Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Symbol of the Government of Canada

ARCHIVED - 2009-2010 RPPs - Horizontal Initiatives

Warning This page has been archived.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived on the Web is for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It has not been altered or updated after the date of archiving. Web pages that are archived on the Web are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats on the "Contact Us" page.




Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Horizontal Initiative

AgriInsurance
AgriInvest
Agricultural Disaster Relief Program (ADRP) under AgriRecovery
AgriStability
Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan element of Growing Forward
Memorandum of Understanding between Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Co-operative Development Initiative
The Canadian Rural Partnership

Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInsurance (statutory)

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $1.6 billion

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
AgriInsurance is a statutory program. It is one element of the suite of BRM programs. It provides insurance against production losses for specified perils. The federal government contributes to costs of premiums with provinces and producers, and administration costs with provinces. The agricultural products covered vary by province and provinces continue to expand coverage to include additional agricultural products.

Shared outcome(s):
Mitigate the financial impacts of production losses by providing affordable insurance protection.

Governance structure(s):
AgriInsurance is a provincial program to which the federal government contributes financially under the federal-provincial-territorial "Growing Forward" Agreement. Governance structure includes various national standards outlined in Canada Production Insurance Regulations and federal-provincial-territorial committees (AgriInsurance and Business Risk Management Working Groups as well as Policy Assistant Deputy Ministers).

($ millions)


Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2009-10 Expected Results for 2009-10
1. AAFC PA1

2.1 Business Risk Management

a. federal-provincial-territorial delivery partners $1.6 billion $410.8 million Minimize production and asset losses caused by severe but uncontrollable natural hazards like drought, flood, wind, frost, excessive rain, heat, snow, uncontrollable disease, insect infestations and wildlife.
Total $1.6 billion $410.8 million  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable.

Contact Information:

Jody Aylard
Director General
Finance and Renewal Programs Directorate
Farm Financial Programs Branch
613-759-7333

Note:
Planned spending figures represent the amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submission and does not include any additional amounts that may be brought into the Department's reference levels. This program is Statutory and demand-driven, therefore, actual spending could vary. Spending also reflects all costs incurred by the department (salary, operating, transfer payments). See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability, AgriInvest, and AgriRecovery.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInvest (Statutory)

Name of lead department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 25, 2007

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $1.5 billion over five years.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The AgriInvest program allows producers to self-manage income stabilization on the first 15% of income decline by providing producers the opportunity to deposit money annually into their savings account and receive matching government contributions. In combination with the AgriStability program, it is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program. Producers can make withdrawals from the funds they have set aside to help stabilize income shortfalls and pro-actively manage their risks on the farm.

The AgriInvest program is delivered federally in all provinces except Quebec. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are cost shared by the federal government and the provinces/territories on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome 'A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk' and the Government of Canada's outcome of 'Strong Economic Growth'.

Shared Outcome(s):
To provide producers with flexibilty in how they choose to manage and/or mitigate small income losses (losses of up to 15% relative to their historical reference margin) through the availability of timely and predictable funds.

Governance Structure(s):

The AgriInvest program is a part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agriculture and agri-food policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture. The program falls under the Business Risk Management priority.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of a number of working groups and committees, including the federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) BRM Working Group, FPT Administrators Working Group and the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC). These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers, Deputy Ministers and Ministers.

($ millions)


Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for 2009-10
1. AAFC Business Risk Management AgriInvest $1.5 billion $168.9 million AgriInvest is fully operational, with accounts held by participating financial institutions and producers can make a deposit to their AgriInvest accounts to receive a matching government contribution. The program helps producers to reduce/ mitigate small income losses (losses of up to 15% of their margin relative to their historical margins).
Total $1.5 billion $168.9 million  

Results to be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:
Joint planning and execution (federally and provincially) to ensure federal and provincial results are consistent.

Contact Information:
Danny Foster
Director General
Business Risk Management Program Development
Farm Financial Programs Branch
613-715-5044

Note:
Planned spending figures represent the amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submission and does not include any additional amounts that may be brought into the Department's reference levels. This program is Statutory and demand-driven, therefore, actual spending could vary. Spending reflects all costs incurred by the department (salary, operating, transfer payments). See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability, AgriInsurance, and AgriRecovery.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Disaster Relief Program (ADRP) under AgriRecovery (Statutory)

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: December 6, 2007

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2011

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $440.7 million over four years.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreemnt):

The AgriRecovery disaster relief framework is one of four core pillars of the new BRM suite available to producers under Growing Forward. AgriRecovery facilitates the federal government working with impacted provinces and industries to provide short-term, timely assistance not otherwise provided by other programs to help producers re-establish their income stream and contain the long-term impacts after a natural disaster.

Under AgriRecovery, the ADRP helps focus the coordination effort, providing individual fast-tracked disaster programs of up to $20 million (up to $125 million per fiscal year - however, cannot exceed $440.7 million over four years) in federal funding to assists producers in recovering from disaster situations, quickly resuming business operations and/or reducing/mitigating long-term impacts when disasters occur. Participating provinces-territories are expected to cost-share these initiatives on a 60:40 federal-provincial/territorial basis. For AgriRecovery programming outside the ADRP, funding options are negotiated with the provinces on a case-by-case basis.

This program links to the departmental strategic outcome "A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk" and the Government of Canada's outcome of "Strong Economic Growth."

Shared Outcome(s):

The shared outcomes for the ADRP under AgriRecovery include:

  • Providing a rapid financial response to assist with the immediate recovery from a disaster situation;
  • Helping producers quickly resume business operations after a disaster; and
  • Enabling short-term actions to minimize/contain the impacts of the disaster on producers.

Governance Structure(s):

The AgriRecovery framework, including the ADRP, is a part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agriculture and agri-food policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture. The program falls under the Business Risk Management priority.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for AgriRecovery and the ADRP consists of a number of working groups and committees, including the federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) BRM Working Group, FPT Administrators Working Group and the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC). These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers, Deputy Ministers and Ministers. Specific to AgriRecovery and the ADRP are FTP Task Teams, which are initiated on a case-by-case basis when requested to analyze a disaster and its impacts and, if needed, develop options for an individual disaster assistance program to be brought forward to participating FTP Ministers.

($ millions)


Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2009-10 Expected Results for 2009-10
AAFC Business Risk Management ADRP $440.7 million ($72.9 million for FY 2007/08 and $122.6 million per year for FYs 2008/09 to 2010/11) $122.6 million To continue to help producers affected by natural disasters with timely assistance for extraordinary costs in order to help them quickly resume their business operations or take actions to mitigate the impacts of the disaster.
Total $440.7 million $122.6 million  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Joint planning and implementation (federally and provincially) of initiatives that are consistent with the AgriRecovery framework and the terms and conditions of the ADRP.

Contact Information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
613-715-5044

Note:
Planned spending figures represent the amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submission and does not include any additional amounts that may be brought into the Department's reference levels. This program is Statutory and demand-driven, therefore, actual spending could vary. Spending also reflects all costs incurred by the department (salary, operating, transfer payments). See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability, AgriInvest and AgriInsurance.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriStability

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $2.6 billion over five years.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The AgriStability program is a margin-based program that helps producers protect their farming operations from larger income declines (more than 15%) due to circumstances beyond their control. In combination with the AgriInvest program, it is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program. The AgriStability program commenced with the 2007 program year.

The AgriStability program is delivered by the federal administration in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Yukon and by provincial administrations in Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and Prince Edward Island. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are cost shared by the federal government and the provinces on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome 'A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk' and the Government of Canada's outcome of 'Strong Economic Growth'.

Shared Outcome(s):

To mitigate the impacts of larger income losses (losses of over 15% relative to their historical reference margin) with margin-based assistance.

Governance Structure(s):

The AgriStability program is a part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agriculture and agri-food policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture. The program falls under the Business Risk Management priority.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of a number of working groups and committees, including the federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) BRM Working Group, FPT Administrators Working Group and the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC). These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers, Deputy Ministers and Ministers.

($ millions)


Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for 2009-10
1. AAFC Business Risk Management AgriStability $2.6 billion $644.1 million AgriStability helps producers protect their farming operations from large income losses (losses of over 15% of their margin relative to their historical margins) due to circumstances beyond their control.
Total $2.6 billion $644.1 million  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):
Joint planning and execution (federally and provincially) so provincial results are consistent.

Contact Information:
Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
613-715-5044

Note:
Planned spending figures represent the amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submission and does not include any additional amounts that may be brought into the Department's reference levels. This program is Statutory and demand-driven, therefore, actual spending could vary. Spending also reflects all costs incurred by the department (salary, operating, transfer payments). See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriInsurance, AgriInvest, and AgriRecovery.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan element of Growing Forward

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Proposed start date under the new Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2009

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Proposed expiry March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

This program activity targets four specific regulatory issues that were identified by stakeholders, namely: 1) health claims, novel foods, and ingredients; 2) the enforcement of food fortification regulations; 3) the continuation of the Minor Use Pesticides program; and, 4) veterinary drugs. Initiatives under the Facilitating Regulatory Efficiency program activity support the general principles of the Government of Canada's Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation, as they specifically address the development of regulatory frameworks based on the accumulation of sound science, as well as advancing the transparency, timeliness, responsiveness, efficiency, public interest, and government collaboration to minimize regulatory burden for stakeholders.

Shared Outcome(s):

Addressing key regulatory obstacles promotes a competitive and innovative sector, while it protects and advances the public interest.

Governance Structure(s):

AAFC, Health Canada (HC) and Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) have worked to develop a comprehensive governance structure. HC and AAFC Deputy Ministers (DM), as well as the President of the CFIA will oversee the governance process. Three levels of governance have been established by way of the Memoranda of Understanding (MOU):

  • An Assistant Deputy Ministers' (ADM) Committee, will oversee the management of the MOUs and will report back to the DMs.
  • Joint Management Committees (JMC), composed of Directors General or equivalent level representatives, will be established to manage the implementation of the MOUs and report semi-annually to the ADM Committee.
  • AAFC, HC and the CFIA will establish working groups for the initiatives in which they are partnering. These working groups will develop business cases, costed work plans, performance objectives and targets, budget and expenditure reports, etc. The Working Groups will report to their respective JMCs on a regular basis.

($ millions)


Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2009-10 Expected Results for 2009-10
1. AAFC For Health claims, novel foods, and ingredients; and for pesticides, AAFC's PA is Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation a. Health claims, novel foods, and ingredients; minor use pesticides; and, veterinary drugs Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. An enhanced regulatory environment which promotes sector innovation, investment and competitive-ness
2. CFIA For Food fortification, the CFIA PA is Food Safety and Nutrition Risks b. Food Fortification Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. As above
3. Health Canada For Health claims, novel foods, and ingredients, HC's PA is Food and Nutrition

For Minor Use Pesticides, HC's PA is Pesticide Regulation

For Veterinary Drugs, HC's PA is Health Products

c. Health claims, novel foods, and ingredients; minor use pesticides; and, veterinary drugs Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. As above
Total N/A N/A  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Michael Silverman
Assistant Director, Food Regulatory Issues Division
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 5, 2nd Floor, Room 144
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-0170
silvermanm@agr.gc.ca

Note:
Growing Forward is the new 5-year policy framework that replaces APF programming as of the 2008-09 fiscal year through a transitional continuity framework until the new policy and programs are in place in 2009-10. Only funding for 2008-09 and 2009-10 has been secured through Estimates (along with internal reallocations) with subsequent TB Submissions to follow for each functional area, spanning the full five years of the Framework. Between the two Frameworks, programming may have been modified to reflect a new strategic direction.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Memorandum of Understanding between Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Original start date under APR: April 1, 2003
Proposed start date under the new Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2009

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Proposed expiry March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): Not available at this time - Program splits not approved by Treasury Board.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The following initiatives will be performed by the CFIA under the MOU:

  1. The System Recognition initiative will provide government recognition of on-farm and post-farm food safety systems developed by national industry organizations. The CFIA will continue the development and delivery of food safety system recognition programs and provide scientific and technical advice to support HACCP-based food safety system development.
  2. The National Biosecurity Standards Development will allow CFIA to focus on developing nationally consistent Biosecurity standards in conjunction with industry, national commodity organizations and provinces. Once the Biosecurity Standards are approved by CFIA then these standards will become the national Biosecurity standard for that particular commodity.

The operating expenditures of these two initiatives are funded over 4 years via Vote 1 - Operating.

Shared outcome(s):

Program Activity Architecture (PAA) for AAFC

A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk.

Growing Forward Policy Outcomes

A sector that contributes to society's priorities promoting food safety and environmentally responsible agriculture; and

A sector that is proactive in managing risks.

Initiatives Outcomes: short and long-term benefits to Canadians.

  1. 1) On-Farm Food Safety Systems Recognition Program completely operational
    2) Post-Farm Food Safety Systems Recognition Program developed and operational
  2. Development and Approval of National Biosecurity Standards for priority commodity groups.

Governance structure(s):

The overall administration of the MOU is delegated to the Director General, Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate, AAFC and the Executive Director, Food Safety and Consumer Protection Directorate of the CFIA.

($ millions)


10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Expected Results for
2009-10
1. AAFC
(work performed by
CFIA)
Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems a. On-Farm and Post- Farm Food Safety Systems Recognition Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Work performed by CFIA
b. Development of National Biosecurity Standards Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Work performed by CFIA
2. CFIA Food Safety and Nutrition Risks a. On-Farm and Post-Farm Food Safety Systems Recognition. Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. 1) On-going development of the On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program.
2) Development of options for a Post-Farm Recognition Program.
3) On-going technical review and assessments of On-Farm Food Safety Programs for recognition.
4) Scientific and technical support provided as needed to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders.
b. Development of National Biosecurity Standards Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. 1) Development and approval of Biosecurity standards for one priority commodity group.
2) Initial Development of Biosecurity standards for up to two other priority commodity groups.
Total N/A N/A  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Linda Parsons
Director General
Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
Farm Financial Programs Branch
613-715-5569

Note:
Growing Forward is the new 5-year policy framework that replaces APF programming as of the 2008-09 fiscal year through a transitional continuity framework until the new policy and programs are in place in 2009-10. Only funding for 2008-09 and 2009-10 has been secured through Estimates (along with internal reallocations) with subsequent TB Submissions to follow for each functional area, spanning the full five years of the Framework. Between the two Frameworks, programming may have been modified to reflect a new strategic direction.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Co-operative Development Initiative

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Rural and Co-operative Development

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Original start date under APR: April 1, 2003
Proposed start date under the new Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2009

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Proposed expiry March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Through the Co-operative Development Initiative, the Co-operatives Secretariat provides advice on policies and programs affecting co-operatives and builds partnerships within the federal government and with industry, provinces, and other key stakeholders in the implementation of initiatives to support the development of co-operatives. The Secretariat manages a grants and contribution program which includes:

  • Providing advisory services and funding innovative co-op projects, delivered by the co-operative sector; and
  • Funding research to build knowledge contributing to co-op development.

Shared Outcome(s):

Access to services across the country creates an enabling environment for co operative development and growth

More and stronger co operatives respond to public policy challenges

Canadians are better able to utilize the co operative model to meet their economic and social needs

Governance Structure(s):

The Co-operatives Secretariat was created as a focal point between Canadian co-operatives and federal departments and agencies. It has instituted mechanisms to raise awareness and inclusion of co-operatives in federal policies and programs. These include dialogue and collaboration with key federal departments as well as with provincial counterparts and the sector.

($ millions)


Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for 2009-10
1. Co-operatives Secretariat (AAFC) Co-operative Development Initiative Co-operative development Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Innovative co-operative projects are implemented

Access to services across the country creates an enabling environment for co-operative development and growth

Total N/A N/A  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Donna Mitchell
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariats
613-759-7113

Note:
Growing Forward is the new 5-year policy framework that replaces APF programming as of the 2008-09 fiscal year through a transitional continuity framework until the new policy and programs are in place in 2009-10. Only funding for 2008-09 and 2009-10 has been secured through Estimates (along with internal reallocations) with subsequent TB Submissions to follow for each functional area, spanning the full five years of the Framework. Between the two Frameworks, programming may have been modified to reflect a new strategic direction.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Canadian Rural Partnership

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Rural and Co-operative Development

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Original start date under APF: April 1, 2003
Proposed start date under the new Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2009

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Proposed expiry March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Canadian Rural Partnership (CRP) leads an integrated, government-wide approach through which the government aims to co-ordinate its economic, social, environmental, and cultural policies towards the goal of economic and social development and renewal of rural Canada.

Shared Outcome(s):

  • Collaboration between rural communities and stakeholders to address barriers and challenges to local development.
  • Information and tools are used by rural communities and regions to develop local amenities and other assets.
  • New economic activities are being implemented in rural Canada.

Governance Structure(s):

The CRP is managed by the Rural Secretariat. It has instituted mechanisms that contribute to raising awareness and inclusion of rural Canada in federal policies and programs. This includes:

  • The Rural Development Network which is a policy maker forum involving 26 federal departments and agencies;
  • The National Rural Research Network which brings research partners from both academia and government to focus on enhancing knowledge about rural issues to better inform policy making;
  • The Community Information Database, a free web based resource that provides comprehensive and reliable information on economic, social and demographic factors at the community level, to support decision making and action; and
  • The Rural Partnership Development Program which funds activities that encourage collaborative economic activities at the community level.

These efforts are reinforced by Rural Teams in each province and territory comprised of the federal government in the region, with most teams also including members from the provincial or territorial government and/or sectoral stakeholders.

($ millions)


Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for 2009-10
1. Rural Secretariat

26 departments and Agencies in the Rural Development Network

The Canadian Rural Partnership Rural development Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Not available at this time - Program splits not yet approved by Treasury Board. Regional and national partnering initiatives are in place to respond to barriers to rural development

Rural stakeholders have access to new and updated/adapted rural development information, expertise and tools that help respond to barriers to innovative development

Total N/A N/A  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Donna Mitchell
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariats
613-759-7113

Note:
Growing Forward is the new 5-year policy framework that replaces APF programming as of the 2008-09 fiscal year through a transitional continuity framework until the new policy and programs are in place in 2009-10. Only funding for 2008-09 and 2009-10 has been secured through Estimates (along with internal reallocations) with subsequent TB Submissions to follow for each functional area, spanning the full five years of the Framework. Between the two Frameworks, programming may have been modified to reflect a new strategic direction.

Top of Page

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Table: Horizontal Initiatives


1. Horizontal Initiative: 2. Lead Department:
International Business Development Program Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)
3. Lead Department Program Activity:
Enterprise Development (program sub activity: Trade)
4. Start Date: 5. End Date: 6. Total Federal Funding:
April 11, 2005 March 31, 2010 $7.0 million
7. Description:
The International Business Development Program (IBDP) involves four Atlantic provincial governments and three federal departments: ACOA, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and Industry Canada. The previous International Business Development Agreement (IBDA) was first signed in May 1994 for three years and $3 million. It was extended in March 1997 for a further three years and $2 million. A second extension, for $8 million, involved the seven partners in international business development for a further four years from 2000 to 2004.

The $10‑million IBDP will continue the work of the partners until 2010. Funding for the agreement is shared 70/30 by ACOA and provincial governments. The IBDP’s mandate is to undertake specific measures to optimize regional coordination on a pan‑Atlantic scale, and combine limited resources to coordinate trade‑related activities. The commitment to this IBDP, with the increased funding allocation, attests to both the IBDA’s positive results and its significance for the future of the region’s international business development. see http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/English/ibda/Pages/HomePage.aspx  

8. Shared Outcomes:
The shared outcomes for the IBDP support ACOA’s priority for trade and are as follows.
  • increased number of new exporters;
  • existing exporters reporting sales to new markets; and
  • existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets.

Since the original IBDA commenced in 1994, the Agency and its partners have administered over 207 projects involving some 3,500 Atlantic Canadian companies. The IBDA has assisted 182 companies to begin exporting; 380 exporters to increase their export sales; and 259 exporters to expand into new markets.

9. Governance Structure:
ACOA is the lead organization for this initiative, and houses the secretariat responsible for administering the agreement. A management committee, comprising a representative from each of the partners, is responsible for the planning and management of the agreement’s programs and the evaluation of projects.
10. Partners involved in each program:
Federal departments and agencies (70% funding)
  • ACOA (lead department - 70% funding)
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada – non-funding partner
  • Industry Canada – non-funding partner

Provincial governments (30% funding)

  • Business New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia Business Inc.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development
  • Prince Edward Island Business Development Inc.
12. Program Name: 13. Total Federal Allocation: 14. 2009-2010 Planned Spending:
International Business Development Program $7.0 million $1.1 million
15. Expected Results:
  For the life of the agreement (2005-2006 through 2009-2010) 2009-2010
Increased number of new exporters 40 companies 8
Existing exporters reporting sales to new markets 75 companies 15
Existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets 150 companies 30
16. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):
Same as above.
17. Contact Information:
Michel Têtu
Director General, Trade and Investment
ACOA
644 Main Street, Moncton NB
506-851-6496
Michel.Têtu@acoa-apeca.gc.ca


1. Horizontal Initiative: 2. Lead Department:
Team Canada Atlantic Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)
3. Lead Department Program Activity:
Enterprise Development (program sub-activity: Trade)
4. Start Date: 5. End Date: 6. Total Federal Funding:
April 1999 July 2010 $11.14 million
7. Description:
Team Canada Atlantic (TCA) is a partnership of ACOA and the four Atlantic provinces, with support from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Industry Canada (IC), Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (FAITC), and Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation (ECBC).

The core of the TCA approach is the trade mission, which enables small and medium-sized businesses from across Atlantic Canada to meet with potential buyers, agents, distributors and strategic partners in the United States. The mission format features a comprehensive program that equips private sector participants with the knowledge, contacts and advice they require to make the best of their international opportunities (especially before, during and after their ventures abroad). Missions also provide the Government of Canada and the Atlantic provincial governments with crucial opportunities to promote the region as an attractive location for foreign investment. The initiative also helps commercialize technology and raise the region’s visibility. See the TCA website at http://www.teamcanadaatlantic.ca/.

8. Shared Outcomes:
The TCA trade missions are focused on small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Atlantic Canada, and are intended to assist SMEs to increase exports and attract investments in key markets. The mission objectives are to:
  • increase export readiness of Atlantic Canadian SMEs;
  • develop new partnerships/alliances between Atlantic Canadian SMEs and companies in target markets; and
  • increase Atlantic Canadian SME export sales to new and established markets, as well as raise awareness of Atlantic Canada in these markets.

As of November 2008, Team Canada Atlantic had completed 14 missions to United States markets, involving 530 companies and more than 3,665 business meetings, and resulting in excess of $45 million in actual sales.

9. Governance Structure:
A management committee, comprising senior officials of ACOA, FAITC and provincial governments, is the decision-making body that directs and oversees the coordination and implementation of the TCA missions. The TCA organizing committee is responsible for organizing the missions, and includes representation from the four provincial trade departments in Atlantic Canada, FAITC, AAFC, and the Team Canada Atlantic Secretariat. The secretariat, housed at ACOA, is responsible for the overall coordination and implementation of the TCA missions.
10. Partners involved in each program:
  • ACOA
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (FAITC) – non-funding partner
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) – $6,000/mission
12. Program Name: 13. Total Federal Allocation: 14. 2009-2010 Planned Spending:
Team Canada Atlantic ACOA $11.14 million

AAFC $132,000

ACOA $ 0 (G&C)
          $10,000 (O&M)
AAFC  $ 0
15. 2009-2010 Expected Results:
SMEs that have increased export-readiness No expected results, as there will be a moratorium on Team Canada Atlantic trade missions for the 2009-2010 fiscal year.
New exporters
Exporters developing new markets
Forecasted export sales by SMEs
16. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):
There are no expected results for 2009-2010; there will be a moratorium on Team Canada Atlantic trade missions for the 2009-2010 fiscal year. The federal partners involved (AAFC and FAITC) will be included in discussions on the renewal of the initiative. The only costs that will be disbursed are for one and two-year-out surveys.
17. Contact Information:
Michel Têtu
Director General, Trade and Investment
ACOA
644 Main Street, Moncton NB
506-851-6496
Michel.Têtu@acoa-apeca.gc.ca

Top of Page

Canada Border Services Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Supplementary information on the CBSA's participation in horizontal initiatives can be found on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's Web site at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2008-2009/info/info-eng.asp.

Top of Page

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Lead department program activity: Aquatic Animal Health Management to International Standards

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $59M (2005-06 to 2010-11) plus $10.33M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The NAAHP will protect Canada’s aquatic resource productivity by minimizing the risk of introducing infectious diseases of concern to Canada; by removing non-tariff trade barriers imposed by trade partners because Canada does not meet international trade standards for regulatory disease control measures; and by allowing Canada to apply control measures on imports that pose a risk of disease introduction into Canada. The NAAHP is built on the CFIA’s animal health management and legislative framework and on DFO’s laboratory infrastructure and aquatic animal health research expertise. The CFIA provides overall program direction under the authority of the Health of Animals Act and the field operations capability for aquaculture surveillance, emergency response measures, export certification and import controls. DFO performs the surveillance and monitoring activities for wild resources, and delivers and oversees the diagnostic and research support responsibilities. Ongoing funding was obtained through an approved Treasury Board submission.

Shared outcome(s): Sustainable Aquatic Resource Productivity and Internationally Competitive Aquatic Animal Resource Based Industries.

Governance structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for delivery of the NAAHP. Respective federal roles and responsibilities are outlined in a Memorandum of Understanding co-signed with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO). A steering committee was established, consisting of Director General-level officials from both organizations, who are responsible for strategic direction, monitoring and analysis of the program implementation of the NAAHP. The CFIA Director of the Aquatic Animal Health Division and the DFO Director of Aquatic Animal Health Science Branch are also members of the steering committee. Stakeholder input on development of the NAAHP is managed through an Aquatic Animal Health Committee (AAHC), which includes provincial and territorial authorities for aquaculture and wild fisheries resource management, veterinary association representatives, Aboriginal groups and wild and farmed industry stakeholders. Progress with program development and implementation of the NAAHP is reported to the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers CFIA Committee (CFIA-CCFAM), and to the Agriculture Federal/Provincial/Territorial Regulatory ADM committees.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Aquatic Animal Health Management to International Standards National Aquatic Animal Health Program $32.13M over 5 years
(plus $6.35M ongoing)26
$6.35M26 Regulatory amendments based on full consultation (FPT, Aboriginal Groups, & WTO);

Initiation of discussion on FPT MOUs on Emergency Response & delineation of Domestic Disease Control zones;

Priority policies and procedures required to enforce revised regulations;

NAAHP integration into priority IMIT systems (SIMS, AIRS, ICTS, IPS, CEMRS) & linkage to DFO LIMS;

Training modules for key NAAHP implementation activities.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada Diagnostics and Research National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory Management System $26.92M over 5 years
(plus $3.98M ongoing)26
$3.98M26 Laboratory standards & tracking system that meets international requirements for audit/challenge of export certificates and/or import controls, and ISO 17025 Laboratory Accreditation
Total $59.05M $10.33M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Sharon McGladdery, ((613) 221-1487; 613-668-6492)
Stephen Stephen, (613) 990-0292

Top of Page

Canadian Heritage

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future

Name of lead department: Canadian Heritage

Lead department program activity: Official Languages

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1,110.10 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future (Roadmap) is a Government of Canada policy statement that includes a number of initiatives to strengthen and promote linguistic duality. Thirteen federal institutions have received funds for sectoral programs and activities related to official languages. The Roadmap contributes to the attainment of a strategic outcome for Canadian Heritage (Canadians have a sense of their Canadian identity) and to the Government of Canada’s outcome (A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion).

Another key component of the Roadmap is the implementation of an accountability framework and a coordinated government-wide approach to official languages. The implementation of the Roadmap is a component of the broader Official Languages Program (OLP), as defined and approved by the Committee of Deputy Ministers on Official Languages in December 2004.

Web site: http://www.pch.gc.ca/slo-ols/

Shared outcomes:

Three levels of outcomes have been established.

Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in the language of choice.

Three intermediate outcomes:

  • Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English‑speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in the language of choice.
  • Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
  • Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.

Eight immediate outcomes:

  • Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
  • Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
  • Improved social and economic development of official‑language minority communities (OLMC).
  • Strengthened capacity of language industries.
  • Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
  • Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
  • Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
  • Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.

Governance structure: The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for the implementation of the Roadmap. The Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) (Canadian Heritage) supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. With respect to roles and responsibilities, the OLS is responsible for developing and coordinating the results of the Roadmap. The OLS ensures that all information (financial and non-financial) needed is gathered and that the content of all logic models of the Roadmap’s structure is taken into consideration. The OLS is also responsible for the complete implementation and the accountability framework for the Roadmap. This role was given to the OLS by the partners through the development of a Management Framework for the Roadmap, which outlines the activities and results structure, the governance structure, as well as the roles and responsibilities of departments and different interdepartmental committees, while also identifying the relevant operational issues concerning its horizontal implementation. The OLS will also support the governance of the Official Languages Program through various mechanisms and committees.

A governance structure has been established; the highest level is the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages (CADMOL). It acts on behalf of all federal departments, agencies and organizations that are partners in the Roadmap in a variety of ways: it supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and all ministers who have responsibilities under the Official Languages Act (OLA); it ensures leadership for managing the OLP, and particularly the Roadmap, by making decisions and overseeing the coordination of partners’ actions; it guides the implementation of the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (HRMAF) and oversees the evaluation of the government strategy regarding official languages (the Roadmap). During CADMOL meetings, departments having specific responsibilities under the OLA (for instance, Canadian Heritage, Justice Canada, and the Canada Public Service Agency) report on achievements that are specific to their mandate and describe the challenges and issues related to these responsibilities.

Three interdepartmental committees support CADMOL’s work by providing recommendations. Firstly, the Interdepartmental Policy Committee (IPC) provides an information-sharing forum between partners in order to present a joint approach to strategic issues regarding the OLP. The Interdepartmental Management Committee for the Official Languages Program (IMCOLP) seeks to ensure that interdepartmental coordination of the OLP is formalized and structured, most notably by assessing the implementation of the OLP and strengthening the accountability process. The Coordinating Committee on Official Languages Research (CCOLR) ensures that official-languages research is coordinated. The committees may create working groups as needed to complete specific projects. For example, the Working Group on the HRMAF Revision (Working Group) was created in the summer of 2008.


 
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
1. Canadian Heritage Official Languages a. Accountability and Coordination Framework
Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) The Government of Canada has official languages strategies.

2) The partners are supported in the implementation of their official languages initiatives.

3) The results of the research on official languages are communicated to the partners.

4) The Minister of Official Languages is advised on official languages files.

5) The quality of information on results (financial and non-financial) provided by the partners is improved.

$13.5 M $2.8 M Support to Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and senior officials in elaborating timely documentation and in insisting on quality assurance of given information and strategic advice.


Update of the Accountability and Coordination Framework on Official Languages in collaboration with partners (synthesis of the documentation, quality of information, utility of the documentation for partners).


To facilitate the implementation of the Roadmap by organizing regular meetings of interdepartmental committees of various levels, by consulting with the partners, by coordinating the collection of information for ministerial reports, by sharing timely financial and non-financial information and by preparing the organization of a symposium on research on official languages.

Implementation of the Horizontal Results-based Management Accountability Framework (HRMAF).

Official Languages b.1 Minority-Language Education –
Component: Support to Second-Language and Minority-Language Education.

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Increased access of OLMCs to quality education in their language in their milieu.
$470.0 M $94 M Renew the Multilateral Protocol with the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC) and various agreements containing action plans with the provinces and territories concerning minority‑language education and second-language instruction.
Official Languages b.2 Minority-Language Education –
Component: Official-language Monitors


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Improved access of OLMCs to a quality education in their language and milieu.
$20.0 M $4.0 M Implementation of an agreement with the CMEC for Monitors Accent and Odyssee program delivery to support learning in minority area and in second-language classrooms.
Official Languages b.3 Minority-Language Education –
Component: Summer Language Bursaries

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Improved access of OLMCs to a first-rate education in their language in their environment.

$40.0 M

$8.0 M

Implementation of an agreement with the CMEC Drench bursary program delivery for young francophones of OLMCs (Destination CLIC) and second-language bursaries (Explore).
Official Languages c.1 Community vitality –
Component: Youth Initiatives.


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language.

2) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially for youth).

$12.5 M

$12.5 M

Grants and contributions for the implementation of youth projects and activities in different areas, which allows the use of the language of the minority, the use of the second language and the exposure to the second language.
Official Languages c.2 Community vitality –
Component:  Support to Official-language Minority Communities


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Improved capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and improved access to a range of programs and services offered in their language.

$22.5 M

$4.5 M

Grants and contributions for the creation, improvement and delivery of activities and services to support life environments fostering the use of the language in minority area.
Official Languages c.3 Community vitality –Component: Intergovernmental Cooperation.


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Increased access of OLMCs to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.

$22.5 M

$4.5 M

Implementation of agreements with provincial and territorial governments for the delivery of provincial and territorial services in the language of the minority.
Official Languages c.4 Community vitality –Component: Cultural Development Funds


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Increased access to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.

2) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially in culture)

$14.0 M

$3.5 M

Grants and contributions for the implementation of services, activities and cultural products fostering the development of cultural vitality in OLMCs.
Cultural Industries d. Musical Showcase Program for Artists from Official-language Communities


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.

$4.5 M

$1.0 M

Funding agreements are in place with partners who organize showcases and finance the artists.


Music showcases are organized and presented.

Artists from OLMCs perform at these showcases.
Official Languages

Broadcasting Policy and Programs

e. CTRC Study


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) CRTC report is issued on the availability and quality of broadcasting services to English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada.

2) The findings of the report will inform policy and decision-making on the availability and quality of broadcasting services in English and French linguistic communities in Canada.

Non- monetary

N/A

CRTC report on availability and quality of English- and French-language services in the linguistic minority communities in Canada completed by March 31, 2009.
Cultural Industries f. National Translation Program for Book Publishing


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.

$5 M

$0.75 M

Funding is allocated to book publishers for eligible translations.

Canadian publishers produce translations of Canadian-authored books in both official languages.

2. Justice Canada Legal Services to Government a. 1 Accountability and Coordination Framework


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Support to ministers with statutory or sectoral responsibilities for official languages and to work with them.

$2.18 M

$0.44 M

Client-focused service delivery. 

Effective management of legal risks.

Internal Services a. 2 Accountability and Coordination Framework

$0.15 M

$0.03 M

N/A
Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs b. 1 Contraventions Act Fund


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Improved capacity to carry on judicial activities and to deliver extrajudicial services related to federal contraventions in both official languages.

$47.46 M

$9.49 M

Continued and increased access to justice in both official languages by the implementation of the Contraventions regime in one province.
Internal Services b. 2 Contraventions Act Fund

$1.92 M

$0.38 M

N/A
Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs c.1 Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training)

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Increased capacity of partners and the Department to implement solutions relating to access to justice in both official languages.

$38,02 M

$6.97 M

Training priorities established following results of the nationwide needs analysis on training needs in both official languages in the area of justice.


Coordination mechanism related to training is created and functional.

Eight financial agreements concluded in terms of core funding from the Support Fund.


30% of financed projects will focus on awareness or knowledge.


35% of projects will have other sources of funding (other than from the Department).Five projects will fall under the training component.

Internal Services c.2 Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training)

$1.89 M

$0.44 M

N/A
3. Health Canada Canadian Health System Training, Networks and Access to Health Services


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Increased number of health professionals to meet health service needs of OLMCs in both official languages.


2) Increased coordination and integration of health services for OLMCs within institutions and communities.


3) Increased partnerships, interaction of networks in provincial, territorial health systems.


4) Increased awareness among stakeholders that networks are a focal point for addressing health concerns of OLMCs.

5) Increased dissemination and uptake of knowledge best practices to address health concerns of OLMCs.

$174.3 M

$34.8 M

Elaborate a baseline study to identify gaps in information, to strengthen the database, to systematically collect baseline information on performance indicators, to serve as a reference point, and to measure change over time.


Elaborate a Program Recipient Guide to provide guidance to program applicants on the nature of program requirements.

Sign new funding agreements with all primary funding recipients.
4. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Social Development a. Strengthening NGOs’ means for Early Childhood Development


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

The capacity of NGOs in early childhood in minority environment will be increased.

$4.0 M

$0.8 M

Develop tools for the implementation of the National Framework for Collaboration on Early Childhood Development to enhance the language and culture of minority Francophone communities in Canada:
  • Create a repertory of existing training resources for Early Childhood Development in French.
  • Take an inventory of existing research in Early Childhood Development in French.
  • Develop a mechanism to share information for members of the Table nationale en développement de la petite enfance francophone and their affiliate organizations in communities across Canada.
Skills and Employment b. Family Literacy


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Community stakeholders can act in the area of family literacy, and tools and support are available and used by those members of OLMCs that need them.

$7.5 M

$1.8 M

Initiate four research projects on the specific literacy needs of new groups such as immigrants, fathers, grand-parents, exogamous families, eligible clients, and on ways of integrating family literacy in other areas such as the workplace, sport, and theatre.

Initiate the development, testing and adaptation of six new family literacy models responding to the needs of new groups.

Initiate the development of four new promotion and awareness models for partner literacy organizations targeting new groups.

Implement a performance and results-based measurement framework.
Social Development c. Child Care Pilot Project


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

New knowledge on child care services for minority Francophone communities
$13.5 M

$2.7 M

(Note: a
portion of
funds for
2009–2010
may be
spent on
projects to
better
understand
issues around
literacy
and/or
immigration.)
Conduct child assessments and parent and community surveys in order to add to the collective knowledge of what works to help ensure Francophone minority children have the abilities to succeed when they start school.
Skills and Employment d. Enabling Fund for  Official-Language Minority Communities


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Contribute to synergies among Government of Canada programming relevant to OLMCs; Contribution recipients are informed and contribute to knowledge building and program/policy issues; Knowledge shared among federal partners, contribution recipients and OLMCs.


2) Program results are available to inform management and program policy issues.


3) OLMCs’ access to Government of Canada programs and services.

4) Collaborative arrangements.

$69.0 M

$13.8 M

Sign contribution agreements with 14 organizations responsible for enhancing community economic development and human resources development within official-language minority communities.


 Sign new memoranda of understanding between Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, other federal departments and community partners involved in activities of both national committees in order to clarify the activities of these two committees.

Produce annual reports that describe activities and results for each of the two national committees.
5. Citizenship and Immigration Canada Integration of French-speaking immigrants a. Recruitment and integration of immigrants


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

French-speaking immigrants obtain reinforced services of establishment in OLMCs.

$20.0 M

$4.5 M

For 2009–2010, CIC will continue existing activities to foster immigration to Francophone minority communities (FMCs). This period will be used to strengthen implementation of the Strategic plan to Foster Immigration to Francophone Minority Communities.


More specifically, CIC is expecting to:

  • Intensify coordination and research activities among key partners (Integration).
  • Inform more prospective French-speaking immigrants of immigration opportunities in Francophone Minority communities. (Recruitment and Promotion).
  • Strengthen French-speaking immigrant settlement services in FMCs (Integration).
6. Public Works and Governmental Services Canada Linguistic Services           

Linguistic Stewardship

a. Government of Canada Language Portal


Result for 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Canadians have better access to quality language resources in both official languages.

$16.0 M

$4.48 M

Launch of the Government of Canada Language Portal in Fall 2009.
Linguistic Services         

Linguistic Stewardship

b. Language Industry Initiative


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Funded projects help enhance the capacity, diversity and effectiveness of the language sector.

$10.0 M

  $1.68 M 

Launch of the Language Industry Initiative in Spring 2009.
Linguistic Services           

Linguistic Stewardship

c. University Scholarships Program in Translation


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Scholarships help encourage students to pursue post-secondary studies in translation, interpretation and terminology.

$8.0 M

$1.45 M

Launch of the University Scholarships Program in Translation in Fall 2009.
7. Canada School of Public Service Foundational learning


Official Languages Learning

Language retention services
a. Expanding Universities’  Access to Language Learning


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Increased access to language training products to Canadians through new partnerships with Canadian universities.

$2.5 M

$0.9 M

New partnerships with Canadian universities.
8. Canada Public Service Agency Policy Direction. Partnerships and Integration Program


Integrity and Sustainability Program

a. Centre of excellence


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Linguistic duality is reinforced in the federal public service.

$17.0 M

$3.4 M

Simplified, updated and restructured official languages policy instruments to allow deputy heads to better discharge their responsibilities regarding the implementation of the Official Languages Act.


An interpretation service for policy instruments made available to institutions subject to the Official Languages Act.


Support reviewing the policy instruments of other policy centres for everything regarding official languages.


Support, opinion and advice provided to institutions subject to the Official Languages Act to better assist them in applying the provisions of the relevant policy instruments.


Information sessions and workshops offered to federal institutions to help them to better understand the requirements of the Act and of the policy instruments.

Awareness-raising activities with institutions’ senior management in need of additional support.
Strategic Services Program       Renewed method of cooperation with champions to encourage stronger leadership on official languages.

Renewed method of cooperation with advisory committees to suggest ideas to them and encourage them to take shared initiatives to improve the overall official languages performance of institutions.

  Integrity and Sustainability Program       Monitoring of official languages management practices and controls in the context of conducting risk-based official languages annual reports.


An assessment of the state of official languages in the institutions that make up the core public administration in the context of the Management Accountability Framework (MAF).

An Annual Report on Official Languages presented to Parliament that gives a strategic picture of the Program in the institutions subject to the Official Languages Act while focusing on a specific theme for the year.

9. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Community Development a. Support to francophone immigration in New-Brunswick


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Enhanced capacity to support francophone immigration in New Brunswick.

$10.0 M

$2.7 M

Number of immigration centres opened in OLMCs (2).

Number of immigration awareness sessions to business owners (4).

Community Development b. Economic Development  Initiative


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.

$6.2 M

$1.8 M

Number of partnerships in Atlantic Canada with groups representing OLMCs (10).

Number of projects approved (10).

10. Industry Canada—FedNor

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)

Community, Economic and Regional Development

Northern Economy

a. Economic Development  Initiative


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.

$10.9 M

$2.7 M

Industry Canada will hold community consultations at the national level with partners.


FedNor: Expected results for 2009-2010 are to develop 30 projects with the planned funding for the same year. The emphasis will be put on community strategic planning and economic and enterprise development initiatives to foster economic development of OLMCs.

INAC:  Encourage the economic development of OLMCs across the territories and will complement current economic development efforts in these communities.
11. Canada Economic Development (CED) for Quebec regions Community Development a. Economic Development  Initiative


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.

$10.2 M

$2.0 M

CED will put in place the Economic Development Initiative for English communities of Quebec. The priority will be put on projects, such as local planning, entrepreneurship, creation and development of SME, tourism, integration of targeted groups and attractive funding in order to create an economic environment which helps and attracts the development of enterprises in OLMCs, especially for young people.
12. Western Economic Diversification Canada Research and Analysis; Community Economic Planning, Development and Adjustment; Business Development and Entrepreneurship;        Innovation a. Economic Development  Initiative


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.

$3.2 M

$0.8 M

Improved understanding of western Canadian economic issues, challenges, opportunities and priorities.


Communities have increased economic opportunities and capacity to respond to challenges.


Strong SMEs in Western Canada with improved capacity to remain competitive in the global marketplace.

A stronger knowledge-based economy.
13. National Research Council of Canada Information Technologies Languages Technologies Research Centre


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Collaboration with key partners in the implementation of an R&D strategy responsive to industry needs.


2) Innovative tool prototypes for the support of translation, and the creation and management of multilingual and multicultural content.

Transfer of knowledge and technology.

$10.0 M

$2.0 M

Immediate result: Transfer of knowledge and technology. Implementation of a machine translation system PORTAGE in the Translation Bureau (Public Works and Government Services Canada) and, at least, in a translation firm of the private sector. Negotiation of a commercial license for machine translation technology, PORTAGE.


Immediate result: Innovative tool prototypes for the support of translation, and the creation and management of multilingual and multicultural content; running-in of the machine translation system PORTAGE.

Immediate result: Collaboration with key partners in elaborating an R&D strategy responsive to industry needs; signature of at least two agreements of cooperation with Canadian translation firms, a governmental firm and a firm of the private sector.
Total $1,110.1 M

$235.61 M

 

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Geneviève Postolec (819) 934-9196

Name of Horizontal Initiative: 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games—Delivering on our Commitments

Name of lead department(s): Department of Canadian Heritage

Lead department program activity: Sport

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003–2004

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $654.65M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): To monitor and report on the Government of Canada’s contribution to the 2010 Winter Games, which engage Canadians from across the country; to reflect Canadian values and priorities in the Games’ planning, delivery, and international profile; to promote opportunities to advance public policy goals; and to make strategic investments that support long-term tangible economic benefits and sport, social, cultural and environmental legacies for all Canadians (www.pch.gc.ca).

The Government of Canada is a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games. The 2010 Federal Secretariat within the Department of Canadian Heritage works horizontally to support and promote federal engagement in planning and delivering the Games, which includes providing high quality essential federal services as well as capital and legacy funding. The 2010 Federal Secretariat works with its partners and stakeholders to leverage the Games as an opportunity to advance public policy objectives, establish lasting legacies, and derive maximum benefit for all Canadians (www.canada2010.gc.ca).

Shared outcome(s):

  • Canadian excellence and values will be promoted nationally and internationally.
  • Sport, economic, social and cultural legacies will be established for the benefit of all Canadians, in alignment with federal policy objectives.
  • Early planning and seamless, cost-effective delivery of mandated federal responsibilities, including federal essential services (security, entry of individuals, etc.) will contribute to high quality 2010 Winter Games.

Governance structure(s):

2010 Federal Games Secretariat

Representative Working Group (RWG)

The 2010 Federal Secretariat, under the leadership of the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage, supports the Framework for Federal Coordination (FFC)—the primary mechanism for promoting horizontal management of the Winter Games. This governance structure consists of three levels:

  1. A Deputy Ministers and Heads of Agency Coordination Committee facilitating interdepartmental and intergovernmental consultation and coordination of Games-related issues and commitments.
  2. An Assistant Deputy Minister-level Representative Working Group (RWG) reporting on the progress of essential federal service delivery.
  3. Working-level Issue Clusters supporting intergovernmental coordination and information sharing.
In addition, an Essential Federal Services Committee (EFS Committee) has been established under the authority of the RWG to support, promote, coordinate and monitor seamless planning of essential federal services.
 
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
A. Canadian Heritage Sport Sport Hosting Program

2010 Federal Secretariat

$527.05 M

 

$94 M Positive domestic and international exposure.

Canada has established sport, social and cultural legacies.

B. Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP),
Public Safety Canada,
Department of National Defence (DND),
Canadian Security Intelligence Agency (CSIS),

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

The goal is to ensure a safe and secure Games through an Integrated Security Model as partners in safety, peace and celebration. Security and Safety $87.5 M Total planned spending is currently being revisited. Security and public safety partners at the federal, provincial and municipal levels confirm their level of preparedness and interoperability.

Security and safety operations.

C. Canada Border Services Agency Access Security

 

$15.8 M $11.2 M Finalize/implement plans, processes and policies.

Deliver training and perform accreditation screening.

Operational readiness.

Delivery of integrated border services.
D. Citizenship and Immigration Maximum contribution to Canada’s economic, social and cultural development from migration. Temporary Resident Program $5.0 M $2.7 M All processing of applications will be completed.
E. Human Resources and Social Development Canada Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning. Foreign workers and immigrants N/A

The Temporary Foreign Workers Program (TFWP) has not received funding through this mechanism to support its Olympic Process.

N/A

The Temporary Foreign Workers Program (TFWP) has not received funding through this mechanism to support its Olympic Process.

HRSDC/Service Canada, in collaboration with CIC/CBSA will develop an end-to-end process to facilitate the entrance of temporary foreign workers, when warranted, for employers to support the 2010 Games.
F. Health Canada Reduced health and environmental risks from products and substances, and safer living and working environments. Regions and Programs Branch:
  • Health Protection of Foreign Dignitaries
  • Health Protection of Public Servants

Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:

  • Health Protection of travelling public

Health Products and Food Branch:

  • Import of drugs
TB support: $2.6 M TB support:

 

$1.275 M

 

$0.200 M

 

 

 

 

$0.200 M

 

 

$0.325 M

Address operational requirements related to the implementation of the health contingency plan for dignitaries and implement the plan.

Identify requirements, develop and implement plans with stakeholders to ensure the health and safety of federal employees working on location during the event, including emergency preparedness and response capacity, and psycho-social health of federal government employees who must meet the challenges of a terrorist attack or disease outbreak.

Identify requirements, develop and implement plans with stakeholders to:

  • Ensure that all points of entry are meeting recommended public health standards or guidelines; respond to any quarantine-related issues as they pertain to conveyances, goods and cargo.
  • Prepare and be able to respond to communicable diseases.
  • Ensure that there are no gastro-intestinal disease outbreaks.

HPFB Inspectorate:

  • Compliance and verification of imported products.
  • Monitoring and return of imported products to country of origin.

Additional funding will be needed to cover:

  • Accommodation costs in Whistler and Vancouver;
  • Audit and reporting requirements and the Gold exercise; and
  • Radiation Protection Bureau V2010 costs.
G. Environment Canada Weather and environmental predictions and services reduce risks and contribute to the well-being of Canadians. Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision-making. $9.3 M $2.3 M Delivery of weather services in support of Federal Partners, Games operations and for the benefit of the public and visitors to Canada.
  Canada's natural capital is restored, conserved and enhanced. Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes. $2.6 M $0.5 M Coordination and communication of 2010 partner initiatives that:
  • Reduce the environmental impact of Games operations and federal services; Showcase sustainability innovations.
  • Engage the public in sustainability actions.
  Environmental Assessment is integral part of program and policy decision-making. Efficient and effective environmental assessments. $1.5 M $0.1 M Completion of environmental assessment follow-up activities.
H. Fisheries and Oceans Canada Healthy and productive aquatic eco-systems. Habitat Management $0.6 M $0.1 M Environmental Assessment work conducted as required.
      Total :

$654.65M (Includes $2.7M for PHAC in non-security funding, $26M for CTC and $34.55M for INAC Legacy Grant)

Total :

$112.9M

 

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a

Contact information: Karen Mackarous (613) 949-7816

Top of Page

Department of Finance Canada

Table 4: Horizontal Initiatives

Name of horizontal initiative: Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime—formerly the National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering

Name of lead department(s): Department of Finance Canada

Lead department program activity: Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework

Start date of the horizontal initiative: June 2000

End date of the horizontal initiative: 2009-10

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $455,408 (thousands)

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering (NICML) was formally established in 2000 as part of the government's ongoing effort to combat money laundering in Canada. Legislation adopted that year, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act (PCMLA), created a mandatory reporting system for suspicious financial transactions, large cross-border currency transfers, and certain proscribed transactions. The legislation also established the Financial Transactions Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) to collect and analyze these financial transaction reports and to disclose pertinent information to law enforcement and intelligence agencies. In December 2001, the PCMLA was amended to include measures to fight terrorist financing activities and was renamed the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (PCMLTFA).

The NICML was expanded and is now known as Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing (AML/ATF) Regime. In December 2006, Bill C-25 amended the PCMLTFA to ensure that Canada's legislation remains consistent with international AML/ATF standards as set out by the Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering (FATF) and is responsive to areas of domestic risk. Amendments include enhanced client identification requirements, the creation of a registration regime for money services businesses, and the establishment of an administrative and monetary penalties regime to deal with lesser infractions of the PCMLTFA.

Shared outcome(s): To detect and deter money laundering and the financing of terrorist activities and to facilitate the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences

Governance structure(s): Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime is a horizontal initiative composed of both funded and non-funded partners. The funded partners include the Department of Finance Canada, FINTRAC, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)—Immigration and Customs, the Canada Revenue Agency—Charities Directorate, the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS); non-funded partners include Public Safety Canada and the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions.

