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2012-13
Report on Plans and Priorities



Natural Resources Canada






The original version was signed by
The Honourable Joe Oliver
Minister of Natural Resources






Table of Contents

Minister’s Message

Section I: Organizational Overview

Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Section III: Supplementary Information

Section IV: Other Items of Interest



Minister’s Message

The Honourable Joe Oliver

It is my pleasure to present the 2012–13 Report on Plans and Priorities for Natural Resources Canada (NRCan).

Natural resource sectors underpin Canada’s economy and are the cornerstone of our future prosperity. Collectively, energy, mining and forestry account for over 760,000 workers in communities throughout the country.

Beyond our borders, the global economy remains fragile and any potential setbacks would have an impact on Canada. Canadian businesses face an ever increasing level of competition from emerging fast growth countries and the challenges associated with an aging population and demographic change.

Canada’s Economic Action Plan 2012 addresses these challenges by building on our positive record of achievement and leveraging our tremendous natural resource potential with new and renewed measures to support energy, forestry innovation and mining exploration.

Unlocking our resource potential through responsible resource development is one of the key initiatives from the Economic Action Plan that will improve competitiveness and environmental performance, while contributing to the prosperity of all Canadians. Through the Major Projects Management Office initiative, NRCan will provide leadership and support for system-wide legislative improvements to the review process for these projects to achieve the goal of “one project, one review” in a clearly defined time period.

Our country’s prosperity is also linked to reaching beyond our borders to economic opportunities that serve to grow Canada’s trade and investment. We will focus on expanding markets and diversifying global partnerships for natural resources by reducing barriers to trade, facilitating market access and branding Canada as a reliable and responsible supplier of resources. Budget 2012 provides continued support for the transformation of the forestry sector and encourages the development and commercialization of emerging innovative technology and next-generation forest products.

In keeping with our commitment to innovation, NRCan will advance the development of alternatives to existing isotope production technologies and help secure the supply of medical isotopes for Canadians.

To further the continued safety and security of Canada and Canadians, NRCan will leverage its Science and Technology knowledge for safety and security risk management. This includes working with partners to prepare for and manage resource-related threats and emergencies. Economic Action Plan support for the development of new satellite reception facilities and a data management system will enable the observation of Canada’s vast geography and further NRCan’s leadership in science and technology.

Our country’s natural resources have been the foundation of our prosperity for generations in the past. We have a tremendous opportunity to capitalize on their future potential. In a period of global economic uncertainty, NRCan will further secure Canada’s economic and social progress through the responsible development of our natural resources.

The Honourable Joe Oliver
P.C., M.P. (Eglinton-Lawrence)
Minister of Natural Resources



Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d’Ítre

NRCan’s vision is to improve the quality of life of Canadians by creating a sustainable resource advantage. It seeks to fulfill this vision by working to: improve the global competitiveness of the natural resource sectors; enable the sustainable development of Canada’s natural resources; and enhance the safety and security of citizens.

Responsibilities

The Minister of Natural Resources is specifically responsible for or has responsibilities under more than 30 Acts of Parliament 1. The Minister’s core powers, duties and functions are set forth in the Department of Natural Resources Act 2, the Resources and Technical Surveys Act 3 and the Forestry Act 4. NRCan also works in areas of shared responsibility with the provinces.

 

Within the Government of Canada the Minister of Natural Resources also has responsibilities for the natural resources portfolio 5, which includes the following:

 

To deliver on its responsibilities, NRCan relies on a number of tools. It uses science and technology (S&T) to help address priorities and plan for the future. It develops policies, programs, and regulations that help create a sustainable resource advantage, supporting strong, competitive natural resource sectors that are environmentally and socially responsible. And it uses partnerships and international collaboration to help drive progress on natural resources issues important to Canadians. More broadly, the Department plays a critical role in Canada’s future, contributing to high-paying jobs in Canada’s natural resources sectors, business investment and overall economic growth.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Activity Architecture

The diagram below presents NRCan’s expected results and programs for 2012-13, commonly referred to as the Program Activity Architecture. Through its programs, NRCan supports the achievement of three Government of Canada outcomes, Strong Economic Growth, A Clean and Healthy Environment, and A Safe and Secure Canada.

Natural Resources Program Activity Architecture

[text version]   [larger image]

NRCan reviewed its Strategic Outcomes and Program Activity Architecture for 2012-13 to better showcase its contribution to Canada and Canadians and to measure and show results. For example, all programs supporting market access and diversification were regrouped together in one program activity supporting the first Strategic Outcome.

Organizational Priorities

NRCan has identified five priorities seen as critical to meeting its Strategic Outcomes and supporting the Government of Canada’s priorities. Together, these priorities will guide the Department’s policy direction, science and technology initiatives, and program development and delivery.

The success in delivering each priority will be assessed in the 2012-13 Departmental Performance Report. Below are details on each of the priorities and the plans for achieving them.


Expand markets and
global partnerships
Type 14
New
PAA Linkages: Strategic Outcome 1
PA 1.1 Market Access and Diversification
PA 1.2 Innovation for New Products and Processes

Why this is a priority

Market access for natural resource products generates significant benefits to Canadians. For example, on average, they accounted for 47% of our total exports and 10% of our Gross Domestic Product from 2001 to 2011. With slower-than-anticipated economic growth in the United States (US) and high demand for natural resources in fast growing economies in the Asia-Pacific region, Canada must focus on expanding and diversifying its markets. It must position itself as a reliable and responsible supplier worldwide.

Plans for meeting the priority

NRCan supports the natural resource sectors in diversifying and expanding their markets by addressing barriers to trade, facilitating market access and by branding Canada as a reliable and responsible supplier of natural resources. In strengthening relationships with key foreign governments, both bilaterally and multilaterally, NRCan works to expand existing markets, open new markets, and facilitate foreign investment in Canada as well as Canadian private investment abroad. In 2012-13, NRCan will: 

  • Work bilaterally to strengthen key partnerships with growing economies in the Asia-Pacific region such as China, Japan and India (through, for example, the Canada-China Memorandum of Understanding on Energy Cooperation).
  • Pursue strategic bilateral engagement with the United States to strengthen our energy and natural resources relationship, notably through the Canada-US Energy Consultative Mechanism and the Clean Energy Dialogue.
  • Leverage multilateral fora to engage key partners and promote Canada as a reliable and responsible supplier of natural resources, for example through the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, the Intergovernmental Forum on Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development, and the International Energy Agency.
  • Work to enhance global market acceptance of Canadian energy and natural resources by acting to minimize discriminatory measures (e.g. European Union’s Fuel Quality Directive).
  • Contribute to the implementation of Canada’s Corporate Social Responsibility Strategy for the Extractive Sector Abroad, and to the creation of the Canadian International Institute for Extractive Industries in order to safeguard Canada’s reputation and position Canadian companies as preferred partners for host countries and communities.
  • Support the forest industry’s market diversification activities in targeted offshore markets as well as in the US and Canada.


Unlock resource
potential through
responsible
development
Type:
ongoing
PAA Linkages: Strategic Outcomes 1, 2 & 3
PA 1.1 Market Access and Diversification
PA 1.3 Investment in Natural Resource Sectors
PA 2.3 Responsible Natural Resource Management
PA 3.2 Landmass Information

Why this is a priority

Canada has a vast natural resource endowment. The responsible development of Canada’s natural resources and export market hold the promise of hundreds of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in economic activity across the country. Over the next 10 years, more than $500 billion could be invested in Canada’s mining and energy sectors.

Seizing this tremendous opportunity will require Canada to attract capital to develop its natural resources and build the necessary infrastructure. It will also require that it has in place a regulatory system that supports Canada’s competitive advantage while protecting Canadians, promoting environmental stewardship and ensuring meaningful consultations with Aboriginal groups.

Plans for meeting the priority

To achieve this, NRCan will be 1) providing federal leadership to improve the federal regulatory system for major resource projects; 2) encouraging investments in the natural resource sectors by increasing geoscientific knowledge on resource potential; and 3) supporting meaningful consultations with Aboriginal Peoples. In 2012-13 specifically, the Department will: 

  • Continue to work with federal regulatory departments and agencies through the Major Projects Management Office to develop and implement system-wide legislative, regulatory and policy changes to the federal regulatory system and improve the regulatory system for project reviews, including possibilities to better align federal and provincial processes.
  • Through the Major Projects Management Office, provide overarching management of the regulatory review of major resource projects to ensure that reviews are timely and predictable, with appropriate consideration of social and environmental effects and meaningful consultation of Aboriginal groups.
  • Through the Geo-mapping for Energy and Minerals program and the Targeted Geoscience Initiative 4, provide geoscience knowledge to support exploration that could lead to the discovery of mineral and energy resources, and deliver tools to help uncover deep hidden mineral deposits.
  • Provide timely decisions, technical information, and advice in support of efficient environmental assessment.
  • Work in collaboration with other departments and stakeholders to support responsible mining in the North and to realize socio-economic benefits for northerners.


