selected First Nation communities (42 participants per community) across Canada. Over 500 First Nation peoples participated to yield a 92% success rate. Laboratory analysis from the full-scale survey will be available by the beginning of the 2012-13 fiscal year.

The 2012-13 fiscal year will be the Analysis and Dissemination Phase. Analysis of the laboratory data will be carried out. Participants of the health survey will be provided with their individual results and community summary reports for each First Nation community that was part of the health survey will be developed and presented to the community. A national report will also be prepared of the aggregate findings. 

Enhanced Congenital Anomalies Surveillance

In 2012-2013 the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will continue to work with the provinces and territories on the implementation of congenital anomalies surveillance systems in the various jurisdictions. It will also continue its participation in the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research and organize the 10th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Agency's Canadian Congenital Anomalies Surveillance Network.

Surveillance of Developmental Disorders

In 2012-2013 the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will continue to build a national surveillance system for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). In 2011-12, PHAC established relationships with surveillance partners and stakeholders, put in place an expert ASD Advisory Committee to oversee the development process, and completed the preliminary research necessary to inform the selection of the most appropriate surveillance option for ASD surveillance. Options include the use of administrative datasets, sentinel surveillance, clinical databases, population based surveys and/or registries. With input from the ASD Expert Advisory Committee, PHAC will determine the most cost-effective, comprehensive, flexible and reliable surveillance option(s) for a national ASD surveillance system.

In 2012-13, the focus will be on establishing the surveillance methodology, as well as implementing pilot projects to identify indicators, case definitions, data sources, and a sampling approach. This work will be done collaboratively, with the guidance of the ASD Advisory Committee, and with experts in the field, other levels of government and other stakeholders.

Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS)

In 2012-13 the CHMS team will be working simultaneously on three cycles of the survey:

Cycle 3 (2012-2013): Data collection begins in Montreal QC, the first of 16 national sites. Data collection response rates will be monitored regularly to ensure adequate representation of the Canadian population by age group and sex.

Four new measures in support of environmental contaminants include passive sampling and measurement of household tap water for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and fluoride; hearing tests to support examination of hearing loss and its association with noise exposure/noise pollution; a Fractional exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO) measurement that directly measures airway inflammation; and an objective test of skin pigmentation. 

Cycle 2 (2009-2011): Data processing and validation will begin in FY 2012-13, with the first data files planned for release and dissemination in the fall, 2012.

Cycle 1 (2007-2009): The first studies using stored samples from the CHMS biobank begin in 2012 according to published protocols. More than 50 studies based on CHMS data in 21 universities across Canada will continue in 2012 through the Research Data Centre Network.

11. Federal Partner(s): 

Health Canada (HC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13

PA 3.1 Sustainable Environmental Health

HECSB & PACCB

Environmental Health Guide for Canadians HECSB
3.0
HECSB
0.4
PACCB:
6.5
PACCB:
0.2
PA 3.1 Sub-total 9.5 0.6

PA 4.1 First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

FNIHB & PACCB

Environmental Health Guide for First Nations FNIHB:
1.5
FNIHB:
0.1
PACCB:
2.1
PACCB:
0.1
3.6 0.2
First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative 5.6 0.7
PA 4.1 Sub-Total 9.3 0.9
Total 18.7 1.5

Expected results by program:

  • Distribution of the Environmental Health Guides.
  • Increased online discussion of the link between health and home environments.
  • Tailored Guides for First Nations and Inuit Fall/Winter and Spring/Summer Outdoor activities are developed and distributed to aboriginal communities.
  • Continuation of the Environmental Health marketing campaign (mainstream and First Nations components).
  • Tailored environmental health product for seniors 65+ is published and distributed.
  • Preparation and distribution of a national report on the findings from the First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative.
  • Preparation of community reports on health survey results for that particular community.
  • Reliable and usable data for First Nation communities, researchers, and government on the health status of First Nations' exposure to environmental contaminants and enable comparison between First Nations and the Canadian population.
  • Participants and/or communities to take action to reduce exposure levels to chemical(s) of concern.

Statistics Canada (SC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
PA 2 Social Statistics Canadian Health Measures Survey 54.5 14.0
Total 54.5 14.0

Expected results by program:

  • CHMS Cycle 1: All data from Cycle 1 will be in the public domain and the CHMS biobank will be available for access by researchers according to published protocols. Access to the data by users and researchers, use of the data files in the Research Data Centres, publications in journals, media and other channels will be tracked and monitored.
  • CHMS Cycle 2: Data collection response rates are monitored regularly to ensure adequate representation of the Canadian population by age group and sex. Ongoing data quality control and data quality assurance activities, including observation of the data collection procedures by health experts, are performed to ensure a high data quality level.
  • CHMS Cycle 3: Specifications for data collection and processing applications, operations manuals and lab and clinic manuals will be developed in collaboration with health experts, through working groups and advisory committees, and federal partners through the tripartite governance structure between Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada. Pilot testing and feasibility studies will determine appropriate operational processes to ensure high response rates and quality data while ensuring adherence to planned resources.

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
PA 1.2 Surveillance and Population Health Assessment Enhanced Congenital Anomalies Surveillance 5.8 1.7
Surveillance of Developmental Disorders 5.3 1.7
Total 11.1 3.4

Expected results by program:

  • Enhanced Congenital Anomalies Surveillance: increased capacity in the provinces and territories for surveillance of congenital anomalies in their jurisdictions and strengthened networks across Canada for surveillance and research into prevention of congenital anomalies.
  • Surveillance of Developmental Disorders: a network for surveillance of autism in Canada and increased public health scientific capacity on autism within the federal government.

12. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

13. Contact information:

Suzanne Leppinen
Director
Chemicals Policy Bureau
Safe Environments Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Product Safety Branch
Health Canada
Telephone: 613-941-8071

Horizontal Initiative 4

Chemical Management Plan

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Chemicals Management Plan

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada (HC)/Environment Canada (EC)

3. Lead department program activity: Environmental Risks to Health (HC)/Substances and Waste Management (EC)

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-2012 (second phase)

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2015-2016 (second phase)

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $516 M

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Originally launched in 2006, the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) enables the Government of Canada to protect human health and the environment by addressing substances of concern in Canada. It is a science-based approach that includes:

  • setting priorities and government-imposed timelines for risk assessment and risk management for chemicals of concern;
  • enhancing research, monitoring and surveillance;
  • increasing industry stewardship and responsibilities for substances;
  • collaborating internationally on chemicals assessment and management;
  • communicating to Canadians the potential risks of chemical substances;
  • engaging industry to inform risk assessment and risk management action while also enhancing trust in the program.

Jointly managed by Health Canada and Environment Canada, the CMP brings all existing federal chemical programs together under a single strategy. This integrated approach allows the Government of Canada to address various routes of exposure to chronic and acute hazardous substances. It also enables use of the most appropriate management tools among a full suite of federal laws, which include the Canadian Environmental Projection Act, 1999, the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (which replaced the Hazardous Products Act in June 2011), the Food and Drugs Act, and the Pest Control Products Act

Building on lessons learned in the first four years of the program, CMP priority setting was refined and, under this phase of the CMP substances will be grouped to facilitate more efficient assessments, industry participation and risk management. Integration across government programs remains critical since many remaining substances are found in consumer, health, drug and other products. 

The same core functions continue: risk assessment; risk management, compliance promotion and enforcement; research; monitoring and surveillance; stakeholder engagement and risk communications; and policy and program management.

The following program areas are involved in CMP activities:

In Health Canada

Health Products and Food Branch:

  • Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate
  • Food Directorate
  • Natural Health Products Directorate
  • Policy, Planning and International Affairs Directorate
  • Therapeutics Products Directorate
  • Veterinary Drugs Directorate

Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:

  • Consumer Product Safety Directorate
  • Safe Environments Directorate
  • Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate

Pest Management Regulatory Agency

In Environment Canada

Environmental Stewardship Branch:

  • Chemicals Sector Directorate
  • Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Directorate
  • Public and Resources Sectors Directorate
  • Energy and Transportation Directorate
  • Environmental Protection Operations Directorate

Science and Technology Branch:

  • Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
  • Wildlife and Landscape Sciences Directorate
  • Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate
  • Water Science and Technology Directorate

Enforcement Branch

Strategic Policy Branch:

  • Economic Analysis Directorate

For more information, see the Government of Canada's Chemical Substances Portal

8. Shared outcome(s):

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Knowledge, information and data on substances of concern is used by HC and EC recipients to inform risk management, risk communication and stakeholder engagement, research, risk assessment, and monitoring and  surveillance activities;
  • Canadians and stakeholder groups understand information on the risks and safe use of substances of concern;
  • Targeted industry conforms or complies with requirements of risk management measures;
  • Targeted industry takes voluntary or enforced action to protect Canadians and the environment;
  • Targeted industry understands its obligations to take action to protect Canadians and the Environment.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Canadians use information on the risks and safe use of substances of concern to avoid or minimize risks posed by these substances;
  • Risks associated with harmful substances in humans, the environment, food and consumer products are prevented, minimized or eliminated.

Final Outcome:

  • Reduced threats to health and the environment from harmful substances.

9. Governance structure(s): In meeting their obligations pursuant to the CMP, EC and HC deliver their responsibilities through established internal departmental governance structures. CMP governance is assured through a joint Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee) and an Interdepartmental Chemicals Management Executive Committee (CMEC). These Committees were established to maximize the coordination of efforts, while minimizing duplication between the two departments.

The CMP ADM Committee provides strategic direction, coordination and a challenge function for the implementation and review of results and resource utilization of the CMP. The CMEC is the management committee at the Director General level to support the development of joint Health Canada/Environment Canada strategic directions. It is also a formal body for cooperation to ensure timely and concerted actions in implementing the CMP activities in an integrated fashion. The CMEC reports to the ADM Committee, providing recommendations on program implementation, results and resource utilization.

10. 2012-213 Planning Highlights: In 2012-2013, HC and EC will continue to assess and manage the potential health and ecological risks from the remaining high priority substances from the first phase of the CMP, including completion of assessments from the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach, as well as the assessment of other substances deemed to be a priority. Screening Assessment Reports and Risk Management Strategies for high priorities will be completed and risk management measures will continue to be developed, implemented, tracked and monitored. Work with other jurisdictions bilaterally and in multinational fora to undertake regional and multilateral efforts to manage chemicals of concerns will continue.

The next phase of the CMP will see the continued assessment and management of the potential health and ecological risks associated with approximately 1,500 substances by 2015 through the substance groupings initiative, rapid screening, and other approaches. During 2012-2013, data collection activities will take place for the following groups of substances:

Health Canada will continue to conduct risk assessments and develop and implement risk management measures to address risks posed by harmful chemicals in foods, consumer products, cosmetics and drinking water. Highlights for 2012-13 include the publication of regulations under the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act in Canada Gazette Part II for two CMP substances - (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) and 2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethanol (DEGME). Health Canada will also continue its review, listing and prioritization for assessment of risk due to presence in the environment of substances in Food and Drugs Act regulated products.

HC and EC will continue to conduct research and monitoring programs to address existing and emerging chemicals of concern, and to inform risk assessment needs and risk management activities. Specific monitoring activities include completion of the second cycle of the Canadian Health Measures Survey and preparation for the release of the biomonitoring results in 2013-2014. Research in support of current CMP themes and priorities will continue and opportunities for synergies with government organizations and universities will be explored. Ways and means of improving knowledge transfer will also be implemented.

Work will continue on substances/products regulated under the Food and Drugs Act, including the development of Environmental Assessment Regulations and non-regulatory initiatives, re-evaluation of food additives and food packaging materials and assessment of food contaminants as indicated by CMP screening assessments and new scientific knowledge.

Work will also continue on the re-evaluation of previously approved pesticides according to legislated timelines and requirements under the Pest Control Products Act, as well as on continuing to monitor health and environmental incidents related to pesticides, analyzing trends and sales data, and taking regulatory action as needed.

EC will continue to develop compliance strategies and enforcement plans and will continue to deliver related activities, to promote regulatees' awareness and understanding of, and compliance, with regulatory requirements for CMP substances. Focus will be on delivering compliance promotion activities for the highest priority instruments as determined by the compliance priority setting process.

11. Federal Partner(s):

Health Canada (HC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13

*$9.3M ($3.1M/year) from 2012-2013 to 2014-2015 not included for the Banting Retrofit. Funds earmarked in fiscal framework and the department will seek access to these funds moving forward.

Totals may differ within tables due to rounding of figures.