An assistant deputy minister-level steering committee and an interdepartmental working group, consisting of all partners and led by the Department of Finance Canada, direct and coordinate the government's efforts to combat money laundering and terrorist financing activities. In addition, the Department chairs a public-private sector advisory committee. This is a broad-based advisory committee that includes both public- and private-sector representatives to provide general guidance for Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime.


($ thousands)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Department of Finance Canada Financial
Sector Policy
Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
$2,700 $300 Effective oversight of Canada Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime (the Regime)
Undertake a 10-year Treasury Board-mandated evaluation of the Regime to assess effectiveness and access to continued funding
Monitor the financial sector for money laundering and terrorist financing risks and other emerging illicit financial risks
Participate in international forums related to combatting money laundering and terrorist financing, in particular the G7 financial experts meetings, the FATF, the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force, and the Asia Pacific Group on Money Laundering
Department of Justice Canada The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
$7,000 $100 The Criminal Division of the Department of Justice Canada plays a significant role in the regime. For 2009-10, it is anticipated that the Criminal Division will use the resources it receives to carry out work related to the FATF, including attending FATF-related international meetings. Resources will also be allocated to ensure the Criminal Division's continued involvement in policy development relating to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, the Human Rights Law Section will receive money to deal with any ancillary constitutional issues raised during the prosecutions.
Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) Addressing criminal issues to contribute to a safer world for Canada Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
$9,200 $2,300 The PPSC plays a significant role in the regime. For 2009-10, it is anticipated that information provided to law enforcement by FINTRAC will result in more prosecutorial legal advice being provided to law enforcement. It will also result in additional charges being laid for money laundering and terrorist financing offences and thus result in an increased workload for prosecutors. The PPSC also has responsibilities related to the PCMLTFA. The planned work includes applications for production orders, increases in border seizure and forfeiture work associated with suspected proceeds of crime, and prosecutions related to offences created within the Act. In addition, resources will be used to provide training to law enforcement personnel and prosecutors and for the development and coordination of policy as it relates to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, PPSC resources will carry out work related to the FATF, including attending the FATF international meeting.
Financial Transactions Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) Collection, analysis, and dissemination of financial information Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
$269,085 $37,500 Produce technology-driven financial intelligence analysis and case disclosures that are widely used by law enforcement and intelligence agencies with a program that fosters compliance by the reporting entities
Canada Border Services Agency(CBSA) Security Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
$57,008 $7,727 CBSA border services officers are responsible for the enforcement of the cross-border currency reporting program, which includes conducting searches, questioning individuals, and seizing non-reported or falsely reported currency and suspected proceeds of crime. In addition, FINTRAC discloses information to CBSA Immigration, which plays a key role in denying the use of Canadian territory to criminals and persons who pose security threats to Canada.
          The CBSA is responsible for administering Part 2 of the PCMLTFA, "Reporting of Currency and Monetary Instruments." The Cross-Border Currency Reporting (CBCR) Program requires that travellers report the importation and exportation of currency and monetary instruments equal to or greater than CAD$10,000. Part 2 also provides for the enforcement element of the CBCR Program, which includes conducting searches, questioning individuals, and seizing non-reported or falsely reported currency and suspected proceeds of crime.
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Charities Directorate Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
$7,429 $4,976 The CRA has responsibility for administering the registration system for charities under the Income Tax Act. In recognition that the existence of a strong regulatory deterrence against terrorist abuse of charities contributes to suppressing the financing of terrorism in Canada and to protecting and preserving the social cohesion and well-being of Canadians, the CRA's regulatory oversight of charities has been strengthened by the enactment of complementary measures under the Charities Registration (Security Information) Act and the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act, and by changes to the Income Tax Act authorizing broader information sharing between AML/ATF agencies. Under these authorities, intelligence provided to the CRA assists in its mandate to protect the integrity of the registration system for charities, and information disclosed by the CRA can be used for investigative purposes. For 2009-10, it is anticipated that the CRA will use the resources it receives to strengthen capacity to identify and respond to cases involving possible links to terrorism through investments in facilities and IT development and an increase in on-going, direct program full-time equivalents.
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Special Enforcement Program Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
$21,568 $2,200 The CRA is focussing on the following four pillars:
  • participation in committees and initiatives to manage and enhance the AML/ATF Regime;
  • enhancement of the operational relationship with FINTRAC and other partners in the Regime;
  • research and analysis; and
  • contributing to the work of international organizations to enhance cooperation between tax administrations and anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing authorities by participating in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Sub-Group on tax crime and money laundering.

All disclosures received from FINTRAC are thoroughly reviewed, and those with potential are selected for audit by the Special Enforcement Program. The projected number of audits is 90, with a projected federal tax recovery of $7,000,000.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police(RCMP)-Money Laundering Units Money Laundering Units Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
$55,898 $6,872 Enhance national and international opportunities for the detection and investigation of money laundering activities
Develop FINTRAC disclosures and other intelligence to a point where resources from the Integrated Proceeds of Crime Units or elsewhere in the RCMP can be directed towards investigations in an effort to increase seizures.
The resource level in Canada's three major urban centres (Vancouver, Toronto, and Montréal) was increased in 2007 and continues to positively affect the investigative capacity in those centres to conduct investigations on leads related to Canada's AML/ATF Regime.
RCMP—Anti-Terrorist Financing Team (ATFT) Special Initiatives Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
$22,937 $5,158 Through the gathering and analysis of financial intelligence, the Anti-Terrorist Financing Team will focus on converting that intelligence into proactive investigations, thus enhancing the Department's ability to detect and deter terrorist financing activities.
Total $453,1251 $67,133  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact information:

Rachel Grasham
Chief, Financial Crimes Section
Phone: 613-943-2883

1. Certain organizations that are partners in the AML/ATF regime are exempt from reporting. Therefore the figures presented in the table may not sum to the total amount allocated.

Top of Page

Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives-Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of lead department(s): Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Lead department program activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: Initiated October 2, 2005; operationalized September 18, 2006

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): 1,108.0

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Funded from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, the GPSF fills a funding gap by providing dedicated resources for activities that are necessary for a timely response with respect to countries in or at risk of crisis, but that are not properly the responsibility of the Department of National Defence and are outside Canada's traditional official development assistance program. Examples of these activities are supporting peace operations and peace processes, supporting justice and security system reform, enhancing transitional justice and reconciliation, and improving the peace enforcement and peace operations capacities of military and police in Africa and the Americas. Major recipients of funding are Afghanistan, Sudan and Haiti.

The GPSF is both a responsive and directive program, established to provide timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges. DFAIT works closely with a range of government departments including CIDA, RCMP, DND, CSC, CBSA and Justice Canada. Among other assistance, these partnerships provide critical expertise in the area of justice and security system reform to the civilian components of UN peace operations. In 2007-08, the GPSF entered into arrangements with several major implementing partners from the federal government. DFAIT's contribution of $86.3 million was supplemented by $82.4 million in spending by partners, for total spending of $168.7 million. Of particular note was support to peace operations in Sudan through the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the implementation of stabilization and reconstruction projects in Kandahar province, Afghanistan.

Shared outcome(s):

  • safer and more secure environments conducive to stabilization, recovery and long-term reconstruction;
  • greater protection of rights and safety of individuals and populations; and
  • Improved global and regional response to crisis situations.

Governance structure(s): The GPSF is managed by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) Secretariat in the context of a whole-of-government approach coordinated through the START Advisory Board. Chaired by the Director General of the START Secretariat and comprising senior officials from across government, the START Advisory Board is responsible for establishing, within the framework of individual departmental authorities, whole-of-government strategic policy as well as priority setting and direction with respect to fragile states and complex emergencies. It is also responsible for providing a platform for information exchange to ensure that program-related activities are complementary and avoid duplication. The START Secretariat is located in the International Security Branch of DFAIT and is accountable to DFAIT, which is responsible for the financial, human and physical resource services for START.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA)* Names of Programs for Federal Partners** Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)*** Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT)




Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)
PA 2: Diplomacy and Advocacy






PA 1: Federal and International Operations
Global Peace and Security Program; Global Peace Operations Program; Glyn Berry Program for Peace and Security   91.8 Improved Canadian contribution to peace and security and the safety and well-being of beneficiaries living in targeted areas
Canadian Police Arrangement   11.4**** Implementation of RCMP international police peacekeeping projects
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) PA 1: Geographic Programs N/A   0 (no GPSF funds to be administered by CIDA in 2009-10) N/A
Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) N/A Peace Support Operations in Fragile States   6.5 Logistical support to Sudan peace operations (AMIS and UNAMID)
Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) PA 1: Correctional Interventions Operations in Afghanistan and Stabilization and Reconstruction in Haiti   2.0 Supported the deployment of correction advisers to the PRT in Afghanistan
Department of Justice PA 1: Justice policies, laws and programs N/A   0 (none identified to date) N/A
Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) PA 1: Security Operations in Afghanistan (Pakistan-Afghanistan border); Canada's support to the Middle East Peace Process; Stabilization and Reconstruction in Haiti   0 (none identified to date) Provision of technical assistance
Department of National Defence (DND) PA 1: Contribute to Canada and the international community Operations in Afghanistan   10.4 (includes police and corrections issues and the Kandahar Initiatives for Peace and Security) Support to implementation of projects in Kandahar
* Includes grants.
** "Names of programs of federal partners" refers to support to GPSF activities and does not necessarily reflect the name of a department's official program. It is often the case that departments working with the GPSF do not have an official program name.
*** Exact figures not known due to definitional ambiguities, in particular inclusion/exclusion dates and Human Security Program (now Glyn Berry Program) carry-over from fiscal years 2005-06 and 2006-07.
**** This represents funding to cover incremental costs to the RCMP for the deployment of civilian police in support of international police peacekeeping operations. Excluded are reference level transfers to the RCMP to support the International Police Program.
  Total $122.1 million  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): The GPSF works with a wide array of implementing partners, including international and regional organizations such as the United Nations and its bodies, the Organization of American States and the African Union, as well as with non-governmental organizations, academic institutions, foreign governments and other legal entities. Further information on GPSF projects can be found in the DFAIT 2007-08 Departmental Performance Report.

Contact information:

Robert Derouin
Director General, START Secretariat
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
Tel.: 613-992-1361
Fax: 613-944-1226
Email: Robert.Derouin@international.gc.ca

Top of Page

Department of Justice Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Anti-drug Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Department of Justice

Lead department program activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-08

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12 and ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $578.1 millions[1]

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Anti-Drug Strategy is built on the former Canada’s Drug Strategy, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Its goal is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

 The prevention action plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use and to develop and implement community-based interventions & initiatives to prevent illicit drug use. The treatment action plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The enforcement action plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

Shared outcome(s):

  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced impacts of illicit drug use through prevention and treatment efforts; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.

Governance structure(s):

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Strategic Initiative Unit of the Department of Justice Canada.

The Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC), which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources.  The ADMSC prepares questions for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the development and implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by the Department of Public Safety Canada, oversees the development and implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the development and articulation of policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy and the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy including, making decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative and ensuring coordination of communication.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Department of Justice A1 - Justice policies, laws and programs a. Drug Treatment Courts $16.23M $3.63M Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court clients.
b. Youth Justice Fund - Youth Justice Anti-drug Treatment Component

(Treatment Action Plan)
$6.8M $1.58M Overall results:
  • To work collaboratively with interested provinces and territories as well as other stakeholders in order to identify gaps in drug treatment programs for youth in the justice system.
  • To introduce, pilot and evaluate a number of drug treatment options for youth involved in the youth justice system in communities.
  • To share knowledge of the piloted drug treatment programs and promising practices with provinces and territories as well as other interested stakeholders.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Projects on Treatment Services & Program Enhancements
  • Enhanced capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations
c. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.34M $0.25M Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:
  • exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • maintaining the NADS Governance Structure;
C1 - Internal Services a. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.53M $0.33M Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:
  • leading and coordinating all NADS communi-cations activities;
  • taking lead responsibility for accountability – evaluation and performance reporting.
b. National Anti-drug Strategy $0.25M $0.05M  
Health Canada N/A a. Mass Media Campaign

(Prevention Action Plan)

$29.8M $6M Increased awareness & understanding of illicit drugs & their negative consequences
3.4.3 Controlled Substances b. Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF)

(Prevention Action Plan)

$59.0M $11.8M Increased awareness & understanding of illicit drugs & their negative consequences

Enhanced uptake of knowledge in communities to address illicit drug use & its negative consequences

3.4 Substance Use and Abuse c. Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP)

(Treatment Action Plan)

$124.7 M $30.77M Improved collaboration on responses & knowledge of treatment issues

Enhanced capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations

Enhanced F/PT commitments to improve treatment systems in targeted areas of need

4.1.1.2 First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions d. National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP)

(Treatment Action Plan)

$36 M $7.9M Enhanced capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations
3.4.3 Controlled Substances e. Office of Controlled Substances

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$12.8 M $2.66M Increased capacity to control & monitor controlled substances & precursor chemicals
f. Drug Analysis Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$ 49.2 M[2]

$ 3.4 M[3]

$9.44M Increased capacity to gather, analyze/share intelligence & analyse evidence

Increased awareness of illicit drug & precursor chemical issues for enforcement officials

Canadian Institutes of Health Research 1.2 Strategic Priority Research Research on Drug Treatment Model

(Treatment Action Plan)

$4.0M $0.97M Improved collaboration on responses & knowledge of treatment issues
Department of Public Safety Canada 5 a. Crime Prevention Funding and Programming:  (Crime Prevention Action Fund & Research and Knowledge Development Fund)

(Prevention Action Plan)

$20.0M $5.0M Enhanced support for targeted at-risk populations.

Enhanced knowledge in communities to address illicit drug use and its negative consequences.

3.1 Law enforcement policy b. National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation

 (Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.0M $0.8M Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies
Royal Canadian Mounted Police 1.1.2.7 a. Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Service (DOCAS)

(Prevention Action Plan)

$15.1M $3M Increased awareness & understanding of illicit drugs & their negative consequences by youth targeted through DOCAS programming.
3.5.2 Community and Youth Programs b. National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program

(Treatment Action Plan)

$3.6M $0.745M Implementation sites underway in participating RCMP Divisions.

RCMP Divisional representatives selected to assist in local program delivery and data collection.

1.1.2.9 c. The RCMP Drug Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$91.4 M $17.3M Increased capacity for the enforcement of illicit drug producers & distributors, in particular, through the dismantling of marihuana and synthetic drug operations.

Increased capacity to gather, analyze and/or share intelligence & analyse evidence, through additional resources in Criminal Intelligence.

Change in the level of MGO or Clan Labs investigated and/or disrupted.

Continue to maintain the integration, collaboration and capacity between sectors, law enforcement agencies, governments, communities and international partners to address the illicit importation and/or exportation, production and distribution related to MGOs or SDOs.

Increase awareness of illicit drug & precursor chemical issues among enforcement officials and first responders.

Correctional Service Canada 3.0 Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision
of Provincial Offenders

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$23.3 M [4] $6.8M Timely case preparation; rate of
offenders successfully reintegrated into the community

(if legislation regarding mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug offenders is passed)

National Parole Board of Canada   Conditional Release

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$7.2 M [5] $2.2M Preparation for implementation of Mandatory Minimum Penalties for serious drug offences.

Following Royal Assent for Mandatory Minimum Penalties for serious drug offences, completion of conditional release reviews for those offenders incarcerated for offences subject to the Mandatory Minimum Penalties.

Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions 1 - Drug, Criminal Code and Terrorism Prosecution Program a. Prosecution and prosecution -related services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$8.6M $1.6M Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) in response to the workload generated by the enhanced RCMP dedicated anti-drug teams and criminal intelligence and technical operations support staff.
b. Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$33.5 M [6] $0 Provision of prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations, and prosecution of drug charges under the CDSA resulting from the Minimum Mandatory Penalties, subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.
3 - Internal Services Enforcement Action Plan $1.3M $0.2 M  
Canada Border Services Agency 1 Border Intelligence, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$12.7M $2.35M The resources will be focused on intelligence gathering, information sharing, enforcement activities, assessment capabilities and laboratory support and services.
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade 1.2 International Operations and Programs Annual Contributions to UNODC and CICAD

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.5M $0.9M Improved capacity of UNODC to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs and international crime at the global level.

Improved capacity of CICAD to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs in the Americas.

Canada Revenue Agency 4 Reporting Compliance Special Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.2 M $0.8M 15 audits of targets involved in marijuana grow operations or illicit drugs generating approximately

$750,000 in federal tax

Public Works and Government Services Canada 1.7 Specialized Programs and Services Forensic Accounting Management Group (FAMG)

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$1.6 M $0.2M To remove financial incentive for engaging in criminal activity
Financial Transactions and analysis Centre of Canada 4881

Collection, Analysis and Dissemination of Financial Information

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$2.5 M $512,000 Enhanced support to Law enforcement

Development of financial intelligence

Ensuring compliance in high-risk reporting sectors
Total $573 M $117.8M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Catherine Latimer 
General Counsel and Director General
Strategic Initiative Unit
(613) 957-9623

clatimer@justice.gc.ca

[1] It includes funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences, which is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

[2] Original allocation as per RMAF is $62.4M. Variance is a result of internal reallocation to support DAS activities (research, policy, regulatory development).

[3] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

[4] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent. No funding was available for 2007/08.

[5] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

[6] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

Top of Page

Environment Canada

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canadian Group on Earth Observations (CGEO)

2. Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions.

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 2003

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): No new funds - annual multi-departmental contributions

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Interdepartmental secretariat established to coordinate Canada's participation in the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO); and advance coordinated, comprehensive and sustained Earth observations in Canada, funded through annual interdepartmental transfers and in-kind contributions.

8. Shared outcome(s):

- Enhancing access to global Earth observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements

- Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international

- Improving evidence-based decision-making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations

9. Governance structure(s):

- Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADM) Steering Committee (Chair: Assistant Deputy Minister for the Meteorological Service of Canada)

- Directors General (DG) Interdepartmental Coordination Committee

- Canadian Group on Earth Observations Secretariat

 


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
1. Environment Canada PA1

 

n/a

a. Weather & Environmental Monitoring $ not available $ 230 salary

140 O&M

38 G&C

25 in-kind

a) Federal Earth Observation Strategy implemented;

b) CGEO Working Committees (Soil Moisture, Arctic, & Data Policy) making active progress; development of a National Earth Observation Strategy initiated;

c) CGEO engaged in GEOSS in the Americas initiatives;

d) bilateral activities with USA initiated; e) additional federal departments engaged in CGEO;

2. Natural Resources Canada PA1

n/a

a. Earth Sciences Sector $ not available $ to be determined as above
b. Canadian Forest Service $ not available $ to be determined as above
3. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada PA1

n/a

a. Science and Technology $ not available $ 20,000

In-kind TBD

as above
b. Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration and Environment $ not available $ 20,000

In-kind TBD

as above
4. Canadian Space Agency PA 1

n/a

a. Earth Observations $ not available $ 40,000

In-kind TBD

as above
5. Department of Fisheries & Oceans PA 1

n/a

a. Science & Technology $ not available $ to be determined as above
6. Health Canada PA 1

n/a

a. Radiation $ not available $ to be determined as above
7. Statistics Canada PA 1

n/a

a. Agriculture $ not available $ to be determined as above
8. Department of Foreign Affairs & International Trade PA 1

n/a

a. Environment $ not available $ not available as above
Total $ not available $ to be determined  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact information: Kenneth Korporal, Coordinator, Canadian Group on Earth Observations Secretariat, 373 Sussex Dr. , Ottawa, ON K1A 0H3 613-995-2466 kenneth.korporal@ec.gc.ca


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Great Lakes BasinEcosystem Initiative

2. Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada

3. Lead department program activity: COA Delivery

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005 (GLAP IV resources)

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2010 (expiry of COA and GLAP IV resources)

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $40 million over five years (GLAP IV resources), plus Departmental A-Base.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative is Environment Canada's mechanism for coordinating and delivering federal commitments to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem, as expressed in the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Environment Canada uses the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem (COA) to engage other federal departments and Ontario in delivering Canada's Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments.

Environment Canada's Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative (GLBEI) reflects Budget 2005 investments targeted at continuing the work under the Great Lakes Action Plan to improve the ecological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. A total of $40 million over five years was allocated in GLAP IV to continue the environmental restoration of key aquatic Great Lakes Areas of Concern. Federal departments also use A-Base resources to support their efforts towards achieving COA results.

8. Shared outcome(s): The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement establishes broad, long term objectives for Canada and the United States in restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. The Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem (COA) provides a short-term plan for achieving Canada's Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments. Through the COA, federal and provincial agencies are guided by a shared vision of a healthy, prosperous and sustainable Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem for present and future generations. The COA also establishes a common purpose and shared goals, results and commitments in four priority areas: restoration of Areas of Concern; reduction of Harmful Pollutants; achievement of Lake and Basin Sustainability; and coordination of monitoring, research and information.

9. Governance structure(s): Eight federal departments are engaged in delivering GLBEI results under the COA: Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Transport Canada, Infrastructure Canada and Health Canada.

 

The COA Management Committee is the senior federal-provincial management body responsible for priority setting, establishing strategies to ensure delivery of the COA, and developing common positions and joint action plans for representing Canadian interests and engaging in cooperative initiatives with the United States agencies and the International Joint Commission.

 

Planning, prioritization and allocation of GLAP IV monies is managed through the federal Great Lakes Executive Committee, which involves the eight federal signatories to COA. The role of Great Lakes Executive Committee is to approve strategic directions and priorities for GLAP IV work activities, and to coordinate federal positions, strategies and initiatives in support of bi-national activities and discussions.

 


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Environment Canada Sustainable use & management of natural capital and working landscapes COA $37.5 Million GLAPIV plus Departmental A-Base. $2.4 Million GLAPIV plus $2.1 Million Departmental A-Base All COA Results, except Ann. 2-3.2
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Healthy & Productive Aquatic Ecosystems COA $2.5 Million GLAPIV, plus Departmental A-Base $445.0K GLAPIV plus $5.164M Departmental A-Base Ann. 1-2.4; Ann. 1-2.6; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-3.1; Ann. 3-3.2; Ann. 3-4.1; Ann. 3-4.2; Ann. 3-5.1; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2.
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Health of the Environment COA Departmental A-Base $8 - 10 million Ann. 1-1.2; Ann.1-2.2; Ann. 2-2.3; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-2.2; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2
Natural Resources Canada Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources

Ecosystem risk management: Canada understands and mitigates risks to natural resource ecosystems and human health

Port Hope Long term Low-level Radioactive Waste Mgmt. Project

CFS Forest harvesting in riparian zones

CFS Pesticides Program

Departmental A-Base; and

C-Base

$675.0K Ann. 1-2.3; Ann. 2-3.1; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-2.4; Ann. 3-5.1; Ann. 4-2.2
Parks Canada Conserve heritage resources COA Departmental A-Base $0 Ann. 3-1.1; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-2.2; Ann. 3-3.2; Ann. 3-3.3; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2.
Transport Canada Environmental Protection and Remediation; the Canadian Ballast Water Program COA Departmental A-Base $507.0K Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-2.1; Ann. 3-4.1; Ann. 3-4.2
Infrastructure Canada Infrastructure funding programs Building Canada plan and sunsetting programs (CSIF MRIF) Building Canada plan and sunsetting programs (CSIF MRIF) TBD* Ann. 1-2.1; Ann. 3-6.1**
Health Canada Healthy Environments & Consumer Safety COA Departmental A-Base No A-Base funding. COA commitments incorporated in CMP initiatives. Ann. 2-3.2
TOTAL:

GLAPIV plus Departmental funding

$2.85M GLAPIV

$17.45M Dept'l funding

 
* For INFC, exact figures are not available for Total Allocation and Planned Spending for 2009-2010. Projects that are to be funded may be determined through a competitive, merit-based process, through joint federal-provincial discussions, or the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities may accept an Annual Capital Plan describing these.

** INFC is committed to attaining the objectives of the COA with particular emphasis on Annex items Ann. 1.2-1; Ann. 3-6.1; however, INFC employs its own project selection process to ensure that projects selected for funding meet specific eligibility criteria.

Results Anticipated in 2009-10:

In 2009-2010 progress toward a healthy and sustainable Great Lakes basin ecosystem will continue on many fronts.

 

Specific Results by Department:

Environment Canada

Work will continue to achieve progress in restoration of Great Lakes Areas of Concern. Environment Canada anticipates contributing $4.5 million towards numerous projects and initiatives including:

· Working with the City of Toronto on the development of a Wet Weather Flow Master Plan (Toronto AOC).

· Developing site-specific data and information on submerged aquatic substrates for the development of sediment management options (various AOCs).

· Developing indicators to assess efficacy of remedial activities carried out in Areas of Concern (various AOCs).

Work will continue to achieve a better understanding of the state and trends in the Great Lakes Ecosystem. Environment Canada will work with universities and other government agencies on many water and wildlife research projects, including:

· Fish health effects in Areas of Concern.

· Wildlife populations monitoring in Great Lakes Areas of Concern.

· Watershed modelling for assessing nutrient loading and water quality.

 

Work will continue to reduce the release of harmful substances. Environment Canada will work with the Great Lakes community on projects, including:

· Participating in the development and implementation of the Municipal Wastewater Effluent Strategy in Ontario.

· Encouraging citizens and First Nations peoples to return unused and/or expired pharmaceuticals and personal care products to local drugstores.

· Participating in outreach activities during development of a provincial Toxics Use Reduction Strategy.

 

Fisheries and Oceans

Work will continue to conduct science, enhance fish habitats and control the negative impacts of established invasive species, including:

· Developing indices of Biotic Integrity and Habitat Productivity to evaluate the diversity and biomass of near shore fish populations (Bay of Quinte).

· Developing fish habitat classification schemes to assess the recovery of fish habitat (Bay of Quinte, Hamilton Harbour).

· Developing and implementing new sampling methodologies to facilitate the ability of inspectors to collect water samples from ballast tanks, including tanks which contain only residual amounts of water.

 

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Work will continue to improve beneficial agriculture management practices with involvement of the Great Lakes farming community in numerous projects, including:

· Improving nutrient management practices.

· Improving water use efficiencies.

· Improving management of riparian areas including planting of buffers, fencing and alternate watering systems.

 

Natural Resources Canada

Work will continue towards the achievement of sustainable development of Canada's energy, forestry and mineral metals resources within the Great Lakes Basin, including:

· Enhancing policies and practices to mitigate forestry impacts on creeks and rivers.

· Enhancing accuracy of pesticide applications on forests to reduce impacts on aquatic organisms.

· Leading the design of the waste management facilities to manage Port Hope area historic, low-level radioactive wastes, following anticipated licensing decisions by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission in 2009 and 2010.

 

Parks Canada

Work will continue to manage parks in the Great Lakes Basin and towards the achievement of a viable protected areas


Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Contact information:

Linda Klaamas, Manager, Great Lakes Environment Office, Environment Canada, 416-739-581

Appendix - COA Results Statements

ANNEX 1 - AREAS OF CONCERN

Result 1.1 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial or municipal wastewater to achieve delisting targets in Nipigon Bay and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.2 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources to meet delisting criteria in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC.

Result 1.3 - Contaminated sediment management strategies developed for the Wheatley Harbour AOC and implemented in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC.

Result 1.4 - Plans in place and being implemented to rehabilitate fish and wildlife habitats and populations to meet delisting targets in the Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.5 - Informed, effective collaboration amongst government, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in Nipigon Bay, Jackfish Bay, Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.6 - Environmental monitoring and reporting to document improvements and track environmental recovery.

Result 2.1 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from municipal sewage treatment plants, combined sewer overflows, urban stormwater and industrial wastewater towards delisting targets in St. Mary's River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region, and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.2 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources towards achieving RAP delisting criteria in St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, and Toronto and Region AOCs.

Result 2.3 - Progress made in developing sediment management strategies to reduce ecological and human health risk from contaminated sediments in Thunder Bay, Peninsula Harbour, St. Mary's River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Port Hope and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.4 - Long-term management plans being developed and priority actions for delisting being implemented for rehabilitation and protection of fish and wildlife habitats and populations in St. Mary's River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region, and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.5 - Informed, effective collaboration amongst government, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in AOCs.

Result 2.6 - Identify monitoring needs, undertake required studies and evaluate results to assess environmental recovery and support remediation strategies in AOCs.

 

ANNEX 2 - HARMFUL POLLUTANTS

Result 1.1 - Reduction in releases of Tier 1 substances beyond the 2005 achievements towards the goal of virtual elimination.

Result 2.1 - Reduction in releases of Criteria Air Pollutants.

Result 2.2 - Coordinated activities to reduce releases from municipal wastewater.

Result 2.3 - Develop and initiate a program for the Sound Management of Chemical Substances in the Great Lakes Basin.

Result 3.1 - Improved understanding of the sources, fate and impacts of harmful pollutants in the Great Lakes Basin.

Result 3.2 - Human Health risks from harmful pollutants are understood and addressed in the Great Lakes Basin

 

ANNEX 3 - LAKE AND BASIN SUSTAINABILITY

Result 1.1 - Increased awareness and appreciation of the Great Lakes and their contributions to social, economic and environmental well-being.

Result 1.2 - Increased stewardship actions that work towards a balance between human well-being and prosperity, and healthy aquatic ecosystems.

Result 1.3 - Sustainable use of land, water and other natural resources to provide benefits from the Great Lakes now and in the future.

Result 1.4 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and resources

Result 2.1 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial and municipal wastewater, combined sewer overflows and urban stormwater sources consistent with actions specified in binational Lakewide Management Plans (LaMPs) and binational lake action plans.

Result 2.2 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural sources by undertaking actions specified in the binational Lakewide Management Plans and binational lake action plans.

Result 2.3 - Identification of contaminated sediment and development of sediment management plans to reduce the release and impact of sediment-bound contaminants on the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem.

Result 2.4 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes water quality.

Result 3.1 - Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and habitats are protected, restored and sustained consistent with binational Great Lakes planning.

Result 3.2 - Progress on rehabilitation of Great Lakes native species to restore the health of aquatic ecosystems, consistent with binational Great Lakes planning.

Result 3.3 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, habitats and species.

Result 4.1 - Implementation of the "National Action Plan to Address the Threat of Aquatic Invasive Species" in the Great Lakes.

Result 4.2: Enhanced knowledge about the harmful impacts of aquatic invasive species on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, food webs and species.

Result 5.1 - The impacts of climate change on the Great Lakes ecosystem composition, structure, and function, including biodiversity (organisms and their habitat), water quality and quantity, human health and safety (including access to clean drinking water), social well being and economic prosperity are understood by governments and the Great Lakes community.

Result 6.1 - The potential risks to Great Lakes drinking water intakes are identified and assessed, and early actions to address risks are undertaken

Result 6.2 - Develop knowledge and understanding of water quality and quantity issues of concern to the Great Lakes as drinking water sources.

 

ANNEX 4 - COORDINATION OF MONITORING, RESEARCH AND INFORMATION

Result 1.1 - Responsive and comprehensive monitoring and research programs.

Result 2.1 - Improved reporting on environmental conditions, changes and progress

Result 2.2 - Increased sharing of data and information among governments, organizations and Basin residents.


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Implementation of the Species at Risk Act

2. Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Biodiversity is conserved and protected

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2000

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing (Current approval of sunsetting resources portion ends in 2011-2012)

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $713 million

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): This horizontal initiative supports the development and implementation of the National Strategy for the Protection of Species at Risk and the Species at Risk Act (SARA) that came fully into force in June 2004. Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada are the departments and agency responsible for the protection of species at risk under federal jurisdiction. The three departments received funds from Treasury Board in 2000 for the "Implementation of the National Strategy for the Protection of Species at Risk and their Critical Habitat", in 2003 for the "Implementation of the Act respecting the protection of wildlife species at risk in Canada" and in 2007 for "Delivering results under the Species at Risk Act ".

8. Shared outcome(s):

- Implementation of SARA

- Protection of species at risk

- Protection of biodiversity

9. Governance structure(s):

- Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) - federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for wildlife

- Canadian Wildlife Deputy Ministers

- Canadian Wildlife Directors Committee (CWDC) - federal, provincial and territorial directors responsible for wildlife

- Associate Deputy Ministers Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada)

- Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada)

- Director General Operations Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada and others)


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
1. Environment Canada PA1 - Biodiversity is conserved and protected a. Environment Canada Species at Risk Program $424,000,000 $59,900,000 General administration of SARA, including production of the Annual Report to Parliament

Preparation for and participation in Parliamentary five-year review of SARA and as required, Minister's Roundtable

Respond to recommendations from the SARA Minister's Round Table (SARA s.127)

Finalization and implementation of policies

Continued implementation of the SARA evaluation action plan

Ongoing administration of contribution funding programs, including: HSP, AFSAR, IRF and ESRF

Preparation of ministerial response statements

Continued work to finalize bilateral agreements with provinces and territories

Consultations on listing and recovery strategies

Regulatory initiatives as required, including addition of species to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk

Preparation of recovery strategies

Development of outreach material, including SARA enforcement and compliance promotion

 

Responding to legal challenges

2. Fisheries and Oceans Canada PA1 a. Fisheries and Oceans Canada Species at Risk Program $176,500,000 $26,000,000
3. Parks Canada PA2

Heritage Resources Conservation

a. Parks Canada Species at Risk Program $102,500,000 $14,100,000

(not including A-base investment of over $2 million)

Total $713,000,000 $ to be determined

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Assessment and reassessment of species, subspecies and populations by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC)

 

Leveraged funding and various public- and private-sector stewardship activities for the protection of species at risk habitat through the Habitat Stewardship Program

Development of recovery strategies by provinces and territories, and with involvement of experts from the academic world and non-governmental organizations

 

Research and education efforts to recover Canadian species at risk through the Endangered Species Recovery Fund and departmental funding

Protection of important or critical habitat through the Aboriginal Critical Habitat Protection Fund

Contact information:

Mary Taylor
Director
Conservation Service Delivery and Permitting Division
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
819-953-6283
Mary.Taylor@ec.gc.ca

 

Eleanor Zurbrigg
A/Director
Ontario Region
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
613-949-8262
Eleanor.Zurbrigg@ec.gc.ca


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: An Accelerated Action Plan for Federal Contaminated Sites - FCSAAP (Succeeded by the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), approved March 2005)

2. Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada and Treasury Board Secretariat

3. Lead department program activity: Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced (EC); Management Policy Development and Oversight (TBS)

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2003 (FCSAP in effect since April 2005)

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAAP funding to March 31, 2008, replaced by FCSAP in April 2005, which is expected to be 12 to 15 years. Currently, funding has been approved until March 31, 2010.

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Total Funding Allocated (FCSAAP and FCSAP) - $1,629.1 million

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP) and its successor program, the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), provide a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites having the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2004, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $3.5 billion. Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial departments, the overall program is administered jointly by Environment Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

8. Shared outcome(s): Reduce federal financial liability and risks to human health and the environment, including fish habitat. Increase public confidence in the overall management of federal real property through the effective risk management or remediation of individual federal contaminated sites.

9. Governance Structure for FCSAAP and its successor program, FCSAP: Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.

The Clean Air Agenda

Horizontal Initiative: The Clean Air Agenda


Lead Department Environment Canada
Federal Partners Natural Resources Canada, Transport Canada, Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, National Research Council, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Foreign Affairs and International Trade.
Start Date April 1, 2007
End Date March 31, 2011

Description

The Clean Air Agenda (CAA) is the Government's response to achieving tangible improvements in Canada's environment, including reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The CAA represents a part of the Government's broader efforts to address the challenges of climate change and air pollution, with a view to building a clean and healthy environment for Canadians. These efforts will be delivered through two main initiatives:

  • The Clean Air Regulatory Agenda, which is intended to provide effective regulation of air pollutants and GHG emissions from transportation, key industrial sectors and consumer products; and
  • Program measures which are intended to support the regulatory agenda and to address actions in key areas that cannot be covered by regulation.
The CAA is a four-year (from 2007-2008 to 2010-2011), $1.9 billion horizontal strategy regrouping nine (9) federal departments and agencies involved in designing and delivering more than 40 programs under eight (8) themes within the overall Agenda.
The overall CAA is managed through a horizontal management framework known as the Horizontal Management, Accountability and Reporting Framework (HMARF) being led by Environment Canada.

Shared outcomes

To support the broader efforts to address the challenges of climate change and air pollution, with a view to building a clean and healthy environment for Canadians, the focus in 2009-2010 will continue to be on reducing emissions of GHGs and air pollutants through the implementation of regulatory measures, and programs and initiatives, including building capacity, knowledge and strengthening partnerships with key stakeholders such as industry, both domestically and internationally.

Through new or amended regulations, adoption of new energy efficient products, practices and technologies and increasing awareness, it is anticipated that a reduction of both GHGs and air pollutants will result.

Work under the CAA will also support action to help Canadians adapt to climate change through continued work with partners and stakeholders to increase the use of adaptive products, practices and technologies; tools will also be developed to encourage Canadians to adopt more sustainable behaviours. The CAA also supports Canada's on-going participation in the various international processes focussed at achieving a global agreement and mechanisms to reduce and address international climate change.

Reporting on these efforts serves to demonstrate progress towards the collective goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution.

Governance structure

The HMARF is governed by a Deputy Ministers Committee, an Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee, and a Directors General Theme Lead Coordinating Committee to ensure successful collective and horizontal management, including accountability and transparency, inclusiveness and decision-making.

The Clean Air Agenda, Results Management Secretariat (CAA-RMS) has been established within Environment Canada to facilitate coordination and collaboration and to support the implementation of the framework.

Expected achievements in 2009-2010 for Agenda-wide programming

Each of the eight (8) Clean Air Agenda themes have defined expected achievements in 2009-2010 towards supporting the Agenda's shared outcomes. Theme expected achievements are detailed and specific and are referenced below.


Total 2009-2010 Planned Spending for Agenda-wide programming Total Approved Spending over the duration of the Clean Air Agenda (2007-2011)
$ 464,608,364 $ 1,891,840,000

Expected GHG reductions by 2011 attributable to the Clean Air Agenda

The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The preliminary expected GHG reductions for the 2010-2011 fiscal year for the Clean Air Agenda include 11.0Mt contributed by Clean Energy, 9.6Mt contributed by Clean Transportation, and less than 1Mt contributed by enabling themes: Indoor Air Quality, Adaptation, Partnerships, International Actions, and Management and Accountability; as well as reductions from industrial regulations in an amount dependent on the final form and timing of the regulations.

The estimated emissions reductions are based on estimates for the individual CAA programs. Reduction estimates from individual CAA programs have been taken on a case-by-case basis and summed up by theme. Due to interactions and synergies within and among programs and regulations the total emissions impact for a given CAA theme may be less than the sum of the individual CAA programs.



Navigation
Use the links below to navigate to plans and priorities by Theme or program:


Themes

CARA

Clean Energy

Clean Transportation

Indoor Air Quality

Adaptation

International Actions

Partnerships

Management and Accountability
Programs

CARA Program 1

CARA Program 2a

CARA Program 2b

CARA Program 2c

CARA Program 3a

CARA Program 3b

CARA Program 4

CARA Program 5a

CARA Program 5b

CARA Program 6

CARA Program 7

CARA Program 8

CARA Program 9

Clean Energy Program 1

Clean Energy Program 2

Clean Energy Program 3

Clean Energy Program 4

Clean Energy Program 5

Clean Energy Program 6

Clean Energy Program 7

Clean Energy Program 8

Clean Transportation Program 1

Clean Transportation Program 2

Clean Transportation Program 3

Clean Transportation Program 4

Clean Transportation Program 5

Clean Transportation Program 6

Clean Transportation Program 7

Clean Transportation Program 8

Clean Transportation Program 9a

Clean Transportation Program 9b

Clean Transportation Program 10

Clean Transportation Program 11

Clean Transportation Program 12

Indoor Air Quality Program 1

Indoor Air Quality Program 2

Adaptation Program 1

Adaptation Program 2a

Adaptation Program 2b

Adaptation Program 3

Adaptation Program 4

Adaptation Program 5

Adaptation Program 6a

Adaptation Program 6b

International Actions Program 1a

International Actions Program 1b

International Actions Program 2a

International Actions Program 2b

International Actions Program 2c

International Actions Program 3a

International Actions Program 3b

International Actions Program 3c

International Actions Program 4

Partnerships Program 1

Management and Accountability Program 1


Theme: Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA)


Lead Department Environment Canada
Federal Theme Partners Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Health Canada

Description of Theme programming

CARA is an integrated, nationally consistent approach to reduce emissions of both air pollutants and greenhouse gases, intended to protect the health and environment of Canadians, and to avoid falling further behind our trading partners. The regulations and targets to be pursued under CARA are designed to:

a) substantially reduce GHG emissions (20% reduction from 2006 levels by 2020) and air pollutants from major source sectors;
b) provide industry with the long-term certainty and level playing field needed to make significant, synergistic and cost-efficient investments to reduce emissions;
c) strengthen Canada's ability to engage effectively in international discussions, such as the transboundary flow of air pollutants between Canada and the US and influencing international climate change negotiations; and
d) control emissions from products that release indoor pollutants.

Expected achievements in 2009-2010 from Theme programming

In support of the reduction of air emissions:

  • Advance approaches to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions from key industrial sectors and produce supporting documents, including working with stakeholders on the development of a possible alternative regulatory framework to address air pollutant emissions.
  • Upgrading and/or development of scientific and economic models to measure the impacts and benefits of proposed mitigation options; improved and expanded monitoring of air pollutants, supporting the development of air quality objectives for particulate matter and ozone.
  • Development of options, including economic modeling analysis, for Canada-US cooperation on greenhouse gas, including the development of a North American cap-and-trade regime.

In support of a more efficient and cleaner transportation sector:

  • Continue the development and implementation of air pollutant emission regulations to address vehicles and engines under CEPA and the Canada Shipping Act 2001, and non-regulatory measures to address emissions from rail. Continue the development of fuel consumption regulations for motor vehicles and emission regulations for rail.

In support of safer and energy efficient consumer products:

  • Finalization and implementation of regulations to address Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) limits in various products, regulatory measures to address energy efficiency of products, and development of a regulatory strategy to govern the design of residential wood burning appliances sold within Canada.

In support of improving air quality in Canadian households and buildings:


  • An across-Canada radon survey of 15,000 residential homes over a two-year period starting in 2009-2010, along with distribution of radon brochures at regional events and Service Canada Centres targeting the Canadian public, all levels of government, health professionals, the building industry and real estate professionals. A memorandum of agreement will be established with the Standards Council of Canada to perform accreditation that ensures Canadians receive radon testing services of high quality.

In support of more accurate reporting, as well as easier compliance on air emissions:

  • Compilation, publication, maintenance and improvements of national inventories for GHGs and air pollutants, and submission of national inventories to meet international reporting requirements (GHG inventory to the UN Federation of Climate Change and National Air Pollutant Release inventory to the UN Economic Commission for Europe to support the Convention on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution).
  • Continue the development of various compliance mechanisms and electronic infrastructure in support of a regulatory regime as follows: the Offset System for Greenhouse Gases - publication of draft guides for comments and then of the final program guides; the National Registry - development of documentation for users and support staff; and the Domestic Credit Tracking System - completion of the design of the manual for system development of policies on privacy and confidentiality along with development of the documentation for users and support staff.
  • Continued improvements to methodologies to map and analyze air pollutants at the local level, including analysis at several locations across Canada and nearby U.S. sites to better understand the relationship between PM2.5 and ozone ambient concentrations and emission sources.
  • Development of an updated energy, emissions and economic baseline which will serve as a reference point for future analysis of Canada's climate change agenda, plus modeling of options to achieve Canada's domestic climate change goal of reducing emissions by 20% by 2020. Economic modeling analysis of potential industrial regulatory frameworks for air emissions, including profiles for key sectors, to examine potential impacts such as emission reductions, energy prices and economic growth.
  • Continued participation in international climate change discussions and negotiations with a view to promoting Canadian interests.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada 's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides, and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Total 2009-2010 Planned Spending for Theme programming Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Expected GHG reductions by 2011 attributable to Theme programming
$ 105,343,100 $347,300,000 Dependent on the final form and timing of the regulations*

*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The main achievement of the 2007-2011 period is the development and implementation of the various federal components that will contribute to these reductions. The reductions will progressively begin to be realized to ramp up towards 2020 and to meet the above target. The preliminary estimate of expected GHG reductions from the Industrial Regulations will be calculated from the projected levels (Business as usual) and derived from lower emission-intensities for the 2010-2011 fiscal year.


Theme: Clean Energy


Lead Department Natural Resources Canada
Federal Theme Partners Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Description of Theme programming

Energy production and use is responsible for the majority of Canada's greenhouse gas and air pollution emissions. While mandatory national regulation is the centerpiece of the Government's Clean Air Agenda, there remains a need to address important energy-related sources of emissions and air pollutants that cannot be effectively addressed through regulation.

As part of the Clean Air Agenda, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) are delivering the ecoENERGY Initiatives - a set of measures to promote smarter energy use, increase clean energy supply, and support the development and deployment of clean energy technologies.

The suite of Clean Energy initiatives has been designed to complement the regulatory aspects of the Clean Air Agenda by highlighting existing government work and introducing new measures that immediately address important sources of emissions and that will facilitate the transition to major emissions reductions that will be required by regulation over the longer term.

As the lead department for the Clean Energy theme, NRCan is responsible for collecting, collating and reporting information on the progress of Clean Energy programming.

Expected achievements in 2009-2010 from Theme programming


Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHG and air pollutant emissions:


  • Provision of grants to Canadian homeowners to offset the cost of making energy efficiency improvements. In 2009-2010, collaborative work with stakeholders in the existing Canadian housing sector is expected to realize energy savings of 49 GJ per home which is equivalent to a GHG emission reduction of 3.3 tonnes per house per year (50,000 dwellings);
  • Funding of retrofit projects in small and medium industrial organizations (380 retrofit projects are expected to be funded in 2009-2010);
  • Installation of renewable technologies and products in renovations;
  • Support approximately 150 Canadian companies as they register their corporate commitments to improve energy efficiency and become leaders in the Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC);
  • Make funding available for energy efficiency and energy conservation projects in Aboriginal and Northern communities.

Adoption of renewable energy projects and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs:


  • At least 25 renewable power projects, including wind, biomass and low impact hydro, will be commissioned for a total capacity of more than 1000 megawatts (MW);
  • By the end of fiscal year 2009-2010, more than 3000 MW of renewable power capacity will have been commissioned representing about $1 billion of incentive support under the program over 13 years. By year-end, renewable power projects are expected to produce about 10.3 terawatt hours of electricity annually thereby avoiding between 4 - 5 megatonnes of GHG and related CAC;
  • More than 175 solar thermal systems are expected to be installed in Canada's Industrial/Commercial/Institutional sectors; 13 residential pilot project agreements are expected to be signed; two standards will be developed; two solar hot water systems will receive certification. Taken together, these activities are projected to result in energy savings of 0.09 petajoules and the reduction of approximately 5 kilotonnes of GHG emissions;
  • Make funding available to off-grid communities that face specific challenges in the development and implementation of renewable energy projects.

Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs:


  • Start-up of front-end engineering studies and demonstrations of integrated carbon capture and storage projects in partnership with the private sector and provincial agencies;
  • Completion of Memorandum of Understanding with Efficiency New Brunswick to support the development of a toolkit for the delivery of an Energy Management Information Systems (EMIS) program for industry;
  • Provision of funding for Northern and Aboriginal communities to work with regions and collaborate with provinces in support of the development and implementation of clean energy projects;
  • Implementation of several projects in partnership with municipalities, builders and developers covering elements of planning and construction of highly energy efficient buildings and communities;
  • Work with provinces and territories to facilitate the improvement of their building codes to a higher level of energy performance by providing core tools to measure design/actual performance;
  • Work collaboratively with the building industry to increase the adoption of new technology ready construction practices and higher standards of design to reduce energy consumption through best-in-class labelling and training programs;
  • Ongoing engagement through meetings and workshops with the scientific community and all provinces and territories to improve understanding of forest carbon, and improve carbon monitoring and reporting.

Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions:


  • Provision of policy documents (reports, briefing materials and presentations) and advice to the Minister, Deputy Minister and other senior officials of NRCan and INAC in support of policy and program development and decision making;
  • Contribution of professional strategic and technical guidance and tools that facilitate the development of clean energy projects in Aboriginal and Northern communities;
  • Completion of a successful wind technology roadmap that will establish guidelines for future federal involvement in the technical development of wind energy in Canada, including utility offshore wind systems;
  • Analysis, development and promotion of post-2012 international GHG accounting rules for forest carbon that improve upon those established under the Kyoto Protocol for 2008-2012;
  • Continued development of National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting system and preparation of forest-related information for Canada's 2010 National GHG Inventory Report to the UNFCCC, in collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment Canada (EC);
  • Planning and coordination of communications materials for ministerial events, meetings and presentations in support of clean energy projects and activities.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period


Immediate Outcomes


  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcomes


  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.


Total 2009-2010 Planned Spending for Theme programming Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Expected GHG reductions by 2011 attributable to Theme programming
$224,862,000 $877,040,000 11.0 MT*

*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The above represents the preliminary expected GHG reductions for the Clean Energy theme. The estimated emissions reductions are based on estimates for the individual CAA programs. Reduction estimates from individual CAA programs have been taken on a case-by-case basis and summed up by theme. Due to interactions and synergies within and between programs and regulations the total emissions impact for a given CAA theme may be less than the sum of the individual CAA programs.


Theme: Clean Transportation


Lead Department Transport Canada
Federal Theme Partners Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada

Description of Theme programming

The Clean Transportation Theme program measures will work towards: improved management of sustainable transportation infrastructure in communities; improved efficiency and reduced emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHG) from the movement of goods; and improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions from the personal vehicle fleet.

Expected achievements in 2009-2010 from Theme programming

In 2009-2010, the twelve programs under the Clean Transportation Theme will be in their third year of operation. Fully staffed and effective, these programs will contribute to attaining both the immediate and intermediate outcomes under this theme. In a period of volatile fuel prices, these programs will provide continuing strong impetus for the development and application of emission-reducing technologies, increased public knowledge of emission reducing opportunities, and public engagement in reducing transportation-related emissions. The expected achievements are summarized under the following outcomes:

Informed positions on policies and programs

  • Launching of a climate change data strategy, including the collection of data on freight and urban transportation to address major gaps and data needs. The main focus on the strategy will be on improving data and tools with respect to freight and urban transportation.
  • Development of greenhouse gas-energy models to support emissions-reduction policy with respect to light duty vehicles and the rail industry. This will enhance Transport Canada's ability to assess various policy and regulatory options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from Canada's transportation system.
  • The preparation of a report on the 2008 interim goal of the Memorandum of Understanding with the Auto Industry to voluntarily reduce greenhouse gas from light duty vehicles by 5.3 Mt in 2010 will provide key information describing energy efficiency and consumption trends in the personal vehicle sector.
  • Research studies on aerodynamics, tires, and idle-reduction devices will provide knowledge of new opportunities for reducing emissions from the trucking sector. This information will be used to plan outreach initiatives and more comprehensive messaging for the trucking sector.

Increased uptake of emission-reducing technologies

  • Acquisition of next-generation (hydrogen, electric, plug-in electric, diesel hybrid and alternative fuel) vehicles for testing and evaluation of their environmental performance and safety.
  • Financial contributions to Ontario and Quebec, which represents over 60% of the trucking activity in Canada, to aid detection under, and enforcement of, new regulations for mandatory use of speed-limiting devices on large trucks.
  • Contribution of up to $3.8 million to freight transportation organizations to help them purchase and install proven emission-reducing technologies.
  • Contribution of up to $2 million to a $9million pilot project to d emonstrate the use of shore-based power for marine vessels in Port Metro Vancouver to reduce air pollution from idling ship engines .