Innovate for
competitiveness
and environmental
performance
Type:
Previously
Committed
PAA Linkages: Strategic Outcomes 1 & 2
PA 1.2 Innovation for New Products and Processes
PA 2.1 Energy-efficient Practices and Lower-carbon Energy Sources
PA 2.2 Technology Innovation
PA 2.3 Responsible Natural Resource Management

Why this is a priority

Canadians have made it clear that they want their natural resources developed in an environmentally responsible way. At the same time, the emergence of low-cost competitors create a challenge for Canadian companies to keep the cost low to remain competitive.  Energy efficiency and clean energy technology allow industries to lower their energy consumption, simultaneously decreasing their production costs and improving their environmental performance. Long term competitiveness is also supported by encouraging industries to develop and implement new processes and value-added products and technologies.

Furthermore, the market for clean technology is growing. By 2020, the clean technology industry is expected to be the world’s 3rd largest industry. By investing in innovation, Canada can seize a larger share of this market and improve the competitiveness of its industries. NRCan can also support Canada’s transition to a lower-carbon economy by encouraging the uptake of energy efficient products and services and advancing carbon capture and storage technologies.

Plans for meeting the priority

Over the medium to long term, the objective is to encourage the natural resources sector to adopt new technologies and processes and use cleaner technologies, and to enhance energy efficiency in the residential, commercial and institutional, industrial and transportation sectors. To achieve this, NRCan’s strategy will be focused on: 1) supporting major clean energy projects; 2) supporting forest innovation and industry transformation; 3) pursuing S&T projects on unconventional oil and gas and implementing ecoENERGY initiatives for alternative transportation fuels; 4) improving energy efficiency, and; 5) advancing innovation in green mining. In 2012-13 specifically, NRCan will:

  • Leverage investments in clean energy research, development and technology deployment, including small and large-scale carbon capture storage (CCS) projects.
  • Support  major new clean energy projects of national or regional significance, such as the planned Lower Churchill hydroelectricity project in Atlantic Canada. 
  • Support the development and deployment of transformative technologies in the forest sector, including the development and implementation of five high-value Canadian forest products, processes and/or technologies by 2016.
  • Promote energy efficiency by continuing to deliver the ecoENERGY Efficiency initiatives, and increase Canada’s domestic alternative fuel production capacity.
  • Undertake research and development projects to develop lightweight and other advanced materials to enable energy efficient vehicles, and to extend the life and reliability of existing nuclear reactor components supplied by Canadian companies.
  • Establish two agreements related to the development of clean processing methods for rare earth elements and alternative energy underground mining vehicles (batteries, electric and others).


Leverage S&T knowledge
for safety and security risk
management
Type:
New
PAA Linkages: Strategic Outcomes 2 & 3
PA 2.3 Responsible Natural Resource Development
PA 3.1 Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources
PA 3.2 Landmass Information

Why this is a priority

NRCan supports the Government of Canada in fulfilling some of the most basic obligations a country has to its citizens, ensuring the safety and security of Canada and Canadians. With increased considerations for security and risk management as they relate to natural resources and to natural and man-made hazards – brought upon by recent incidents such as the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, wildfires affecting Canadian Communities and the nuclear incident in Japan – NRCan must continue to leverage its knowledge and work with partners to prepare for and manage threats and emergencies.

Furthermore, NRCan will play a key role in providing up-to-date information on our natural resources and landmass through Open Government, a whole-of-Government initiative to ensure Canadians have easy access to the right information, in the right format, and in a timely manner.

Plans for meeting the priority

NRCan will continue to prepare for and manage risks and emergencies as they relate to its mandate.  In 2012-13, the Department will:

  • Provide open geospatial data and technological expertise in partnership with Public Safety Canada and Defence Research and Development Canada to deploy more widely the Multi-Agency Situational Awareness System used to provide real-time management capability.
  • Develop a Federal Geospatial Platform to provide accurate geospatial and geosciences information, in support of Canada’s land use management and emergency response capabilities.
  • Deliver a national adaptation platform that will provide a forum on which to build and exchange knowledge on the impacts of climate change in order to better equip natural resources sector decision makers to implement adaptation strategy.
  • Provide the scientific data and analyses required to finalize Canada’s submission to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).
  • Enhance the framework for pest risk analyses of Canada’s forest pests, and deliver information on high-priority pest risks to decision makers.
  • Assess risks and impacts of wildland fire on Canada’s forests and on the safety and security of Canadians, and disseminate information to key stakeholders.


Increase the effectiveness
and efficiency in NRCan
operations
Type:
New
PAA Linkages:
PA 4.1 Internal Services

Why this is a priority

NRCan is in a period of significant change. The sunsetting of programs will mean that NRCan will reduce in size while transforming its internal business practices, processes and tools. At the same time, the Department remains at the forefront of the Government’s agenda and will be expected to continue to play a prominent and important role. In response, the department must increase effectiveness and efficiency in its operations to ensure it is ready to respond to the Government’s agenda.

Plans for meeting the priority

NRCan has articulated four guideposts to ensure it is ready to respond effectively and efficiently to the Government’s agenda and to sustain high performance on core business: asserting policy leadership, mobilizing science and technology, transforming business and growing human capital.  Specifically NRCan will:

  • Advance collaboration between policy and science communities and increase analytical rigour and governance to enable NRCan to meet its role in delivering on priorities across government and with external partners.
  • Launch the corporate knowledge management initiative to transform the way NRCan employees manage information by implementing an electronic document and records management system to capture, store and retrieve documents easily. NRCan will also leverage collaborative technologies such as web 2.0 to meet business needs.
  • Further transform NRCan’s information technology management through collective governance with Shared Services Canada and the Treasury Board Secretariat.
  • Engage NRCan staff to identify key areas of improvement to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of NRCan’s business processes.
  • Strengthen integrated business planning through further alignment of human resource planning to business priorities, including the identification of critical areas and positions and their required knowledge, skills and abilities.
  • Make NRCan's Talent Management Program a core corporate enterprise providing an integrated and structured approach that maximizes the contribution and career development of employees by strengthening performance management; linking learning and leadership development to business needs and phasing the implementation of succession planning.

Risk Analysis

As a large and diverse organization, NRCan prepares for and manages a wide range of risks and opportunities. The foundation of the Department’s approach to risk management is found in its Integrated Risk Management Policy Framework, which is based on the recognition that all activities towards achieving its strategic objectives must rest upon a solid understanding of its risk environment.  Accordingly, organizational priorities have been carefully chosen to address the key risks and opportunities that are instrumental to achieving the Strategic Outcomes of the organization. This risk-based approach is at the basis of NRCan’s integrated planning and resource allocation.

For 2012-13, the Department will be actively managing a range of key risks, both strategic/external and operational, which are contained in its Corporate Risk Profile. Of note, particular attention will be paid to the Workforce and Capacity Management risks.  Responding to its changing fiscal and operational context through updating the Corporate Risk Profile will ensure that NRCan is able to meet its departmental priorities and commitments. Some other noteworthy risks are presented below.

Global Economy

While the global economic outlook remains uncertain, Canada is in a strong fiscal position relative to other G8 countries, due in part to the country’s large and diverse natural resource endowment and its stable investment climate. Canada’s resource endowment and production is far larger than its domestic demand; as a result, economic growth and resource-based prosperity is influenced by commodity prices and global demand for natural resources.

The slower-than-anticipated economic growth in the US and the fragile economic growth in Europe remain a key risk for our natural resource sectors. Although robust by Western standards, growth in emerging economies, most notably China, is slowing and may be adversely affected if developed economies slow down.

To address this, NRCan has in place programs directed at strengthening the resiliency and competitiveness of the Canadian resource sectors. That said, persistent uncertainty and uneven economic growth could strain Canada’s resource sectors to the point where additional adjustments may be required in NRCan programming to support the sectors.

Market Development and Diversification

The global economic balance is shifting and it is essential for Canada to adapt to these changes. For instance, China and the Asia-Pacific region represent a tremendous opportunity that can make significant contributions to Canada’s long-term growth. China is expected to be the world’s largest oil consumer by 2030, and 30% of world energy demand is expected to come from China by 2035. The country's appetite for natural resources is expected to grow, as it adds another 350 million people to its population by 2035. Given Canada’s large resource endowment and expertise, seizing this immense opportunity could stimulate job creation and economic growth. However, it also requires addressing a number of issues.

The right conditions need to be in place to attract capital to develop Canada’s natural resources and to build the necessary infrastructure. Canada must ensure that it has in place a regulatory system that supports Canada’s competitive advantage while protecting Canadians, promoting environmental stewardship and ensuring meaningful consultations with Aboriginal groups. To that effect, NRCan is working on measures to focus federal resources where they matter most: on large projects, including energy infrastructure, with the greatest risk for environmental impacts.