2.1 Health Products a. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 10.4 2.1
2.2 Food Safety and Nutrition a. Risk Assessment 5.8 1.2
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 5.3 1.1
c. Research 3.6 0.7
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 5.4 1.1
e. Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 1.0 0.2
2.3 Environmental Risks to Health a. Risk Assessment 57.5 11.5
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 72.7 14.5
c. Research* 42.2 7.3
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 43.3 8.7
e. Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications 10.1 2.0
f. Policy and Program Management 12.1 2.3
2.4 Consumer Products a. Risk Assessment 12.8 2.6
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 12.9 2.6
2.7 Pesticide Safety a. Risk Assessment 20.9 4.2
b. Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 4.4 0.9
c. Research 1.7 0.3
Internal Services 36.9 7.3
Total 359.2 70.6

Expected results by program:

  • Threats to the health of Canadians posed by environmental risks are reduced
  • Timely regulatory decisions for health products
  • Increased awareness of the benefits and risks associated with the use of health products
  • Timely regulatory system response to nutritional risks and food safety risks
  • Increased awareness of Canadians on the benefits and risks related to food safety, nutrition and healthy eating
  • Responsive regulatory system for consumer products
  • Increased consumer/industry awareness of health risks and regulatory requirements related to consumer products
  • Improved industry compliance with product safety obligations
  • Timely regulatory decisions for pesticides
  • Prevention of unacceptable risk from pesticides
  • Mitigation or risks of/from non-compliance associated with pesticides

Environment Canada (EC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
Totals may differ within tables due to rounding of figures.
3.1 Substances and Waste Management a. Risk Assessment  17.4 3.5
b. Risk Management 68.4 13.7
c. Research 9.0 1.8
d. Monitoring and Surveillance 24.6 4.9
3.3 Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution a. Compliance Promotion 4.3 0.9
b. Enforcement 11.3 2.3
Internal Services 12.4 2.5
Total 147.5 29.5

Expected results by program:

  • Threats to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by harmful substances and waste are reduced.
  • Unlawful releases of harmful substances into the environment are prevented or minimized through enforcement and promotion of Environment Canada-administered laws and regulations.
Federal Partners - Total Program Spending ($ millions)
Total* Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date): Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13:
*$9.3M ($3.1M/year) from 2012-2013 to 2014-2015 not included for the Banting Retrofit. Funds earmarked in fiscal framework and the department will seek access to these funds moving forward.
506.7 100.1

12. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

13. Contact information:

Suzanne Leppinen
Director
Chemicals Policy Bureau
Safe Environments Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
Telephone: (613) 941-8071

Stewart Lindale
Director
Legislative and Regulatory Affairs
Environmental Stewardship Branch
Environment Canada
Telephone: (819) 934-2358

Horizontal Initiative 5

Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada (HC)

3. Lead department program activity: First Nations and Inuit Health Primary Health Care

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

  • ECD component - October 2002
  • Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) component - December 2004

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

  • ECD component - ongoing
  • ELCC component - ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

  • ECD: $320 million 2002-03 to 2006-07 ($60 million in 2002-03 and $65 million thereafter). Ongoing: $65 million per year.
  • ELCC: $45 million 2005-06 to 2007-08 ($14.5 million in 2005-06; $15.3 million in 2006-07; $15.2 million in 2007-08). Ongoing: $14 million per year.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The goal of the Federal Strategy on Early Childhood Development for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children, announced in October 2002, is to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. This initiative allocated $320 million over first five years which was shared by Health Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

In December 2004, Cabinet approved an additional $45 million over three years (beginning fiscal year 2005-06) and $14 million ongoing for the ELCC component to improve integration and coordination of two ECD programs: Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve (AHSOR- Health Canada) and the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative (FNICCI- Human Resources and Skills Development Canada).

8. Shared outcome(s): The ECD component complements the September 2000 First Ministers F/P/T ECD Agreement. It seeks to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children by improving the developmental opportunities to which Aboriginal children (and their families) are exposed at an early age (0-6 years).

The ELCC component complements funding released to provinces and territories under the March 2003 Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Childcare (ELCC) to improve access to ELCC programs and services.

9. Governance structure(s):

  • Interdepartmental ECD ADM Steering Committee
  • Interdepartmental ECD Working Group

10. Planning highlights: In collaboration with partners and stakeholders, federal departments will continue to build on evidence to inform programming and capacity building efforts, and to enhance linkages and integrate services to better support Aboriginal children and families.

11. Federal Partner(s):

Health Canada (HC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
*The budget for the AHSOR program in 2009-2010 was $59 million which included $25 million historical funding, $21.5 million in enhanced funding under the Early Childhood Development (ECD) Federal Strategy, $7.5 million in Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) funds and $5 million under upstream investments.
First Nations and Inuit Health Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR)

107.595 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; 21.519/year).

21.519/year ongoing.*

Committed in 2002.

21.519

ELCC
24.0 (2005-06 through to 2007-08, 7.5 in 2005-06, 8.3 in 2006-07; 8.2 in 2007-08).

7.5 in 2008-09 and ongoing.

Committed in 2005.

7.5
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (FASD-FNIC)

70.0 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; 10.0 in 2002-03 and 15.0 thereafter).

15.0/ year ongoing.

Committed in 2002.

15.0
Capacity Building

5.075 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; 1.015/year).

1.015/ year ongoing.

Committed in 2002.

1.015
Total

From start to 2009-10
ECD: 295.272

ELCC: 39.0

ECD: 37.534

ELCC: 7.5

Electronic Link: For more information, please visit Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve and Fetal Alchohol Syndrom/Fetal Alcohol Effects

Expected results by program:

Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (ADSOR):

  • Ongoing program support and enhancement
  • Increase integration, coordination, access, and quality of programming (i.e. identify core competencies of workers/staff)

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (FASD-FNIC):

  • Program enhancement, i.e. develop strategies on how to implement the considerations put forward in both the FASD Community Coordinator Pilot Project Special Study and the FASD Mentoring Special Study with the goal of enhancing linkages and integrating services to support First Nations and Inuit women with addictions.

Capacity Building:

  • Increase capacity of National Aboriginal Organizations
  • Enhance capacity of community Early Childhood Education practitioners

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
Health Promotion Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) 62.880 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; 12.576/ year and ongoing. 12.576

5.0/year as per renewal of AHSUNC (2010-11).

Committed in 2002.

5.0
Capacity Building

2.5 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; 0.5/year) and ongoing.

Committed in 2002.

0.5
Total 109.608 18.076

Electronic Link: For more information, visit Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC)

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
The People - Social
Development
Capacity building

5.05 (total for 2001-03 through to 2006-07; 1.01/year and ongoing)

Committed in 2002.

1.01
Total 9.01 1.01

Expected results by program: Support horizontal work with ECD partners by funding research and capacity-building.

Federal Partners - Total Program Spending ($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners
(from Start to End Date)
Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13

ECD: $320 million 2002-03 to 2006-07 ($60 million in 2002-03 and $65 million thereafter).

Ongoing: $65 million per year.

ECD: 55.651

ELCC: $45 million 2005-06 to 2007-08 ($14.5 million in 2005-06; $15.3 million in 2006-07; $15.2 million in 2007-08).

Ongoing: $14 million per year.

ELCC: 7.5

Total 63.151

12. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

13. Contact Information:

Cathy Winters
Senior Policy Coordinator
Children and Youth Division
Community Programs Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9
Telephone: (613) 946-2896

Horizontal Initiative 6

Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (FCSAP)

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (FCSAP)

2. Name of lead department(s): The lead is shared between Health Canada (HC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

3. Lead department program:

  • HC: Health Products, Consumer Products Safety, Pesticide Safety and Food Safety and Nutrition;
  • CFIA: Food Safety Program;
  • PHAC: Health Promotion, Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, and Infectious Disease Prevention and Control;
  • CIHR: Health and Health Services Advances.

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: Fiscal Year 2008-2009.

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Fiscal Year 2012-2013 (and ongoing).

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $489.4 million over five years ending in Fiscal Year 2012-2013 (and $126.7 million ongoing).

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The federal government is responsible for promoting the health and safety of Canadians. A key part of this role is ensuring that the food, health and consumer products used by Canadians are safe. Adverse consequences associated with unsafe products impact not only the Canadian public, but also the Canadian economy. The FCSAP is a horizontal initiative aimed at modernizing and strengthening Canada's safety system for food, health and consumer products. A number of high-profile incidents, such as lead and ingestible magnets in children's toys, food borne illness outbreaks, and the global withdrawal of some prescription medicines, have underscored the need for government action.

The FCSAP includes efforts to modernize Canada's regulatory system to enable it to better protect Canadians from unsafe consumer products in the face of current realities and future pressures. The FCSAP bolsters Canada's regulatory system by committing to amending or replacing outdated health and safety legislation with new legislative regimes that respond to modern realities, and by enhancing safety programs in areas where modern legislative tools already exist. The FCSAP helps to ensure that Canadians have the information they need to assess the risks and benefits associated with the consumer and health products they choose to use, and to minimize risks associated with food safety.

The FCSAP is an integrated, risk-based plan and includes a series of initiatives that are premised on three key areas of action: active prevention, targeted oversight and rapid response. We focus on active prevention to avoid as many incidents as possible and work closely with industry to promote awareness, provide regulatory guidance, and help identify safety concerns at an early stage. Targeted oversight provides for early detection of safety problems and further safety verification at the appropriate stage in a product's life cycle. To improve rapid response capabilities and ensure the government has the ability to act quickly and effectively when needed, we work to enhance health and safety risk assessments, strengthen recall capacity, and increase the efficiency in responding and communicating clearly with consumers and stakeholders.

8. Shared outcome(s):

  • Increased knowledge of food risks and product safety (scientific and surveillance/monitoring);
  • Increased industry awareness and understanding of regulatory requirements;
  • Increased industry compliance with safety standards;
  • Increased consumer awareness and understanding of safety risks associated with health and consumer products and food;
  • Strengthened oversight and response to safety incidents;
  • Increased consumer confidence in health and consumer products and food;
  • Increased trade-partner confidence in Canadian controls, which meet international standards;
  • Increased availability of safe and effective products; and
  • Level playing field where imports can be demonstrated to meet Canadian requirements.

9. Governance structure(s): The Minister of Health and the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada have joint responsibility and accountability for results, and for providing information on progress achieved by the FCSAP.

A Governance Framework has been established and endorsed by all of the partner departments/agencies. To facilitate horizontal coordination, the following Director General (DG)/Executive Director (ED) level Task Forces have been established:

  • Legislative and Regulatory Task Force;
  • Health Products Task Force;
  • Consumer Products Task Force;
  • Food Task Force; and the
  • Communications Task Force.

These Task Forces report to a DG/ED level Coordinating Committee. An Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)/Vice President (VP) level Steering Committee provides direction to the Coordinating Committee. An Oversight Committee of Deputy Heads facilitates the provision of high level guidance to the Steering Committee.

Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) has primary responsibility for implementing FCSAP activities related to health products with support from Health Canada's Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) on one initiative (increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness).

Health Canada's Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch (HECSB) and the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), along with the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), work together to implement FCSAP activities related to consumer products.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) work together to implement FCSAP activities related to food.

The Public Affairs, Consultation and Communications Branch (PACCB) of Health Canada provides communications support for all of the above activities and will coordinate or lead many of the horizontal Departmental activities under the Consumer Information Strategy.

10. Planning Highlights: The FCSAP reflects the need to modernize and sharpen the focus of Government action to protect Canadians and responds to the economic realities and new technologies of the 21st century, such as globalization and the introduction of more complex products. The FCSAP is an integrated, risk-based plan with the streams of initiatives (premised on the three key areas of action) aligned to meet these needs.

11. Federal Partner(s):

Health Canada (HC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
Health Products Active Prevention 57.6 11.7
Targeted Oversight 34.6 10.2
Rapid Response Existing resources Existing resources
Consumer Products Safety Active Prevention 41.0 13.7
Targeted Oversight 15.7 4.9
Rapid Response 17.9 4.4
Pesticide Safety Active Prevention 6.9 1.6
Rapid Response 8.0 2.1
Food Safety and Nutrition Active Prevention 29.6 7.6
Rapid Response 1.3 0.3
Total 212.6 56.5

Expected results by program (HC):

Active Prevention

Regulatory modernization is an area of great importance for Health Canada. In 2012-13, the Health Products program will continue to engage stakeholders in discussions to support the policy development process for modernized regulatory frameworks.

In an effort to improve the safety, quality and efficacy of health products, the Health Products program will initiate regulatory change to include regulatory oversight of the manufacturing of active pharmaceutical ingredients. The Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) Inspection Program is dependent on the new API legislation, therefore, API inspections are not possible at this time and targets cannot be set until the regulatory amendments come into force. Planning and implementation work on inspection training, compliance and promotion, as well as on quality system documents continue while these regulations are pending.

As part of its review of drugs and medical devices, Health Canada prepares Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) documents to explain why certain products are authorized for sale in Canada. The documents include regulatory, safety, effectiveness and quality (chemistry and manufacturing) considerations.

Health Canada also produces Product Monographs (PM) that are factual, scientific documents on a drug product that describes the properties, claims, indications and conditions as well as information that may be required for the optimal, safe and effective use of the drug. The Product Monograph consists of three sections: Part 1 - Health Professional Information, i.e., prescribing information; Part 2 - Scientific Information; and Part 3 - Consumer Information. Health Canada will be finalising the plain language labelling improvements to PM Part III.

As part of the lifecycle approach, and in the absence of enabling legislation, Health Canada will continue reviewing Risk Management Plans (RMP) for therapeutic products. Generally, these plans are reviewed as part of a New Drug Submission and for various therapeutic health products in the post market setting. An RMP can be requested by Health Canada or submitted voluntarily by the manufacturer. It provides information related to identified and potential risks, strategies to characterize the risks in question, and a risk minimization plan. 