Increased participation by the target audience in emission-reducing activities

  • Provide incentives for Canadians to retire up to 50,000 old (pre-1996) higher-polluting vehicles and promote environmentally friendly transportation choices. Replacing older, higher-polluting vehicles with more sustainable alternatives means cleaner air and a healthier environment for Canadians. Retiring 50,000 vehicles annually will lead to a reduction of nearly 2,250 tonnes of smog-forming pollutants and 54,000 tonnes of GHG emissions.
  • Conduct of a client survey to assess the impact of the ecoAuto Rebate Program on the decision-making behaviour of purchasers of light-duty vehicles. EcoAuto will have provided up to $247 million to consumers to purchase more fuel-efficient vehicles.
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities will be achieved through delivery of up to ten collaborative agreements under the ecoENERGY for Fleets program and of at least five collaborative agreements under the ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles program.

Increased capacity by the target audience to undertake emission-reducing initiatives

  • Delivery of five information events, six technical training sessions, two research projects and five case studies to increase the knowledge of municipal authorities practitioners and decision-makers in delivering green transportation services and policies.
  • Development of a Code of Practice for responsible recycling of vehicles, with audits to ensure compliance.
  • The ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles program will enhance capacity to address emissions from personal vehicles through better driving practices and more efficient vehicle purchases through the training of 125,000 new drivers and through the national distribution of information materials such as the 2009 Fuel Consumption Guide with a targeted circulation of 350,000 units. Additionally, funding of up to $1.7 million of emissions-reducing projects will enable proponents to deliver targeted outreach activities aimed at increasing consumers' awareness and adoption of energy efficient buying, driving, and maintaining practices for personal vehicles.
  • The ecoENERGY for Fleets program will enhance capacity of transportation professionals (drivers, driver trainers, mechanics, and managers) to address emissions through their decision making through training and through the provision of decision-support tools and information materials including workshops. These knowledge transfer opportunities encompass the training of 2200 transportation professionals, the mounting of 31 workshops, 25,000 web hits, and outreach from truck-stop anti-idling campaigns. Additionally, capacity to undertake emissions-reducing projects will be increased through the provision of up to $2 million of funding, which will enable fleets to create and implement action plans that include the adoption of energy efficient fleet management, driving, and maintenance practices, as well as increased uptake of energy efficient technologies.

Increased awareness, knowledge and acceptance of energy efficient transportation technologies and best practices

  • Contribution of up to $3.4 million towards the purchase, installation and demonstration of the effectiveness of new and underused emission-reducing technologies in the freight industry.
  • Launching of the ecoFreight information network to publicize the experience of Canadian freight firms adopting new technologies.
  • Funding of three conferences and an award program to spread information, and recognize excellence, in freight industry emissions reduction.
  • Development and publishing on TC Freight Programs website of information and decision tools for freight shippers and forwarders to increase awareness of green transportation options.
  • Showcasing of new energy-efficient vehicle technologies to thousands of Canadians through 22 public events.
  • Conduct of multi-media advertising campaign to promote early scrappage of polluting vehicles.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcome

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcome


  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcome


  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.


Total 2009-2010 Planned Spending for Theme programming Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Expected GHG reductions by 2011 attributable to Theme programming
$77,565,762
$461,600,000
9.6 MT*

*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The above represents the preliminary expected GHG reductions for the Clean Transportation theme. The estimated emissions reductions are based on estimates for the individual CAA programs. Reduction estimates from individual CAA programs have been taken on a case-by-case basis and summed up by theme. Due to interactions and synergies within and between programs and regulations the total emissions impact for a given CAA theme may be less than the sum of the individual CAA programs.


Theme: Indoor Air Quality


Lead Department Health Canada
Federal Theme Partners National Research Council of Canada

Description of Theme programming

Health Canada and National Research Council of Canada are responsible for implementation of the Indoor Air theme as an integral element of the government's broader Clean Air Agenda (CAA). This CAA theme consists of two elements; the Indoor Air R&D initiative (National Research Council Canada) and the Radon Program (Health Canada). Together these initiatives will contribute to theme results by supporting the research, development and dissemination of knowledge of indoor air quality risks and ways by which these risks can be managed. By generating and sharing knowledge about indoor air pollutants and how they can be managed, the Indoor Air theme elements will support informed decision-making by governments, industry and consumers on cost-effective means to reduce harmful exposures and, in so doing, reduce health risks. While the findings from these two research-based initiatives can provide useful input to potential regulatory initiatives under the Clean Air Agenda, their utility extends well beyond that, most notably by helping to identify and target non-regulatory measures that address indoor air concerns.

Expected achievements in 2009-2010 from Theme programming

To support improved awareness of public, property managers, and governments on health risks and the causes of reduced indoor air quality and associated strategies, we will:

  • target Canadian homeowners during the implementation of the second phase of the national radon awareness campaign; and
  • increase the percentage of Canadian homes tested for radon by 15% and increasing in the "informed" awareness of Canadians by 30% over the 2007 level at the end of 2009-2010.

To support stronger interest in and basis for the development of technological solutions for improving indoor air quality and strengthened research capacity, we will:

  • prepare and submit a paper on "IAQ Solution" technologies for peer review; and
  • develop three to four protocols for technology assessment which will include the evaluation and validation of the prioritization for the "IAQ Solution."

In support of reducing health risks from poor indoor air quality:

  • the Indoor Air Research Laboratory will design interventions that will be used to retrofit heat recovery ventilation systems to improve air flows and increase air exchange rates; and .
  • two field teams will be investigating approximately 120 homes (max.) where 50% of the homes will be interventions and the other 50 % will serve as the control group.

In supporting the development and effective application of regulations, guidelines and recommendations related to indoor air quality, we will:

  • work on two best-practice guides for defining acceptable IAQ and assessing IAQ through the New National Committee on IAQ and buildings; and
  • undertake systematic on-site testing and screening of approximately 15,000 federal buildings and facilities for actual radon levels and their comparison against the new radon guidelines.

To support the production and uptake of new products/techniques related to reducing health risks from poor indoor air quality, we will:

  • continue testing federal buildings in the National Capital Region, Quebec and Manitoba , and roll-out the project to the remaining regions of Canada; and
  • complete the protocol on radon mitigation in residential homes and large buildings to reduce exposure in Canadian homes and workplaces.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

Improved awareness by public, property managers, and governments of health risks and causes of reduced indoor air quality and strategies to improve it:

  • 20 % of Canadians are aware of specific technical solutions to improve air quality (2010-2011).

Development and support of technological solutions for improved IAQ:

  • Technically sound infrastructure and knowledge in place to support and assess IAQ improvement technologies (2010-2011).

Increased knowledge of health impacts and mitigation strategies related to indoor air pollution:

  • One research intervention field study on ventilation, air distribution and health conducted (2011).


Total 2009-2010 Planned Spending for Theme programming Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Expected GHG reductions by 2011 attributable to Theme programming
$ 5,700,000
$ 23,000,000
Less than 1MT*

*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The above represents the preliminary expected GHG reductions for the Indoor Air Quality theme. The estimated emissions reductions are based on estimates for the individual CAA programs. Reduction estimates from individual CAA programs have been taken on a case-by-case basis and summed up by theme. Due to interactions and synergies within and between programs and regulations the total emissions impact for a given CAA theme may be less than the sum of the individual CAA programs.


Theme: Adaptation


Lead Department Environment Canada
Federal Theme Partners Health Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada

Description of Theme programming

The Adaptation programs will begin to help all Canadians build their capacity to adapt, by developing knowledge, information, tools and/or collaborative arrangements that they need to take action to successfully reduce their risks. These initiatives differ from many of the programs within the Clean Air Agenda as they do not contribute to reductions of greenhouse gases, but rather support the critical complementary activity of adaptation to climate change impacts.

About half of the total funding will build capacity to respond to diverse risks across the country and remain relevant to many economic sectors and regions. The other half will be targeted to address three urgent risks: (i) the North , where impacts of a changing climate are already very visible, vulnerability of communities and infrastructure is high, and the federal government has unique constitutional and land claims obligations toward Aboriginal people and northerners; (ii) human health , which faces particular risks through changing climate conditions and extremes, and the spread of infectious diseases; and (iii) infrastructure , in which governments and firms will invest hundreds of billions of dollars over the next decade, which must be designed to endure climate conditions that will differ from those of the past.

Expected achievements in 2009-2010 from Theme programming

Some key results expected in 2009-2010 include:

  • Continued work and strengthened partnerships in assisting Northerners in assessing key vulnerabilities and opportunities at the community and local level.
  • Expansion and continued implementation of the National Air Quality Health Index program in more communities across Atlantic Canada, Quebec and the Prairies.
  • Further development of next-generation climate change models through enhancement of existing capabilities and collaboration with the OURANOS consortium.
  • Continued expansion of the Canadian Climate Change Scenarios Network through development of additional regional nodes and continued provision of workshops on scenario use, model inter-comparison and climate extremes.
  • Complete all regional hazards websites and develop methodologies to include climate extremes for emergency risk management, as well as continue stakeholder consultation on infrastructure codes and standards.
  • Continue expansion of climate change health adaptation plans in Northern communities through funding allocations.
  • Continue the development of tools for assessing climate change risks, review existing planning tools for adaptation and survey requirements in the energy sector.
  • Establish six funded Regional Adaptation Collaboratives and conduct workshops to build a community of participants.
  • Continue development and implementation of heat alert and response systems in four pilot communities, develop an evaluation framework, complete draft guidelines for health professionals, and establish a network for developing a quantitative relationship between heat and health effects.
  • Continue development of a community-based approach to assessing infectious disease risk relative to climate change in four pilot communities. As part of this, disseminate information to communities on adaptation options and provide evidence based research and risk analysis to those communities.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

The Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecasting Program of the Adaptation theme received TB approval in 2007-2008, while other programs were not approved until early April 2008 - some results were reported in 2007-2008 (see below)

Immediate Outcome

  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.

Intermediate Outcome


  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and reduce air quality related health; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.

Final Outcome


  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.


Total 2009-2010 Planned Spending for Theme programming Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Expected GHG reductions by 2011 attributable to Theme programming
$ 33,587,536
$ 115,900,000
Not applicable*

*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. While this Theme will not achieve direct emission reduction, it does play an important complementary role through helping Canadians adapt to the effects of climate change, building partnerships for program delivery or knowledge transfer and placing Canada within the important international environmental community.


Theme: International Actions


Lead Department Environment Canada
Federal Theme Partners Natural Resources Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Industry Canada

Description of Theme programming

This theme aims to advance Canada's international action on climate change, improve Canadian air quality and reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Funding in the amount of $50M is required to implement the following:

  1. Undertake actions related to compliance with existing treaty obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol, including: payment of assessed contributions, provision of discretionary administrative funding, and contribution to other international climate change initiatives;
  2. Continue to engage across a number of multilateral fora, on behalf of the Canadian Government, in strategic international climate change discussions and negotiations;
  3. Continue and enhance Canada's participation in the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate; and
  4. Engage in the development of a Particulate Matter (PM) Annex and lay the groundwork for a potential cross border emissions trading annex for air pollutants under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement.

Expected achievements in 2009-2010 from Theme programming

In support of the advancement of Canada's strategic interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality, and alignment of Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies:

  • Provision of Canadian funding to selected international organizations that play a key role in enhancing the analysis and assessment of options related to the development of a future climate change agreement under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC);
  • Payment of Canadian membership dues and financial obligations to the UNFCCC;
  • Continued contribution of expertise to the UNFCCC Expert Group on Technology Transfer, which identifies and analyzes ways to facilitate and advance technology development and transfer activities, and to the UNFCCC Least Developed Countries Expert Group, which supports least developed countries in the development of national adaptation programs of action;
  • Close cooperation of federal departments to develop policy , strategic advice, and positions on a range of issues relating to the negotiation of a post-2012 agreement;
  • Canadian attendance and active participation to advance Canadian national interests in the negotiations under the UNFCCC and in international processes that complement the UNFCCC negotiations, including the G8, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, and the US-led Major Emitters Meetings;
  • Continued provision of advice and information to and from Canada's network of Embassies and other Missions abroad.

In support of the Canadian private sector gaining exposure to international markets and research and development opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution as well as enhancing Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies:

  • Alignment of Canadian participation in the Asia-Pacific Partnership (APP) with Canada's international and domestic objectives for climate change, clean air and clean technology partnerships;
  • Development of a stakeholder outreach strategy to attract the participation of Canadian industry in this public-private partnership initiative;
  • Efforts undertaken to influence the scope and direction of the APP through participation in the APP's Policy Implementation Committee (PIC), Ministerial Summits and sectoral Task Force meetings; and
  • Cooperation among federal departments to coordinate technical and policy work related to Canada's participation in the APP's Task Forces.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada 's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies & negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada 's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes


  • Canada 's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome


  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.


Total 2009-2010 Planned Spending for Theme programming Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Expected GHG reductions by 2011 attributable to Theme programming
$ 13,299,966
$50,000,000
Not applicable*

*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. While this Theme will not achieve direct emission reductions, it does act as an enabler for those themes which have committed to reduction targets.


Theme: Partnerships


Lead Department Environment Canada

Description of Theme programming

This program was established by the federal government in support of Turning the Corner: A Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution. The main objective is to improve the capacity of communities and individuals to take positive environmental actions at home, school and in the workplace which may have lasting benefits.
Its goal is to ensure that all funded projects have measurable results and can be replicated by other groups or organizations. Projects funded through CACP are designed to engage Canadians to take positive environmental action in the following areas: Home and outdoor energy efficiency - Encourage energy and water efficiency, waste reduction and the replacement or purchase of more energy-efficient products or technologies, including energy-efficient home appliances, lighting, lawn mowers and the purchase of energy from renewable sources; School-based sustainability - Improve the energy efficiency of school operations and facility management by engaging custodians, principals, teachers, students and parents. The program includes an educational component to engage teachers and students in learning about energy efficiency, water efficiency and waste reduction; and Greening the workplace - Inspire employees to adopt environmentally friendly behaviours at work and to encourage business owners and managers to implement measures to reduce energy consumption and associated emissions in their daily operations.

Expected achievements in 2009-2010 from Theme programming

This type of activity is important. Exploring complementary and alternative initiatives, both within and outside Environment Canada, to fulfill this role are also being considered as a more cost-effective approach. While there would potentially be an overall reduction in investment in the specific agreements meant to be funded by this program, similar programs will be maintained to ensure a continuing federal presence to support community funding focussed on energy efficiency and reduced air pollution. The department will continue to reinvest in a variety of alternative program activities aimed at achieving desired results.

A call for proposals will be issued for national, regional, or local projects that encourage Canadians to adopt more sustainable behaviours at home, at school, and in the workplace. Projects focus will include home and outdoor energy efficiency, school-based sustainability and greening the workplace.
Program infrastructure will be developed:

  • A Proposal Review Committee will be established and proposal evaluation and ranking tools will be developed and used to assess project proposals.
  • An Inter-departmental Advisory Committee will be established to select projects that enable Canadians to make decisions and take action to enhance environmental quality.
  • A project tracking database and a Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) including an evaluation plan, indicators, and performance measures will be developed to effectively manage and deliver the program in line with departmental priorities.

Funding for community initiatives that reduce emissions will leverage support from the private sector and other orders of government. A minimum of 50% of the total project value will be leveraged from non-federal sources (includes in-kind contributions, and the total cost of any incentives or rebates provided through the initiative).

Strategic investments will be made in projects that enable communities and individuals to reduce emissions that contribute to climate change and air pollution. Funded projects will aim at including incentives (such as rebates and discounts) that encourage Canadians to make purchases to protect the environment and reduce emissions at home, at school, and in the workplace.

Projects funded through CACP will be designed to lead Canadians to take positive environmental actions in the areas of:

  • Home and outdoor energy efficiency - Encourage energy and water efficiency, waste reduction, and the replacement or purchase of more energy-efficient products or technologies including: energy-efficient home appliances, lighting, lawn mowers, and the purchase of energy from renewable sources.
  • School-based sustainability - Improve the energy efficiency of a school's operations and facility management by engaging custodians, principals, teachers, students and parents. Includes an educational component engaging teachers and students to learn about energy efficiency, water efficiency and waste reduction.
  • Greening the workplace - Inspire employees to adopt environmentally-friendly behaviours at work and to encourage business owners and managers to implement measures to reduce energy consumption and associated emissions in their daily operations.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • MC Submission developed and approved.
  • Treasury Board Submission is developed and approved.
  • The Clean Air Community Partnerships Program is launched.
  • Promotional materials for the CACP program (including web site) are developed and distributed to appropriate stakeholders.
  • The Request for Proposals (for funding starting in FY 2008-09) is issued.
  • Contribution Agreements will be in place for Strategic Investments.
  • A contract with a GHG / CAC Valuation Expert is in place to provide results monitoring and measurement support to Strategic Investment projects.
  • Proposals for 2007-08 Strategic Investment projects are approved and announced.
  • Program assistance to be provided by EcoAction Regional offices (including proposal review, management of contribution agreements and reporting requirements) is determined and communicated clearly with the regional offices.
  • An Inter-departmental Advisory Committee is established for the CACP program.
  • Proposal Review Committee is established and its members are effectively briefed on the program goals, requirements, and evaluation process/tools to be used in proposal assessment.
  • Program materials and tools, including application forms, proposal evaluation tools, project tracking database, and GHG/CAC valuation tools are developed.
  • An RMAF is developed for the CACP program, including the development of an evaluation plan, indicators, performance measures.

Intermediate Outcomes


  • Community initiatives that provide incentives for Canadians to take action on Clean Air and Climate Change are funded.
  • Community initiatives that provide incentives for Canadians to take action on Clean Air and Climate Change are funded.
  • Program Governance Structure is designed and implemented.
  • Program Management Systems and Evaluation Tools and are developed.

Final Outcomes


  • A greater number of Canadians are engaged in protecting our environment, including our air, water, land, climate and nature.
  • Communities and individuals are better able to manage and take a lead on environmental issues.
  • Community Funding Programs are managed effectively to deliver on departmental priorities.


Total 2009-2010 Planned Spending for Theme programming Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Expected GHG reductions by 2011 attributable to Theme programming
$ 3,000,000 $ 12,000,000
Not applicable*

*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. While this Theme will not achieve direct emission reductions, it does act as an enabler for those themes which have committed to reduction targets.


Theme: Management and Accountability


Lead Department Environment Canada

Description of Theme programming

The Management and Accountability Theme sets the path for the Clean Air Agenda, Horizontal Management, Accountability and Reporting Framework (CAA-HMARF). This theme facilitates the management and reporting of financial and non-financial performance information at the program level within 8 themes on a consolidated basis (at the theme and agenda levels) across participating departments and agencies. The theme ensures that ongoing monitoring and assessment of progress in achieving objectives and expected outcomes against financial investments are undertaken, and it facilitates the setting of priorities and reallocating of resources, as appropriate, ensuring engagement of the governance structure within the CAA-HMARF.

Expected achievements in 2009-2010 from Theme programming

In support of improved accountability to parliamentarians and Canadians; active engagement of partner departments and agencies; effective and timely collection of performance information; and coherent CAA program architecture:

  • Regular reporting on finances and results for all CAA programs through existing reporting mechanisms (HRPP, HPR, CPR)

In support of clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for implementing, managing and reporting on CAA activities; an appropriate balance of departmental and horizontal CAA accountabilities; effective decision-making regarding CAA activities; and effective alignment of resources to CAA priorities:

  • Provide support to the CAA-HMARF governance committees to ensure the active engagement of all participating departments and agencies:
    • Develop CAA governance materials (i.e. management and accountability information and analysis to inform senior management (ADMs/DMs) of progress made by the participating departments and agencies).
    • Develop an integrated report that includes financial and performance information, including risks in support of governance decisions such as reallocation or re-profiling of CAA funds, realignment of programs; and impacts from possible evaluations, in line with the government's expenditure management cycle
    • Support Environment Canada's Evaluation unit with respect to Theme-level evaluations and evaluation of the framework
    • Respond to evaluations that may be done from time to time and share information with program managers.

In support of improved accountability to Parliamentarians and Canadians; clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for implementing, managing and reporting on CAA activities; appropriate balance of departmental and horizontal CAA accountabilities; and effective and timely collection of performance information:

  • Implement the Auditor General's principles for rating performance reports in support of the CAA performance story at the program, theme and agenda level, by: linking expected achievements with CAA immediate outcomes and long term results at the Theme and Agenda level
  • identifying and assessing high-level risks related to not achieving the CAA's outcomes

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for implementing, managing and reporting on CAA activities
  • Appropriate balance of departmental and horizontal CAA accountabilities
  • Coherent CAA program architecture
  • Effective alignment of resources to CAA priorities
  • Effective and timely collection and reporting of performance information

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Active engagement of partner departments and agencies in horizontal aspects of CAA activities
  • Effective decision-making regarding CAA activities
  • Improved accountability of federal government to parliamentarians and Canadians for CAA expenditures and activities

Final Outcome

  • Increased ability to achieve CAA outcomes.


Total 2009-2010 Planned Spending for Theme programming Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Expected GHG reductions by 2011 attributable to Theme programming
$ 1,250,000 $5,000,000
Not applicable*

*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The Management and Accountability Theme coordinates and supports the implementation of the Clean Air Agenda Framework, acting as an enabler for those themes which have committed to reduction targets.


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 1 - Industrial Sector Regulatory Actions


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

In 2009-10, through Industrial Sector Regulatory Actions, Environment Canada plans to:

  • Advance approaches regulations to reduce GHG emissions from key industrial sectors (including aluminum, base metal smelters, cement, chemical manufacturing, electricity generation, iron and steel and ilmenite, iron ore pelletizing, lime, potash, oil sands, pipelines, petroleum refineries, pulp and paper and upstream oil and gas) and produce supporting documents, in context of a North American cap-and-trade scheme;
  • Advance work on a regulatory framework to reduce air pollutant emissions from those sectors noted above as well as Wood Products, along with supporting documents, pending policy decisions after receipt of recommendations from provincial and multi-stakeholder discussions on an air pollutant framework; and,
  • Develop draft regulation to implement codes of practice for fugitive methane emissions from oil and gas sectors, and pending air pollutant policy decisions, expand scope to include VOCs from all oil and gas sectors.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Regulatory Framework: development of a regulatory framework for emissions of air pollutants and GHG emissions from all key industrial sectors and in partnership with all responsible jurisdictions, through an integrated, multi-pollutant approach.

Legal Analysis: regulations are consistent with the authorities in the enabling legislation

Flexible Compliance Mechanisms: providing firms with a variety of options to comply with the regulations there by reducing the economic impact of the regulations.

Air Emissions Targets: development of targets that are consistent with leading environmental standards and are at least as rigorous as those in the US;

Reporting System: a rigorous system to ensure that the targets are met, while minimizing the burden on reporting industries and avoiding duplication, where possible, and allowing for transparency of information.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$20,390,000
$60,500,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 2a - Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions (EC Component)


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Develop regulations to reduce air pollutant emissions from on-road and off-road vehicles and engines under CEPA, 1999 to maintain alignment with stringent US federal standards as they evolve.

  • Final regulations for marine spark-ignition engines and off-road recreational vehicles to be published in the Canada Gazette Part II (possibility of being delivered late in 2008-09);
  • Proposed regulations to amend emission requirements for heavy-duty on-road and off-road diesel engines and to introduce new requirements for off-road large spark-ignition engines to be published in the Canada Gazette Part I.

Administer the vehicle and engine regulations and manage the associated testing program, including completing and implementing a framework for enhanced collaboration in these areas with the US EPA.

Participate in the U.N process to develop harmonized global technical regulations for vehicle and engines to ensure that stringent emission standards will be applied around the world.

Finalize analyses to support a joint Canada-US application to the IMO proposing to designate North American waters as an Emission Control Area.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (On and Off Road)
Reduced emissions of air pollutants (NOx, VOC and particulate matter) from vehicles and engines. Emission reductions achieved vary by individual regulations and depend on many factors such as the emission rates of existing products, the stringency of the regulated levels and the attrition rate of particular types of vehicles and engines.

Marine spark-ignition engine and off-road Recreational Vehicles
Total emissions from the in-use fleet of outboard engines, personal watercraft, snowmobiles, off-road motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles will be progressively reduced as cleaner new products replace older, higher emitting vehicles and engines. It is estimated that cleaner marine engines and off-road recreational vehicles will result in a 46% reduction of combined HC+NOx emissions in 2020, compared to having no regulations. Similarly, CO emissions are expected to be reduced by 30%.

Off-Road Diesel Engines
Amendments to the Off-Road Compression-Ignition Engine Emission Regulations to ensure alignment with more stringent US EPA "Tier 4" emission standards to be phased-in beginning with the 2008 model year will reduce allowable emission levels from individual engines by between 50-95 percent for PM and between 37-85 percent for HC and NOx, depending on the engine power category. By 2020, it is estimated that the introduction of cleaner Tier 4 off-road diesel engines used in off-road applications such as construction, agriculture, mining and forestry equipment will reduce smog forming emissions from the in-use fleet of off-road diesel engines by 54 percent for PM, 39% for NOx, 21% for VOCs and 54% for CO.

Large Off-Road Spark-Ignition Engines
New smog-forming emission standards will be introduced for large spark-ignition engines such as those found in forklifts and ice resurfacers. Preliminary estimates suggest that, by the year 2020, the introduction of cleaner large spark-ignition engines will reduce air pollutant emissions from the in-use fleet of these engines by 17% for NOx, 22% for VOCs and 36% for CO.

On-Board Diagnostics Systems for On-Road Heavy-Duty Engines
New regulated requirements for on-board diagnostics (OBD) systems on on-road heavy-duty engines of the 2010 and later model years to align with emerging US requirements. OBD systems monitor emission-related components and detect deterioration or malfunctions and communicate them to the driver and the repair technician, ensuring that the expected air quality benefits from improved emission control technologies will be fully realized throughout the life of new vehicles. The new requirements will ensure that the emission reductions anticipated from 2010 and later heavy-duty engines will be achieved under in-use conditions.

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Ships)
Initial work will determine the potential for emission reductions, to be followed by efforts to establish international standards. The expected outcome is reduced emissions of air pollutants (SO2, NOx and particulate matter) from marine ships. As regulatory development is on-going, the extent of the reductions that will be achieved have not yet been quantified; however, significant reductions in SO2, NOx and PM emissions are expected to result through the introduction of more stringent international emission standards for engines and marine fuels.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 6,830,000
$ 24,200,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 2b - Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions (TC Component)


Department Transport Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.1 - Policies and programs in support of sustainable development

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Rail)
The Minister of Transport, with the Minister of the Environment, will continue to support a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Railway Association of Canada that is consistent with the United States (U.S.) air pollution standards and that ensures that the rail industry continues to improve its emission performance during the 2006-2010 period. Once the MOU expires, the voluntary approach will be replaced with regulatory regime. The Minister of Transport will implement new regulations, under the Railway Safety Act, to take effect in 2011. Consultations with key stakeholders will be undertaken.

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Ships)
Transport Canada will develop regulations under the Canada Shipping Act 2001 to implement stricter standards for air pollutants. The department will also support Environment Canada to propose a North American Emission Control Area, in collaboration with the United States. Finally, the department will advance uniform, global measures to reduce greenhouse gases from ships at the International Maritime Organization.

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Motor Vehicles)
As announced in January 2008, Canada will develop regulations that, at a minimum, meet the goal established by the United States (U.S.) congress in the Energy Independence and Security Act . The Act requires a combined car and light truck fleet fuel economy performance of 35 miles per gallon (6.7 litres per 100 kilometres) by 2020. The government continues to work towards implementation of fuel consumption regulations for 2011 model-year vehicles.

As required by government policy, Transport Canada is conducting a cost-benefit analysis to support the development of Canadian regulations. This assessment includes an analysis of U.S. final corporate average fuel economy standards in a Canadian context. Transport Canada is also conducting a detailed technical analysis of standards proposed by the State of California, in a Canadian context, for comparative purposes.

The Canadian government has consulted widely to obtain input on the development of Canada's first-ever motor vehicle fuel consumption regulations. This input will be considered as the government moves forward. Proposed regulations on fuel consumption will be designed to ensure Canadians are offered a wide range of vehicle choices, for different needs, with a more fuel-efficient product mix. The regulations will also take into account the integrated nature of the North American automobile marketplace.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Rail)
The expected outcome is reduced emissions of both air pollutants (NOx) and GHG from railway locomotives. Specific targets will be developed through the regulatory process.

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Ships)
Initial work will determine the potential for emission reductions, to be followed by efforts to establish international standards. The expected outcome is reduced emissions of air pollutants (SO2, NOx and particulate matter) from marine ships. As regulatory development is on-going, the extent of the reductions that will be achieved have not yet been quantified; however, significant reductions in SO2, NOx and PM emissions are expected to result through the introduction of more stringent international emission standards for engines and marine fuels.

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Motor Vehicle)
A measurable reduction in the fuel consumption, in litres/100 km, of the new light duty vehicle fleet in Canada, beginning in 2011. The program will reduce GHG emissions as more fuel efficient vehicles are introduced into the Canadian fleet each year.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 6,115,500
$22,500,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 2c - Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions (NRCan Component)


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 - Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

In 2009/10:

NRCan will continue to lead on the development of the portion of the regulation that addresses vehicle labelling. In collaboration with Transport Canada, NRCan is developing the regulatory criteria outlining content, format, and method for determining values of fuel consumption ratings to appear on the label and to be defined in the regulations to be set under the Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act. Requirements for the new label need to be defined and agreed on in time for the publication of draft regulations in the Canada in Gazette I.

NRCan will also continue to provide input and expertise in the analysis to establish cost-effective standards for motor vehicles in Canada. Part of the analysis required to fulfill Canada's commitment to benchmark its fuel consumption standard against a dominant North American standards was delayed in the 2008/09 year because of delays in the US regulatory process. In light of decisions from the new US administration, NRCan will work with Transport Canada in 2009/10 on the final iterations of analysis that will be required to benchmark Canadian standards.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

A measurable reduction in the fuel consumption, in litres/100 km, of the new light duty vehicle fleet in Canada, beginning in 2011. Specific reduction targets will be established by 2008. The program will reduce GHG emissions as more fuel efficient vehicles are introduced into the Canadian fleet each year. Regulations aimed at improving vehicle fuel consumption have the potential to reduce air pollution at the tailpipe as well.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 400,000
$ 3,200,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 3a - Consumer and Commercial Products Regulatory Actions (EC Component)


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

In 2009-2010, through Consumer and Commercial Products Regulatory Actions, Environment Canada plans to finalize and implement the following regulations:

  1. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Concentration Limits for Automotive Refinishing Products Regulations;
  2. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings Regulations; and,
  3. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Concentration Limits for Certain Products Regulations.
Environment Canada also plans to further implement the Federal Agenda for VOC reductions (2010-2020) for other consumer and commercial products.
Furthermore, Environment Canada will develop a regulatory strategy for governing the design of residential wood burning appliances sold within Canada, and will develop relevant guidance documents and other supporting documentation. Drafting of the regulation and stakeholder consultations will be initiated (note: regulatory drafting and consultation results are contingent on the receipt of legal authority).

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The expected outcome is reduced emissions of air pollutants from consumer and commercial products. Specific targets are being developed as part of the regulatory process. Pollutants of particular concern include VOCs as well as emissions from residential wood combustion.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 3,260,000
$ 12,000,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 3b - Consumer and Commercial Products Regulatory Actions (NRCan Component)


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

In 2009 -10 this program will monitor the implementation of the standards and labelling components of Amendment 10 of the Energy Efficiency Regulations. This Amendment, expected to be approved December 08 will implement 7 new standards for products and increase the stringency for 4 products for which standards are currently prescribed. Labelling provisions for light bulbs will also be implemented.

The program will also conduct the necessary analysis and consultation to pre publish and publish Amendment 11 of the Energy Efficiency Regulations that will propose 6 new standards and increases in stringency for standards for 7 products already covered by standards.

Compliance and monitoring activities for the entire portfolio of products subject to energy efficiency standards will also be continued.

The Energy Star high performance labelling programs will also be supported with consumer information and stakeholder relations. High performance product demonstrations are expected to be implemented with respect to lighting and commercial heating and analysis of standards and market transformation potentials will be conducted collaboratively with utilities and provinces.

Proposed amendments to the Energy Efficiency Act will continue to be considered by the NRCan.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Energy Efficiency Labelling Program
Estimated annual, aggregate impacts in 2010-2011 are: energy savings of between 13.37 and 14.85 petajoules/yr, which presently convert to annual emission reductions of between 1.4 to 1.6 megatonnes/yr for GHGs and, for air pollutants, the most significant are: 725-1002 tonnes of NOx, 837-3446 tonnes of SO2 , 204-1155 tonnes of PM10.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 8,750,000
$32,000,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 4 - Indoor Air Quality Management Actions


Department Health Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.1 - Healthy Environments and Consumer safety

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Indoor Air Quality Management Actions
Health Canada will continue work with stakeholders and provincial/territorial partners to collect information on indoor pollutants, assess sources of exposure and levels of risk in order to determine appropriate guidelines, develop awareness and preventative action programs for the public and health professionals and develop source product regulations, as required, to reduce exposure to these contaminants.

  • Collect and analyze toxicological information on priority indoor contaminants, including particulate matter (PM), naphthalene, toluene
  • Develop instruments to address priority indoor air contaminants, including guidelines, regulations on consumer products or other measures as appropriate.
  • Continue to provide municipal, regional and provincial public health agencies with information on indoor air quality guidelines and regulations.

Radon Strategy

Over four years, to establish a radon exposure guideline and to develop knowledge on susceptible populations and testing protocols. This will be accomplished through: upgrade of facilities to establish a national laboratory to evaluate testing equipment; the development of standards for testing; and research on the health impacts of radon on particular subsections of the population.

The National Radon Laboratory maintains an array of radon detection equipment for use in federal projects and provides technical advice and expertise to other federal departments and provincial/territorial and public sector groups with radon-related issues. In FY2009/10 the Laboratory will continue its operation and will provide support through the maintenance of the
inventory of radon detectors and by shipping, deploying and analyzing radon detectors for a large cross-Canada survey of radon levels in residential homes and continued testing of radon levels in federal buildings.

An extensive cross-Canada radon survey will be performed in 15,000 residential homes across the country over a two-year period starting in FY2009/10. Homes will be recruited at random to participate and will ensure geographical coverage of the country and represent a variety of different types of home constructions. The study will be performed over two consecutive fall/winter seasons (the project will conclude in FY2010/11) during home heating periods when radon levels tend to be higher. The data from this study will be used to identify potential areas of high radon exposure and will be used in mapping radon "rich" areas in Canada.

To disseminate relevant health information and advice to Canadians in support of implementation and a national radon strategy centred on new health-based radon exposure guidelines.
There will be widespread distribution of radon brochures at regional events and Service Canada Centres targeting the Canadian public, all levels of government, health professionals, the building industry and real estate. Increased radon information will also be made available on stakeholder websites through collaborations with NGOs, and federal and provincial governments. This information will focus on the health risks associated with radon exposure and the ways in which to reduce levels and risks in homes and workplaces. These efforts will be supported by a larger public awareness campaign being developed under the Indoor Air Quality Theme.

In future years, to introduce new testing techniques including certification programs for testers, and to identify problem areas across the country through a national database.
Negotiations will continue with the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) and the National Radon Safety Board (NRSB) to have these U.S.-based organizations expand their current radon proficiency programs to include a Canadian-specific training curriculum and certification exam for companies performing radon testing in Canada. In parallel a memorandum of agreement will be established with the Standards Council of Canada to perform an accreditation of NEHA and/or the NRSB as radon certification bodies for Canada. The establishment of this accreditation/certification program will ensure Canadians receive radon testing services of high quality.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Indoor Air

Health Canada supports and improves risk management actions to address indoor air quality risks to health, including radon, through the development of indoor air guidelines, awareness and prevention programs, and source product regulations to reduce exposure to indoor contaminants.

To implement regulations, guidelines and other measures to reduce indoor air pollution, yielding health benefits for Canadians. Over four years, to address the most important indoor contaminants in the Canadian residential indoor environment by reviewing and consulting on 20 contaminants or groups of contaminants, with follow up information gathering on up to 10 priorities, and developing guidelines and, as required, source product regulations to reduce exposure to these contaminants.

To disseminate relevant health information and advice to Canadians in support of implementation of indoor air quality regulations or other pollution reduction measures.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 5,478,000
$17,500,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 5a - Science in Support of Regulatory Activities and Accountability (EC Component)


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Program 5 Output 1: Air quality objectives and guidelines are based on sound scientific information

  • Publication of the Summary for Policy-Makers: Canadian Smog Assessment
  • Production of maps that describe ambient levels of PM and ozone across Canada to support the development of ambient standards for PM and ozone
  • Production of national maps of aquatic and forest soil critical loads for acidity that update the information available for western Canada

Program 5 Output 2: Measurements intended to "set-the-baseline" for tracking the benefits of regulations on the health and environmental effects of air pollutants across Canada


  • Completion of up-grades of NAPS data management systems; Addition of 13 new NAPS sites; Addition of NOx monitoring to 10 existing NAPS sites; Addition of 3 new CAPMoN acid deposition monitoring sites;
  • Addition of acid deposition, mercury and PM mass measurements to 2 existing CAPMoN sites, respectively.
  • Publication in peer-reviewed literature of studies describing the transport of pollutants from the Pacific to western Canada
  • Publication in peer-reviewed literature of studies of particle and smog formation in southern Ontario
  • Collection of data on food webs, waterbirds and habitats across Canada to assess biological status/effects/levels/trends and predict ecosystem benefits of regulations on acid-causing pollutants and mercury.

Program 5 Output 3: Results from an improved air quality model describing future air quality conditions resulting from the implementation of air pollutant regulations


  • Improve ability of EC air quality models (AURAMS, GEM-MACH) to predict PM, ozone, and acid deposition, including intercomparison with comparable U.S. air quality models.
  • Completion of preliminary version of an Ecosystem Mercury Model to define the state of mercury in the environment in response to regulatory actions on mercury.

Program 5 Output 4: Scientific information to support the development of air quality regulations, targets, objectives and guidelines; scientific support for Canadian positions and strategies during international negotiations


  • Predictions of the impacts of revised CARA regulations and co-benefits of GHG reductions on levels of air pollutants
  • Provision of scientific support to the review of the UN ECE LRTAP Gotenburg Protocol and discussions within the context of the UNEP Global Mercury Programme, Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement PM Annex and emission trading options.

Program 5 Output 5: Domestic scientific assessments of smog, acid deposition, mercury and other air pollutants describing emission sources, trends and the forecasted benefits of regulatory actions under CARA on air quality, human health and the environment.


  • Publication of the Canadian Smog Assessment
  • Launch of 2012 Canadian Mercury Assessment

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Science in Support of Regulatory Activities and Accountability
To identify and address critical environmental and health-related knowledge gaps in order to provide adequate information to carry out responsibilities under the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda.

To apply research findings to the development of proposed regulations and other air pollution reduction measures associated with the Notice of Intent issued in conjunction with the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda.

Monitoring
To provide measurements, data, and models that describe the impact of air pollution sources to inform scientific assessments and the development and implementation of regulations.

To measure and report on air quality progress, improvements in ambient air quality, and health and environmental benefits and economic valuation achieved, resulting from actions taken under the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda, and to inform the choice and development of future regulations and other pollution reduction measures.

Modelling
To develop, modify, and apply air quality modelling techniques to input into the development and implementation of the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda.

Assessments
To provide science-based information and advice to accurately inform Canadians and decision-makers: to determine if emission reductions result in improved ambient air quality, and ecosystem and human health benefits; to assist in determining whether additional measures may be required; and to provide scientific assessments and advice to develop air quality objectives.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 13,566,000 $ 40,100,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 5b - Science in Support of Regulatory Activities and Accountability (HC Component)


Department Health Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.1 - Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Health Canada and Environment Canada will collaborate to develop air quality objectives for particulate matter and ozone that will specify a target concentration for ambient air, based on an assessment of the health and environmental effects associated with exposure to these pollutants. The health impacts of new fuels and technologies will be evaluated as they are introduced. Research activities will improve estimates of the health impacts of air pollution and pollution sources. Models and tools quantifying the health impacts and economic costs of air pollution and the benefits of improved air quality, such as the Air Health Indicator and the Air Quality Benefits Assessment Tool (AQBAT), will be developed further and used to help provide direction in determining management options to reduce air pollution.
Specific actions/deliverables:

  • PM and Ozone Air quality Objectives and supporting information published in Canada Gazette I; drafting of Carbon Monoxide and Sulphur Dioxide Health Science Assessment
  • Complete draft biodiesel health effects assessment, review priority GHG reduction technologies as required
  • Work with US EPA and California fuels and technology health policy programs to support harmonization of US/Canada fuel requirements
  • Work with industry to obtain information on fuels and fuel additives
  • Undertake human exposure studies that measure the impacts of air pollution sources and allow the determination of the benefits achievable from new regulations (ongoing)
  • Continue and initiate new comparative studies for air quality investigations in communities affected by specific industrial sector sources, as required
  • Apply models to evaluate health-related economic impacts using input to support regulatory development

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Health Canada supports and improves risk management actions to address outdoor air quality risks to health, and works to identify and address critical environmental and health-related knowledge gaps in order to provide information to carry out responsibilities under CARA.

To provide measurements, data, and models that describe the impact of air pollution sources to inform scientific assessments and to input into the development and implementation of the CARA.

To measure and report on air quality progress, improvements in ambient air quality, and health and environmental benefits and economic valuation achieved, resulting from actions taken under the CARA, and to inform the choice and development of future regulations and other pollution reduction measures.

To provide science-based information and advice to accurately inform Canadians and decision-makers: to determine if emission reductions result in improved ambient air quality, and ecosystem and human health benefits; to assist in determining whether additional measures may be required; and to provide scientific assessments and advice to develop air quality objectives.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 24,304,600 $71,300,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 6 - Emissions Reporting


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

  • Submission of an annual, compliant National Inventory Report for 2007 data within accepted UN time frames (April 15 of each year).
  • Publication and provision of facility level GHG reporting data for 2008 (CEPA S46 and S71 as appropriate).
  • Maintenance of existing institutional capacity to deliver an enhanced monitoring, accounting and reporting system to produce a UN compliant national GHG inventory system and national inventory report;
  • Maintenance of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program to ensure compliance with CEPA 1999 reporting requirements, including integration of S46 and S71 Gazette Notices;
  • Publication of the 2007 national emissions inventory for air pollutants.
  • Publication of the 2008 facility level emissions for air pollutants compiled through the National Pollutant Releases Inventory (NPRI).
  • Compilation of the 2008 national emissions inventory for air pollutants.
  • Submission of compliant 2008 national emission summaries for air pollutants to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) as required to fulfill the reporting obligations for the protocols that have been ratified by Canada under the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (February 15, 2010).
  • Improved air pollutant emission quantification methods for the steel and the aluminum industry.
  • Improved emission inventories, trends, and projections for air pollutants obtained through technical studies, emission estimation model improvements, and measurements.
  • Improved air pollutant data files for the air quality models.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The emissions reporting program will ensure:

  • the continuation, expansion and enhancement of annual national air emissions inventories, trends, and projections of air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs).
  • that an integrated reporting tool is developed to support compliance with the proposed regulations and a single window reporting system for all emissions and related information is fostered to minimize burden on industries and to provide better linkages with GHG and air pollution reduction strategies.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 10,005,000
$ 39,000,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 7 - Emissions Trading


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Trading Program Development: Provide policy advice on design of emission trading systems for greenhouse gases and air pollutants in context of North American cap and trade.

Canada 's Kyoto Protocol National Registry : Develop documentation for users and support staff and train staff on the operation of the system. Launch the National Registry for use by private account holders. Contribute Canada's assessed amount to the operation of the UN International Transaction Log.

Canada 's Domestic Credit Tracking System (DCTS ): Complete design of the manual DCTS and develop policies on privacy and confidentiality. Conduct testing of the system.

Develop documentation for users and support staff and train staff on the operation of the system.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

To establish a greenhouse gas and air pollutant (NOx and SO2) domestic emissions trading systems as well as a domestic greenhouse gas offset system and consideration will be given to establishing a parallel offset system for air pollutants.

To provide a foundation should Canada decide to begin negotiations with the U.S. to join their NOx and SOx trading systems.

To encourage emissions reduction technology development and deployment through market driven financial incentives provided by emissions trading systems.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 2,502,000 $ 10,000,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 8 - Enforcement Advice and Reporting on Progress


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Continued improvements and updates to the Emissions Mapping and Information Tool (EMIT), a mapping software extension that provides a simplified method for extracting detailed air pollutant emissions data down to a municipal scale.

Air flow analysis at several locations across Canada and nearby U.S. sites will be conducted and compared with ambient data to help identify source regions and atmospheric factors that are associated with PM 2.5 and ozone concentrations. This information can be combined with the emissions data above to define airsheds and source regions that contribute to elevated pollutant levels.

Expansion of previous receptor modelling analysis of Canadian urban PM 2.5 speciation monitoring sites to include an examination of nearby rural PM 2.5 stations. This analysis will be used to help apportion the source contributions of PM 2.5 that come from local source versus those that are transported into (and out of) urban areas.

Examination of the spatial representativeness of the PM 2.5 , ozone and their precursor samplers in the Canadian monitoring network to better estimate how populations are being exposed to them.

A workshop will be held to develop consistent methods for transforming PM 2.5 data to be compatible with measurements from the newer instruments so that data can be used to analyze trends and changes in PM over time.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

To produce an annual "State of the Air Report", that will inform Canadians on the current status, trends, and factors influencing the quality of air in Canada.

To establish a benchmark against which to monitor national progress and policy effectiveness.

To ensure that the "enforceability" of proposed regulations in the drafting stages, as well as preparing for enforcement of the eventual regulations through activities such as the training of enforcement officers.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 1,742,000 $7,000,000


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda Program 9 - Policy Development, Analysis and Coordination


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Development of an updated energy, emissions and economic baseline which will serve as a reference point for future analysis of Canada's climate change agenda.

Economic modeling analysis of key elements of approaches to reduce industrial emissions. The analysis will examine the potential impacts on key parameters such as emission reductions, energy prices and economic growth by sector.

Economic modeling analysis of key mitigation options to achieve Canada's domestic climate change goal of reducing emissions by 20% by 2020 (such as: more stringent passenger vehicle fuel economy standards, more stringent building codes and appliance/equipment standards, East-West grid, carbon capture and storage)

Economic modeling analysis of alternative options for a North American cap-and-trade regime.

Development of economic profiles for key industrial sectors (Pipelines; Pulp and Paper; Chemical; Petroleum Refining; Cement; Lime & Gypsum; Iron and Steel; Aluminum and Smelting; Iron Ore, Potash and Other Mining; Conventional Oil and Gas; Electricity Generation; Oil Sands).

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

To maintain policy capacity to support decision making within the federal government, by providing sound policy analysis and advice on further elaboration of the clean air/climate change component of the environmental agenda.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 2,000,000 $ 8,000,000


Clean Energy Program 1 - ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses encourages both the construction and retrofit of more energy-efficient buildings and houses.

In 2009-2010:

  • Collaborative work with provinces on code adoption is to continue;
  • Championing the updating of the Model National Energy Code for Buildings with a new code for 2011;
  • Labels are to be issued for new and existing houses that meet energy efficiency standards;
  • Working on a pilot benchmarking/labeling program for existing buildings;
  • Working on a program for commissioning and recommissioning commercial/institutional buildings in order to ensure that buildings operate in an energy efficient manner;
  • Partnerships with stakeholders are to be cultivated, for the ongoing development of energy codes and other regulatory instruments, as well as for the provision of training and information guides;
  • Communications and marketing products (e.g. articles, advertisements) are to be developed to promote energy efficient practices for buildings and houses;
  • Training on software tools is to continue (e.g. Hot 2000 version 10 and EE4 for new building simulation);
  • Energy efficient building techniques (e.g. pertaining to whole-house ventilation, water conservation, energy budget, and cleaner heating) are to be provided; and
  • Building professionals, including architects, designers and building managers are to be trained in energy efficiency techniques, through a series of seminars and workshops.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

  • Increased energy efficiency of buildings; 25% efficiency improvement of housing.
  • Development and Implementation of a labelling system for new and existing buildings. Labelling of 160,000 existing and 30,000 new houses and 400 buildings. Energy savings of 17.1 to 19.0 Petajoules.
  • Annual emission reductions of between 1.3 and 1.4 Mt /yr. of greenhouse gases , 0.8 and 1.1 kilotonnes/yr. of SO2, 3.0 to 4.1 kilotonnes/yr. of CO, and other Criteria Air Contaminants.
  • NRC: The final outcome of the project (March 2011) will be the development of the Model National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 16,100,000
$61,000,000


Clean Energy Program 2 - ecoENERGY Retrofit


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

ecoENERGY Retrofit offers homeowners, along with smaller businesses and organizations, financial support to retrofit their homes, smaller buildings, and industrial processes.

In 2009-2010, for Homes:

  • Incentives are to be provided directly to property owners who implement home energy retrofits, in the form of grants for approved retrofit costs;
  • Adoption of energy efficiency and renewable energy technology systems and products is to be increased through the incentive program and its informational website; and
  • Collaborative agreements with provinces, territories, utilities and other stakeholders are to be signed.

In 2009-2010, for Small and Medium Organizations:


  • Awareness is to be raised through communications materials;
  • Information sessions are to be held (conferences and webinars);
  • 250 Participants are to attend information sessions;
  • Articles on the program are to be distributed online and by email; and
  • 380 project proposals for energy efficiency improvements to commercial, institutional, and industrial buildings and/or processes are expected to be received/reviewed and funded.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Existing Building Initiative (EBI) Extension
It is expected that the extension will result in up to 300 new retrofit projects and energy audits, which will result in reductions in 0.2 Mt of GHGs.

ecoENERGY Retrofit Initiative - Homes
Reduced energy consumption and lower GHG and CAC emissions.
Reductions of up to 30% in energy use and up 4 tonnes of GHG emissions/year/house.
Anticipated energy savings of 6.08 to 6.75 PJ/yr in 2011.
Reductions of fossil fuels use and electricity generated using fossil fuels that presently convert to annual emissions reductions of between 0.4 and 0.5 Mt/yr of greenhouse gas emissions, 296 to 368 tonnes/yr of NOx, 171 to 625 tonnes/yr of SO2, 0.8 to 1.1 kilotonnes/yr of CO, and the following criteria air contaminants: PM10, 163-611 kt/yr; PM2.5, 149-459kt/yr; VOC 141-221kt/yr.
Increased adoption of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies, systems & products.
Increased awareness of the potential for, and methods of, reducing energy use and emissions in housing.
Improved air quality as a result of lower energy consumption and consequent reduction in emissions.

ecoENERGY Retrofit Initiative - Small and Medium Organizations
Intermediate Outcomes
Increased activity in small and medium organizations buildings and industry sectors related to energy saving projects.
Final Outcome:
Energy savings that result in reduction of GHG emissions and CACs.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 56,500,000
$ 220,000,000


Clean Energy Program 3 - ecoENERGY for Industry


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

ecoENERGY for Industry aims to accelerate energy-saving investments and the exchange of best-practices information within Canada's industrial sector.

In 2009-2010:

  • 30 leadership networking meetings are to be conducted, for best practice- and information-sharing;
  • Data are to be collected pertaining to industry progress on energy efficiency;
  • Policy, program and analytical studies are to be conducted, looking at the methodology and impacts of ecoENERGY for Industry initiatives;
  • Benchmarking studies, best practices guides and tools are to be developed;
  • 1,200 energy managers are to be trained;
  • New companies are to be engaged as members of the voluntary association of companies committed to improving their energy efficiency; and
  • New energy assessments are to be funded to determine where companies can improve their energy efficiency.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Intermediate Outcome

  • Industry implements energy efficiency projects and practices.