In addition, strategies are being put in place to address barriers to trade and market access, and to expand and diversify Canada’s export markets for natural resource products.

Security and Emergency Management

NRCan also manages multiple emergency management risks that fall under its mandate. The Department has a key role to play to ensure the safety and security of Canada and Canadians by providing timely and accurate scientific and technical information, and advice and guidance on natural hazards that both informs policy, regulations, standards, and/or codes as well as supports mitigation, prevention, emergency preparedness, response, and recovery activities.

By providing knowledge on Canada's lands and natural resources, NRCan enables informed decision making and facilitates the responsible development and management of our natural resources and land, and helps protect Canadians from natural and man-made hazards.

As Canada’s natural resources are being developed, NRCan can leverage its S&T knowledge for the safety and security of Canada and Canadians, and for the risk management and sustainable development of our natural resource endowment. For example, specific considerations have been given to Canada’s energy security and to the potential vulnerabilities of energy systems, and mitigation strategies have been put in place to reduce the consequences of those risks and ensure proper collaboration with industry and provinces on energy emergency contingency plans.

Capacity Management and Workforce

NRCan manages several high-profile programs that have a limited lifespan, including large Grants and Contributions programs. As noted in the Departmental Spending Trend section (see page 16), NRCan’s program spending is expected to return to the pre- Economic Action Plan levels. The Department must thus manage important capital assets and highly qualified personnel in an environment where funding is time-limited and can fluctuate over time. While this ensures that NRCan’s programs are reviewed on a regular basis and that any new programs are aligned to the Government’s priorities, managing in this context brings about some risks related to workforce and capacity management.

To respond to this context, NRCan has taken several measures to continue to support the Government’s agenda. It has conducted a thorough risk assessment and run a comprehensive integrated planning process to identify its priorities, key activities and performance measures. These priorities will ensure the alignment of resources to the Government’s agenda.

Planning Summary

As noted above, NRCan reviewed its Strategic Outcomes and Program Activity Architecture (PAA) for 2012-13 to better showcase its contribution to Canada and Canadians and to measure and show results. Financial information related to fiscal year 2011-12 is presented according to that year’s PAA.


NRCan Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
2,811,857 2,875,283 2,246,566


NRCan Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
4,495 4,467 4,433

 

Strategic Outcome 1:
Canada’s Natural Resource Sectors are Globally Competitive
Performance Indicators 15 Targets
Canada's rank in trade as measured by Canada's Trade Performance Index (TPI) for wood, wood products & paper relative to all nations. Favourable 10 year trend
Canada's rank in trade as measured by Trade Performance Index (TPI) for minerals (includes energy and power) relative to all nations. Favourable 10 year trend

 

2012-13
Program Activity
Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
($ thousands)
Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes 16
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
1.1 Market Access and Diversification * 28,258 28,257 28,252 Strong economic growth
1.2 Innovation for New Products and Processes * 71,292 81,522 40,622 Strong economic growth
1.3 Investment in Natural Resource Sectors * 74,618 54,969 51,533 Strong economic growth
1.4 Statutory Programs – Atlantic Offshore * 1,134,954 1,389,370 1,277,168 Strong economic growth
Total Planned Spending 1,309,122 1,554,119 1,397,576  

* Note that NRCan changed its Program Activity Architecture (PAA) from 2011-12 to 2012-13. Forecast spending for 2011-12 reflects that year’s PAA structure, for which there were two program activities under Strategic Outcome 1: 1.1 Economic Opportunities for Natural Resources (forecast spending for 2011-12 of $1,455,616,000, which includes the Statutory Programs related to the Atlantic Offshore, with forecast spending for 2011-12 of $1,211,424,000), and 1.2 Natural Resource-based Communities (forecast spending for 2011-12 of $146,000)


Strategic Outcome 2:
Natural Resource Sectors and Consumers are Environmentally Responsible
Performance Indicators Targets
Change in Canadian Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions Canada’s national target is a 17% reduction from 2005 levels by 2020.
Annual harvest of timber relative to the level of harvest deemed to be sustainable (Allowable Annual Cut – AAC) Stay within the upper limit of the supply line (AAC)

 

2012-13
Program Activity
Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
($ thousands)
Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
2.1 Energy-efficient Practices and Lower-carbon Energy Sources * 585,488 468,729 426,691 A clean and healthy environment
2.2 Technology Innovation * 430,843 343,217 140,315 A clean and healthy environment
2.3 Responsible Natural Resource Management * 234,547 260,332 38,364 A clean and healthy environment
Total Planned Spending 1,250,878 1,072,278 605,370  

* Note that NRCan changed its Program Activity Architecture (PAA) from 2011-12 to 2012-13. Forecast spending for 2011-12 reflects that year’s PAA structure, for which there were two program activities under Strategic Outcome 2: 2.1 Clean Energy (forecast spending for 2011-12 of $1,416,944,000), and 2.2 Ecosystem Risk Management (forecast spending for 2011-12 of $182,820,000)



Strategic Outcome 3:
Canadians have Information to Manage their Lands and Natural Resources,
and are Protected from Related Risks
Performance Indicators Targets
Number of new and updated public and private sector adaptation and risk mitigation activities, plans and strategies, such as Natural Resource Management Plans, Adaptation Plans or Emergency Preparedness Plans using NRCan information 5 activities, plans or strategies 
Number of national or international interoperable geo-tools and data frameworks that support the management of lands, natural resources, national infrastructure and human populations Baseline to be established

 

2012-13
Program Activity
Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
($ thousands)
Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
3.1 Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources * 56,020 56,723 56,740 A safe and secure Canada
3.2 Landmass Information * 48,117 45,270 43,611 A safe and secure Canada
Total Planned Spending 104,137 101,994 100,351  

* Note that NRCan changed its Program Activity Architecture (PAA) from 2011-12 to 2012-13. Forecast spending for 2011-12 reflects that year’s PAA structure, for which there were three program activities under Strategic Outcome 3: 3.1 Adapting to a Changing Climate and Hazard Risk Management (forecast spending for 2011-12 of $74,503,000), 3.2 Natural Resource and Landmass Knowledge and Systems (forecast spending for 2011-12 of $92,201,000), and 3.3 Geomatics Canada Revolving Fund (forecast spending for 2011-12 of $1,968,000 with revenues of the equal amount).


2012-13
Program Activity
Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
4.1 Internal Services 254,467 147,720 146,892 143,270
Total Planned Spending 147,720 146,892 143,270

For more information on NRCan’s plans and performance please visit www.nrcan.gc.ca/plans-performance-reports/home


Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada’s commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision-making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets. Sustainable development is central to the mandate of NRCan and essential to the future of the natural resource sectors and to the Canadian economy. The Department makes significant contributions to the FSDS. This is captured throughout the document and more specifically under the organizational priority - Innovate for competitiveness and environmental performance - where high level information on NRCan plans regarding low-carbon economy and clean energy technology are presented. Furthermore, the Department ensures that consideration of FSDS outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. For example, an analysis of the impacts on FSDS goals and targets is included in every proposal for policies, plans, or programs as part of the federal Strategic Environmental Assessment process.

NRCan contributes to the following FSDS themes: I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality; II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability; III - Protecting Nature, and; IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government, as denoted by the visual identifiers below.

FSDS Themes I, II, II, IV

These contributions are components of most of the Department’s Program Activities, outlined in sections II and III (Greening Government Operations supplementary table). Please visit NRCan’s website 17 for additional details on the Department’s activities to support sustainable development. For complete details on the FSDS, please see Environment Canada’s Sustainable Development website 18

Expenditure Profile


Voted and Statutory Items
($ millions)
Voted or Statutory Items Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording Main Estimates
2011-12
Main Estimates
2012-13
1 Operating expenditures 569.9 718.7
5 Capital 13.9 6.8
10 Grants and Contributions 1,267.5 832.3
(S) Minister of Natural Resources – Salary and Motor Car Allowance 0.1 0.1
(S) Contributions to Employee Benefit Plans 58.7 59.7
(S) Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board 6.8 7.8
(S) Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board 3.4 3.5
(S) Payments to the Nova Scotia Offshore Revenue Account 179.7 135.8
(S) Payments to the Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Resource Revenue Fund 1,424.0 987.9
(S) Grant to the Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology 0.0 59.3
(S) Geomatics Canada Revolving Fund
- Operational expenditures
- Respendable revenue

2.0
2.0

2.0
2.0
Main Estimates 3,524.0 2,811.9

Departmental Spending Trend

The graph below illustrates the departmental spending trend for the period 2008-09 to 2014-15. Note that it does not include information from the 2012 Budget.

Expenditure Profile - Spending Trend Graph

[text version]

Programs:

Program spending increased from 2008-09 to 2011-12, and is decreasing for subsequent years as a result of the completion of many of Canada’s Economic Action Plan initiatives and the sunsetting of a number of programs, for example the Clean Air Agenda programs, the Pulp and Paper Green Transformation Program, the ecoENERGY Retrofit Homes program and the Investing in Canada’s Forest Sector Initiative.