To increase awareness and compliance with regulatory requirements, Health Canada will continue to engage in pre-submission meetings with industry. These meetings provide the opportunity to better document, track, monitor and evaluate the exchange of information as well as obtain feedback regarding areas of concern prior to filing a submission. 

As technology adapts and Canadians look for their information in different ways -- via websites, smart phones, TV, and print materials - Health Canada continues to strive to offer information in a variety of new and traditional ways. In 2012-13, PACCB will continue to focus on improving the structure and content of our websites. We will launch a new Recalls and Safety Alerts Database making it easier for Canadians to find important safety information.

Expected Results: Increase industry awareness and knowledge of regulatory requirements; Enhance knowledge of post-market health products safety risks to inform decisions; increase oversight of the risk management and risk mitigation strategies for health products; increase safety of APIs through industry compliance with the Food and Drug Act (FDA) and its regulations; improve timeliness of pre-market reviews; increase awareness and understanding of the safe use of health products by consumers and health care professionals.

Performance Indicator: number of engagement opportunities with industry, international collaborations; number of guidance/educational tools developed; number of standards, frameworks and policies developed or modified; and number of consultations/ engagement activities with Canadians and target populations; improved timeliness of pre-market reviews; number risk management and mitigation plans received, reviewed and implemented; percent of API firms inspected.

Targeted Oversight

Through the National Border Integrity Program, Health Canada's ability to make and support admissibility decisions at the border as they relate to health products will be strengthened. This program was implemented in 2008 and is delivered by Health Canada. The program will continue to advance its ability to monitor and control the importation of health products by addressing challenges involved in reducing the health and safety risk for products entering Canada through the following initiatives: a national standardized process for the handling of health products at the border; establishment of service standards between Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and Health Canada to improve the ability to respond when safety incidents occur; and, undertaking public education activities to inform Canadians of risk associated with the importation of non-compliant health products. An interim compliance policy to address key border issues is intended to be implemented in fiscal year 2012-13. Meanwhile, Health Canada will continue to work to address these issues on a more permanent basis.

In addition, Health Canada will continue to enhance the post-market surveillance elements of the program through increased efforts focused on review of Periodic Safety Update Reports (PSURs) - documents that summarize the worldwide safety experience of a health product at pre-established post-authorization times. Furthermore, Health Canada will continue to seek opportunities to expand and enhance the Post Market Reporting Compliance (PMRC) inspection program, such as through a review of international best practices and the incorporation of additional elements to its inspections.

The Department will continue to work with its partners to increase reporting of adverse drug reactions through the Hospital-Based Mandatory Reporting Project for Adverse Drug Reactions. Implementation of mandatory reporting is however dependent upon the passing of relevant enabling legislation. Health Canada also promotes adverse reaction reporting through the Canada Vigilance Regional Offices, by way of outreach and promotional activities, as a way to increase health professional and consumer awareness of, and participation in, the Canada Vigilance Program. 

In partnership with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Health Canada has implemented the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN), a pan-Canadian network of centres of excellence in post-market pharmaceutical research, to fund studies that will inform pharmaceutical decision-making across the health care system. The DSEN partners (CIHR and Health Canada) will continue to work collaboratively to refine the processes and procedures to support DSEN research, including the development of a framework to prioritize DSEN research queries to reflect pan-Canadian needs for evidence on past market safety and effectiveness. 

Expected Results: Enhance capacity of Health Canada and industry to identify and respond to risk issues; increase capacity to identify safety issues with health products on the market; increase knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions and increase capacity to address priority research on post-market drug safety and effectiveness; improve ability to monitor and control importation of health products.

Performance Indicators: Year over year increase in PSUR submitted by industry; number new safety signals generated through PSUR reviews per year; percent of safety issues identified by Market Authorization Holders (MAH) resulting in product monograph changes or regulatory action to mitigate risk; percent of ARs addressed within service standards; number of import alerts resulting in detecting/stopping non-compliant products at the border.

Active Prevention

The Consumer Products Safety program will provide information to consumers and work closely with industry to promote awareness, provide regulatory guidance, help identify and systematically assess safety risks at early and ongoing stages of product development, develop standards and share best practices.

Targeted Oversight

Through targeted oversight actions, the Consumer Product Safety program works to detect safety problems as early as possible and at all stages in a product's life cycle. Under the new Canada Consumer Product Safety Act, Consumer Products Safety program has improved authorities to ensure investigative actions are being taken to determine the safety profile of products and to verify that preventative measures are being implemented.

Expected Results: Improved information and reporting of consumer product safety related incidents (by industry and consumers).

Rapid Response

The Government is equipped to respond rapidly to remove unsafe consumer products from shelves, preventing them from reaching consumers. While the Department continues to operate with a step-wise approach to compliance and enforcement by working with industry to voluntarily take corrective actions, the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) offers new measures to protect Canadians from unsafe consumer products. This includes a general prohibition against products that pose an unreasonable danger, the authority to order industry to recall* and/or take other corrective measures and in the case of industry's failure to act in a timely manner, Health Canada's ability to initiate a recall and/or corrective measures to ensure the health and safety of Canadians.

*Recall is a process by which the responsible establishment in Canada notifies consumers of the danger associated with a product and this notice should be accompanied by all of the following steps:

  • Stopping distribution of product by upper levels of trade;
  • Stopping sale of product by lower levels of trade;
  • Determining accounts/producing distribution lists and gathering necessary information pertaining to the recall;
  • Notifying accounts of the recall, with instructions to take specified measures (correct, return product/accept returns of products, disposal);
  • Removing product throughout supply chain; and,
  • Completing recall effectiveness form(s) and reporting on any reconciled product from accounts.

(The recall may also include other corrective measures in a separate order.)

Expected results: Increased consumer/industry awareness of health risks and regulatory requirements related to consumer products; Improved industry compliance** with product safety obligations.

**Compliance is measured by a monitoring approach. Compliance results are determined by monitoring activities following initial inspection. Due to the non-license (post-market) nature of the consumer products industry, compliance verification is limited to primary level establishments and targeted to the highest levels of trade.

Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) encourages and facilitates industry development and adoption of quality assurance and stewardship programs for the safe manufacture and subsequent selection and use of pesticides and other consumer products containing pesticides. Retailers of pest control products often rely on their distributors for validation of access to products with lapsed registrations, or which have never been registered. Work under this strategy fosters an increased knowledge of the requirements of the Pest Controls Products Act (PCPA) and an awareness of the tools available to validate the status of the pest control products and their label information.

PMRA enhances compliance targeting and enforcement capacity in support of expanded regulatory authority under the PCPA, and maintains public confidence in pesticide product safety. In conjunction with other federal and provincial regulators, Health Canada continues the development and implementation of an evidence and risk-based approach to identify and act on situations of higher risk associated with non-compliance. Activities continue to include the enhancement of current information/intelligence networks, analysis and an updated targeting strategy to verify the presence of compliance and the reasons that non-compliance was found to exist. Activities also include an updated strategy to address the importation of unregistered consumer pesticides where the safety would be unknown.

The PMRA also provides information to consumers through outreach programs, these initiatives are critical in promoting the safe and proper use of pesticides and ensuring risk reduction practices are established along the entire supply chain. The compliance strategies under active prevention aim to engage stakeholders in order to test assumptions about the ability and will to comply in a timely and effective manner with enforcement actions.

Expected results: Increased awareness and understanding of product safety obligations, standards and regulatory requirements by industry; improved risk-based monitoring of products.

Active Prevention

The Food Safety and Nutrition program will continue to support the Government as it develops and seeks Parliamentary approval for amendments to food safety legislation.

Health Canada will continue to enhance risk management measures for priority food safety hazards in foods, implement Food Allergy Incident Prevention Measures, consult with industry and stakeholders on key files, and engage with international standards bodies while developing standards, policies, regulations and processes.

Expected Results: Increased effective assessment and mitigation strategies of food safety risks.

Performance Indicators: number of risk modelling activities conducted, number and type of involvement in International initiatives that support industry, number and type of involvement with international standard setting initiatives, percent and range of new submissions addressed within time standards, research in policy and RIAS, as well as the considerations of consumer and stakeholder feedback documented in decision-making.

Targeted Oversight

The Food Safety & Nutrition program has no targeted oversight funding under this stream.

Rapid Response

Under the rapid response pillar the Food Safety and Nutrition program will continue its participation in the Partnership for Consumer Food Safety Education with the goal of promoting the "Be Food Safe" campaign and will continue to develop new education materials for consumers to promote food safety in an effort to reduce foodborne disease outbreaks in Canada.

Expected Results: Consumers make informed decisions about food.

Performance Indicators: percent of consumers aware and knowledgeable of their role in food safety, and how this is used in decision-making.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
Food Safety Program
and
Internal Services
Active Prevention 114.2 27.3
Targeted Oversight 77.0 21.9
Rapid Response 32.2 7.2
Total 223.4 56.4

Expected results by program (CFIA):

Active Prevention

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) food safety initiatives aimed at ensuring active prevention include measures to enable government to better understand and identify food safety risks and to work with industry to implement effective food safety risk mitigation strategies. The CFIA, along with its federal partners, will strive to strengthen food safety standards and regulations and will engage Canadians in making decisions with respect to food safety.

In 2012-13, the CFIA will continue to support the Government as it develops and seeks Parliamentary approval for amendments to food safety legislation, and will move forward with its Imported Food Sector Product Regulations regulatory proposal under the Canada Agricultural Products Act.

The CFIA will continue to work with Health Canada on data collection and risk mapping towards identification and characterization of areas of concern, including imported food ingredients, produce, mycotoxins in cereals and undeclared allergens. Risk mapping will identify gaps in standard-setting and policy development and will assist in focusing operational efforts on areas of greatest risk. Data collected through baseline surveillance will serve to fill information gaps.

The CFIA will continue engagement with counterparts in foreign countries to enhance food safety information exchange and identify best practices to inform risk management approaches.

The CFIA will continue to revise its food safety programming for verification of industry food safety systems in high-risk sectors and IM/IT business solutions for supporting importer licensing will be further developed. As well, the CFIA will also continue to inform consumers and industry on the Canadian Food Labelling Initiative and the use of Product of Canada and Made in Canada claims on food products.

Expected results: To better identify, assess, and prioritize potential food safety hazards through risk mapping, information gathering, and sampling and testing of foods on the Canadian marketplace and to inform the relevant Agency stakeholders on relative risk in order to influence decisions and priorities for different food/hazard combinations; improved industry compliance; industry implementation of preventive food safety systems; establishment of standards, regulations, and policies that contribute to the prevention of food safety issues through the product lifecycle.

Performance indicators: number of planned and percent completed commodity / hazard targeted surveys to address information gaps; number of risk profiles completed; percent completion of re-engineered risk prioritization, profiling, and mapping approaches; number of consultations held with industry and other jurisdictions; percent completion of revised approaches to food safety system verification; number of inquiries related to Product of Canada guidelines; percent completion of the supporting IM/IT infrastructure and tool for importer licensing management

Targeted Oversight

In 2012-13, the CFIA will continue to adapt its food safety inspection practices for high-risk sectors. Evaluation and verification of industry's food safety control systems in both fresh fruit and vegetable and non-federally registered sectors will take place with a focus on imported products. Method development and testing in targeted areas will continue, and front-line capacity will continue to increase. Border blitz will be conducted, and IM/IT business solutions for supporting enhanced tracking of imported food products will be further developed.

Expected results: Improved industry compliance with food safety standards; modern tools and new risk-based approaches contribute to improved safety of imported foods.

Performance indicators: number and percent of planned high-risk food safety inspections and verifications completed; number of border blitzes conducted; percent completion of the supporting IM/IT infrastructure and enhancements to tools for import tracking; number required and percent in place of new hires to support increased import tracking and enhanced inspection / verification activities; number and percent of new testing methodologies developed and implemented.

Rapid Response

Towards ensuring rapid response to food safety issues and emergencies, enhanced recall capacity will enable the Government of Canada to effectively respond to and conduct investigations for an anticipated increased number of food recalls resulting from targeted oversight activities. Targeted consumer risk communication activities and products will also improve Canadian's awareness of food safety issues and recalls and will help consumers better protect their health.

In 2012-13, the CFIA will continue to augment human resource capacity to address identified food safety issues. Enhancements to food safety recall and investigation methodology will continue.

Expected results: Timely and efficient recall capacity in the face of increased identification of potential risks through targeted testing and other information; better public understanding of food safety risks; increased consumer use of various food safety alert systems; and increased public trust and confidence in the food safety system.

Performance indicators: number of personnel trained and available to support recall activities; number of recalls and percent conducted in accordance with CFIA standards; number of and percent of required investigations conducted in accordance with CFIA standards; number of communications initiatives aimed at increasing consumer awareness of food safety issues and recall; percent of consumers aware of food safety issues.