Final Outcome


  • Energy savings that result in reduction of GHG emissions and CACs.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 4,300,000
$18,000,000


Clean Energy Program 4 - ecoENERGY for Renewable Power


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

  • During fiscal year 2009-2010, it is expected that at least 25 renewable power projects, including wind, biomass and low impact hydro, will be commissioned for a total capacity of more than 1000 megawatts (MW). These projects will receive about $382 million in incentive support over ten years under the ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program.
  • The 25 projects will generate annually approximately 3.8 terawatt hours (TWh) of electricity and avoid between 1.6 and 1.8 megatonnes ( MT) of greenhouse gas emissions plus criteria air contaminants.
  • By the end of fiscal year 2009-2010, about 3000 MW of renewable power capacity will have been commissioned representing about $900 million of incentive support under the program, producing annually 9 terawatt hours of electricity and avoiding between 3.8 and 4 MT of greenhouse gas emissions plus criteria air contaminants.
  • It is anticipated that in fiscal year 2009-2010 all of the grants and contribution funding under the program will be fully allocated to renewable power projects.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Outcomes

Annual production of 14.3 terawatt-hours of electricity or about 4000 MW of capacity depending on the mix of energy sources, by 2011, which presently convert to annual emission reductions of between 6 and 6.7 Mt for greenhouse gases and, for criteria air contaminants (CACs), the most significant are 2 to 3 kilotonnes of NOx, 3 to 12 kilotonnes of SO2, 0.6 to 4 kilotonnes of PM10, and other CACs.

Greater experience in Canada with more low-impact renewable power generation by utilities, independent power producers and other stakeholders.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 74,850,000 $276,000,000


Clean Energy Program 5 - ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

  • Installation of 175 units of air and hot water systems for such targeted economic sectors as business, industry, manufacturing, agriculture, residential, utility, non-profit organizations, institutions and energy service companies located in all Canadian provinces and territories
  • Development of two standards (e.g., CSA F379 and CSA F383 for solar hot water systems will be published over the next year, and CSA F378 for solar collectors will be developed)
  • 13 residential pilot project agreements are expected to be signed to foster the use of solar water heater units in the sector
  • Certification of two solar hot water systems
  • Two software design tools are expected to be upgraded and/or developed
  • Development of two occupational standards for installers
  • Completion of an annual national survey to quantify the size (through sales) of the Canadian solar heating industry to better understand the evolution and growth of the sector
  • Energy savings of 0.09 petajoules, reduction of approximately 5 kilotonnes of GHG emissions

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Outcomes

  • The deployment of up to 700 solar thermal technology units in ICI (Industrial, Commercial and Institutional) sectors.
  • Up to 8 residential sector pilot projects collaborations (each deploying many solar thermal units) are expected to be financially supported. Energy savings of 0.35 petajoules, which converts to annual emission reductions of about 20 kilotonnes of GHG, 9.8 kilotonnes of NOX, and 19 to 32 tonnes of SO2.
  • Industry capacity development is expected to result in the development of two standards for renewable thermal technologies, certification of up to 8 solar water systems to standards, two annual industry surveys, development and distribution of at least three new technology publications for public information, development of two renewable energy occupational standards for installers.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 8,000,000 $36,000,000


Clean Energy Program 6 - ecoENERGY Technology Initiative


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Clean Electricity

  • Commencement of front-end engineering studies and demonstrations of integrated carbon capture and storage projects in partnership with the private sector and provincial agencies
  • Completion of a successful wind technology roadmap that will set out guidelines for future federal involvement in the technical development of wind energy in Canada, including utility offshore wind systems

Bioenergy


  • Production of inventories of existing, new, and opportunity forest and agriculture biomass resources, in a single database (GIS-based web portal).

Clean Transportation


  • Demonstration and integration of pre-commercial hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and infrastructure for successful vehicle demonstration fleet, including Olympic Village hydrogen buses

Low-emissions industry


  • Development of tools, improved process design, bench scale testing, and partner site validation to reduce the energy/emissions footprint for industry
  • Oil sands
  • Determination of the parameters necessary to predict the partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during solvent recovery.

Built Environment


  • Implementation of several projects in partnership with municipalities, builders and developers covering elements of planning and construction of highly energy efficient buildings and communities. The projects will cover early stage community planning as well as building construction projects.

Knowledge dissemination


  • S&T publications, reports, and workshops, targeted at stakeholders operating at the next stage of the innovation continuum.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Outcomes

  • An improved suite of clean energy technologies and improved regulations to ensure their uptake.
  • Increased involvement and collaboration of the research community and key stakeholders.
  • Increased awareness and understanding of technologies and processes associated with reducing air emissions.
  • Increased capability to develop new and improved energy systems and technologies that contribute to clean air objectives; and a consolidated program.
  • The new technologies will be expected to lead to significantly reduced emissions of particulates, gaseous pollutants, toxic substances and greenhouse gases from the production and use of energy.
  • The new knowledge/technology will enable the development of regulations, codes and standards.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 55,222,000 $226,440,000


Clean Energy Program 7 - Policy, Communications, Monitoring and Reporting


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Policy:

  • Provision of policy documents (reports, briefing materials and presentations) and advice to the Minister, Deputy Minister and other senior officials in support of policy and program development and decision making
  • Analysis of medium-term policy measures/options for NRCan's contribution to the Government's 2020 GHG emissions reduction targets
  • Continued collaboration with Environment Canada on approach to industrial GHG emissions.
  • Development of materials in support of Cabinet decision making processes

Strategic Communications:


  • Planning and coordination of announcements to celebrate milestones of ecoENERGY projects - ministerial events will take place across the country to reach Canadians and stakeholders.
  • Planning and coordination of large events such as G8 and other domestic and international meetings - these will require a series of products such as news releases, speaking notes, media lines, QsAs, etc.
  • Production of generic marketing and outreach material such as web site, publications, newspaper supplements to promote the ecoENERGY program and its success.
  • Handling media inquires and monitoring of media/public environment on issues related to the ecoENERGY program and stakeholders.

Forest Policy & Monitoring:


  • Ongoing engagement through meetings and workshops with the scientific community and all provinces and territories to improve understanding of forest carbon, and improve carbon monitoring and reporting
  • Analysis, development and promotion of post-2012 international GHG accounting rules for forest carbon that improve upon those established under the Kyoto Protocol for 2008-12
  • Continued development of National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting system and preparation of forest-related information for Canada's 2010 National GHG Inventory Report to the UNFCCC, in collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment Canada (EC)
  • Analysis of forest sector opportunities to contribute to climate change mitigation, and engagement of stakeholders to encourage action through workshops and meetings

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Policy:
Outcomes

  • Climate change and clean air policies are well-analyzed and their implications understood such that policy options can be presented to senior officials and ministers for decision.
  • Effective coordination of, and participation in, interdepartmental processes ensuring effective government management, preparation of materials for Cabinet and the implementation of Cabinet decisions.
  • Future emissions trends are understood enabling informed discussion of emission reduction objectives

Strategic Communications:
Outcomes
  • Targeted audiences understand the government's Clean Energy Agenda and its role in the overall Environmental Agenda.
  • Provision of high-quality communications advice and consistent messaging supports the implementation and uptake of the policies and programs of the government's Clean Energy Agenda.
  • Development of a government-wide communications strategy and messaging ensures a consistent approach for communicating government actions on clean energy and the environment.
Outputs
  • Provision of strategic communications advice and support to the government's environmental agenda.
  • Effective and consistent messaging in horizontal communications.
  • Proactive and integrated communications planning.

Forest Policy & Monitoring:
Outcomes
  • Forest monitoring and reporting leads to an understanding of the impacts of climate change and other human stresses on Canada's forests.
  • Provision of improved information covering the entire forest area becomes available, enabling policy development and improved forest management practices and business planning to reduce forest loss.
Outputs
  • Analysis of policy options, design, and evaluation of emission reduction and adaptation options.
  • Implementation and maintenance of a flexible forest inventory and related monitoring systems through partnerships with the provinces and territories.
  • Contributions to international climate change negotiation workshops, to universities for modeling work, and for data acquisition shared with provinces/territories, using the existing departmental class contribution authority.
  • Reporting on forests, land-use changes and air emissions.

Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 6,140,000
$24,600,000


Clean Energy Program 8 - ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities


Department Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Departmental Program Activity Healthy Northern Communities

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

In 2009-2010, the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program will continue to support the efforts of Aboriginal and northern communities in developing their own clean energy projects to help reduce their reliance on diesel fuel, lower their energy costs, contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gases and criteria air contaminants in Canada, and most importantly, assume a role in improving the health of their members.

The Program will make funds available to:

  • off-grid communities that face specific challenges in the development and implementation of renewable energy projects;
  • energy efficiency projects;
  • energy conservation projects; and,
  • community energy baseline studies and implementing their recommendations.

The Program will provide funding to:


  • assist in various aspects of project development, particularly during the early stages, including project
  • identification and inception, feasibility and planning studies, financial and project management, equity partnerships, power purchase agreements and project completion;
  • expand Off-Grid Framework and implement projects
  • work with regions to collaborate with provinces, targeting Ontario region.

The Program will contribute professional strategic and technical guidance and tools that facilitate the development of clean energy projects.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Northern and Aboriginal communities are engaged and participating in the ecoENERGY Program.
  • Improved northern and Aboriginal technical and management skills for clean energy.
  • Successfully implemented renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

Intermediate Outcomes


  • Northern and Aboriginal communities are equipped with knowledge and tools to increase energy efficiency of community infrastructure.
  • Decrease in emissions of GHG and CAC in northern and Aboriginal communities.
  • Increased energy efficiency and use of renewable energy in northern and Aboriginal communities.
  • More reliable infrastructure in northern and Aboriginal communities.
  • Energy cost savings in northern and Aboriginal communities.

Final Outcomes


  • Reduced greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air contaminants in northern and Aboriginal communities.
  • Sustainable and healthy northern and Aboriginal communities


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 3,750,000
$15,000,000


Clean Transportation Program 1 - ecoMobility


Department Transport Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Financial support

  • In 2009-2010, 12 municipalities will have a contribution agreement in place and will be implementing Green Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Services and Policies. Total contribution will be up to $3 million under the Program.

Training and education


  • At least 200 Green TDM project participants are engaged and are more aware of sustainable transportation options such as car sharing, public transit, active transportation, alternative transportation to single occupancy car.
  • At least two tools, such as guidelines for Green TDM practitioners & webinars, and program modules to support Green TDM project implementation will be developed.
  • At least 200 municipal Transportation practitioners and decision-makers will increase knowledge to foster ongoing implementation and measurement of Green Transportation policies and programs through the following activities:
    • Five information events;
    • Up to six technical training sessions (e.g. webinars);
    • Two research projects;
    • Green TDM project profiles on the TC web site; and,
  • Five case studies.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period


Short-term results include


  • Municipalities implement targeted TDM (Transportation Demand Management) initiatives;
  • TDM project participants are more aware of sustainable transportation options;
  • Tools and program modules to support TDM project implementation developed;
  • TDM practitioners and decision-makers have requisite knowledge to foster ongoing implementation and measurement of TDM policies and programs.

Longer-term expected results include


  • TDM project participants reduce the vehicle kilometres traveled within their jurisdictions;
  • TDM project participants increase the share of trips within their jurisdictions via less energy intense modes;
  • Municipalities incorporate TDM approaches in their plans and operations;
  • Professional expertise for TDM increases.

The ultimate outcomes would be reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CAC) emissions in urban passenger transportation sector and an increase in use of TDM in Canadian municipalities.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 2,803,000 $8,200,000*

*Excludes approved spending of $1.1M for 2011-12 due to program extension.


Clean Transportation Program 2 - ecoTechnology for Vehicles


Department Transport Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010


Information and decision support


  • In 2009-10, the ecoTechnology for Vehicles (ETV) program will acquire approximately five next generation vehicles and technologies for testing and evaluation of their environmental performance and safety. These vehicles will include hydrogen, electric, plug-in electric, diesel hybrid and alternative fueled vehicles.
  • The eTV technical team will continue to update an environmental scan of all emerging technologies and develop protocols for testing and evaluation.

Training and education


  • The program will showcase vehicles and technologies at over 22 public events across the country, ranging from major Canadian international auto shows (in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver) to consumer lifestyle or environmental shows. Providing Canadians with information as a method to encourage their acceptance of cutting-edge environmental technologies that reduce the harmful environmental impacts of motor vehicles.

Partnership and Network


  • The eTV program will continue to work in cooperation with the automotive industry, other government departments, and consumers to better identify potential barriers to the introduction of advanced vehicle technologies in Canada.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period


Immediate Outcomes


  • Increased knowledge about technologies and vehicles generated.
  • Information on the program, the technologies, and the vehicles effectively disseminated to the Canadian consumer and automotive industry

Immediate Outcomes


  • Increased public awareness.
  • Increased penetration of advanced technology vehicles in the market place.

Ultimate Outcome


  • Reduced Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from transportation sources in 2010/11.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 4,315,000 $14,100,000


Clean Transportation Program 3 - National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry


Department Transport Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

The major thrust in this initiative relates to the activation of speed limiting devices on large trucks, which falls under provincial and territorial jurisdiction. In 2009, the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec, which represents over 60% of the trucking activity in Canada and partially based on the studies and reports completed by Transport Canada in the summer of 2008, will begin regulating the maximum speed of large commercial vehicles through the mandatory activation of a speed limiting setting (max.105 kph) on their vehicle. This requirement will be applicable to all vehicles that operate in the jurisdiction, regardless of their home base of operation. Ontario and Quebec are also developing details of an enforcement educational program that will be implemented in their jurisdictions to allow a "grace" period during the transition. Transport Canada has set aside up to $5 million in Contribution funds to assist jurisdictions in acquiring devices to aid detection and enforcement. Transport Canada also expects to receive a proposal from other provinces who may wish to proceed with mandating speed limiters for large trucks. Financial assistance may be required and Transport Canada is prepared to consider proposals. Transport Canada has provided its findings to all jurisdictions, who are assessing their interest in this area.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

This contribution program is designed to achieve the following objectives:

  • Support the government's platform commitments on the environment and Clean Air Agenda by contributing to modal efficiency and reducing air emissions and energy use in the transportation sector;
  • Support the removal of regulatory barriers to enable the harmonization of provincial/territorial regulations in order to adopt emissions-reducing technologies in the Canadian Trucking Industry; and
  • Support an increase in the freight transportation industry's participation in air emissions reduction initiatives.

Anticipated short-term results of this program include:


  • Provinces and territories agree to consider amending their regulations to permit the implementation of emissions-reducing technologies in the trucking industry; and
  • Provinces and territories agree to the removal of regulatory barriers that will enable harmonization of provincial/territorial regulations.

Anticipated long-term results of the program include:


  • Removing regulatory barriers and developing best practices in a harmonized approach across Canada, allowing for the implementation of emissions-reducing technologies in the trucking industry; and
  • Achieving the ultimate outcome of a reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants in the trucking industry and indirectly increasing competitiveness.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 2,153,000
$ 5,400,000


Clean Transportation Program 4 - Freight Technology Demonstration Fund


Department Transport Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Financial support

  • The Freight Technology Demonstration Fund will provide contributions towards the purchase, installation and demonstration of the effectiveness of new and underused emission-reducing technologies in the freight industry. Eight projects selected in January 2008 will be funded as part of Round 1 and results will be available in 2009-10. These projects will demonstrate technology such as common rail fuel injection system on a ferry; variable-speed gantry container cranes at a port; ultra low-emitting genset locomotives for yard and road switching; multiple truck technologies (aerodynamic trailer skirts, base flaps, auxiliary power units and single wide-base tires); truck on-board computers and hybrid reefer technology; an engineless (nonpetroleum) auxiliary power unit.
  • Approximately ten projects will be selected for funding in Round 2 and will be underway in 2009-10. The Round 2 projects will be allocated up to $3.4M. These projects represent different modes and regions with in Canada.

Partnership and networks


  • The ecoFREIGHT program will participate in at least four events in Canada to enable the transfer of knowledge acquired from demonstration projects to the broader industry. Events will consist of freight industry conferences, annual general meetings and trade shows. EcoFreight program staff will participate as speaker and/or exhibitor.
  • The ecoFREIGHT Web-base Information Network will launch in 2009/10 with published demonstration results achieved by specific companies and other information enabling the transfer of knowledge to industry.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The contribution program is a direct response to the rapid growth in freight transportation activity, which is predicted to lead to increased emissions.

This contribution program is designed to achieve the following objectives:

  • Support improvements in modal and inter-modal freight efficiency and reduce air emissions and energy use in the freight transportation sector; and
  • Demonstrate and encourage the take-up of innovative environmental technologies and efficient best practices within the freight transportation sector that can reduce GHG emissions and air pollutants.

In the short term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results
:

  • Support the testing of new and underutilized technologies;
  • Enable the transfer of knowledge from demonstrations to broader industry;
  • Implement pilot projects; and
  • Demonstrate results achieved by industry.

In the medium to long term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results:


  • Adoption of environmentally friendly technologies and best practices by the freight industry;
  • Reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants from the transportation sector; and
  • Improved efficiency in the transportation industry.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 3,718,201 $9,300,000


Clean Transportation Program 5 - Freight Technology Incentives Program


Department Transport Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Financial support

  • The Freight Technology Incentives Program will provide cost-shared funding to companies and non-profit organizations in freight transportation to help them to purchase and install proven emission-reducing technologies. Fifteen projects were selected in January 2008 for funding as part of Round 1 and the results of these projects will be available in 2009-10. The projects will focus on technology areas of potential emission reductions such as reduce idling; engine innovations (genset locomotive); aerodynamic/friction reduction; and electric hybrid cargo and baggage tractors at airport.
  • A number of projects will be selected in January 2009 as part of Round 2. Total funding of 3.8 M will be allocated to the Round 2 projects selected and will represent different modes and regions with in Canada.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The contribution program is a direct response to the rapid growth in freight transportation activity, which is predicted to lead to increased emissions.

This contribution program is designed to achieve the following objectives:

  • Support improvements in modal and inter-modal freight efficiency and reduce air emissions and energy use in the freight transportation sector; and
  • Encourage the take-up of innovative environmental technologies within the freight transportation sector by reducing the cost barriers of the technologies.

In the short term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results:


  • Provide incentives for the purchase and installation of proven technologies; and
  • Acquisition and installation of equipment by project proponents.

In the medium to long term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results
:

  • Greater adoption of efficiency enhancing equipment;
  • Reduction of GHG emissions and pollutants from the transportation sector; and
  • Improved efficiency in the transportation industry.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 4,109,561 $9,350,000


Clean Transportation Program 6 - ecoFreight Partnerships


Department Transport Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Partnership and networks. National freight industry:

  • The ecoFreight Partnerships will continue to work with Canadian Industrial Transportation Association (CITA) on annual survey of industry members to better understand their environmental practices and the decision-making. The program will provide $15,000 to CITA to conduct its 2009 survey.
  • The ecoFreight Partnerships will sponsor and/or host three conferences or workshops with the freight transportation industry and/or shippers sector to transfer the knowledge and information.
  • The ecoFreight Partnerships will sponsor at least one industry award to recognize transportation industry environmental leader.
  • International Partnerships on Emissions Reductions:
  • Participate in international events and committees to improve the environmental footprint of the transportation sector. This will include ongoing discussions with the International Maritime Organization and International Civil Aviation Organization concerning the development of international standards and recommended practices for reducing fuel emissions in the international marine and aviation sectors.
  • Share lessons learned and successful practices with international partners related to the development of voluntary agreements with industry.
  • Support and participate in relevant research related to environment and transportation with clear benefits to Canada's environmental objectives and benchmarking against "best practices" and lessons learned from international experiences.

Transportation Industry Partnership Initiative:


  • Consult with the domestic marine industry to develop a memorandum of understanding to voluntarily reduce air emissions.
  • Release the Annual Reports for 2008 under existing memorandum of understanding with the Air Transportation Association of Canada and the Railway Association of Canada outlining progress in reducing emissions.
  • Hold/sponsor expert conferences with industry in support of all memorandum of understanding.
  • Share lessons learned and successful practices with domestic partners related to the development of voluntary agreements.

Efficiency Program for Freight Shippers and Forwarders:


  • Develop and publish information and tools for freight shippers and forwarders to increase awareness of sustainable transportation options.
  • Work with international partners to share information and successful practices on shipper awareness in order to facilitate cooperation and replication of successful practices.
  • Establish collaboration with the United States Environmental Protection Agency Smartway program to share information and ensure a consistent approach to shipper awareness in North America.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

International Partnerships on Emissions Reductions

The International Partnerships on Emissions Reductions will provide for increased presence at International committees, Working Groups, and other fora that develop international approaches in aviation and marine modes. The result of this activity will be more stringent regulations, standards, best practices or guidelines being developed leading to an overall reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants and improved efficiency from the aviation and marine sectors.

Transportation Industry Partnership Initiative

TC will implement and monitor the existing Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Air Transport Association of Canada. TC will also sign, implement and monitor a MOU with the Railway Association of Canada. TC will establish similar partnerships with the marine industry. Program activities will include providing the secretariat function for the various MOU Management Committees; review of annual and progress reports; and oversight audits. TC will also conduct joint studies and initiatives with industry to foster progress towards the emissions targets and continue to play a facilitator role in helping the industry to address barriers to emissions reduction that are beyond the scope of individual industries. This initiative will lead to voluntary agreements where modal associations and their members commit to reduce their air emissions.

Efficiency Program for Freight Shippers and Forwarders

TC will draw upon the results of recent focus groups to establish new partnerships directly with users of the freight systems to improve their transportation decision-making and increase the adoption of more sustainable modal choices and practices. TC will conduct studies, benchmarking and other initiatives to identify and produce the information required by shippers and forwarders to inform their transportation decisions. TC will also work with industry on annual surveys on industry environmental practices and decision-making, and sponsor and/or host conferences, workshops, etc. This program will educate users of the freight systems on the impacts made as a result of their freight transportation selection decisions. With this knowledge, users will be able to include environmental impacts in the decision making process when selecting between modes and carriers during their freight transportation decisions.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 1,860,000
$ 6,550,000


Clean Transportation Program 7 - Marine Shore Power Program


Department Transport Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Guidelines and agreements/financial support

  • The Marine Shore Power Program will fund the project selected in September 2008 as part of the Round 1 selection process. Port Metro Vancouver is eligible to receive up to $2.0 million from the program for this 9-million project to demonstrate shore-based power, an "anti-idling" technology that enables ships to turn off their diesel engines while docked in port by connecting to electric power from a transformer at the port facility.
  • The Marine Shore Power Program will advertise and hold a second round of funding in 2009-2010. $2.7M of program funding is available to fund the selected projects.

Partnership and Network


  • The Marine Shore Power Program will participate in at least two conferences or workshops with the industry to increase awareness on the program and the technology, and to transfer knowledge.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The contribution program is a direct response to the rapid growth in freight transportation activity, which is predicted to lead to increased emissions.

This contribution program is designed to achieve the following objectives:

  • Support improvements in modal and inter-modal efficiency and reduce air emissions and energy use in the transportation sector; and
  • Demonstrate and encourage the take-up of marine shore power installations in Canadian ports.

In the short term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results:


  • Funding of pilot projects for marine shore power;
  • Transfer of knowledge and dissemination of results;
  • Purchase and installation of marine shore power equipment by demonstration proponents; and
  • Increased awareness and understanding of marine shore power opportunities.

In the medium to long term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results:


  • Greater adoption of marine shore power equipment in Canadian ports;
  • Reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants from the marine sector; and
  • Improved efficiency in the transportation industry.

The ultimate outcomes would be to reduce emissions of GHG and air pollutants by 2010/11 in the marine transportation sector.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 1,406,000 $ 5,700,000*

*Excludes approved spending of $0.3M for 2011-12 due to program extension.


Clean Transportation Program 8 - Analytical and Policy Support


Department Transport Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Policy/advice/research studies

Under this program, Transport Canada will initiate a number of studies and explore policy options concerning areas of key interest to the department with respect to the environment. This will include developing and launching a climate change data strategy, in collaboration with various stakeholders including key federal departments responsible for climate change policy (e.g. Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada), provincial and territorial governments, as well as transportation industries and associations, to address major gaps and data needs. The collaboration from provinces and territories is essential to the success of this initiative. The main focus of the studies will be on improving data and tools with respect to freight and urban transportation, noting that provinces and territories have jurisdiction over these two key components of the transportation sector.

One major study to be launched in 2009-10 will be the development of a greenhouse gas-energy model for the rail sector that, once completed, will enhance Transport Canada's ability to assess various policy and regulatory options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from Canada's transportation system. Discussions will be ongoing with provinces and other stakeholders concerning how to address other data gaps in the transportation freight sector (e.g. trucking) as well as measure to update the 1999 Transportation Climate Change Table.
In addition, work is ongoing on the further development of a light duty vehicle model. This model, once completed, should allow the analysis of fuel consumption regulation targets with and without incentive policies. The model is being designed to allow for the analysis of potential impacts from provincial or national complementary measures.

One major project will be the creation of provincial light duty fleet data in order to assess provincial measures. This data will be developed through the decoding vehicle registration files, which will continue over 2009-10. It is also expected that fuel consumption data will be linked with new/existing light duty vehicle fleet purchases. The success of these projects/ initiatives requires collaboration with provinces/territories.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The overarching goal of this initiative is to help ensure the provision of the analytical and policy expertise necessary to support and further develop research, policies and programs related to the federal priorities of sustainable transportation, clean air and climate change.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 985,000 $ 4,000,000


Clean Transportation Program 9a - ecoAUTO Rebate Program (Transport Canada Component)


Department Transport Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

All applications for the ecoAUTO Rebate Program must be received by March 31, 2009. Any applications received before March 31, 2009, but not yet processed by that date, will be processed early Fiscal Year 2009/2010. Therefore, there will be no application activity in 2009-2010 to measure. However, during fiscal year 2009-2010, Transport Canada will implement and complete a client survey which will comprise of Canadian consumers and dealers. The survey will assess the impact of the ecoAuto Rebate Program on the decision-making behaviour of purchasers of light-duty vehicles. EcoAuto will have provided up to $247 million to consumers to purchase more fuel-efficient vehicles. The file information and the client survey should provide accurate information on consumers and dealers awareness and acceptance of fuel-efficient vehicles.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The main objective of the ecoAUTO Rebate Program is to provide incentives to encourage the purchase of more fuel efficient personal vehicles, thereby reducing air emissions and energy use in the transportation sector in support of the Government's Clean Air Agenda.

  • Reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants from the urban passenger transportation sector.
  • Increase in advanced fuel efficiency technology penetration into the Canadian vehicle market.
  • Timely, citizen-centred service to the applicants of the program through an efficient Call Centre, In-Person Network and Processing Centre.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 1,943,000 $ 252,700,000*

*Note that the program ends in 2009-2010


Clean Transportation Program 9b - ecoAUTO Rebate Program (HRSDC Component)


Department Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Departmental Program Activity

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

All application for the ecoAUTO Rebate Program must be received by March 31, 2009. Any applications received before March 31, 2009, but not yet processed by that date, will be processed early Fiscal Year 2009/2010 under the 2008/2009 fiscal year using the PAYE process. Therefore, there will be no application activity in 2009-2010 to measure.

However, during fiscal year 2009-2010, Transport Canada anticipates to implement and complete a client survey, which will comprise of Canadian consumers and dealers, providing the baseline to measure the effectiveness and impact of the ecoAUTO Rebate Program.

The file information and the client survey should provide accurate information on consumers and dealers awareness and acceptance of alternative fuel-efficient vehicle .

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

ecoAUTO Program activities also include receiving and processing applications for rebates to consumers purchasing eligible vehicles, resulting in eligible recipients receiving rebate cheques in a timely manner.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 300,000
$11,300,000*

* Note that the program ends in 2009-2010


Clean Transportation Program 10 - ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 - Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Output targets for 2009/10

  • Financial support
  • Expect to receive 20 proposals under the ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles funding opportunity, for funding of up to $1.7 million dollars.
  • Partnerships and networks
  • Expect to hold 2 meetings with Auto industry
  • Training and education
  • Expect 125,000 new drivers will be trained on fuel efficient driving practices
  • Information and decision support/analysis
  • Expect to target purchasers of new vehicles through the production of the 2010 EnerGuide for Vehicles fuel consumption guide and the Most Fuel Efficient Vehicles list
  • Research studies
  • Expect to prepare a report on the 2008 interim goal of the Memorandum of Understanding with the Auto Industry to voluntarily reduce greenhouse gas from light duty vehicles by 5.3 Mt in 2010.

Immediate Outcome targets for 2009/10


  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices
  • The preparation of a report on the 2008 interim goal of the Memorandum of Understanding with the Auto Industry to voluntarily reduce greenhouse gas from light duty vehicles by 5.3 Mt in 2010 will provide key information describing energy efficiency and consumption trends in the personal vehicle sector.
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities will be achieved through signature of at least five collaborative agreements.
  • Increased capacity to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances
  • Capacity to address emissions from personal vehicles through better driving practices and more efficient vehicle purchases will be enhanced through the training of 125,000 new drivers and through the national distribution of information materials such as the 2009 Fuel Consumption Guide with a targeted circulation of 350,000 units. Additionally, funding of up to $1.7 million of emissions-reducing projects will enable proponents to deliver targeted outreach activities aimed at increasing consumers' awareness and adoption of energy efficient buying, driving, and maintaining practices for personal vehicles.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Final Outcome

  • Reductions in energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants from transportation

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices
  • Increased capacity to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities

Outputs


  • Financial support
  • Partnerships and networks
  • Training and education
  • Information and decision support/analysis
  • Research studies


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 6,050,000 $ 21,000,000


Clean Transportation Program 11 - ecoENERGY for Fleets


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 - Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Output targets for 2009/10

  • Financial support
  • 10 proposals under the ecoENERGY for Fleets funding opportunity are expected during 2009/2010 with funding up to $2 million dollars.
  • Partnerships and networks
  • EcoEnergy for Fleets program is expected to participate in 15 trade shows and 30 meetings with industry.
  • Training and education
  • 2200 transportation professionals, including drivers, driving instructors, mechanics and fleet managers, are expected to be trained on fuel efficient driving, maintenance and business practices during 2009/2010
  • Information and decision support/analysis
  • Expect to produce information materials on fuel efficient practices targeting the off-road sector.
  • Research studies
  • Research studies examining program options for idle-reduction devices, aerodynamics and tires are expected to be developed.

Immediate Outcome targets for 2009/10


  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices.
  • Research studies on aerodynamics, tires, and idle-reduction devices will provide the program team with knowledge of new opportunities for reducing emissions from the trucking sector. This information will be used to plan outreach initiatives and more comprehensive messaging for the trucking sector.
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities will be achieved through signature of up to ten collaborative agreements.
  • Increased capacity to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances
  • The capacity of transportation professionals (drivers, driver trainers, mechanics, and managers) to address emissions through their decision making will be enhanced through training and through the provision of decision-support tools and information materials including workshops. These knowledge transfer opportunities encompass the training of 2200 transportation professionals, the mounting of 31 workshops, 25,000 web hits, and outreach from truck-stop anti-idling campaigns. Additionally, capacity to undertake emissions-reducing projects will be increased through the provision of up to $2 million of funding, which will enable fleets to create and implement action plans that include the adoption of energy efficient fleet management, driving, and maintenance practices, as well as increased uptake of energy efficient technologies.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period


Final Outcome


  • Reductions in energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants from transportation

Immediate Outcomes


  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices.
  • Increased capacity to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities

Outputs


  • Financial support
  • Partnerships and networks
  • Training and education
  • Information and decision support/analysis
  • Research studies


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 6,000,000
$ 22,000,000


Clean Transportation Program 12 - Vehicle Scrappage


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Financial support

  • The program continues to run in every province, after its initial launch in January 2009, with a goal to provide incentives for Canadians to retire in their old, higher-polluting vehicles and promote environmentally friendly transportation choices. By replacing older, higher-polluting vehicles with newer, cleaner alternatives means cleaner air and a healthier environment for Canadians. Retiring of up to 50,000 old (pre-1996) annually . will lead to a reduction of nearly 2,250 tonnes of smog-forming pollutants and 54,000 tonnes of GHG emissions
  • Attractive incentives, such as free transit passes, rebates on bicycles, memberships in car sharing program, have been developed as a reward for accelerating the retirement of their older (1995 and before) vehicles that Canadians can choose from.
  • The program has generated results such as emission reductions from retiring older vehicles and their replacing them (based on reward selected). The results are continuously tracked a national database.
  • Complementary advertising and other outreach activities by program delivery agents to promote the program locally.

Training and education


  • Environment Canada has developed a multi-media (television, radio, newspaper, web) advertising campaign to communicate the impacts of old vehicles on the environment and the reasons for Canadians to scrap them.
  • An additional public awareness campaign has been developed for buses and bus shelters across the country.

Partnership and network


  • Exhibit on vehicle recycling and sustainable transportation on display at the Biosphere. Smaller, similar travelling exhibit on display in one or two other museums.

Guidelines and agreements


  • Code of Practice detailing the legal requirements before, during and after vehicle recyclers and summarizing best environmental management practices for vehicle recycling is followed for every vehicle retired through the program. All vehicle recyclers participating in the program are trained. Up to100 audits to verify compliance with code of practice are conducted through on-site visits of participating vehicle recyclers.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The Scrappage program will target personal automobiles that are model year 1995 or earlier, in running condition ("live vehicles") and have been registered and insured for at least the past 6 months. Owners of these vehicles will be offered a suite of incentives that could include: a cash incentive; free transit passes; incentives supporting sustainable transportation alternatives (such as a car sharing membership or rebate on a bicycle); or a rebate on a vehicle of model year 2004 and newer to be provided by manufacturers and/or dealers. There will be regional variations in the type and value of incentives depending on the contribution of local partners such as transit authorities.

By the end of four years, the Program will achieve the following results:

  • 200,000 in-use vehicles will be scrapped during the four-year life of the Program.
  • Smog-forming emissions will be reduced by a total of nearly 9,000 tonnes of NOx and VOCs, and 214,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions over the life of the Program.
  • Increased use of sustainable transportation alternatives could result in further reductions of greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Increased awareness and understanding among Canadians of the environmental impacts of older vehicles.
  • Responsible recycling of vehicles will prevent the release of toxic substances.
  • The code of practice developed for vehicle recycling through the Program will provide the impetus to raise standards, nationally, and may be adopted by provinces and territories.

Leveraging of federal funding by partners at a ratio of about 3:1 ($3 in incentive value for every $1 in federal funding towards incentives).


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 41,923,000 $92,000,000


Indoor Air Quality Program 1 - Indoor Air Research and Development Initiative


Department National Research Council
Departmental Program Activity 1.1 Research and development

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Assessment of the Impacts of Improved Indoor Air Ventilation and Indoor Air Distribution on Human Health and Indoor Air Quality

Design of interventions (retrofitting with Heat recovery ventilation systems, improving air flows, and increasing air exchange rates) in the Indoor Air Research Laboratory will be completed, including actual measurements of ventilation rates and using modelling tools, with data obtained from Quebec City homes, during the ongoing field study.

As of November 2008, homes of asthmatic children are being investigated with two-field teams. Most of the 120 homes (max.) will have been investigated three times in 2009/10, followed by interventions in 50 % of the homes; the other 50 % will serve as controls. The interventions will start in fall 2009 and through spring 2010.

Evaluation of Indoor Air Quality Technologies and Solutions

An environmental scan on current technologies related to "IAQ Solutions" was conducted to identify candidate technologies for protocol development. More than 40 technologies were ranked and prioritized based on their potential health relevance, measurable impact on health-relevant pollutants, feasibility of assessment by developed protocols, product availability, labelling support, and time and cost feasibilities criteria. A paper related to these "IAQ Solution" technologies is currently being prepared and will be submitted for peer review by September 2009.

3 to 4 Protocols for technology assessment will be developed, evaluated as well as validated for those prioritized IAQ solution. This task will also include the preparation of research facilities and the preparation of analytical instrumentation required to assess the technology impact. The first IAQ solution technology to be addressed is portable air cleaners. A Technical Workshop related to scientific, engineering, and technology aspects of this IAQ solution will be held in April 2009. A technical paper on the protocol for this solution will be completed by mid-2009. The related technical test report will be submitted for peer review and publication by the end of FY 2009/10.

Establishment of a National Committee Focusing on Indoor Air

A new national committee on IAQ and buildings will begin work on two best-practice guides for defining acceptable IAQ and for assessing IAQ.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Assessment of the Impacts of Improved Indoor Air Ventilation and Indoor Air Distribution on Human Health and Indoor Air Quality

  • Establishment of one Scientific Steering Committee with Institut national de sante publique du Quebec (INSPQ) on intervention field study on Ventilation, Air Distribution and Health (in Quebec City) in 2007/08
  • One 'Memorandum of Understanding' (MOU) in place with provincial health partner, to complement field intervention study (2008/09)
  • One research modelling and ventilation research facility built and instrumented (2008/09)
  • Two papers, accepted or published in peer-reviewed journals (one in 2009/10, and one in 2010/11)

Evaluation of Indoor Air Quality Technologies and Solutions


  • Two stakeholder meetings/workshops with Canadian interest groups and manufacturers, to prioritize IAQ technologies to be tested, validate research protocols, and disseminate findings (2008/09)
  • Three protocols developed on the assessment of "Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) improvement solutions"/technologies (2009/10)
  • Two papers, accepted or published in peer-reviewed journals (one in 2009/10, and one in 2010/11)
  • Two test systems built to test different relevant indoor air quality improvement technologies (2010/11)
  • One collaborative agreement in place to support one Indoor Air Quality solution (by 2010/11)
  • Three "Indoor Air Quality improvement solutions"/technologies tested against three respective protocols (2010/11)
  • One publicly available data set available regarding features of IAQ improvement technologies
  • Report on procedures in support of rating systems in respect to IAQ (2010/11)

Establishment of a National Committee Focusing on Indoor Air


  • Establishment of a consultation/decision-making process to guide industry and relevant stakeholders concerned with Indoor Air Quality (Indoor Air Quality Committee) (2008/09)
  • Two surveys of stakeholders of industry, home owners, general interest groups etc. on awareness of indoor air and improvement strategies (2008/09 and 2010/11)


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 2,000,000 $ 8,000,000


Indoor Air Quality Program 2 - Radon Strategy


Department Health Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer safety

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Mapping

Systematic surveying, mapping and identification of radon hotspots in all major populated areas of Canada that are known or believed to be at risk because of local geological and climatic conditions associated with elevated radon levels.

Health Canada, in collaboration with NRCan, will perform aerial surveys of selected locations in Canada to assess the levels of uranium and other naturally-occurring radioactivity. Radon is produced by the decay of uranium found in soil, rock or water. In FY2009/10 the aerial radiation surveys are expected to include the southern areas of the prairie provinces. As part of the work, soil gas radon measurements will be made at approximately 500 locations throughout Canada, including 100 major population centres.

All of these efforts will generate key data which are to be integrated into a map of areas with elevated levels of radon.

Education and Awareness

Heightened knowledge, awareness and sensitivity of all key sectors, as well as Canadian consumers and federal employees and building managers, regarding the nature and extent of risks to human health from exposure to radon and of available prevention and mitigation measures to effectively address those risks.

The second phase of a national radon awareness campaign (Phase 1 to be launched in FY2008/09) will be carried out in the fall/winter 2009/2010 targeting Canadian homeowners. The messaging content for Phase 2 will focus on radon health risks and will encourage Canadians to test their homes by providing information on radon testing and mitigation. Advertising media will include national Canadian magazines, 30 second radio advertisements with national coverage and internet advertisements.

The targeted outcome is a 15% increase in the percentage of Canadian homes tested for radon and an increase in the "informed" awareness of Canadians by 30% over the 2007 level at the end of FY2009/10.

Testing

Systematic on-site testing and screening of approximately 15,000 federal buildings and facilities for actual radon levels and their comparison against the new radon guidelines, such inventory consisting of all federal facilities located in known and/or potential high-risk areas.

Testing of federal buildings which began last year in the National Capital Region, Quebec and Manitoba will continue and the project will be rolled-out to the remaining regions of Canada. Large scale testing projects with the Department of National Defence to test buildings and Personal Married Quarters (PMQs) on Canadian Forces Bases and with First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) to test federal buildings on reserves across Canada will also continue. The targeted outcome will be to test a minimum of 2000 federal buildings in FY2009/10.

A protocol for radon mitigation in residential homes and large buildings will be completed to aid Canadians in reducing their exposure to radon at home and the workplace. These mitigation protocols will be specific to both Canada's climate and building practices where required. Health Canada will work in collaboration with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada to prepare a case to have the next revision of the Canada Labour Code harmonized with the Canada Radon Guideline to ensure that federal employees are not exposed to high levels of radon in the workplace.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Mapping
Systematic surveying, mapping and identification of radon hotspots in all major populated areas of Canada that are known or believed to be at risk because of local geological and climatic conditions associated with elevated radon levels.

Education and Awareness
Heightened knowledge, awareness and sensitivity of all key sectors, as well as Canadian consumers and federal employees and building managers, regarding the nature and extent of risks to human health from exposure to radon and of available prevention and mitigation measures to effectively address those risks.

Testing
Systematic on-site testing and screening of approximately 15,000 federal buildings and facilities for actual radon levels and their comparison against the new radon guidelines, such inventory consisting of all federal facilities located in known and/or potential high-risk areas.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 3,700,000 $15,000,000


Adaptation Program 1 - Assist Northerners in Assessing Key Vulnerabilities and Opportunities


Department Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Departmental Program Activity Northern Land and Resources

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

  • Develop frameworks, in conjunction with the territories, which support regional and community based adaptations while delivering on territorial priorities.
  • Expand the work with local-level northern partners on the assessment of risks and building adaptive capacity.
  • Support the collection, analysis and dissemination of information which is necessary for local-level decision-making and adaptation planning.
  • Continue work with partner organizations and aboriginal communities South of 60° to identify vulnerabilities and work towards future regional and community-based adaptation planning.
  • Strengthen relationships within Indian and Northern Affairs Canada sectors, both within headquarters and the regional offices, so as to:
    • Maximize the success and delivery of the Climate Change Adaptation Program.
    • Work towards the consideration of climate change impacts and adaptation within departmental operations.
  • Partner with other federal departments around common themes in order to maximize the successful delivery of the adaptation program and build necessary capacity.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Northerners and Aboriginal people will have increased their knowledge and resource capacity to adapt to climate change impacts. Program measures are aimed at improving access to information and increasing technical expertise on adaptation to climate change, evaluating climate risks and identifying responses to risks, putting in place collaborative mechanisms to design effective solutions, and developing adaptation actions by aboriginal and northern communities to address key vulnerabilities. The program supports the distribution of information on tools, best practices and project results to enable communities to integrate climate change risk management in their planning, decision-making and project implementation.

Expected results for 2007/08 (from program's RMAF/RBAF)

Long Term Outcome

  • Increased capacity of northerners to adapt to climate change impacts.

Intermediate Outcomes


  • Increased professional and institutional development related to adaptation to climate change
  • Aboriginal and northern communities have access to support to develop and implement adaptation planning actions
  • Guidance material for developing safer and more reliable infrastructure, and,
  • Planning decisions are based on identified risks.

Immediate Outcomes


  • Access to information and increased technical expertise on adaptation to climate change
  • Climate risks evaluated and responses to risks identified and
  • Greater collaboration in place of the design of effective solutions.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 5,400,000
$14,000,000


Adaptation Program 2a - National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program (Environment Canada Component)


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.2 - Weather and Environmental Prediction Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Provision of Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) forecasts and forecast dissemination in additional Census Metropolitan Areas in Atlantic Canada, Quebec and the Prairies.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Air Quality reports and forecasts will be produced by Environment Canada's regional Storm Predictions Centres, supported by Environment Canada's weather and environmental prediction infrastructure and real-time use of data by federal-provincial air quality monitoring programs.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 5,800,000 $21,300,000


Adaptation Program 2b - National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program (Health Canada Component)


Department Health Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer safety

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Implementation of the AQHI in additional Census Metropolitan Areas in Atlantic Canada, Québec and the prairies.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Within the next four years, the expected outcome is for all 27 census metropolitan areas (communities larger than 100,000), collectively accounting for 80% of the Canadian population in Canada, to receive local AQHI forecasts. The longer-term objective is for full national access to the AQHI in all Canadian communities including the north if the necessary monitoring infrastructure exists to support forecasting.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 2,200,000 $8,700,000


Adaptation Program 3 - Improved Climate Change Scenarios


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.2 - Weather and Environmental Prediction Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Climate Models Year 2: begin development and testing of the next-generation atmospheric model component (focusing on improved representation of the sulphur and carbon cycles); continue development of the global coupled model (particularly, improving the representation of ocean mixing); conduct preliminary historical and future climate change simulations with the latest coupled model, together with associated analysis of performance; commence development and implementation of improved coupling scheme (required to allow better representation of interaction between atmosphere, ocean and sea ice); continue testing and evaluation of regional climate model; collaborate with OURANOS on analysis of regional climate simulations, with a particular focus on the representation of snow in Canada.

Scenarios Year 2: Expand CCSN to include regional nodes; incorporate the most recent scientific developments into CCSN; develop guidance and organize training workshops on the use of scenarios and model intercomparisons; develop scenario tools for climate extremes; collaborate with OURANOS with respect to scenario development.

Hazards Year 2: Complete all regional climate hazards websites; develop methodologies to incorporate climate trends and future projections into climate hazards, risk assessments and climatic design information for infrastructure; prioritize upgrading needs and identify methodologies to upgrade existing climatic design information; expand stakeholder consultations.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Accurate climate information and projections are essential to assess impacts and develop robust adaptation strategies and measures. Improved climate change projections and scenarios will be developed by EC particularly on extremes and hazards for vulnerable infrastructure (e.g. bridges and sewers, which require extreme rainfall design information) and for communities across Canada. Key outcomes of this program include: Adaptive decision making, risk reduction and emergency preparedness.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 4,899,641
$ 15,000,000


Adaptation Program 4 - Climate Change and Health Adaptation in Northern/Inuit Communities


Department Health Canada
Departmental Program Activity 4.1 First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Northern First Nations and Inuit communities/organizations will have increased availability of climate change and health-related adaptation plans as measured by the number of workshops conducted and the number of participants attending as well as through the number of education and awareness tools developed and disseminated from the previous year's community-based research.

Northern First Nations and Inuit communities/organizations will have increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change on their health as measured by the number of communities/organizations who have applied for funding for climate change and health research projects in 2009-10, based on the criteria developed in the: "Climate Change and Health Adaptation in Northern First Nations and Inuit Communities Program 2009-10 Funding Application Guide".

Northern First Nations and Inuit communities/organizations will have increased capacity to conduct and apply climate change and health adaptation science as measured by the number of communities/organizations that have met the funding criteria and have received the funding to conduct their research on 2009-10.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period


  • Vulnerable northern communities will have assessed human health risks and impacts related to climate change so as to position themselves to develop locally-relevant contingency plans and adaptation strategies to address priority risks and impacts. As the research will be done by communities - whether individually or as a group - much of this research and the associated mitigation strategies will be transferable to similar communities across the North.
  • Northern communities will have greater capacity/knowledge for development of culturally-sensitive educational and awareness materials on the health impacts of climate change, thereby enabling them to make better local/regional decisions to protect their health.
  • Outcomes will be measured through collection and assessment of media reports, local council meeting minutes, publications and research papers to determine the effectiveness of transferring and applying knowledge on climate change and health adaptation in northern and/or Inuit communities


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 2,150,000 $ 7,000,000


Adaptation Program 5 - Innovative Risk Management Tools / Regional Adaptation Action Partnerships


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 1.1 Earth Sciences

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Innovative Risk Management Tools

  • Delivery of two tools for use in assessing climate change risks
  • Review of tools used in planning and the need for updated or new tools to assist planners
  • Survey of tools required in the energy sector

Regional Adaptation Action Partnerships


  • Six Regional Adaptation Collaboratives (RACs) will be established
  • In each RAC, initial workshops or other activities to build the community of the participants will take place

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Innovative Risk Management Tools

  • Information and decision-support tools needed for practitioners (e.g. planners and resource managers) and decision-makers are more readily available;
  • Practitioners and decision-makers use information and decision-support tools to assess risks and opportunities from a changing climate and identify adaptation options; and
  • Strengthened Canadian expertise in development and application of tools for adaptation in Canada.

Regional Adaptation Action Partnerships


Information and decision-support tools needed for practitioners and decision-makers to understand risks and opportunities from a changing climate, and identify adaptation options that are available from RAWP members;

  • Practitioners and decision-makers with responsibilities to adapt are engaged on adaptation;
  • Mechanisms to share regional & sectoral information, tools & experiences nationally are used;
  • Improved institutional capacity (meaning staff understanding how to integrate climate change considerations in their organization's decisions in public and private sectors) to address adaptation issues;
  • Strengthened linkages among stakeholders on the issue of adaptation (to share lessons learned);
  • Practitioners (such as engineers and planners) adjust routine practices, guidelines, or codes & standards to respond to the risks and opportunities from a changing climate; and
  • Decision-makers adjust policy, planning, or operations to respond to the risks and opportunities from a changing climate.

Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$8,500,000
$ 35,000,000


Adaptation Program 6a - Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System to Protect the Health of Canadians (Health Canada component)


Department Health Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010


  • Conduct simulations, implement heat alert and response systems and analyze first summers results in the four pilot communities
  • Develop an evaluation framework for a heat alert and response system
  • Complete draft clinical guidelines for health professionals
  • Establish a network for developing a quantitative relationship between heat and health effects

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Health Professional Interventions and Training
Canadians and health care professionals will have access to improved knowledge on the health risks of a changing climate in the following key areas:

  • Health professionals and others will have substantially improved understanding of risk factors that make certain vulnerable population groups particularly susceptible to, or at risk from, extreme weather conditions, enabling them to identify and pursue more effective prevention and mitigation measures to protect health.
  • Data collection protocols and reporting frameworks distributed to support reporting on heat-health issues at the provincial and local levels.

Pilot Heat Alert and Response Systems

Canadians and health care professionals will have access to improved knowledge on the health risks of a changing climate in the following key area:

  • Stakeholders and decision-makers have the information and knowledge to both characterize heat-health risks facing communities, as well as develop appropriate alert and response strategies to protect the health of community members - especially vulnerable populations - in response to situations of extreme heat.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 2,150,000 $ 7,900,000


Adaptation Program 6b - Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System to Protect the Health of Canadians (Public Health Agency of Canada component)


Department Public Health Agency of Canada
Departmental Program Activity 1.2 Disease Prevention and Control

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Four pilot communities will have commenced a community-based approach to assessing infectious disease risk relative to climate change and response plans.

Information will be provided to four pilot communities to assist with community adaptation activities relative to climate change and infectious disease threats; they will be better informed of the actions they need to take to protect themselves and their families through development of new outreach products and response systems.

Partnerships will be established with two universities and research activities will begin relative to increasing knowledge and ability to predict areas and sub-populations at increased risk as a result of changes to the incidence, prevalence and spread of specified infectious diseases occurring as a result of a changing climate.

Pilot communities will be provided with evidence based research and risk analysis to assist with the development of mitigation strategies at the local level.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Development of a pilot community-based approach to assessing infectious disease risk and effectiveness of response in up to four communities.

  • Canadians will have access to new information to protect their health from risks related to climate change and infectious disease threats; they will be better informed of the actions they need to take to protect themselves and their families through development of new outreach products and response systems.
  • Increased knowledge and ability to predict which areas and sub-populations will be at increased risk as a result of changes to the incidence, prevalence and spread of specified infectious diseases occurring as a result of a changing climate.
  • Further development of Canadian expertise in risk modeling and risk mitigation as it relates to changes in climate and the impact on human health.
  • Tools and recommendations are available to support provinces, territories and local municipalities in the development and provision of social and public health care services in response to infectious disease events.
  • Provinces, territories and local governments, including public health authorities, will be provided with the research, evidence base and risk analysis to develop and implement prevention and mitigation strategies at the local and provincial level.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 2,487,895 $7,000,000


International Actions Program 1a - International Obligations (Environment Canada Component)


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 4.2 Relations with other governments and partners are managed in support of environmental priorities

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Funding to selected international organizations that play a key role in enhancing the analysis and assessment of options related to the development of a future climate change agreement. This contributes to constructive and active participation in the international climate change discussions through the enhancement of understanding around the main issues comprising a post-2012 climate change agreement currently being negotiated under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Payment of financial obligations to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) is made.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Payment of membership dues and active participation in international technology partnerships outside the UN will strengthen Canada's credibility and influence discussions on a future climate change agreement. The latter should also help create opportunities for Canadian businesses.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 623,000 $2,892,000


International Actions Program 1b - International Obligations (Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada Component)


Department Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
Departmental Program Activity 1.3 Global Issues

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) will ensure that all funding obligations to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) will be met. Additional voluntary contributions will be made as appropriate to the UNFCCC, in support of Canada's strategic interests with regard to the negotiations.