Information on year-to-year variations for the 2012-13 to 2014-15 period can be found in the table below, which provides details on both programs that are sunsetting or will have reduced funding and programs that will have increased funding.


Fiscal year Programs sunsetting or with reduced
funding
Programs with increased
funding
2012-13
  • Pulp and Paper Green Transformation Program
  • ecoENERGY Retrofit Homes Program
  • ecoENERGY Technology Initiative
  • Transfer to Shared Services Canada (SSC) for the Administrative Service Review
  • ecoENERGY for Biofuels Producer Incentive
  • Isotopes Supply Initiative
  • CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory Relocation Program
  • Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program
  • Clean Energy Fund
  • ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative
  • ecoENERGY Efficiency Program
  • Sustainable Development Technology Canada – Next Generation Biofuels Fund
  • Port Hope Area Initiative
2013-14
  • Clean Energy Fund
  • ecoENERGY for Biofuels Producer Incentive
  • Geo-mapping for Energy and Minerals Program
  • Sustainable Development Technology Canada – Next Generation Biofuels Fund
  • Port Hope Area Initiative
  • Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program
  • Investments in Forest Industry Transformation Program
 
2014-15
  • Clean Energy Fund
  • Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program
  • Port Hope Area Initiative
  • Investments in Forest Industry Transformation Program
  • ecoENERGY for Biofuels Producer Incentive
  • Sustainable Development Technology Canada – Next Generation Biofuels Fund
 

Statutory Programs:

As per the various Atlantic Offshore Accords, NRCan receives royalties for offshore oil and gas production and subsequently pays an equal amount to the provinces of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador. The increased expenditures levels in 2008-09 is largely a result of the significant increase in oil prices experienced in that fiscal year. The spending for 2009-10 and subsequent years reflect actual and forecasted oil price and production levels.

Estimates by Vote

For information on NRCan’s appropriations, please see the 2012–13 Main Estimates publication 19



Section II - Analysis of Program Activities
by Strategic Outcome

This section provides information on programs that are critical to the realization of our Strategic Outcomes and priorities for 2012-13. NRCan monitors and tracks progress through quarterly reviews, which enables early detection of problem areas and, wherever possible, the implementation of corrective actions to deliver expected results in accordance to plans and budgets. NRCan will use its updated performance indicators to improve performance management and decision-making, and provide more accurate and balanced performance information to Parliament and Canadians. As a result, the commitments presented below will serve as the basis for the next Departmental Performance Report.

More information about these programs and initiatives, as well as supporting evidence from internal evaluations and audit reports, can be found on NRCan’s website.


Strategic Outcome 1 - Canada’s Natural Resource Sectors are Globally Competitive

Canada’s Natural Resource Sectors are Globally Competitive

[text version]

Canada is a major producer and exporter of natural resources. Being competitive in Canadian and foreign markets is imperative to the nation’s economic growth. The objective of this strategic outcome is to help Canada’s natural resource sectors become more globally competitive by adapting to the continuously changing conditions of success. This will be achieved by supporting the natural resource sectors to expand and diversify their markets to respond to the high demand from emerging economies, and diversify their product offerings to remain innovative and competitive. Major activities to achieve this include:

  • Increasing access to new and existing markets by contributing to the reduction of trade barriers and ensuring that regulations are up-to-date;
  • Maximizing productivity and diversifying markets by encouraging natural resources sectors to adopt new technologies and processes to develop new value-added products and explore new revenue streams;
  • Encouraging investments in the natural resource sectors by decreasing the risk of development and increasing knowledge on opportunities; and,
  • Developing and implementing system-wide improvements to modernize the federal regulatory system for major resource projects.

NRCan also administers the statutory programs for the Atlantic Offshore Accords, which provide that the benefits of revenues from the offshore should flow to provinces as if the resources were on land. The revenues collected by the Receiver General of Canada are paid to provinces (Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador).

For more information on NRCan’s plans and performance please visit www.nrcan.gc.ca/plans-performance-reports/home


Program Activity 1.1: Market Access and Diversification

Canada’s natural resource sectors face two key barriers to market access and diversification: 1) trade and policy barriers and 2) lack of awareness of Canada’s natural resource products. The objectives of this program activity are to break down those barriers and support natural resource markets by making information available to Canadians, supporting negotiations to reduce trade barriers, and ensuring that regulations are up-to-date. This helps maintain natural resource sectors’ access to existing markets and increases their access to new market segments.

What we are trying to accomplish and how we measure success
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets How it works
Natural resource sectors have increased access to markets and new market segments Natural resource sectors have access to markets and new market segments as defined by domestic exports of energy products, minerals and metal products and forestry products.  Favourable 10 year trend By measuring the levels of domestic exports of energy, minerals, metals, and forest products, NRCan will be able to assess the impact of its programs that are aimed at increasing exports and the overall health and competitiveness of the natural resources sectors. 
Canadian direct investment abroad Favourable 10 year trend The health and competitiveness of Canada’s natural resources industries can be measured by the level of investments that they make in foreign countries.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
28,258 28,257 28,252


Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
222 222 222


Planning Highlights

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityCanada’s natural resources and its associated products and technologies are an important source of wealth and employment for Canadians, and significantly contribute to Canada's export trade. To maximize and ensure Canada’s international standings, it is essential to diversify the export markets of our natural resources and realize the full range of global opportunities available to us. Bilateral and multilateral trade agreements in the mining, forest and energy sectors will help gain new market access. NRCan will also work at maintaining its long-established relationships with key trading partners and will continue to engage domestic partners in the articulation of Canada’s approach to the management of energy resources.

Commitments for 2012-13: Work bilaterally to strengthen key partnerships with growing economies in the Asia-Pacific region such as China, Japan and India (through, for example, the Canada-China Memorandum of Understanding on Energy Cooperation).

Pursue strategic bilateral engagement with the United States to strengthen our energy and natural resources relationship, notably through the Canada-US Energy Consultative Mechanism and the Clean Energy Dialogue.

Leverage multilateral fora to engage key partners and promote Canada as a reliable and responsible supplier of natural resources, for example through the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, the Intergovernmental Forum on Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development, and the International Energy Agency.

Work to enhance global market acceptance of Canadian energy and natural resources by acting to minimize discriminatory measures (e.g. European Union’s Fuel Quality Directive).

Support the forest industry’s market diversification activities in targeted offshore markets as well as in the US and Canada.

With the divestiture of the CANDU reactor division completed, NRCan is pursuing the second phase of the restructuring of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). It will examine the long term future of AECL’s Nuclear Laboratories, including their mandate, governance and management structure. It will take into account views and interests expressed further to the Request of Expression of Interest issued in early February 2012, and third-party advice on key components.

NRCan is also collaborating with AECL to manage all pre-closing liabilities and obligations remaining from the sale to Candu Energy Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. Concurrently, NRCan will continue to support the efforts of AECL to ensure its infrastructure meets health, safety, security and environmental requirements.  

Commitments for 2012-13: Implement Government decisions with respect to the restructuring of Atomic Energy Canada Limited’s Nuclear Laboratories.

The Government of Canada recognizes the importance of bringing forward modernized nuclear civil liability legislation that aligns compensation with internationally-accepted levels. The new legislation would update the Nuclear Liability Act to ensure that an appropriate civil liability regime is in place that will serve the public interest in the unlikely case of a nuclear incident at a nuclear power plant or other nuclear installation subject to the legislation.

Commitments for 2012-13: Bring forward recommendations to modernize the nuclear civil liability legislation to align compensation with internationally accepted levels.


Program Activity 1.2: Innovation for New Products and Processes

Optimizing the use of Canada's natural resources and the processes by which they are developed would improve the productivity of the natural resources sectors and reduce its dependency on the sale of traditional natural resource products. The objective of this program activity is twofold: to maximize the productivity and to decrease our dependency on the sale of traditional products by encouraging natural resources sectors to adopt new technologies and processes to develop new products. This objective is achieved by conducting science, research, development, and demonstrations on new applications, technologies, processes, and products.

What we are trying to accomplish and how we measure success
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets How it works
Natural Resource sectors increase production of new products and processes as a result of NRCan information Number of new products and processes resulting from NRCan information. 5 (annual) NRCan undertakes and funds research activities to develop new products and processes, and disseminates this knowledge through various information channels. Measuring the uptake of this information and its use for new products and processes will enable the Department to assess the direct impact of its programs. By developing and offering new products and processes, the natural resources sectors will remain competitive in the long-term.
Research and development (R&D) expenditures in natural resource sectors as defined by total intramural R&D expenditures in energy, mining and forestry sectors. Favourable 10 year trend NRCan undertakes R&D activities to develop new products and processes in energy, mining and forestry. Measuring the trend in expenditures will enable the Department to measure and compare the level of R&D expenditures and activities over time.
Public and private sector organizations have increased cost-efficiency or productivity resulting from the integration of geomatics or geoscience policies, tools and frameworks Number of citations of cost-efficiency and productivity gains in public or private sector organizations. 5 (annual) NRCan provides integrated geomatics and geoscience information and tools with a view of increasing the efficiency and productivity of private sector organizations. By measuring the number of citations related to these two topics, the Department will be able to assess the impact of its programs and evaluate the uptake of its knowledge products.


Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
71,292 81,522 40,622

Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
319 319 309


Planning Highlights

To maximize the productivity of the natural resource sectors, NRCan’s CANMET Laboratories contribute – through partnerships and collaboration – to mining innovation in Canada. The current focus is on innovations that enhance the productivity, energy efficiency and competitiveness of Canada’s mines and reduce workplace health and safety risks.

Commitments for 2012-13: Undertake a demonstration of a continuous monitoring system for hoist ropes at the Iamgold Westwood project in Abitibi.  This innovative system will enhance the competitiveness and energy efficience of Canada’s deep and shallow mines and reduce workplace health and safety risks

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityFurthermore, NRCan supports the competitiveness of the forestry sector by encouraging industries to develop new value-added products and implement new technologies, thus enabling it to transform its products, markets and business models. Through the Investments in Forest Industry Transformation Program, NRCan works with eligible forest products companies to develop and implement new technologies and processes such as bioenergy, biomaterials, biochemicals and next-generation building products. These technologies make better use of forest fibre and by-products to create a more diversified, higher value product mix. The Department also leads the development of the forest sector innovation system by establishing partnerships and strengthening institutional arrangements with key players among forest research and development performers (FPInnovations and universities), funders (Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council) and governments. The design of the system ensures the integration, alignment and coordination of the various organizations’ work. This will ultimately contribute to the competitiveness of the forestry sector. 

Commitments for 2012-13: Support the development and deployment of transformative technologies in the forest sector, including the development and implementation of five high-value Canadian forest products, processes and/or technologies by 2016.  

The emergence of mass-market distribution systems, such as mobile devices, has dramatically increased the demand for location-based data and technology. Geographic Information Systems and other location-enabled applications are dependent on standardized, up-to-date and accurate information. NRCan delivers architecture, standardization and application policies and expertise enabling the natural resources sector to create innovative applications and be more competitive.

Commitments for 2012-13: Deliver open data tools and technology that is user friendly and reusable such as customized data information catalogues to promote the competitiveness of Canadian industries and support productive investments.


Program Activity 1.3: Investment in Natural Resource Sectors

Investing in the development of natural resources is costly and risky due to the uncertainties related to the potential economic viability of natural resources. There are many factors to consider when deciding whether or not to develop a natural resource – such as investors and/or companies lacking knowledge on and, thus, being unaware of potential opportunities, or regulatory delays and uncertainty impeding the investment climate. The objective of this program activity is to encourage natural resource sector investment by either decreasing the risk of development, or increasing knowledge on opportunities. This objective is achieved by advancing federal system-wide regulatory improvements and providing funding and information on the factors that determine the potential economic viability of natural resources.

What we are trying to accomplish and how we measure success
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target How it works
Natural resource sectors have increased investment   New capital Investment in forest, energy, minerals and metals sectors Favourable 10 year trend New capital investments are related to the health and competitiveness of the natural resource sectors and the development of natural resources. As NRCan’s programs are aimed at facilitating investments, this measure will enable the Department to assess the effectiveness of its program.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
74,618 54,969 51,533


Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
492 466 466


Planning Highlights

NRCan continues to provide leadership to advance fundamental legislative, regulatory and policy improvements necessary to modernize the federal regulatory system for major projects. It also works to strengthen Canada’s reputation as an attractive place to invest. Through inter-departmental collaboration, NRCan also ensures timely, high-quality reviews of major resource projects.

Commitments for 2012-13: Continue to work with federal regulatory departments and agencies through the Major Project Management Office to develop and implement system-wide legislative, regulatory and policy changes to the federal regulatory system and improve the regulatory system for project reviews, including possibilities to better align federal and provincial processes

Through the Major Project Management Office, provide overarching management of the regulatory review of major resource projects, to ensure that reviews are timely and predictable, with appropriate consideration of social and environmental effects and meaningful consultation of Aboriginal groups.

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityNRCan supports investments in natural resources by providing key geoscientific knowledge and information to stakeholders, thereby facilitating exploration. Targeting Canada’s North, Geo-mapping for Energy and Minerals (GEM) provides the fundamental geoscience required to make strategic land-use and investment decisions. Furthermore, the economic development of communities is supported by the Targeted Geoscience Initiative 4 (TGI-4), which identifies potential new areas of mineral resources and uncovers deep or hidden mineral deposits in targeted mining communities across Canada. This program supports the economic development of established mining communities and enables investment in new, renewable energy resources.

Commitments for 2012-13: Through GEM and TGI-4, provide geoscience knowledge to support exploration that could lead to the discovery of mineral and energy resources, and deliver tools to help uncover deep hidden mineral deposits.

Release three reports and strategic assessments on offshore and new energy supply and deliver tools to uncover deep hidden mineral deposits.

Organize and lead 5 scientific workshops with exploration industry, provincial-territorial and academic collaborators to disseminate and share the latest Targeted Geoscience Initiative 4 research discoveries.

The Department also works to remove key barriers to mining development and ensures that mining is undertaken in a responsible manner. NRCan supports the industry by providing tax rulings and advice to the Canada Revenue Agency on the eligibility for various mineral-related tax incentives, with a view of reducing investment barriers. Information about the minerals and metals sector; including products such as Aboriginal mining toolkits, is also disseminated to support sound decision making and increase Aboriginal peoples’ understanding of the socio-economic opportunities and benefits of the mining industry.

NRCan is also a key player in promoting the Government of Canada’s Corporate Social Responsibility Strategy to ensure that Canadian companies bring economic, social and environmental benefits to the communities in which they work both at home and abroad. To this end, NRCan supports developing countries’ requests for assistance by providing policy advice on their mining governance framework, working bilaterally or through international fora such as the Intergovernmental Forum on Mining, Mineral, Metals and Sustainable Development.

Commitments for 2012-13: Work in collaboration with other departments and stakeholders to support responsible mining in the North and to realize socio-economic benefits for northerners.

Contribute to the implementation of Canada’s Corporate Social Responsibility Strategy for the Extractive Sector Abroad, and to the creation of the Canadian International Institute for Extractive Industries in order to safeguard Canada’s reputation and position Canadian companies as preferred partners for host countries and communities. 

To increase knowledge related to potential economic development opportunities, the Aboriginal Forestry Initiative facilitates, identifies and develops regional-scale, forest-based economic development opportunities in cooperation with Aboriginal communities across the country. Through pan-federal, regional and community-level partnerships, these investments help forest-based communities capitalize on emerging economic opportunities. In 2012-13, these strategic projects will focus on three major forest-based economic themes: bioenergy research and development; forest-based services to Government and industry; and value-added wood products. The objective is to build viable Aboriginal businesses and develop the knowledge and skills necessary for them to participate in and take advantage of employment opportunities in a transitioning forest sector.

Commitments for 2012-13: Implement 15 Aboriginal Forestry Initiative contribution agreements with Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and other federal departments to help Aboriginal organizations and businesses develop business opportunities.

Produce 5 Aboriginal Forestry Initiative knowledge products and tools such as techniques, reports and outreach publications that will enable Aboriginal communities to participate in and take advantage of forest economic opportunities.


Program Activity 1.4: Statutory Programs – Atlantic Offshore

This program activity is about monitoring and facilitating payment disbursal agreements and transfer payments under the Atlantic Offshore Accord Acts.

What we are trying to accomplish and how we measure success
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target How it works
Management of statutory requirements related to offshore petroleum in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador in a timely and efficient manner. Timeliness and accuracy of offshore payments Payment on time (100%) The Offshore Accords Act, managed by NRCan, provides that the revenues from the offshore petroleum are to flow to provinces within 48 hours.


Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
1,134,954 1,389,370 1,277,168


Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
0 0 0

Planning Highlights

The Atlantic Offshore Accords provide that the benefits of revenues from the offshore petroleum should flow to provinces as if it was on land. Revenues collected by the Receiver General of Canada are paid to the provinces of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador. As the amounts credited to the Receiver General and paid out of the revenue fund are the same, there is no net liability incurred by the federal government should the payments to provinces increase.

Commitments 2012-13: Process offshore transfer payments to both Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador as required under the Atlantic Offshore Accord Acts in a timely manner.