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
Surveillance and Population Health Assessment Targeted Oversight 22.8 5.3
Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation Targeted Oversight 3.5 1.00534
Total 26.3 6.30534

Expected results by program (PHAC):

Targeted Oversight

Through ongoing and expanded data collection, analysis and reporting on the rates, patterns and circumstances of unintentional injury of Canadians, focusing on children and seniors, PHAC will contribute to the evidence base for policies, practices and programs for injury prevention and control.

Expected results: 1) More and better data on accidents, injuries, illnesses and deaths due to consumer products. 2) Engagement of risk assessment stakeholders.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

Federal Partner Program Spending ($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012-13
Health and Health Services Advances Targeted Oversight 27.1 9.0
Total 27.1 9.0

Expected results by program (CIHR):

Targeted Oversight

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research will make investments and focus efforts in advancing the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network to increase the available evidence on drug safety and effectiveness to regulators, policy-makers, health care providers and patients and to increase capacity within Canada to undertake high-quality post-market research in this area.

Work will continue on engaging interested parties during the development of the Network, delivering on peer reviewed funding opportunities for the initiative and responding to strategic direction received from the DSEN Steering Committee.

Expected results: Increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions and increased capacity in Canada to address priority research on post-market drug safety and effectiveness.

Performance Indicators: Evidence of the dissemination of research knowledge to the target audience.

Federal Partners - Total Program Spending ($ millions)
Total* Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date): Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13:
Health Canada 56.5
Canadian Food and Inspection Agency 56.4
Public Health Agency of Canada 6.30534
Canadian Institutes of Health Research 9.0
Total 128.20534

12. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

13. Contact information: N/A

Top of Page

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Please note that this document was prepared prior to Budget 2012 and therefore does not reflect Budget announcements.

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS)

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Social Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2011

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2014

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $396.8M over three years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) promotes strategic partnerships and structures, including transitional and supportive housing solutions and supports, to assist homeless persons and those at risk of homelessness to move toward self-sufficiency. The HPS recognizes that a stable living arrangement is a basic requirement for improving health, parenting, education, and employment. As a result, communities are encouraged to develop longer-term solutions to address their homelessness-related needs.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy:

  • Serves as a catalyst for partnerships at the community level, between governments and across the federal government;
  • Provides communities with resources and information to target homelessness supports and services to the areas of greatest need based on local circumstances;
  • Invests funds in a manner that targets the greatest needs and affected client groups while ensuring that those investments complement those of other stakeholders and partners; and,
  • Enhances understanding of homelessness among communities, partners and stakeholders, as well as all orders of government, through knowledge development and dissemination as well as results reporting and analysis.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy has seven funding streams:

The first three funding streams focus on the needs of homeless and at-risk individuals at the local level, and provide funding to help them gain and maintain a stable living arrangement. These streams are delivered regionally through the Program Operations Branch:

  • Designated Communities;
  • Rural and Remote Homelessness; and,
  • Aboriginal Homelessness.

The remaining four streams, delivered nationally through the Income Security and Social Development Branch (Homelessness Partnering Secretariat), provide the means to develop and explore innovative methods, as well as horizontal approaches, to address issues related to homelessness including: effective reporting; accountability; data development and collection; evidence-based knowledge development; the sharing of best practices; and making surplus federal real properties available to communities:

  • Federal Horizontal Pilot Projects (FHPP);
  • Homelessness Knowledge Development (HKD);
  • National Homelessness Information System (NHIS); and
  • Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative (SFRPHI).

For more information, please visit the Homelessness Partnering Strategy website: Web site of HRSDC

Shared outcome(s): Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Governance structure(s): The Homelessness Partnering Strategy community-based program is delivered via two models:

  • Community Entity model: Under this model, the federal government entrusts a community body, often the community's municipal government, through a single contribution agreement with the ability to select and manage HPS projects in their area. This includes: publishing Calls for Proposals based on the priorities identified in the Community Plan; approving projects recommended by a Community Advisory Board (CAB); contracting and monitoring all agreements it holds with third-party service providers; reporting on CAB activities and disbursements; and, reporting on the results and outcomes for these agreements.
  • Shared Delivery model: Under this model, HRSDC works in partnership with the community, through a CAB, to support funding priorities resulting in a joint selection of projects and decision-making process. Where appropriate, partners also include the province/territory. HRSDC is responsible for project approvals, negotiation of contribution agreements, and monitoring.

A formal Canada-Quebec Agreement defines how the program is delivered in Quebec.

Work will continue to strengthen bilateral arrangements with provinces and territories in order to better coordinate policy and program priorities and complement efforts to address the needs of individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Areas of engagement with provinces and territories will vary according to the interests of each jurisdiction and could include, for example: facilitating officials' membership on HPS Community Advisory Boards and Regional Advisory Boards; data collection and sharing; exchanging research and knowledge; and, consultations on program development.

The Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative (SFRPHI) makes surplus federal real properties available to community organizations, the not-for-profit sector, and other levels of government for projects to help prevent and reduce homelessness. The SFRPHI is a horizontal initiative under HPS, which HRSDC manages in partnership and in collaboration with Public Works and Government Services Canada as well as the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.

Planning Highlights: Planning highlights for 2012–2013 focus on implementing the renewed HPS to better prevent and reduce homelessness across Canada while introducing several enhancements for the 2011–2014 period.

Specific 2012–2013 planning highlights include:

  • Strengthening accountability through increased data collection;
  • Increasing the relevance and dissemination of research;
  • Engaging with provinces and territories on HPS at the corporate and local level to complement efforts in the prevention and reduction of homelessness;
  • Focusing on labour market integration to help homeless individuals access the labour market;
  • Working horizontally with other federal departments and agencies to address homelessness among key populations of federal interest;
  • Using early findings from the Mental Health Commission of Canada to inform future directions; and
  • Strengthening the community based model by revitalizing community infrastructure (CABs/CEs).

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Social Development Homelessness Partnering Strategy - regionally Delivered Projects $381.0M $147.4M
Federal Horizontal Pilot Projects (Examples of federal partners for this initiative include Health Canada, Justice Canada, Veteran Affairs, and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada) $2.6M $1.0M
Homelessness Knowledge Development $2.6M $1.0M
National Homelessness Information System $1.6M $0.6M
Total $387.8M $150M

Expected Results:

  • Continued availability of essential supports and facilities within communities for individuals who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.
  • New projects funded based on identified priorities from 2011-2014 Community Plans.
  • Projects that receive funding through the Designated Communities funding stream demonstrate cost-matching by other partners.
  • Pilot projects are developed and implemented to facilitate broader involvement of federal departments and agencies in developing solutions to homelessness.
  • Understanding of homelessness issues and improved dissemination of research findings at the community level is increased.
  • Increased number of shelters with data exported to NHIS.

Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative $9.0M $3.0M
Total $9.0M $3.0M

Expected Results: Communities have enhanced capacity to provide facilities for use by individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-2013
$396.8M $153.0M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

Contact information:
Barbara Lawless, Director General
Homelessness Partnering Secretariat
Income Security and Social Development Branch
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Québec K1A 0J9
(819) 997-5464
barbara.lawless@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Youth Employment Strategy (YES)

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Skills and Employment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Through the Youth Employment Strategy (YES), the Government of Canada is working to provide young Canadians with both valuable work experience and earnings to help transition to the labour market and support their further education. The Youth Employment Strategy supports Canadian youth as they move into the workforce. The Strategy plays a role in developing Canada's workforce by providing young Canadians with access to programs and services to help them gain the skills, knowledge, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment and make a successful transition into the labour force.

The Youth Employment Strategy is designed to respond to labour market challenges facing youth, aged 15 to 30. The Strategy has three program streams: Skills Link, Career Focus and Summer Work Experience, which includes the Canada Summer Jobs initiative. Skills Link provides youth-at-risk with opportunities to develop the skills they need to find work or return to school. Career Focus helps post-secondary graduates find work in their area of specialization. Summer Work Experience helps secondary and post-secondary students acquire career-related skills and financing for their education through summer jobs.

The Government of Canada's support for young Canadians is a shared responsibility and a partnership effort among many departments and organizations. Human Resources and Skills Development, along with 10 other federal government departments, work cooperatively with other levels of government, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, the private sector, and not-for-profit and voluntary sector organizations to deliver Youth Employment Strategy initiatives.

Shared outcome(s):

The shared outcomes of partners for the common key results are:

  • Number of youth served
  • Number of youth employed / self-employed
  • Number of youth returning to school

Governance structure(s): The Youth Employment Strategy has in place a horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework that represents a commitment among the eleven participating federal departments to undertake ongoing collection of common performance management data to ensure effective overall performance management of the program.

Oversight of the Youth Employment Strategy horizontal initiative is provided through a collaborative committee structure. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for facilitating coordination among the departments and agencies funding Youth Employment Strategy activities. As lead of this horizontal initiative, HRSDC chairs and is responsible for the coordination and management of the Youth Employment Strategy Interdepartmental Operations Committee and the Youth Employment Strategy Evaluation Sub-Committee. HRSDC is ultimately accountable for attaining the expected results for the Youth Employment Strategy and has the ultimate decision-making authority for issues related to the overall policy, design and implementation of the Youth Employment Strategy.

Youth Employment Strategy initiatives are delivered nationally, regionally and locally using a variety of funding instruments, such as contribution agreements and some direct delivery methods. Transfer payments are provided primarily by participating departments through contribution agreements and service delivery agreements in support of participants' remuneration and overhead costs.

Planning Highlights: As lead, HRSDC will continue to support implementation of the YES across the eleven participating federal departments with a focus on program results and performance monitoring, and preparing the YES summative evaluation scheduled to begin in 2012.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Career Focus Ongoing $13.0M
Skills Link Ongoing $123.3M
Summer Work Experience Ongoing $111.5M
Total Ongoing $247.8M

Expected Results:

Career Focus:
Projected Range of Results

For POB-Service Canada:
Clients Served: 494
Employed or Self-Employed: 291
Return to School: 31
Contribution Agreements: 150
Funds Leveraged: $4.0M-$6.0M

For Sector Council:
Clients Served: 350
Employed or Self-Employed: 309
Return to School: 35
Contribution Agreements: 163
Funds Leveraged: TBD

Skills Link

For POB-Service Canada
Projected Range of Results

Clients Served: 12,283
Employed or Self-Employed: 3,876
Return to School: 1,351
Contribution Agreements: 750
Funds Leveraged: $50.0M-$65.0M

Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-food Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Career Focus   $1.1M
Total   $1.1M

Federal Partner: Canadian International Development Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Career Focus   $7.2M
Total   $7.2M

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Career Focus   $0.9M
Summer Work Experience   $7.9M
Total   $8.8M

Federal Partner: Environment Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Career Focus   $3.3M
Total   $3.3M

Federal Partner: Industry Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Career Focus   $3.6M
Summer Work Experience   $3.5M
Total   $7.1M

Federal Partner: National Research Council

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Career Focus   $5.4M
Total   $5.4M

Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Career Focus   $0.6M
Total   $0.6M

Federal Partner: Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Skills Link   $1.0M
Total   $1.0M

Federal Partner: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Skills Link   $15.9M
Summer Work Experience   $8.1M
Total   $24.0M

Federal Partner: Parks Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Summer Work Experience   $2.0M
Total   $2.0M

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-2013
Ongoing

Total Career Focus:
$35.1M

Total Skills Link:
$140.2M

Total Summer Work Experience:
$133.0M

Total Youth Employment Strategy:
$308.3M


Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

Contact information: John Atherton, Director General
Active Employment Measures
Skills and Employment Branch
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Québec K1A 0J9
(819) 994-6916
john.atherton@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP)

Note: The June 2007 start date represents the latest authorities for the Temporary Foreign Worker program. The planned spending figures are for Citizenship and Immigration Canada and HRSDC only. Figures exclude planned spending for other government departments such as Department of Foreigh Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) and Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) and therefore do not represent the full Government of Canada costs for the Temporary Foreign Worker Program.

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Skills and Employment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 13, 2007

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) enables Canadian employers to hire foreign workers on a temporary basis to meet immediate skills and labour needs when Canadians are not available, subject to employers and workers meeting specified criteria. The Program is jointly managed by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The TFWP includes program streams such as: Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program, Live-in-Caregiver Program, Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training, and several Labour Market Opinion (LMO) exempt streams.

In the province of Quebec, the TFWP is administered through a partnership with the Government of Quebec, as referenced in the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration.

The Temporary Foreign Worker Program is funded from the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Web site of HRSDC

Shared outcome(s):

  • Employers' temporary human resource needs are addressed;
  • Temporary Foreign Workers' rights and protections are respected;
  • Entry of eligible temporary foreign workers into Canada in a timely manner;
  • Temporary migration that is consistent with federal, provincial and territorial regulations, standards and international obligations; and,
  • Migration that significantly benefits Canada's economic, social, and cultural development.

Governance structure(s):

  • HRSDC is responsible for providing a LMO to CIC and employers indicating whether the employment of the temporary foreign worker is likely to have a positive, negative or neutral impact on the labour market in Canada, and processes LMO applications to support the work permit application process.
  • CIC is responsible for assessing work permit applications and issuing work permits to workers.
  • Each Department is responsible for the design and management of those elements of the program under its Minister's responsibility.

Planning Highlights: HRSDC in partnership with CIC will implement TFWP regulatory changes, which will include enhancements to the Program that will strengthen worker protection and improve program integrity. A key part of the process will be to monitor the implementation of the Quality Assurance Framework training and materials in order to ensure consistency and compliance in the application of all program directives and guidelines. These directives include the evaluation of the genuineness of job offers made to foreign nationals, and restricting program access to employers failing to meet commitments to workers with respect to wages, working conditions and/or the occupation.

In addition, HRSDC will continue to work with other government departments and the provinces and territories to develop information sharing agreements. These agreements will assist with the administration and enforcement of the Program as well as provincial/territorial employment standards and occupational health and safety legislation.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Skills and Employment Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing $38.6M
Total Ongoing $38.6M

Expected Results:

Program enhancement including those to strengthen worker protection, enhance program integrity and respond to the recommendations of the Auditor General of Canada.

  • Implement activities outlined in the HRSDC TFWP Response Plan to the Red Tape Reduction Commission. Initiatives include:
    • strengthen operational guidance through the implementation of a Quality Assurance Framework;
    • improve processing of applications with the launch of the TFWP Web Service;
    • better assessment of wage information with the development of a new wage methodology;
  • Develop an accelerated and simplified LMO application process;
  • Work with Service Canada to implement an enhanced TFWP employer compliance framework;
  • Continuing to work toward information sharing protocols and authorities with Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA);
  • Exploring the development of a policy for on-site employer visits and the extension of additional monitoring activities for the Live-in Caregiver Program
  • Reporting publicly on TFWP outcomes, including program statistics, and results of employer compliance reviews where possible
  • Continue to develop and implement information sharing agreements with other government programs/departments and provinces/territories to assist in the administration and enforcement of employment standards and occupational health and safety legislation;
  • Complete a joint HRSDC-CIC summative program evaluation of the TFWP, with results expected in 2012-2013, and develop a Management Action Plan;
  • Collaborate with CIC in efforts to modernize the TFWP;
  • Partner and participate with CIC in joint F-P/T Temporary Foreign Workers Working groups; and,
  • Negotiate and implement, with CIC, Federal-Provincial Temporary Foreign Worker Annexes.

Federal Partner: Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Temporary Resident Program Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing $23.3M
Total Ongoing $23.3M

Expected Results:

  • Complete a joint HRSDC – CIC evaluation of the LMO streams of the TFWP, with results expected in 2012-2013, and develop a Management Action Plan;
  • Collaborate with HRSDC in efforts to modernize the TFWP;
  • Partner and participate with HRSDC in joint Federal-Provincial/Territorial Temporary Foreign Workers working groups; and,
  • Negotiate and implement, with HRSDC, Federal-Provincial Temporary Foreign Worker Annexes;
  • Implement activities outlined in the CIC TFWP response plan to the Red Tape Reduction Commission.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-2013
Ongoing $61.9M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

Contact information: Andrew Kenyon, Director General
Temporary Foreign Worker and Labour Market Information Directorate
Skills and Employment Branch
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0J9
(819) 994-1021
andrew.kenyon@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca




Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Child Benefit Program Initiative

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Income Security

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 1998

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Through the Federal-Provincial/Territorial (F-P/T) National Child Benefit (NCB) initiative, the Government of Canada is working with provincial and territorial governments1 to provide income support, as well as benefits and services, for low-income families with children. The initiative also includes a First Nations component.

Shared outcome(s): The National Child Benefit initiative has three goals:

  • Help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty;
  • Promote attachment to the labour market by ensuring that families will always be better off as a result of working; and,
  • Reduce overlap and duplication by harmonizing program objectives and benefits and simplifying administration.

Annual National Child Benefit Progress Reports include information on the level of spending by all jurisdictions. There is a data collection process to which all participating jurisdictions contribute to in order to present comparable information on National Child Benefit initiatives. The data submitted by each jurisdiction is reviewed jointly to ensure consistency in reporting. To obtain the most recent Progress Report or for further information, please visit the Federal-Provincial/Territorial National Child Benefit website: http://www.nationalchildbenefit.ca/eng/home.shtml.

Federal Spending:

The Government of Canada contributes to the National Child Benefit initiative through a supplement to its Canada Child Tax Benefit. In addition to the base benefit of the Canada Child Tax Benefit, which is targeted to both low- and middle-income families, the National Child Benefit Supplement provides extra income support to low-income families with children. Federal spending on the Canada Child Tax Benefit is tracked by the Canada Revenue Agency, which is responsible for the delivery of the National Child Benefit Supplement (NCB).

The federal government provided $3.76B through the NCB Supplement in the 2010-2011 benefit year (July 2010 to June 2011). By 2011-2012, total annual federal support delivered through the Canada Child Tax Benefit, including the NCB Supplement, is projected to reach $10.37B, including a projected $3.81B through the NCB Supplement.

Provincial and Territorial and First Nations Spending:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The latest F-P/T NCB Progress Report, the National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2007, reports that in 2007-2008, total reinvestments and investments for provinces, territories, and First Nations were estimated at $836M in programs and services. These programs and services include child/day care initiatives; child benefits and earned income supplements; early childhood services and children-at-risk services; supplementary health benefits; and youth initiatives. First Nations investments and reinvestments in programs and services were estimated at $54.8M in 2007-2008.

Indicators and Impacts:

The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2007 includes an analysis of both societal level indicators, which measure areas such as low income and labour force attachment, and direct outcome indicators, which measure only those changes that are directly attributed to the National Child Benefit initiative.

With respect to societal level indicators, the report shows that the proportion of families with children living in low income has declined significantly since the mid-1990s, decreasing from 17.6 percent in 1996 to 10.5 percent in 2005, based on Statistics Canada's post-tax low-income cut-offs. During this period, the number of children living in low income decreased from 1,304,000 in 1996 to 787,894 in 2005, a decrease of approximately 516,106 children.

Further, using the Market Basket Measure (MBM), the report estimates that in 2005, as a direct result of the National Child Benefit initiative:

  • 171,100 children in 78,800 families were prevented from living in low income in 2005, a reduction of 13.7 percent. This means that in 2005, there were 13.7 percent fewer families with children living in low income than there would have been without the National Child Benefit. These families saw their average disposable income increase by an estimated $2,400, or 9.5 percent.
  • For those families with children who remained in low income, the National Child Benefit improved their disposable income by an average of $1,900 (10.7 percent). This means that the low-income gap (the additional amount of income needed by low-income families to reach the low-income line) was reduced by 20.4 percent in 2005.

In addition, in June 2005, federal, provincial and territorial governments released a synthesis report of a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the National Child Benefit initiative (1998-1999, 1999-2000, and 2000-2001). The evaluation compiled evidence from a number of studies and showed that the National Child Benefit initiative is meeting its goals. In addition, a second evaluation is underway.

For a complete discussion of indicators, please see Chapters 5 and 6 of the National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2007. For a discussion of evaluation results, please see the Evaluation of the National Child Benefit Initiative: Synthesis Report. These reports are available free of charge on the National Child Benefit website, at: http://www.nationalchildbenefit.ca/eng/home.shtml.

Governance structure(s): The National Child Benefit initiative Governance and Accountability Framework outlines the key characteristics of the federal, provincial and territorial partnership: cooperation, openness, flexibility, evolution and accountability. As a co-operative effort among governments, the National Child Benefit initiative combines the strengths of a national program with the flexibility of provincial and territorial initiatives designed to meet the specific needs and conditions within each jurisdiction.

With respect to accountability, under the Governance and Accountability Framework, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services have committed to sharing data on reinvestment initiatives and reviewing results and outcomes achieved in order to identify best practices. Federal, provincial and territorial governments have also agreed to report annually to the public with a primary focus on the performance of the initiative. To date, nine annual progress reports have been published, as well as a synthesis report on a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the initiative.

The Federal Role:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, the Government of Canada provides additional income support to low-income families with children via the National Child Benefit Supplement component of the Canada Child Tax Benefit. Canada Revenue Agency delivers these benefits to families.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, and the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development represents the Government of Canada in this F-P/T initiative.

The Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency. Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.

The Provincial and Territorial Role:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The initiative is designed so that provinces, territories and First Nations have the flexibility to develop and deliver programs and services that best meet the needs and priorities of their communities. As part of this flexibility, provinces and territories may adjust social assistance or child benefit payments by the full or partial amount of the National Child Benefit Supplement. This approach has resulted in families on social assistance being no worse off in terms of their level of benefits, while providing additional funds for new or enhanced provincial and territorial programs benefitting low-income families with children.

As the National Child Benefit initiative has matured, the majority of provinces and territories no longer recover increases to the National Child Benefit Supplement. This means that the vast majority of children living in low-income families, including those on social assistance, are currently receiving some or all of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

Under the National Reinvestment Framework, provincial and territorial governments, along with First Nations, have committed to re-allocating available social assistance funds into benefits and services for children in low-income families that further the goals of the initiative. Jurisdictions have focused reinvestments primarily in key areas:

  • Child Benefits and Earned Income Supplements;
  • Child Care;
  • Early Childhood Services and Children-at-Risk Services;
  • Supplementary Health Benefits; and,
  • Youth Initiatives.

First Nations Role:

The federal government is responsible for ensuring programs for First Nations children on reserve are comparable to those available to other Canadian children. Under the National Child Benefit, First Nations have the flexibility to reinvest savings from adjustments to social assistance into programs and services tailored to meet the needs and priorities of individual communities. Some 500 First Nations participate in the National Child Benefit initiative and implement their own programs.

Planning Highlights: In 2012-2013, HRSDC will work with its federal, provincial and territorial partners to finalize and release the 2008 NCB Progress Report. (As noted above, F-P/T Ministers Responsible for Social Services release an annual report on the progress of the initiative).

Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency2

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-2013
Administers the National Child Benefit Supplement and delivers income benefits directly to low income families. National Child Benefit Supplement Ongoing $3.94B(projected)
Total Ongoing $3.94B(projected)

1 The Government of Québec has stated that it agrees with the basic principles of the National Child Benefit. Québec chose not to participate in the initiative because it wanted to assume control over income support for children in Québec; however, it has adopted a similar approach to the National Child Benefit. Throughout this text, references to joint federal, provincial and territorial positions do not include Québec.

2 While Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, the Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency. In addition, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.

Expected Results: Continued progress on the goals of the National Child Benefit initiative, as described in the "Shared Outcomes", above.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-2013
Ongoing $3.94B (projected)

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

Contact information:
Siobhan Harty, Director General
Social Policy Directorate
Strategic Policy and Research Branch
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0J9
(613) 994-3184
siobhan.harty@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Early Childhood Development Agreement

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: N/A

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: September 2000 with funding beginning April 2001

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): In September 2000, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for Social Services reached agreement to improve and expand early childhood development supports for young children (prenatal to age 6) and for their parents.

Under the Early Childhood Development Agreement, the Government of Canada agreed to transfer $500M per year via the Canada Social Transfer (CST) to provinces and territories. In Budget 2007, the CST was renewed until 2013-2014 and a 3% escalator was added to CST transfers starting in 2009-2010.

Information about the Agreement, including the text of the First Ministers' communiqué on Early Childhood Development, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at: www.ecd-elcc.ca.

Shared outcome(s): The objectives of the initiative, as outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement, are:

  • to promote early childhood development so that, to their fullest potential, children will be physically and emotionally healthy, safe and secure, ready to learn, and socially engaged and responsible; and,
  • to help children reach their potential and to help families support their children within strong communities.

Governance structure(s): In the Early Childhood Development Agreement, First Ministers recognized that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early childhood development programs and services. Federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for Social Services and Ministers of Health are responsible for implementation of the commitments in the Agreement.

Planning Highlights: As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer (CST), provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners:

Provincial and territorial governments are investing the funds transferred to them by the Government of Canada in any or all of the following four areas of action outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement:

  • promoting healthy pregnancy, birth and infancy;
  • improving parenting and family supports;
  • strengthening early childhood development, learning and care; and,
  • strengthening community supports.

All participating federal, provincial and territorial governments have committed to three reporting requirements:

  • Each government released a first report on Early Childhood Development programs and expenditures for the 2000-2001 fiscal year, providing a baseline against which new investments can be tracked;
  • In fall 2002, governments began annual reporting, using a shared framework with comparable program indicators, to track progress in improving and expanding early childhood development programs and services within the four areas for action; and,
  • In fall 2002, governments began regular reporting on children's well-being, using a common set of outcome indicators.

The Government of Québec supports the general principles expressed in the Early Childhood Development Initiative but did not participate in developing the initiative because it wishes to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Contact information:
Siobhan Harty, Director General
Social Policy
Strategic Policy & Research Branch
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0J9
Telephone: (819) 994-3184
siobhan.harty@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: N/A

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): In March 2003, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for Social Services, reached agreement on a framework for improving access to affordable, quality, provincially and territorially regulated early learning and child care programs and services. Under the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, the Government of Canada provided $1.05 billion over five years (2003-2008) through the Canada Social Transfer (CST) to support provincial and territorial government investments in early learning and child care. In Budget 2007 the CST was renewed until 2013-2014 and a 3% escalator was added to CST transfers starting in 2009-2010. The Government of Canada is providing over $1.97 billion over six years (2008-2014).

The objective of this initiative, which complements the September 2000 Early Childhood Development Agreement, is to further promote early childhood development and support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

Governments also committed to transparent public reporting that will give Canadians a clear idea of the progress being made in improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services, beginning with a baseline report in November 2003.

Information about the initiative, including the text of the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial Web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at: www.ecd-elcc.ca.

Shared outcome(s): The objectives of the initiative, as outlined in the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care are:

  • to promote early childhood development; and,
  • to support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

Governance structure(s): The Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Child Care recognizes that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early learning and child care programs and services.

Planning Highlights: As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer (CST), provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners:

Provincial and territorial governments have agreed to invest the funding provided in regulated early learning and child care programs for children under the age of six. Early learning and child care programs and services funded through this initiative will primarily provide direct care and early learning for children in settings such as child care centres, family child care homes, preschools, and nursery schools. Investments can include capital and operating funding, fee subsidies, wage enhancements, training, professional development and support, quality assurance, and parent information and referral. Programs and services that are part of the formal school system are not included in this initiative.

Governments also committed to transparent public reporting that will give Canadians a clear idea of the progress being made in improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services, beginning with a baseline report in November 2003 and annual reporting in November 2004.

The Government of Québec supports the general principles expressed in the Early Learning and Child Care Initiative but did not participate in developing the initiative because it wishes to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Contact information:
Siobhan Harty, Director General
Social Policy
Strategic Policy & Research Branch
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0J9
Telephone: (819) 994-3184
siobhan.harty@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

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Infrastructure Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF)

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

4. Start Date: 2003-04

5. End Date: 2016-17

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $4.3 Billion[1]

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF), which received funding in the 2001 and 2003 federal budgets, is a cost-shared contribution program for strategic infrastructure projects. To date, funding has been approved to support 76 projects.

Investments are directed to projects of major national and regional significance and are to be made in areas that are vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life for Canadians. The CSIF is delivered through negotiated agreements with provincial, territorial or local governments, private partners or non-governmental organizations. Contribution agreements are tailored based on the project requirements.

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Act outlines the prime categories of investments in projects that involve fixed capital assets that are used or operated for the benefit of the public. The categories eligible under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund are:

  • Highway and Rail Infrastructure;
  • Local Transportation Infrastructure;
  • Tourism or Urban Development Infrastructure;
  • Water or Sewage Infrastructure; and
  • Other categories approved by regulation, e.g. Advanced Telecommunications and High-Speed Broadband, Northern Infrastructure.

8. Shared outcome(s):

The overall planned results Infrastructure Canada expects to achieve through CSIF are to invest in projects which:

  • facilitate the movement of goods and people on Canada’s National Highway System for the purposes of increasing the productivity, economic efficiency, and safety of Canada’s surface transportation system;
  • facilitate the safe and efficient movement of goods and people, ease congestion, or reduce greenhouse gases and airborne pollutants;
  • ensure that tourism continues to contribute to the economic well-being of Canadians and to serve as a bridge between Canada and the world;
  • ensure that drinking water is safe, clean and reliable at drinking water facilities, and ensure sustainable treatment of wastewater; and
  • expand broadband networks in Canada.

9. Governance structure(s):

All CSIF projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. After project selection, Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution. At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by the implementing departments/agencies are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The fund is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review, selection, approval, public announcements, environmental assessment in some cases, and program evaluation. It leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients, except for transportation projects where Transport Canada is the lead. Infrastructure Canada (or Transport Canada, for transportation projects) develops, in coordination with the implementing department/agency, the submission to Treasury Board for the approval of funds. Infrastructure Canada is also responsible for the overall management of program funding, for seeking appropriation of funds from Parliament through Contribution Votes and for transferring funds to the federal delivery partners. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative will usually sit on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee.
  2. A federal delivery partner: Infrastructure Canada’s relationship with each federal delivery partner varies with the capacity and the complexity of the project. Umbrella Memoranda of Understanding govern the relationship between Infrastructure Canada and each federal delivery partner for the implementation of CSIF projects. Responsibilities may however also be negotiated specifically for each project. The federal delivery partner may provide technical assistance in the analysis of the business case, determining the costs and benefits to be realized, and providing advice on the development of the contribution agreement and Treasury Board submission. Except for broadband projects where Infrastructure Canada retains all responsibilities for the implementation of the project, the federal delivery partner will support implementation of CSIF projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as overseeing the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assessing the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, providing information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approving claims, making payments, and conducting audits and evaluation of projects. The federal delivery partner normally serves as the federal co-chair of the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. The federal delivery partner also ensures adherence to information management requirements, including the use of the Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, which captures, monitors and reports on project information. The federal delivery partner also provides communication support.
  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be a provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization, or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, Infrastructure Canada or Transport Canada leads the negotiations to develop a contribution agreement. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the Terms and Conditions of the Contribution Agreement.

10. Performance Highlights:

In order to provide funding for quality, cost-effective public infrastructure that meets the needs of Canadians, key planning highlights under this program include:

  • Apply consistent project monitoring to closing-out projects. Oversee the scheduled completion of nearly 100 projects. In advance of the planning period, 100 percent of approved CSIF projects have work underway or completed;
  • Collaborate with partners and stakeholders to update the program’s terms and conditions and amend individual project funding agreements, to allow sufficient time for recipients to complete all projects;
  • Oversee project completion and close-out adhering to consistent monitoring and review procedures; and
  • Assemble and analyze project information for reporting purposes.

11. Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $158.2 $11.7
     
     
Total: $158.2 $11.7

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Infrastructure Canada and ACOA will continue to co-manage two projects currently underway in Newfoundland and Labrador.

11. Federal Partner: Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $144.2 $14.2
     
     
Total: $144.2 $14.2

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Infrastructure Canada and the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec will continue to co-manage two projects currently underway in Quebec.

11. Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification (WED)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $655.5 $37.9
     
     
Total: $655.5 $37.9

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Infrastructure Canada and Western Economic Diversification will continue to co-manage three water and sewage treatment infrastructure projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Once completed, these projects will contribute to a cleaner environment while improving the quality of life of Canadians.

11. Federal Partner: Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $288.0 $1.2
     
     
Total: $288.0 $1.2

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Infrastructure Canada and the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario) will continue to co-manage one water quality and access project forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Once completed, this project will contribute to liveable communities while improving the quality of life of Canadians.

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $41.1 $29.2
     
     
Total: $41.1 $29.2

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Infrastructure Canada and the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) will continue to co-manage a water and sewage treatment infrastructure project in Nunavut and one northern infrastructure project in Yukon both forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Once completed, these projects will contribute to a cleaner environment and liveable communities while improving the quality of life of Canadians.

11. Federal Partner: Transport Canada

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $3,545.4 $240.7
     
     
Total: $3,545.4 $240.7

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Transport Canada will continue to serve as the lead partner in the management of projects throughout the country that deal with highways and other major transportation infrastructure and is planning to complete 10 projects during the fiscal year 2012-2013 in Ontario, Québec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, the Northwest Territories and Newfoundland and Labrador. Once completed, these projects will contribute to a stronger economy and to liveable communities while improving the quality of life of Canadians.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (From Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$4,832.4 Million $334.9 Million

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Infrastructure Canada will continue to monitor three broadband projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013 contributing to a stronger economy in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.

18. Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail: claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.

Border Infrastructure Fund (BIF)

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Border Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Border Infrastructure Fund

4. Start Date: 2003-04

5. End Date: 2015-16

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $600 Million[2]

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): 

The Border Infrastructure Fund (BIF), which was announced in Budget 2001, is a cost-shared contribution program. It complements some of the Government of Canada’s other infrastructure programs such as the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund and the Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program, a Transport Canada program.

As part of “Canada’s commitment to address land border pressures, such as traffic congestion, and to continue to facilitate the large volume of trade across the Canada-United States border”, BIF contributions are directed at or on routes leading to Canada’s border crossings, with a particular focus on the six largest:

  • Windsor, Ontario;
  • Sarnia, Ontario;
  • Fort Erie, Ontario;
  • Niagara Falls, Ontario;
  • Douglas, British Columbia; and
  • Lacolle, Quebec.

The fund also directs some funding toward smaller and regionally important border crossings throughout Canada. Once completed, projects supported under BIF will help alleviate traffic congestion, increase system capacity and further the Smart Border Declaration (a Canada-US Declaration; see http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/anti-terrorism/declaration-en.asp).

8. Shared outcome(s):

The overall planned results expected to be achieved through BIF are investments in projects that contribute to safe and efficient border crossings. Expected outcomes are to alleviate border congestion and increase border crossing capacity and to increase security and safety at border crossings, leading to cross border trade efficiencies.

9. Governance structure(s): 

All BIF projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults with other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. After project selection, public announcements are made by the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution. At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by Transport Canada are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The fund is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review, selection, approval, public announcements, environmental assessment (in some cases) and program evaluation. It also develops, in coordination with the implementing department/agency, the submission to Treasury Board for the approval of funds. Infrastructure Canada is also responsible for the overall management of program funding, for seeking appropriation of funds from Parliament through the Contribution Votes and for transferring funds to Transport Canada. 
  2. Transport Canada: An umbrella Memorandum of Understanding governs the relationship between Infrastructure Canada and Transport Canada for the implementation of BIF projects. Transport Canada may provide technical assistance in the analysis of the business case, determining the costs and benefits to be realized, and leads the development of the contribution agreement and Treasury Board submission. Transport Canada will support implementation of BIF projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as overseeing the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assessing the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, providing information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approving claims, making payments, and conducting audits and evaluation of projects. Transport Canada serves as the federal co-chair of the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. Transport Canada also ensures adherence to information management requirements, including the use of the Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, which captures, monitors and reports on project information. 
  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be a provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization, or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, Transport Canada leads the negotiations to develop a contribution agreement. The recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the Terms and Conditions of the Contribution Agreement.

10. Planning Highlights:

In order to provide funding for quality, cost-effective public infrastructure that meets the needs of Canadians, key planning highlights under this program include:

  • Monitor the implementation of project-specific agreements in partnership with Transport Canada;
  • Oversee the scheduled completion of projects subject to terms of agreements ensuring claims are processed efficiently and timely; and
  • Assemble and analyze project information for reporting purposes.

11. Federal Partner: Transport Canada

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $604.1 $35.9
     
     
Total: $604.1 $35.9

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Transport Canada will continue to serve as the lead partner in the management of projects throughout the country that deal with highways and other major transportation infrastructure and is planning to complete one physical infrastructure project during the fiscal year 2012-2013 in Ontario.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (From Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$604.1 Million $35.9 Million

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a.

18. Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail: claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.

Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF)

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2004-05

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2013-14

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1.2 Billion[3]

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The $1.2 billion Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) has been structured to provide a balanced response to local infrastructure needs in urban and rural Canada and will ensure that all Canadians, whether they live in large, small or remote communities, will share in the benefits of infrastructure investments.

The fund improves and increases the stock of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, culture, recreation. It targets communities of less than 250,000 residents as well as First Nation communities. Like other infrastructure programs, MRIF seeks to ensure that the projects it funds support the goals of the Government of Canada, encourages new and innovative approaches and favours partnerships, including an emphasis on ‘green’ projects which are sustainable and reduce greenhouse gases.

Through MRIF, the Government of Canada continues to work in productive partnerships with provinces, territories, and municipalities, as well as First Nations and the private sector to invest in local infrastructure projects. These projects will be vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life in Canadian communities.

The fund is cost-shared with the Government of Canada contributing, on average, one-third of total project eligible costs. Provinces and municipalities contribute the remainder of these costs. In recognition of the unique circumstances of the First Nations and the Territories, where many communities have no tax base, the Government of Canada may contribute a higher percentage of total project eligible costs.

8. Shared outcome(s):

The overall expected outcomes are:

  • Improved and increased core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, culture and recreation; and
  • Improved quality of life and economic opportunities for smaller communities and First Nations.

9. Governance structure(s):

The MRIF is based on a federal partnership arrangement between Infrastructure Canada and five federal partners: Western Economic Diversification, Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario, and the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency. It involves 14 sub-programs, one joint sub-program for each province and territory and a sub-program for First Nations communities. Each of the 14 sub-programs follows the same general conditions, priorities and approaches. Also, recognizing the individual nature of each sub-program, the various agreements reflect the nature of the partnership as it relates to the order of government. 

To affect expected outcomes, MRIF eligible projects must conform to a policy leveraging framework, based on a common baseline, but adapted for each jurisdiction. To ensure broad support and effective, innovative project delivery, partnerships of various types, including public-private partnerships are encouraged in the formulation and delivery of the fund projects. The program relies on strong input from local and rural municipalities, including the support of the locally elected councils. In addition, municipal representatives are involved in the processes and management of the program in the respective province or territory.

10. Planning Highlights:

In order to provide funding for quality, cost-effective public infrastructure that meets the needs of Canadians, key planning highlights under this program include:

  • Continue to manage projects subject to federal-provincial-territorial contribution agreements. In advance of the planning period, 100 percent of approved MRIF projects have work underway or completed;
  • Continue to work with Federal Delivery Partners on project close-out adhering to consistent monitoring and review procedures; and
  • Assemble and analyze project information for reporting purposes.

11. Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $143.4 $0.5
     
     
Total: $143.4 $0.5

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency will continue to co-manage 65 projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Of these, 11 projects will contribute to a cleaner environment while an additional 54 projects will improve the liveability in communities in Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Over 70 percent of the federal contribution is committed to green projects.

11. Federal Partner: Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $241.8 $72.9
     
     
Total: $241.8 $72.9

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Infrastructure Canada and the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec will continue to co-manage 76 projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Of these, 18 projects will contribute to a cleaner environment while additional 58 projects will improve the liveability in communities in Québec. Over 60 percent of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.

11. Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification (WED)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $286.3 $3.6
     
     
Total: $286.3 $3.6

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Infrastructure Canada and Western Economic Development will continue to co-manage 33 projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Of these, two projects will contribute to stronger economy, 11 projects will contribute to a cleaner environment and an additional 20 projects will improve the liveability in communities in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Over 55 percent of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.

11. Federal Partner: Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $350.3 $17.7
     
     
Total: $350.3 $17.7

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Infrastructure Canada and the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario will continue to co-manage 58 projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Of these, 22 projects will contribute to a cleaner environment while an additional 36 projects will improve the liveability in communities in Ontario. Over 70 percent of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. $59.1 $0.0
     
     
Total: $59.1 $0.0

16. Expected results by program as per (13): Infrastructure Canada and the Canadian Economic Development Agency (CanNor) will continue to co-manage 10 projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Of these, 5 projects will contribute to a cleaner environment and additional five will improve the liveability in communities in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Almost 40 percent of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (From Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$1,080.9 Million $94.7 Million

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a.

18. Contact information:  Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail: claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.

Building Canada Fund

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Building Canada Fund

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Building Canada Fund

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-08

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2016-17

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):  $8.8 Billion[4]

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Building Canada Fund focuses on projects that deliver economic, environmental, and social benefits to Canadians.

The national priorities for funding are the core national highway system, drinking water, wastewater, public transit and green energy. Other eligible categories include projects that support economic growth and development (short-line rail and short-sea shipping, connectivity and broadband, tourism and regional and local airports), environmental projects (solid waste management and brownfield re-development), as well as projects that contribute to the ongoing development of safe and strong communities (disaster mitigation, culture, sport, recreation and local roads and bridges). Funding is used to support public infrastructure owned by provincial, territorial and municipal governments and entities, as well as the non-profit sector and private industry, in certain cases.

Funding is allocated for projects in the various provinces and territories based on their population (as of the 2006 Census). In the provinces, the program operates through two components: the Major Infrastructure Component and the Communities Component. In the territories, in recognition of their very low per capita allocations, their funding under the Building Canada Fund has been rolled into the Provincial-Territorial Base Funding Program and is managed under the terms of this latter program in each territory.

The Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC) targets larger, strategic projects of national or regional significance. Under this component, at least two-thirds of national funding is to be directed to the above-mentioned national priorities. Projects under the Major Infrastructure Component are selected jointly through federal-provincial/territorial discussions with all projects required to meet minimum federal eligibility criteria.

The Building Canada Fund-Communities Component (BCF-CC) is focused on projects in communities with populations of less than 100,000. Projects are selected through an application-based process and, like projects under the Major Infrastructure Component, are evaluated on the extent to which they meet minimum federal eligibility criteria. This will significantly help smaller communities to address their infrastructure pressures, and serve as a complementary instrument to the Gas Tax Fund.

More information on the Building Canada Fund can be found at: http://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/prog/bcf-fcc-eng.html.

8. Shared outcome(s):

The expected outcomes are to deliver results that matter to Canadians, including cleaner air and water, safer roads and shorter commutes while supporting broad federal priorities of a stronger economy, cleaner environment and liveable communities.

9. Governance structure(s):

i. Major Infrastructure Component of the Building Canada Fund

All BCF-MIC projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities , and priorities are identified through discussions with provinces. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. Following due diligence, the Minister can approve projects under all project categories under the BCF delegated threshold ($100 million federal share). Treasury Board approval is required for contributions to any projects above the delegated threshold (i.e. $100 million federal contribution) or that require exemptions to program terms and conditions. At the same time, should they be required for transportation projects, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by Transport Canada are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

BCF-MIC is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  • Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for assessing potential priorities, undertaking the detailed review of identified priorities against program terms and conditions, and recommending projects for approval-in-principle to the Minister, Infrastructure Canada is also responsible for public announcements, environmental assessment in some cases, and program evaluation. For non-transportation projects, in addition to the above, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for the preparation of Treasury Board submissions (where required), the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients, and the oversight of these agreements. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative sits on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. Infrastructure Canada oversees the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assesses the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, monitors information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approves claims, make payments, and conducts audits and evaluations of the projects. Infrastructure Canada will use Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure to capture, monitor and report project information.
  • Transport Canada: For transportation projects, Transport Canada drafts a project review/due diligence for Infrastructure Canada’s review (except Public Transit Infrastructure projects, where Infrastructure Canada is solely responsible for reviewing transit projects), prepares any required Treasury Board submissions, and leads the negotiations of contribution agreements. Transport Canada monitors activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, and nominates federal representatives to sit on projects’ Agreement Steering Committees. Transport Canada oversees the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assesses the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, monitors information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approves claims, makes payments, and conducts audits and evaluations of the projects. Transport Canada will also ensure adherence to Infrastructure Canada’s information management requirements, including the use of Infrastructure Canada’s Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, which captures, monitors and reports project information. Transport Canada also provides communication support to Infrastructure Canada.
  • The funding recipient: The recipient may be a provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization or a combination thereof. The recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the Terms and Conditions of the Contribution Agreement, and is also responsible for the ongoing operation and maintenance of the asset.

ii. Communities Component of the Building Canada Fund

BCF-CC is governed by separate federal-provincial contribution agreements, each of which is managed by an Oversight Committee established by the Infrastructure Framework Committee that includes both federal and provincial senior officials. To support the operation of the Communities Component and Oversight Committees, each jurisdiction has a federal-provincial Joint Secretariat staffed by Federal Delivery Partners and provincial officials.

All project applications under BCF-CC are subject to a competitive application-based process. This process is administered by the Joint Secretariat, but a material role for the respective provincial municipal association (for those provinces that have municipal associations) may also have been established as part of the application review process. Allowing some implementation flexibility to the Joint Secretariats and Oversight Committees, all competitive processes issue calls for applications (either one open window for applications or multiple shorter windows with set closing dates). Some provinces may limit the number of applications per community within and/or across all intakes.

Joint Secretariats provide the first level of due diligence, including engineering, environmental, and legal review of the applications, and prepare briefing material for the Oversight Committees. The Oversight Committees review and rank the application against the mandatory and additional leveraging criteria established in the Policy Leveraging Framework of the Building Canada Fund. The Oversight Committee presents the recommended list of projects to the Minister or the Federal Delivery Partner Minister for consideration, in accordance with the delegations of authority. After consulting with other Ministers who have a mandate in the substantive project area, the Minister or the Federal Delivery Partner Minister provide feedback on the list of projects to the Oversight Committee. The Oversight Committee then performs a final review of the list and makes a recommendation to the appropriate Minister, in accordance with the delegations of authority. Federal funding for projects is announced once final approval has been granted in writing.

The Framework Agreements stipulate that individual federal-provincial contribution agreements govern the Communities Component in each province, and that these agreements are managed by an Oversight Committee, established under the Infrastructure Framework Committee. Each Oversight Committee includes both federal and provincial senior officials and may also include representatives from provincial municipal associations (where applicable). The federal co-chair of the Oversight Committee is a senior official from Infrastructure Canada appointed by the Minister.

In the federal-provincial contribution agreement, the parties agreed to establish a Joint Secretariat to support the Oversight Committee and administer BCF-CC. This secretariat is staffed by officials from the provincial government and the Federal Delivery Partner.

10. Planning Highlights:

Under BCF-MIC:
In order to provide funding for quality, cost-effective public infrastructure that meets the needs of Canadians, key planning highlights under this program include:

  • Continue to work with provincial governments to identify priority major infrastructure projects for funding in order to commit the remaining provincial allocations. In advance of the planning period, approximately 80 percent of the announced projects have signed Contribution Agreements with work underway. By the end of the period, over 90 percent (or approximately $6 billion) of program funding is expected to be committed;
  • Continue to accelerate the approval of major infrastructure projects through streamlined federal evaluations;
  • Continue to sign project-specific contribution agreements for major infrastructure projects announced as funding priorities under the Building Canada Fund; and
  • Continue to oversee the implementation of project-specific agreements, ensuring that the terms of agreements are respected, that claims for payment are processed efficiently and that closing out of projects has been completed.

Under BCF-CC:
In order to provide funding for quality, cost-effective public infrastructure that meets the needs of Canadians, key planning highlights under this program include:

  • Oversee the scheduled completion of nearly 100 projects. 
  • Work with recipients to initiate the remaining 20 percent of approved projects. In advance of the planning period, over 80 percent of approved BCF-CC projects have work underway or completed;
  • Develop and implement nationally consistent tools and of best practices to improve program monitoring and ensure compliance with the Terms and Conditions of the program; and
  • Work with Federal Delivery Partners through the Service Level Agreement (signed August 2010) to ensure efficient and effective delivery of the program.

11. Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component $155.5 $30.4
     
     
Total: $155.5 $30.4

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

a. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component: Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency will continue to co-manage 23 projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Of these, 10 projects will contribute to cleaner environment though waste water infrastructure and an additional 13 projects will improve the liveability in smaller communities in Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia through local road, recreation and water infrastructure.

11. Federal Partner: Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component $422.6 $72.3
     
     
Total: $422.6 $72.3

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

a. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component: Infrastructure Canada and the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec will continue to co-manage four projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Of these, two projects will contribute to cleaner environment though waste water infrastructure and an additional two projects will improve smaller communities in Québec through local road, recreation and water infrastructure.

11. Federal Partner: Transport Canada

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component $3,739.6 $1,014.4
     
     
Total: $3,739.6 $1,014.4

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component: Transport Canada will continue to serve as the lead federal department in the management of contribution agreements for transportation projects under BCF-MIC. In its role, Transport Canada will continue to work with recipients to implement Contribution Agreements and to deliver program funding to recipients under the Terms and Conditions of the BCF-MIC. Transport Canada and Infrastructure Canada will continue to work together to review new transportation project priorities that are identified for funds remaining under the BCF-MIC, but Infrastructure Canada will be solely responsible for reviewing transit projects. In addition, Infrastructure Canada and Transport Canada will ensure that all selected projects meet the eligibility criteria of the BCF-MIC as set out in the program Terms and Conditions. Based on information available from project proponents, it is expected that over 15 projectswill be completed during fiscal year 2012-13

11. Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification (WED)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component $381.3 $96.8
     
     
Total: $381.3 $96.8

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

a. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component: Iinfrastructure Canada and Western Economic Diversification will continue to co-manage 62 projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Of these, 16 projects will contribute to cleaner environment though solid waste and waste water infrastructure and an additional 46 projects will improve smaller communities in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia through local road, disaster mitigation, culture, recreation and water infrastructure.

11. Federal Partner: Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario)

($ Millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2012-13
PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component $379.2 $50.0
     
     
Total: $379.2 $50.0

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

a. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component: Infrastructure Canada and the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario will continue to co-manage 20 projects forecasted to be completed during the fiscal year 2012-2013. Of these, 9 projects will contribute to cleaner environment though waste water infrastructure and an additional 11 projects will improve smaller communities in Ontario through local road, culture, recreation and water infrastructure.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (From Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
$5,078.2 Million $1,263.9 Million

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a.

18. Contact information:  Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail: claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.


[1] Of the $4.3 billion originally allocated to the CSIF, approximately $50 million has been transferred to Parks Canada Agency to support a high priority infrastructure project. These funds were reallocated through Main Estimates prior to 2012-13. Column 14 of the table reflects the actual project funding delivered by federal delivery partners, under the CSIF terms and conditions, as well as their associated administrative costs. 

[2] Of the $600 million originally allocated to the BIF), approximately $18 million has been transferred to Canada Border Services Agency for border projects. These funds were reallocated through Main Estimates prior to 2012-13. Column 14 of the table reflects the actual project funding delivered by federal delivery partners, under the BIF) terms and conditions, as well as their associated administrative costs.

Under the 2010 Strategic Review process, $10.4 million in unallocated funds from the Border Infrastructure Fund was identified for reallocation to other Government priorities. Prior to 2012-13, $5.2 million was removed from departmental reference levels through the 2011-12 Supplementary Estimates. An additional $5.2 million will be removed through the 2012-13 Main Estimates, subject to Parliamentary approval. No projects have been cancelled or otherwise affected as result of this reallocation.

While additional funding to support the G8 Summit (2010) was appropriated by Parliament through the Border Infrastructure Fund, it has been reported separately through the 2010-11 Departmental Performance Report since no border funding was used for G8 Summit-related projects.

[3] Under the 2010 Strategic Review process, $23 million in unallocated funds from MRIF was reallocated to other Government priorities. These funds were removed from departmental reference levels through 2011-12 Supplementary Estimates. No projects have been cancelled or otherwise affected as result of this reallocation. Column 14 of the table reflects the actual project funding delivered by federal delivery partners, under the MRIF terms and conditions, as well as their associated administrative costs.

[4] As a result of the 2010 Strategic Review, Infrastructure Canada is saving $5.4 million and $4.9 million on administration by delivering the BCF-CC and BCF-MIC respectively, more efficiently. These funds are being removed from the Fiscal Framework and made available for other Government of Canada priorities. The funding for projects remains unchanged. Column 14 of the table reflects the actual project funding delivered by federal delivery partners, under the BCF terms and conditions, as well as their associated administrative costs.

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National Research Council Canada

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: Genomics R&D Initiative (GRDI)

Name of lead department: National Research Council

Lead department program activity: Health and Life Science Technologies

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 1999-2000

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2013-14 (renewed in 2011-12)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $ 293,800,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Genomics R&D Initiative (GRDI) was established for the purpose of building and maintaining capacity inside government departments to do genomics research. As an enabling technology, genomics provides powerful tools and precise information to support operational mandates and upon which policy and regulatory decisions can be based. Federal science-based departments and agencies interact with partners, stakeholders and clients and link these enabling tools and technologies to value-added applications that enable Canada to respond to national priorities, deliver on government mandates and support the development of wealth for Canadians.

These applications range from international requirements for genomics enabled testing to support access of exported products; the ability to interpret and assess genomics information submitted with product information for regulatory oversight; the development of assays and products using genomics approaches for enhancing the health of Canadians, the environment and sustainability of human activities; socio-economic and ethical considerations related to the use and integration of genomics in health care, environmental sustainability activities, and consumer and industrial products and applications; as well as facilitating Canadians' access to accurate and understandable information concerning genome sciences. Focusing specifically on issues that involve living organisms, the GRDI's overarching goal is thus to contribute solutions to issues that are important to Canadians, with particular attention to the role that federal government research plays in finding these solutions. Additional information may be found on the GRDI web site.

Shared outcomes: A Performance Measurement Strategy was developed for the Initiative in 2011. It presents two intermediate outcomes:

  1. Government policy makers and regulators have used research results for evidence-based regulatory, policy, and resource management decisions, and
  2. Private and public stakeholders involved in the innovation continuum in Canada have adopted innovative or improved tools and processes using research results; as well as three long-term outcomes: 1) Improved human health in Canada, 2) Enhanced sustainability and management of Canada's environment, agriculture, forestry and fisheries sectors, and
  3. Improved food safety and security in Canada.

Governance structure: An interdepartmental ADM Coordinating Committee (CC) has been established to oversee collective management and coordination of the federal GRDI. It is chaired by the lead agency (NRC) with membership at the ADM-level from each of the organizations receiving funding, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), and guest representatives from Industry Canada and Genome Canada. It is responsible for the overall strategic direction for the GRDI and approval of investment priorities. It ensures that effective priority setting mechanisms are established within departments and agencies, and that government objectives and priorities are addressed. The Committee also ensures that common management principles are implemented and collaborations between organizations are pursued wherever relevant and possible. It typically meets three times a year at the call of the Chair, more often when warranted by specific needs for decision-making.

An Interdepartmental Working Group (WG) supports the work of the committee. It is chaired by the lead agency (NRC) with membership at the Director level from all participating departments/agencies, the CFIA, and Industry Canada. The mandate of the WG is to provide recommendations and strategic advice to the ADM CC regarding strategic priority setting and overall management of the GRDI. The WG is responsible for providing direction to GRDI program activities related to operational delivery, implementation planning and investment priority setting. The WG also supports evaluation and reporting requirements related to the Initiative. It meets about every two months, more often when warranted by specific needs for recommendations and advice, as well as to develop and approve the GRDI Annual Performance Report.

A Coordination Function, housed at NRC, provides GRDI-wide program coordination, communication, networking and outreach support. This includes support to the ADM CC and the GRDI WG, transparent and effective communication to departments of the planning cycle, process requirements, financial administration and other project management requirements, and support for interdepartmental shared project planning and implementation. This function is also responsible for conducting studies and analyses to serve as input to determination of GRDI-wide research priorities, and providing management and administration support, as well as support for performance management, reporting, evaluation, and communications.

Planning Highlights: Fiscal year 2012-13 is the second year of GRDI Phase V. Phase V seeks to:

  1. address shared priorities through horizontal integration and effective collaborations around two interdepartmental projects; and
  2. support the priorities, policies and mandates of government through concerted high calibre genomics research in areas where federal laboratories have distinct roles and competencies.

The development of interdepartmental projects, while continuing to invest in mandated research, represents an important transition for the Initiative that will ensure continued relevance and impact of the R&D for Canadians. The overall risk related to the funding and delivery of the GRDI program was evaluated during the planning stages of the 2010 GRDI evaluation, and was found to be medium-low.

Federal Partners: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), Environment Canada (EC), Health Canada (HC), National Research Council (NRC), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC).

Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Science, Innovation and Adoption Canadian Crop Genomics Initiative (CCGI) 86.3 4.8
Total 86.3 4.8

Expected Results: Investment in genomics research will be focused in three broad categories:

  1. biodiversity, gene mining and functional analysis;
  2. delivery of genomics discoveries through bioinformatics and physical tools; and
  3. enhancing the efficiency of plant breeding.

Biodiversity, gene mining and functional analysis focus on the identification and extraction of genes for desirable traits. Bioinformatics and physical tools are required to enhance the efficiency of this process. Improved access to both biological materials and data sets will assist and accelerate the adoption of new technologies and the pace of commercialization. The new knowledge generated by these program areas will lay the scientific foundation for major advances in the genetic improvement of crops which will be critical in the next decade. To take full advantage of these new opportunities, Canada must have a responsive regulatory system that has the most effective and efficient testing and inspection tools at its disposal. In Phase V, AAFC will increase its commitment to work more closely with its portfolio partner, the CFIA, on genomics research projects that support mutual needs.

Federal Partner: Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Biotechnology and Genomics National Aquatic Biotechnology and Genomics R&D Strategy 12.9 0.7
Total 12.9 0.7

Expected Results: Genomics-enabled research within DFO will continue to be aligned within the following themes:

  1. Genetic Profiling of Aquatic Resources: DFO has responsibility for providing scientific advice and research for over 650 fish, invertebrate, and mammal species. There is enormous potential for the development of genomic tools relevant to those species under management, and particularly those that are of management concern;
  2. Research and Development of Genomic Approaches for Aquatic Animal Health Diagnostic Tools to Protect Aquatic Ecosystems: Aquatic animal health research under this theme includes the genomics research concerning the health of aquatic animals that fall under DFO legislative authority. Further research incorporating genomics approaches to aquatic animal health will better position Canada to respond and manage aquatic animal resources, particularly under changing environmental conditions;
  3. Aquatic Ecosystem Health: Genomics approaches offer opportunities for increasing our understanding of the aquatic ecosystem, and are anticipated to be an important tool for applying an ecosystem approach to managing aquatic resources and healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems.

Federal Partner: Environment Canada (EC)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Climate Change and Clean Air Strategic Technology Applications of Genomics in the Environment (STAGE) 14.6 0.8
Total 14.6 0.8

Expected Results: The Strategic Technology Applications of Genomics in the Environment program aims at enhancing EC's applications of genomics-based tools and technologies for responsible decision-making. EC will continue to show leadership in environmental genomics and foster collaboration in other departments and external institutions. Genomics research supports EC's Science Plan in crucial areas such as understanding cumulative risks and managing risks, optimizing opportunities, and building resilience. This will assist the delivery of EC's obligations as a signatory of, and regulator for, major environmental legislation and agreements such as the Fisheries Act, the Toxic Substance Management Policy, the Chemical Management Plan, the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, and the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network.

Federal Partner: Health Canada (HC)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Emergent Health Issues GRDI 51.1 1.6
Total 51.1 1.6

Expected Results: Genomics research will continue to focus on four priority areas of investment for strengthening the department's regulatory role:

  1. Regulatory knowledge on therapeutics and biologics: studies will be conducted for the identification of biomarkers associated with the safety evaluation of health products;
  2. Regulatory knowledge on food safety and nutrition: genomics research will be undertaken to detect food-borne contaminants; to characterize the health effects of food contaminants, nutrients, novel foods/food ingredients, and pre- and pro-biotics for enhanced regulatory decisions; and to develop biomarkers to monitor cellular and physiological responses in the context of nutrition and disease susceptibility of defined populations;
  3. Regulatory knowledge to protect human health from potential adverse effects of environmental contaminants, consumer products, and pesticides: research will focus on effectively and efficiently assessing the hazards of environmental contaminants, occupational health hazards, pesticides, and consumer products; and
  4. Research on socio-ethical impacts of genomics technologies and products: bioethics and benefit-sharing best practices will be developed for genetic research, with studies pertaining to ethical, legal, and social issues of genomics to address the use of DNA samples for research purposes.

Federal Partner: Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Science and Technology for Public Health GRDI 5.1 1.6
Total 5.1 1.6

Expected Results: Two themes guide research activities of the GRDI for PHAC:

  1. Public Health Pathogenomics: generating, synthesizing, and moving new knowledge on pathogen genomics and related sciences into enhanced infectious disease surveillance, prevention and control programs. New applications to be targeted will take the form of novel diagnostics, molecular risk assessment tools, vaccines, intervention strategies, and methods for mitigating antimicrobial resistance.
  2. Public Health Genomics: generating, synthesizing, and translating new knowledge in human genomics and related sciences with the aim of enhancing diagnostic, health promotion and preventative efforts, such as modulation of risk factors for chronic and infectious diseases and/or predictive genetic screening.

Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Economic Opportunities for Natural Resources GRDI 28.1 1.6
Total 28.1 1.6

Expected Results: Genomics research will address the challenges faced by Canada's forest sector by using that knowledge for commercial innovation. Canada's capacity and expertise in forest genomics will address the needs of the forest sector by:

  1. identifying genes of commercially important traits such as wood quality, growth and resistance, giving tree breeders the ability to select superior trees in seedlings as young as a year;
  2. the production of innovative molecular technologies that will allow the identification or diagnosis of potentially invasive pests;
  3. furthering our understanding of the interactions between hosts and pests or hosts and beneficial microorganisms for the development of environmentally friendly forest management approaches, including, biological control methods; and
  4. investigating bioenergy solutions via improved feedstock and/or novel enzymatic processes and associated value-added bioproducts.

Federal Partner: National Research Council Canada (NRC)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
Health and Life Science Technologies GRDI 86.3 5.7
Shared Priorities 9.0 4.0
Total 95.3 9.7

Expected Results: NRC investments using GRDI funding are focused on the application of genomic technologies – key enabling technologies that support federal priorities in health, energy and environment. A program-based management approach provides a mechanism to bring to bear NRC multi-disciplinary competencies and converging technologies, while ensuring that research projects are linked to market needs and opportunities for Canadian companies. Program/project funding decisions will support the NRC Strategy in critical research areas related to environmental degradation and climate change (e.g. adapting Canadian crops), as well as in response to growing health care pressures (e.g. developing and advancing technologies for diagnosing, treating and preventing human disease that help reduce health care costs). Shared priorities research will focus on two areas:

  1. Improved ability to detect, diagnose and monitor organisms to ensure a sustainable supply of safe and healthy food and water for human consumption;
  2. Improved ability to detect, identify and understand Canadian biological diversity to prepare Canadian natural and managed resources and markets for global change.

Because of the usefulness of genomic-based tools for detection and diagnosis in regulatory programs, the CFIA will also have the opportunity to participate in interdepartmental projects addressing the shared priority areas. NRC will administer the shared priorities funds and redistribute them to departments and agencies based on their contribution to the selected shared priority projects, based on a collaborative approach.

Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR)

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners ($ millions)
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2012-13
N/A N/A 0.5 0
Total 0.5 0

Expected Results: N/A – one time allocation in 1999-00 to assist in creation of Genome Canada Secretariat


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)
($ millions)
Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2012-13
($ millions)
293.8 19.9

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Gary Fudge, P. Eng.
Director, Program and Project Services
National Research Council Canada
613-949-0542
Gary.Fudge@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca


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Parole Board of Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

The Board will become involved in the National Anti-Drug Strategy following Royal Assent for legislative proposals calling for the introduction of mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug offences. Current plans call for the provision to $7.5 million for PBC over four years, including $2.2 million in 2012-13 to manage increased numbers of conditional release reviews as a result of mandatory minimum sentences. The following table illustrates the planned spending and expected results for each of the program activities.

Federal Partner: Parole Board of Canada
Federal Partner
Program Activity
Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2012–13
Expected Results for
2012–13
Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions $4.4 M $1.3 M Note [1]
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability $1.8 M $0.5M Note[2]
Internal Services Internal Services $1.3 M $0.4M Support programs
Total