Where suitable, DFAIT will also provide funding to international organizations in order to advance Canada's interests and strategic objectives, as well as to enhance understanding of the key policy options for a post-2012 agreement. DFAIT will provide strategic direction, intelligence and advice, and work interdepartmentally to develop preliminary, intermediate, and final negotiating positions. DFAIT will also continue to support strategic bilateral engagement with other countries through its network of Missions abroad, and will promote the integration of climate change issues into foreign policy through the G8, Arctic Council, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, International Energy Agency, and other multilateral fora.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Canada , in continuing to meet its funding obligations for the UN Climate Change Secretariat, will contribute to its international reputation and the overall functioning of this organization, enabling the Secretariat to continue to organize future meetings.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 477,000 $1,908,000


International Actions Program 2a - International Participation and Negotiations (Environment Canada Component)


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 4.2.3 Long term global climate change regime

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Continued advancement of Canada's strategic interests related to climate change in multilateral and bilateral fora by working closely with other government departments to develop policy, provide strategic advice, and elaborate positions consistent with the objectives of the Government of Canada on a range of issues relating to the negotiation of a post-2012 agreement under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Continued advancement of Canada's national interests and objectives related to climate change, by attending and actively participating in the UNFCCC negotiations and key international processes that complement these negotiations, including the G8, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, and the US-led Major Emitters Initiative to advocate Canadian positions and views. Canada's participation in these international processes is consistent with Canada's domestic climate change policy and promotes national economic and environmental interests.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Given the interdisciplinary and collaborative approach among departments on this component, some expected outcomes of this work are shared across departments. These shared expected outcomes are:

  1. Effective coordination of issues, matters and policy perspectives related to international climate change across relevant departments. Ministers are kept apprised of relevant issues affecting their portfolios. Analytically-sound options for Canadian negotiating positions are developed, analyzed and broadly coordinated through the interdepartmental process.
  2. Outcomes of international negotiations and initiatives are consistent with Canada's interests and priorities as agreed to inter-departmentally and/or through Cabinet directives. Canadian interests are protected and advanced in both existing and new agreements, and through participation in key bilateral and multilateral partnerships.

Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 2,800,000 $11,400,000


International Actions Program 2b - International Participation and Negotiations (Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada Component)


Department Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
Departmental Program Activity 1.3 Global Issues

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

  • Research and policy analysis to enable the advancement of Canada's interests and objectives in international forums. In particular, the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) will lead the development of key analytical work on the development of international adaptation policy.
  • Provision of advice and information to Canada's network of Embassies and other Missions abroad in order to enable them to advocate Canadian positions on climate change issues, and gather information pertinent to the negotiations.
  • Participation in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Least Developed Countries Expert Group (LEG) through the provision of expert advice for Least Developed Countries on the preparation and implementation of National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs).
  • Active participation in United Nations (UN) and non-UN negotiations and discussions (e.g., G8 processes, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, and the US-led Major Emitters Initiative) leading to the establishment of a post-2012 climate change agreement. Canada's participation will contribute to ensuring that the future agreement on climate change is consistent with our domestic approach on climate change and protects Canadian environmental and economic interests.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Given the interdisciplinary and collaborative approach among departments on this component, some expected outcomes of this work are shared across departments. These shared expected outcomes are:

  1. Effective coordination of issues, matters and policy perspectives related to international climate change across relevant departments. Ministers are kept apprised of relevant issues affecting their portfolios. Analytically-sound options for Canadian negotiating positions are developed, analyzed and broadly coordinated through the interdepartmental process.
  2. Outcomes of international negotiations and initiatives are consistent with Canada's interests and priorities as agreed to inter-departmentally and/or through Cabinet directives. Canadian interests are protected and advanced in both existing and new agreements, and through participation in key bilateral and multilateral partnerships.

Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 1,550,000 $ 6,400,000


International Actions Program 2c - International Participation and Negotiations (Natural Resources Canada Component)


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

  • Research, analysis and advice in support of policy development, decision making and negotiations in the lead-up to and during Conference of Parties (COP) 15 in Copenhagen in December 2009.
  • Expert advice and leadership on key issues related to NRCan's mandate, including energy, technology, forestry and adaptation in support of Canada's negotiations fora global post-2012 climate change agreement.
  • Research, analysis and re-advancement of Canadian natural resource interests in a range of strategic climate change-related international meetings (e.g., the G8, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, and the US-led Major Emitters Initiative), and
  • Continued contribution of expertise to the Expert Group on Technology Transfer, established under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), with the purpose of analyzing and identifying ways to facilitate and advance technology development and transfer activities.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The expected outcomes of NRCan's international climate change policy development and continued engagement in international climate change negotiations, both inside and outside the UNFCCC include:

  1. Aligning of Canada's international climate change policies and negotiating positions with Canada's domestic energy and other natural resource interests (i.e. as a major natural resources exporter), as well as alignment with Canada's domestic climate change and clean air policies.
  2. Highlighting Canadian technologies and activities through international climate change venues that can assist in addressing the global nature of climate change while promoting Canadian technology exports internationally.
  3. Providing timely strategic policy advice to the Minister of NRCan, Deputy Minister and senior management on global climate change developments, and the links with energy policy and other natural resource issues.
  4. Preparing NRCan's Minister, Deputy-Minister and other senior officials for representing the Department and Canada in a range of strategically selected bilateral and multilateral meetings across a range of fora.

Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 1,300,000 $ 5,200,000


International Actions Program 3a - Asia-Pacific Partnership (Environment Canada Component)


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 4.2.3 Long-term global climate change regime

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010


  • Alignment of participation in the Asia-Pacific Partnership (APP) with Canada's international and domestic objectives for climate change, clean air, and clean technology partnerships.
  • Development of a stakeholder outreach strategy to attract the participation of Canadian industry in the public-private partnership initiative.
  • Work with Industry Canada, Natural Resources Canada, International Trade and relevant industry sectors to develop a process to both evaluate and fund projects that promote the development, diffusion and deployment of clean technologies.
  • Environment Canada seeks to influence the scope and direction of the APP through participation in the APP's Policy Implementation Committee (PIC), Ministerial Summits and sectoral Task Force meetings.
  • Environment Canada works with departmental partners, including Industry Canada, Natural Resources Canada and International Trade to coordinate technical and policy work related to Canada's participation in the APP's Task Forces.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

In the first year, Canada was to be in a design phase where APP activities focussed on: 1) obtaining membership; 2) consulting with key domestic industrial sectors, and; 3) developing Canada's governance structure and operational guidelines through the establishment of an APP Secretariat.

Now that Canada's membership has been confirmed, the focus has shifted from program design to implementation. Domestic activities are to shift from promotion and consultation to project selection. Internationally, Canada is to seek to influence the scope and direction of the Partnership to ensure alignment with Canada's interests, while leveraging enhanced bilateral relations to shape the role of key large emitting countries in a future climate change agreement.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 5,738,166
$18,882,700


International Actions Program 3b - Asia-Pacific Partnership (Natural Resources Canada component)


Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

  • Continue to align its participation in the APP with Canada's international objectives for clean technology partnerships.
  • Ensure that the private sector is informed, and able to participate in new and existing APP projects, exposing it to new international markets and opportunities for technology transfer, including, clean, renewable, and energy efficient technologies. Also explore the opportunities in sharing expertise in the sustainable development of natural resources, such as mining.
  • Participate in the APP's Policy Implementation Committee and Task Force meetings to influence the direction of the Partnership to align with Canadian objectives and interests.
  • Strengthen existing, and develop new, bilateral and multilateral relationships within the APP, to promote collaboration in other arenas, such as the G8 and the UNFCCC, to respond to the global climate change challenge.
  • Continue to contribute to interdepartmental technical and policy work related to Canada's participation in the Partnership's task forces.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

In the first year, Canada was to be in an design phase where APP activities would focused on: 1) obtaining membership; 2) consulting with key domestic industrial sectors, and; 3) developing Canada's governance structure and operational guidelines through the establishment of an APP Secretariat.
Now that Canada's membership has been confirmed, the focus has shifted from program design to implementation. Domestic activities will shift from promotion and consultation to project selection. Internationally, Canada will seek to influence the scope and direction of the Partnership to ensure alignment with Canada's interests, while leveraging enhanced bilateral relations to shape the role of key large emitting countries in a future climate change agreement.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 211,800 $ 877,300


International Actions Program 3c - Asia-Pacific Partnership (Industry Canada component)


Department Industry Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010


  • Alignment of participation in the Asia-Pacific Partnership (APP) with Canada's international objectives for clean technology partnerships.
  • Contribution to interdepartmental technical and policy work related to Canada's participation in the APP's task forces.
  • Private sector entities are informed and able to participate in new and existing APP projects, exposing them to new international markets and opportunities for technology transfer, including, clean, renewable, and energy efficient technologies.
  • Participation in the APP's Policy Implementation Committee (PIC) and Task Force meetings to influence the direction of the APP to align with Canadian objectives and interests.
  • Industry Canada contributes to strengthen existing, and develop new, bilateral and multilateral relationships within the APP, to promote collaboration to respond to the global climate change challenge.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

In the first year, Canada was to be in a design phase where APP activities would focused on: 1) obtaining membership; 2) consulting with key domestic industrial sectors, and; 3) developing Canada's governance structure and operational guidelines through the establishment of an APP Secretariat.

Now that Canada's membership has been confirmed, the focus has shifted from program design to implementation. Domestic activities are to shift from promotion and consultation to project selection. Internationally, Canada will seek to influence the scope and direction of the Partnership to ensure alignment with Canada's interests, while leveraging enhanced bilateral relations to shape the role of key large emitting countries in a future climate change agreement.

Industry Canada's involvement in the APP is to result in enhanced participation and liaison with key Canadian sectors and key sectors internationally.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 50,000
$ 240,000


International Actions Program 4 - PM Annex


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

Activities to be undertaken for the development of a Particulate Matter Annex to the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement will include :

  • Analysis and development of negotiating positions reflecting Canada's interests, coordination of and participation in negotiating sessions.
  • Continued consultation with stakeholders (i.e. Other Government Departments, Provinces); both in preparation for and as follow-up on 2009 negotiating sessions.
  • Coordination of and participation in inter-sessional work.
  • Management of technical information sharing on U.S. air-related initiatives and analysis of U.S. developments and positions and their implications for Canada.
  • Work with the U.S. and legal services to draft possible elements of PM Annex.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The negotiations of a PM Annex will result over the longer-term (i.e. by 2011) in:

  • an enhanced relationship between Canada and the U.S. on a key environmental issue for both countries - clean air as evidenced by their continued interest in pursuing air quality initiatives of common interest;
  • reduced transboundary flow of PM and its precursors based largely on the caps and timelines established by the Clean Air Interstate Rule in the U.S. and by the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda in Canada.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 550,000 $ 2,200,000


Partnerships Program 1 - Clean Air Community Partnerships


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

This type of activity is important. Exploring complementary and alternative initiatives, both within and outside Environment Canada, to fulfill this role are also being considered as a more cost-effective approach. While there would potentially be an overall reduction in investment in the specific agreements meant to be funded by this program, similar programs will be maintained to ensure a continuing federal presence to support community funding focussed on energy efficiency and reduced air pollution. The department will continue to reinvest in a variety of alternative program activities aimed at achieving desired results.

In 2009-10, the Clean Air Community Partnerships Program will be launched. A call for proposals will be issued for national, regional, or local projects that encourage Canadians to adopt more sustainable behaviours at home, at school, and in the workplace. Projects will focus on home and outdoor energy efficiency, school-based sustainability and greening the workplace.

Program infrastructure will be developed:

  • A Proposal Review Committee will be established and proposal evaluation and ranking tools will be developed and used to assess project proposals.
  • An Inter-departmental Advisory Committee will be established to select projects that enable Canadians to make decisions and take action to enhance environmental quality.
  • A project tracking database and a Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) including an evaluation plan, indicators, and performance measures will be developed to effectively manage and deliver the program in line with departmental priorities.

Funding for community initiatives that reduce emissions will leverage support from the private sector and other orders of government. A minimum of 50% of the total project value will be leveraged from non-federal sources (includes in-kind contributions, and the total cost of any incentives or rebates provided through the initiative).

Strategic investments will be made in projects that enable communities and individuals to reduce emissions that contribute to climate change and air pollution. Funded projects include incentives (such as rebates and discounts) that encourage Canadians to make purchases to protect the environment and reduce emissions at home, at school, and in the workplace.

Projects funded through CACP will lead Canadians to take positive environmental actions in the areas of:

  • Home and outdoor energy efficiency - Encourage energy and water efficiency, waste reduction, and the replacement or purchase of more energy-efficient products or technologies including: energy-efficient home appliances, lighting, lawn mowers, and the purchase of energy from renewable sources.
  • School-based sustainability - Improve the energy efficiency of a school's operations and facility management by engaging custodians, principals, teachers, students and parents. Includes an educational component engaging teachers and students to learn about energy efficiency, water efficiency and waste reduction.
  • Greening the workplace - Inspire employees to adopt environmentally-friendly behaviours at work and to encourage business owners and managers to implement measures to reduce energy consumption and associated emissions in their daily operations.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Short-term results include

  • Incentives are provided to encourage Canadians to adopt more sustainable behaviours at home, at school, at the workplace.
  • Funding from EC to partners leverages projects and initiatives that provide incentives for Canadians to take action on Clean Air and Climate.
  • Communities and individuals are better able to manage and take a lead on reducing emissions that contribute to climate change and air pollution.
  • Community Funding Programs are managed effectively to deliver on departmental priorities.

Longer-term expected results include

  • Canadians make decisions and take action to enhance environmental quality
  • Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production behaviours
  • The ultimate outcomes of the CACP will be that greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution is reduced.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 3,000,000
$ 12,000,000


Management and Accountability Program 1 - Management and Accountability


Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2009-2010

In support of improved accountability to parliamentarians and Canadians; active engagement of partner departments and agencies; effective and timely collection of performance information; and coherent CAA program architecture:

  • Regular reporting on finances and results for all CAA programs through existing reporting mechanisms (HRPP, HPR, CPR)

In support of clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for implementing, managing and reporting on CAA activities; an appropriate balance of departmental and horizontal CAA accountabilities; effective decision-making regarding CAA activities; and effective alignment of resources to CAA priorities:

  • Provide support to the CAA-HMARF governance committees to ensure the active engagement of all participating departments and agencies:

  • Develop CAA governance materials (i.e. management and accountability information and analysis to inform senior management (ADMs/DMs) of progress made by the participating departments and agencies.
  • Develop an integrated report that includes financial and performance information, including risks in support of governance decisions such as reallocation or re-profiling of CAA funds, realignment of programs; and impacts from possible evaluations, in line with the government's expenditure management cycle.
  • Support Environment Canada's Evaluation unit with respect to Theme-level evaluations and evaluation of the framework.
  • Respond to evaluations that may be done from time to time and share information with program managers.
  • In support of improved accountability to Parliamentarians and Canadians; clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for implementing, managing and reporting on CAA activities; appropriate balance of departmental and horizontal CAA accountabilities; and effective and timely collection of performance information.

  • Implement the Auditor General's principles for rating performance reports in support of the CAA performance story at the program, theme and agenda level, by: linking expected achievements with CAA immediate outcomes and long term results at the Theme and Agenda level.

  • Identifying and assessing high-level risks related to not achieving the CAA's outcomes.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The Government has committed to achieving tangible improvements in Canada's environment, including reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It has also committed to implement a more strategic approach to expenditure management in horizontal priority areas. The HMARF will help address the need to improve governance and accountability in the management of horizontal initiatives that involve a number of departments.

The objectives of the Clean Air Agenda are to improve the health of Canadians and increase environmental benefits by reducing air pollution and GHG emissions. This will be delivered through two main initiatives:

  • The Clean Air Regulatory Agenda, which is intended to provide effective regulation of air pollution and GHG from transportation, key industrial sectors and consumer products; and
  • Program Measures in Support of the Government's Clean Air Agenda, which are intended to provide for a balanced approach to reducing emissions of air pollutants and GHGs to protect the health and environment of Canadians. They will encompass actions in all key areas that cannot be covered by regulation.

Together, these initiatives provide an integrated, nationally consistent approach for areas that can be regulated and addresses important sources of emissions that cannot be effectively regulated. The program measures can also contribute to emission reductions while regulations are being developed. Each of the main initiatives will be delivered through theme areas composed of specific programs.


Program's planned spending in 2009-2010 Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period
$ 1,250,000 $ 5,000,000

Top of Page

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Over the next three years, FINTRAC will be involved in the following horizontal initiatives as a partner:
  • Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing (AML/ATF) regime (partner)
  • Public Security and Anti-Terrorism (PSAT) Initiative (partner)
  • National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS) (partner)

For further information on the above-mentioned horizontal initiatives, please see: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp

Top of Page

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Horizontal initiatives are programs or initiatives in which partners from two or more organizations have agreed under a formal funding agreement to work toward the achievement of shared outcomes.

DFO is the lead on one horizontal initiative, Health of the Oceans, which was allocated $61.4 million in federal funds over a five-year period. This initiative is discussed in detail in DFO's Report on Plans and Priorities.

 

Table: Horizontal Initiatives

Health of the Oceans (HOTO)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Health of the Oceans (HOTO)

Name of lead department(s): Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Lead department program activity: Oceans Management

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2007

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $61.5 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

This initiative provides funds, as part of the National Water Strategy, over a five year period to support 22 initiatives across five departments and agencies. The goal of the initiative is to achieve progress on the health of the oceans through establishing new marine protected areas, increasing the capacity of government to enforce pollution prevention rules and to respond to environmental emergencies; and through strengthening collaborative oceans arrangements with our partners in the Arctic and in the Gulf of Maine.

Shared outcome(s):

The initiative is targeted to achieve three shared outcomes, as defined by the RMAF, namely:

  • Marine Protected Areas establishment;
  • Pollution Control; and
  • Collaborative Oceans Management.

Governance structure(s):

This initiative is subject to interdepartmental government through the Assistant Deputy Ministers Interdepartmental Committee on Oceans, supported by a shadow Director General Committee. This Governance structure reviews the initiatives on a regular basis including review and approval of annual reports to Ministers on the progress of this initiative.


($ thousands)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Fisheries and Oceans Oceans Management Federal Marine Protected Areas Strategy Implementation in DFO 1,250.0 250.0 Advance the creation by 2012 of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada's oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management frame-work.
Development of a Federal-Provincial-Territorial MPA Network 2,500.0 725.0 Significant progress in planning and advancement of a National (federal-provincial-territorial) Marine Protected Area Network in Canada's three oceans.
Arctic Council - Ecosystem Projects 1,000.0 275.0 A State of the Arctic Basin Report and use of common eco-system monitoring strategies in shared and boundary waters by 2012;

Canada's participation in expert workshops and major conferences on ecosystem approach for advancing EBM concepts and approaches, promoting Canada's leadership in EBM applied to the Arctic, and sharing information and practices with other circumpolar countries, including US;

Article on EBM in Canada's Arctic published in expert journals or workshop proceedings;

A suite of indicators for monitoring and assessing ecosystem status and trends, socio-economic aspects and governance structures in place in Arctic; and;

The Arctic Council's Report on Best Practices in Ecosystem-based Oceans management in the Arctic (key product of the 2009 Ministerial Meeting)
Oceans Centres of Expertise (Coastal, Corals, Data Integration, TEK) 3,000.0 700.0 Establishment of four centres of excellence. Development and implementation of common tools and approaches in the five LOMAs to protect deep sea corals and sponge reefs, incorporate traditional knowledge, develop information management and exchange standards and accelerate progress in addressing coastal management issues.
Collaboration with World Wildlife Fund (WWF) 213.0 42.6 Greater contribution by environmental non-governmental organizations to the Health of the Oceans
Gulf of Maine (at DFO) 750.0 147.5 This initiative builds on the existing successful trans-boundary collaboration and management of Groundfish stocks through the CA-US Steering Committee, and the excellent cooperation between states and provinces through the Gulf of Maine Council. Based on DFO's national stan-dard, a literature review and project work plan for a joint CA-US Bay of Fundy/Gulf of Maine Ecosystem Overview and Assessment Report was developed as part of the 2005 Oceans Action Plan.
Marine Protected Areas Establishment 5,250.0 1,500.0 Six new MPAs will be designated by 2012 and a national monitoring and reporting sys-tem will be implemented for all Oceans Act MPAs.
Habitat Management Integrated Management and Canadian Environmental Assessment Act Assessment Tools Linkages 1,450.0 425.0 Processes and tools developed to support integrated oceans management and promote Health of the Oceans bridged with Canadian Environmental Assessment Act project-specific environmental assessment and strategic environmental assessment to address ecosystem-level cumulative impacts.
Science for Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems Ecosystem Science Support and Advice on Health of the Oceans 5,500.0 1,100.0 Science advice on Marine Protected Areas and on priority sector-specific impacts and mitigation.
Canadian Coast Guard Spill Capacity and Emergency Response Strategy 2,260.0 750.0 Canada's spill response capacity in the Arctic assessed, and equipment and systems to respond to the unique risks prepared.
Environment Canada Biodiversity and Corporate services Federal Marine Protected Areas Strategy - Implementation in EC 1,250.0 250.0 Advance the creation by 2012 of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada's oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management framework.
Marine Wildlife Areas Establishment 2,000.0 507.0 Both the National Wildlife Area at Sable Island and Marine Wildlife Area at Scott Islands will be ready for designation by 2012, and a contribution will have been made to the Federal Marine Protected Area Network building process.
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision making and Corporate services Sable Island Weather Station 4,000.0 800.0 The risk of loss of life or property due to weather events is reduced for mariners, Canadian citizens and the international community, by producing more accurate weather forecasts and warnings using data from the Sable Island Weather Station.

The understanding of upper atmospheric conditions and the flow of airborne pollutants and greenhouse gases is improved, by enabling scientific research through the continued existence of the Sable Island weather Station infra-structure.

The unique and fragile eco-system of Sable Island is conserved by protecting it from human degradation.
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes and Corporate services Gulf of Maine (at EC) 751.0 148.0 Increased support for the Gulf of Maine Council and implementation of the joint Canada-US five-year action plan that includes implementation of regional strategies for adaptation to climate change, indicators development, education and engagement and joint monitoring for toxic contaminants in the trans-boundary ecosystem.
Parks Canada Agency Heritage Places Establishment Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy Implementation in Parks Canada 1,250.0 361.0 Advance the creation by 2012 of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada's oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management frame-work.
National Marine Conservation Area in Lancaster Sound 5,000.0 1,250.0 By 2012, achieve a full understanding of the feasibility of establishing a National Marine Conservation Area in Lancaster Sound with the support of Inuit, Nunavut and key sectoral stakeholders, leading to the conservation of a significant representative component of Canada's marine environment and a clear demonstration of Arctic sovereignty in the Northwest Passage.
Transport Canada Transportation Safety and Security and Internal Services Enforcement of Ballast Water Regulations 4,500.0 966.5 Enforcement of regulations that minimize the risk of harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens from being introduced through ship ballast water to waters under Canadian jurisdiction.
Pollution Prevention - Surveillance 13,000.0 3,181.6 Enforcement of Canada's pollution prevention regulations in the Pacific, Arctic, East Coast Waters, the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the St. Lawrence Estuary.
Pollution Prevention - Dash 7 Outfitting 5,000.0 100.0 Enforcement of Canada's pollution prevention regulations in the Pacific, Arctic, East Coast Waters, the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the St. Lawrence Estuary. Modernization of the current Dash 7 surveillance aircraft to a standard equal to the Dash 8 surveillance aircraft dedicated for use on the East and West Coast.
Arctic International Marine Shipping Assessment 550.0 50.0 An assessment of projected shipping activities and the associated environmental, social and economic impacts and risks as reduced sea ice may lead to increased marine transport in the Arctic
Pollution Prevention - Ship Waste Reduction Strategy 800.0 200.0 Adequate reception facilities for wastes; appropriate legislation and standards
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Northern land Resources Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment/Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment from land-based sources of pollution 175.0 0.0 An expanded arctic regional program of action on land-based sources of pollution; a greater understanding of Aboriginal Arctic marine resource use; and a greater understanding of the social, economic and environmental impacts from changing shipping patterns on northern and aboriginal communities
Total 61,449.0 12,480.5  

Contact information:

W. Moore

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

 

DFO is a partner on the following horizontal initiatives led by other government departments:


Program Lead Department DFO Partner Start Date End Date of the Horizontal Initiative
Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products Health Canada Yes 2002-03 2008-09
Canadian Biotechnology Strategy Industry Canada Yes 1998 2010-11
Invasive Alien Species Partnership Program Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, DFO, Natural Resources Canada, and EC all lead the Aquatic Invasive Species Partnership Program, but the program is administered by EC. Yes 2005 2009-10
International Polar Year Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Yes April 1, 2007 March 31, 2012
National Aquatic Animal Health Program Canadian Food Inspection Agency Yes 2005 Ongoing
Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) and induced oil and gas exploration and development in the NWT Indian and Northern Affairs Yes Budget 2004, Budget 2005, 2004-05 2008-09
Implementation of the Act respecting the protection of wildlife species at risk in Canada Environment Canada Yes 2000 Ongoing
20% Paper Burden Reduction Initiative Industry Canada Yes March 19, 2007 November 2008
Canadian Group on Earth Observations (CGEO) Environment Canada Yes July 2003 Ongoing; No new funds — annual multi-departmental contributions
Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative Environment Canada Yes April 1, 2005 March 31, 2010

Top of Page

Health Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)

Name of lead department: Health Canada (HC)

Lead department program activity:

Substance use and abuse

Start date: April 1, 2007

End date: March 31, 2011

Total federal funding allocation: $368.5 million

Description of the horizontal initiative: The FTCS establishes a framework for a comprehensive, fully-integrated, and multi-faceted approach to tobacco control. It is driven by the longstanding commitment of the Government of Canada to reduce the serious and adverse health effects of tobacco for Canadians. It focuses on four mutually reinforcing components: prevention, cessation, protection, and product regulation.

Shared outcomes: The long-term outcome of the FTCS is to reduce tobacco-related disease and death in Canada.

To pursue this long-term outcome, the FTCS will contribute the following tobacco control goal and objectives for April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2011.

Goal: Reduce overall smoking prevalence from 19% (2005) to 12% by 2011.

Objectives:

  • Reduce the prevalence of Canadian youth (15 to17) who smoke from 15% to 9%;
  • Increase the number of adult Canadians who quit smoking by 1.5 million;
  • Reduce the prevalence of Canadians exposed daily to second-hand smoke from 28% to 20%;
  • Examine the next generation of tobacco policy control in Canada;
  • Contribute to the global implementation of the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control; and
  • Monitor and assess contraband tobacco activities and enhance compliance.

Governance structures: Resources for the implementation of the FTCS were allocated to a number of departments and agencies. HC is the lead department in the FTCS and is responsible for regulating the manufacture, sale, labelling, and promotion of tobacco products as well as developing, implementing and promoting initiatives that reduce or prevent the negative health impacts associated with smoking.

The partner departments and agencies are:

  • Public Safety Canada (PSC): administers contribution funding for monitoring activities in connection with determining levels of contraband tobacco activity. PS also provides policy advice and support on smuggling issues and leads Canada's delegation that is negotiating an international protocol on illicit trade in tobacco products
  • Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP): responsible for monitoring federal fines imposed in relation to tobacco and other types of offences, and for enforcing and recovering outstanding fines
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP): responsible for the enforcement of laws in relation to the international movement of tobacco products (including the illicit manufacture, distribution or possession of contraband tobacco products)
  • Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) (formerly the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency): responsible for ensuring the assessment and collection of tobacco taxes and monitoring tobacco exports.
  • Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) (previously part of the former Canada Customs and Revenue Agency): responsible for monitoring and assessing of the contraband tobacco market in Canada and internationally, as well as improving the administration of assessment and collection of new tobacco taxes on imported tobacco.

Federal Partners: Federal Partner Program Activity (PA): Names of Programs for Federal Partners: Total Allocation (from Start to End Date):
(Million)
Planned Spending for 2009–10:
(Million)
Expected Results for 2009–10:
HC Substance use and abuse FTCS 287.34 57.46 The FTCS has set a 4-year goal to: Reduce overall smoking prevalence from 19% (2005) to 12% by 2011 . All activities are expected to contribute towards achieving this result.
PSC N/A FTCS 3.05 0.61 Expected results for 2009-10 will be reported through PSC's departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.
RCMP N/A FTCS 8.62 1.72 Expected results for 2009-10 will be reported through the RCMP's departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.
ODPP N/A FTCS 12.22 2.44 Expected results for 2009-10 will be reported through the ODPP's Report on Plans and Priorities.
CRA N/A FTCS 4.44 0.89 Expected results for 2009-10 will be reported through the CRA's departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.
CBSA N/A FTCS 52.8 10.56 Expected results for 2009-10 will be reported through the CBSA's departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.
Total     368.47 73.68  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners: Health Canada works with a variety of partners (e.g. Provinces, Territories, NGOs) to achieve results in reductions in tobacco control.

Contact information :

Cathy A. Sabiston
Director General, Tobacco Control Program
Health Canada
613-941-1977

Chemicals Management Plan

Name of lead departments: Health Canada

Lead department program activity:

Sustainable Environmental Health

Start date: 2007-2008

End date: 2010-2011

Total federal funding allocation: $299.4 million

Description of the horizontal initiative: The Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) is part of the Government's comprehensive environmental agenda and is managed jointly by Health Canada (HC) and Environment Canada (EC). The activities identified in this plan build on Canada's position as a global leader in the safe management of chemical substances and products, and focus upon timely action on key threats to health and the environment.

The CMP will also generate a higher level of responsibility for industry through realistic and enforceable measures, stimulate innovation, and augment Canadian competitiveness in an international market that is increasingly focussed on chemical and product safety.

HC and EC will manage the CMP funding collectively and ensure that it is aligned with human health and environmental priorities.

Shared outcomes: High-level outcomes for managing the CMP include:

  • Ensuring Canadians and their environment are protected from the harmful effects of chemicals;
  • Identification, reduction, elimination, prevention or better management of chemicals substances and their use;
  • Direction, collaboration and coordination of science and management activities;
  • Understanding of the relative risks of chemicals substances and options to mitigate;
  • Biomonitoring and environmental monitoring of substances;

Risk assessment and risk management; and informed stakeholders and the Canadian public.

Governance structures: HC shares responsibility with EC in the attainment of objectives and results, in the overall delivery of the CMP. The two departments are individually accountable along their vertical authorities for leading programs, but share collective responsibility for achieving the expected CMP results.

The CMP consists of five inter-related program elements: Risk Assessment, Risk Management, Research, Monitoring and Surveillance, and Policy and Program Management, which are delivered and evaluated within the CMP integrated horizontal governance framework.

Under this framework, the Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (ADM Committee) and the Chemical Management Executive Committee (CMEC) provide strategic direction, oversight, coordination and challenge function for the overall CMP implementation and review of results on CMP-related activities.

Various committees and working groups share information, support integrated program delivery of the key functions of the CMP, and provide advice and information to the CMEC and ADM Committees. Two Advisory Bodies - the Stakeholder Advisory Council and the Challenge Advisory Panel - provide additional input and advice for CMP implementation.

The horizontal governance mechanisms are supported by the Integrated Program Management Office (IPMO) of Health Canada as well as ESB Branch Coordination (Environment Canada). The IPMO provides secretariat support to the operation of governance committee meetings and ensures the implementation of supportive management procedures to facilitate executive oversight, monitoring and analysis of results.

A series of agreed-upon procedures will permit departments to collectively address key issues such as the allocation and re-allocation or reprofiling of resources, data collection on performance and coherence in the reporting of results.


Federal Partners: Federal Partner Program Activity (PA): Names of Programs for Federal Partners: Total Allocation (from Start to End Date):
(Million)
Planned Spending for 2009-10:
(Million)
Expected Results for 2009–10 :
HC Sustainable Environmental Health
Chemical Management (PAA Sub-Activity)
Risk Assessment 10.0 2.5 Increase level of Canadian public awareness of chemical management issues and actions being taken, including risks related to food chemical contamination, pesticides and consumer products.
Risk assessments are conducted and risk management objectives are met for regulations and other control instruments for substances and the products of biotechnology, including risks related to food chemical contamination, pesticides and consumer products.
Declining trends in levels of risk, adverse reactions, illnesses and injuries from toxic chemical substances in the environment and their use and/or the risk of exposure to Canadians, including the use of pesticides, consumer products and items regulated under the Food and Drugs Act.
Enhanced knowledge of chemical contaminants of environmental origin and their impacts on human health with targeted risk assessment and regulatory decisions to reduce Canadians' exposure to these substances, including risks related to food chemical contamination, pesticides and consumer products.
Risk Management 50.1 14.0
Research 26.6 10.9
Monitoring & Surveillance 34 11.5
Program Management 5.4 1.4
Consumer Products Risk Management 12.6 3.4
Pesticide Regulation Risk Assessment 9.9 3.1
Risk Management 13.6 4.2
Health Products Risk Assessment 3.3 0.8
Risk Management 12.5 4.3
Research 2.5 0.5
Monitoring & Surveillance 1.2 0.3
Program Management 0 0.1
Food and Nutrition Risk Assessment 3.8 1.2
Risk Management 6.2 1.9
Research 1.2 0.3
EC Chemicals Management (3.1) Risk Assessment 13.1 3.1 Risks to Canadians and impacts on their environment posed by toxic and other substances of concern are reduced.
  • Direction, collaboration and coordination of science and management activities
  • Increased knowledge of the risks of toxic chemical substances through research and options to mitigate
  • Risk assessments conducted in a timely fashion as required
  • Risk management objectives are met, e.g. effective controls identified and implemented
  • Enhanced knowledge of stakeholders and the Canadian public regarding risk assessment/management activities, including knowledge on the effectiveness of control actions
Research /Science 2.1 0
Monitoring & Surveillance 26.4 7.3
Risk Management 64.9 19.3
Sub-Total (Environment Canada) 106.5 29.7  
Sub-Total (Health Canada) 192.9 60.4  
Total 299.4 90.1  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Suzanne Leppinen
Director, Safe Environments Directorate
Health Canada
613-941-8071

Early Childhood Development and Early Learning and Child Care

Name of lead department: Health Canada (HC)

Lead department program activity:

First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

Start date: ECD - October 2002.

ELCC - December 2004

End date : ECD Strategy - ongoing

ELCC Single Window - ongoing

Total federal funding: $365 million 2002-03 to 2006-07; Ongoing: $79 million/year ongoing.

ECD: $320 million 2002-03 to 2006-07 ($60 million in 2002-03 and $65 million thereafter). Ongoing: $65 million per year ongoing.

ELCC: $45 million 2005-06 to 2007-08 ($14.5 million in 2005-06; $15.3 million in 2006-07; $15.2 million in 2007-08). Ongoing: $14 million/year ongoing.

Description of the horizontal initiative: The ECD Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children was announced on October 31, 2002. The strategy provides $320 million over five years to: improve and expand existing ECD programs and services for Aboriginal children; expand ECD capacity and networks; introduce new research initiatives to improve understanding of how Aboriginal children are doing; and work towards the development of a "single window" approach to ensure better integration and coordination of federal Aboriginal ECD programming.

In December 2004, as first phase of a "single window", Cabinet approved an additional $45 million over three years ($14 million ongoing) to improve integration and coordination of two ECD programs-Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve and the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative-beginning in 2005-06.

The objectives of these funds are to increase access to and improve the quality of ELCC programming for First Nations children on reserve, and improve integration and coordination between the two programs through joint planning, joint training and co-location.

Joint planning will also include INAC-funded child/day care programs in Alberta and Ontario.

Shared outcomes: The federal ECD Strategy complements the September 2000 First Ministers F/P/T ECD Agreement. It seeks to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children by improving the developmental opportunities to which Aboriginal children (and their families) are exposed at an early age (0-6 years).

The funding approved in December 2004 for ELCC for First Nations Children Living on Reserve and Working Towards the First Phase of a "Single Window" complements funding released to provinces and territories under the March 2003 Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Childcare (ELCC) to improve access to ELCC programs and services.

Governance structures: Interdepartmental ECD ADM Steering Committee and Interdepartmental ECD Working Group.


Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date):
($ millions)
Planned Spending for 2009–10
($ millions)
Expected Results for 2009–10
HC First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR) 107.60 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; 21.52/year) 21.52/year ongoing.
Committed in 2002.
21.52 Program support and enhancement
24.00 (2005-06 through to 2007-08,
7.50 in 2005-06,
8.30 in 2006-07;
8.20 in 2007-08).
7.50 in 2008-09 and ongoing
Committed in 2005
7.50 Increase integration, coordination, access, and quality
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component
(FASD-FNIC)
70.00 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
10.00 in 2002-03 and 15.00 thereafter). 15.00/ year ongoing.
Committed in 2002.
15.00 Complete the Mentoring Project Special Study to guide mentoring projects and to provide further training and support.
Support and evaluate FASD Community Coordinator pilot projects towards the development of an evidence-based project framework.
Develop strategies to incorporate findings on support for FN/I women with addictions
Capacity Building 5.08
2002-03 through to 2006-07; 1.02/year). 1.02/ year ongoing.
Committed in 2002
1.02 Increase capacity with National Aboriginal Organizations
Enhance capacity of community ECE practitioners
PHAC Child and Adolescent Health Promotion a. Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) 62.88 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
12.58/ year and ongoing.
Committed in 2002.
12.58 Enrolment in the AHSUNC program has increased by almost 10%. Program expansion and enhancement will address the increasing special needs requirements of children and provide staff with the tools to address these needs
Child and Adolescent Health Promotion Capacity Building 2.50 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; 0.50/year) and ongoing
Committed in 2002
0.50 Increased capacity
HRSDC Lifelong Learning– Health Human Resources (HHR) First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative (FNICCI) 45.70 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; 9.14/year) and ongoing
Committed in 2002
9,14 and on-going
Program expansion and enhancement

 

 

21.00 (2005-06 through to 2007-08; 7.00/year). 6.50/ year ongoing.
Committed in 2005
6,50 and on-going Increase program integration, coordination, access and quality
Lifelong Learning-HHR Research and Knowledge 21.20
(2002-03 through to 2006-07); 4.24/year and ongoing.
4,24 and on-going Assessment and implementation of the Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the Aboriginal component of "Understanding the Early Years" (EUY)
INAC The people- social development Family Capacity Initiatives 5.05 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; 1.01/year 2007-2008 and ongoing.
Committed in 2002
1.01 and on-going Partnerships with other government departments and First Nations to support increased coordination/integration of ECD programs and services
Total     ECD: 320.00
(60.00 in 2002-03 and 65.00/year through to 2006-07); 65.00/year ongoing

 

ECD: 65.00/year ongoing  
    ELCC: 45.00
(14.50 in 2005-06; 15.30 in 2006-07; 15.20 in 2007-08); and 14.00/year ongoing
ELCC: 14.00/year ongoing  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information :

Marcia Armstrong, Program Officer,
ECD Strategy Unit, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
613-946-4621

Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (Action Plan)

Name of lead department: The lead is shared between Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Health Canada (HC), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

Lead department program activity:

CIHR: Strategic Priority Research
CFIA: Food Safety
HC: Consumer Products, Pesticide Regulation, Health Products, and Food Safety
PHAC: Health Promotion, Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, and Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

Start date: Fiscal Year 2008-09

End date: 2012-13 and ongoing

Total federal funding allocation: $489.5 million over five years ending in Fiscal Year 2012/2013, and $126.7 million ongoing.

Description of the horizontal initiative : The federal government is responsible for promoting the health and safety of Canadians. A key part of this role is ensuring that the products used by Canadians are safe. Adverse consequences associated with unsafe products impact not only the Canadian public, but also the Canadian economy. The Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (Action Plan) is a horizontal initiative aimed at modernizing and strengthening Canada's safety system for food, health and consumer products. A number of recent high-profile incidents, such as lead and ingestible magnets in children's toys, foodborne diseases in fresh produce, and the global withdrawal of Vioxx, have underscored the need for government action.

The Action Plan will modernize Canada's regulatory system to enable it to better protect Canadians from unsafe consumer products in the face of current realities and future pressures. The Action Plan will bolster Canada's regulatory system by amending or replacing outdated health and safety legislation with new legislative regimes that respond to modern realities, and by enhancing safety programs in areas where modern legislative tools already exist. We will implement the Action Plan to ensure that Canadians have the information they need to assess the risks and benefits associated with the consumer and health products they choose to use, and to minimize risks associated with food safety.

The Action Plan is an integrated, risk-based plan and includes a series of initiatives that are premised on three key pillars: active prevention, targeted oversight and rapid response. We will focus on active prevention to avoid as many incidents as possible and work closely with industry to promote awareness, provide regulatory guidance, and help identify safety concerns at an early stage. Targeted oversight will provide for early detection of safety problems and further safety verification at the appropriate stage in a product's life cycle. To improve rapid response capabilities and ensure the government has the ability to act quickly and effectively when needed we will work to enhance health risk assessments, strengthen recall capacity, and increase the efficiency in responding and communicating clearly with consumers and stakeholders.

In addition to addressing the concerns outlined above, the Action Plan provides a platform for Canada to actively participate in the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP), in particular by supporting recent commitments to increase the safety of imported products within North America. It will also enable Canada to better align with US standards, which will have a positive impact on consumer confidence and the business climate.

Shared outcomes:

  • Increased knowledge of food risks and product safety (scientific and surveillance/monitoring)
  • Increased industry awareness and understanding of regulatory requirements
  • Increased industry compliance with safety standards
  • Increased consumer awareness and understanding of safety risks associated with health and consumer products and food
  • Strengthened oversight and response to safety incidents
  • Increased consumer confidence in health and consumer products and food
  • Increased trade-partner confidence in Canadian controls, which meet international standards
  • Increased availability of safe and effective products; and
  • Level playing field where imports can be demonstrated to meet Canadian requirements

Governance structures: The Minister of Health and the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada have joint responsibility and accountability for results, and for providing information on progress achieved by the Action Plan.

Health Canada's Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch (HECSB) and the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), along with the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), will work together to implement Action Plan activities related to consumer products.

Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) will take primary responsibility for implementing Action Plan activities related to health products with support from Health Canada's Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) on one initiative.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch and the Public Health Agency of Canada will work together to implement Action Plan activities related to food.

A Governance Framework has been established and endorsed by all of the partner departments/agencies. To facilitate horizontal coordination the following DG/ED level Task Forces have been established: Health Products Task Force, Consumer Products Task Force, Food Task Force, Communications Task Force, and the Legislative and Regulatory Task Force. The Task Forces report to a DG/ED level Coordinating Committee. An ADM/VP level Steering Committee provides direction to the Coordinating Committee. An Oversight Committee of Deputy Heads will facilitate the provision of high level guidance to the Steering Committee. A Secretariat will play an integral role in supporting the ongoing operation and decision-making of the governance committees.


Federal Partners: Federal Partner Program Activity (PA): Names of Programs for Federal Partners: Total Allocation (from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013): (Million $) Planned Spending for 2009–10 :
(Million$)
Expected Results for 2009–10:
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety Active Prevention 114.2 20.1 Better understanding of food safety risks
Increased collaboration with industry to implement effective risk mitigation measures
Strengthened standard setting and appropriate regulatory backstops
Further engagement with Canadians in food safety decision making
Targeted Oversight 77.1 13.2 Enhanced inspection of high risk sectors
Enhanced targeted import control measures
Rapid Response 32.2 6.0 Enhanced recall capacity
Further targeted consumer risk communication
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Strategic Priority Research Targeted Oversight 27.1 2.3 Increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions
Increased capacity in Canada to address priority research on post-market drug safety and effectiveness
Health Canada Consumer Products Active Prevention 41.0 3.6 Increase effective use of standards by industry and improved compliance with product safety obligations
Better informed consumers properly selecting and safely using products
Responsive and proactive, risk-based product safety regulatory framework
Targeted Oversight 15.7 2.7
Rapid Response 17.9 3.4
Pesticide Regulation Active Prevention 6.9 1.3
Rapid Response 8.0 1.0
Food and Nutrition Active Prevention 29.6 4.9 Increased awareness and understanding of food safety risks by consumers and health professionals
Increased awareness and understanding of regulatory requirements by industry
Rapid Response 1.3 0.2 Improved ability to respond when unsafe food is identified
Health Products Active Prevention 57.6 10.8 Increased awareness and understanding of health products safety risks by consumers and health professionals
Increased awareness and understanding of regulatory requirements by industry
Targeted Oversight 34.6 3.9 Improved information, data and knowledge sharing related to health products, and associated adverse health incidents
Improved monitoring of products and associated adverse health incidents
Rapid Response Existing Resources Existing Resources Improved ability to respond when unsafe health products are identified
Public Health Agency of Canada Health Promotion Targeted Oversight 4.5 0.6 More and better data on unintentional injuries, illnesses and deaths due to consumer products
Engagement of risk assessment stakeholders
Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Targeted Oversight 3.5 0.4
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Active Prevention 18.3 4.0 New information and data on enteric disease issues and the impact of interventions on public health
Total     489.5 78.4  

Top of Page

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Table 5 - Horizontal Initiatives

1. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Skills and Employment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 3, 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $290.0M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership program was initially an $85M initiative beginning in 2003 to 2009 and expanded in 2007 – 2012 with an additional $105M. Budget 2009 announced an additional $100M will be invested over three years in the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program. The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership is targeted at developing the skills of Canada's Aboriginal workforce, promoting maximum employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments across the country and providing lasting benefits for Aboriginal communities, families and individuals.

The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership program is an opportunity driven initiative that is implemented through formalized partnerships between the private sector and Aboriginal communities (and others such as the provincial governments and training institutions). The partnerships are responsible for jointly developing and managing comprehensive, multi-year skills development plans that will ensure long-term highly skilled sustainable employment as a result of the projects. The comprehensive Aboriginal training-to-employment plan covers a broad continuum ranging from basic skills, literacy and academic upgrading, through job-specific training and apprenticeships to retention counselling and other on-the-job supports. The plan must have a commitment from the employers to provide at least 50 long-term (sustainable) jobs for Aboriginal people. The partnership must also make a significant financial contribution to the training plan and must develop a governance model that will manage and oversee the project.

For more information, please visit: http://www8.hrsdc.gc.ca

Shared outcome(s):
Long term sustainable employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments.

Governance structure(s):

  • Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership is a national, centrally managed program. It promotes the maximum employment of Aboriginal people through a collaborative approach.
  • The implementation of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership projects requires the participation of Aboriginal organizations the private sector, provincial governments and others as appropriate and may involve collaboration with regional Service Canada officials.
  • Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership proponents receive direct support through a multi-year contribution agreement negotiated by HRSDC based on a human resources development plan. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership proponents are responsible for interim and final financial and performance reports.

($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Skills and Employment Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships $292.0 M $47.3 Aboriginal clients served : 7,500

Interventions completed : 6,500

Clients returned to employment following an ASEP intervention: 3,000

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada   Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships     See Department's Report on Plans and Priorities for Expected Results.
Western Economic Diversification   Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships  
Natural Resources Canada   Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships  
Total $292.0 M $47.3M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:
Keith Conn
Director General
Aboriginal Affairs Directorate
(819) 997-8551
keith.conn@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec

2. Youth Employment Strategy

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Youth Employment Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Skills and Employment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 18, 1999

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The Youth Employment Strategy supports Canadian youth as they move into the world of work. The Strategy plays a role in developing Canada's workforce by providing young Canadians with access to programs and services to help them gain the skills, knowledge, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment and make a successful transition into the labour force.

The Youth Employment Strategy is designed to respond to labour market challenges facing youth, aged 15 to 30. The Strategy has three program streams: Skills Link, Career Focus and Summer Work Experience, which includes the Canada Summer Jobs initiative. Skills Link provides youth-at-risk with opportunities to develop skills they need to find work or return to school. Career Focus helps post-secondary graduates find work in their area of specialization. Summer Work Experience helps secondary and post-secondary graduates acquire career-related skills and financing for their education through summer jobs.

The Government of Canada's support to young Canadians is a shared responsibility and a partnership effort among many departments and organizations. Human Resources and Skills Development, along with 11 other federal government departments, work cooperatively with other levels of government, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, and private sector, not-for-profit and voluntary sector organizations to deliver Youth Employment Strategy initiatives.

For more information, please visit: http://www.youth.gc.ca.

Shared outcome(s):

The shared outcomes of partners for the common key results are:

  • Number of youth served
  • Number of youth employed / self-employed
  • Number of youth returning to school

Governance structure(s):
The Youth Employment Strategy has in place an umbrella Results-based Management and Accountability Framework that represents a commitment among the eleven participating federal departments to undertake ongoing collection of common performance management data to ensure effective overall performance management of the program.

Oversight of the Youth Employment Strategy horizontal initiative is provided through a collaborative committee structure. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for facilitating coordination among the departments and agencies funding Youth Employment Strategy activities. As lead of this horizontal initiative, HRSDC chairs and is responsible for the coordination and management of Youth Employment Strategy Interdepartmental Operations Committee and the Youth Employment Strategy Evaluation Sub-Committee. HRSDC is ultimately accountable for attaining the expected results for Youth Employment Strategy and has the ultimate decision making authority for issues related to the overall policy, design and implementation of Youth Employment Strategy.

Youth Employment Strategy initiatives are delivered nationally, regionally and locally using a variety of funding instruments, such as contribution agreements and some direct delivery methods. Transfer payments are provided primarily by participating departments through contribution agreements and service delivery agreements in support of participants’ remuneration and overhead costs.

Youth Protocols for joint planning mechanisms have been signed with Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Manitoba.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (with Service Canada) Skills and Employment Career Focus Ongoing $13.0M Projected Range of Results

Clients Served:
400 – 500

Employed or Self-Employed:
300 – 350

Return to School:
10 – 30

Contribution Agreements:
80 – 110

Skills Link Ongoing $136.6M Service Canada
Projected Range of Results

Clients Served:
14,000 – 16,000

Employed or Self-Employed:
6,000 – 6,900

Return to School:
1,350 – 1,500

Contribution Agreements:
1,100 – 1,300

Summer Work Experience (Canada Summer Jobs) Ongoing $111.6M Clients Served:
30,000 – 35,000

Employed or Self-Employed:
N/A

Return to School:
N/A

Contribution Agreements:
15,000 – 20,000

Funds Leveraged:
N/A

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada   Career Focus Ongoing $1.1M  
Canadian International Development Agency   Career Focus Ongoing $6.4M
Canadian Heritage   Career Focus Ongoing $0.9M
Summer Work Experience Ongoing $8.0M
Environment Canada   Career Focus Ongoing $3.3M
Industry Canada   Career Focus Ongoing $9.8M
Summer Work Experience Ongoing $7.4M
National Research Council   Career Focus Ongoing $5.4M
Natural Resources Canada   Career Focus Ongoing $0.6M
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation   Skills Link Ongoing $1.0M
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada   Skills Link Ongoing $18.6M
Summer Work Experience Ongoing $8.0M
Parks Canada   Summer Work Experience Ongoing $2.0M
Total Career Focus $40.5M
Total Skills Link $156.2M
Total Summer Work Experience $138,8M
Total Youth Employment Strategy $335.4M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:
John Atherton, Director General
Active Employment Measures
Skills and Employment Branch
(819) 994-6916
john.atherton@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec

3. Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Skills and Employment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 13, 2007

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Temporary Foreign Worker Program enables Canadian employers to hire foreign workers on a temporary basis to meet immediate skills and labour needs when Canadians are not available. The Program is jointly managed by Citizenship and Immigration Canada and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (with Service Canada). Employers can recruit workers into any legal profession and from any source country, subject to employers and workers meeting specified criteria. The Temporary Foreign Worker Program includes program streams such as the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program and the Live-in-Caregiver Program, the Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training, and the Arranged Employment Opinion program.