Strategic Outcome 2 - Natural Resource Sectors and Consumers are Environmentally Responsible

Natural Resource Sectors and Consumers are Environmentally Responsible

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Energy use and natural resource development can have negative impacts on land, water and air, which can affect the well-being of current and future generations. NRCan works to ensure that natural resources are developed and used in an environmentally responsible manner by:

  • Encouraging and enabling energy consumers and producers to adopt cleaner and more efficient technologies, products, services and practices;
  • Encouraging academia, industry and the public sector to research, develop and demonstrate innovative solutions to resource development and environmental implications; and,
  • Enabling government departments, regulatory bodies and industry to understand the risks to our environment, assess environmental impacts and protect our resources.

For more information on NRCan’s plans and performance please visit www.nrcan.gc.ca/plans-performance-reports/home


Program Activity 2.1: Energy-efficient Practices and Lower-carbon Energy Sources

Canada’s energy markets are defined by consumption and production decisions; however, consumers and producers do not necessarily make decisions that minimize their impact on the environment due to several barriers including: 1) a lack of awareness of available options and their benefits, 2) insufficient capacity for adoption (e.g. regulatory frameworks, codes and standards, etc.) and 3) financial risk. The objective of this program activity is to address these barriers and encourage and enable energy consumers and producers to adopt cleaner and more efficient technologies, products, services and practices, thereby transforming the market. This objective is achieved through education and outreach activities, targeted incentives, and regulatory interventions that keep pace with technological changes.

What we are trying to accomplish and how we measure success
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets How it works
Energy Consumers and producers adopt environmentally responsible products and practices Canada’s total annual energy savings due to efficiency (difference between energy use without energy efficiency improvements and energy use with energy efficiency improvements; the units are petajoules [PJ]) Favourable 5-year trend in PJ saved (2006 baseline) Energy savings can be achieved through consumption and production choices. Measuring the annual energy savings over 5 years will allow NRCan to assess the effectiveness and direct impacts of its energy efficiency programs that include education, outreach and legislation.
Renewable electricity generation capacity in megawatts Favourable 5-year trend in megawatts
(2005 baseline)
Our programs support the development of renewable energy. By assessing the trend in megawatts of capacity, we will be able to measure the increase in renewable electricity generating capacity, which contribute to the reduction of GHG emissions. 
Biofuel production in Canada Favourable 5-year trend
(Baseline to be established)
Our programs support domestic biofuel production. By assessing the production trend, NRCan will be able to measure the effectiveness of its program.


Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
585,488 468,729 426,691


Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
318 316 316


Planning Highlights

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityThe transition to a cleaner energy mix is a long-term challenge that requires awareness and understanding of how clean energy production options fit within the broader energy system. NRCan provides advice, information and analysis on climate change and clean energy issues and ensures that Canadians and federal government decision-makers have information to support decisions on clean energy, climate change and other environmental issues that related to energy and the economy.

Recognizing the key role clean energy can play now and in the future – providing economic and environmental benefits to Canadians – NRCan works to encourage energy efficiency, increase the availability of renewable energy and support the development and use of cleaner fossil fuels and alternative fuels. Programs and initiatives focus on reducing GHG emissions from the natural resources sectors, increasing the production of low-impact renewable energy and improving energy efficiency in every sector of the economy, including homes, commercial and institutional buildings, vehicles and industry. NRCan also works to advance the Government’s commitment to support major new clean energy projects of national or regional significance, with a view of developing Canada’s extraordinary resource wealth in a way that protects the environment.

Commitments 2012-13: Advance Canada’s clean energy and technology interests at environmental and climate change-related international fora (e.g. United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Clean Energy Ministerial process).

Support major new clean energy projects of national or regional significance, such as the planned Lower Churchill hydroelectricity project in Atlantic Canada as a means to advance clean energy.

NRCan also works to encourage and enable energy consumers and producers to adopt cleaner and more efficient technologies and practices. The ecoENERGY Efficiency initiatives will maintain the momentum to improve energy efficiency at home, at work and on the road. New labelling, benchmarking, training and information sharing tools will help Canadians make wiser energy decisions and improve energy performance in all sectors of the economy.

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityThe ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels program is expected to increase awareness and use of alternative fuels through outreach and education, as well as by supporting codes and standards committees related to alternative fuels. The ecoENERGY for Biofuels program supports the production of renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel, and encourages the development of a competitive renewable fuels industry in Canada by directly providing incentives to new and existing producers.

The Marine Renewable Energy Enabling Measures program will examine policy options for administering marine renewable energy in the federal offshore. Finally, the ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program diversifies Canada’s energy mix by providing production incentives to producers of renewable electricity. This program has been instrumental in increasing the supply of renewable electricity, such as wind, biomass, low-impact hydro, geothermal, solar, photovoltaic and ocean energy to the electrical grid. It is contributing about 14.0 terawatt-hours of electricity to Canada’s total annual generation through 4,458 MW of capacity.

Commitments 2012-13: Increase Canada’s domestic alternative fuel production capacity to 2 billion litres of renewable alternatives to gasoline and 500 million litres of renewable alternatives to diesel by December 2012.

Support two codes and standards committees actively working on developing and updating codes and standards related to alternative fuels and support the establishment of two natural gas local support networks.

Contribute to 11.30 – 13.21 petajoules of energy savings through the ecoENERGY Efficiency initiatives.

Support training sessions on energy efficiency products and practices for 170,200 individuals in the transportation sector, 400 in the buildings sector, 500 in the housing sector, and 750 (including conferences and webinars) in the industrial sector.

Manage 104 contribution agreements under the ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program.

Produce a report about regulatory approaches to marine renewable energy management in other countries.


Program Activity 2.2: Technology Innovation

Solutions to the environmental challenges faced by the natural resource sectors require sustained efforts in research, development and demonstration because the current level of science and technology is inadequate to address these concerns. However, the natural resource sectors neither have all the necessary knowledge nor make the necessary investments in innovation due to the potential poor return on investment. The objective of this program activity is to encourage academia, industry and the public sector to research, develop and demonstrate innovative solutions to environmental challenges encountered in the natural resource sectors. This objective is achieved through the generation and dissemination of scientific knowledge, and the development and demonstration of new technologies.

What we are trying to accomplish and how we measure success
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target How it works
Stakeholders invest in research, development and demonstration to address environmental challenges Amount of stakeholder investments in research, development and demonstration (RD&D) to address environmental challenges. Favourable 5-year trend (2006 baseline) ($1.15B) NRCan conducts and provides funding for clean energy RD&D. Activities are undertaken in partnership with industry, academia and other governments to allow for risk and cost sharing, and to ensure that the research is relevant to the needs of the industry. Measuring stakeholder investment will allow NRCan to assess the relevance of its research activities.


Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
430,843 343,217 140,315


Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
759 759 742


Planning Highlights

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityNRCan works to advance the sustainable and clean development of Canada’s natural resources by fostering technology innovation to create and advance new energy knowledge and technologies that will enhance energy efficiency, increase the availability of renewable energy and support the development and use of cleaner fossil fuels and alternative fuels. Activities in research, development and demonstration support policy development, regulatory initiatives and technological advancement which may lead to the commercialization and market uptake of new technologies. Through the Program for Energy and Research Development, Clean Energy Fund and the ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative announced in Budget 2011, NRCan supports the research, development and demonstration of next-generation clean energy technology and systems to increase clean energy supply and renewable energy, advance cleaner fossil fuels technologies – including Carbon Capture Storage (CCS) - and improve energy efficiency within industry and end users.  

Commitments 2012-13: Undertake research projects to develop countermeasures for offshore oil spills, which will lead, amongst other things, to the development of oil spill response strategies tailored for the Arctic environment

Complete 10 small scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects; sign additional contribution agreements for large-scale CCS projects, including the Shell Quest project and Enhance the Energy Alberta Carbon Trunk Line project. 

Implement 1 pilot-scale pressurized oxy-fuel and gasification energy conversion system intended to achieve near-zero emission power and electricity generation lower costs and improve efficiency of CCS technologies.

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityNRCan’s research, development and demonstration activities support the Canadian nuclear, automotive and oil and gas industries to increase energy efficiency and safety in these sectors. For example, research is undertaken to develop new high strength steels for the material used for the transportation of oil and gas, which will increase the integrity of pipelines. Working closely with Canada’s industry and academia to ensure alignment with industry needs, NRCan is developing lightweight materials for the automotive sector that will lead to vehicles that are stronger and lighter, therefore safer, more energy efficient and will enable the use of clean energy sources (such as vehicle electrification). NRCan is also working on developing a high-efficiency next-generation of nuclear reactors.

Commitments 2012-13: undertake research and development projects to develop lightweight and other advanced materials that enable energy efficient vehicles, and to extend the life and reliability of existing nuclear reactor components supplied by Canadian companies.

Propose two new materials technologies developed or validated by NRCan to be used in pipeline projects to transport fossil fuels.

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityNRCan’s research, development and demonstration activities are focused on improving the mining sector’s environmental performance and productivity, ultimately enhancing its competitiveness and reducing the environmental risks and impacts of its activities. Through its Green Mining Initiative, and in partnership with industry, provinces and territories, NRCan works to develop green mining technologies and processes focused on footprint reduction, mine waste management, mine closure and rehabilitation, and ecosystem risk management. For example, research on energy efficient equipment, processes and ventilation for underground mining, such as automated ventilation systems and hybrid mining vehicles, will lead to cleaner air for mine workers and an overall improved environmental impact footprint for the sector.

Commitments 2012-13: Start an NRCan-led Canada-wide research initiative targeting advancement in mining technology such as the Electric (Li-Ion Battery) Service Vehicle.

Establish two agreements related to the development of clean processing methods for rare earth elements and alternative energy underground mining vehicles (batteries, electric and others).


Program Activity 2.3: Responsible Natural Resource Management

Greater knowledge of risks and environmentally-responsible practices could help to prevent and reduce the environmental impacts of natural resource development. The objectives of the program activity are to enable government departments, regulatory bodies and industry to assess these impacts to the environment and develop, monitor and maintain resources or clean-up wastes responsibly. These objectives are achieved through the provision of assessments and knowledge rooted in sound science, and waste management efforts in collaboration with provinces, federal agencies and municipalities.

What we are trying to accomplish and how we measure success
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets How it works
Public and private sectors establish practices to mitigate the environmental impacts to natural resources Number of public and private sectors' new/updated policies, regulations or other decision-making tools complete annually 3 (annual) Through its programs and activities, NRCan provides information on environmentally responsible practices and risks to the environment. The uptake of this information by public and private stakeholders shows that its use for environmental decision making is based on science. 
Federal Government implements waste management practices that meet modern standards for safety and environmental protection Number of contaminated sites where the environmental impacts are reduced Environmental impacts reduced at Whiteshell and Chalk River Laboratories, Glace Bay, Port Granby and Welcome waste management facilities, Port Hope and Northern Transportation Route sites (annual) NRCan characterizes contaminated sites and develops clean-up strategies in cooperation with local stakeholders and implementing agencies. Clean-up approaches meet federal and provincial regulatory requirements including those of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.


Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
234,547 260,332 38,364


Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
336 336 336


Planning Highlights

Theme III - Protecting NatureTo prevent and reduce the environmental impacts of natural resource development, NRCan contributes its expertise and science and technology to environmental assessments for all federally triggered or regulated projects/reviews as required under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and Northern Regime. The Department also provides guidance to other government departments and regulatory bodies and contributes to the provision of science, the development of guidelines and the identification of best practices to address the environmental impacts of oil, gas and mineral exploitation. Ongoing activities include the assessment of potential impacts of pipeline construction and permafrost stability in the Arctic. 

Commitments 2012-13:  Provide mining policy/regulatory advice to support efficient environmental assessment processes within the timeline specified by the project agreements. 

Provide scientific, technical information, and advice on projects that require environmental assessment under the federal Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and northern resource management legislation.

Develop remote sensing methodologies to improve the analysis of flooded vegetation and assessment of ground deformation in the oil sands and permafrost in the North.  

Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and AvailabilityOn the radioactive waste management front, the Department is working to mitigate the risks to the environment and human health through Radioactive Waste Management programs. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program implements a long-term 70-year strategy to deal with legacy decommissioning and radioactive waste liabilities at AECL sites. The Historic Waste Program deals with radioactive waste arising across Canada for which the current owner cannot be held responsible, such as in the Port Hope area of Ontario.

Commitments 2012-13: Undertake the construction of enabling facilities in both Port Hope and Clarington, as part of Phase II of the Port Hope Area Initiative program.         

Approve a remediation option for the clean-up of the Gunnar uranium mine and mill sites in Saskatchewan.

Produce an Integrated Waste Plan for Chalk River laboratories through the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program.

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme III - Protecting NatureNRCan conducts research as well as national assessments and monitoring to develop, synthesize and integrate scientific knowledge of Canada’s forest ecosystems. This knowledge is used by governments, industry, and non-governmental organizations to develop forest management practices and policies, to meet international reporting obligations, to form Canada’s negotiating positions on international environmental issues related to forests and to promote a science-based understanding of Canada’s forest management practices and the changes and condition of Canada’s forests.

Commitments 2012-13: Generate new knowledge products to support forest management practices, to mitigate options for the effects of climate change, and to address forest ecosystems integrity.

Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and AvailabilityFinally, NRCan works with provincial and territorial partners to develop common standards and approaches needed to support standardization of methodologies required to assess and map Canada’s key (underground water). This will ensure that the management of Canada’s groundwater is sustainable and based on science.

Commitments 2012-13:Collaborate with provinces and territories to complete standardized assessments and mapping for an additional 7 interprovincial Canadian aquifers by March 2014.


Strategic Outcome 3 - Canadians have Information to Manage their Lands and Natural Resources, and are Protected from Related Risks

Canadians have Information to Manage their Lands and Natural Resources, and are Protected from Related Risks

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By providing knowledge on Canada's lands and natural resources, NRCan enables informed decision making, facilitates the responsible development and management of our natural resources and land, and ensures the safety and security of Canadians and the management of risks associated with natural and man-made hazards. This is achieved by:

  • Enabling the government, communities and the private sector to reduce the risks from natural and man-made hazards by providing regulation and knowledge, fulfilling legislated responsibilities, and ensuring capacity and undertaking climate change impacts and adaptation research and analysis to develop a greater understanding of the issues.
  • Providing clearly-defined legal boundaries to support sovereignty, interprovincial-territorial lands administration and effective property rights system in Canada.
  • Providing authoritative geographic infrastructure and fundamental geospatial information on Canada’s landmass in order to support the Canadian public and stakeholders in location-based decision-making.

For more information on NRCan’s plans and performance please visit www.nrcan.gc.ca/plans-performance-reports/home


Program Activity 3.1: Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources

Natural resource development and military activities, and changes in the environment pose risks to human, natural resource and infrastructure health. Without the appropriate coordination for and knowledge on the management of these risks, the impacts would be severe. The objective of this program activity is to enable other government departments, communities and the private sector to manage these risks to human, natural resource and infrastructure. This objective is achieved by providing regulation and knowledge, fulfilling legislated and regulatory responsibilities, and ensuring capacity.

What we are trying to accomplish and how we measure success
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets How it works
Risks to natural resource sectors, infrastructure and human health are safely managed Number of climate change risk or related assessments completed on natural resources and infrastructure 4 (annual) Our programs provide information on climate change adaptation and natural hazards. The use of this information by stakeholders to complete natural resources and infrastructure assessments will allow the Department to assess the effectiveness of its programs. 
Number of active collaborations with the public and private sector that manage risks to human population, natural resources and infrastructure health 3 collaboration agreements (annual) Multi-jurisdictional discussions are required to manage risks to human health and infrastructure. By assessing the number of collaboration agreements, the Department will be able to measure the potential number of practical adaptation measures being implemented.


Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
56,020 56,723 56,740


Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
569 569 569


Planning Highlights

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityHow Canada responds to the changing climate and manages risks from natural and human-induced hazards has a significant impact on the safety and security of Canadians. By developing a greater understanding of hazards such as wild land fire, forest insects and disease pests, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, geomagnetic storms, tsunamis and nuclear & radioactive incidents, NRCan facilitates government response in times of crisis. This is done by providing quick and clear information to Canadians and stakeholders and informing the development of long-term mitigation, prevention and adaptation strategies. Working directly with provinces, territories, other government departments and industry, NRCan provides information, knowledge and tools required to analyze climate-related risks, vulnerabilities and opportunities. To this end, the development of the Adaptation platform will bring together governments, the private sector and other stakeholders to share information, experience and expertise to generate new information and insights to identify opportunities for adaptation, including infrastructure and development planning.

Commitments 2012-13: Enhance the framework for pest risk analyses by producing a peer-reviewed publication to outline optimal strategies and tactics for dealing with emerald ash borer infestations in urban areas that will assist provincial governments and regulatory agencies to mitigate the impacts of this invasive species, and by organizing workshops with entomologists of provinces affected by Mountain Pine Beetle to present final results of insect population modelling research that will help manage and minimize damage to forest resources in other communities in Canada.

Organize a National Wildland Fire Conference to exchange fire knowledge amongst forest sector stakeholders to inform policies to better manage wildland fire and reduce its impacts on Canadians.

Produce 4 new geohazard assessment and risk management guidelines.

Complete the implementation of a robust information system based on Canadian commercial “cloud” technology to ensure rapid delivery of earthquake information to Canadians.

Deliver a national adaptation platform that will provide a forum on which to build and exchange knowledge on the impacts of climate change in order to better equip natural resources sector decision makers to implement adaptation strategy.

Pursue climate change geoscience activities related to infrastructure design in the North.

NRCan also regulates, licenses and inspects the manufacture, storage, sale and possession of explosives and fireworks with a view of ensuring the safety and security of Canadians. NRCan also acts as the Certifying Agency for the Canadian Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) Personnel Certification Program. The certification of individuals on NDT allows for the ongoing inspections and tests on new product quality, equipment condition and infrastructure reliability, which help prevent failures in nuclear power, aviation, transportation, oil and gas, petrochemical plants and anywhere else where public safety or the environment could be significantly impacted.

Commitments 2012-13: Issue 1700 explosives licences and certifications.

Complete 65% of planned inspections for licensed explosive factories and magazines.

Maintain a minimum of 4800 Canadians holding one or more valid non-destructive testing certifications issued by NRCan.


Program Activity 3.2: Landmass Information

NRCan provides clearly-defined legal boundaries, a robust property system framework, authoritative geographic infrastructure and fundamental geospatial information on Canada’s landmass. Without these frameworks, negative impact will result to the Canadian economy, environment and standard of living. This program activity delivers Canada's regulatory system for Canada Lands legal surveys, the fundamental geodetic reference system, earth observation and mapping information. Together, these support the Canadian public, other federal departments and levels of government, the private sector and academia to carry out a variety of decisions founded on location-based information, such as land transactions, commercial/industrial development, transportation and logistics. This information enables effective management of Canada’s natural resources and lands including opportunities for collaboration across jurisdictions (i.e. cross-border planning, regulatory efficiency), which advances the interests of Canada’s natural resources sectors, both domestically and at the international level.

What we are trying to accomplish and how we measure success
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets How it works
Public, private sectors and academia use trusted, reliable, accurate, Government of Canada geo-information for decision-making and research Number of public, private sectors and academia using landmass information 6 large federal departments/ agencies (annual) Our programs provide information on Canada’s landmass - legal boundaries, property system framework, authoritative geographic infrastructure and fundamental geospatial information. By assessing the number of public, private sector and academic institutions using NRCan landmass information, we will be able to measure the relevance and accessibility of the information produced.
Client satisfaction or benchmarking results on Canada's legal boundary framework for effective governance, economic and social development Positive trend on bi-annual client satisfaction surveys (rotational amongst key client groups: Aboriginal, Other Government Departments, Industry) (Baseline years ending 2012-13) (annual) Our programs impact land use, elections planning, emergency preparedness and response, transportation and real estate. By surveying our client groups - Aboriginal groups, other Government departments and industry - we will be able to assess client satisfaction with NRCan’s data.


Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
48,117 45,270 43,611


Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
416 416 410


Planning Highlights

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air QualityNRCan provides accurate, location-based data and information used to manage Canada’s natural resources and lands. The Department’s programs support open access of geomatics information such as maps, geodetic reference points and satellite imagery. NRCan is also conducting surveys to determine the limits of Canada’s continental shelf. This data will support Canada’s submission to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea by the 2013 deadline. This submission will define the extent of the continental shelf in the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans where Canada may exercise its existing sovereign rights over the exploration of the natural resources of the seabed beyond the customary 200 nautical miles.

Theme III - Protecting NatureMany socio-economic and environmental decisions, such as land use planning and sustainable resource development would generate inconsistency, disputes or turmoil without authoritative geographic information. This fundamental information enables the effective management of Canada’s natural resources and lands. Moreover, opportunities for collaboration across jurisdictions can improve emergency preparedness and response (i.e. cross-border planning, regulatory efficiency) thereby advancing the interests of Canada’s natural resources sectors both domestically and internationally.

Commitments 2012-13: In partnership with Public Safety Canada and Defence Research and Development Canada provide geospatial data and expertise to deploy more widely the Multi-Agency Situational Awareness System.

Develop a Federal Geospatial Platform to provide accurate geospatial and geosciences information, in support of Canada’s land use management and emergency response capabilities.

Provide scientific data and analyses required to finalize Canada’s submission to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) to extend our sovereign rights on the Atlantic and Arctic continental margins.

NRCan is fulfilling Canada’s obligations for demarcating the boundaries of land claim parcels. As uncertainties around Aboriginal treaties and rights can negatively affect the investment climate and competitiveness of natural resources sectors, NRCan’s location-based information facilitates land transactions and collaboration across jurisdiction. The Department conducts boundary surveys of Aboriginal settlement lands, in accordance with Canada’s obligations under the land claim legislation and treaties. The Department also maintains the Canada/US international boundary.

Commitments 2012-13: Complete 100% of annual land claim survey obligations as defined in the legislation and agreements for the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, and for First Nations Land Management in southern Canada.

Finally, the Polar Continental Shelf Program delivers efficient and cost-effective logistical support to researchers in the Canadian Arctic, such as air and ground transportation, equipment, fuel and accommodations.

Commitments 2012-13: Collaborate with the Department of National Defence (DND) in the construction of additional accommodation and hangar space at the Polar Continental Shelf Program facility in Resolute to allow DND to base its Canadian Forces Arctic Training Centre.

Collaborate with Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development and other partners on the development of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station and the establishment of a centre of excellence for arctic science logistics in Resolute.


Program Activity 4.1: Internal Services

This program activity regroups three areas which assist NRCan in delivering on its mandate and priorities: governance and management support, resource management services, and asset management services. The key to the effectiveness and efficiency of this program activity is the ability of internal services to adjust and respond to evolving business priorities and requirements. This will allow the Department to better align its priorities to those of Canadians, its activities to its priorities, and its resources to its activities. It will also increase NRCan’s capacity to monitor the financial and non-financial performance of its activities and programs.

For 2012-13, NRCan continues the implementation of the previously-established four corporate directions: asserting our policy leadership, mobilizing our science, transforming our business and managing our human capital. These will ensure that the Department further develops its capacity, responsiveness and resilience to maximize its contribution to the Government of Canada and to Canadians.


Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
147,720 146,892 143,270


Human Resources (FTEs)
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
1063 1063 1063


Section III: - Supplementary Information

Financial Highlights

The highlights presented in this section are intended to serve as a general overview of NRCan’s operations. Future-oriented Financial Statements are prepared on an accrual basis to strengthen accountability and improve transparency and financial management.

The variance between the figures that follow and the planned spending amounts provided in other sections of the RPP relate to such items as non-respendable revenues, services without charge received from other government departments, amortization, and adjustments to liabilities such as environmental liabilities, vacation pay, compensatory leave and employee future benefits. Also, statutory payments related to the employer's portion of the Employee Benefit Plan are included in the following figures, but not in the planned spending.

Condensed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations
For the Year ended March 31
($ millions)
  $ Change Future-Oriented
2012-13
Future-Oriented
2011-12*
Total Expenses (826) 2,794 3,620
Total Revenues (301) 1,527 1,828
Net Cost of Operations (525) 1,267 1,792

*refer to the Future-Oriented Financial Statements prepared as at March 31, 2012.


Condensed Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position
For the Year ended March 31
($ millions)
  $ Change Future-Oriented
2012-13
Future-Oriented
2011-12
Total Assets   1,231  
Total liabilities   1,803  
Equity   (572)  
Total liabilities and Equity   1,231  


Future-Oriented Financial Statements

The complete Future-oriented Financial Statements is available on Natural Resources Canada's website at: http://www.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/com/resoress/rpprpp/index-eng.php

List of Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables found in the 2012–13 Reports on Plans and Priorities can be found on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website.

  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs;
  • Greening Government Operations;
  • Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue;
  • Summary of Capital Spending by Program Activity;
  • Up-Front Multi-Year Funding;
  • Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the next three fiscal years.

Section IV - Other Items of Interest

NRCan’s Plans and Performance Reports Website

NRCan has developed a new plans and performance reports website, which presents the Department’s plans and performance by fiscal year and presents linkages with the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and the Clean Air Agenda. For more information, please visit www.nrcan.gc.ca/plans-performance-reports/home


Endnotes

1 http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/acts-regulations/332

2 http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/N-20.8/

3 http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/R-7/

4 http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/F-30/

5 http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/portfolio/573

6 http://www.aecl.ca/Home.htm

7 http://www.neb.gc.ca/clf-nsi/rcmmn/hm-eng.html

8 http://www.cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca/eng/

9 http://www.cnlopb.nl.ca/

10 http://www.cnsopb.ns.ca/

11 http://npa.gc.ca

12 http://www.sdtc.ca/

13 http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/prflOrg.asp?OrgID=ESR&type-typ=3&lang=eng

14 Type is defined as follows: previously committed to—committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing—committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new—newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR.

15 www.nrcan.gc.ca/plans-performance-reports/sustainable-development-strategy

16 http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/frame-cadre-eng.aspx

17 www.nrcan.gc.ca/plans-performance-reports/sustainable-development-strategy

18 http://www.ec.gc.ca/dd-sd/Default.asp?lang=Fr&n=C2844D2D-1

19 http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/20122013/p2-eng.asp