In the province of Quebec, the Temporary Foreign Worker Program is administered through a partnership with the Government of Quebec.

The Temporary Foreign Worker Program is funded from the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/workplaceskills/foreign_workers/index.shtml

Shared outcome(s):

  • To enhance Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets and internationally competitive workplaces;
  • To respond to regional, occupational, and sectoral skills and labour demands;
  • To protect employment opportunities for Canadians.

Governance structure(s):

  • Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for providing a Labour Market Opinion to Citizenship and Immigration Canada and employers indicating if the employment of the temporary foreign worker is likely to have a positive, negative or neutral impact on the labour market in Canada.
  • Service Canada delivers the program regionally for Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and processes Labour Market Opinion applications to support the work permit application process.
  • Citizenship and Immigration Canada is responsible for assessing work permit applications and issuing work permits to workers.
  • Each Ddepartment is responsible for the design and management of those elements of the program under its Minister's responsibility.

($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Skills and Employment and Internal Services program activities Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing $32.6M Program enhancements, including strengthened worker protection, program integrity measures, and more responsive and efficient processes
  • strengthen requirement relating to employer efforts to recruit Canadians
  • implement joint employer monitoring and compliance measures
  • expand and improve availability of on-line Labour Market Opinion application forms
  • sector/occupation-based Labour Market Opinion processing
  • development and implementation of information sharing agreements with Provinces/Territories to assist in the administration and enforcement of P/T legislation and assist HRSDC in administering the Labour Market Opinions
  • in partnership with Citizenship and Immigration Canada, develop and participate in Temporary Foreign Workers (F/P/T) Working groups
  • participate with Citizenship and Immigration Canada in the negotiation and implementation of Fed-Prov Temporary Foreign Worker Annexes
  • joint evaluation of the program
Citizenship and Immigration Canada Temporary Resident Program Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing $33.2M Program enhancements, including strengthened worker protection, program integrity measures:
  • develop joint employer monitoring and compliance measures
  • Federal/Provincial information–sharing Memoranda of Understandings
  • negotiate and implement Temporary Foreign Worker Annexes to Federal-Provincial Immigration Agreements in partnership with HRSDC
  • conduct a joint formative evaluation.
Total Ongoing $65.8M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact information:
Andrew Kenyon, Director General
Temporary Foreign Workers
Skills and Employment Branch
(819) 994-1021
andrew.kenyon@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec

NOTE: The June 2007 start date represents the latest authorities for the Temporary Foreign Worker program. The above planned spending figures are for Citizenship and Immigration Canada and HRSDC only. Figures exclude planned spending for other government departments such as DFAIT and PWSGC and therefore do not represent the full Government of Canada costs for the Temporary Foreign Worker Program.

4. Canada Student Loans Program

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada Student Loans Program

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Learning

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: September, 1964

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The purpose of the Canada Student Loans Program is to promote accessibility to post-secondary education for individuals with demonstrated financial need by lowering financial barriers through the provision of loans and grants and to ensure Canadians have an opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills to participate in and contribute to a skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and efficient labour market.

Information for the public on saving, planning and paying for post-secondary studies and specific information for Canada Student Loans Program clients (including information on learning opportunity selection, financial planning, and how to apply for, maintain and repay student loans) can be accessed at: www.canlearn.ca.

Shared outcome(s):
Maintain the Government’s commitment to accessible post-secondary education by:

  • lowering financial barriers to post-secondary education through the provision of financial assistance to eligible Canadians; and
  • ensuring a more manageable debt burden for borrowers.

Governance structure(s):

The Government of Canada has entered into Integration Agreements with four provinces (Ontario, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador) in order to create a “one-student-one-loan” service approach. These four integrated provinces accounted for over 60 percent of the Canada Student Loans Program borrowers.

The administration of the current Program is the product of a co-operative effort between Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Service Canada, Canada Revenue Agency, participating provinces and the Yukon Territory, a Service Provider, financial institutions and Public Works and Government Services Canada. These agents are responsible for conducting one or more activities during the loan lifecycle. Program documents and communications tools are typically prepared with the input and approval of both federal and participating provincial and territorial governments. Quebec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut do not participate in the Canada Student Loans Program. These jurisdictions receive an alternative payment to assist in the cost of delivering a similar student financial assistance program.

Effective management of the Program and of relations with third-party agents is the primary responsibility of the Canada Student Loans Program. Program activities include, for example, defining the operational and financial processes for the delivery of the program by the service providers and client relations for escalated cases and comptrollership.

The application and needs assessment for the Program is delivered by provincial student assistance offices, which also administer provincial aid. The participating provinces and the Yukon Territory:

  • determine individual eligibility for loans and grants based on federal criteria;
  • assess students’ financial needs based on federal criteria;
  • issue loan certificates;
  • administer and deliver grants; and
  • designate educational institutions that students may attend with Canada Student Loans Program assistance.

While the Canada Student Loans Program provides the guidance and direction on how the Program is to be delivered, the Service Provider assumes responsibility for managing the loans once the loan agreement is signed and submitted for processing. Responsibilities of the Service Provider include:

  • verifying loan agreements;
  • managing the in-study interest-free period;
  • negotiating and handling loan repayment; and
  • managing debt management activities and advising counselling borrowers on their debt management options.

Public Works and Government Services Canada is responsible for disbursing loans to the borrowers and to Educational Institutions, for any funds directed to pay for tuition.

Canada Revenue Agency Non-Tax Collection Services is the agent responsible for debt collection. Delinquent guaranteed and risk-shared loans become debts to the Crown when the Government of Canada buys back the debt from financial institutions. Delinquent direct financed loans are returned to government after the Service Provider has attempted collection of a set period of time and the borrower has either not made payments on their loan or is unwilling to repay. These activities may also be conducted by private collection agencies under contract to Canada Revenue Agency. These private collection agencies must abide by Canada Revenue Agency collection guidelines when carrying out the recovery of Crown debts.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Learning Canada Student Loans Program $613.9M

Loans disbursed under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act:
$2.0 B

$1005.5M

Loans disbursed under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act: $1.8B

Estimated number of Canadians to benefit from loans and non-repayable in study interest subsidies received (in the 2009 Loan Year beginning August 1, 2009) through the Canada Student Loans Program: 455,000a
Estimated number of Canadians to benefit from the Canada Student Grant Program (in the 2009 Loan Year beginning August 1, 2009): 245,000b
Public Works and Government Services Canada Receiver General Services        
Canada Revenue Agency Accounts Receivable and Returns Compliance        
Total $ 613.9M 1005.5M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

Contact information:
Barbara Glover, Director General
Canada Student Loans Directorate
200 Montcalm Street
Gatineau, Quebec
Canada
K1A 0J9
(819) 997-1094
barbara.glover@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca

a Please note that the number is estimated as loans are awarded based on client eligibility and demonstrated need.

b Please note that the number is estimated as grants are awarded based on client eligibility and demonstrated need.

5. National Child Benefit Initiative

Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Child Benefit Initiative

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Income Security

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 1998

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Statutory

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Through the National Child Benefit Initiative, the Government of Canada is working with provincial and territorial governments1 to provide income support, as well as benefits and services, for low-income families with children. The initiative also includes a First Nations component.

Shared outcome(s):

The National Child Benefit initiative has three goals:

  • Help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty;
  • Promote attachment to the labour market by ensuring that families will always be better off as a result of working; and
  • Reduce overlap and duplication by harmonizing program objectives and benefits and simplifying administration.

Annual National Child Benefit Progress Reports include information on the level of spending by all jurisdictions. There is a data collection process to which all participating jurisdictions contribute in order to present comparable information on National Child Benefit initiatives. The data submitted by each jurisdiction is reviewed jointly to ensure consistency in reporting. To obtain the most recent Progress Report or for further information, please visit the federal, provincial and territorial National Child Benefit website: www.nationalchildbenefit.ca.

Federal Spending:

The Government of Canada contributes to the National Child Benefit initiative through a supplement to its Canada Child Tax Benefit. In addition to the base benefit of the Canada Child Tax Benefit, which is targeted to both low- and middle-income families, the National Child Benefit Supplement provides extra income support to low-income families with children. Federal spending on the Canada Child Tax Benefit is tracked by the Canada Revenue Agency, which is responsible for the delivery of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

The federal government provided $3.5B through the National Child Benefit Supplement in 2007-2008. By 2008-2009, total annual federal support delivered through the Canada Child Tax Benefit system, including the National Child Benefit Supplement, is projected to reach $9.4B, including a projected $3.6B through the National Child Benefit Supplement.

Provincial and territorial and First Nations Spending:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2006, reports that in 2005-2006, provinces, territories, and First Nations spent $873.9M in programs and services in key areas such as child/day care initiatives, child benefits and earned income supplements, early childhood services and children-at-risk services, supplementary health benefits, and youth initiatives. This includes First Nations reinvestments in programs and services which are estimated to be $58.0M in 2005-2006.

Indicators and Impacts:

The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2006 includes an analysis of both societal level indicators, which measure areas such as low income and labour force attachment and do not infer that any changes are the result of the initiative, and direct outcome indicators, which measure only those changes that are directly attributed to the National Child Benefit initiative.

With respect to societal level indicators, the report shows that the proportion of families with children living in low income has declined significantly since the mid-1900s, decreasing from 17.6 percent in 1996 to 11.6 percent in 2004, based on Statistics Canada's post-tax low-income cut-offs. During this period, the number of children living in low income decreased from 1,304,000 in 1996 to 877,300 in 2004, a decrease of approximately 426,700 children.

Further, the report estimates that in 2004, as a direct result of the National Child Benefit initiative :

  • 125,000 children in 59,000 families were prevented from living in low income, a reduction of 12.1 percent. This means that in 2004, there were 12.1 percent fewer families with children living in low income than there would have been without the National Child Benefit. These families saw their average disposable income increase by an estimated $2,400, or 9.3 percent.
  • For those families with children who remained in low income, the National Child Benefit improved their disposable income by an average of $1,600 (9.1 percent). This means that the low-income gap (the additional amount of income needed by low-income families to reach the low-income line) was reduced by 18.5 percent in 2004.

In addition, in June 2005, federal, provincial and territorial governments released a synthesis report of a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the National Child Benefit initiative (1988-1999, 1999-2000, 2000-2001). The evaluation compiled evidence from a number of studies and showed that the National Child Benefit initiative is meeting its goals. In addition, a process to launch further evaluation has begun.

For a complete discussion of indicators, please see Chapters 5 and 6 of the National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2006. For a discussion of evaluation results, please see the Evaluation of the National Child Benefit Initiative: Synthesis Report. These reports are available free of charge on the National Child Benefit website, at: www.nationalchildbenefit.ca.

Governance structure(s):

The National Child Benefit initiative Governance and Accountability Framework outlines the key characteristics of the federal, provincial and territorial partnership: cooperation, openness, flexibility, evolution and accountability. As a co-operative effort among governments, the National Child Benefit initiative combines the strengths of a national program with the flexibility of provincial and territorial initiatives designed to meet the specific needs and conditions within each jurisdiction.

With respect to accountability, under the Governance and Accountability Framework, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services have committed to sharing data on reinvestment initiatives and reviewing results and outcomes achieved in order to identify best practices. Federal, provincial and territorial governments have also agreed to report annually to the public with a primary focus on performance of the initiative. To date, six annual progress reports have been published, as well as a synthesis report on a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the initiative.

The Federal Role:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, the Government of Canada provides additional income support to low-income families with children via the National Child Benefit Supplement component of the Canada Child Tax Benefit. Canada Revenue Agency delivers these benefits to families.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, and the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development represents the Government of Canada in this federal/provincial/territorial initiative.

The Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.

The Provincial and Territorial Role:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The initiative is designed so that provinces, territories and First Nations have the flexibility to develop and deliver programs and services that best meet the needs and priorities of their communities. As part of this flexibility, provinces and territories may adjust social assistance or child benefit payments by the full or partial amount of the National Child Benefit Supplement. This approach has resulted in families on social assistance being no worse off in terms of their level of benefits, while providing additional funds for new or enhanced provincial and territorial programs benefiting low-income families with children.

It is important to note that, as the National Child Benefit initiative has matured, the majority of provinces and territories no longer recover increases to the National Child Benefit Supplement. This means that the vast majority of children living in low-income families, including those on social assistance, are currently receiving some or all of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

Under the National Reinvestment Framework, provincial and territorial governments, along with First Nations, have committed to re-allocating available social assistance funds into benefits and services for children in low-income families that further the goals of the initiative. Jurisdictions have focused reinvestments primarily in five key areas:

  • Child Benefits and Earned Income Supplements;
  • Child Care;
  • Early Childhood Services and Children-at-Risk Services;
  • Supplementary Health Benefits;
  • Youth Initiatives; and
  • Other Benefits and Services;
  • First Nations Role

The federal government is responsible for ensuring programs for First Nations children on reserve are comparable to those available to other Canadian children. Under the National Child Benefit, First Nations have the flexibility to reinvest savings from adjustments to social assistance into programs and services tailored to meet the needs and priorities of individual communities. Some 500 First Nations participate in the National Child Benefit and implement their own programs.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
Canada Revenue Agency2 Administers the National Child Benefit Supplement and delivers income benefits directly to low income families a. National Child Benefit Supplement Ongoing $3.68B (projected) Continued progress on the goals of the National Child Benefit initiative, as described in the “Shared Outcomes”, above.
Total $ N/A $3.68B  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

Contact information:
Shawn Tupper, Director General
Social Policy Directorate
Strategic Policy and Research Branch
HRSDC
(613) 957-9865


1 Le gouvernement du Québec a déclaré qu’il entérine les principes généraux de la Prestation nationale pour enfants mais a décidé de ne pas participer à l’initiative parce qu’il veut être maître du soutien du revenu pour les enfants au Québec; toutefois, il a adopté une démarche semblable à la Prestation nationale pour enfants. Dans le présent texte, les renvois aux positions conjointes fédérales-provinciales-territoriales n’incluent pas le Québec.

2Tandis que Ressources humaines et Développement des compétences Canada est responsable de l’élaboration de politiques relatives à la Prestation nationale pour enfants, la Prestation fiscale canadienne pour enfants (y compris le supplément de la Prestation nationale pour enfants) est une mesure fiscale et est administrée par l’Agence du revenu du Canada. De plus, Affaires indiennes et du Nord Canada et Citoyenneté et Immigration Canada prennent part aux investissements et aux réinvestissements

6. Homelessness Partnering Strategy

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Homelessness Partnering Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Social Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2009

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2011

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $269.6M over two years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy makes strategic investments in community priorities and includes a planning process that encourages cooperation between governments, agencies and community-based organizations to find local solutions for homeless people and those at risk of becoming homeless. The Homelessness Partnering Strategy is designed to provide supports to 61 designated communities and some small, rural and Aboriginal communities to develop community-based measures that assist homeless individuals and families move toward self-sufficiency, thereby contributing to society and the economy. Although the responsibility for homelessness programs falls under Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, most Homelessness Partnering Strategy program components are delivered by regional staff, now part of Service Canada.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy:

  • helps communities build on their successes and focuses on interventions to help prevent and break the cycle of homelessness;
  • achieves results for Canadians by focusing on attaining self-sufficiency and not just temporary measures;
  • requires that federal funding be targeted more at the development of transitional and supportive housing and at improving access to services that help homeless people become self-sufficient such as skills training, health and substance abuse treatment;
  • enhances the partnership approach with provinces and territories, communities and the private and voluntary sectors to strengthen capacity and build sustainability; and
  • carries out research to foster a better understanding of homelessness as well as collects and disseminates best practices to assist in designing the most effective responses.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy accomplishes its objectives through a class contribution and class grant program.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy has three initiatives:

  • Homelessness Partnership Initiative;
  • Homelessness Accountability Network; and
  • Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative.

For more information, please visit the Homelessness Partnering Strategy website: www.homelessness.gc.ca

Shared outcome(s): Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Governance structure(s):

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy community-based program is delivered via two models:

  • community entity model: Under this model, the Community Advisory Board recommends projects to the community entity (an incorporated organization) which is the decision-making body responsible for approving project proposals and determining the eligibility of projects. HRSDC is responsible for managing the contribution agreement and all related activities. The community, in consultation with Service Canada, has designated responsibility for program delivery to a specific local organization; and
  • shared delivery model: Under this model, the Community advisory Body reviews project proposals and makes recommendations to HRSDC which manages the contribution agreement and all related activities. Both Service Canada and the community work in partnership to support funding priorities, resulting in a joint selection and decision-making process. The Minister approves the project proposals.

In Quebec, unlike other provinces and territories, the Homelessness Partnering Strategy stream known as the Homelessness Partnership Initiatives delivered under a formal Canada-Quebec agreement, in collaboration with the province of Quebec.

The community entity model and the shared delivery model deliver the components of the Homelessness Partnering Strategy, specifically the Homelessness Partnership Initiative. In addition, regions are actively involved in setting the agenda of the Homelessness Accountability Network and the delivery of the Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy recognizes that the prevention and reduction of homelessness requires collaboration among all levels of government, particularly the federal and provincial/territorial governments. Provinces and territories are being invited to enter into bilateral agreements with the federal government to support community efforts to address homelessness. The Canada-Quebec agreement serves as a model that will be adapted for other jurisdictions. Partnering agreements will offer provinces and territories the opportunity to participate in community planning and priority-setting at the outset. Agreements will support the alignment of federal, provincial and territorial investments to enhance linkages between social services and housing as well as to address the operational sustainability of community projects. This partnering approach will ensure that all of the necessary tools and supports are in place for homeless people to secure housing and supports that effectively meet their needs and for those at-risk of homelessness to attain housing stability.

Enhanced collaboration with other federal departments whose policies and programs are linked to homelessness is also essential. Horizontal pilot projects will be developed to facilitate a more coordinated approach to homelessness at the federal level, in recognition that homelessness interacts with an array of factors that relate to other federal program and policy areas, including: housing affordability; mental/physical health; labour market vulnerabilities; skills, education and literacy levels; community and personal safety; barriers facing newcomers; discharged offenders; Aboriginal issues; and others. The key objectives of horizontal pilot projects are to: address common risk factors associated with homelessness and other policy areas; prevent homelessness by addressing its root causes; and reduce the negative outcomes on other policy areas caused by homelessness. These pilot projects test approaches on homelessness, and their results are expected to inform future policy development.

Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative (SFRPHI) provides surplus federal property to community organizations, the not-for-profit sector, and other levels of government for projects to alleviate and prevent homelessness. The SFRPHI is a Homelessness Partnering Strategy program co-managed by Public Works and Government Services Canada and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, with advice and support from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Social Development Homelessness Partnership Initiative 219.2M 109.6M
  • Homelessness Partnership Initiative- Designated Communities have demonstrated cost-matching with other partners.
Federal Horizontal Project 5.2M 2.6M
  • Increased availability and access for homeless people, to a range of services and facilities along the continuum (i.e., emergency, transitional and supportive housing).
  • Horizontal pilot projects - Implementation of projects with key departments such as Justice Canada, Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Correctional Service Canada, and Urban Aboriginal Strategy.
Homelessness Accountability Network (HAN) 3.7M 1.85M Increased knowledge (e.g., best practices, research findings) exchanged among community service providers, researchers, and all levels of government working on issues of homelessness.
Urban Aboriginal Strategy / Homelessness Partnership Initiative 35.5M 17.75M Better coordination and complementarity among Government of Canada policies and programs to address Aboriginal homelessness and other related issues.
PWGSC   Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative Funding administered by PWGSC $6.0M Funding administered by PWGSC $3.0M Enhanced capacity of communities to provide facilities to homeless individuals and families.
Total $ $269.6M $134.8M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

Contact information:
Jane Weldon, Director General
Homelessness Partnering Secretariat
Place du Portage, Phase II
165 Hotel-de-Ville St.
Gatineau QC
(819) 997-5464
jane.weldon@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca

7. Federal Elder Abuse Initiative

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Federal Elder Abuse Initiative

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Social Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2011

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $13,050,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The overarching objectives of the Federal Elder Abuse Initiative are to raise awareness of elder abuse throughout society, particularly among seniors, their families, and key professional groups, and to ensure the availability of appropriate elder abuse-related information, resources and tools.

To address this, new federal elder abuse activities will be coordinated interdepartmentally and will involve the cooperation and collaboration of the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police under the leadership of HRSDC.

The centrepiece of the Federal Elder Abuse Initiative will be a public awareness campaign using various media. Generic information and resource materials for frontline workers (public health, medical, legal, police, and financial professionals, etc.) will be developed to provide key professional groups with the information necessary to identify cases of elder abuse, access the appropriate resources, and take measures to provide assistance to victims.

Shared outcome(s):
To help seniors and others recognize the signs and symptoms of elder abuse and to provide information on what support is available.

Governance structure(s):
The Seniors and Pensions Policy Secretariat (SPPS) within HRSDC is the focal point for Government of Canada activities related to seniors.

The Elder Abuse Task Force within the Seniors and Pensions Policy Secretariat is leading a working group of officials from partner departments/agencies to coordinate the implementation of Government of Canada initiatives to raise awareness and to develop and disseminate tools and supports for frontline workers. Partner departments/agencies retain responsibility for planning, programming, and budgeting their own resources to implement their activities.

The working group has developed a performance measurement framework, including a logic model, to identify the relationships between departmental/agency activities, outputs, and outcomes, and a suite of performance indicators to measure progress against outputs/outcomes. The working group will coordinate reporting and monitor performance and results over the course of the initiative.

The Interdepartmental Committee on Seniors will provide senior-level oversight and direction for the Federal Elder Abuse Initiative. The Committee will provide a forum to update federal departments on the progress and achievements of the initiative and to identify opportunities to align the initiative with other government initiatives and priorities.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Social Development   $10,220,000 $4,870,000 2009-2010 will see partner departments increase awareness about elder abuse through advertising and/or the involvement of key stakeholders on elder abuse.
Department of Justice     $1,410,000 $440,000  
Public health Agency of Canada     $1,420,000 $470,000  
RCMP     Coming from internal allocations Coming from internal allocations  
Total $ $13,050,000 $5,780,000  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):
Through a call for proposals process, national associations will be supported to develop information materials about elder abuse for their frontline professionals who regularly come in contact with older Canadians.

Contact information:
Dominique La Salle, Director General
Seniors and Pensions Policy Secretariat
Income Security and Social Development
Place Vanier, Tower B
355 North River Road
Ottawa ON
dominique.lasalle@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca

8. Federal Elder Abuse Initiative

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Federal Elder Abuse Initiative

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Social Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2011

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $13,050,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The overarching objectives of the Federal Elder Abuse Initiative are to raise awareness of elder abuse throughout society, particularly among seniors, their families, and key professional groups, and to ensure the availability of appropriate elder abuse-related information, resources and tools.

To address this, new federal elder abuse activities will be coordinated interdepartmentally and will involve the cooperation and collaboration of the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police under the leadership of HRSDC.

The centrepiece of the Federal Elder Abuse Initiative will be a public awareness campaign using various media. Generic information and resource materials for frontline workers (public health, medical, legal, police, and financial professionals, etc.) will be developed to provide key professional groups with the information necessary to identify cases of elder abuse, access the appropriate resources, and take measures to provide assistance to victims.

Shared outcome(s):
To help seniors and others recognize the signs and symptoms of elder abuse and to provide information on what support is available.

Governance structure(s):
The Seniors and Pensions Policy Secretariat (SPPS) within HRSDC is the focal point for Government of Canada activities related to seniors.

The Elder Abuse Task Force within the Seniors and Pensions Policy Secretariat is leading a working group of officials from partner departments/agencies to coordinate the implementation of Government of Canada initiatives to raise awareness and to develop and disseminate tools and supports for frontline workers. Partner departments/agencies retain responsibility for planning, programming, and budgeting their own resources to implement their activities.

The working group has developed a performance measurement framework, including a logic model, to identify the relationships between departmental/agency activities, outputs, and outcomes, and a suite of performance indicators to measure progress against outputs/outcomes. The working group will coordinate reporting and monitor performance and results over the course of the initiative.

The Interdepartmental Committee on Seniors will provide senior-level oversight and direction for the Federal Elder Abuse Initiative. The Committee will provide a forum to update federal departments on the progress and achievements of the initiative and to identify opportunities to align the initiative with other government initiatives and priorities.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Social Development   $10,220,000 $4,870,000 2009-2010 will see partner departments increase awareness about elder abuse through advertising and/or the involvement of key stakeholders on elder abuse.
Department of Justice     $1,410,000 $440,000  
Public health Agency of Canada     $1,420,000 $470,000  
RCMP     Coming from internal allocations Coming from internal allocations  
Total $ $13,050,000 $13,050,000  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):
Through a call for proposals process, national associations will be supported to develop information materials about elder abuse for their frontline professionals who regularly come in contact with older Canadians.

Contact information:
Dominique La Salle, Director General
Seniors and Pensions Policy Secretariat
Income Security and Social Development
Place Vanier, Tower B
355 North River Road
Ottawa ON
dominique.lasalle@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca

Top of Page

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Canadian Polar Commission

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Lead department program activity: Community Infrastructure

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2010

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $735,639,806 for the two years. Of this amount $202,500,000 in each of 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 are funded from existing reference levels. New funds of $165,318,143 in 2008-2009 and $165,321,663 in 2009-2010 including employee benefits plans and Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation requirements are sourced from the Fiscal Framework, as confirmed in Budget 2008.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The prime objective of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan (FNWWAP) is to support First Nations communities on reserve in bringing their drinking water and wastewater services to a level and quality of service comparable to those enjoyed by other Canadians living in communities of similar size and location. There are five key activity areas in the FNWWAP: Infrastructure investments; Operations and maintenance; Training; Monitoring and awareness; and Standards.

To meet the objectives of the FNWWAP, several program enhancements have been introduced, including a national engineering assessment of existing water and wastewater facilities, consultations on a new federal legislative framework for safe drinking water, increased training through Circuit Rider training program, modifying existing policies related to small water and septic systems and agreements for water/wastewater services, investment in a National Wastewater Program and waterborne illness procedures.

The FNWWAP was implemented to support government commitments to supporting First Nations access to safe drinking water, in Budget 2008 and the 2007 Speech from the Throne.

The FNWWAP supports INAC’s strategic outcome for “The Economy”: Increased participation of Aboriginal people and Northerners in the Economy. The FNWWAP also supports Health Canada’s First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services strategic outcome of Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians.

More information at these Web sites:

Backgrounder — First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan
Budget 2008, Responsible Leadership — Chapter 4 — Leadership at Home and Abroad
RPP 2007-2008 Health Canada — Health Canada's Regional Operations — An Overview

Shared outcome(s):

The FNWWAP works towards the achievement of four outcomes:

  • First Nation communities have an increased capacity to address potential water quality problems
  • Reduction in health risks associated with water quality and supply
  • All First Nation community water and wastewater facilities meet federal standards
  • First Nation communities have increased confidence in their drinking water

Governance structure(s): The First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan (FNWWAP) is a successor to the joint First Nations Water Management Strategy (2003-2008) and the INAC Plan of Action for Drinking Water (2006-2008). An MOU has been in place between INAC and HC since 2005 regarding data sharing related to drinking water. INAC shares information on the proposed water and wastewater infrastructure investments, the annual inspections of water and wastewater treatment plants, and information on action related to Drinking Water Advisories. Conversely, HC shares information such as drinking water sample results that do not meet the Canadian Drinking Water Quality Guidelines and reasons for having recommended Drinking Water Advisories. At the working level, the Strategic Water Management on Reserve Committee which includes representatives from HC, INAC, Environment Canada (EC) and the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), provides a forum for discussion to share information and coordinate joint action, and to provide leadership in an integrated and coordinated manner to ensure safe drinking water for First Nations communities and implementing FNWWAP. Although this is not a formal decision-making body, it does provide a good venue to promote dialogue and the sharing of information.

Director Generals and ADMs from HC and INAC meet when needed to exchange and coordinate action on all relevant issues related to the FNWWAP.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Community Infrastructure Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program $671.0 $335.3 Percentage of First Nation communities with acceptable water and wastewater facility risk ratings (i.e., not high risk): 85% of systems will be either low or medium risk
Health Canada First Nations and Inuit Health Drinking Water Safety Program — FNWWAP funding $54.6 $27.3 Number of First Nations communities south of 60° with increased or maintained capacity to monitor their drinking water quality as per the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality and reduce health risks associated with drinking water quality and supply
Drinking Water Safety Program — A-Based funding $10.0 $5.0
Total $735.6 $367.6  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a

Contact information:
Sébastien Labelle,
Director, Policy
Indian and Northern Affairs
Policy Directorate, Community Infrastructure Branch
10 Wellington Street
Gatineau, Quebec Canada
K1A 0H4
Telephone: (819) 994-6466
Fax: (819) 953-3321



Name of Horizontal Initiative: International Polar Year

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) — Northern Affairs Program

Lead department program activity: Healthy Northern Communities

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1st 2007

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31st 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $150 million over five years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): In order to support Canada’s participation in International Polar Year (IPY), the Government of Canada has invested $150 million over five years. This funding is being used to carry out an innovative and multidisciplinary Arctic science program. The Government of Canada Program for IPY is led by INAC in conjunction with eight lead federal departments and agencies: Environment, Fisheries and Oceans, Health, National Sciences and Engineering Research Council (on behalf of Industry), Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Canada’s significant involvement and investment in the International Polar Year 2007–2009 contributes to the government’s stewardship of Canada’s Northern Region. The Government of Canada IPY Program is working with Canadian scientists and northern communities in developing and conducting activities such as research, training and capacity building.

Key areas of the Government of Canada Program for IPY include:

  • new science and research in and for the North, which includes the involvement of northern communities;
  • ensuring the health and safety of scientists and communities conducting research in the North;
  • communication information about the program and the science undertaken;
  • building capacity, through training opportunities for youth and Northerners aimed at enhancing participation in northern scientific research;
  • ensuring that the resultant scientific knowledge and data are properly managed, archived and made accessible; and
  • support for the appropriate procedural, regulatory and infrastructure framework for conducting scientific research.

The distribution of funds among federal departments and agencies is according to their involvement in the various aspects of the program, including the science and research program, support for logistics, communications and outreach, training, and capacity building. Funding is being provided to support Northern IPY Coordinators who act as points of contact on IPY matters for northern communities and researchers. The Northern IPY Coordinators maintain a regional network to support all aspects of Canada’s IPY Program in four locations across the North. The federal departments and agencies participating in IPY are undertaking research projects, delivering support for logistics and emergency preparedness as well as contributing to projects for training, communications and outreach.

Shared outcome(s):

  • Increased understanding (of impacts of a changing climate and of health and well-being of northern communities) that informs policy and decision making, and contributes to recognition of Canada as an expert on the Canadian North.
  • Enhanced northern research capacity through newly trained scientists, knowledge and skills transfer to Northerners, and greater participation in planning and delivery of research by Northerners.

Governance structure(s):

  • Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) Committee on IPY (chaired by the ADM of Northern Affairs, INAC);
  • IPY Federal Program Office (housed at INAC);
  • Director Generals, Communications Committees on IPY; and
  • IPY Advisory Subcommittees.

The Government of Canada Program for IPY works in conjunction with the Canadian IPY National Committee and the Canadian IPY Secretariat who link to the International Joint Committee for IPY and IPY committees from other participating countries.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Indian Affairs and Northern Development Healthy Northern Communities Government of Canada Program for IPY $59,694,657 $16,896,000 Achieved infrastructure improvements to northern research facilities and search and rescue organizations.

Increased of Northerners in Arctic Science activities.
Health Sustainable environmental Health   $158,234 $15,009 (Amount not significant enough to determine results)
Environment Biodiversity is conserved and protected

Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making

Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions
  $11,169,875 $1,893,101 Projects funded will enhance and reinforce circumpolar cooperation, strengthening partnerships and environmental protection.

Improved weather and environmental forecasting capabilities for Polar regions.
Fisheries and Oceans Oceanography and Climate Aquatic Ecosystem Science   $31,542,477 $1,970,093 Improved knowledge about the effects of and adaptability of Arctic aquatic ecosystems and key resource species to Climate Change.

Increased knowledge of the circum-Canadian ocean system, from physical to biological domains, and identification of key zones and boundaries to assist supporting historic comparisons and future research and monitoring.
Natural Resources Adapting to a Climate and Hazard Risk Management   $3,063,000 $532,770 The impact of climate change on Canada’s landmass and coastal areas is assessed, and strategies are developed to adapt to these changes.
Ecosystem Risk Management Knowledge of Canada's forest ecosystems informs and influences decision making.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council     $31,290,669 $5,213,952 Projects contribute to enhancing knowledge of polar regions environment and identifying mechanism to adapt to these changes.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Strategic Priority Research   $9,747,988 $1,403,376 Building and sustaining healthy resilient northern communities

Ecosystem and Community Vulnerability, resilience and adaptive capacity
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Food Safety and Nutrition Risks   $414,500 $11,250 Arctic community-based laboratory capacity is developed through training and lab support for two meat-borne parasites of public health concern.
Parks Canada Agency Conserve Heritage Resources   $1,350,000 $385,000 Complete terrestrial ecosystem inventory of Wapusk National Park

Complete freshwater hierarchical study — Sirmilik National Park

Conduct outreach and communication of IPY activities.
Public Health Agency of Canada     $617,000 $95,000 General knowledge that will support informed decision making addressing health disparities among indigenous populations of the North.
Agriculture and Agri-food     $156,400 $0 N/A
Canadian Museum of Civilization     $795,200 $91,800 Increase knowledge on the interactions between Inuit, their Tuniit (Dorset culture) predecessors, and early Europeans.
Total $150,000,000 $28,507,351  

Contact information:
Kathleen Fischer
Executive Director
International Polar Year Federal Program Office
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
10 Wellington Street, Room 745
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H4
Tel: 819-934-6085
Fax: 819-934-0584
fischerk@ainc-inac.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Indian Residential Schools (IRS) Resolution Health Support Program (formerly Mental Health Support Program)

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) — Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector

Lead department program activity: Claims Resolution

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: November, 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $112.038 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The IRS Resolution Health Support Program component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) ensures that eligible former students, and their families, have access to an appropriate level of health support services so that they may safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuses. Main program components include: Emotional support services provided by Resolution Health Support Workers (RHSWs); Cultural support services provided by Elders; Professional Counseling; and assistance with the cost of transportation to access counseling, Elder, and/or Traditional Healer services.

Shared outcome(s): Healing for former IRS students and their families as they go through the IRSSA process.

Governance structure(s): INAC — Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector is responsible for the overall IRSSA model and is working in partnership with Health Canada to coordinate and provide services for former Indian Residential School students. Various program components of the Resolution Health Support Program will be delivered separately by Health Canada and INAC — Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector.

INAC — Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector responsibilities relating to the Resolution Health Support Program include:

  • Administration of the national 24-hour toll free Indian Residential School Crisis Line operated by an Aboriginal organization with trained Aboriginal crisis counsellors;
  • Communicating the entire IRSSA to former Indian Residential Schools students and Aboriginal communities, including the various components of the Resolution Health Support Program;
  • Facilitating Health Canada’s verification of eligibility; and
  • Ensuring that Health Canada’s Resolution Health Support Program is aware of dates for Independent Assessment Process/Alternative Dispute Resolution hearings, litigation, and Truth and Reconciliation and Commemoration events as they arise, so that Resolution Health Support Program regional coordinators are prepared to address high claimant settlement areas.

Health Canada provides cultural, paraprofessional and professional support for individuals, families and communities, as well as assistance with the cost of transportation, throughout all phases of the Settlement Agreement including the Common Experience Payments, the Independent Assessment Process, the Truth and Reconciliation Committee, and Commemorative events.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Health Canada First Nations and Inuit Health, Community Programs Directorate, Mental Health and Addictions Resolution Health Support Program $112.038M $22.451M provision of support at IAP, Truth and Reconciliation and Commemoration events;

increase in the number of Elders available to provide Cultural Support; and

increase in the number of RHSWs available to provide Emotional Support.
Total $112.038M $22.451M  

Contact information Health Canada:
Kari Nisbet
Manager
IRS Resolution Health Support Program

Contact information:
Patricia Power
A/Director
Policy and Strategic Planning
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
90 Sparks Street, Room 341
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Tel: 613-947-4146
ppower@ainc-inac.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Labrador Innu Comprehensive Healing Strategy (LICHS)

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada — Lead; Health Canada; Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 2001

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 2010

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Cabinet approved the LICHS in June 2001 and provided $81 million over three years including: $59 million for INAC; $20 million for Health Canada and $2 million for Solicitor General. The initial LICHS ended March 2004, but was extended for one-year; INAC received a further $15 million to provide basic programs and services; and Health Canada received $5.5 million to continue the work already begun under the LICHS. Cabinet approved a new 5-year strategy for INAC and Health Canada (HC) partners in December 2004. Budget 2005, provided funds of $102.5 M for fiscal years 2005–2006 to 2009–2010 for the continuation of the LICHS.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The LICHS was developed by INAC, HC and former Solicitor General in response to the 2000 gas-sniffing crisis facing the Labrador Innu to help resolve the serious health, social and safety issues in the communities of Davis Inlet and Sheshatshiu. While notable progress has been achieved, many serious issues remain. To address these issues, INAC and HC sought Cabinet approval and funding for the continuation of the LICHS. The proposed approach responded positively to the priorities in the October 2004 Speech from the Throne for addressing the needs of Aboriginal Canadians.

Shared outcome(s): The partners, in consultation with the Innu, developed the following 5-year vision with respect to the continuation of the LICHS. This vision is for the federal government, the Province and the Innu to work in partnership to: advance Innu community healing; build increased Innu capacity for the management and delivery of some government programs; conclude a land claim Agreement-in-Principle; address issues arising from sexual, physical and emotional abuse; achieve improvements in health, education, family and social well-being, economic development, community development, public safety and First Nation governance; and, manage the LICHS in an integrated and effective fashion.

Governance structure(s): The Main Table is chaired by the Chief Federal Negotiator, Labrador Innu file. Membership includes representatives of the Labrador Innu leadership, Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, and federal partners to the LICHS.

The tripartite sub-committees’ role includes: reserve creation, education, new school at Sheshatshiu, income support, child youth and family services, economic development, health, and evaluation.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Community Infrastructure Sheshatshiu school design $0.1 $0.0 New school to open September 2009
Education Education $14.8 $6.8 Creation of Innu School; Board and Devolution of education programming to Board
Social Development Child, Youth and Family Services (CYFS) $27.9 $9.1 Negotiate CYFS tripartite Agreement based on enhanced prevention
Social Development Income Support $6.1 $1.5 Negotiate devolution Income Support to Innu communities
Community Infrastructure Electrification — Natuashish $6.0 $3.6 Electrification for community of Natuashish
Community Infrastructure Airport Agreement — Natuashish $0.5 $0.1 Cost shared with Province of Newfoundland to operate airport at Natuashish
Community Infrastructure Facilities O&M Capacity Building $3.6 $0.45 Facilities Manager to run operations of buildings
Community Infrastructure Housing Capacity Building $0.6 $0.0 N/A
Clarity of Title to Land and Resources LTS Capacity Building $1.4 $0.12 Training, capacity building
Clarity of Title to Land and Resources Reserve Creation $0.2 $0.0 Reserve Creation Completed
Governance and Institutions of Government Devolution Planning and Transition $0.75 $0.15 Tripartite committees on the devolution of CYFS and Education to hold meetings
Education New Paths (Outpost) $1.0 $0.2 The Innu to travel into the country as an educational community activity and to live in their traditional ways. Innu see this as essential component of healing
Education Strategies for Learning $2.2 $0.5 JTA to act as a resource for the Innu Education Board. Innu Director Education hired to oversee the Critical Path toward devolution and the ongoing implementation of the 61 Philpott Recommendations
Governance and Institutions of Government Planning and Consultation $0.5 $0.1 N/A
Social Development Safe houses $1.4 $0.4 Operate Youth Safehouse in Sheshatshiu and dual purpose safehouse in Natuashish 24 hrs, 7 days per week
Health Canada   Addictions/ Mental Health $31.75 $2.7 Treatment programs continue through the Family Treatment (in Sheshatshui) and Healing Lodge (in Natuashish)
Maternal/ Child Health $8.1 $1.2 Health promotion programs continue through the Family Resource Center (in Sheshatchui) and Wellness Center (in Natuashish)
Community Health Planning $3.99 $351K Program evaluation information will inform future health programming in both communities
Management and Support $6.4 $718K Ongoing activities by Labrador Health Secretariat staff to support capacity development and program delivery by community staff as they move towards self management of effective health programs and services

Improved coordination of health services being achieved through tri-partite projects on integration and adaptation of health services at community and health authority levels
Safe houses $1.65 $400K Program delivery, policy, and operations continue
Health Canada Overhead $1.18 $137K N/A
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation   Safe houses $0.95 $0.0 Construction completed

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Increased collaboration among the parties has emerged.

Contact information:
Stelios Loizides
Senior Policy Analyst
Social Policy and Programs Branch
INAC
10 Wellington Street
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H4
819-997-6717



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Name of lead department(s): INAC, Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (OFI)

Lead department program activity: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $68.5 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) was developed in 1997 to respond to the needs of Aboriginal people living in urban centres. Through the UAS, the Government of Canada partners with various governments, community organizations and Aboriginal people to support projects that address local priorities. In 2007, the Government of Canada renewed the UAS by investing $68.5 million over five years to help meet the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres.

Today, the UAS improves co-ordination within federal departments and agencies to maximize the Government of Canada’s investments. The UAS also helps the Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians ensure all federal government policies, priorities and expenditures to do with Aboriginal people in key urban centres advance federal objectives, respond effectively to local challenges and opportunities, and result in the integrated delivery of federal, provincial, municipal, Aboriginal and private-sector programs and policy objectives.

DIAND/Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians uses either the Multi-year Comprehensive Funding Arrangement (MCFA) or the Comprehensive Funding Arrangement (CFA) to transfer annual funding to eligible recipients for program delivery under the UAS. Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians may also use a multi-year CFA, which respects provisions in the Treasury Board Policy on Transfer Payments as well as the terms and conditions for the Renewal and Enhancement of the UAS Contribution Program. All components of the UAS program are eligible under the UAS Contribution funding authorities.

Shared outcome(s): The aim of the renewed and enhanced UAS program is to promote the self-reliance of — and increase life choices for — Aboriginal people in urban centres. In fact, the UAS program objective directly supports the implementation of Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians’s strategic outcome: Socio-economic conditions of Métis, non-status Indians and urban Aboriginal people.

Specifically, the UAS program objectives are to:

  • target urban Aboriginal socio-economic needs within new and renewed federal initiatives, where appropriate;
  • improve access to and co-ordination of programs and services;
  • co-ordinate policy research and information sharing in the urban Aboriginal area;
  • harmonize policy and improve horizontal connections within the federal government; and
  • seek out opportunities for partnership with federal, provincial and municipal governments, Aboriginal groups and the private sector.

To accomplish these UAS program objectives, UAS projects will focus investments strategically in three project priority areas:

  • improving life skills;
  • promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and
  • supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Achievement of the UAS objectives will maximize the Government of Canada’s ability to align federal expenditures directed toward urban Aboriginal issues in key urban centres with provincial and municipal programming.

Governance structure(s): All UAS-designated communities have established Community Committees which partner with the private sector and all levels of government to accelerate planning, funding decisions and responses to urban Aboriginal issues. Each Community Committee is composed of a cross section of the Aboriginal community to ensure decisions reflect broad community concerns and priorities.

The UAS takes a community-based approach to the management and delivery of its projects, and uses either a Community Entity Model or a Shared Delivery Model, depending on the initiative. Under both models, project proposals are distributed to federal departments for review. Departments that determine a project to be consistent with their mandate may choose to either: (1) flow funding to DIAND or another lead department through the UAS horizontal terms and conditions, which require a Memorandum of Understanding and an Interdepartmental Letter of Agreement, or (2) negotiate a separate agreement and fund the delivery organization directly.

To maximize federal investments, the UAS horizontal terms and conditions allow for federal co-ordination of Aboriginal programs within signatory departments, as well as programs of general application. This practice has been recognized as a model for federal horizontality, and has led to greater program alignment with provincial and municipal programming. In addition, the National Caucus, an advisory group comprised of representatives from each of the Community Committees, shares national perspectives with the UAS.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and non-Status Indians Urban Aboriginal Strategy $68,500,000 $13,567,000 UAS projects will strategically focus investments in three priority areas (improving life skills, promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families).
The total federal funding allocation for each federal department over the UAS initiative will vary year over year for the five year authority based on the amount of funding available in the department and the priorities and projects identified by the community.
Human Resource and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) Aboriginal Human Resource Development Strategy, (AHRDS)   $137,072 The UAS and AHRDS will complete three joint projects that will result in the following benefits:

In Vancouver, 24 Aboriginal individuals receiving job/skills development training and the same individuals moving on to specialized employment or further training.

One employment development service created. Report to detail the level of local Aboriginal involvement in the project.

In Prince George, 30 Aboriginal individuals served through life skill services and receiving job/skills development training.
Homelessness Partnering Strategy   $1,109,677 The UAS and Homelessness Partnering Strategy will complete eight joint projects that will result in the following benefits:

50 Aboriginal individuals participating in a cultural event(s), programs and/or communications projects. Summary will detail the benefits and outcomes to the Aboriginal women participants in project.

In Winnipeg, 10 Aboriginal individuals moving from homelessness to affordable housing, and three local government partnerships sustained and/or developed with the goal of improving the delivery of programs and services.

104 Aboriginal individuals participating in a cultural event(s), programs and/or communications projects and seven Aboriginal individuals served through employment development services.

UAS funding will enable one life skill services program to add an Aboriginal element, with five Aboriginal individuals participating in parent/child reunification.

75 Aboriginal individuals served through life skill services.

12 Aboriginal individuals receiving job/skills development training and two sustainable partnerships created/maintained between urban Aboriginal community organizations.

40 Aboriginal individuals in program and services offered to urban Aboriginal particularly women and children.

9,360 Aboriginal individuals served through life skill services and through participating in a risk reduction project.[1]
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program   $328,691 The UAS and Skills Employment Program will complete two joint projects that will result in the following benefits:

12 Aboriginal individuals served through life skill services, resulting in employment.

12 Aboriginal individuals served through life skill services and 10 Aboriginal individuals served through employment development services.
Aboriginal Affairs Directorate   $15,000 The UAS and HRSDC’s Aboriginal Affairs Directorate will complete two joint projects that will result in the following benefits:

A conference in which 250 Aboriginal individuals will participate in targeted wellness projects.

An International Indigenous Forum hosted by the Pacific Business and Law Institute will examine current initiatives that are working to promote indigenous culture and traditions around the world.[2]
Health Canada Headstart Program   $36,278 The UAS and Headstart Program will complete one joint project that will result in the following benefits:

100 Aboriginal individuals moving from homelessness to affordable housing and 300 Aboriginal individuals participating in targeted wellness projects.
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB)   $30,000 The UAS and FNIHB will complete one joint project that will result in the following benefits:

Support for the 9th Annual Indigenous Women in Leadership Training Conference, in which 250 Aboriginal individuals will participate in targeted wellness projects.
Canadian Heritage Urban Multi-Purpose Aboriginal Youth Program   $338,943 The UAS and Urban Multi-Purpose Aboriginal Youth Program will complete seven joint projects that will result in the following benefits:

505 Aboriginal individuals receiving job and/or skills development training.

In Calgary, 3000 individuals participating in a cultural event(s), programs and/or communications projects.

20 Aboriginal individuals receiving life skills services.

Four employment development service programs enhanced by UAS funding.

In Prince Albert, 120 individuals participating in cultural event(s), programs and/or communications projects and participating in a risk reduction project.
Service Canada Youth Awareness Program   $76,763 The UAS and the Youth Awareness Program will complete two joint projects that will result in the following benefits:

42 Aboriginal individuals served through employment development services.

60 Aboriginal individuals served by urban risk reduction projects.
Canada Summer Jobs

Student Employment Experience
  $22,672 The UAS and the Canada Summer Jobs and Student Employment Experience will complete two joint project that will result in the following benefits:

152 Aboriginal individuals served through life skill services, and two sustainable partnerships created and/or maintained between urban Aboriginal community organizations.

In Saskatoon, 200 Aboriginal individuals participating in a cultural event(s), programs and/or communications projects.
Status of Women Canada Women’s Program   $50,000 The UAS and Status of Women will complete one joint project that will result in the following benefits:

200 Aboriginal individuals participating in a risk reduction project. A best practices report will flow from this project.
Public Safety Canada National Crime Prevention Strategy   $733,136 The UAS and National Crime Prevention Center will complete three joint projects that will result in the following benefits:

48 Aboriginal students retained within school as a result of the program and participating in risk reduction projects.

60 Aboriginal individuals participating in a cultural event(s), programs and/or communications projects and receiving skill development and cultural reclamation programming, education, counselling, support and advocacy.

10 Aboriginal individuals served through life skill services and employment development services participating in a cultural program and receiving job/skills development training.
Research   $50,000 The UAS and Public Safety Research program will complete one joint project that will result in the following benefits:

An Urban Aboriginal Study to better understand and effectively document the experiences, aspirations and identities of urban Aboriginal individuals.[3]
Public Health Agency of Canada HIV/AIDS   $143,771 The UAS, Homelessness Partnering Strategy and HIV/AIDS will complete one joint project that will result in the following benefits:

9,360 Aboriginal individuals served through life skill services and through participating in a risk reduction project.[4]
Correctional Service Canada Policy Unit   $100,000 The UAS and Corrections Canada Policy Unit will complete one joint project that will result in the following benefits:

12 Aboriginal individuals receiving job/skills development training.
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Research   $50,000 The UAS and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Aboriginal Research Branch will complete one joint project that will result in the following benefits:

An Urban Aboriginal Study to better understand and effectively document the experiences, aspirations and identities of urban Aboriginal individuals.[5]
Justice Canada Aboriginal Affairs Portfolio   $20,000 The UAS and Aboriginal Affairs Portfolio will complete one joint project that will result in the following benefits:

An International Indigenous Forum hosted by the Pacific Business and Law Institute will examine current initiatives that are working to promote indigenous culture and traditions around the world.[6]
Total unknown $16,809,003  

Footnotes:

  1. This is the same project as that referred to under footnote 4. (return to source paragraph)
  2. This is the same Forum as that referred to under footnote 6. (return to source paragraph)
  3. This is the same project as that referred to under footnote 5. (return to source paragraph)
  4. This is the same footnote as that referred to under footnote 1. (return to source paragraph)
  5. This is the same study as that referred to under footnote 3. (return to source paragraph)
  6. This is the same Forum as that referred to under footnote 2. (return to source paragraph)

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Based on community needs and on a 50:50 basis, the refocused UAS helps co-ordinate federal programs, maximizes the Government of Canada’s investments and aligns national initiatives with provincial and municipal programming.

The UAS strives to significantly improve its horizontal management and shared accountability with federal partners. The UAS’ objectives exemplify how Canada’s government is moving in the right direction to ensure that Aboriginal people living in cities across Canada acquire the skills and experiences they need to gain access to and succeed in urban centres.

Contact information:
Allan MacDonald
Director General
Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
66 Slater Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Telephone: 613-992-8186

Top of Page

Industry Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Strategic Outcome
Competitive Businesses are Drivers of Sustainable Wealth Creation


BizPaL
Lead Department:
Industry Canada
Start Date:
January 31, 2005
End Date:
March 31, 2011
Description (including funding agreement):

BizPaL is a unique collaboration of federal, provincial/territorial and municipal governments working together in a new service delivery model to improve access to information on permits and licences needed from all orders of government to start or operate a business.

Integrated into local government websites or portals, BizPaL provides a single point of contact for entrepreneurs, enabling them to quickly learn which permits and licences they will need from municipal, provincial/territorial and federal governments.

Federal funding supports secretariat services, expansion and development of the service and the federal role. None of the participants (provinces/territories/municipalities) receive federal funds for the BizPaL initiative. They provide in-kind support in their respective jurisdictions. Provincial and territorial participants also contribute funds to a specified purpose account to support basic operating costs in accordance with a cost-sharing formula based on population size.

Shared Outcomes:
  • Increased awareness of and access to business permits and licences from all orders of government.
  • Increased cost savings for businesses by avoiding involuntary non-compliance.
  • Support government efforts to reduce the paperwork burden and red tape that face small business owners and operators.
Governance Structure:

BizPaL represents a shared governance model that involves participants from the federal, provincial/territorial and local/municipal levels of government. Industry Canada manages the expansion and evolution of the BizPaL service and develops relationships among participating jurisdictions.

Although governance is shared through various participant committees, Industry Canada is accountable for the federal resources contributed to the BizPaL initiative. In addition, Industry Canada is responsible for enlisting the participation of federal government departments to BizPaL and managing the national BizPaL office.

Federal and Other Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Programs Total Allocation (start to end) ($000) Planned Spending 2009–2010 ($000)
Industry Canada (Lead) Entrepreneurial Economy BizPaL 15.7 3
Natural Resources Canada Management and Oversight (Internal Services) BizPaL Not applicable Not applicable
Provincial and territorial governments (10)* Not applicable BizPaL Not applicable Not applicable
Municipal/local governments (150) Not applicable BizPaL Not applicable Not applicable
Total : 15.7 3.0
Expected Results for 2009–2010:
Accelerated expansion of the service to all interested provincial/territorial governments and local government participants within those provinces and territories.
Contact Information:

Executive Director
Service Delivery and Partnerships
Small Business and Marketplace Services Sector
Industry Canada
613-954-3576

*   Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba New Brunswick, Northwest Territories, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Saskatchewan, Yukon


Canada Business Network
Amalgamation of Canada Business Service Centres (CBSC) and Business Gateway (BG)
Lead Department:
Industry Canada
Start Date:
April 1, 1995 (CBSC)


April 1, 2000 (BG)
End Date:
March 31, 2009 (CBSC)
(pending renewal)
March 31, 2006 (BG)
Description (including funding agreement):

The Canada Business Network was established to improve service to small business and start-up entrepreneurs by providing a comprehensive first stop for information on government services, programs and compliance requirements from federal and provincial/territorial levels of government.

On behalf of the Government of Canada and its partners, Canada Business delivers a host of information products and resources through a variety of channels across Canada (web, in-person, telephone). Through its collaboration with the provinces and territories, information products and resources are supplemented by jurisdictionally relevant content — providing a truly client-centred, integrated information service.

Shared Outcomes:
  • Increased awareness and access to government business-related information, programs and services and facilitated compliance for business
  • Increased use of self-service channels
  • Reduced complexity in accessing programs and services and compliance requirements for SMEs
  • Improved SME business planning and market research
Governance Structure:

The Canada Business Network is managed on behalf of the federal government by Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA), Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED), Industry Canada and Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD).

The lead organizations are responsible for ensuring compliance with all federal policies affecting program delivery in a collaborative environment, particularly policies on topics such as official languages, accessibility, access to information and privacy, federal identity and alternative service delivery.

Federal and Other Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Programs Total Allocation (start to end) ($000) Planned Spending 2009–2010 ($000)
Industry Canada (Lead) Entrepreneurial Economy Canada Business Network 98.9 6.5
ACOA Enterprise Development Canada Business Network 38.7 2.6
WD Business Development and Entrepreneurship Canada Business Network 53.9 4.0
CED Competitiveness of Enterprises Canada Business Network 25.1 1.9
Total : 216.6 15.0
Expected Results for 2009–2010:
SME use of government business-related information, programs and services and facilitated compliance for business.
Contact Information:

Executive Director
Service Delivery and Partnerships
Small Business and Marketplace Services Sector
Industry Canada
613-954-3576

Top of Page

Infrastructure Canada

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives


Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

1. Name of horizontal initiative: Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Targeted Project-Based Infrastructure Funding

4. Start date of the horizontal initiative: 2003-04

5. End date of the horizontal initiative: 2012-13

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $4.8 billion

7. Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement):

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund, which received funding in the 2001 and 2003 federal budgets is a cost-shared contribution program for strategic infrastructure projects. To date, the fund provided federal support to 71 projects.

Investments are directed to projects of major national and regional significance, and are to be made in areas that are vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life for Canadians. The fund is delivered through negotiated agreements with provincial, territorial or local governments, private partners or non-governmental organizations. Contribution agreements are tailored based on the project requirements.

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Act outlines the prime categories of investments in projects that involve fixed capital assets that are used or operated for the benefit of the public. The categories eligible under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund are:

  • Highway and Rail Infrastructure;
  • Local Transportation Infrastructure;
  • Tourism or Urban Development Infrastructure;
  • Water or Sewage Infrastructure; and
  • Other categories approved by regulation, e.g. Advanced Telecommunications and High-Speed Broadband, Northern Infrastructure.

More information on the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund can be found at: http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/csif-fcis/csif-fcis-eng.html

8. Shared outcome(s):

The overall planned results Infrastructure Canada expects to achieve through the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund are to invest in projects which:

  • facilitate the movement of goods and people on Canada’s National Highway System for the purposes of increasing the productivity, economic efficiency, and safety of Canada’s surface transportation system;
  • facilitate the safe and efficient movement of goods and people, ease congestion, or reduce greenhouse gases and airborne pollutants;
  • ensure that tourism continues to contribute to the economic well-being of Canadians and to serve as a bridge between Canada and the world;
  • ensure that drinking water is safe, clean, and reliable at drinking water facilities, and ensure sustainable treatment of wastewater; and
  • expand broadband networks in Canada.

9. Governance structure(s):

All Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. After project selection, Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution. At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by the implementing departments/agencies are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The fund is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review, selection, approval, public announcements, environmental assessment in some cases, and program evaluation. It leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients. It also develops, in coordination with the implementing department/agency, the submission to Treasury Board for the approval of funds. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative will sit on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee usually as the federal co-chair, except for transportation projects where Transport Canada is the lead.
  2. An implementing department/agency: Infrastructure Canada’s relationship with each implementing department or agency varies with their capacity and the complexity of the project. Responsibilities are also negotiated specifically for each project. The implementing department/agency may provide technical assistance in the analysis of the business case, determining the costs and benefits to be realized, and providing advice on the development of the contribution agreement and Treasury Board submission. The implementing department/agency will support implementation of the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: overseeing the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assessing the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, providing information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approving claims, making payments, and conducting audits and evaluation of projects. The implementing department/agency would normally be represented on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. The implementing department/agency will also ensure adherence to information management requirements, including the use of the Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, which captures, monitors and reports on project information. The implementing department/agency also provides communication support.
  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, Infrastructure Canada leads the negotiations to develop a contribution agreement. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)1 14. Planned Spending for 2009-101 15. Expected Results for 2009-10
1. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) PA 1 a. $152.8 Million $9.3 Million The Halifax Harbour project will result in the construction of sewer treatment plants at Dartmouth and Herring Cove which will meet or exceed effluent quality requirements identified by the Nova Scotia Department of Environment and Labour. The enhanced primary treatment and the associated UV disinfection of wastewater will greatly reduce the introduction of sewage-related human pathogens into the harbour. The harbour’s water quality and the benthic habitat will be improved, leading to an overall positive impact on the fisheries. Wastewater treatment will remove 75 percent of the sewage-related particles.
2. Canada Economic Development – Quebec (CED-Q) PA 1 a. $144.5 Million $43.1 Million The Rivière Saint Charles Wastewater Project in Québec City will aid in the protection of the river environment by minimizing the quantity of contaminated wastewater that overflows into it and reestablishing the riverbanks natural habitat, making them more suitable for recreational purposes.
3. Western Economic Diversification (WED) PA 1 a. $655.5 Million $69.1 Million  
4. Industry Canada PA 1 a. $398.0 Million $34.6 Million The Toronto Soccer Stadium, with a seating capacity of 20,000, is expected to increase tourism as well as the capacity to host soccer events of a world-caliber.
5. Indian and Northern Affairs (INAC) PA 1 a. $41.0 Million $12.6 Million The Nunavut Social Housing project is for 182 new housing units with all 25 communities in Nunavut having at least one housing unit built. It will increase the supply of social housing and therefore shortened waiting lists, reduce over-crowding and improve housing quality.
6. Transport Canada PA 1 a. $3,340.5 Million $332.6 Million  
      Total $4,732.3 Million Total $501.3 Million  

16. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a

17. Contact information:

Jocelyne St Jean
Director General of Intergovernmental Operations
(613) 948-8003 jocelyne.stjean@infc.gc.ca

1 Includes $89.1 million for project funding provided under the Building Canada Fund.


Border Infrastructure Fund

1. Name of horizontal initiative: Border Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Targeted Project-Based Infrastructure Funding

4. Start date of the horizontal initiative: 2003-04

5. End date of the horizontal initiative: 2013-14

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $600 Million

7. Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement):

The Border Infrastructure Fund, which was announced in Budget 2001, is a $600-million cost-shared contribution program. It complements some of the Government of Canada’s other infrastructure programs such as the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund and the Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program, a Transport Canada program.

As part of “Canada’s commitment to address land border pressures, such as traffic congestion, and to continue to facilitate the large volume of trade across the Canada – United States border”, the Border Infrastructure Fund contributions are directed at or on routes leading to Canada’s border crossings, with a particular focus on the six largest:

  • Windsor, Ontario;
  • Sarnia, Ontario;
  • Fort Erie, Ontario;
  • Niagara Falls, Ontario;
  • Douglas, British Columbia; and,
  • Lacolle, Quebec.

The fund also directs some funding toward smaller and regionally important border crossings throughout Canada. Once completed, projects supported under the Border Infrastructure Fund will help alleviate traffic congestion, increase system capacity and further the Smart Border Declaration (a Canada – US Declaration; see http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/anti-terrorism/declaration-en.asp).

More information on this fund can be found at: http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/bif-fsif/bif-fsif-eng.html.

8. Shared outcome(s):

The overall planned results that Infrastructure Canada expects to achieve through the Border Infrastructure Fund are to invest in projects that contribute to safe and efficient border crossings. Expected outcomes are to alleviate border congestion and increase border crossing capacity, and to increase security and safety at border crossings, leading to cross border trade efficiencies.

9. Governance structure(s):

All Border Infrastructure Fund projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults with other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. After project selection, public announcements are made by the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution. At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by Transport Canada are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The fund is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review and selection. It leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients and is responsible for the evaluation of the program. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative will sit on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee.
  2. Transport Canada: This department has the project-specific technical knowledge with regard to each project. Transport Canada provides analysis and advice for the review and approval of projects. It is responsible for implementing the Border Infrastructure Fund projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: environmental assessment, the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, the provision of information pertaining to cash flow and budget, the approval of invoices, making payments, the conducting of audits and evaluation of the projects. Transport Canada reviews the business case for the project, and determines the costs and benefits. It works with Infrastructure Canada to jointly negotiate the project agreement and prepares the Treasury Board submission; the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities signs both documents. Transport Canada is the federal co-chair of the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. It also ensures adherence to information management requirements to capture, monitor and report on project information.
  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be a provincial, territorial or local government, private partner or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, the funding recipient enters into negotiations with Infrastructure Canada to develop a contribution agreement. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Expected Results for 2009-10
1. Transport Canada PA 1   $542 Million $66.7 Million The Windsor/VACIS is a joint project with Canadian Pacific Railway and secures the 7.5km CPR rail corridor from Walker Road in Windsor to the United States’ border by protecting that length of track and preparing the site for the installation of a Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System by the United States Government.
      Total $542 Million Total $66.7 Million  

16. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a

17. Contact information:

Jocelyne St Jean
Director General of Intergovernmental Operations
(613) 948-8003 jocelyne.stjean@infc.gc.ca


Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

1. Name of horizontal initiative: Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Targeted Project-Based Infrastructure Funding

4. Start date of the horizontal initiative: 2004-05

5. End date of the horizontal initiative:2009-11

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1.2 billion

7. Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement):

The $1.2-billion Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund has been structured to provide a balanced response to local infrastructure needs in urban and rural Canada and will ensure that all Canadians, whether they live in large, small or remote communities will share in the benefits of infrastructure investments.

The fund improves and increases the stock of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, culture, recreation, and those very things that make our communities vibrant and productive places to live, work and raise families. It targets communities of less than 250,000 residents as well as First Nation communities. Like other infrastructure programs, the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund seeks to ensure that the projects it funds support the goals of the Government of Canada, encourages new and innovative approaches and favours partnerships, including an emphasis on ‘green’ projects which are sustainable and reduce greenhouse gases.

Through the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund, the Government of Canada continues to work in productive partnerships with provinces, territories, and municipalities, as well as First Nations and the private sector, to invest in local infrastructure projects. These projects will be vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life in Canadian communities.

The fund is cost-shared, with the Government of Canada contributing, on average, one-third of total project eligible costs. Provinces and municipalities contribute the remainder of these costs. In recognition of the unique circumstances of the First Nations and the Territories, where many communities have no tax base, the Government of Canada may contribute a higher percentage of total project eligible costs.

More information on the fund can be found at: http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/mrif-fimr/mrif-fimr-eng.html.

8. Shared outcome(s):

The overall expected outcomes are:

  • Improved and increased core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, culture and recreation; and
  • Improved quality of life and economic opportunities for smaller communities and First Nations.

9. Governance structure(s):

The Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund is based on a federal partnership arrangement between Infrastructure Canada and five federal departments: Western Economic Diversification, Industry Canada (for Ontario projects), Canada Economic Development – Quebec, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. It involves 14 sub-programs, one joint sub-program for each province and territory and a sub-program for First Nations communities. Each of the 14 sub-programs follows the same general conditions, priorities and approaches. Also, recognizing the individual nature of each sub-program, the various agreements reflect the nature of the partnership as it relates to the order of government.

To stimulate expected outcomes, the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund eligible projects must conform to a policy leveraging framework, based on a common baseline, but adapted for each jurisdiction. To ensure broad support and effective, innovative project delivery, partnerships of various types, including public-private partnerships, are encouraged in the formulation and delivery of the fund projects. The program relies on strong input from local and rural municipalities, including the support of the locally elected councils. In addition, municipal representatives are involved in the processes and management of the program in the respective province or territory.


10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)1 14. Planned Spending for 2009-101 15. Expected Results for 2009-10
1. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) PA 1 a. $143.4 Million $37.5 Million The City of Bathurst New Brunswick’s Water and Wastewater System Expansion will connect approximately 450 new households to municipal water service.

Nova Scotia’s Cape Breton Regional Municipality’s Dominion Sanitary Sewer and Treatment will treat approximately 1,100 households to a higher quality of water and increase the capacity to treat wastewater by approximately 1,360,000 M3 per annum.

The Mealy Mountain Auditorium in Newfoundland and Labrador is a cultural facility that should attract approximately 5,000 visitors per annum.

The Montague Wellness Centre in Prince Edward Island should attract approximately 15,000 visitors per annum and will be used by approximately 25,000 people per annum.

2. Canada Economic Development – Quebec (CED-Q) PA 1 a. $241.8 Million $166.3 Million An industrial park in the City of New Richmond is expected to have approximately 7 new businesses and 200 permanent jobs will be created as a direct result of this project.

The Maison des jeunes Kekpart will support users by offering workshops and practical training in the arts and multimedia. Once the project has been completed, the building will benefit at least 6,000 young people.

The Patro de Lévis Community Centre will be able to better respond to the increasing demand for activities and services for the growing population of Lévis.

The repairs to Royal Avenue between the bridge at the Montmorency River and la Côte de l’Église are replacing 1,000 meters of sewer underneath Royal Avenue and will result in 4,500 people having access to a higher standard of drinking water.

3. Western Economic Diversification (WED) PA 1 a. $286.3 Million $151.3 Million The Drayton Valley Wastewater Treatment Facility Upgrade will connect approximately 300 new households to municipal wastewater treatment systems and increase the number of industries, commercial establishments and institutions connected to these systems. It will meet the future capacity for the Town of Drayton Valley and surrounding rural areas of Brazeau County with higher effluent quality release to the environment.

Manitoba’s Grand Rapids Sewer and Water Project will connect 140 new households to municipal water service and improve the quality of water to 30 more. The facility should reduce the number of health related water incidents by approximately 20 incidents per annum.

The Water System Improvements for the City of Yorkton in Saskatchewan will improve the quality of potable water to 6,800 new households.

The Chiliwack-Evans Road Connector in British Columbia will decrease traffic accidents by approximately 20 per annum. It will also reduce congestion, estimated at saving 1.1 million vehicle-hours per year, and save approximately 6,553 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions per year.

4. Industry Canada PA 1 a. $373.3 Million $99.1 Million In Ontario, the North Bay Water Filtration Plant will improve the quality of potable water to 22,500 houses while improving the quality of 230,000 meters of pipe within the wastewater distribution system.

The upgrading of the Renfrew Wastewater Treatment Plant will connect 395 new houses to municipal wastewater collection and treatment systems while improving quality to 3,460 more.

5. Indian and Northern Affairs (INAC) PA 1 a. $59.1 Million $29.5 Million The Wood Box Utilidor Replacement Program in Inuvik, Northwest Territories, will improve service reliability of wastewater treatment facilities and collection systems. It will also reduce Operations and Management costs and minimize service interruptions.

The Pond Inlet Community Centre will provide residents with a new location for meetings and social interactions as well as increasing programming of activities, both educational and recreational for youth and children of the community.

      Total $1,103.9 Million Total $483.7 Million  

16. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a

17. Contact information:

Jocelyne St Jean
Director General of Intergovernmental Operations
(613) 948-8003 jocelyne.stjean@infc.gc.ca

1 Includes $113.6 million for program funding provided under the Building Canada Fund.


Infrastructure Canada Program

1. Name of horizontal initiative: Infrastructure Canada Program

2. Name of lead department(s): Industry Canada, Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, Western Economic Diversification Canada and Indian and Northern Affairs (INAC). In 2002, Infrastructure Canada was created and assumed the coordination role played, up to then, by the Treasury Board Secretariat.

3. Lead departments program activity: Targeted Project-Based Infrastructure Funding

4. Start date of the horizontal initiative: 2000-01

5. End date of the horizontal initiative: 2010-11

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $2.05 billion

7. Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement):

The Infrastructure Canada Program is a contribution program introduced in 2000 for local municipal infrastructure projects. The Government of Canada matches the provincial/territorial governments’ contribution, providing up to one-third of the cost of each municipal infrastructure project. It is a $2.05-billion program in effect over seven fiscal years. The fund is well underway and projects are ongoing across the country. Most of the funding has either been committed to approved projects or notionally allocated to those that are under review.

The fund’s first priority for funding is “green municipal projects”, i.e. projects with environmental benefits that enhance the quality of the environment or health benefits that enhance the quality of human life. Other priorities include affordable housing, culture, tourism and recreation, rural and remote telecommunication, high-speed access for local public institutions and local transportation. Recognizing that individual communities know their needs best, the program operates in a "bottom-up" fashion, with the flexibility for municipalities and First Nations to identify their own infrastructure priorities. It also includes provisions to ensure an equitable balance of funding between urban and rural communities.

Further information may be obtained at http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/icp-pic/icp-pic-eng.html.

8. Shared outcome(s):

The overall planned results are that urban and rural municipal infrastructure in Canada is enhanced and Canadians’ quality of life is improved through investments that protect the environment and support long-term community and economic growth.

9. Governance structure(s):

The key roles and responsibilities of partners are as follows:

  • Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities – overall program management and accountability to Parliament, including media relations, appointment of Management Committee members, project approval for projects where the federal share is between $1M - $10M;
  • Infrastructure Canada – oversight and monitoring of the program ensuring effective management and a coordinated approach to communications and provision of services including operational services, information management, and communications services;
  • Ministers or Ministers of State responsible for delivery (Industry Canada; Western Economic Diversification; Canada Economic Development – Quebec; Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency; Indian and Northern Affairs Canada) – with Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities joint authority to enter into contribution agreements with provinces/territories, and project approval where federal share is less than $1M;
  • Federal-Provincial/Territorial Management Committees (one per jurisdiction) – administration and management of the Infrastructure Canada Program in accordance with the terms and conditions of the applicable federal-provincial/territorial agreement;
  • Provinces/Territories – signatories to the negotiated agreements with the federal government;
  • Local governments – main applicants for Infrastructure Canada Program projects; also responsible for sponsoring projects with non-governmental organizations and/or private sector;
  • Non-governmental organizations and private sector – eligible to propose projects that are sponsored either by a municipality, a province/territory or the federal government; and
  • Other government departments - provide key expertise for all or some types of Infrastructure Canada Program projects (e.g., Transport Canada, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency).

10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Expected Results for 2009-10
1. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) PA 1 a. $188.2 Million $0 Million In Nova Scotia, the Municipality of the County of Victoria –Baddeck, the upgrades to its wastewater treatment system will treat 287 houses to a higher quality of wastewater while connecting 80 more to wastewater treatment systems.

The upgrades to New Brunswick’s Village of Dorchester’s water system will allow it to provide potable water to the residences there.

The Glenwood-Applewood Sewage Treatment Plant in Newfoundland and Labrador will increase the quality of potable water to 540 houses.

2. Canada Economic Development – Quebec (CED-Q) PA 1 a. $525.3 Million $12.4 Million  
3. Western Economic Diversification (WED) PA 1 a. $568.3 Million $6.8 Million  
4. Industry Canada PA 1 a. $693.8 Million $0 Million  
5. Indian and Northern Affairs (INAC) PA 1 a. $40.0 Million $0 Million  
      Total $2,015.6 Million Total $19.2 Million  

16. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a

17. Contact information:

Jocelyne St Jean
Director General of Intergovernmental Operations
(613) 948-8003 jocelyne.stjean@infc.gc.ca


Building Canada Fund

1. Name of horizontal initiative: Building Canada Fund

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Targeted Project-Based Infrastructure Funding

4. Start date of the horizontal initiative: 2007-08

5. End date of the horizontal initiative:2016-17

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $8.8 billion

7. Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement):

The Building Canada Fund focuses on projects that deliver economic, environmental, and social benefits to all Canadians.

The national priorities for funding are core national highway system routes, drinking water, wastewater, public transit and green energy. Other eligible categories include projects that support economic growth and development (short-line rail and short-sea shipping, connectivity and broadband, tourism and regional and local airports), environmental projects (solid waste management), as well as projects that contribute to the ongoing development of safe and strong communities (disaster mitigation, culture, sport, local roads and bridges, and brownfield redevelopment). Funding is used to support public infrastructure owned by provincial, territorial and municipal governments and entities, as well as the non-profit sector and private industry, in certain cases.

Funding is allocated for projects in the various provinces and territories based on their population (as of the 2006 Census). In the provinces, the program operates through two components: the Major Infrastructure Component and the Communities Component. In the territories, in recognition of their very low per capita allocations, the Building Canada funding has been rolled into the Provincial-Territorial Base Funding Program and is managed under the terms of this latter program in each territory.

The Major Infrastructure Component targets larger, strategic projects of national and regional significance. Under this component, two-thirds of national funding is directed to the above-mentioned national priorities. Projects under the Major Infrastructure Component are selected jointly on the basis of merit through a federal-provincial/territorial negotiation process, and all projects are required to meet criteria targeting environmental, economic and quality-of-life objectives. Innovative technologies and partnerships will also be emphasized.

The Communities Component is focused on projects in communities with populations of less than 100,000. Projects will be selected through an application-based process and, like projects under the Major Infrastructure Component, will be evaluated on the extent to which they meet environmental, economic and quality of life objectives. This will significantly help smaller communities address their infrastructure pressures and serve as a complementary instrument to the Gas Tax Fund.

More information on the Building Canada Fund can be found at: http://www.buildingcanada-chantierscanada.gc.ca/funprog-progfin/target-viser/bcf-fcc/bcf-fcc-eng.html

8. Shared outcome(s):

The overall expected outcomes are to deliver results that matter to Canadians—cleaner air and water, safer roads, shorter commutes, and prosperous, liveable communities while supporting the Canada's priorities—a stronger economy, cleaner environment and better communities.

9. Governance structure(s):

  1. Major Infrastructure Component of the Building Canada Fund

    All Major Infrastructure Component projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Priorities are identified through discussions with provinces, territories, including through the Infrastructure Framework Committees. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. Following due diligence, Treasury Board approval is required for contributions to any projects above the delegated threshold (e.g. $50 million federal contribution). At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by the implementing departments/agencies are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

    The Major Infrastructure Component is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

    • Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for identifying priorities, recommending approval of all Major Infrastructure Component projects to the Minister, public announcements, environmental assessment in some cases, and program evaluation. In the case of non-transportation projects, Infrastructure Canada is also responsible for project review/due diligence, selection, and the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients. Infrastructure Canada develops, in coordination with the implementing department/agency, the submission to Treasury Board for the approval of funds. For transport-related projects, Transport Canada completes a project review/due diligence for Infrastructure Canada, negotiates the contribution agreements and the Treasury Board submissions. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative will sit on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. Infrastructure Canada is responsible for general oversight of all projects in this program.
    • An implementing department/agency: Infrastructure Canada’s relationship with each implementing department or agency varies with their capacity and the complexity of the project. Responsibilities are also negotiated specifically for each project. The implementing department/agency may provide technical assistance in the analysis of the business case, determining the costs and benefits to be realized, and providing advice on the development of the contribution agreement and Treasury Board submission. The implementing department/agency will support Infrastructure Canada in the implementation of the Major Infrastructure Component projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: overseeing the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assessing the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, providing information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approving claims, making payments, and conducting audits and evaluations of the projects. The implementing department/agency would normally be represented on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee. The implementing department/agency will also ensure adherence to Infrastructure Canada’s information management requirements, including the use of Infrastructure Canada’s Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, which captures, monitors and reports project information. The implementing department/agency also provides communication support to Infrastructure Canada.
    • The funding recipient: The recipient may be provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, Infrastructure Canada leads the negotiations to develop a contribution agreement, except for transportation items which are handled by Transport Canada. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.
  2. Communities Component of the Building Canada Fund

    The Communities Component is governed by separate federal-provincial contribution agreements, each of which is managed by an Oversight Committee established by the Infrastructure Framework Committee that includes both federal and provincial senior officials. To support the operation of the Communities Component and Oversight Committees, each jurisdiction has a federal-provincial Joint Secretariat staffed by Federal Delivery Partners and provincial officials.

    All project applications under the Communities Component are subject to a competitive, application-based process. This process is administered by the Joint Secretariat, but a material role for the respective provincial municipal association (for those provinces that have municipal associations) may also have been established as part of the application review process. Allowing some implementation flexibility to the Joint Secretariats and Oversight Committees, all competitive processes issue calls for applications (either one open window for applications or multiple shorter windows with set closing dates). Some provinces may limit the number of applications per community within and/or across all intakes.

    Joint Secretariats provide the first level of due diligence, including engineering, environmental, and legal review of the applications, and prepare briefing material for the Oversight Committees. The Oversight Committees review and rank the application against the mandatory and additional leveraging criteria established in the Policy Leveraging Framework of the Building Canada Fund. The Oversight Committee presents the recommended list of projects to the Minister or the Federal Delivery Partner Minister for consideration, in accordance with the delegations of authority. After consulting with other Ministers who have a mandate in the substantive project area, the Minister or the Federal Delivery Partner Minister provide feedback on the list of projects to the Oversight Committee. The Oversight Committee then performs a final review of the list and makes a recommendation to the appropriate Minister, in accordance with the delegations of authority. Federal funding for projects is announced once final approval has been granted in writing.

    The Framework Agreements stipulate that individual federal-provincial contribution agreements govern the Communities Component in each province, and that these agreements are managed by an Oversight Committee, established under the Infrastructure Framework Committee. Each Oversight Committee includes both federal and provincial senior officials, and may also include representatives from provincial municipal associations (where applicable). The federal co-chair of the Oversight Committee is a senior official from Infrastructure Canada appointed by the Minister.

    In the federal-provincial contribution agreement, the parties agreed to establish a Joint Secretariat to support the Oversight Committee and administer the Communities Component. This secretariat is staffed by officials from the provincial government and the Federal Delivery Partner.


10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-101 15. Expected Results for 2009-10
1. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) PA 1 a. BCF MIC $12.0 Million $5.4 Million Nova Scotia - Design and construction of a 176,000-square-foot multi-purpose athletic facility and space for the Canadian Sport Centre Atlantic to provide services to the community and to host the 2011 Canada Winter Games.
b. CSIF $26.6 Million $9.3 Million St. John’s Harbour.
c. BCF CC $148.3 Million $30.0 Million New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador
d. MRIF $23.2 Million $8.5 Million  
2. Canada Economic Development – Quebec (CED-Q) PA 1 a. BCF MIC $40.0 Million $11.0 Million Quartier des spectacles in Montreal.
b. BCF CC $210 Million $0 Québec
c. MRIF $39.8 Million $19.8 Million  
3. Transport Canada PA 1 a. BCF MIC $1,517.7 Million $239.2 Million Toronto-York Spadina -Supporting long-term economic prosperity by providing for an efficient, cost-effective, reliable multi-modal transportation system that is integrated with adjacent systems and other jurisdictions.

Québec A30 Phase II, BC Highway 1, BC Highway 97, BC Highway 97A, BC Kicking Horse Canyon, NB Highways, Nova Scotia Antigonish Bypass.

b. CSIF $100.0 Million $32.6 Million NB Highways
4. Western Economic Diversification (WED) PA 1 a. BCF MIC $100.0 Million $47.4 Million Northlands (AB) Exhibition Facility –

Will help meet current and forecasted demand for exhibit, conference and catering space; enhance ability to attract international conventions, as well as to compete for regional and national events.

AB Banff Centre –

Increased number of professional development opportunities in all arts disciplines and resulting heightened enrolment.

Calgary Olympic Development Association (CODA) –

Provide long-term training and competition opportunities and improve opportunities for Canadian athletes to compete for and win Olympic and Paralympics medals by centralizing coaching and supporting excellence.

IPSCO Place (formerly Regina Exhibition Park)-

Enhances capacity of Saskatchewan’s largest events facility to retain long standing clients and to attract new, large scale events.

b. CSIF $170.5 Million $47.2 Million Red River Floodway
c. BCF CC $359.5 Million $47.5 Million Alberta, BC, Manitoba, Saskatchewan
d. MRIF $58.5 Million $46.0 Million  
5. Industry Canada PA 1 a. BCF MIC $50.1 Million $24.8 Million The Ottawa Congress Centre –

The new congress centre will be better able to accommodate large events and attract a larger number of visitors to the region.

b. BCF CC $362 Million $35 Million Ontario
c. MRIF $64.0 Million $33.0 Million  
6. Indian and Northern Affairs (INAC) PA 1 a. MRIF $9.5 Million $6.3 Million  
      Total $3,399.7 Million Total $643.0 Million  

16. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a

17. Contact information:

Jocelyne St Jean
Director General of Intergovernmental Operations
(613) 948-8003 jocelyne.stjean@infc.gc.ca

1 Includes $202.7 million in funding for projects which are managed under CSIF and MRIF program mechanisms.

Top of Page

National Parole Board

Horizontal Initiatives

The National Parole Board became involved as a partner in the ongoing implementation of Firearms legislation in 1999-2000. Introduction of the Firearms legislation and related changes to the Criminal Code created longer sentences for offences involving the use of a firearm or an imitation firearm. Longer sentences generate the need for more conditional release reviews which, in turn, increase NPB’s program delivery costs (salary and non-salary).

As a result, the Board received a permanent increase to its funding base. The increase was incremental, rising from $437,000 in 1999-2000 to $858,000 per year in 2004-2005 and future years, consistent with projected workload growth. Workload data indicate that the Board now carries-out 1,400 to 2,000 reviews annually for offenders with firearms convictions. The estimated total cost for these reviews averages $1.6 million, of which $858,000 is covered by funding provided specifically as a result of changes in Firearms legislation.

The Board will also become involved in the National Anti-Drug Strategy following Royal Assent for legislative proposals calling for introduction of mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug offences. Current plans call for provision of $7.2 million for NPB over four years, including $2.2 million in 2009-10 to manage increased numbers of conditional release reviews as a result of mandatory minimum sentences.

Top of Page

National Research Council Canada

Table 3: Horizontal Initiatives

Name of horizontal initiative:  Genomics R&D Initiative

Name of lead department(s):  National Research Council

Lead department program activity: Research and Development

Start date of the horizontal initiative: 1999-2000

End date of the horizontal initiative:  2010-11 (Note: The current phase of GRDI is from 2008-09 to 2010-11.)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $ 234,100,000

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement):  The Genomics R&D Initiative was established for the purpose of building and maintaining capacity inside government departments to do genomics research.  As an enabling technology, genomics provides powerful tools and precise information to support operational mandates and upon which policy and regulatory decisions can be based.  Federal science-based departments and agencies interact with partners, stakeholders and clients and link these enabling tools and technologies to value-added applications that enable Canada to respond to national priorities, deliver on government mandates and support the development of wealth for Canadians.

These applications range from international requirements for genomics enabled testing to support access of exported products; the ability to interpret and assess genomics information submitted with product information for regulatory oversight; the development of assays and products using genomics approaches for enhancing Canadian’s lives (e.g. public health, food safety), the environment and sustainability of human activities; socio-economic and ethical considerations related to the use and integration of genomics in health care, environmental sustainability activities, and consumer and industrial products and applications; as well as facilitating Canadians’ access to accurate and understandable information concerning genome sciences.

Shared outcome(s):  A revised RMAF was prepared for the Initiative in 2006-07 based on an ultimate outcome of enhanced quality of life in terms of health, safety, and environment, social and economic development.  Long-term outcomes include: improved health care (e.g. diagnostics and treatment, reduced heath and environmental risks, reduced heath costs); reduced environmental impacts (e.g. water quality, healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems, sustainable fisheries, agriculture, forestry and aquaculture); and, improved competitiveness of Canadian Companies (e.g. diversification, improved productivity, cost reductions, sustainable development).

Governance structure(s): An interdepartmental ADM Coordinating Committee has been established to oversee collective management and coordination of the federal Genomics R&D Initiative.  The Committee ensures that effective priority setting mechanisms are established within departments, and that government objectives and priorities are addressed.

The Committee also ensures that common management principles associated with Genomics R&D management are implemented and horizontal collaborations between organizations are pursued wherever relevant and possible.  The committee includes members from each of the organizations receiving funding, as well as a representative from Industry Canada.

An Interdepartmental Working Group (WG) supports the work of the committee.  The mandate of the WG is to provide recommendations and advice to the ADM Coordinating Committee regarding strategic priority setting and overall management of the Genomics R&D Initiative.  The WG also supports evaluation and reporting requirements related to the Initiative.  NRC is the lead agency for the Initiative and chairs the Coordinating Committee and the Working Group.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Canadian Crop Genomics Initiative AAFC Canadian Crop Genomics Initiative $ 71.0 $ 6.0 See attachment
Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) Genomics and Biotechnology Aquatic Biotechnology and Genomics R&D $ 10.6 $ 0.9 See attachment
Environment Canada (EC) Sustainable Consumption and Production Approaches Strategic Applications of Genomics in the Environment $ 12.0 $ 1.0 See attachment
Health Canada (HC) Health Products and Food Branch – Health Products – Biologics HC/PHAC Genomics Initiative $ 46.0 $ 4.0 See attachment
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Natural Resource and Landmass knowledge for Canadians NRCan-CFS Genomics R&D Initiative $ 23.0 $ 2.0 See attachment
National Research Council (NRC) Research and Development Genomics and Health Initiative $ 71.0 $ 6.0 See attachment
Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) N/A – one time allocation in 1999-00 to assist in creation of Genome Canada Secretariat N/A $ 0.5 $ 0.0 N/A
Total  $ 234.1  $ 19.9  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:
Gary Fudge, P. Eng.
Director, Life Sciences Horizontal Initiatives
National Research Council Canada
613-949-0542

Expected Results for 2009-10

  1. Commercially relevant advances in areas of genomics R&D related to human health (e.g. genetic testing, diagnostics, microbial genomic applications, treating and preventing human diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, and pathogen detection).
  2. Improvements in crop value in cereals, soybean and canola through quality improvements in areas related to plant adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses (e.g. resistance to disease, tolerance to drought and cold), as well as seed development and metabolism (e.g. related to oil content for biofuels and nutraceutical applications).
  3. Sustainable management of aquatic resources through the use of genomics tools to: manage fishery openings; generate increased understanding of population genetics and structure; further understanding of behavioural, physiological and immunological responses to the environment; and through the management of aquatic animal diseases.
  4. Positioning the Canadian regulatory system for health to enable innovation while minimizing the risks to Canadians through a focused genomics R&D program aimed at strengthening capacity in priority areas such as genetic information, biotechnology products, human genomics and microbial genomics, on human, animal and environmental health.
  5. Increased knowledge for forest generation and protection methods, and for addressing environmental impact considerations, through a focused genomics R&D effort on species and traits that are of economic importance to Canada.
  6. Development of genome-science applications to support regulatory and enforcement activities in key areas such as environmental risk assessment and management; enforcement and compliance; pollution detection, monitoring and prevention; conservation biology and wildlife genetics.
Top of Page

Natural Resources Canada

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives: Improving the Performance of the Regulatory System for Major Natural Resource Projects

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Improving the Performance of the Regulatory System for Major Natural Resource Projects

2. Name of lead department(s): Natural Resources Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Safety, Security and Stewardship – Natural Resource and Landmass Knowledge and Systems

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 1, 2007

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $150 million over 5 years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

To respond to the recent growth in the number of major resource projects and move forward on commitments to create a more accountable, predictable and timely regulatory review process, the Government has allocated $150 million over five years to establish the Major Projects Management Office (MPMO) within Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and to increase the scientific and technical capacity of key regulatory departments and agencies.

The MPMO has been created to provide a single point of entry into the federal regulatory system for all stakeholders and to provide overarching management of the federal regulatory process for major natural resource projects. New capacity funding provided through this initiative will ensure key regulatory departments and agencies are positioned to respond to the recent growth in the number of new major resource projects and will better enable departments to meet their legal responsibilities for Aboriginal Crown consultation associated with their regulatory decisions relative to major resource projects.

This initiative will provide the oversight and capacity needed to address the issues affecting the performance of the federal regulatory system. In short, it will lay the foundation for a more predictable and accountable regulatory system that will improve the competitiveness of Canada's resource industries while ensuring careful consideration of environmental standards and technical requirements.

8. Shared outcomes:

Among the more tangible improvements resulting from this initiative will be the timeliness and predictability of the regulatory process. The environmental review and permitting of major resource projects is targeted to be reduced from upwards of four years to an average of about two years.

Other important outcomes from this proposal include:

  • a more accountable, predictable and timely regulatory review process that will facilitate investment and planning decisions and improve the competitiveness of Canada's resources industries;
  • high quality assessments of the environmental and social effects of resource development so that federal decisions in relation to projects safeguard the environment and promote sustainability; and
  • Aboriginal consultation responsibilities will be fulfilled in a more consistent, adequate and meaningful manner.

9. Governance structures:

The Cabinet Directive on Improving the Performance of the Regulatory System for Major Resource Projects has established a new governance framework for federal government departments and agencies to facilitate the effective, coordinated, and concurrent discharge of their statutory duties, functions and obligations related to the regulation of major resource projects. It encourages federal government departments to work together to identify areas where the consistency, efficiency and effectiveness of the federal regulatory system can be improved and to develop and implement system improvements. These activities are intended to improve the accountability, transparency, timeliness and predictability of the federal regulatory system for major natural resource projects.

The Minister of Natural Resources is the lead Minister for the Initiative. In collaboration with her counterparts in other regulatory departments, the Minister of Natural Resources will report biannually to Cabinet on progress made towards achieving the objectives of the initiative, and will report annually to Parliament and the public through NRCan's annual reporting requirements.

A Major Projects Deputy Ministers' Committee has been created to serve as the governance body for the implementation of the initiative. This Committee will provide direction for the resolution of project-specific issues and oversee the application of the Cabinet Directive. Membership on this committee includes the Deputy Minister of NRCan (Chair), the Deputy Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the Deputy Minister of the Environment, the Deputy Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, the Deputy Minister of Transport, the Associate Deputy Minister of Industry, the President of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, the President of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and the Chair of the National Energy Board.

The MPMO has been established to provide overarching management of the federal regulatory system for major resource projects. It will achieve this by working with the federal regulatory departments / agencies to identify areas where the consistency, efficiency and effectiveness of the federal regulatory process can be improved and work with these departments and agencies to implement change. The MPMO will also provide support to the Major Projects Deputy Ministers' Committee, through the provision of data, analysis and other information.

To ensure effective communication with federal regulatory departments on key issues and to facilitate collaboration and cooperation, interdepartmental working groups have been established at the ADM, DG and working levels.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)* 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Expected Results for
2009-10
Natural Resources Canada Natural Resource and Landmass Knowledge and Systems a. Major Projects Management Office $13,000,000 $4,500,000
  • Lead the development and implementation of a consistent, whole of government approach to Aboriginal consultations;
  • Ensure the environmental assessment and regulatory review processes for major resource projects are integrated and well coordinated through the development of Project Agreements;
  • Increase the transparency and accountability of the federal regulatory review process through increased oversight and regular monitoring, tracking and reporting on progress against commitments in Project Agreements; and
  • Identify and implement process improvements to continue to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the federal regulatory system for major resource projects.
Total NRCan $13,000,000 $4,500,000  
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency Environmental Assessment Support   $33,824,000 $8,400,000
  • Support a whole-of-government approach to addressing strategic and project-specific environmental assessment issues, including supporting implementation of the major resource projects initiative;
  • Manage the federal environmental assessment process and related Aboriginal consultation activities for most major resource projects; and
  • Develop and deliver training and guidance in support of the initiative.
Environmental Assessment Development   $3,497,000 $874,000
  • Support the implementation of this horizontal initiative focused on achieving improvements in the process, capacity, and associated Aboriginal consultations with respect to major resource projects;
  • Contribute to the ongoing development of policies, procedures and guidance materials for enhancing coordination and collaboration on high-quality, timely and predictable environmental assessment within the regulatory approval process; and
  • Contribute to the development of policies and procedures in support of the integration of Aboriginal Crown consultations in the environmental assessment and regulatory approval process.
Internal Support   $10,004,000 $2,426,000
  • Core support services are provided to support program delivery.
Total CEAA $47,325,000 $11,700,000  
Environment Canada Biodiversity is conserved and protected Wildlife program $2,352,116 $466,159
  • The efficiency and effectiveness of the Canadian Wildlife Service's regulatory role in major resource projects is improved; and
  • Guidance is developed to support Canadian Wildlife Service involvement in the EA process for major resource projects.
Water is clean, safe and secure Aquatic ecosystems are conserved and protected $614,683 $123,841
  • EC's responsibilities associated with the International River Improvements Act are supported by standard operating procedures and policies for licensing.
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes Environmental assessment and ecological monitoring $4,533,659 $868,975
  • Environment Canada's participation in the Major Projects Deputy Ministers' Committee and associated governance structure is supported;
  • Departmental EA processes are streamlined to ensure efficiency and effectiveness of the MPMO regulatory process for major resource projects;
  • Regional offices are supported in the delivery of streamlining priorities for major resource projects; and
  • Environment Canada's participation in the regulatory improvement initiative for major resource projects is well coordinated.
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced Risk management/ Risk mitigation and implementation $2,723,837 $562,122
  • EC provides input into the federal EA process for major resource projects through the provision of expertise;
  • Environment Canada's regulatory decisions related to Ocean Disposal permitting are timely; and
  • Environment Canada's involvement in the regulatory process for major resource projects is supported by guidance.
Relations with other governments and partners are effectively managed in support of environmental priorities Inter-governmental and stakeholder relations $596,818 $122,302
  • Regular, timely, and strategic advice is provided on consultation and engaging Aboriginal groups throughout the regulatory process for major resource projects; and
  • Environment Canada's participation on the Crown Oversight Committee and associated working groups on Aboriginal consultation is supported.
Strategic management support enables the department to meet its objectives Legal services $650,739 $141,844
  • Timely legal advice and support on delivery of national EA program involvement in major resource projects is provided.
Internal Services Core Support Services $1,028,148 $214,757
  • Core support services are provided to support program delivery.
Total EC $12,500,000 $2,500,000  
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Habitat Management Habitat Management $34,041,800 $6,808,360
  • Participation in the governance mechanism, e.g., Major Projects Deputy Ministers' Committee and supporting governance structures; and
  • Provision of DFO technical capacity in the areas of the Fisheries Act, Species at Risk Act (SARA), Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) and Aboriginal consultation activities relative to DFO's regulatory decisions associated with major resource projects identified under this initiative.
Legal Services Legal Services $958,200 $191,640
  • Provision of Legal Services support to DFO to operationalize the initiative and relative to the Fisheries Act, CEAA, SARA and Aboriginal consultation issues associated with major resource projects identified under the initiative.
Total DFO $35,000,000 $7,000,000  
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Northern Land and Resources Northern Affairs Organization $6,600,000 $1,320,000
  • Enhance capacity of the INAC NWT Regional Office to enable them to better meet their environmental assessment, Aboriginal consultation and regulatory responsibilities; and
  • Provide funding support to regulatory boards in the NWT to allow them to better meet their aboriginal consultation, regulatory permitting and environmental assessment responsibilities with respect to major resource projects.
Responsible Federal Stewardship Lands and Economic Development – Environmental Management $3,400,000 $680,000
  • Enhance the capacity of INAC regional offices to enable them to better meet their environmental assessment, Aboriginal consultation and regulatory responsibilities; and
  • Provide funding support to First Nations communities to build capacity to better equip them to coordinate and to participate in major resource development projects.
Total INAC $10,000,000 $2,000,000  
Transport Canada Transportation Safety and Security   $3,365,555 $864,421
  • To participate in the various governance mechanisms for the MPMO;
  • TC (headquarters and regional staff) to participate in working groups to assist with the creation and approval of key documents, processes and tracking systems required to operationalize the MPMO office; and
  • TC to participate in projects in the MPMO process.
Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs   $1,813,090 $448,991
  • TC to develop procedures for and participate in consultation with Aboriginal groups.
Sustainable Transportation Development and the Environment   $5,413,592 $1,341,515
  • To participate in the various governance mechanisms for the MPMO;
  • TC (headquarters and regional staff) to participate in working groups to assist with the creation and approval of key documents, processes and tracking systems required to operationalize the MPMO office;
  • TC to work on departmental processes to ensure new MPMO processes are applied in an efficient manner internally; and
  • TC to participate in projects in the MPMO process.
Internal Services   $3,407,763 $845,073
  • TC to hire lawyers to increase capacity to deal with legal issues associated with the regulatory process across the country; and
  • To support corporate involvement.
Total TC $14,000,000 $3,500,000  
Total $131,825,000 $31,200,000  

*Totals do not equal the total allocation under the initiative (i.e.; $150 million over five years) due to changes that have occurred in departmental Program Activity Architectures since the beginning of the initiative

16. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

17. Contact information:

Mr. Philip Jennings
Assistant Deputy Minister
Major Projects Management Office
Natural Resources Canada
55 Murray Street, Suite 600
Ottawa, ON  K1N 5M3

Top of Page

Public Health Agency of Canada

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives

Over the next three years, the Public Health Agency of Canada will participate in the following horizontal initiatives:

Name of horizontal initiative:  The Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada

Name of lead department: Public Health Agency of Canada (the Agency)

Lead department program activities: Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

Start date:  January 13, 2005

End date:  Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):  $84.4 M (ongoing)

The original federal funding allocation of $84.4 M in 2009-2010 is on-going and has been reduced to $72.6 M due to the following: reallocation to the Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative (-$5.2M), reductions to grants and contributions (-$2.4M) and reductions to operating (-$4.2M).

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement):  The Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada is the Government of Canada's response to HIV/AIDS in Canada. The initiative strengthens domestic action on HIV/AIDS, builds a coordinated Government of Canada approach, and supports the global health response to HIV/AIDS. It focuses on prevention and access to diagnosis, care, treatment and support for those populations most affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Canada - people living with HIV/AIDS, gay men, Aboriginal people, people who use injection drugs, inmates, youth, women, and people from countries where HIV is endemic. The Federal Initiative also supports and strengthens existing multi-sectoral partnerships to address the determinants of health. It supports collaborative efforts to address factors which can increase the transmission and acquisition of HIV including sexually transmitted infections (STI) and also addresses co-infection issues with other infectious diseases (for example, hepatitis C and tuberculosis) from the perspective of disease progression and morbidity in people living with HIV/AIDS. Gender-based analysis and human rights analysis are fundamental to the approach. People living with and vulnerable to HIV/AIDS are active partners in shaping policies and practices affecting their lives.

Shared Outcomes:

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Increased knowledge and awareness
  • Enhanced multi-sectoral engagement and alignment
  • Increased individual and organizational capacity
  • Increased coherence of federal response  

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Reduced HIV/AIDS stigma, discrimination and other barriers to better health outcomes.  
  • Improved access to effective HIV/AIDS prevention, diagnosis, care treatment and support; and  
  • Strengthened pan-Canadian response to HIV/AIDS.  

Long-Term Outcomes:

Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada contributes to the:

  • Prevention of the transmission of new infections;  
  • Reduction of the progression  of the disease and improve the quality of life for persons living with or HIV;  
  • Reduction of social and economic costs of HIV/AIDS to Canadians; and  
  • Global effort to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS and mitigate its impact. 

Governance Structure:

The Responsibility Centre Committee (RCC) is the governance body for the Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada (FI). It comprises representatives of the 10 responsibility centres which receive funding through the FI. Led by the Public Health Agency, the RCC promotes policy and program coherence among the participating departments and agencies, and ensures that evaluation and reporting requirements are met.

The Agency is the federal lead for issues related to HIV/AIDS in Canada responsible for overall coordination, communications, social marketing, reporting, evaluation, national and regional programs, policy development, surveillance and laboratory science.

Health Canada (HC) supports community-based HIV/AIDS education, capacity-building, and prevention for First Nations on-reserve and some Inuit communities; and provides leadership on international health policy and program issues.

As the Government of Canada's agency for health research, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) sets priorities for and administers the extramural research program.

Public Safety Canada, provides health services, including services related to the prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of HIV/AIDS, to offenders sentenced to imprisonment for two years or more.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Agency Infectious Disease Prevention and Control HIV/AIDS Ongoing $28.0M Increased knowledge and awareness of:
  • HIV and risk behaviour;
  • evidence-based population-specific approaches; and
  • emerging issues and gaps of vulnerable populations.

Enhanced multi-sectoral engagement and alignment.

Increased individual and organizational capacity to:

  • use population-specific diagnosis and prevention approaches and
  • contribute to global health security.
Increased integration of public health and community based activities.
AIDS Community Action Program (ACAP) Ongoing $14.4M Increased knowledge and awareness of specific strategies to reach priority populations.

Issues of co-infection with Hepatitis C, TB and STIs explored.

Increased individual and organizational capacity.

Increased awareness of the social and economic factors that create barriers for people at risk and those living with HIV/AIDS.
HC First Nations Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) First Nations in-reserve and Inuit Community Health Ongoing $4.0M Increased community-based research and surveillance.

Increased awareness of the need for HIV testing.

Increased access to prevention education, care and support networks, and supportive environments.
 
Increased collaboration among partners to achieve a coordinated and integrated response.

Cooperation among communities and FNIHB regional health care providers.

Contribution to the global response to HIV among indigenous people.

Increased access to evidence-based HIV interventions.
International Affairs Directorate Global Engagement Ongoing $1.4M Increased participation in multilateral and international bodies.

Strengthened support to developing country health sector responses to HIV by global partners.

Policy coherence across the federal government’s global activities.
CIHR Institute of Infection and Immunity HIV/AIDS Research Projects and Personnel Support Ongoing $20.6M Funding HIV/AIDS socio-behavioural, biomedical, clinical, clinical trials infrastructure and community-based research.

Development of a knowledge translation and partnership strategy.

Responsive funding mechanisms.

Funding of and participating in HIV/AIDS conferences and workshops.

New research funding opportunities for scientists in strategic areas of HIV/AIDS research.

Increased capacity building initiatives for researchers.

Implementation of CIHR HIV/AIDS Research Initiative Strategic Plan 2008-2013.
CSC Health Services a. Institutional Health Services Ongoing $4.2M Augmented surveillance and data collection.

Analysis of the inmate survey on risk behaviours.

Expanded health promotion and education initiatives.

Increased information sharing on best practices within the F/P/T/ Heads of Corrections Working Group on Health.

Increased co-ordination of discharge planning for federal offenders with ongoing infectious disease needs.

Increased support and learning for correctional health care professionals.

Enhanced harm reduction programs and measures.

Implementation of an infectious disease strategy for women offenders.

Development of culturally appropriate health programs and services for Aboriginal offenders in federal correctional institutions.
Total   $72.6M  
Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners Major non-governmental stakeholders are considered full partners in the Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada. Their role is to engage and collaborate with all levels of government, communities, other non-governmental organizations, professional groups, institutions and the private sector to enhance the Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada's progress on all outcomes identified above. Contact Information: 
Dr. Howard Njoo
130 Colonnade Road
Ottawa ON K1A 0K9
Tel: 613-948-6799  
howard_njoo@phac-aspc.gc.ca

Name of horizontal initiative:  Preparedness for Avian and Pandemic Influenza

Name of lead department: Public Health Agency of Canada (the Agency)

Lead department program activities:

  • Infectious Disease Prevention and Control
  • Emergency Preparedness and Response

Start date:  late 2006

End date:  ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):  $422M for Health Portfolio and $195M for CFIA

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement): Canada is facing two major, inter-related animal and public health threats: the potential spread of avian influenza virus (H5N1) to wild birds and domestic fowl in Canada and the potential for a human-adapted strain to arise, resulting in human-to-human transmission, potentially triggering a human influenza pandemic. A coordinated and comprehensive plan to address both avian and pandemic influenza is required.

In 2006 the Health Portfolio received $422M over five years to improve preparedness for avian and pandemic influenza. The bulk of the initiatives are ongoing. Initiatives are being launched in the areas of vaccines and antivirals, surge capacity, prevention and early warning, emergency preparedness, critical science and regulation, risk communication, and inter-jurisdictional collaboration. Efforts will also be undertaken to fill gaps in on-reserve planning and preparedness and enhance federal capacity to deal with an on-reserve pandemic.

Under the umbrella of “Preparing for Emergencies”, in 2006 CFIA obtained $195M to be spent over five years to enhance Canada’s state of Avian Influenza (AI) preparedness. Canada’s Avian Influenza Working Group was established in 2006 to update policies, protocols, operating procedures, and systems to enhance Canada’s state of preparedness—through collaborations and partnership— in five pillars of strategies and processes for prevention and early warning, emergency preparedness, emergency response, recovery, and communications.

Shared outcomes:  These initiatives will allow the federal government to strengthen Canada’s capacity to prevent and respond to immediate animal health and economic impacts of avian influenza while increasing preparedness for a potential pandemic.

Greater Protection for Canadians will come about with improved vaccines and antivirals, improved emergency preparedness, and increased surge capacity to better address peak periods, as well as through critical science and regulation processes in the area. There will be enhanced on-reserve planning and preparedness and improved federal capacity to deal with an on-reserve pandemic.

Response Speed and Understanding will be enhanced through prevention and early warning measures, risk communication and inter-jurisdictional collaboration.

Governance structure:  In January 2008, the Agency, the  Health Canada (HC) finalized “The Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Interdepartmental/Agency Governance Agreement”. The primary scope of the Agreement is the management of specific horizontal issues and/or initiatives stemming from the $1B for avian and pandemic influenza preparedness emanating from Budget 2006. Ministerial accountability is not altered by this agreement and departments/agencies maintain their responsibility to manage their mandated areas and the funds entrusted to them.

The Agreement is supported by a structure that falls within the auspices of the Deputy Minister's Committee on Avian and Pandemic Influenza Planning (CAPIP). The implementation of the Agreement is led by the Avian and Pandemic Influenza Assistant Deputy Ministers Governance (API ADM Governance) Committee focussing on the implementation of the initiatives funded through Budget 2006. 

The API ADM Governance Committee provides strategic direction and oversight monitoring.  It authorizes and facilitates overview reporting to the TBS. Members of this committee ensure support for the pursued initiatives in their departments/agencies. The API ADM Governance Committee keeps the Committee of ADMs under the CAPIP process informed of its activities through cross membership.

An Avian and Pandemic Influenza Operations Directors General (APIO DG) Committee supports the API ADM Governance Committee, makes recommendations to it and oversees the coordination of the exercise. The APIO DG committee keeps the DG Steering Committee under the CAPIP process informed of its activities through cross membership. The APIO DG Committee is chaired by PHAC and CFIA and its members include director general level representatives from HC and CIHR and chairs of established working groups.

Working groups are established for areas that cross departmental/agency activity. Working groups report to the API ADM Governance Committee through the APIO DG Committee.

The Agency provides Secretariat support for the API ADM Governance and APIO DG Committees.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Agency Infectious Disease Prevention and Control a. Vaccine readiness and clinical trials Ongoing $15.9M Clinical trials of a pre-pandemic vaccine undertaken and the relevance of individual trials to Canada’s needs assessed. 

Pandemic capacity for vaccine adverse event surveillance and effectiveness monitoring improved.

b. Rapid vaccine development and testing Ongoing $1.7M Progress on the development of different clinical grade commercial H5N1 influenza vaccines.
c. Contribution to National Antiviral Stockpile Ongoing $7.4M Reduced gap between the outbreak of a pandemic and the availability of a pandemic vaccine. 

Plans established to replace the antiviral stocks as they reach the end of their shelf-life.

d. Capacity for pandemic preparedness Ongoing $4.8M Minister and senior administrators informed on range of avian and pandemic influenza issues.  

Improved capacity from increase use of the regional communication systems established over the past 3 years.

e. Surveillance Ongoing $8.2M Improved capacity and timeliness to identify and report on human cases of avian flu and pandemic health care incidents of potential interest.
f. Emergency human resources Ongoing $0.4M Updated Human Resources Emergency Response Plan.
g. Winnipeg lab and space optimization Ongoing $7.2M Design for the renovations of the new lab completed.

Planned renovations of the JC Wilt Laboratory completed.

Canada's laboratory research and response capacity increased.

h. Strengthening the public health lab network Ongoing $1.2M Federal laboratory liaison technicians in provinces and territories trained, equipped and in place and communications between provinces and territories labs and NML improved, strengthening the national lab capacity. 

Components of CPIP Annex C in operation.

i. Influenza research network Ongoing $2.2M A Research agenda responds to the needs of avian and pandemic influenza preparedness.

Research resources granted under the avian and pandemic influenza preparedness TB decision optimally allocated.

j. Pandemic influenza risk assessment and modelling Ongoing $0.8M Predictive and assessment models used for pandemic preparedness developed and established. 

More potential learners in university and college settings train as mathematical modellers in order to expand the ranks of the profession.

k. Performance and evaluation Ongoing $0.6M Evaluation Plan for avian and pandemic influenza preparedness implemented.

Components of the performance measurement framework in place at the responsibility centre level. 

Data collection facilitated using a web-based system. 

Performance monitoring and measurement data and evidence used for management and reporting.

l. Pandemic influenza risk communications strategy Ongoing $1.8M Contributed to the strategy for a three-year pan-Canadian social marketing campaign on influenza and infection prevention to launch in fall 2009.

Communications Operational Plan developed to support the Annex K (Communications) of the Canadian Pandemic Influenza Plan.

m. Skilled national public health workforce Ongoing $6.0M Completion of MOUs with selected placement sites across the country that will host Public Health Officers.

More Public Health Officers in place. 

More CPHS Regional Coordinators in place across Canada.

Training modules developed and delivered to those in the field. 

Competency profiles for Public Health Officers developed.

More of public health students recruited for project placements in public health organizations.

Emergency Preparedness and Response a. Emergency preparedness Ongoing $6.6M A variety of components capable of responding to an avian or pandemic influenza outbreak in place.

Laboratories capable of working with influenza strains certified.

Further integrated quarantine stations with traditional services at the 3 major Canadian maritime ports.

NESS and the Emergency Operations Centre maintained in state of readiness.

Plans in place with provincial, territorial departments and NGOs who will be responding to outbreaks.

Increased efficiency and effectiveness of regional resources placed to facilitate the flow of information between the federal and provincial/territorial levels.
HC Access to safe and effective health products and food and information for healthy choices a. Regulatory activities related to pandemic influenza vaccine Ongoing $1.5M Establish WHO lab requirements for release of vaccine lots for international markets.
b. Resources for review and approval of antiviral drug submissions for treatment of pandemic influenza Ongoing $0.3M Establish review procedures for antivirals submissions, before and during pandemic occurrence.
c. Establishment of a crisis risk management unit for monitoring and post market assessment of therapeutic products Ongoing $0.4M Establish post-market risk management and communication of safety issues related to the use of antivirals and vaccines.
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians a. FN/I surge capacity $1.48M
(2007-08 to 2009-10)
$0.4M Implement pandemic and infection control education and training initiatives.
b. Strengthening federal public health capacity Ongoing $0.7M Collaborate with PHAC, PSC, and INAC for planning and response.

Work on surveillance needs with PHAC.

Enhance support for FN communities.

Develop/maintain links with EPR program staff nationally/regionally and with provinces and territories.

c. First Nations and Inuit emergency preparedness, planning, training and integration Ongoing $0.4M Continued support for testing and   revision of community pandemic plans.
Reduced health and environmental risks from products and substances, and healthy sustainable and working environments. a. Public health emergency preparedness and response on conveyances Ongoing $0.3M Enhance training in quarantine/EPR as per training needs assessment.

Develop and test surge capacity for response capacity.

Program evaluation and third party audit of EPR Conveyances Program.

Continue ongoing program delivery and adjust to address findings.

CIHR Pandemic Preparedness Research Strategic Initiative a. Influenza research priorities $38.2M (2006-07 to 2010-11) $10.7M Peer review and fund research projects.

Develop and launch requests for research applications, as needed.

Review progress on funded projects and research outcomes. Facilitate uptake of research results and consult on future research needs through reporting and meetings of researchers, stakeholders and decision makers.

Chair Research Working Group of Avian and Pandemic Influenza Operations Directors General (APIO DG) Committee.

CFIA Disease Prevention and Control a.  Enhanced enforcement measures Ongoing $1.5M Increased capacity to support enhanced screening procedures for live birds or poultry products at Canada's ports of entry with a view to mitigating the risk of future avian influenza outbreaks in Canada.
b. Avian biosecurity on farms Ongoing $2.7M Implementation of the National Standards for Avian Biosecurity, continuation of public education, communications and outreach programs and development of a governance framework surrounding the standards.
c.  Real property requirements $4.0M
(2006-07 to 2007-08)
$ 0 No planned expenditures as investments realized in previous fiscal years.
d.  Domestic and wildlife surveillance Ongoing $3.1M Enhanced/integrated Canadian surveillance system, supported by a robust systems platform and the analysis and interpretation of the data collected to allow more timely identification of potential outbreaks, and more timely response to avian influenza situations.
e.  Strengthened economic and regulatory framework Ongoing $0.9M Strengthened capacity for increased regulatory review including analysis of current legislative/regulatory framework.
f. Performance evaluation Ongoing $1.1M Management and evaluation of CFIA's AI activities, including ongoing performance measurement to monitor results and a formative evaluation.  The evaluation will assess the AI Initiative's design, delivery, and management.  In addition, it will assess the likelihood of it achieving its objectives, as well as the adequacy of its performance measurement and reporting strategy.
g.  Risk communications Ongoing $1.6M National on-farm biosecurity information sessions and maintenance of “Bird Health Basics” outreach campaign. Continued implementation of the “Be Aware and Declare” international border biosecurity outreach campaign. Ongoing media monitoring and training and risk communications related to AI prevention, preparedness and response activities.
Emergency Preparedness and Response a. Field training Ongoing $1.1M Continued training that will contribute to a skilled and experienced workforce ready to respond to an AI outbreak.

Continued development of training materials (instructor-led and e-learning) in support of emergency response procedures and plans and of trainers in support of end-user training.

b. AI enhanced management capacity Ongoing $1.0M Updated electronic capture of the field level efforts of outbreak management and reporting for AI and other foreign animal diseases.
c. Updated emergency response plans Ongoing $2.0M Continued development and updating of emergency response procedures and plans.
d. Risk assessment and modelling Ongoing $2.1M Continued development of avian influenza disease modelling to better understand the spread of AI and the effectiveness of disease control measures. 
e. AI Research Ongoing $1.5M Investment in an improved federal capacity for mathematical modelling, statistical analysis, and operations research on avian influenza issues will allow a better understanding of the spread of influenza and the effectiveness of disease control measures. These investments will allow more timely and evidence-based decision making on avian influenza responses, thus helping to reducing the risk of transmission to humans and mitigating economic and production losses.

Identification of the research gaps related to AI and development, with partners, of effective tools and knowledge to facilitate decision making and policy development.

Research projects in the areas of humane euthanasia and effective disposal methodologies to support the need for mass depopulation and disposal.

f.  International collaboration Ongoing $1.6M Participation in international fora as opportunities are identified to contribute to the global effort related to avian and pandemic influenza.
g.  Animal vaccine bank $1.0M
(2006-07 to 2007-08)
$ 0 No planned expenditures as investments realized in previous fiscal years.
h. Access to antivirals Ongoing $0.1M Maintenance of access protocols and bank of antivirals to provide appropriate protection to federal employees, ensuring a more timely and effective response to an avian influenza situation and better protection of Canadians.
i.  Specialized equipment $20.8M
(2006-07 to 2008-09)
$ 0 No planned expenditures as investments realized in previous fiscal years.
j.  Laboratory surge capacity and capability Ongoing $3.8M Increased coordination capacity with the creation of an integrated lab network across the country (federal, provincial and university labs). This network will allow for rapid testing, detection and reporting of AI.
k. Field surge capacity Ongoing $1.0M Refinement and enhancement of a viable response plan, including HR capacity and equipment.
l. National veterinary reserve Ongoing $0.9M Continued training of a reserve of professional veterinarians to enhance surge capacity, expertise and rapid response capability for animal disease control efforts.
Total   $105.5M  
Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Contact information: 
Dr. Arlene King
130 Colonnade Road
Ottawa ON K1A 0K9
613-948-7929
Email: Arlene_King@phac-aspc.gc.ca

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative (CHVI)

Name of Lead Department: Public Health Agency of Canada (The Agency)

Lead Department Program Activity: Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

Start Date: February 20, 2007

End Date: March 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocated (start to end date): $111M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The CHVI, Canada’s contribution to the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise, is a collaborative undertaking between the Government of Canada and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to contribute to the global effort to develop a safe, effective, affordable and globally accessible HIV vaccine. This collaboration builds on the Government of Canada’s commitment to a comprehensive, long-term approach to address prevention technologies. Participating federal departments and agencies are the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Agency, Industry Canada (IC), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and Health Canada (HC). The CHVI’s overall objectives are to: strengthen HIV vaccine discovery and social research capacity; strengthen clinical trial capacity and networks, particularly in low and middle income countries (LMICs); increase pilot scale manufacturing capacity for HIV vaccine clinical trial lots; strengthen policy and regulatory approaches for HIV vaccines and promote the community and social aspects of HIV vaccine research and delivery; and ensure horizontal collaboration within the CHVI and with domestic and international stakeholders.

Shared Outcome(s):

Immediate (Short-Term 1 - 3 years) Outcomes:

  • Increased and improved collaboration and networking
  • Enhanced knowledge base
  • Increased readiness and capacity in Canada and LMICs

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Pilot scale HIV vaccine manufacturing facility for clinical trial lots is fully operational and globally accessible
  • Strengthened contribution to global efforts to accelerate the development of safe effective, affordable, and globally accessible HIV vaccines

Long -Term Outcomes:

  • The Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative contributes to the global efforts to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS particularly in LMICs.

Governance Structure(s): The Minister of Health, in consultation with the Minister of Industry and the Minister of International Cooperation, will be the lead Minister for the CHVI for the purposes of overall coordination. Communications for the CHVI will be handled jointly.

In support of the Ministers, coordination for the Government of Canada is provided by an Interdepartmental Steering Committee consisting of representatives from the participating federal departments and agencies. The Interdepartmental Steering Committee is responsible for providing strategic directions and priorities and reviewing progress.

Multi-stakeholder advisory committees and working groups, involving governments, the private sector, international stakeholders, people living with HIV/AIDS, researchers and NGOs and other relevant stakeholders, have been, and will continue to be established to inform the CHVI. The role of participating departments and agencies involved in the CHVI are:

  • The Agency contributes its public health scientific, policy and program expertise and provides secretariat support for the CHVI.
  • HC applies its wider range of expertise, including vaccine related policy, regulations and protocols; facilitates collaborative networks of specialists with a particular focus on the community and social dimensions of vaccine research, development and delivery; and enhances international collaborations. 
  • CIHR provides scientific leadership and strategic guidance through its linkages to the Canadian research community, as well as brings critical expertise in peer review mechanisms and related professional support services to identify and fund eligible HIV vaccines projects.
  • IC applies its industry specific knowledge and experience to provide linkages to the Canadian and International vaccine industry, as well as assist with industry-related issues, including the appropriate engagement of potential private sector collaborators.
  • CIDA provides effective linkages to international development efforts and ensures consistency with Canada’s international commitments. Moreover, CIDA will provide strategic guidance to ensure that the goals of the CHVI promote the development and delivery of HIV vaccines that benefit the needs of the highly endemic HIV/AIDS countries in the developing world.

($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Agency Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Public Health Contributions Program $27M (2007-08 to 2012-13) $10.7M Completed open and transparent selection process for a Not for Profit Corporation (NPC) to build and operate a pilot scale clinical trial lots manufacturing facility.

Negotiation and finalization of a contribution agreement with the successful NPC.

New Community Initiatives Fund implemented (in partnership with HC).

Evaluation completed.

HC International Health Affairs Grants to eligible non-profit international organizations in support of their projects or programs on health $1M $0.2M New Community Initiatives Fund implemented (in partnership with the Agency).
IC Industry Sector- Science and Technology and Innovation N/A $13M $3.2M Support provided to (Agency-led) open and transparent selection process for a NPC to build and operate a pilot scale clinical trial lots manufacturing facility.

Support provided on the negotiation and finalization of a contribution agreement with the successful NPC.

CIDA Institutions  -  Enhanced capacity and effectiveness of Multilateral institutions and Canadian/ International organizations in achieving development goals International Development Assistance Program $60M $6.2M Under the discovery and social research component, and in collaboration with CIHR, successfully completed the Letter of Intent and development grant stages of the Team Grant program to support collaborative teams of Canadian and LMIC researchers.

Establishment of a program to support teams of Canadian and LMICs researchers and research institutions to strengthen their capacity to conduct high-quality clinical trials of HIV vaccine and other related prevention technologies.

Activities supported to improve regulatory capacity in LMICs, especially those where clinical trials are planned or ongoing.

Support provided to (Agency-led) open and transparent selection process for a NPC to build and operate a pilot scale clinical trial lots manufacturing facility.

Support provided on the negotiation and finalization of a contribution agreement with the successful NPC.

CIHR HIV/AIDS Research Initiative -- Program Activity Architecture Code: 12300 HIV/AIDS
Research Initiative
$10M $1.3M Canadian researchers, working either independently or in small teams, supported through operating grant and Catalyst grant programs.

Under the discovery and social research component, and in collaboration with CIDA, successfully completed the Letter of Intent and development grant stages of the Team Grant program to support collaborative teams of Canadian and LMIC researchers.

Total $111M $21.6M  
Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners:
Non-governmental stakeholders (including research institutions and not-for-profit community organizations) are integral to the success of the CHVI. Their role is to engage and collaborate with participating departments and agencies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and other funders to contribute to CHVI objectives and to a significant Canadian contribution towards the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise.
Contact Information:
Steven Sternthal
130 Colonnade Road
Ottawa ON K1A 0K9
Tel: 613-952-5120
Steven_Strenthal@phac-aspc.gc.ca

Top of Page

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada


Table 4: Horizontal Initiatives
Name of horizontal initiative: Integrated Market Enforcement Teams (IMET) Program
Name of lead department(s): Public Safety Canada Lead department program activity:
Law Enforcement
Start date: 2003/2004 End date: Ongoing
Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $ 198,750,000 from 2003-2004 through 2009-2010; $ 40,000,000 per year ongoing
Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement): The IMET program objective is to effectively enforce the law against serious criminal capital market fraud offences in Canada. To achieve this objective, IMET is mandated to investigate serious Criminal Code capital markets fraud offences that are of regional or national significance and threaten investor confidence or economic stability in Canada.
Shared outcome(s): Improved Canadian and international investor confidence in the integrity of Canada’s capital markets.
Governance structure(s): The IMET Executive Council, composed of senior officials from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (co-chair), Finance (co-chair), the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, Justice and Public Safety Canada provides strategic oversight for the IMET program.
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Planned Spending for 2009-10
(in dollars)
1. Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada Law Enforcement $ 658,790
2. Justice Canada Justice, Policies, Laws and Programs $ 2,596,663
3. Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions Prosecution of Federal Offences to Protect the Environment, Natural Resources, Economic and Social Health $ 5,853,337
4. Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal and International Operations $ 30,718,817
5. Finance Canada Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework $ 172,393
Total: $ 40,000,000
Contact information: Barry MacKillop (613) 991-4281

Top of Page

Public Works and Government Services Canada

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens Remediation Project

Name of lead department(s): PWGSC

Lead department program activity: PWGSC Special Purpose Allotment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: May 12, 2004

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2014

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $282 million for PWGSC cost share with the Province of Nova Scotia. (The Province of Nova Scotia's share is up to $120 million for a total project cost of $402 million.) Costs outside of the cost share are: PWGSC federal lead oversight $25.8 million, Environment Canada $7.6 million and Health Canada $5.5 million.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Remediation of Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens comprises federally and provincially owned land, which were contaminated as a result of a century of manufacturing steel. The project is in support of the federal government's sustainable development initiative, recognizing the environmental, social and economic dimensions of the Sydney area. The project will have long-term benefits for all Canadians. When remediation is complete, Nova Scotia will take ownership of the lands. Any remaining contaminants will be managed and monitored by the Province of Nova Scotia in accordance with the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). The website for the provincial agency is http://www.tarpondscleanup.ca.

Shared outcome(s): The project will result in environmental, economic, and social benefits for Nova Scotians, First Nations Communities and all Canadians. Downtown Sydney will have new land to be developed, which will aid in rejuvenation of the economically depressed area.

Governance structure(s):

  • Memorandum to Cabinet dated April 2004 defined PWGSC as the federal lead for the project. MOA between Province of Nova Scotia and Government of Canada was signed on May 12, 2004. This document describes the management of the project.
  • The Interim Cost Share Agreement (ICSA) with the Province of Nova Scotia, signed on October 20, 2004, provided for interim governance and funding until the end of 2007-2008 fiscal year and for undertaking preventative works and preliminary works as set out in the MOA.
  • Preventative Works includes design and construction of the Battery Point Cofferdam, which separates the Tar Ponds from Sydney Harbour, removal of the Cooling Pond, realignment of the Coke Oven's Brook, and relocation of the Whitney Pier Waterline.
  • Preliminary Works includes the environmental assessment review, project description development, remediation pre-design and design, selection of independent engineer, development of the cost to complete mechanism and work breakdown structure, risk assessment strategy (Risk-based Audit Framework - RBAF), Results based Accountability Framework (Results-based Management and Accountability Framework - RMAF) and the creation of the Sydney Tar Ponds Agency as a single purpose entity to deliver the project.
  • The Sydney Tar Ponds Agency (STPA) was set up by the Province of Nova Scotia to manage and implement the project. Its operating charter was established on August 18, 2004.
  • An Independent Engineer (IE) was jointly appointed in October 2005, to monitor and confirm the engineering and financial integrity of the project as work progresses. A Project Management Committee (PMC), which includes senior representatives from both the federal and provincial governments, has been established to oversee all aspects of the project.
  • RMAF and RBAF were established.
  • A Joint Environmental Assessment was initiated pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act as a Comprehensive Study until a decision of the Minister of Environment referred it to a review panel process in May 2005. The parties entered into a Joint Panel Agreement on July 13, 2005 and thereafter conducted a joint environmental assessment of the project by an independent joint review panel. The panel released its recommendations July 2006. The parties each considered the report of recommendations of the panel and formally issued a joint response to the recommendations on January 28, 2007 identifying related project changes.
  • An Environmental Management Committee (EMC) was formed in keeping with the Environmental Assessment and Review Panel recommendations. This committee is chaired jointly by the federal and provincial partners. The EMC provides oversight on all aspects of the environmental management of the project. The EMC is also tracking the implementation of panel recommendations throughout the life of the project, and allows stakeholders an opportunity to meet and discuss technical project details as they relate to environmental considerations.
  • A Protocol Agreement to govern Federal/Provincial/First Nations relations, with the objective of establishing a procurement strategy for meaningful economic participation of First Nations, was signed on October 28, 2005 by the federal, provincial and First Nation's officials. Set asides were established for competition among Canadian First Nations businesses.
  • An Environmental Management Plan (EMP) has been established to address and mitigate potential environmental impacts throughout construction.
  • A Final Cost Share Agreement (FCSA) was signed on September 27, 2007 with the Province of Nova Scotia which includes the main Remediation Project and began in fiscal year 2007-2008. The FCSA serves as the legal instrument to govern and fund the Project to its completion in 2014. On May 31, 2007, Treasury Board granted approval of the terms and conditions of the Final Cost Share Agreement, and associated funding for the cost shared activities, as well as for costs of federal operations of Environment Canada and Health Canada. The FCSA incorporates the Environmental Assessment panel recommendations, reaffirming funding commitments and further delineating the governance structure.
  • A Regulatory Management Plan is being developed, with the provincial Department of Environment, to ensure regulatory obligations are adhered to.
  • A Local Economic Benefits Policy (LEB) provides a framework to optimize economic benefits from the cleanup for the local community.

($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from 2004 to 2014) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
PWGSC Cost Share:



PWGSC Operating
Federal Lead Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens Remediation Project $282,240





$25,870
$43,024





$3,162
PWGSC's project team is carrying out its oversight role to ensure the project is complying with the project agreements.
Environment Canada Provision of advice to PWGSC on technical issues, historical studies and scientific issues related to contaminated sites. n/a $7,640 $677.6 Provision of advice to PWGSC on technical issues, historical studies and scientific issues related to contaminated sites.
Health Canada Provision of advice to PWGSC on issues related to human health, technical issues and risk assessment. n/a $5,500 $550 Provision of advice to PWGSC on issues related to human health, technical issues and risk assessment.
Total $321,250 $47,413.6  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): The Sydney Tar Ponds Agency, a single purpose entity, was established by the Province of Nova Scotia to manage and implement the project.

Contact information: Randy Vallis, Director, 295 Charlotte Street, Sydney, NS B1P 6J9 (902) 564-2543

Top of Page

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative:

Integrated Border Enforcement Teams (IBETs)

Name of lead department(s):

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Lead department program activity:

Federal and International Operations (FIO)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

March 31, 2009

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$25.9 Million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The mandate of Integrated Border Enforcement Teams (IBETs) is to enhance the integrity of the border between Canada and the United States by identifying, investigating, and interdicting persons and organizations that pose a threat to national security or are engaged in other criminal activity.

Shared outcome(s):

Enhanced border security and improved international relationships along the shared border by improving information-sharing between Canadian and US law enforcement agencies and conducting intelligence-led investigations. Border-related investigations will be more effective as a result of integrated intelligence collected and shared by all IBET partners. Law enforcement interoperability will improve by linking multiple agencies through the development of a communications technology system. This system will facilitate joint operations, while addressing health & safety concerns for law enforcement officers along the Canada-US border .

Governance structure(s):

Providing program oversight and direction, the International Joint Management Team (IJMT) is composed of senior officials from the five core agencies: RCMP, CBSA, Department of Homeland Security (US Customs Border Protection/Border Patrol, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, US Coast Guard). Regional Joint Management Teams (JMT) for each of the 15 IBET regions provide joint decision making and direction to the IBET program at a local level. The National Coordination Team (NCT) is comprised of representatives of the five core partners at the Headquarters level and provides policy direction for the participating agencies and the program as well as facilitating the objectives of the Smart Border Accord and the IBET mandate.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
RCMP Federal and International Operations (FIO) Integrated Border Enforcement Team program.
$ 25.9
$ 25.9
  1. Reduce the exploitation of our borders by terrorist and organized crime groups.
  2. Ensure timely identification of threats, vulnerabilities and emerging trends.
  3. Continuously improve border enforcement technology.
  4. Increase understanding of border issues.
  5. Ensure an integrated, layered border management approach.
CBSA    
$0
$0
  1. To preserve the integrity of Canada's borders.
  2. To protect the health, safety, and security of Canadians from the movement of illegal or dangerous goods and people, and support the Government of Canada with emergency response capabilities as required.
  3. To effectively collect, analyze, and distribute intelligence regarding threats to national security; screening, targeting, interdiction, and deterrence of inadmissible people and goods
  4. To facilitate the removal and detention of persons who have no legal right to remain in Canada, especially those who pose a threat to Canadian society.
Total
 $ 25.9
  $ 25.9
 

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

The IBET core partners include US Customs Border Protection/Border Patrol, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the US Coast Guard, all part of the Department of Homeland Security. The IBET program contributes significantly to their objective to enhance border integrity between Canada and the United States by identifying, investigating, and interdicting persons and organizations that pose a threat to national security or are engaged in other organized criminal activity. These agencies are committed to the IBET program to achieve the Smart Border Accord Plan goal to ensure the: 1. secure flow of people; 2. the secure flow of goods; 3. secure infrastructure; and 4. the coordination and information sharing in the enforcement of these objectives.

Contact information:

Supt. Warren Coons, Director, IBET


Name of Horizontal Initiative:

Investments to Combat the Criminal Use of Firearms (ICCUF)

Name of lead department(s):

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Lead department program activity:

Canadian Firearms Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

May 2004

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$49.9 million over 5 years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The overall aim of the ICCUF is to improve the national collection, analysis and sharing of firearms-related intelligence and information. Funding is distributed within the RCMP to the National Weapons Enforcement Support Teams (NWEST), Forensic Science and Identification Services (FSIS), Criminal Intelligence (CI), and the Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC). The initiative also provides funds to Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and Public Safety Canada (PSC).

The ICCUF directly supports Government’s objective to tackle violent crime (especially firearms-related offences in relation to organized crime and street gangs), as outlined in the 2008 Speech from the Throne.

Shared outcome(s):

Enhanced RCMP and CBSA capacity to gather, analyze, and share criminal intelligence in order to improve individual investigations, and to increase knowledge of the extent and patterns of smuggling and trafficking of firearms used in crime. These will support the development of an intelligence-led national enforcement strategy.

Governance structure(s):
A Joint Management Team (JMT) coordinates ICCUF efforts. Partners will be heavily involved in JMT meetings. Public Safety Canada will maintain observer status, attending as required and participating in national data collection to the extent required by its research role.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
PSC Policing and Law Enforcement ICCUF Ongoing
$ .244
 
RCMP Canadian Firearms Program ICCUF
Ongoing
$8.42
Valuable criminal intelligence shared in support of firearms crime investigations
CBSA   ICCUF
Ongoing
$1.23
Valuable criminal intelligence shared in support of firearms crime investigations
Total
 
  $9.89
 

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact information:

Supt. Geoffrey Francis, Director, Firearm Support Services Directorate
RCMP Canadian Firearms Program
1450 Meyerside Drive, Suite 415
Mississauga, Ontario L5T 2N5
Office: 905-795-5205


Name of Horizontal Initiative:

National Weapons Enforcement Support Teams (NWEST)

Name of lead department(s):

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Lead department program activity:

Canadian Firearms Program

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

May 2004

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$22.5 million over 5 years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

NWEST is a partnership with Canadian municipal and provincial police services. It supports law enforcement efforts to counter the illegal movement of firearms into and within Canada and their subsequent violent criminal use. NWEST plays an integral role in the fight against organized crime and terrorism in Canada.

The RCMP provides funding for the secondment of police officers from partner police services as well as funds for vehicles and other support equipment; office space is provided by municipal and provincial police services in some areas.

Shared outcome(s):

  • Direct investigative support to front line policing
  • Tracing firearms of questionable origin
  • Assisting with the development and execution of search warrants
  • Analysis of crime guns
  • Training sessions to law enforcement agencies across Canada.

Governance structure(s):

MOU’s are entered into with other police services for the secondment of officers to the NWEST. The NWEST Advisory Board is made up of senior police officers and other stakeholders.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-2010
Expected Results for
2009-2010
RCMP Canadian Firearms Program NWEST
Ongoing
$5
Operational information to police; enhanced safety for all communities
Total
  
  $5
 

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Police services across the country collect intelligence and other information in support of firearms investigations.

Contact information:

Supt. Geoffrey Francis
Director, Firearm Support Services Directorate
RCMP Canadian Firearms Program
1450 Meyerside Drive, Suite 415
Mississauga, Ontario L5T 2N5
Office: 905-795-5205

Top of Page

Transport Canada

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: ecotransport Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Transport Canada (TC)

Lead department program activity: Clean Air from Transportation

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-2011*
(*ecomobility and Marine Shore Power programs were extended to 2011-2012)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $461.6 million*
(*As of 2012, total allocation will be $463 million due to a $1.4 million allocation for a one-year extension of the ecomobility ($1.1 million) and Marine Shore Power programs ($0.3))

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The ecotransport Strategy involves a series of initiatives designed to reduce the amount of fuel consumed, improve transportation efficiency and introduce cleaner transportation technologies. Launched as part of the Government’s Clean Air Agenda, this strategy features the ecomobility program; the ecotechnology for Vehicles Program; the ecoenergy for Personal Vehicles Program (Natural Resources Canada); and the ecofreight programs which include Natural Resources Canada’s (NRCan’s) ecoenergy for Fleet Program. The ecoauto Rebate Program and the Environment Canada’s (EC’s) Vehicle Scrappage program were introduced separately but are complementary to the programs for personal vehicles (see http://www.ecoaction.gc.ca/ecotransport/index-eng.cfm).

  • The ecomobility program is a $9.3 million initiative that seeks to work with municipalities to help cut urban-passenger transportation emissions by encouraging commuters to choose public transit or other sustainable transportation options. Working with cities across Canada, this initiative will help develop programs, services and products that improve sustainable transportation options in urban areas. This program was extended by one year to 2012.
  • The ecotechnology for Vehicles Program ($14.1 million) includes in-depth testing and showcasing of advanced technologies for vehicles in order to raise awareness and foster important new partnerships with the automotive industry and encourage the introduction of a broader range of environmental technologies in Canada. The ecoenergy for Personal Vehicles Program ($21 million), delivered by NRCan, will provide fuel consumption information and decision-making tools to encourage consumers to purchase fuel-efficient vehicles that are currently available in the market.
  • The ecofreight programs, with $58.7 million in funding, features new steps to reduce the environmental and health effects of freight transportation through technology and will be delivered by TC ($36.7 million) and NRCan ($22 million). These programs include the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund ($9.3 million), providing cost-shared funding of demonstrations to test and measure new freight transportation technologies in real-world conditions; the Freight Technology Incentive Programs ($9.4 million), providing cost-shared funding to help recipients to purchase and install proven emission-reducing technologies; the ecoFreight Partnership Program ($6.6 million), building industry partnerships; the Marine Shore Power Program, extended by one year to 2012 ($6 million), demonstrating the installation and use of shore-based power for marine vessels in Canadian ports; the National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry ($5.4 million), identifying regulatory barriers and solutions in collaboration with provinces and territories, so that the Canadian trucking industry can embrace emissions-reducing technologies; and the ecoEnergy for Fleets programs ($22 million), aiming to reduce fuel use and emissions in commercial and institutional fleets via training, sharing of best practices, anti-idling campaigns, technical analysis to look for potential improvements and other technology opportunities.
  • The ecoauto Rebate Program (ending in March 2009) provides performance-based rebates to consumers who purchase fuel-efficient vehicles. It requires eligible vehicles to meet a performance standard or fuel consumption rating. To be eligible for a grant, vehicles must be purchased by December 31, 2008, and applications must be received by March 31, 2009. However, any applications received before March 31, 2009, but not yet processed by that date, will be processed early in fiscal year 2009/2010 under the 2008/2009 fiscal authority. TC will also implement and complete surveys, which will be comprised of completed surveys of Canadian consumers and dealers. The Program files and the survey information will provide accurate data on consumers’ and dealers’ awareness and acceptance of alternative fuel-efficient vehicles and on the Program’s effectiveness.
  • EC’s Scrappage Program is a national program of $92 million over four years, intended to promote the accelerated scrappage of older vehicles.

Shared outcome(s): The overall objective of the ecotransport Strategy is to reduce energy use and emissions in the transportation sector. All the specific measures envisioned in the strategy are expected to contribute to reduced fuel consumption and, as a result, the personal vehicle fleet as well as the freight sector will use less energy. Other measures will help to reduce the demand for personal transportation and encourage modal shifts to more sustainable transportation options. The strategy will lead to reduced greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants that contribute to smog, thus protecting the environment and the health of Canadians.

Governance structure(s): Under the ecotransport Strategy, each of the three departments implicated (TC, NRCan and EC) will manage their respective programs in accordance with defined governance structures for the individual programs concerned. Each program is subject to a Results-based Management Accountability Framework (RMAF), which includes committee structures, risk management strategies, and provisions for performance measurement, information management, auditing, evaluation and reporting. In addition, a broader Horizontal Management Accountability and Reporting Framework (HMARF) for the Clean Air Agenda was developed and encompasses, among others, all regulatory and program initiatives for clean transportation, including those of the ecotransport Strategy. The HMARF includes governance structures; financial, measurement, risks and information management strategies; and lines of reporting.

($ thousands)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2007-11
1. Transport Canada 1 Clean Air from Transportation a) eco-MOBILITY

9,300*

*Includes
1.1 million
allocated
to
2011-12
due to
program
extension.

2,803

Feasibility studies, municipal tools and resources for implementing Transportation demand management (TDM), pilot TDM projects, training materials and learning workshops; and

Reduce GHG emissions and reduced air pollutants due to modal shifts towards public transportation, higher occupancy of personal vehicles, and active transportation – all of which are less emissions intensive travel choices.

Clean Air from Transportation b) eco-
technology for Vehicles
14,100 5,512

Evaluate and showcase near and long term advanced technologies in the Canadian vehicle market, including more efficient and cleaner gasoline and diesel engines, electric, solar, hydrogen fuel cells, biodiesel etc, as well as individual advanced technology components; and

Reduce emissions of GHGs and air pollutants as advanced technologies gain market penetration over time.

Clean Air from Transportation c) National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry 5,400 2,153

Environmental benefits are reflected in the anticipated technology take-up from activities under the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund and the Freight Technology Incentive Program

Clean Air from Transportation d) Freight Technology Demonstration Fund 9,300 3,718

Support technology demonstrations across all transportation modes and stimulate technology take-up in the four freight modes according to the modal distribution of the projects; and

Reduce emissions of GHGs and air pollutants as advanced technologies gain market penetration over time.

Clean Air from Transportation e) Freight Technology Incentives Program 9,350 4,110

Provide cost-shared funding to companies and non-profit organizations in freight transportation to help them to purchase and install proven emission-reducing technologies; and

Reduce in emissions of GHGs and air pollutants as advanced technologies gain market penetration over time.

Clean Air from Transportation f) eco-FREIGHT Partnerships 6,550 1,860

Build and maintain partnerships within the transportation sector to reduce emissions from freight transportation through fast and flexible voluntary actions that can support the regulatory framework; and

Support agreements with industry in all freight modes.

Clean Air from Transportation g) Marine Shore Power

6,000*

*Includes
0.3 million
allocated
to
2011-2012
due to
program
extension

1,406

Demonstrate the use of shore-based power for marine vessels in Canadian ports to reduce air pollution from idling ship engines in some of Canada’s largest urban centres; and

Reduce air pollutants in the downtown areas of major port cities.

Clean Air from Transportation h) ecoauto Rebate Program 2

264,000

includes
11.3 million
for
Service
Canada
operational
requirements

2,243

includes
300,000
for
Service
Canada
operational
requirements

Provide consumer rebates to encourage the purchase of fuel-efficient vehicles;

Couple with a Green Levy to discourage the purchase of fuel-inefficient vehicles (administered by Finance Canada and Canada Revenue Agency); and

Reduce fuel consumption, commensurate with GHG emission reductions

Clean Air from Transportation i) Analytical and Policy Support 4,000 1 1,194  
2. Natural Resources Canada Clean Energy a) eco-ENERGY for Personal Vehicles 21,000 6,050

Provide information to consumers on fuel consumption and decision-making tools such as vehicle labels, guides and information, and undertake partnerships, to encourage more fuel efficient buying, driving and maintenance practices;

Administer the GHG Memorandum of Understanding with the vehicle industry; and

Reduce fuel consumption with associated reductions in GHG emissions. Air pollutant emissions will also be reduced.

Clean Energy b) eco-ENERGY for Fleets 22,000 7,159

Provide training to professional drivers representing the heavy truck, transit, intercity motor-coach, school bus, urban light and medium vehicle drivers and off-road machinery including mining, construction and farm tractors;

Expect fleets to take actions to reduce fuel use/emissions;

Expect truck stops to participate in annual idle-free truck stop campaigns; and

Expect reductions in fuel consumption with associated reductions in GHG emissions. Air pollutant emissions will also be reduced.

3. Environment Canada Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are reduced a) Scrappage 92,000 41,923

National program over four years, intended to promote the accelerated scrappage of older vehicles.

Total

463,000*
*Includes
a
$1.4 million
allocated to
2011-2012
for a
one-year
extension
of the
ecomobility
($1.1 million)
and Marine
Shore Power
programs
($0.3)

$80,130   

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact information: Alain Paquet, Manager, Performance Measurement Unit, Environmental Program, TC : 613- 990-5394


1 As part of ecotransport strategy, $4 million is allocated to analytical and policy capability in support of Transport Canada’s ecotransport strategy programs with the exception of the ecoauto Rebate program.

2 Transport Canada is responsible for the overall objectives of the program while Service Canada is responsible for the program delivery.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Marine Security

Name of lead department(s): Transport Canada

Lead department program activity: Marine Security

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: Budget 2001

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Not Applicable

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Marine Security is a horizontal initiative that is linked to the Government’s key priority of “A Safe and Secure Canada”. Its aim is to improve the security of Canada’s marine domain, including territorial waters, and inland waterways, and at Canadian ports. Elements of this initiative include:

  • Increased domain awareness, surveillance and tracking of marine traffic;
  • Improved co-ordination and cooperation on marine security, including the development of Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOCs);
  • Security clearance program for marine sector employees;
  • Implementing new detection equipment in Canadian ports to monitor containers;
  • Additional resources for emergency and law enforcement response capacity in the marine domain; and
  • International initiatives, which will ensure that Canada will meet current international standards and obligations, including those being developed by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

Shared outcome(s): The following are planned shared outcomes and activities in marine security.

Key areas include:

  • Domain awareness – Canada’s surveillance and awareness efforts within marine areas;
  • Responsiveness – Enforcement efforts in cooperation with all relevant police forces and security agencies;
  • Safeguarding – Efforts to enhance the physical security of marine infrastructure of other critical infrastructure in or around marine areas; and
  • Collaboration – Efforts in support of all other activities to ensure that the various federal and provincial departments, agencies and police forces and other groups with a responsibility for marine security.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;
  • Increased on-water presence;
  • Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;
  • Increased capability to respond to marine threats;
  • Increased stakeholder awareness and understanding;
  • Increased stakeholder ability to meet marine security requirements; and
  • Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Effective domain awareness;
  • Rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents;
  • Security-conscious culture among stakeholders;
  • Stakeholder compliance with security regulations; and,
  • Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

Ultimate Outcomes:

  • An effective and efficient marine security system;
  • High public confidence in Canada’s marine security system; and
  • A marine security system that facilitates the efficient and legitimate flow of people and goods.

Strategic Outcome:

  • A marine system that contributes to the security, safety and prosperity of Canadians and of our allies.

Governance structure(s): The Government of Canada created the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group (IMSWG), chaired by Transport Canada, to identify and coordinate federal actions in support of Canada’s objectives with regard to public security and anti-terrorism in the marine domain as well as its international marine security obligations. Under the guidance of the IMSWG, key departments are responsible for the following:

Transport Canada

Leads the Government’s initiatives in marine security enhancements, including:

  • Policy coordination;
  • Chairing the IMSWG;
  • Regulatory development in support of marine security initiatives;
  • Marine Security Oversight and Enforcement Program;
  • Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program;
  • Marine Security Contribution Program; and
  • Participation in the Marine Security Operations Centres.

Department of Fisheries and Oceans/Canadian Coast Guard

Contributor to the enhancement of the level of domain awareness within the Canadian exclusive economic zone (EEZ) through increased surveillance activities and the implementation of shore-based automatic identification system (AIS) infrastructure and the development of a long-range vessel tracking capability. As well, increased its level of on-water capability for providing platform support to respond to marine security incidents.

Also participates in the Marine Security Operations Centres.

Public Safety Canada

Public Safety Canada (PS) is Canada’s lead department for public safety. PS coordinates efforts with portfolio agencies, federal partners, other levels of government (including international allies) and stakeholders in building national policies and programs dealing with national security, emergency management, law enforcement, corrections, crime prevention and border integrity. This includes, for example, the development and implementation of marine-based counter-terrorism exercises.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

CBSA’s mandate is to manage the nation’s borders at ports of entry by administering and enforcing the domestic laws that govern trade and travel, as well as international agreements and conventions. The work of the CBSA includes identifying and interdicting high-risk individuals and goods, working with law enforcement agencies to maintain border integrity and engaging in enforcement activities, which include seizure of goods, arrests, detentions, investigations, hearings and removals.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

The RCMP is responsible for enforcing federal statutes, leading national security and organized crime investigations across Canada both on land and waterside and for maintaining border integrity between ports of entry.

Department of National Defence

Contributes to enhanced domain awareness of the strategic high-traffic coastal area. Leads the Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOCs) on the coasts and participates in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway MSOC.

($ thousands)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
1. Transport Canada Marine Security a) Marine Security Coordination Fund 16,200 2,000

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;

Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;

Security-conscious culture among stakeholders; and

Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

b) Oversight and Enforcement 54,070 11,553

Enhanced security procedures at ports, marine facilities and Canadian Vessels;

Increased stakeholder awareness and understanding;

Stakeholder compliance with security regulations; and

Security-conscious culture among stakeholders.

c) Marine Security Policy and Interdepartmental Coordination 5,000 1,000

Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;

Security-conscious culture among stakeholders;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and

Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

d) Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program 11,800 2,000

Increased stakeholder awareness and understanding;

Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities; and

Stakeholder compliance with security regulations.

e) Marine Security Contribution Program 115,000 12,500

Increased ability to meet marine security requirements;

Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;

Security-conscious culture among stakeholders; and

Stakeholder compliance with security regulations.

f) Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (design team) New
funding
1,900

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;

Effective domain awareness; and

Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

2. Department of Fisheries and Oceans Safe and Accessible Waterways a) Increased On-Water Patrols 10,000
(annually
and
ongoing)
10,000

Increased on-water presence; and

Effective domain awareness.

b) Automatic Identification System and Long Range Identification and Tracking 27,500 12,000

Increased volume of vessel traffic data;

Increased awareness; and

Effective domain awareness.

c) Great Lakes/ St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (Design Team) $1,060
(funding
sunsets
on
March 31,
2008)
$400

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;

Effective domain awareness; and

Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

d) Marine Security Enforcement Teams 18,000 4,500

Increased on-water presence;

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased capability to respond to marine threats;

Effective domain awareness; and

Rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents.

e) Construction of Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels 68,500 4,000

CCG will procure MSPV vessels;

RCMP will report on the enforcement results of the MSET program.

f) Increased Surveillance Flights 7,000
(annually
and
ongoing)
7,000

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment; and

Effective domain awareness.

3. Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) Enforcement a) Radiation Detection Equipment Initiative 31,670
(over
5 years)
5,420

Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities.

b) Passenger and Crew Screening Initiative 34,900 7,224

Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities.

c) Cruise Ship Inspections 2,350
annually
2,350

Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities.

4. Public Safety Policing and Law Enforcement a) Marine-Based Counter-terrorism Exercises (sometimes referred to as scenario based training)

200
ongoing

$1,000
to date

200

Improved understanding of roles and responsibilities; contribution to the development of robust interdepartmental procedures and thereby enhanced interdepartmental coordination for Port Domain Awareness and Emergency / Consequence Management

b) Great Lakes / St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (Design Team) 1,600 308

Overall policy coordination for the implementation and direction of the permanent Great Lakes / St. Lawrence Marine Security Operations Centre.

Improved domain awareness in the Great Lakes / St. Lawrence Seaway region by implementation of a permanent facility.

4. Department of National Defence Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces – Generate and Sustain Forces Capable of Maritime Effects – Operational Units a) Coastal Marine Security Operations Centres 165,000 22,450

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and

Effective domain awareness.

b) Interdepart-mental Maritime Integrated Command Control and Communication

10,000

+7,000
recurring
O&M
yearly

135

(for
definition
phase)

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and

Effective domain awareness.

Conduct Operations – Domestic and Continental Operations – Conduct Ongoing Operations and Services to Canadians c) Increased On-Water Presence/ Coordination (Marlant and JTF(P))

5,000

Annual
recurring
amount

5,000

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased on-water presence; and

Effective domain awareness.

6. Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security a) National Ports Project 1,029 1,029 Safeguarding
b) National Port Enforcement Teams (NPET) 4,440 4,440

NPET are integrated, intelligence-led, and conduct federal-statute investigations applicable to Canadian ports; and

The enforcement objective is to prevent, detect and interdict organized criminal activity, contraband, and people who may pose a threat to the safety and security of Canada and other countries.

c) Marine Security Emergency Response Team Training 560 560

Increased capability to respond to marine threats; and

Rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents.

d) Marine Security Emergency Response Teams

Re-profiled funding carried forward to 2007-2008

5,630

 

0

5,630

 

0

Increased capability to respond to marine threats; and

Rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents.

Forensic Identification e) Marine Transportation Clearance Program 180 180 Improved security measures at ports and marine facilities.
Marine Security f) Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (interim)

2,491

Note:
Interim
funding
ended
March 31,
2008.
Permanent
funding
has been
approved
as of fall
2008-09

2,491

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;

Effective domain awareness; and

Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces, and municipalities.

g) National Waterside Security Coordination Team 839 839

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment; and

Effective domain awareness.

h) Marine Security Enforcement Teams

7,432

(recurring)

7,432

Increased on-water presence;

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased capability to respond to marine security threats;

Effective domain awareness; and

Rapid and effective response to marine threats.

Total 600,000+  134,541   

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicabl