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2013–14 Estimates

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© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Public Works and Government Services, 2013

This document is available in multiple formats upon request.

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Catalogue No.: BT31-2/2014E
ISBN 978-0-660-20038-5

Erratum

Natural Resources

As requested by the department, the following changes to the table "Listing of the 2013–14 Transfer Payments” were done to reflect an accurate distribution of the expenditures to the following contributions:

  • Contribution Program for expanding market opportunities should be $14,200,000 instead of $23,700,000.
  • Contributions in support of the Forest Innovation Program should be $23,700,000 instead of $14,200,000.

Table of Contents



Part I - Government Expenditure Plan

Introduction

Purpose

Expenditures made by government require the authority of Parliament. That authority is provided in two ways: annual Appropriation Acts, or Supply Bills, that specify the amounts and broad purposes for which funds can be spent; and other specific statutes that authorize payments and set out the amounts and time periods for those payments. The amounts approved in Appropriation Acts are referred to as voted amounts, and the expenditure authorities provided through other statutes are called statutory authorities.

Estimates documents are prepared to support Appropriation Acts. As such, the Estimates provide additional information on voted amounts included in the Appropriation Act. Forecasts of statutory amounts are also presented to provide a broader context.

Links with the Budget

The Budget Plan is a key policy document of the Government, announcing tax changes, new or enhanced programs and anticipated revenues. It also provides an economic forecast. While the Budget, like a Supply Bill, is also a confidence measure, the Budget does not provide parliamentary expenditure authority.

Given the differences in timing of the preparation of the Main Estimates and the Budget, it is not always possible to include emerging priorities and items announced in the Government's Budget in the Main Estimates. Additional requirements for initiatives included in the 2013 Budget will be presented in future Estimates.

The Estimates and Budget use different accounting methodologies. Estimates, with the focus on authority for payments in a fiscal year, are prepared on a near-cash basis. The Budget's economic forecast is prepared on a full accrual basis. A more complete explanation of the differences in methodology and a reconciliation between the annual results and amounts included in Estimates are presented in the Notes to the Financial Statements of the Government of Canada included in the Public Accounts. Volume II of Public Accounts presents government expenditures on the same basis as the Estimates, while Volume I of Public Accounts provides financial information corresponding to the Budget.

The Estimates Documents

The Estimates are comprised of three parts:

Part I - Government Expenditure Plan - provides an overview of the Government's requirements and changes in estimated expenditures from previous fiscal years.

Part II - Main Estimates - supports the appropriation acts with detailed information on the estimated spending and authorities being sought by each federal organization requesting appropriations.

Parts I and II are included in this volume and, in accordance with Standing Orders of the House of Commons, must be tabled on or before March 1.

Part III - Departmental Expenditure Plans - consists of two components:

The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates by the President of the Treasury Board.

The DPRs for the most recently completed fiscal year are tabled in the fall by the President of the Treasury Board.

Supplementary Estimates support Appropriation Acts presented later in the fiscal year. Supplementary Estimates present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or have subsequently been refined to account for developments in particular programs and services. Supplementary Estimates also provide information on changes to expenditure forecasts of major statutory items as well as on such items as: transfers of funds between votes; debt deletion; loan guarantees; and new or increased grants.

The Budget, Main and Supplementary Estimates and the Updates of Economic and Fiscal Projections reflect the Government's financial plans and resource allocation priorities at different points in the fiscal year. In combination with the subsequent reporting of financial results in the Public Accounts and of accomplishments achieved in Departmental Performance Reports, this material helps Parliament hold the Government to account for the allocation and management of public funds.

Changes to the presentation of the Main Estimates

Several changes have been made to the presentation of the 2013-14 Main Estimates document to increase the amount of information provided and improve the usability of the overall publication:

The 2011-12 actual expenditures are taken from the 2011-12 Public Accounts of Canada. 2012-13 Estimates to Date is the sum of the amounts presented in the 2012-13 Main Estimates and increases sought through the 2012-13 Supplementary Estimates A, B and C. Allocations from Treasury Board Central Votes are made through-out the year and the expenditure authority provided by these allocations is not included in Estimates to Date. In-year information on expenditure authorities is available in departmental Quarterly Financial Reports and final expenditure authority and actual expenditures for a fiscal year are reported in the Public Accounts of Canada.

The 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture is used for the tables presenting information by Strategic Outcome and Program. If there has been a change in the Architecture, amounts for previous years have not been reclassified to the new structure and are reported as "Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture".

The Estimates documents are prepared to support Appropriation Acts. Other changes have been made to Part II of the Estimates to focus on the items in the Proposed Schedule to the Appropriations Bill:

Summary of Estimates

These Estimates support the government's request to Parliament for authority to expend through annual appropriations:

These voted expenditures require annual approval from Parliament which is sought through an appropriation bill. The bill provides the specific wording that governs the purpose and conditions under which expenditures can be made and the funds subject to these terms and conditions.

Statutory forecasts represent payments to be made under legislation previously approved by Parliament. Statutory forecasts are included in these Estimates to provide a more complete picture of total estimated expenditures. Of these forecasts, $165.5 billion is for budgetary expenditures including the cost of servicing the public debt. Recoveries on loans, investments and advances are expected to exceed expenditures by $41.0 billion.

Figure 1. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures - Budgetary

The following chart shows a breakdown of budgetary net voted and statutory expenditures as compared to previous Supply and actual expenditures.

Figure 2. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures - Non-budgetary

The following chart shows a breakdown of non-budgetary net voted and statutory expenditures as compared to previous Supply and actual expenditures.
Table 1. Comparison of Estimates and Expenditures (billions of dollars)
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Totals may not add and may not agree with details presented later in this document due to rounding.
Budgetary
Voted
89.72 91.95 98.65 87.06
Statutory
158.13 159.95 160.38 165.48
Total Budgetary 247.84 251.90 259.03 252.54
Non-budgetary
Voted
0.49 0.08 0.08 0.07
Statutory
61.60 (1.86) (1.72) (41.02)
Total Non-budgetary 62.09 (1.78) (1.64) (40.95)

The following graphs present the voted and statutory components of Main Estimates and a comparison of Main Estimates over the last ten years of Main Estimates.

Figure 3. Long-term comparison of Main Estimates - Budgetary

The following chart presents the voted and statutory components of budgetary expenditures and a comparison of budgetary expenditures included in the last ten years of Main Estimates.

Figure 4. Composition of Estimates and Expenditures - Budgetary

The following chart presents the composition of Estimates by budgetary expenditure type.
Table 2. Composition of Estimates and Expenditures (billions of dollars)
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Totals may not add and may not agree with details presented later in this document due to rounding.
Budgetary
Transfer Payments
150.70 154.68 158.70 159.23
Operating and capital
69.27 68.35 73.42 66.18
Public Debt
27.88 28.86 26.91 27.13
Total Budgetary 247.84 251.90 259.03 252.54
Non-budgetary
Loans, Investments and Advances
62.09 (1.78) (1.64) (40.95)
Total Non-budgetary 62.09 (1.78) (1.64) (40.95)

Composition of Estimates

The majority of expenditures in 2013-14 will be transfer payments - payments made to other levels of government, individuals and other organizations. Transfer payments make up approximately 63.05% of expenditures or $159.23 billion, operating and capital expenditures account for approximately 26.20% of expenditures or $66.18 billion, while public debt charges are approximately 10.74% of expenditures or $27.13 billion.

Public Debt Charges

Total interest costs are approximately 10.74% of expenditures or $27.1 billion, a projected decrease of $1.7 billion or 6.0% from previous Main Estimates and a $0.7 billion less than actual expenditures for 2011-12. The estimate has been revised down to reflect the decrease in the average forecast of interest rates by private sector economists for 2013-14, consistent with the 2012 Update of Economic and Fiscal Projections. Total interest costs are comprised of interest on unmatured debt of $18.4 billion and other interest costs of $8.7 billion. Interest on unmatured debt represents the interest resulting from certificates of indebtedness issued by the Government of Canada that have not yet become due. Other interest costs include interest on liabilities for federal public service pension plans, deposit and trust accounts and other specified purpose accounts.

Major Transfer Payments

Figure 5. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3

The following chart presents major transfers payments to other levels of government and to persons.

Figure 6. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3

The following chart presents major transfers payments to other levels of government and to persons.

Figure 7. Major Transfer Payments - Top 3

The following chart presents major transfers payments to other levels of government and to persons.
Table 3. Major Transfer Payments (billions of dollars)
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Totals may not add and may not agree with details presented later in this document due to rounding.
Transfers to other levels of government
Canada Health Transfer
26.94 28.57 28.57 30.28
Fiscal Equalization
15.61 15.42 16.10 16.11
Canada Social Transfer
11.51 11.86 11.86 12.22
Territorial Financing
2.88 3.11 3.11 3.29
Wait Times Reduction Transfer
0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25
Additional Fiscal Equalization to Nova Scotia
0.08 0.33 0.30 0.25
Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia
0.03 0.15 0.15 0.09
Payment to Ontario related to the Canada Health Transfer
(0.02) 0 0.09 0
Youth Allowances Recovery
(0.71) (0.75) (0.73) (0.77)
Alternative Payments for Standing Programs
(3.22) (3.39) (3.33) (3.50)
Total transfers to other levels of government 53.36 55.55 56.37 58.21
Transfers to persons
Elderly Benefits
38.06 40.14 40.42 42.63
Employment Insurance
17.65 18.50 18.50 18.90
Universal Child Care Benefits
2.69 2.75 2.75 2.79
Total transfers to persons 58.40 61.39 61.67 64.32
Total Major Transfer Payments 111.76 116.94 118.04 122.53

Major Transfer Payments

Major transfer payments - significant transfers to other levels of government and transfers to persons - are expected to be $122.5 billion, 77% of total estimated transfer payment expenditures.

As presented in the table, transfers to other levels of government are projected to total $58.2 billion in 2013-14, an increase of $2.7 billion over the previous year's Main Estimates and $4.8 billion more than actual expenditures in 2011-12.

The Canada Health Transfer (CHT) is a federal transfer provided to provinces and territories in support of health care. CHT support is provided through cash payments and tax point transfers and is subject to the five conditions of the Canada Health Act and the prohibitions against extra-billing and user fees. The cash transfer levels of the CHT will increase by $1.7 billion from forecasts at the end of 2012-13 to $30.3 billion in 2013-14, as a result of the 6% escalator announced in the September 2004 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care. As legislated in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act (Budget 2012), the cash transfer of the CHT will continue to grow by 6% per year until 2017-18, when it will grow based on a 3-year moving average of nominal gross domestic product, with funding guaranteed to increase by at least 3% per year. Starting in 2014-15, the CHT will be distributed on an equal per capita cash basis.

Fiscal Equalization refers to unconditional transfer payments to provinces so that they can provide their residents with public services that are reasonably comparable to those in other provinces, at reasonably comparable levels of taxation. These payments will be $16.1 billion in 2013-14, an increase of $0.7 billion from the Main Estimates 2012-13, and $0.5 billion more than 2011-12 actual expenditures. The July 2012 Total Transfer Protection (TTP) payments of $679.7 million are included in the 2012-13 Estimates to date amounts. The TTP payments totalling $55.8 million announced in December 2012 are not included in the 2013-14 forecasts since these payments have not yet been legislated. TTP protects individual provinces against year-over-year declines in their total major cash transfers, including prior year TTP amounts.

The Canada Social Transfer (CST) is a federal transfer to provinces and territories in support of social assistance and social services, post-secondary education, and programs for children. For 2013-14, the increase of $355.8 million or 3.0%, to $12.2 billion, represents the legislated increase announced in Budget 2007. As legislated in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act (Budget 2012), this growth rate of 3% per year will continue for 2014-15 and subsequent years.

Territorial Financing payments, provided through the Territorial Formula Financing (TFF) Program, are unconditional federal transfers provided to the three territorial governments that give territorial residents access to a range of public services comparable to those offered by provincial governments, at comparable levels of taxation. The transfers are based on a formula that fills the gap between the expenditure requirements and revenue-raising capacity of the territories. Applying the formula, these payments are forecast to be $3.3 billion in 2013-14, $177.6 million higher than the 2012-13 Estimates.

Wait Times Reduction Funding is part of the 2004 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care in which First Ministers committed to achieving reductions in wait times in priority areas such as cancer, heart, diagnostic imaging, joint replacements and sight restoration. Budget 2005 committed to a transfer of $5.5 billion for wait times reduction. Of this amount, $4.25 billion was provided to provinces and territories by way of third-party trusts. The remaining $1.25 billion is being paid in bi-monthly instalments totalling $250.0 million per year between

Additional Fiscal Equalization Payments to Nova Scotia are payments related to its 2005 Offshore Accord. Following the introduction of a new formula for Equalization in 2007, Nova Scotia was guaranteed that, on a cumulative basis beginning in 2008-09 over the lifetime of the Accord, the new formula would not reduce its Equalization payments and 2005 Offshore Accord payments when compared with what the province would have received under the formula that was in place when it signed its 2005 Offshore Accord. Based on the first calculation of 2013-14, Nova Scotia is entitled to an advance payment of $245.8 million in 2013-14, a decrease of $80 million when compared to Main Estimates 2012-13. However, the December 2012 official determination of 2012-13 (upon which payments will be made), is $297.3 million, which is reflected in the Supplementary Estimates (C), 2012-13.

The Additional Fiscal Equalization Offset Payment to Nova Scotia is a payment related to its 2005 Offshore Accord. This Accord guaranteed the province that its Equalization payments would not be reduced due to offshore oil and gas revenues that entered the Equalization formula. This is derived by applying the Equalization formula with and without offshore oil and gas revenues and comparing the resulting Equalization payments. For the 2004-05 to 2011-12 period, an upfront payment of $830 million was provided to Nova Scotia in July 2005. This ensured that the province would receive at least that much in Accord compensation over the period. Offset amounts are calculated each year providing 100 percent protection from the inclusion of offshore revenues. In 2011-12, the cumulative draw down exceeded the advance payment. The province is expected to receive $89.5 million for 2013-14, a decrease of $56.6 million compared with the amount for 2012-13.

The Payment to Ontario Related to the Canada Health Transfer provides for separate payments to Ontario outside of the Canada Health Transfer (CHT) cash envelope for 2009-10 and 2010-11 to ensure its per capita cash entitlements in relation to the CHT are the same as for other Equalization-receiving provinces. The payment for 2009-10 of $489 million was a legislated fixed amount, whereas the payment for 2010-11 is formula-based, and payments are re-calculated along with each new CHT estimate. In all there are five calculations. Each recalculation is based on updated personal income tax data received from the Fiscal Policy Division of Finance Canada and the Canada Revenue Agency. The final calculation of this program will be made in September 2013. Amounts shown in 2011-12 and 2012-13 represent the impacts of the official recalculations.

The Youth Allowance Recovery relates to tax points transferred to the province of Quebec for the Youth Allowance program, which has since expired. The equivalent value of the tax point reduction is recovered each year from the province of Quebec. The change in recoveries for the Youth Allowances Recovery Program is entirely due to year-over-year changes to the value of federal personal income taxes, the recovery being a percentage of these taxes. For 2013-14, the forecast recovery of $770.3 million is $24.1 million higher than the initial 2012-13 forecast in Main Estimates and $37.6 million higher than the forecast in the 2012-13 Supplementary Estimates (C) due to higher forecast levels of federal personal income taxes.

Alternative Payments for Standing Programs represent recoveries from Quebec of an additional tax point transfer above and beyond the tax point transfer under the Canada Health Transfer (CHT), the Canada Social Transfer (CST) and the Youth Allowances Recovery. The change in recoveries to the Alternative Payments for Standing Programs is entirely due to year-over-year changes to the value of federal personal income taxes, the recovery being a percentage of these taxes. For 2013-14, the forecast recovery of $3.5 billion is $111.3 million higher than the forecast in the 2012-13 Main Estimates and $171.3 million higher than that in 2012-13 Supplementary Estimates (C) due to higher forecast levels of federal personal income taxes.

Transfers to Persons

Transfers to persons are projected to be $64.3 billion in 2013-14, an increase of $3.0 billion over the 2012-13 Main Estimates and $5.9 billion more than actual expenditures in 2011-12.

Elderly benefits include Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement, and Allowance payments. Elderly benefit payments are expected to be $42.6 billion in 2013-14, an increase of $2.5 billion over the 2012-13 Main Estimates and $4.6 million more than actual expenditures in 2011-12.

Employment Insurance benefits provides temporary financial assistance for unemployed Canadians while they look for work or upgrade their skills. Employment insurance benefit payments are forecast to be $18.9 billion in 2013-14, an increase of $0.4 billion over the 2012-13 Main Estimates and $1.3 billion more than actual expenditures in 2011-12.

Universal Child Care benefits provides families with resources to support childcare choices, and is paid to families in monthly instalments of $100 per child under the age of six. Universal child care benefit payments are forecast to be $2.8 billion in 2013-14, an increase of $41 million over the 2012-13 Main Estimates and $97 million more than actual expenditures in 2011-12.

Estimates by Organization

One hundred thirty-five organizations are represented in the 2013-14 Estimates. More information about each organization can be found in Part II - Main Estimates.

Table 4. Estimates by Organization (dollars)
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Agriculture and Agri-Food
2,557,654,625 2,418,594,423 2,788,176,187 2,191,575,219
Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada
3,463,838 10,540,554 9,367,966 0
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
330,453,781 307,460,890 323,175,897 299,971,071
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
719,031,083 376,695,095 619,860,095 211,062,637
Auditor General
89,811,920 84,323,221 84,323,221 84,333,533
Canada Border Services Agency
1,835,296,950 1,776,020,276 2,037,698,000 1,680,153,024
Canada Council for the Arts
181,417,816 181,760,816 181,367,817 180,260,816
Canada Industrial Relations Board
13,698,924 12,993,896 12,993,896 13,553,965
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
2,048,258,589 2,139,812,000 2,139,812,000 2,100,578,000
Canada Post Corporation
22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Canada Revenue Agency
4,351,291,626 4,374,951,936 4,626,608,000 4,276,823,253
Canada School of Public Service
125,940,826 101,095,613 101,095,613 98,464,321
Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
515,006,000 576,397,810 576,397,810 598,286,200
Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal
1,283,192 2,059,543 2,059,543 0
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
1,134,319,060 1,074,319,060 1,106,519,060 1,064,769,060
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
5,290,324 4,984,002 4,984,002 4,971,152
Canadian Commercial Corporation
15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540
Canadian Dairy Commission
4,479,524 3,935,119 3,935,119 3,985,810
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
29,558,489 17,025,198 29,642,248 31,006,012
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
737,696,357 685,537,572 728,297,262 687,885,404
Canadian Forces Grievance Board
6,397,011 6,672,105 6,672,105 6,695,009
Canadian Grain Commission
34,820,012 5,452,010 32,248,237 22,167,708
Canadian Heritage
1,308,491,904 1,280,608,132 1,251,498,074 1,317,225,666
Canadian Human Rights Commission
24,262,323 23,086,498 23,086,498 22,461,289
Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
5,239,794 4,510,620 4,510,620 4,521,383
Canadian Institutes of Health Research
1,009,091,392 977,943,365 1,003,614,375 967,653,157
Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
5,560,612 6,614,729 6,614,730 6,035,504
Canadian International Development Agency
3,927,263,547 3,411,393,223 3,631,036,803 3,159,329,240
Canadian International Trade Tribunal
10,528,906 9,895,292 11,195,292 9,893,541
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
21,798,633 10,000,000 56,700,000 31,700,000
Canadian Museum of Civilization
65,198,130 62,453,730 63,360,382 57,418,730
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
13,824,600 9,950,000 9,950,000 18,450,000
Canadian Museum of Nature
28,591,766 33,134,904 33,134,904 25,834,904
Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
48,599,691 51,151,277 54,135,363 51,791,133
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
136,069,164 123,828,943 132,760,244 132,901,485
Canadian Polar Commission
1,263,210 1,254,544 1,301,212 2,576,669
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
15,682,950 10,627,691 13,981,595 11,206,858
Canadian Security Intelligence Service
539,885,697 520,590,511 519,019,262 513,007,839
Canadian Space Agency
409,135,515 363,244,831 363,375,248 488,680,928
Canadian Tourism Commission
82,033,975 72,032,802 72,032,802 57,832,802
Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board
31,793,781 30,053,968 30,053,968 29,568,209
Canadian Transportation Agency
29,307,687 27,279,376 27,279,376 27,660,522
Chief Electoral Officer
349,351,995 144,158,269 136,222,633 115,854,117
Citizenship and Immigration
1,583,490,747 1,545,476,223 1,564,139,949 1,655,418,818
Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs
471,183,153 484,978,148 485,478,149 497,675,214
Communications Security Establishment
251,856,580 387,007,953 415,648,977 422,207,847
Copyright Board
2,541,273 3,118,008 3,118,008 3,127,995
Correctional Service of Canada
2,666,854,106 3,026,031,206 3,026,031,206 2,597,613,691
Courts Administration Service
73,222,412 64,829,782 67,857,794 68,490,773
Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
305,920,895 300,751,431 308,906,006 254,931,372
Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation
77,191,000 57,268,000 60,667,000 51,763,000
Environment
1,008,476,256 972,700,109 1,040,947,947 959,359,318
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
230,459,808 218,810,587 261,156,578 222,812,766
Finance
84,141,930,000 85,385,604,879 85,112,119,494 87,611,841,751
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
59,228,080 52,230,244 54,043,613 51,402,907
First Nations Statistical Institute
3,957,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 0
Fisheries and Oceans
1,880,882,767 1,665,807,049 1,754,140,168 1,668,889,385
Foreign Affairs and International Trade
2,482,465,566 2,582,131,547 2,637,360,384 2,311,648,594
Governor General
21,727,391 19,783,369 19,783,369 20,047,931
Hazardous Materials Information Review Commission
4,530,969 4,522,751 4,542,751 3,732,855
Health
3,786,299,686 3,347,801,110 3,656,003,745 3,292,207,430
House of Commons
427,234,906 445,935,033 463,022,489 428,770,693
Human Resources and Skills Development
45,953,451,887 47,647,976,655 48,796,702,019 50,525,088,121
Immigration and Refugee Board
140,808,624 145,654,987 145,279,223 122,919,932
Indian Affairs and Northern Development
7,880,883,137 7,718,288,276 8,385,548,115 7,904,970,562
Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission
19,245,153 7,704,000 7,704,000 9,686,945
Industry
1,446,710,180 1,305,274,060 1,472,874,647 1,160,225,456
International Development Research Centre
237,907,649 241,432,539 241,646,094 225,390,066
International Joint Commission (Canadian Section)
8,051,096 6,675,802 6,675,802 6,741,805
Justice
745,007,765 694,558,705 718,021,067 657,476,767
Library and Archives of Canada
112,021,363 117,743,529 118,368,443 98,346,695
Library of Parliament
41,307,604 42,631,056 44,466,056 42,949,558
Marine Atlantic Inc.
183,290,595 185,376,000 185,376,000 154,430,000
Military Police Complaints Commission
4,922,920 4,573,720 8,588,946 5,615,071
National Arts Centre Corporation
35,781,174 35,631,174 35,706,175 33,796,174
National Battlefields Commission
9,804,355 9,244,466 9,244,466 8,588,323
National Capital Commission
107,486,096 124,870,834 125,555,836 116,457,834
National Defence
20,218,757,861 19,799,128,095 20,678,142,610 17,985,310,381
National Energy Board
64,375,613 59,087,083 64,977,944 62,436,291
National Film Board
66,852,578 66,782,204 66,782,204 62,890,037
National Gallery of Canada
49,586,146 48,206,120 48,206,120 43,426,120
National Museum of Science and Technology
30,304,286 28,931,340 28,946,341 26,491,340
National Parole Board
52,188,432 51,488,613 51,391,414 48,679,516
National Research Council of Canada
698,503,582 700,511,537 852,290,714 820,009,430
National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy
5,363,797 5,240,430 5,240,430 0
Natural Resources
3,352,172,605 2,811,857,207 2,489,414,620 2,767,014,238
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
1,085,737,592 1,046,605,320 1,073,777,500 1,045,058,973
Northern Pipeline Agency
2,107,613 3,225,320 3,225,320 3,123,930
Office of Infrastructure of Canada
4,540,110,273 5,105,563,497 5,309,080,822 3,924,705,788
Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying
4,861,590 4,628,368 4,628,368 4,423,541
Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages
22,355,036 20,611,145 20,611,145 23,871,668
Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner
1,942,428 2,104,596 2,394,596 2,112,886
Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner
6,637,861 7,132,288 7,132,288 7,035,401
Office of the Co-ordinator, Status of Women
29,434,826 29,421,778 29,755,112 29,617,167
Office of the Correctional Investigator
4,936,667 4,663,451 4,654,003 4,676,785
Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions
156,443,650 174,255,151 175,056,637 162,429,112
Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions
(12,604,812) 909,369 909,369 909,369
Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada
38,790,696 36,313,667 36,313,667 43,629,683
Old Port of Montreal Corporation Inc.
30,373,000 25,173,000 25,173,000 24,472,000
Parks Canada Agency
678,011,905 648,228,197 749,129,989 597,035,269
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board
11,754,375 11,832,395 11,832,395 10,944,073
PPP Canada Inc.
287,700,000 287,700,000 287,700,000 265,200,000
Privy Council
155,429,813 126,767,388 132,867,054 123,409,904
Public Appointments Commission Secretariat
135,080 1,067,672 1,067,672 0
Public Health Agency of Canada
636,499,537 616,481,573 617,966,996 579,236,460
Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
401,564,796 432,745,113 622,603,292 440,910,923
Public Sector Integrity Commission
5,665,863 5,656,072 5,656,072 5,674,899
Public Service Commission
105,605,883 92,712,454 93,550,868 89,949,594
Public Service Labour Relations Board
13,446,701 13,732,067 13,732,067 13,774,423
Public Service Staffing Tribunal
4,936,076 5,426,302 5,426,302 5,443,445
Public Works and Government Services
2,793,508,544 2,364,254,603 2,749,594,215 2,617,975,950
Registry of the Competition Tribunal
1,588,696 2,326,003 2,326,003 2,331,323
Registry of the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal
1,686,603 1,834,080 1,834,080 1,834,375
Registry of the Specific Claims Tribunal
2,434,276 2,847,056 2,847,056 1,005,559
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
2,974,575,811 2,553,709,628 2,816,555,966 2,758,076,493
Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee
1,691,892 938,724 1,645,676 934,412
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Public Complaints Commission
7,880,902 5,400,474 8,041,947 5,425,682
Security Intelligence Review Committee
2,833,554 2,534,048 2,677,704 2,766,304
Senate Ethics Officer
799,442 807,297 807,297 788,294
Shared Services Canada
622,344,223 1,474,115,798 1,519,453,733 1,398,106,056
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
697,853,661 688,153,011 696,491,418 682,749,959
Standards Council of Canada
8,059,060 7,629,000 9,729,000 9,729,000
Statistics Canada
744,111,844 454,681,353 454,681,353 400,620,413
Supreme Court of Canada
31,455,188 29,816,858 29,816,858 30,656,211
Telefilm Canada
105,667,144 105,667,144 105,667,144 99,622,354
The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited
13,994,307 14,983,000 26,224,693 13,000,000
The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc.
97,329,991 150,363,000 182,933,000 203,590,000
The Senate
89,979,680 92,215,846 92,215,846 92,517,029
Transport
1,281,190,965 2,072,411,559 2,090,429,453 1,512,018,362
Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada
1,856,205 1,411,776 1,661,777 1,419,871
Treasury Board Secretariat
2,504,508,177 5,685,174,258 6,639,949,859 5,662,899,768
Veterans Affairs
3,497,087,250 3,568,014,791 3,631,616,154 3,637,899,334
Veterans Review and Appeal Board
12,746,298 11,501,429 11,501,429 11,556,729
VIA Rail Canada Inc.
493,795,244 306,490,000 475,651,000 187,783,000
Western Economic Diversification
195,283,481 176,306,756 194,410,117 178,700,849
Total Organizations 228,166,212,739 232,277,334,920 239,407,913,224 232,578,373,332
Employment Insurance Operating Account 19,677,343,025 19,618,314,602 19,618,314,602 19,956,684,127
Total Budgetary 247,843,555,764 251,895,649,522 259,026,227,826 252,535,057,459
Non-budgetary
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
(2,973,306,859) (2,769,596,000) (2,769,596,000) (41,866,564,000)
Canadian Dairy Commission
4,246,778 0 0 0
Canadian International Development Agency
107,870,472 83,307,439 95,798,812 81,595,260
Citizenship and Immigration
2,722,769 1 1 0
Correctional Service of Canada
313 0 0 0
Finance
64,011,953,162 20,610,642 80,888,643 2
Foreign Affairs and International Trade
1,855,458 0 0 0
Human Resources and Skills Development
898,256,277 809,592,184 872,131,283 760,632,426
Indian Affairs and Northern Development
49,165,062 78,603,000 78,603,000 70,303,000
Industry
0 800,000 800,000 800,000
National Defence
(6,970,502) 0 0 0
Public Works and Government Services
(7,870,286) 0 0 0
Veterans Affairs
1,137 0 0 0
Total Non-budgetary 62,087,923,781 (1,776,682,734) (1,641,374,261) (40,953,233,312)

Structure of these Estimates

Votes

The basic structural units of the Estimates are the Votes. The following kinds of Votes appear in the Estimates:

A program expenditures vote is used when there is no requirement for either a separate "capital expenditures" vote or a "grants and contributions" vote because neither equals or exceeds $5 million. In this case, all expenditures are charged to the one vote.

An operating expenditures vote is used when there is also a requirement for either a "capital expenditures" vote or a "grants and contributions" vote or both; that is, when expenditures of either type equal or exceed $5 million. Where they do not, the appropriate expenditures are included in the "program expenditures" vote.

A capital expenditures vote is used when capital expenditures equal or exceed $5 million. Expenditure items in a "capital expenditures" vote would include items expected to exceed $10,000 for the acquisition of land, buildings and works, as well as the acquisition of machinery and equipment, or for purposes of constructing or creating assets, where a department expects to draw upon its own labour and materials, or employs consultants or other services or goods. Different threshold limits may be applied for different capital expenditure classes at the departmental level.

A grants and contributions vote is used when grants and/or contributions expenditures equal or exceed $5 million. It should be noted that the inclusion of a grant, contribution or other transfer payment item in the Estimates imposes no requirement to make a payment, nor does it give a prospective recipient any right to the funds. It should also be noted that in the vote wording, the meaning of the word "contributions" is considered to include "other transfer payments" because of the similar characteristics of each.

A non-budgetary vote, identified by the letter "L", provides authority for spending in the form of loans or advances to, and investments in, Crown corporations; and loans or advances for specific purposes to other governments, international organizations or persons or corporations in the private sector.

Where it is necessary to appropriate funds for a payment to a Crown corporation or for the expenditures of a legal entity that is part of a larger program, a separate vote is established. Where this is the case, a separate vote structure is established for each. A legal entity for these purposes is defined as a unit of government operating under an Act of Parliament and responsible directly to a Minister.

To support the Treasury Board in performing its statutory responsibilities for managing the government's financial, human and materiel resources, a number of special authorities are required and these are outlined below.

The Government Contingencies vote serves to supplement other appropriations and to provide for miscellaneous, urgent or unforeseen expenditures not otherwise provided for, including grants and contributions not listed in the Estimates and the increase of the amount of grants listed in these Estimates, where those expenditures are within the legal mandate of a government organization, and authority to re-use any sums allotted and repaid to this appropriation from other appropriations.

The Government-Wide Initiatives vote supplements other appropriations in support of the implementation of strategic management initiatives in the Public Service of Canada.

The Public Service Insurance vote provides for the payment of the employer's share of health, income maintenance and life insurance premiums; for payments to or in respect of provincial health insurance plans; provincial payroll taxes; pension, benefit and insurance plans for employees engaged locally outside Canada; and to return to certain employees their share of the unemployment insurance premium reduction.

The Operating Budget Carry Forward vote supplements other appropriations for the operating budget carry forward from the previous fiscal year.

The Paylist Requirements vote supplements other appropriations for requirements related to parental and maternity allowances, entitlements on cessation of service or employment and adjustments made to terms and conditions of service or employment of the public service including members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Forces, where these have not been provided from the Compensation Adjustments Vote.

The Capital Budget Carry Forward vote supplements other appropriations for the capital budget carry forward from the previous fiscal year.

Presentation by Organization

The individual organizational presentation is made up of various sections, as explained below. Where a section is not appropriate, it does not appear in the presentation.

Raison d'être - This section provides a brief explanation of why the organization exists and the benefits it provides to the Canadians.

Organizational Estimate - This section shows, by Vote, the amounts included in the organization's Main Estimates. For information purposes, the section also includes a summary of statutory forecasts. Abbreviated Vote wordings are used in this section. Complete vote wording is shown in the Proposed Schedules to the Appropriation Bill following Part II, and detailed statutory forecasts are found in the on-line annex.

Highlights - In this section, the department, agency or Crown Corporation provides an explanation of the major item or items that give rise to a year-over-year financial change in Main Estimates, or, where there has not been a material year-over-year change, the department or agency may reference priorities in the Report on Plans and Priorities or Corporate Plan.

Transfer Payments - If applicable, this table provides a listing of transfer payments for the upcoming year. A transfer payment is a grant, contribution or other payment made for the purpose of furthering program objectives but for which no goods or services are received.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - This table shows budgetary expenditures at the Strategic Outcome and Program levels of the department's 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture. Additional information on nature of expenditure by Program is provided in the on-line annex.

Changes to these Estimates

The purpose of this section is to provide a reconciliation of these Estimates with the previous year's Main Estimates in the following areas:

Changes to Government Organization and Structure

Following the tabling of the 2012-13 Main Estimates on February 28, 2012 and pursuant to the Public Service Rearrangement and Transfer of Duties Act, these changes were reflected in Supplementary Estimates (A), 2012-13:

Indian Affairs and Northern Development - Order in Council P.C. 2012-0286 transfers to the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development the control and supervision of the portion of the federal public administration in the Department of Canadian Heritage known as the Urban Aboriginal Youth and Community Programs Unit, effective April 1, 2012.

The following structure changes were reflected in Supplementary Estimates (B), 2012-13:

Public Health Agency of Canada - Order in Council P.C. 2012-0950 transfers to the Public Health Agency of Canada the control and supervision of the portions of the federal public administration in the Department of Health known as the International Affairs Directorate and the Emergency Preparedness and Response Unit, effective June 30, 2012.

Health - Order in Council P.C. 2012-0965 transfers to the Department of Health the control and supervision of the portions of the federal public administration in the Public Health Agency of Canada known as the Communications Directorate, the Human Resources Directorate, the Information Management and Information Technology Directorate, the Facilities and Safety Division, the Integrated Security Services Division, the Access to Information and Privacy Office, the Financial Policy, Systems and Operations Division, and the Assets and Material Management Division; and to the Public Health Agency of Canada the control and supervision of the portions of the federal public administration in the Department of Health known as the Audit and accountability Bureau and the Departmental Performance Measurement and Evaluation Directorate, effective June 30, 2012.

There were changes to the structure of Government reflected in Supplementary Estimates (C), 2012-13:

Health - Order in Council P.C. 2012-1136 transferred the control and supervision of the remaining activities of the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada to Health, effective September 30, 2012.

The following structure change was made through these Estimates:

Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada - Order in Council P.C. 2012-1136 transfered the control and supervision of the remaining activities of the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada to Health, effective September 30, 2012.

Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal - Pursuant to a decision by "The Executive" to accelerate by one year the provision in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, the Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal will cease its operations as of April 1, 2013.

First Nations Statistical Institute - Division 49 of the Jobs, Growth Long-term Prosperity Act announced that First Nations Statistical Institute ceased its operations in 2012; as such no funding provided in the 2013-14 Main Estimates.

Public Appointments Commission Secretariat - Order in Council P.C. 2012-0964 repeals Order in Council P.C. 2006-0223 which established the Public Appointments Commission.

Changes in Voted Authorities

The "Changes in Voted Authorities" sub-section details those Votes which contain specific authorities that differ from those included in the previous year's Main Estimates as well as new expenditure authorities appearing for the first time. In light of the House of Commons Speaker's rulings in 1981, the government has made a commitment that the only legislation that will be enacted through the Estimates process, other than cases specifically authorized by Statute, will be previous Appropriation Acts. Proposed changes to existing wording are underlined for ease of reference.

Foreign Affairs and International Trade - Canadian International Development Agency - Votes L35 and L40 wording was modified by changing the effective date "… April 1, 2013 and ending on March 31, 2014".

Health - Public Health Agency of Canada - Vote 45 wording was modified by adding "… inspection services …".

Industry - Statistics Canada - Vote 105 was modified by adding the following text "… to offset associated expenditures, including revenues from the provision of internal support services to other organizations …".

National Defence - Department - Vote 1 was modified with the following "… future years), authority subject to the direction of the Treasury Board, to make recoverable expenditures or advances in respect of materials supplied to or services performed on behalf of individuals, corporations, outside agencies and other governments and pursuant to paragraph 29.1(2)(a) of the Financial Administration Act, authority to expend revenue received during the fiscal year, to offset related expenditures for the purposes of this Vote including …".

Parliament - House of Commons - Vote 5 wording was modified by removing "… allowances in lieu of residence to the Speaker of the House of Commons, and in lieu of an apartment to the Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons …".

Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness - National Parole Board - Vote 35 wording was modified by changing "… pardon …" with "… record suspension …".

Public Works and Government Services - Old Port of Montreal Inc. - Resulting from the change in government structure (P.C. 2012-1583), Vote 10 wording was modified with the following text "Payments to the Old Port of Montreal Corporation Inc. or to the Crown corporation to which it is amalgamated for operating and capital expenditures of the Old Port of Montreal Division".



Part II - Main Estimates

Agriculture and Agri-Food

Raison d'être

The Department of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada was created in 1868 - one year after Confederation - because of the importance of agriculture to the economic, social and cultural development of Canada. Today, the Department helps ensure the agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products industries can compete in domestic and international markets, deriving economic returns to the sector and the Canadian economy as a whole. Through its work, the Department strives to help the sector maximize its long-term profitability and competitiveness, while respecting the environment and the safety and security of Canada's food supply.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 1. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Agriculture and Agri-Food

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 1. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures
704,941,276 620,125,288 669,590,173 594,969,595
5 Capital expenditures
28,848,626 26,746,894 29,579,826 27,872,294
10 Grants and contributions
359,941,850 423,115,000 632,128,947 226,495,111
Total voted
1,093,731,752 1,069,987,182 1,331,298,946 849,337,000
Total Statutory
1,463,922,873 1,348,607,241 1,456,877,241 1,342,238,219
Total budgetary 2,557,654,625 2,418,594,423 2,788,176,187 2,191,575,219

Highlights

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.2 billion in 2013-14. Of this amount, $849.3 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.3 billion represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes only.

The Department's 2013-14 Main Estimates are a reflection of approved budget and resource allocation decisions at a point in time. Most of the Department's programs are approved on a cyclical basis and, depending on the timing of approvals, some spending authorities may not be received in time for the Main Estimates, but rather are received later in the year and are included in Supplementary Estimates exercises. It is important to note that despite the reduced spending authorities in the 2013-14 Main Estimates as compared to prior years, funding for Growing Forward 2 cost-shared initiatives and support of Business Risk Management programming is expected to be presented in 2013-14 Supplementary Estimates.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides information, research and technology, and policies and programs to help Canada's agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector compete in markets at home and abroad, manage risk, and embrace innovation. The activities of the Department extend from the farmer to the consumer and from the farm to global markets, through all phases of sustainable production, processing and marketing of agriculture and agri-food products. The spending authorities in the 2013-14 Main Estimates are integral to achieving the Department's plans and priorities. Please refer to the Department's Report on Plans and Priorities for further details.

The 2013-14 fiscal year is the first year of Growing Forward 2, the next federal, provincial, territorial agriculture policy framework. This framework will support a shift in focus towards more proactive investments in innovation, competitiveness and market development initiatives to help producers meet rising demand, both in Canada and internationally. Growing Forward 2 will also see a transformative shift in the delivery of Business Risk Management programming, moving away from reactive income support towards programming that facilitates market-based profitability and economic growth. This, in combination with higher commodity prices driven by increasing grain prices, have resulted in an overall reduction of the forecast requirement for statutory grants and contributions under Business Risk Management programming in the 2013-14 Main Estimates, particularly within the AgriStability program. Business Risk Management programming will continue to provide effective support that will ensure producers are protected against severe market volatility and disasters.

Budget 2012 announced that the Government is also delivering on its long-standing promise to give Western Canadian farmers the freedom to market their own wheat and barley on the open market. The 2013-14 Main Estimates include $53.5 million and the 2012-13 Estimates to date include $184.2 million in spending authorities for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs program. As well, savings for the Budget 2012 Spending Review are factored into these Main Estimates, and the Department is currently on track for meeting its 2013-14 savings target.

The Department's Vote 10 grants and contributions spending authorities in 2013-14 decrease compared to the 2012-13 Estimates and 2011-12 actual expenditures primarily due to Growing Forward 2 provincial and territorial cost-shared initiatives which are still being finalized and are therefore not included in these Main Estimates. The Department, in consultation with provincial and territorial partners, continues to work at tailoring Growing Forward 2 cost-shared initiatives to suit local needs and objectives. These amounts are expected to be added to the Department's Vote 10 spending authorities through Supplementary Estimates. In addition, a number of programs will sunset at the end of 2012-13 such as the ecoAgriculture Biofuels Capital Initiative ($52.3 million total) and the Agricultural Innovation program ($38.4 million total). As well, the Agricultural Flexibility Fund will wind down in its final year in 2013-14 ($34.6 million total).

Similarly, the Department's Vote 1 spending authorities in the 2013-14 Main Estimates are less than the 2012-13 Estimates to date, as well as 2011-12 actual expenditures, primarily due to the renewal of support for statutory Business Risk Management programs which is still being finalized. Additional funding is expected to be added to the Department's spending authorities through Supplementary Estimates once this is approved.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 2. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
A competitive and market-oriented agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk.
Business Risk Management
1,412,029,046 1,295,676,584 1,291,031,455
Trade and Market Development
97,976,671 114,283,953 155,414,937
Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems
87,639,411 94,305,586 64,378,297
Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation
12,552,879 35,690,770 16,902,621
Farm Products Council of Canada - FPCC
3,063,149 2,742,353 2,659,276
An innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector.
Science, Innovation and Adoption
265,992,310 339,416,188 300,084,553
Agri-Business Development
116,267,595 51,077,512 14,383,831
Rural and Co-operatives Development
20,288,849 20,042,615 4,063,511
Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency
(253,649) (48,000) (421,000)
An environmentally sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector.
Environmental Knowledge, Technology, Information and Measurement
87,407,541 53,739,793 34,939,444
On-Farm Action
107,027,008 130,946,919 28,669,419
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
347,663,815 280,720,150 279,468,875
Total 2,557,654,625 2,418,594,423 2,191,575,219

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 3. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Agriculture and Agri-Food
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Grants
Grant payments for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs program
0 0 182,700,000 51,900,000
Grant payments for the Churchill Port Utilization program
0 0 4,600,000 4,600,000
Grants to foreign recipients for participation in international organizations supporting agriculture
654,389 673,000 1,273,000 883,000
Agricultural research in universities and other scientific organizations in Canada
100,462 999,000 999,000 299,000
Total Voted Grants
754,851 1,672,000 189,572,000 57,682,000
Total Statutory
358,307,087 226,600,000 224,000,000 169,800,000
Total Grants 359,061,938 228,272,000 413,572,000 227,482,000
Contributions
Contribution payments for the AgriInnovation program under Growing Forward 2
0 0 0 60,455,000
Contribution payments for the AgriMarketing program under Growing Forward 2
0 0 0 35,500,000
Programming related to the Agricultural Flexibility Fund
41,898,590 64,229,778 64,229,778 35,124,111
Contributions to support the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation program
21,361,000 28,361,000 28,361,000 26,761,000
Contributions in support of the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases program
3,142,316 5,382,000 5,382,000 5,382,000
Contribution payments for the AgriCompetitiveness program under Growing Forward 2
0 0 0 3,127,000
Contribution payments for the Canadian Wheat Board Transition Costs program
0 0 1,500,000 1,600,000
Contributions under the Career Focus program - Youth Employment Strategy
646,313 864,000 864,000 864,000
Total Voted Contributions
67,048,219 98,836,778 100,336,778 168,813,111
Total Statutory
1,031,969,482 1,046,515,513 1,157,385,513 1,096,145,513
Total Contributions 1,099,017,701 1,145,352,291 1,257,722,291 1,264,958,624
Total 1,458,079,639 1,373,624,291 1,671,294,291 1,492,440,624

Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada

Raison d'être

Order in Council P.C. 2012-1136 transferred the control and supervision of the remaining activities of the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada to Health, effective September 30, 2012.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 2. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 4. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
Program expenditures
3,212,347 9,925,968 8,753,380 0
Total voted
3,212,347 9,925,968 8,753,380 0
Total Statutory
251,491 614,586 614,586 0
Total budgetary 3,463,838 10,540,554 9,367,966 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 5. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Protection and promotion of health and safety of Canadians in relation to assisted human reproduction and related research, within a sound ethical framework.
Knowledge Transfer Program
841,791 2,561,268 0
Regulatory Compliance Program
707,881 4,297,428 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
1,914,166 3,681,858 0
Total 3,463,838 10,540,554 0

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Raison d'être

Established in 1987 (Part I of the Government Organization Act, Atlantic Canada 1987, R.S.C., 1985, c.41, also known as the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Act), the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) is the federal department responsible for the Government of Canada's economic development efforts in the provinces of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The Associate Minister of National Defence and Minister of State (Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency) (La Francophonie) is responsible for this organization.

ACOA works to create opportunities for economic growth in Atlantic Canada by helping businesses become more competitive, innovative and productive, by working with diverse communities to develop and diversify local economies, and by championing the strengths of Atlantic Canada. Together, with Atlantic Canadians, we are building a stronger economy.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 3. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 6. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures
83,574,012 74,337,351 73,674,351 67,211,348
5 Grants and contributions
236,470,120 225,214,293 241,592,300 225,820,293
Total voted
320,044,132 299,551,644 315,266,651 293,031,641
Total Statutory
10,409,649 7,909,246 7,909,246 6,939,430
Total budgetary 330,453,781 307,460,890 323,175,897 299,971,071

Highlights

The Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $300.0 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $293.0 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $7.0 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

ACOA's decrease in spending of $23.2 million from 2012-13 Estimates to date to 2013-14 is due to a decrease in operating costs of $6.5 million, a decrease in contributions and other transfer payments of $15.7 million, and a decrease of $1.0 million in statutory costs. Factors contributing to the net decrease include:

Impacts of program realignment and efficiencies of $14.1 million:

Impacts of yearly adjustments for which authorities are sought throughout a fiscal year and which may vary in amount from year to year. These adjustments amounted to $9.1 million in 2012-13:

Impacts of termination of funding initiatives and agreements amounted to $1.5 million in 2012-13:

Impacts of other increases of $1.5 million:

In 2013-14, the Agency will continue to use its resources and programs to maintain its focus on improving the productivity and competitiveness of Atlantic Canadian companies. The Agency will also continue to work with communities and community economic development organizations to identify and implement economic opportunities benefiting the region's rural and urban areas. Finally, ACOA will continue to ensure that its programs and activities are responsive and relevant to both national priorities and the needs of Atlantic Canadians.

For further details on ACOA's planned spending, refer to the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 7. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy.
Enterprise Development
172,970,427 175,528,415 170,201,748
Community Development
103,813,765 89,887,856 91,307,430
Policy, Advocacy and Coordination
13,646,372 11,349,000 10,855,783
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
40,023,217 30,695,619 27,606,110
Total 330,453,781 307,460,890 299,971,071

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 8. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to organizations to promote economic cooperation and development
360,446 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000
Total Grants 360,446 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000
Contributions
Contributions under the Business Development Program
128,003,183 104,923,293 113,649,243 100,074,293
Contributions for the Atlantic Innovation Fund
52,891,156 59,949,000 60,223,033 57,649,000
Contributions for the Innovative Communities Fund
33,305,911 45,000,000 45,167,023 44,455,000
Contributions under the Community Futures Program
12,641,584 12,642,000 12,642,000 12,642,000
Contributions for the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund
0 0 8,300,000 8,300,000
Contributions under the Atlantic Policy Research Initiatives
369,595 700,000 700,000 700,000
Total Contributions 227,211,429 223,214,293 240,681,299 223,820,293
Total 227,571,875 225,214,293 242,681,299 225,820,293

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Raison d'être

Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) uses its unique scientific expertise and facilities to ensure that:

The current mandate for the AECL Nuclear Laboratories flows from the powers given to the Minister of Natural Resources under the Nuclear Energy Act:

Organizational Estimates

Figure 4. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 9. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
15 Payments to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for operating and capital expenditures
537,031,083 102,143,000 345,308,000 102,143,000
Total voted
537,031,083 102,143,000 345,308,000 102,143,000
Total Statutory
182,000,000 274,552,095 274,552,095 108,919,637
Total budgetary 719,031,083 376,695,095 619,860,095 211,062,637

Highlights

AECL is estimating budgetary expenditures of $211.1 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $102.1 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $108.9 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The voted funding of $102.1 million will be used to fund AECL laboratory operations and research and development at Chalk River and ensure the safe and reliable operation of its nuclear facilities and supporting infrastructure.

Laboratory operations consist of:

Consistent with the Jobs and Economic Growth Act, the statutory funding of $108.9 million included in these Main Estimates will be used to address commercial commitments associated with the divestiture of AECL's CANDU Reactor Division to Candu Energy Inc.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 10. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Be the top worldwide nuclear products and services company. Protect the health and safety of the public, our employees and the environment. Minimize nuclear legacy obligations for future generations.
Commercial Business
0 274,552,095 108,919,637
Facilities and Nuclear Operations
0 67,006,000 67,006,000
Research and Development
0 35,137,000 35,137,000
Waste Management and Decommissioning
0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 719,031,083 0 0
Total 719,031,083 376,695,095 211,062,637

Auditor General

Raison d'être

The Auditor General is an Officer of Parliament, who is independent from the government and reports directly to Parliament. The Office of the Auditor General is the legislative audit office of the federal government and of the three northern territories. The main legislative auditing duties are financial audits, performance audits, special examinations, and sustainable development monitoring activities and environmental petitions. Our audits and studies provide objective information, advice and assurance to Parliament, territorial legislatures, governments and Canadians. With our reports and testimony, we assist parliamentarians and territorial legislators in their work on the authorization and oversight of government spending and operations. The Minister of Finance is responsible for tabling the Auditor General's administrative reports in Parliament, including the Report on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Report.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 5. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Auditor General

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 11. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Auditor General
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
20 Program expenditures
79,266,383 73,991,868 73,991,868 74,100,653
Total voted
79,266,383 73,991,868 73,991,868 74,100,653
Total Statutory
10,545,537 10,331,353 10,331,353 10,232,880
Total budgetary 89,811,920 84,323,221 84,323,221 84,333,533

Highlights

The Office of the Auditor General is estimating budgetary expenditures of $84.3 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $74.1 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $10.2 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

Additional information can be found in the Office of the Auditor General's 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 12. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Auditor General
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Through legislative auditing, we contribute to a well-managed and accountable government for Canadians.
Legislative Auditing
89,811,920 84,323,221 84,333,533
Total 89,811,920 84,323,221 84,333,533

Canada Border Services Agency

Raison d'être

The Minister of Public Safety is responsible for this organization.

The Canada Border Services Agency provides integrated border services that support national security priorities and facilitate the flow of people and goods, including food, plants and animals, across the border. Responsibilities include:

Additional information can be found in the organization's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 6. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Border Services Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 13. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Border Services Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
10 Operating expenditures
1,521,118,147 1,489,823,517 1,658,975,049 1,396,653,386
15 Capital expenditures
122,748,593 104,705,942 197,232,134 104,335,441
Total voted
1,643,866,740 1,594,529,459 1,856,207,183 1,500,988,827
Total Statutory
191,430,210 181,490,817 181,490,817 179,164,197
Total budgetary 1,835,296,950 1,776,020,276 2,037,698,000 1,680,153,024

Highlights

The Canada Border Services Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1.7 billion in 2013-14. Of this amount, $1.5 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $179.2 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Canada Border Service Agency's decrease in net spending of $95.9 million or 5.4% is due to a decrease in Operating costs of $93.5 million, a decrease in Capital costs of $0.4 million and a decrease of $2.0 million in Statutory costs (Employee Benefit Plan). Factors contributing to the net decrease include:

Increases of:

The increases are offset by the following decreases:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 14. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Border Services Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website – www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks.
Admissibility Determination
582,713,148 663,843,990 630,828,800
Immigration Enforcement
150,516,396 160,981,335 144,658,085
Risk Assessment Program
117,258,228 154,898,721 139,253,528
Revenue and Trade Management
75,965,178 69,966,993 74,836,493
Secure and Trusted Partnerships
33,246,592 45,989,480 46,555,054
Criminal Investigations
27,184,823 23,751,846 23,619,993
Recourse
12,674,105 10,245,798 9,971,032
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
835,738,480 646,342,113 610,430,039
Total 1,835,296,950 1,776,020,276 1,680,153,024

Canada Council for the Arts

Raison d'être

The Canada Council for the Arts (CCA) is a Crown corporation created in 1957 “to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts.” Its grants to artists and arts organizations contribute to a vibrant arts scene in Canada. Its awards celebrate creativity by recognizing exceptional Canadians in the arts, humanities and sciences. The Canada Council Art Bank is a national collection of over 17,000 Canadian contemporary artworks, accessible to the public through rental, loan and outreach programs. The Canadian Commission for UNESCO operates under the general authority of the Canada Council.

The CCA reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 7. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Council for the Arts

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 15. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Council for the Arts
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
10 Payments to the Canada Council for the Arts
181,417,816 181,760,816 181,367,817 180,260,816
Total voted
181,417,816 181,760,816 181,367,817 180,260,816
Total budgetary 181,417,816 181,760,816 181,367,817 180,260,816

Highlights

The Canada Council for the Arts (CCA) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $180.3 million in 2013-14 which require approval by Parliament.

CCA's planned expenditures remain approximately the same as previous year. The CCA is continuing to implement its 2011-16 Corporate Plan “Strengthening Connections” which has five directions (individual artists, arts organizations, equity, partnership and internal capacity) as well as three cross-cutting themes (public engagement in the arts, synergy and new technologies). Main areas of activity in 2012-13 include:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 16. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Council for the Arts
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website – www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
A vibrant and dynamic arts sector in Canada.
Grants and services to support creation, production and dissemination of arts for individuals and organizations
0 161,181,924 159,681,924
Arts promotion to foster public knowledge and appreciation of the Canadian arts and culture
0 8,300,486 8,300,486
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
0 12,278,406 12,278,406
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 181,417,816 0 0
Total 181,417,816 181,760,816 180,260,816

Canada Industrial Relations Board

Raison d'être

The Canada Industrial Relations Board (the CIRB or the Board) contributes to and promotes a harmonious industrial relations climate in the federally regulated sectors and seeks to provide effective and appropriate dispute resolution services for its client community in a fair and timely manner. Established in 1999 to replace the previous Canada Labour Relations Board, the CIRB is an independent, representative, quasi-judicial tribunal, responsible for the interpretation and application of Part I of the Canada Labour Code (the Code), which establishes the framework for collective bargaining, the acquisition and termination of bargaining rights, unfair labour practices and protection of public health and safety in the event of work stoppages affecting essential services. The Board also administers certain provisions of Part II of the Code related to Occupational Health and Safety. It is also planned that starting in fiscal year 2013-14, the Board will be responsible for the interpretation and application of Part II of the Status of the Artist Act.

The Minister of Labour is responsible for the Canada Industrial Relations Board.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 8. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Industrial Relations Board

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 17. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Industrial Relations Board
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
10 Program expenditures
12,212,298 11,424,279 11,424,279 11,916,532
Total voted
12,212,298 11,424,279 11,424,279 11,916,532
Total Statutory
1,486,626 1,569,617 1,569,617 1,637,433
Total budgetary 13,698,924 12,993,896 12,993,896 13,553,965

Highlights

The CIRB's strategic outcome is to achieve the following: effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code. In order to achieve this objective, the Board will continue to focus its efforts on maintaining its current rate of disposition of new cases so as to ensure that a backlog does not recur. This will be achieved through effective case management and proactive mediation assistance at all stages of a case. The CIRB will also proactively seek resolution of matters that best meets the needs of the parties to a dispute through mediation assistance by regional staff and Board members.

The Board will focus on two initiatives in 2013-14:

The Canada Industrial Relations Board is estimating budgetary expenditures of $13.6 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $11.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.6 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The increase in the Board's Estimates is mainly due to additional funding provided to compensate the Board for its planned additional responsibilities related to the Status of the Artist Act. The variance between 2011-12 expenditures and 2012-13 Estimates is directly related to the cash out of severance entitlements in 2011-12 to several CIRB employees, pursuant to a new government policy regarding severance pay.

More information on the Board's plans and priorities can be found in the Board's 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities, available on the CIRB's website.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 18. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Industrial Relations Board
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website – www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code.
Adjudication and Dispute Resolution Program
9,841,296 9,355,605 9,905,354
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
3,857,628 3,638,291 3,648,611
Total 13,698,924 12,993,896 13,553,965

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Raison d'être

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) is Canada's national housing agency. Established as a federal Crown corporation in 1946 to help address post-war housing shortages, its role has evolved as Canadians' needs have changed. Today, CMHC works closely with provinces, territories and the private and not-for-profit sectors to help lower-income Canadians access affordable, better quality housing. CMHC also helps Aboriginal Canadians meet their distinct housing needs.

CMHC's role in housing finance — providing mortgage loan insurance and securitization guarantee products — contributes to the health and stability of Canada's housing finance system and facilitates access to financing for housing across the country. This includes loans for housing in small and rural communities, rental housing and for nursing and retirement homes.

CMHC also promotes the efficiency of the Canadian housing system through research, market analysis and information transfer.

CMHC is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 9. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 10. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 19. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
15 To reimburse Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation for the amounts of loans forgiven, grants, contributions and expenditures made, and losses, costs and expenses incurred under the provisions of the National Housing Act or in respect of the exercise of powers or the carrying out of duties or functions conferred on the Corporation pursuant to the authority of any Act of Parliament of Canada other than the National Housing Act, in accordance with the Corporation's authority under the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Act
2,048,052,949 2,139,812,000 2,139,812,000 2,100,578,000
Total voted
2,048,052,949 2,139,812,000 2,139,812,000 2,100,578,000
Total Statutory
205,640 0 0 0
Total budgetary 2,048,258,589 2,139,812,000 2,139,812,000 2,100,578,000
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory
(2,973,306,859) (2,769,596,000) (2,769,596,000) (41,866,564,000)
Total non-budgetary (2,973,306,859) (2,769,596,000) (2,769,596,000) (41,866,564,000)

Highlights

CMHC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.1 billion in 2013-14 which require approval by Parliament. CMHC is also estimating non-budgetary repayments of $41.9 billion.

A net budgetary decrease of $39.2 million from 2012-13 Main Estimates is due to the following:

A net non-budgetary decrease of $39.1 billion is due to the following:

As Canada's national housing agency, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation plays a significant role in administering federal investments in social housing through agreements with provinces and territories and First Nation communities. Almost 605,000 lower income households benefitted from these types of federal investments in 2011. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation also provided federal funding towards renovation programs so that needed repairs or rehabilitation could be undertaken for another 6,730 units for seniors, persons with disabilities, victims of family violence and others who could otherwise not afford adequate and suitable housing.

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation is the only source of comprehensive market analysis information serving both industry and consumers. Its research and information transfer activities on key housing issues have been instrumental in helping Canadians make more informed housing choices. These activities also support industry in the planning, designing, construction operation and maintenance of housing, and assist the public policy decision-making process. Better information contributes to the stability, effectiveness and efficiency of housing markets.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation's Summary of the Corporate Plan, available at CMHC's website.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 20. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Canadians in need have access to affordable housing.
Funding Under Long-Term Commitments for Existing Social Housing
1,679,443,714 1,756,859,000 1,752,401,000
Funding for New Commitments of Affordable Housing
299,027,470 312,403,000 293,702,000
Housing Support
3,802,379 5,536,000 7,574,000
Canada has a stable, competitive and innovative housing system.
Market Analysis Information
15,012,894 21,910,000 23,902,000
Housing Policy, Research and Information Transfer
35,812,858 29,996,000 22,999,000
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 15,159,274 13,108,000 0
Total 2,048,258,589 2,139,812,000 2,100,578,000

Table 21. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website – www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Canadians in need have access to affordable housing.
Funding Under Long-Term Commitments for Existing Social Housing
636,157,837 (214,814,000) (387,216,000)
Funding for New Commitments of Affordable Housing
0 295,000 500,000
Housing Support
(190,943,118) (129,354,000) (159,778,000)
Canada has a stable, competitive and innovative housing system.
Insured Mortgage Purchase Program
(3,418,521,578) (2,425,723,000) (41,320,070,000)
Total (2,973,306,859) (2,769,596,000) (41,866,564,000)

Canada Post Corporation

Raison d'être

Canada Post Corporation has a mandate to provide an efficient, effective and quality-driven postal service to Canadians, to be profitable, and to maintain and increase the value of the Corporation for Canadians.

The Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities is responsible for this organization.

Under the terms of the Canada Post Corporation Act, the Corporation is mandated to operate the postal service on a financially self-sustaining basis. In addition to core postal service, Canada Post also delivers certain public policy programs for the Government.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 11. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Post Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 22. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Post Corporation
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
15 Payments to the Canada Post Corporation for special purposes
22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Total voted
22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000
Total budgetary 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000

Highlights

Canada Post Corporation receives an annual appropriation of $22.2 million from the Government for the delivery of Parliamentary mail and materials for the use of the blind, which are sent free of postage under the Act. This appropriation helps to offset the financial impact of these programs on the corporation.

Parliamentary Mail

The Canada Post Corporation Act allows for the free mailing of letters between Canadians and the Governor General, Members of Parliament, the Speakers of the Senate and House of Commons, the Parliamentary Librarian and the Ethics Commissioner. Under the Act members of the House of Commons are also allowed up to four free householder (Unaddressed Admail) mailings to their constituents in any calendar year.

Materials for the Use of the Blind

The Canada Post Corporation Act provides for free mailing of materials for the blind. Today, thousands of visually impaired Canadians and many libraries across the country, including that of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, send talking books and other materials free of charge.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 23. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Post Corporation
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website – www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Compensation for the provision of Parliamentary mail and Materials for the use of the blind services, which are sent free of postage under the Canada Post Corporation Act.
Concessionary Governmental Services
0 22,210,000 22,210,000
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 22,210,000 0 0
Total 22,210,000 22,210,000 22,210,000

Canada Revenue Agency

Raison d'être

The Minister of National Revenue is responsible for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The CRA is responsible for administering, assessing, and collecting hundreds of billions of dollars in taxes annually. The tax revenue it collects is used by federal, provincial, territorial and First Nations governments to fund the programs and services that contribute to the quality of life of Canadians. The CRA also uses its federal infrastructure to deliver billions of dollars in benefits, tax credits, and other services that support the economic and social well-being of Canadian families, children and persons with disabilities. In carrying out its mandate, the CRA strives to ensure that Canadians:

Organizational Estimates

Figure 12. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada Revenue Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 24. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada Revenue Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures, contributions and recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan and the Employment Insurance Act
3,158,001,277 3,143,199,578 3,366,888,679 3,046,330,734
5 Capital expenditures and recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan and the Employment Insurance Act
51,689,472 55,465,687 83,432,650 73,081,967
Total voted
3,209,690,749 3,198,665,265 3,450,321,329 3,119,412,701
Total Statutory
1,141,600,877 1,176,286,671 1,176,286,671 1,157,410,552
Total budgetary 4,351,291,626 4,374,951,936 4,626,608,000 4,276,823,253

Highlights

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) is estimating expenditures of $4.3 billion in 2013-14. Of this amount $3.1 billion requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.2 billion represents Statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total the CRA is expecting a decrease of $98.1 million or 2.2% from previous Main Estimates, which is the net result of various increases offset by certain planned decreases.

The CRA budgets will be increasing by $34.7 million due to the following:

The above mentioned increases are offset by decreases totalling $132.8 million due to the following:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 25. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada Revenue Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Taxpayers meet their obligations and Canada's revenue base is protected.
Reporting Compliance
1,055,758,459 985,131,907 1,015,345,341
Assessment of Returns and Payment Processing
642,056,593 617,947,916 595,716,794
Taxpayer and Business Assistance
530,542,287 543,025,304 538,836,440
Accounts Receivable and Returns Compliance
521,505,104 432,277,353 427,902,247
Appeals
175,063,571 153,855,038 178,609,564
Eligible families and individuals receive timely and correct benefit payments.
Benefit Programs
369,783,357 367,546,308 382,509,653
Taxpayers and benefit recipients receive an independent and impartial review of their service-related complaints.
Taxpayers' Ombudsman
2,730,896 3,232,015 3,098,063
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
1,053,851,359 1,271,936,095 1,134,805,151
Total 4,351,291,626 4,374,951,936 4,276,823,253

Canada School of Public Service

Raison d'être

The Canada School of Public Service (CSPS) is the common learning service provider for the Public Service of Canada. The School has a legislative mandate to provide a range of learning activities to build individual and organizational capacity and management excellence within the Public Service. The School has one strategic goal, to ensure public servants have the common knowledge and leadership and management competencies required to effectively serve Canada and Canadians. Additional information can be found in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

The President of the Treasury Board is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 13. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canada School of Public Service

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 26. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canada School of Public Service
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
40 Program expenditures
50,373,377 44,650,030 44,650,030 42,231,200
Total voted
50,373,377 44,650,030 44,650,030 42,231,200
Total Statutory
75,567,449 56,445,583 56,445,583 56,233,121
Total budgetary 125,940,826 101,095,613 101,095,613 98,464,321

Highlights

Canada School of Public Service is estimating budgetary expenditures of $98.5 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $42.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $56.3 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

A year-over-year decrease of $2.6 million in planned spending is mainly due to the following:

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 27. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canada School of Public Service
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Public Servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.
Foundational Learning
74,698,736 65,397,954 55,958,215
Organizational Leadership Development
12,713,243 11,100,410 10,546,028
Public Sector Management Innovation
8,442,790 11,280,286 9,178,036
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
30,086,057 13,316,963 22,782,042
Total 125,940,826 101,095,613 98,464,321

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

Raison d'être

The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) is a Crown corporation with the mandate to protect the public by securing critical elements of the air transportation system as assigned by the Government of Canada. CATSA's goal is to provide a professional, effective, efficient and consistent level of security screening services, at or above the standards set by Transport Canada, its regulator. Fully funded by parliamentary appropriations, CATSA is accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. CATSA's vision is to excel as a world leader in air transportation security through its service to passengers, its people and its partnerships.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 14. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 28. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
20 Payments to the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority for operating and capital expenditures
515,006,000 576,397,810 576,397,810 598,286,200
Total voted
515,006,000 576,397,810 576,397,810 598,286,200
Total budgetary 515,006,000 576,397,810 576,397,810 598,286,200

Highlights

The CATSA is estimating budgetary expenditures of $598.3 million in 2013-14 which require approval by Parliament.

The CATSA's planned operating expenditures for 2013-14 of $457 million are $19 million or 4% lower compared to $476 million in the 2012-13 Main Estimates. This is mainly attributable to savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 spending review.

The CATSA planned capital expenditures for 2013-14 of $141 million are $41 million or 41% higher compared to $100 million in the 2012-13 Main Estimates. The year-over-year variance in capital spending reflects the deployment schedule of the organization's new Hold Baggage Screening system as part of its 10-year capital lifecycle management program at the designated airports across Canada. airports across Canada.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 29. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Screening programs at designated Canadian airports protect the travelling public.
Pre-Board Screening
0 319,203,810 310,270,544
Hold Baggage Screening
0 181,498,000 222,210,656
Non-Passenger Screening
0 14,771,000 13,360,000
Restricted Area Identity Card
0 3,435,000 3,763,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
0 57,490,000 48,682,000
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 515,006,000 0 0
Total 515,006,000 576,397,810 598,286,200

Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal

Raison d'être

Pursuant to a decision to accelerate by one year the provision in the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act, the Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal will cease its operations as of April 1, 2013. As such, no funding was provided in the 2013-14 Main Estimates.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 15. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 30. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
Program expenditures
1,150,256 1,878,673 1,878,673 0
Total voted
1,150,256 1,878,673 1,878,673 0
Total Statutory
132,936 180,870 180,870 0
Total budgetary 1,283,192 2,059,543 2,059,543 0

Highlights

Not applicable

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 31. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
The rights of artists and producers under Part II of the Status of the Artist Act are protected and respected.
Certification, Complaints and Determination Program
780,407 1,610,000 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
502,785 449,543 0
Total 1,283,192 2,059,543 0

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Raison d'être

As defined by the 1991 Broadcasting Act, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (the Corporation), as the national public broadcaster, should provide radio and television services incorporating a wide range of programming that informs, enlightens and entertains. The programming provided by the Corporation should:

The Corporation reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 16. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 32. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
15 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for operating expenditures
1,028,047,060 967,284,060 999,484,060 956,913,060
20 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for working capital
4,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000
25 Payments to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for capital expenditures
102,272,000 103,035,000 103,035,000 103,856,000
Total voted
1,134,319,060 1,074,319,060 1,106,519,060 1,064,769,060
Total budgetary 1,134,319,060 1,074,319,060 1,106,519,060 1,064,769,060

Highlights

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (the Corporation) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1,064.8 million in 2013-14 in comparison to the 2012-13 Main Estimates of $1,074.3 million. The decrease of $9.55 million for 2013-14 relates to savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review.

Following results of the Budget 2012 Spending Review, the Corporation's appropriation will decrease by $115.0 million over three years. The Corporation's operating funding was reduced by $27.8 million in 2012-13 ($27.8 million was deducted from the supplementary funds of $60.0 million received since 2001-02). In 2013-14, the overall reduction will be $69.55 million (annual supplementary funds of $60.0 million will be eliminated completely and the difference of $9.55 million will be reduced from the base operating appropriation as identified above). For 2014-15 and ongoing years, the Corporation's appropriation will be reduced by $115.0 million (annual supplementary funds of $60.0 million eliminated completely and the difference of $55.0 million will be reduced from the base operating appropriation).

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 33. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
A national public broadcasting service exists that is primarily Canadian in content and connects citizens to the Canadian experience.
Television, Radio and Digital Services
0 992,239,676 1,013,116,348
Transmission and distribution of programs
0 65,011,818 45,118,862
Specialty Channels for Specific Audiences
0 0 0
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
0 17,067,566 6,533,850
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 1,134,319,060 0 0
Total 1,134,319,060 1,074,319,060 1,064,769,060

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

Raison d'être

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) was founded by an Act of Parliament in 1978 with a mandate to promote health and safety in the workplace and to enhance the physical and mental health of working people. The Minister of Labour is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 17. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 34. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
20 Program expenditures
4,166,331 3,853,172 3,853,172 3,853,172
Total voted
4,166,331 3,853,172 3,853,172 3,853,172
Total Statutory
1,123,993 1,130,830 1,130,830 1,117,980
Total budgetary 5,290,324 4,984,002 4,984,002 4,971,152

Highlights

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety is estimating budgetary expenditures of $5.0 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $3.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.1 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety's planned expenditures remain the same as last year. CCOHS will focus its efforts on providing a wide range of needed, relevant and practical information, resources and training that assist Canadians to improve health and safety. We will work with Canadian and global partners to develop the resources and tools that will improve health and safety and contribute to making Canada's workplaces safe and more productive.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 35. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Improved workplace conditions and practices that enhance the health, safety, and well being of working Canadians.
Occupational health and safety information development, delivery services and tripartite collaboration
2,599,629 2,291,641 2,189,806
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
2,690,695 2,692,361 2,781,346
Total 5,290,324 4,984,002 4,971,152

Canadian Commercial Corporation

Raison d'être

The Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) is governed by its enacting legislation, the 1946 Canadian Commercial Corporation Act. The Act outlines CCC's broad mandate, which is to assist in the development of trade by helping Canadian exporters access markets abroad and by helping foreign buyers obtain goods from Canada. The legislation also provides CCC with a range of powers, including the ability to export goods from Canada either as principal or as agent in such a manner and to such an extent as it deems appropriate. As a result, CCC negotiates and executes bilateral government-to-government procurement arrangements, facilitating export transactions on behalf of Canadian exporters.

CCC reports to Parliament through the Minister of International Trade.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 18. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Commercial Corporation

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 36. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Commercial Corporation
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
20 Payments to the Canadian Commercial Corporation
15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540
Total voted
15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540
Total budgetary 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540

Highlights

The Canadian Commercial Corporation is estimating Voted budgetary expenditures of $15.5 million in 2013-14 which require approval by Parliament. The funding will be used to facilitate sales of goods and services from Canadian exporters to the U.S Department of Defence in support of the North American Defence Industrial Base. On all other export transactions, CCC charges fees for service. These fees support CCC's other expenditures.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 37. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Commercial Corporation
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Enhanced market access for Canadian exporters to complex international public sector markets.
Defence
0 15,481,540 15,481,540
Emerging and Developing Markets
0 0 0
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 15,481,540 0 0
Total 15,481,540 15,481,540 15,481,540

Canadian Dairy Commission

Raison d'être

The Canadian Dairy Commission (CDC) is a federal Crown corporation created in 1966 through the Canadian Dairy Commission Act. It reports to Parliament through the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. Its legislated objectives are twofold: to provide efficient producers of milk and cream with the opportunity of obtaining a fair return for their labour and investment; and to provide consumers of dairy products with a continuous and adequate supply of dairy products of high quality.

The CDC plays a central facilitating role for the multi-billion dollar Canadian dairy industry. Federal-provincial agreements now provide the authority for many of the programs and activities that the CDC employees administer and facilitate on a day-to-day basis. The CDC strives to balance and serve the interests of all dairy stakeholders — producers, processors, further processors, exporters, consumers and governments.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 19. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 20. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 38. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
15 Program expenditures
4,479,524 3,935,119 3,935,119 3,985,810
Total voted
4,479,524 3,935,119 3,935,119 3,985,810
Total budgetary 4,479,524 3,935,119 3,935,119 3,985,810
Non-budgetary
Total Statutory
4,246,778 0 0 0
Total non-budgetary 4,246,778 0 0 0

Highlights

The Canadian Dairy Commission is estimating budgetary expenditures of $4.0 million in 2013-14, which requires approval by Parliament.

The Canadian milk supply management system rests on three pillars: production management, price setting and import controls. The CDC is directly involved in the administration of two of the three pillars (production management and price setting) via the establishment of industrial milk quota and support price.

The CDC administers the three revenue pooling and market sharing pools that exist among milk producers. Monthly, the CDC receives data from provincial milk marketing boards and calculates the payment transfers between provinces to equalize returns and adjusts quota allocations to provinces to account for the sharing of markets.

To ensure a steady supply of dairy products on the Canadian market, the CDC operates the Domestic Seasonality Programs. To ensure that milk components for which there is no outlet on the domestic market are removed in a timely fashion, the CDC operates the Surplus Removal Program. Furthermore, in order to promote the use of dairy products and ingredients in processed foods, the CDC operates the Dairy Marketing Program.

In addition, the CDC, on the industry's behalf, administers the Special Milk Class Permit Program (SMCPP) and the Domestic Dairy Product Innovation Program. The parameters of these programs are decided by the industry.

The CDC imports the tariff rate quota of butter and sells this butter to participants in the SMCPP through butter manufacturers. Profits that the CDC generates by this activity are used to finance initiatives that provide benefits to the industry. Examples of these initiatives are graduate scholarships in Canadian establishments and the validation of dairy farms under the Canadian Quality Milk Program, an on-farm quality assurance program.

The CDC also controls the subsidized exports of Canadian dairy products through the issuance of export permits. This permit system has been put in place to ensure that Canadian exports of dairy products do not exceed the limits imposed on Canada by the World Trade Organization for subsidized exports.

No significant changes are expected in the programs that the CDC administers in fiscal year 2013-14. Further details can be found in the Canadian Dairy Commission's Corporate Plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 39. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
To enhance the vitality of the Canadian dairy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders.
Administer milk supply management system
4,479,524 3,935,119 3,985,810
Total 4,479,524 3,935,119 3,985,810

Table 40. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canadian Dairy Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
To enhance the vitality of the Canadian dairy industry for the benefit of all stakeholders.
Administer milk supply management system
4,246,778 0 0
Total 4,246,778 0 0

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Raison d'être

The Minister of the Environment is responsible for this organization.

Environmental assessment contributes to informed decision making in support of sustainable development. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency delivers high-quality environmental assessments and serves as the centre of expertise within the federal government on environmental assessment.

Additional information can be found in the Agency's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 21. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 41. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
15 Program expenditures
26,426,963 15,248,257 27,865,307 28,142,126
Total voted
26,426,963 15,248,257 27,865,307 28,142,126
Total Statutory
3,131,526 1,776,941 1,776,941 2,863,886
Total budgetary 29,558,489 17,025,198 29,642,248 31,006,012

Highlights

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $31.0 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $28.1 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $2.9 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Agency's 2013-14 Main Estimates are $14.0 million higher than the 2012-13 Main Estimates. This is attributable to funding renewal for Major Project Management Office initiatives ($7.4 million) and for Aboriginal consultations ($6.6 million). In 2012-13, the Agency received funding for these initiatives through Supplementary Estimates (A).

No significant changes are planned for the 2014-15 Main Estimates.

The Agency's Main Estimates for 2015-16 will show a decrease of $14.0 million due to the sunsetting of funds related to the Major Project Management Office and Aboriginal Consultation initiatives.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 42. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
High quality and timely environmental assessments of major projects to protect the environment and support economic growth.
Environmental Assessment Delivery Program
15,332,906 8,543,055 19,274,780
Environmental Assessment Policy Program
3,524,556 3,380,356 4,263,059
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
10,701,027 5,101,787 7,468,173
Total 29,558,489 17,025,198 31,006,012

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 43. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contribution to the Province of Quebec - James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement
220,500 246,000 246,000 (246,000)
Contributions for the support of public participation in the environmental assessment review process - Participant Funding Program
2,842,203 1,469,000 1,469,000 (4,469,000)
Total Contributions 3,062,703 1,715,000 1,715,000 (4,715,000)
Total 3,062,703 1,715,000 1,715,000 (4,715,000)

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Raison d'être

The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is Canada's largest science-based regulatory agency. It has over 7,200 employees working across Canada, in the National Capital Region (NCR) and in four operational areas (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Western Canada).

The CFIA is dedicated to safeguarding food, animal and plant health, which enhances the health and well-being of Canada's people, environment, and economy.

CFIA develops and delivers inspection and other services to:

CFIA bases its activities on science, effective management of risk, commitment to service and efficiency, and collaboration with domestic and international organizations that share its mandate.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 22. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Food Inspection Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 44. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
20 Operating expenditures and contributions
579,207,923 536,868,665 570,033,515 534,383,158
25 Capital expenditures
13,755,212 14,583,400 24,178,240 17,815,785
Total voted
592,963,135 551,452,065 594,211,755 552,198,943
Total Statutory
144,733,222 134,085,507 134,085,507 135,686,461
faceTotal budgetary 737,696,357 685,537,572 728,297,262 687,885,404

Highlights

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $687.9 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $552.2 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $135.7 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

CFIA's 2013-14 Main Estimates increase by $2.4 million from the 2012-13 Main Estimates of $685.5 million. The major items included in this increase are:

The 2012-13 Estimates to Date are approximately $42.8 million higher than the 2012-13 Main Estimates. This increase can be explained by resource requirements presented in Supplementary Estimates.

In 2012-13, the CFIA's planning of activities was guided by four overarching priorities: strong foundation, working closely with partners, enhancing service, and strengthening internal management. These priorities were rooted in the Agency's strategic change agenda. During the 2012-13 fiscal year, the change agenda, and its priorities, were further refined through the Agency's ongoing long term strategic planning exercise. By defining the Agency's long term vision and careful consideration of its key strategic risks, the Long Term Strategic Plan assists the CFIA in mitigating its risks, strengthening its foundations, and effectively delivering its core program activities into the future. Below are the four priorities for the CFIA for 2013-14 which are a refinement of 2012-13 priorities.

An increased focus on prevention will provide an opportunity to reduce risks to human and ecosystem health. Integrating proactive and preventative risk management approaches into all CFIA programs, including focus on partnerships and sharing of information, will help the CFIA to anticipate, prevent, prepare, and manage issues, including emergencies.

CFIA's role as an effective regulator will be enhanced by a focus on service excellence. Strengthening the service delivery culture will result in effective regulatory delivery and domestic and international stakeholders who have confidence in the CFIA as a trusted and credible regulator.

Adapt and evolve to meet new demands and expectations with a focus on internal performance excellence. Maximizing performance will enable the CFIA to evaluate the effectiveness of the Agency's policies and programs and to allocate resources to areas of highest risk.

Focusing on people who are supported by training and tools will result in a stable and skilled CFIA workforce and adaptable and satisfied employees.

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 45. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
A safe and accessible food supply and plant and animal resource base
Food Safety Program
328,935,486 304,835,449 312,185,374
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program
140,272,363 132,527,929 131,587,718
Plant Resources Program
83,964,959 84,361,594 84,260,734
International Collaboration and Technical Agreements
34,859,200 45,412,978 31,697,693
The following program activity supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
149,664,349 118,399,622 128,153,885
Total 737,696,357 685,537,572 687,885,404

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 46. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions in support of the Federal Assistance Program
1,176,256 124,750 124,750 700,000
Contributions to the provinces in accordance with the Rabies Indemnification Regulations of the Governor in Council of amounts not exceeding two-fifths of the amounts paid by the provinces to owners of animals dying as a result of rabies infection
690 112,000 112,000 112,000
Compensation under terms and conditions approved by the Governor in Council to owners of animals that have died as a result of anthrax
2,000 7,000 7,000 7,000
Total Voted Contributions
1,178,946 243,750 243,750 819,000
Total Statutory
4,223,367 1,500,000 1,500,000 3,500,000
Total Contributions 5,402,313 1,743,750 1,743,750 4,319,000
Total 5,402,313 1,743,750 1,743,750 4,319,000

Canadian Forces Grievance Board

Raison d'être

The raison d'être of the Canadian Forces Grievance Board is to provide an independent and external review of military grievances. Section 29 of the National Defence Act provides a statutory right for an officer or a non-commissioned member who has been aggrieved, to grieve a decision, an act or an omission in the administration of the affairs of the Canadian Forces. The importance of this broad right cannot be overstated since it is, with certain narrow exceptions, the only formal complaint process available to Canadian Forces members. The Canadian Forces Grievance Board reports to Parliament through the Minister of National Defence.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 23. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Forces Grievance Board

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 47. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Forces Grievance Board
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
15 Program expenditures
5,727,601 6,062,076 6,062,076 6,087,490
Total voted
5,727,601 6,062,076 6,062,076 6,087,490
Total Statutory
669,410 610,029 610,029 607,519
Total budgetary 6,397,011 6,672,105 6,672,105 6,695,009

Highlights

The Canadian Forces Grievance Board is estimating budgetary expenditures of $6.7 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $6.1 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $607.0 thousand represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Canadian Forces Grievance Board's expenditures remain approximately the same as the previous year. For your information, details on our priorities will be made available in our 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 48. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Forces Grievance Board
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
The Chief of the Defence Staff and members of the Canadian Forces have access to a fair, independent and timely review of military grievances.
Review Canadian Forces grievances
4,000,698 4,336,868 4,351,756
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
2,396,313 2,335,237 2,343,253
Total 6,397,011 6,672,105 6,695,009

Canadian Grain Commission

Raison d'être

The Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) is a federal government agency that administers the provisions of the Canada Grain Act (CGA). The CGC's mandate as set out in the CGA is to, in the interests of the grain producers, establish and maintain standards of quality for Canadian grain and regulate grain handling in Canada, to ensure a dependable commodity for domestic and export markets. CGC's vision is to be “A leader in delivering excellence and innovation in grain quality and quantity assurance, research, and producer protection”. The Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food is responsible for the CGC.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 24. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Grain Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 49. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Grain Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
30 Program expenditures
35,237,639 4,829,788 31,626,015 21,582,235
Total voted
35,237,639 4,829,788 31,626,015 21,582,235
Total Statutory
(417,627) 622,222 622,222 585,473
Total budgetary 34,820,012 5,452,010 32,248,237 22,167,708

Highlights

The CGC is estimating budgetary expenditures of $22.2 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $21.6 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $0.6 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The increase in net authority of $16.7 million from 2012-13 Main Estimates is due to the provision of funding to transition the CGC to a sustainable funding model as identified in Budget 2012.

The current CGC funding structure is based on budgetary authorities that are comprised of both statutory and voted authorities. The statutory authorities include employee benefit plan authority for appropriation funded positions and the CGC revolving fund authority which allows the CGC to re-spend fees that it has collected. The voted authority is Vote 30 - Program Expenditures which includes annual appropriation authority and any ad hoc appropriation authority for the fiscal year.

A revolving fund was set up for the CGC in 1995 with the expectation that the CGC would be largely self-funded through fees for service. Although the CGC's user fees have not increased since 1991, the CGC is in the process of implementing a new user fee structure to become self-funded. The CGC plans to transition to its new fee structure in 2013-14 and revenues credited to vote have increased to $47.9 million.

Additional information can be found in the CGC's Reports on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 50. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Grain Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Canada's grain is safe, reliable and marketable and Canadian grain producers are protected.
Quality Assurance Program
7,722,754 (5,637,221) 8,307,568
Grain Quality Research Program
10,214,676 3,520,619 5,282,058
Quantity Assurance Program
(293,403) (2,310,980) 2,480,557
Producer Protection Program
3,455,307 443,019 1,203,892
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
13,720,678 9,436,573 4,893,633
Total 34,820,012 5,452,010 22,167,708

Canadian Heritage

Raison d'être

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

The Department of Canadian Heritage and Canada's major national cultural institutions play a vital role in the cultural, civic and economic life of Canadians. We work together to support culture, arts, heritage, official languages, citizenship and participation, in addition to Aboriginal, youth, and sport initiatives.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 25. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Heritage

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 51. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Heritage
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
1 Operating expenditures
205,669,691 180,023,435 171,624,570 162,928,160
5 Grants and contributions
1,071,847,979 1,077,016,980 1,056,305,787 1,131,552,460
Total voted
1,277,517,670 1,257,040,415 1,227,930,357 1,294,480,620
Total Statutory
30,974,234 23,567,717 23,567,717 22,745,046
Total budgetary 1,308,491,904 1,280,608,132 1,251,498,074 1,317,225,666

Highlights

The Department of Canadian Heritage is estimating budgetary expenditures of $1.32 billion in 2013-14. Of this amount, $1.29 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $22.8 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes. This is an increase of $36.6 million when compared to the 2012-13 Main Estimates.

The net increase is a combination of a decrease of $17.9 million in Vote 1 (Operating expenditures) and an increase of $54.5 million in Vote 5 (Grants and contributions). The decrease of $17.9 million in Vote 1 is mainly due to measures announced in the Budget 2012 spending review and a decrease in funding for the bicentennial commemoration of the War of 1812 ($5.4 million).

The increase of $54.5 million in Vote 5 is mainly due to a combination of new funding for the 2015 Pan Am Games ($122.3 million), the transfer of some components of the Aboriginal Peoples' Program to Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada ($38.7 million) and to savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 52. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Heritage
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.
Cultural Industries
311,281,772 315,119,676 299,943,524
Arts
110,408,610 123,748,905 117,779,195
Heritage
40,082,115 36,303,058 40,332,638
Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.
Official Languages
359,492,916 353,264,979 348,369,118
Attachment to Canada
76,824,910 77,375,416 56,919,095
Engagement and community participation
82,267,781 88,228,514 46,062,796
Canadians participate and excel in sport.
Sport
213,206,286 205,932,672 332,917,526
The following program activity supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
114,927,514 80,634,913 74,901,774
Total 1,308,491,904 1,280,608,133 1,317,225,666

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 53. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Canadian Heritage
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to support Canadian periodicals through the Canada Periodical Fund
69,050,046 72,775,054 72,775,054 72,775,054
Grants to organizations, associations and institutions to promote the vitality and long-term development of official-language minority communities through the Development of Official-Language Communities Program
6,029,022 33,322,973 33,322,973 33,322,973
Grants to the Athlete Assistance Program
26,886,307 27,000,000 28,000,000 28,000,000
Grants to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund
19,038,268 19,038,432 19,038,432 19,038,432
Grants in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program
9,612,328 14,355,000 14,355,000 14,355,000
Grants to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund
8,577,635 10,500,000 10,500,000 10,500,000
Grant to TV5 Monde
7,174,756 8,500,000 8,500,000 8,500,000
Grants to the Canada Book Fund
729,254 8,300,000 8,300,000 8,300,000
Grants in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program
5,530,620 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,300,000
Grants to organizations, associations and institutions to promote the full recognition and use of the official languages in Canadian society through the Enhancement of Official Languages Program
480,096 5,599,842 5,599,842 5,599,842
Grants under the Museums Assistance Program
2,368,778 4,663,680 4,663,680 4,663,680
Grants to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund
1,553,940 3,000,000 3,000,000 3,000,000
Grants to the Canada Music Fund
0 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000
Grants to support the Aboriginal Peoples' Program
234,907 1,340,000 1,340,000 1,340,000
Grants in support of the Canadian Studies Program
0 1,150,060 1,150,060 1,150,060
Grants to the Lieutenant-Governors of the provinces of Canada toward defraying the costs incurred in the exercise of their duties:
Quebec
147,372 147,372 147,372 147,372
Ontario
95,000 105,627 105,627 105,627
British Columbia
97,814 97,814 97,814 97,814
Newfoundland
77,590 77,590 77,590 77,590
Alberta
75,940 75,940 75,940 75,940
Manitoba
73,762 73,762 73,762 73,762
Saskatchewan
73,758 73,758 73,758 73,758
Nova Scotia
64,199 64,199 64,199 64,199
New Brunswick
62,947 62,947 62,947 62,947
Prince Edward Island
57,071 57,071 57,071 57,071
Grants in support of Innovative Youth Exchange Projects
0 100,000 100,000 100,000
Total Voted Grants
158,091,410 219,981,121 220,981,121 220,781,121
Total Statutory
1,083,034 819,000 819,000 819,000
Total Grants 159,174,444 220,800,121 221,800,121 221,600,121
Contributions
Contributions to support the Development of Official-Language Communities Program
222,282,395 191,797,917 191,802,917 188,349,017
Contributions for the Games' Hosting Program
23,091,852 22,395,000 36,781,319 146,109,211
Contributions for the Sport Support Program
148,835,390 143,815,064 146,815,064 145,815,064
Contributions to support the Canada Media Fund
134,146,000 134,146,077 134,146,077 134,146,077
Contributions to support the Enhancement of Official Languages Program
116,388,766 105,923,289 105,923,289 105,923,289
Contributions to the Canada Book Fund
35,308,145 28,366,301 28,866,301 28,366,301
Contributions to the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund
17,885,202 24,458,613 24,458,613 24,358,613
Contributions to the Canada Arts Training Fund
22,420,000 22,779,440 22,779,440 22,779,440
Contributions to the Canada Music Fund
25,760,841 23,828,331 23,828,331 20,789,231
Contributions to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund
21,836,827 18,472,742 18,472,742 18,472,742
Contributions in support of the Exchanges Canada Initiative
17,458,496 17,686,359 17,686,359 17,686,359
Contributions to support the Aboriginal Peoples' Program
50,283,337 54,910,737 54,910,737 16,209,757
Contributions under the Museums Assistance Program
11,935,882 11,076,284 11,076,284 11,076,284
Contributions in support of the Celebration and Commemoration Program
8,368,164 7,994,367 13,304,367 7,194,367
Contributions to TV5
5,306,630 4,460,900 4,460,900 4,460,900
Contributions to support the Youth Take Charge Program
3,927,898 1,781,680 1,781,680 3,453,023
Contributions in support of the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program
7,682,659 3,300,000 3,300,000 3,300,000
Contributions to non-profit cultural organizations and institutions to enhance cultural infrastructures and support cultural development: Contributions to Fathers of Confederation Buildings Trust, Charlottetown, P.E.I.
2,600,000 3,005,000 3,005,000 3,005,000
Contributions in support of the Canadian Studies Program
5,333,600 3,312,330 3,312,330 2,937,330
Contributions to the Canada Cultural Investment Fund
5,395,466 5,997,023 5,997,023 2,933,773
Contributions to support the Canada Periodical Fund
3,626,177 1,999,544 1,999,544 1,999,544
Contributions in support of the Court Challenges Program
1,000,000 1,406,017 1,406,017 1,406,017
Total Contributions 890,873,727 832,913,015 856,114,334 910,771,339
Total 1,050,048,171 1,053,713,136 1,077,914,455 1,132,371,460

Canadian Human Rights Commission

Raison d'être

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

The Canadian Human Rights Commission was established in 1977 under Schedule II of the Financial Administration Act in accordance with the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). The Commission leads the administration of the CHRA and ensures compliance with the Employment Equity Act (EEA). The CHRA prohibits discrimination and the EEA promotes equality in the workplace. Both laws apply the principles of equal opportunity and non-discrimination to federal government departments and agencies, Crown corporations, and federally regulated private sector organizations.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 26. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 54. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Human Rights Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
10 Program expenditures
21,457,760 20,437,203 20,437,203 19,861,118
Total voted
21,457,760 20,437,203 20,437,203 19,861,118
Total Statutory
2,804,563 2,649,295 2,649,295 2,600,171
Total budgetary 24,262,323 23,086,498 23,086,498 22,461,289

Highlights

The Canadian Human Rights Commission is estimating budgetary expenditures of $22.5 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $19.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $2.6 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The variance between 2011-12 expenditures and 2012-13 Main Estimates is mainly due to the severance pay cash-out in 2011-12 following the signing of a new collective agreement in June 2011 with the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

The variance between 2012-13 and 2013-14 Main Estimates is mainly due to funding received for the repeal of section 67 of the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). This funding decreases in 2013 and should sunset in March 2014.

In 2013-14, the Commission will continue the transition of its program alignment regarding the processing of complaints subsequent to the repeal of section 67 of the CHRA, enabling members from First Nation communities to file complaints on matters under the Indian Act.

Over the next year, the Commission will also focus on:

Further detail can be found in the Commission's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 55. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Equality, respect for human rights and protection from discrimination by fostering understanding of, and compliance with, the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Employment Equity Act by federally regulated employers and service providers, as well as the public they serve.
Human Rights Dispute Resolution Program
8,828,826 8,837,941 8,997,200
Discrimination Prevention Program
4,554,675 4,322,967 4,000,200
Human Rights Knowledge Development and Dissemination Program
4,313,519 3,583,480 3,440,600
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
6,565,303 6,342,110 6,023,289
Total 24,262,323 23,086,498 22,461,289

Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

Raison d'être

The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal is a quasi-judicial body that hears complaints of discrimination referred by the Canadian Human Rights Commission and determines whether the activities complained of violate the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA). The purpose of the CHRA is to protect individuals from discrimination and to promote equal opportunity. The Tribunal also decides cases brought under the Employment Equity Act and, pursuant to section 11 of the CHRA, determines allegations of wage disparity between men and women doing work of equal value in the same establishment.

The Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 27. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 56. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
15 Program expenditures
4,901,909 4,104,650 4,104,650 4,117,747
Total voted
4,901,909 4,104,650 4,104,650 4,117,747
Total Statutory
337,885 405,970 405,970 403,636
Total budgetary 5,239,794 4,510,620 4,510,620 4,521,383

Highlights

The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal is estimating budgetary expenditures of $4.5 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $4.1 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $403.6 thousand represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Canadian Human Rights Tribunal is a small, permanent quasi-judicial organization comprising a full-time Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson, and up to 13 full or part-time members. The Chairperson is the chief executive officer of the Tribunal and is supported by the Executive Director and Senior Registrar who is responsible for registry operations and internal services.

The Tribunal is a demand-driven organization with a mandate dependent on referrals from the Canadian Human Rights Commission. In addition, changes within the external environment, government policies and the legislative mandate have an impact on the Tribunal's operating environment.

As a key mechanism of human rights protection in Canada, the Tribunal gives effect to the Canadian ideals of pluralism, equity, diversity and social inclusion. It provides a forum where human rights complaints can be scrutinized and resolved and provides definitive interpretations on important issues of discrimination. The primary result of the Tribunal's program is that complainants can air their grievances and achieve closure in a respectful, impartial forum. Moreover, respondents are able to test the validity of allegations made in a quasi-judicial setting. In the longer term, Tribunal decisions create meaningful legal precedents for use by employers, service providers and Canadians at large.

The repeal of Section 67 of the CHRA, which came into force in June 2011, extended human rights protection to individuals who were formerly unable to avail themselves of these protections. Decisions made or actions taken by band councils and the federal government under the Indian Act were, until recently, exempt from the application of the CHRA. Complaints that used to be filed with the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development pursuant to the Indian Act will now come before the Canadian Human Rights Commission. The Tribunal expects that the Commission will refer some of these specific complaints to it but cannot at this time predict how many. Moreover, some of the cases referred to the Tribunal are likely to be complex since they will be exploring new areas of human rights law, requiring additional time and resources for research, mediation, hearings and decisions.

Internal services make a critical contribution to the achievement of the Tribunal's singular primary program. Like small departments and other micro-agencies, the Tribunal continually faces pressure to respond to, or implement various government-wide management initiatives. The Tribunal will continue to actively seek horizontal opportunities and interdepartmental partnerships to achieve efficiencies. The Tribunal believes this approach will mitigate the pressure caused by increased demands, while ensuring it continues to be well positioned to carry out its statutory mandate.

Financially, approximately 60% of its $4.5 million operating budget is for salaries and benefits. Of the remaining $1.8 million in Operations and Maintenance, 40% is directly related to the adjudicative process such as per diem costs for part-time members, travel, facility rentals for hearings and mediation activities and translations of decisions and rulings.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 57. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Individuals have access, as determined by the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Employment Equity Act, to fair and equitable adjudication of human rights and employment equity cases that are brought before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal.
Hearings of complaints before the Tribunal
1,783,912 2,277,120 2,282,382
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
3,455,882 2,233,500 2,239,001
Total 5,239,794 4,510,620 4,521,383

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Raison d'être

Canadian Institutes of Health Research is the Government of Canada's health research funding agency. The Minister of Health is responsible for this organization. It was created in June 2000 by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Act (Bill C-13) with a mandate “to excel, according to internationally accepted standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health care system.”

CIHR's mandate seeks to transform health research in Canada by:

Organizational Estimates

Figure 28. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Institutes of Health Research

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 58. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
15 Operating expenditures
51,699,069 49,057,217 47,921,817 46,367,765
20 Grants
950,729,984 922,268,548 949,074,958 915,350,465
Total voted
1,002,429,053 971,325,765 996,996,775 961,718,230
Total Statutory
6,662,339 6,617,600 6,617,600 5,934,927
Total budgetary 1,009,091,392 977,943,365 1,003,614,375 967,653,157

Highlights

CIHR is estimating budgetary expenditures of $967.6 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $961.7 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $5.9 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

This represents a decrease of $36 million, or 3.6%, from the 2012-13 Estimates to date (including Main and Supplementary Estimates) of $1.004 billion. The decrease in planned spending is mainly due to the following:

CIHR's reference levels were also impacted by its partnership activities with other government departments who transfer funding for specific programs and initiatives. Changes in these funding agreements account for a net decrease of $2.6 million from the 2012-13 Estimates to date.

Further details on CIHR's 2013-14 planned spending are available in CIHR's 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 59. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
A world-class health-research enterprise that creates, disseminates and applies new knowledge across all areas of health research.
Health Knowledge
470,528,113 451,599,487 472,958,825
Health and Health Services Advances
268,011,156 261,050,832 253,336,423
Health Researchers
182,756,604 194,141,821 173,268,324
Health Research Commercialization
55,976,670 43,312,734 43,822,075
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
31,818,849 27,838,491 24,267,510
Total 1,009,091,392 977,943,365 967,653,157

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 60. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants for research projects and personnel support
855,711,960 846,268,148 863,945,111 839,864,065
Networks of Centres of Excellence
26,614,000 25,000,400 25,743,400 22,589,400
Canada Graduate Scholarships
27,960,185 21,250,000 21,250,000 21,250,000
Institute support grants
13,000,000 13,000,000 13,000,000 13,000,000
Canada Excellence Research Chairs
7,700,000 8,400,000 8,400,000 8,400,000
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships
7,722,401 8,350,000 8,350,000 8,350,000
Business-Led Networks of Centres of Excellence
1,737,000 0 7,800,000 1,737,000
Industrial Research Chairs for Colleges
0 0 160,000 160,000
Total Grants 940,445,546 922,268,548 948,648,511 915,350,465
Total 940,445,546 922,268,548 948,648,511 915,350,465

Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat

Raison d'être

The President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada is responsible for this organization. The Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat (CICS), established pursuant to an agreement reached at the May 1973 First Ministers' Conference, is an agency of the federal, provincial and territorial governments. Its one program mandate is to provide administrative services for the planning and conduct of First Ministers, Ministers and Deputy Ministers level federal-provincial-territorial and provincial-territorial conferences.

These intergovernmental conferences are a key instrument for consultation and negotiation among the different orders of governments and assist the development of national and/or provincial/territorial policies. They are a critical component of the workings of the Canadian federation and represent a core principle of our democratic society.

By skilfully executing the logistical planning and delivery of these meetings, CICS not only relieves the federal-provincial-territorial governments of the process burden but also allows them to greatly benefit from significant cost efficiencies and economies of scale, particularly relevant in the current economic environment.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 29. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 61. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
5 Program expenditures
5,227,416 6,144,362 6,144,305 5,597,587
Pursuant to subsection 25(2) of the Financial Administration Act, to write-off from the Accounts of Canada debts due to Her Majesty in right of Canada amounting to $57 related to an unrecoverable debt
0 0 58 0
Total voted
5,227,416 6,144,362 6,144,363 5,597,587
Total Statutory
333,196 470,367 470,367 437,917
Total budgetary 5,560,612 6,614,729 6,614,730 6,035,504

Highlights

The Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat (CICS) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $6.0 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $5.6 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $438 thousand represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

CICS's planned expenditures decrease by $561 thousand due to savings identified as part of the Budget 2012 Spending Review. The 2013-14 funding will be utilized to address the following priorities:

CICS's 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities will contain more details regarding the priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 62. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Multilateral meetings of First Ministers, Ministers and Deputy Ministers are planned and conducted flawlessly.
Conference Services
3,493,260 3,968,837 4,179,031
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
2,067,352 2,645,892 1,856,473
Total 5,560,612 6,614,729 6,035,504

Canadian International Development Agency

Raison d'être

The mission of the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) is to lead Canada's international effort to help people living in poverty. CIDA's mandate is to manage Canada's aid program effectively and accountably to achieve meaningful, sustainable development results, and to engage in policy development in Canada and internationally, enabling Canada to realize its development objectives.

Canada recognizes that achieving significant economic, social and democratic progress in the developing world will reduce poverty for billions of people in recipient countries, increase the prosperity and long-term security of Canadians, promote our values and contribute to a better and safer world. Additional information can be found in the organization's Report on Plans and Priorities.

The Minister of International Cooperation is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 30. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.

Figure 31. Organizational Estimates - Non-budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory non budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 63. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian International Development Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
25 Operating expenditures
211,491,438 184,095,052 181,960,371 171,101,774
30 Grants and contributions
3,278,588,220 2,953,604,019 3,150,878,110 2,719,266,590
Total voted
3,490,079,658 3,137,699,071 3,332,838,481 2,890,368,364
Total Statutory
437,183,889 273,694,152 298,198,322 268,960,876
Total budgetary 3,927,263,547 3,411,393,223 3,631,036,803 3,159,329,240
Non-budgetary
Voted
L35 Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, the amount of financial assistance provided by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, in consultation with the Minister of Finance, for the issuance and payment of non-interest bearing, non-negotiable demand notes may not exceed $246,000,000 for the purpose of contributions to the international financial institutions over a period commencing on April 1, 2013 and ending on March 31, 2014
0 1 2 1
L40 Pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, the amount of financial assistance provided by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, in consultation with the Minister of Finance, for the purchase of shares of international financial institutions, may not exceed an amount of $81,006,546 in United States dollars over a period commencing on April 1, 2013 and ending on March 31, 2014, which amount is estimated in Canadian dollars at $81,595,258
0 1 3 1
Total voted
0 2 5 2
Total Statutory
107,870,472 83,307,437 95,798,807 81,595,258
Total non-budgetary 107,870,472 83,307,439 95,798,812 81,595,260

Highlights

The Canadian International Development Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $3,159.3 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $2,890.4 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $269 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Agency's total budgetary spending will decrease by $252.1 million when compared to the previous year's Main Estimates. Factors contributing to the net decrease include:

The 2012-13 Estimates to date have been adjusted to reflect items included in the 2012-13 Supplementary Estimates, for the implementation of the Budget 2012 savings measures, as well as additional funding of $50 million for the Quick Release Mechanism.

Other annual fluctuations in spending authorities reflect the supplementary funding received for programs and initiatives such as the Fast Start Financing Initiative on climate change for which incremental funds of $345 million and $273 million were approved in 2011-12 and 2012-13 respectively.

Actual 2011-12 spending also includes statutory adjustments such as for debt relief and to account for currency fluctuations that are not included in the Main Estimates as the amounts for these items are finalized during the year.

Finally, the amounts of statutory payments to the World Bank for the Advance Market Commitment for Pneumococcal Vaccines are established and paid during the fiscal year and, as such, are presented for information purposes in the 2011-12 Public Accounts ($23 million) and the 2012-13 Estimates to date ($24.5 million).

Information may be found in the Agency's 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 64. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Reduction in poverty for those living in countries in which the Canadian International Development Agency engages in international development.
Global engagement and strategic policy
1,578,607,671 1,018,514,063 955,135,772
Low-income countries
873,386,696 936,770,376 917,574,328
Fragile states and crisis-affected communities
788,201,321 697,062,607 590,680,214
Middle-income countries
297,083,788 360,831,828 337,884,532
Canadian engagement for development
282,321,595 297,996,026 267,942,474
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
107,662,476 100,218,323 90,111,920
Total 3,927,263,547 3,411,393,223 3,159,329,240

Table 65. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Non-budgetary - Canadian International Development Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Reduction in poverty for those living in countries in which the Canadian International Development Agency engages in international development.
Global engagement and strategic policy
107,870,472 83,307,439 81,595,260
Total 107,870,472 83,307,439 81,595,260

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 66. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Canadian International Development Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants for Multilateral Programming: Grants in support of development assistance, humanitarian assistance or disaster preparedness, for global operations, programs, projects, activities and appeals for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition
1,962,509,222 1,811,600,000 2,111,800,000 1,840,961,792
Grants for Partnerships with Canadians Programming: Grants for development assistance programs, projects and activities intended to support development for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition or to enhance the awareness, understanding, and engagement of Canadians with respect to development
14,227,812 23,900,000 47,131,000 23,900,000
Grants for Bilateral Programming: Grants for cooperation with other donor countries for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition
4,673,194 9,900,000 9,900,000 9,900,000
Total Grants 1,981,410,228 1,845,400,000 2,168,831,000 1,874,761,792
Contributions
Contributions for Bilateral Programming: Contributions in support of development assistance, contributions for cooperation with countries in transition and contributions in support of regional or country specific development assistance programs, projects and activities for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition
739,926,150 844,431,607 853,546,497 614,814,383
Contributions for Partnerships with Canadians Programming: Contributions for development assistance programs, projects and activities intended to support development for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition or to enhance the awareness, understanding, and engagement of Canadians with respect to development
250,518,510 256,979,412 256,979,412 228,690,415
Contributions for Multilateral Programming: Contributions in support of development assistance, humanitarian assistance or disaster preparedness, for global operations, programs, projects, activities and appeals for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition
306,733,332 6,793,000 239,152,000 1,000,000
Total Contributions 1,297,177,992 1,108,204,019 1,349,677,909 844,504,798
Other Transfer Payments
Total Statutory
308,508,447 248,654,000 273,158,170 246,000,000
Total 3,587,096,667 3,202,258,019 3,791,667,079 2,965,266,590

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

Raison d'être

The Canadian International Trade Tribunal provides Canadian and international businesses with access to fair, transparent and timely processes for the investigation of trade remedy cases and complaints concerning federal government procurement and for the adjudication of appeals on customs and excise matters. At the request of the Government, the Canadian International Trade Tribunal provides advice in tariff, trade, commercial and economic matters.

The Minister of Finance is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 32. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian International Trade Tribunal

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 67. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian International Trade Tribunal
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
25 Program expenditures
9,328,928 8,654,867 9,954,867 8,660,195
Total voted
9,328,928 8,654,867 9,954,867 8,660,195
Total Statutory
1,199,978 1,240,425 1,240,425 1,233,346
Total budgetary 10,528,906 9,895,292 11,195,292 9,893,541

Highlights

The Canadian International Trade Tribunal is estimating budgetary expenditures of $9.9 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $8.7 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1.2 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Tribunal's main priority for 2013-14 will continue to be the fair, timely and effective disposition of cases regarding the investigation of trade remedy cases, the complaints concerning federal government procurement and the adjudication of appeals on customs and excise matters. At the request of the Government, the Tribunal will continue to provide advice in tariff, trade, commercial and economic matters. The Tribunal will also continue to pursue initiatives aimed at further improving its management practices as well as its ability to deliver on its legislative mandates in order to provide efficient and reliable services to its stakeholders.

The decreasing trend in spending from 2011-12 to 2013-14 can be explained by the fact that 2011-12 was the last year that the Tribunal received additional funding of $1.575 million to cover a predicted operating budget shortfall resulting from an expected post-recession increase in caseload. As presented in Supplementary Estimates (B) 2012-13, the Tribunal received additional funding of $1.3 million to retrofit its accommodation. In 2013-14, the Tribunal will return to its regular funding base of nearly $10 million.

Please refer to the Canadian International Trade Tribunal's website for further details on its 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 68. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian International Trade Tribunal
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Fair, timely and transparent disposition of international trade cases, procurement cases and government-mandated inquiries within the Tribunal's jurisdiction.
Adjudication of Trade Cases (quasi-judicial role)
6,633,211 7,223,563 7,321,221
General Economic Inquiries and References (advisory role)
105,289 98,953 98,935
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
3,790,406 2,572,776 2,473,385
Total 10,528,906 9,895,292 9,893,541

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Raison d'être

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) was created in 2008 through an amendment to the Museums Act, which established the Museum as the first national museum to be created since 1967 and the first to be located outside of the National Capital Region. The Museum's mandate is “to explore the subject of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, in order to enhance the public's understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 33. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum for Human Rights

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 69. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
30 Payments to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights for operating and capital expenditures
21,798,633 10,000,000 56,700,000 31,700,000
Total voted
21,798,633 10,000,000 56,700,000 31,700,000
Total budgetary 21,798,633 10,000,000 56,700,000 31,700,000

Highlights

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $31.7 million in 2013-14 which require approval by Parliament.

Museum Content and Program

In becoming the world's first museum dedicated to the exploration of human rights, the CMHR is breaking new ground; there is no precedent for a museum of this nature. In its early years, the primary focus of this activity will be on establishing an innovative and unique public program that includes developing a sound research and scholarship capacity; accessible and engaging exhibits and educational programming that promote reflection and dialogue; a strong capacity of national outreach, engagement and service to Canadians; and strong Marketing and Communications to ensure a high level of awareness about the CMHR and its programs and services.

Accommodation

The focus of this activity in the early years will be to manage all stages of the capital construction project-including choosing the final design-leading to its commissioning and public opening. The Board will be fully accountable for overseeing all aspects of the building project, including choosing the final design, establishing the time-frames for construction and managing risks throughout. Prior to the opening of the facility, the Museum will also be establishing the appropriate mechanisms to provide for effective, efficient operations and maintenance and its ongoing security, accessibility and sustainability.

Stewardship and Corporate Management

The Stewardship and Corporate Management Activity is aimed at ensuring the private and public funds invested in the Museum are managed in a transparent, accountable manner; that resources are effectively deployed, developed, directed, administered and controlled; and that the corporation optimizes the value it contributes to Canadians and Canadian society.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 70. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Enhanced knowledge of human rights, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, in order to enhance the public's understanding of human rights, to promote respect for others and to encourage reflection and dialogue.
Accommodation
0 2,124,135 14,129,000
Museum Content and Program
0 5,082,174 10,577,000
Stewardship and Corporate Management
0 2,793,691 6,994,000
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 21,798,633 0 0
Total 21,798,633 10,000,000 31,700,000

Canadian Museum of Civilization

Raison d'être

The Canadian Museum of Civilization is a Crown corporation established by the Museums Act (Statutes of Canada 1990, Chapter 3) which came into force on July 1, 1990. The Act states that the role of the corporation is “to increase, throughout Canada and internationally, interest in, knowledge and critical understanding of and appreciation and respect for human cultural achievements and human behaviour by establishing, maintaining and developing for research and posterity a collection of objects of historical or cultural interest, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, and by demonstrating those achievements and behaviour, the knowledge derived from them and the understanding they represent.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 34. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Civilization

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 71. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Civilization
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
35 Payments to the Canadian Museum of Civilization for operating and capital expenditures
65,198,130 62,453,730 63,360,382 57,418,730
Total voted
65,198,130 62,453,730 63,360,382 57,418,730
Total budgetary 65,198,130 62,453,730 63,360,382 57,418,730

Highlights

The Canadian Museum of Civilization is estimating budgetary expenditures of $57.4 million in 2013-14 which require approval by Parliament. This represents a decrease of $5.035 million from the 2012-13 Main Estimates.

The decrease is due to:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 72. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Civilization
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for human cultural achievements and human behaviour through collections of historical and cultural objects, exhibitions, programs and research reflecting a Canadian perspective.
Accommodation
0 31,190,000 27,454,000
Exhibit, Educate and Communicate
0 16,054,000 15,244,000
Collect and Research
0 13,014,000 12,646,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
0 2,195,730 2,074,730
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 65,198,130 0 0
Total 65,198,130 62,453,730 57,418,730

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Raison d'être

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 was established in 2010 through an amendment to the Museums Act.

The mandate of the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 is “to explore the theme of immigration to Canada in order to enhance public understanding of the experiences of immigrants as they arrived in Canada, of the vital role immigration has played in the building of Canada and of the contributions of immigrants to Canada's culture, economy and way of life.”

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 35. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 73. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
40 Payments to the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 for operating and capital expenditures
9,974,440 9,950,000 9,950,000 18,450,000
Total voted
9,974,440 9,950,000 9,950,000 18,450,000
Total Statutory
3,850,160 0 0 0
Total budgetary 13,824,600 9,950,000 9,950,000 18,450,000

Highlights

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 is estimating budgetary expenditures of $18.5 million in 2013-14 which require approval by Parliament.

Activities of the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 designed to meet strategic outcomes are:

For further details on the Museum's plan and priorities, please refer to our 2013-14 to 2017-18 Corporate Plan.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 74. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Canadians are engaged in building and exploring the stories, themes and history of Canadian immigration as it continues to unfold.
Accommodations
0 4,391,700 12,791,000
Visitor Experience and Connections
0 2,300,100 2,740,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
0 3,258,200 2,919,000
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 13,824,600 0 0
Total 13,824,600 9,950,000 18,450,000

Canadian Museum of Nature

Raison d'être

The Canadian Museum of Nature became a Crown corporation on July 1, 1990 through the Museums Act with the mandate to increase, throughout Canada and internationally, interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for the natural world by establishing, maintaining and developing for research and posterity, a collection of natural history objects, with special but not exclusive reference to Canada, and by demonstrating the natural world, the knowledge derived from it and the understanding it represents. The museum reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 36. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Nature

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 75. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Museum of Nature
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
45 Payments to the Canadian Museum of Nature for operating and capital expenditures
28,591,766 33,134,904 33,134,904 25,834,904
Total voted
28,591,766 33,134,904 33,134,904 25,834,904
Total budgetary 28,591,766 33,134,904 33,134,904 25,834,904

Highlights

The Canadian Museum of Nature is estimating budgetary expenditures of $25.8 million in 2013-14 which require approval by Parliament. A decrease of $7.3 million, or 22% from previous Main Estimates, is due to the sunsetting of temporary funding included in Budget 2008 to address operating and infrastructure pressures.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 76. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Museum of Nature
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Interest in, knowledge of and appreciation and respect for the natural world through collections of natural history objects, public education programmes and research reflecting a special but not exclusive perspective on Canada.
Accommodation
0 16,410,000 10,102,904
Public education programmes
0 5,561,000 4,730,000
Research
0 3,172,000 3,319,000
Collections management
0 1,408,000 1,651,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
0 6,583,904 6,032,000
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 28,591,766 0 0
Total 28,591,766 33,134,904 25,834,904

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

Raison d’être

Contributing to the jobs and growth in Canada, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency works to develop a diversified, sustainable and dynamic economy across Canada’s three territories. It does this by delivering economic development programs, undertaking policy and research, and by collaborating with and aligning the efforts of other federal departments, territorial governments, Aboriginal organizations, and industry. This is particularly the case in resource development through its Northern Projects Management Office.

The Minister of Health and Minister of the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 37. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 77. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
25 Operating expenditures
15,399,923 13,317,521 13,101,607 12,103,359
30 Contributions
31,992,730 36,661,803 39,861,803 38,664,119
Total voted
47,392,653 49,979,324 52,963,410 50,767,478
Total Statutory
1,207,038 1,171,953 1,171,953 1,023,655
Total budgetary 48,599,691 51,151,277 54,135,363 51,791,133

Highlights

The Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $51.8 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $50.8 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $1 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In 2013-14, Aboriginal economic development programming will focus on supporting the opportunities before communities today. This will be complemented by the second year of the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund, and the Northern Adult Basic Education Program that was recently put in place. The Strategic Investments in Northern Economic Development program will also increasingly focus on initiatives that help Northerners drive the northern economy.

Responsible resource development is critical to the success of Canada’s North. CanNor’s Northern Projects Management Office is taking on the task of working with communities and industry to position Canada’s North as a world-class resource development destination where prosperity for Northerners and benefits for Canadians are a single goal.

A net increase of $600 thousand in comparison to 2012-13 Main Estimates is due to the following:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 78. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Developed and diversified territorial economies that support prosperity for all Northerners.
Business Development
22,774,600 23,030,176 22,607,000
Community Development
13,984,232 18,519,898 20,357,119
Policy, Advocacy and Coordination
1,965,564 1,751,526 2,305,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
9,875,295 7,849,677 6,522,014
Total 48,599,691 51,151,277 51,791,133

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 79. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Contributions
Contributions for promoting regional development in Canada's three territories
17,724,649 18,257,000 18,257,000 18,157,000
Payments to support Indians, Inuit and Innu for the purpose of supplying public services in economic development
8,935,679 9,500,000 9,500,000 8,500,000
Contributions for advancing adult basic education in Canada’s territories
1,675,580 6,604,803 6,604,803 6,507,119
Contributions for the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund
0 0 3,200,000 3,200,000
Contributions under the Aboriginal Business Canada Program
2,649,645 2,300,000 2,300,000 2,300,000
Total Contributions 30,985,553 36,661,803 39,861,803 38,664,119
Total 30,985,553 36,661,803 39,861,803 38,664,119

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

Raison d’être

The Minister of Natural Resources Canada is responsible for this organization.

In 1946, Parliament passed the Atomic Energy Control Act and established the Atomic Energy Control Board, providing it with the power to regulate all nuclear activities related to the development and use of atomic energy in Canada.

More than half a century later, in May 2000, the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) came into effect and established the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) as the successor to the Atomic Energy Control Board, with responsibilities and authorities to regulate an industry that spans all segments of the nuclear fuel cycle and a wide range of industrial, medical and academic uses of nuclear substances.

Additional information can be found in the CNSC’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 38. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 80. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
20 Program expenditures
39,864,044 29,302,138 38,233,439 34,976,638
Total voted
39,864,044 29,302,138 38,233,439 34,976,638
Total Statutory
96,205,120 94,526,805 94,526,805 97,924,847
Total budgetary 136,069,164 123,828,943 132,760,244 132,901,485

Highlights

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission is estimating budgetary expenditures of $132.9 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $35.0 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $97.9 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

Budget 2012 earmarked funds to continue to strengthen the ability to regulate and inspect fee-exempt licensees for the use of nuclear devices and activities in Canada, including those at medical and educational institutions. During fiscal year 2012-13, the CNSC received $7.6 million permanently to regulate these fee-exempt licensees.

On August 4, 2011, Shared Services Canada was created by Order in Council under the Public Service Rearrangement and Transfer of Duties Act in order to pool existing resources from across Government to consolidate and transfer IT infrastructure (e.g., data centres and network services) for the Government of Canada. As a result, the CNSC’s funding levels decreased by $0.3 million in fiscal year 2011-12 and $1.5 million on a permanent base in fiscal year 2012-13.

Budget 2012 implemented savings measures in order to refocus Government and programs, make it easier for Canadians and business to deal with their Government, and modernize and reduce the back office. By the end of 2012-13, the first year of implementation, the CNSC will have achieved savings of $0.5 million. Savings of $1.3 million will be achieved on a permanent base in 2013-14. The CNSC will achieve these savings through efficiency measures and program reductions that align resources to its core mandate, scaling back where the need is reduced, transforming how it works internally, and consolidating and streamlining activities. With these changes, the CNSC will focus on supporting management excellence and accountability across Government.

Fiscal year 2012-13 is the final incremental decrease to the CNSC for the 2009 Strategic Review representing $0.8 million.

Additional information can be found in the CNSC’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 81. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and public confidence in the nuclear regulatory regime's effectiveness.
Compliance Program
38,302,145 36,411,921 36,550,986
Licensing and Certification Program
33,211,190 20,150,380 28,505,451
Regulatory Framework Program
23,243,106 28,041,030 25,193,526
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
41,312,723 39,225,612 42,651,522
Total 136,069,164 123,828,943 132,901,485

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 82. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to enable the research, development and management of activities that contribute to the objectives of the Research and Support Program
73,300 75,000 75,000 75,000
Total Grants 73,300 75,000 75,000 75,000
Contributions
Participant Funding Program
86,252 925,000 925,000 925,000
Contributions to enable the research, development and management of activities that contribute to the objectives of the Research and Support Program, and the Canadian Safeguards Support Program
1,003,463 770,000 770,000 770,000
Total Contributions 1,089,715 1,695,000 1,695,000 1,695,000
Total 1,163,015 1,770,000 1,770,000 1,770,000

Canadian Polar Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Polar Commission is responsible for monitoring, promoting and disseminating knowledge of the polar regions; contributing to public awareness of the importance of polar science to Canada; enhancing Canada's international profile as a circumpolar nation; and recommending polar science policy direction to government. The Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada is responsible for this organization.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 39. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Polar Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 83. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Polar Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
25 Program expenditures
1,141,951 1,177,747 1,224,415 2,433,726
Total voted
1,141,951 1,177,747 1,224,415 2,433,726
Total Statutory
121,259 76,797 76,797 142,943
Total budgetary 1,263,210 1,254,544 1,301,212 2,576,669

Highlights

The Canadian Polar Commission is estimating budgetary expenditures of $2.58 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $2.43 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $143 thousand represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The Canadian Polar Commission (CPC) has an increase in planned spending due to a transfer of $1.3 million to manage two new grant programs; the Northern Scientific Training Program which includes the funding to the Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies and the Centenary Medal Commemorating the International Polar Year 1882-1883 also known as the Northern Scientific Award.

The CPC will continue to host conferences and workshops, to publish information on subjects of relevance to polar research, to build and maintain polar knowledge networks, and to work closely with other governmental and nongovernmental agencies to promote and support Canadian study of the polar regions.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 84. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Polar Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Increased Canadian polar knowledge.
Research Facilitation and Communication
951,256 1,032,797 2,095,074
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
311,954 221,747 481,595
Total 1,263,210 1,254,544 2,576,669

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 85. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Canadian Polar Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Grants
Grants to individuals, organizations, associations and institutions to support research and activities relating to the polar regions
0 0 10,000 1,086,000
Total Grants 0 0 10,000 1,086,000
Contributions
Contributions to individuals, organizations, associations and institutions to support research and activities relating to the polar regions
10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000
Total Contributions 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000
Total 10,000 10,000 20,000 1,096,000

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is an administrative tribunal. It implements its mandate as set out in the Broadcasting Act, the Telecommunications Act and Canada’s anti-spam legislation in order to provide Canadians with a world-class communication system.

The CRTC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 40. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 86. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
50 Program expenditures
9,245,829 4,316,662 7,670,566 4,403,550
Total voted
9,245,829 4,316,662 7,670,566 4,403,550
Total Statutory
6,437,121 6,311,029 6,311,029 6,803,308
Total budgetary 15,682,950 10,627,691 13,981,595 11,206,858

Highlights

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is estimating net budgetary expenditures of $11.2 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $4.4 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $6.8 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In total, the CRTC is estimating an increase in net spending of $0.6 million from the previous Main Estimates. Factors contributing to the net increase include:

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 87. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Canadians have access to a world-class communication system.
Connection to the Communication System
0 0 6,266,034
Canadian Content Creation
0 0 2,461,665
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
668,685 3,315,125 2,479,159
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 15,014,265 7,312,566 0
Total 15,682,950 10,627,691 11,206,858

Canadian Security Intelligence Service

Raison d’être

As per the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act, the mandate of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) is to collect, analyze and retain information and intelligence on activities suspected of constituting threats to the security of Canada, and to report to and advise the government. CSIS is responsible for the collection of national security intelligence inside and outside Canada; the collection of foreign intelligence within Canada; and for security screening assessments for federal government employees, refugees, immigration and citizenship applicants, and some other sectors such as the Canadian nuclear industry.

The Minister of Public Safety is responsible for CSIS.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 41. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Security Intelligence Service

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 88. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
20 Program expenditures
491,177,125 472,528,627 470,957,378 464,636,769
Total voted
491,177,125 472,528,627 470,957,378 464,636,769
Total Statutory
48,708,572 48,061,884 48,061,884 48,371,070
Total budgetary 539,885,697 520,590,511 519,019,262 513,007,839

Highlights

CSIS is estimating budgetary expenditures of $513.0 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $464.6 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $48.4 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

In comparison to 2012-13 Main Estimates, this represents a net decrease of $7.6 million. The major changes are as follows:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 89. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Intelligence is used to protect the security and safety of Canada and its citizens.
Intelligence Program
491,690,996 452,757,550 445,826,087
Security Screening Program
48,194,701 67,832,961 67,181,752
Total 539,885,697 520,590,511 513,007,839

Canadian Space Agency

Raison d’être

The mandate of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is to promote the peaceful use and development of space, to advance the knowledge of space through science and to ensure that space science and technology provide social and economic benefits for Canadians.

The CSA is achieving this mandate in cooperation with other government departments and agencies, industries, and universities, as well as international partners. In addition to delivering its own programs, the CSA is responsible for coordinating all federal civil space-related policies and programs pertaining to science and technology research, industrial development and international cooperation.

The Minister of Industry is responsible for the CSA.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 42. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Space Agency

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 90. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Space Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
25 Operating expenditures
247,901,692 163,079,402 163,209,818 171,614,805
30 Capital expenditures
102,802,846 152,535,478 151,533,310 272,688,412
35 Grants and contributions
47,041,048 36,597,000 37,599,169 33,630,000
Total voted
397,745,586 352,211,880 352,342,297 477,933,217
Total Statutory
11,389,929 11,032,951 11,032,951 10,747,711
Total budgetary 409,135,515 363,244,831 363,375,248 488,680,928

Highlights

The Canadian Space Agency is estimating budgetary expenditures of $ 488.7 million in 2013-14. Of this amount, $ 477.9 million requires approval by Parliament. The remaining $10.7 million represents statutory forecasts that do not require additional approval and are provided for information purposes.

The variation in total votes available between 2012-13 and 2013-14 fiscal years represents a net increase of $ 125.4 million. This variation is mainly due to:

Once tabled in the House of Commons, additional information will be available in the departmental Report on Plans and Priorities.

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 91. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Space Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Canada’s exploration of space, provision of space services and development of its space capacity meet the nation’s needs for scientific knowledge, innovation and information.
Space Data, Information and Services
137,297,150 156,193,573 288,783,916
Space Exploration
146,317,119 100,046,254 95,406,830
Future Canadian Space Capacity
69,563,250 63,262,015 58,528,146
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
55,957,996 43,742,989 45,962,036
Total 409,135,515 363,244,831 488,680,928

Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments

Table 92. Listing of the 2013-14 Transfer Payments - Canadian Space Agency
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Grants
Class Grant Program to Support Research, Awareness, and Learning in Space Science and Technology
8,093,100 6,044,000 6,914,000 6,395,000
Total Grants 8,093,100 6,044,000 6,914,000 6,395,000
Contributions
Contributions to the Canada/European Space Agency Cooperation Agreement
35,075,735 28,966,000 28,966,000 24,935,000
Class Contribution Program to Support Research, Awareness, and Learning in Space Science and Technology
3,562,213 1,587,000 2,019,168 2,050,000
Contributions to the Cascade Technology Demonstration/Enhanced-Polar Outflow Probe Small Satellite (CASSIOPE Mission)
310,000 0 150,000 250,000
Total Contributions 38,947,948 30,553,000 31,135,168 27,235,000
Total 47,041,048 36,597,000 38,049,168 33,630,000

Canadian Tourism Commission

Raison d’être

The Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) is Canada’s national tourism marketing organization. A Crown corporation wholly owned by the Government of Canada, the CTC’s purpose is to sustain a vibrant and profitable tourism industry by marketing Canada as an internationally competitive, premier four-season tourism destination where travelers can indulge in extraordinary experiences. Reporting to Parliament through the Minister of Industry, the CTC’s legislative requirements are outlined in the Canadian Tourism Commission Act. Through collaboration and partnerships with the private sector, as well as with the governments of Canada, the provinces and territories, the CTC works with the tourism sector to maintain Canada’s competitiveness and generate wealth for Canadians by stimulating demand for Canada’s visitor economy. Additional information can be found in the CTC’s 2013-17 Corporate Plan.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 43. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Tourism Commission

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 93. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Tourism Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Budgetary
Voted
40 Payments to the Canadian Tourism Commission
82,033,975 72,032,802 72,032,802 57,832,802
Total voted
82,033,975 72,032,802 72,032,802 57,832,802
Total budgetary 82,033,975 72,032,802 72,032,802 57,832,802

Highlights

The Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) is estimating budgetary expenditures of $57.8 million in 2013-14 which require approval by Parliament.

The CTC was created in 1995, as a Special Operating Agency within Industry Canada, and in 2001, became a Crown corporation pursuant to the Canadian Tourism Commission Act. The CTC reports to Parliament via the Minister of Industry. The CTC is Canada’s national tourism marketing organization mandated to: sustain a vibrant and profitable Canadian tourism industry; market Canada as a desirable tourist destination; support a cooperative relationship between the private sector and the governments of Canada, the provinces and the territories with respect to Canadian tourism; and, provide information about Canadian tourism to the private sector and to the governments of Canada, the provinces and the territories (CTC Act, current to June 2012).

In 2012, the CTC took part in the comprehensive review by the Government of Canada as outlined in Budget 2012, to return to balanced budgets over the medium-term. Budget 2012 Spending Review identified savings of $0.5 million in 2012-13 and $14.2 million starting 2013-14. This adjustment will result in CTC’s core appropriations (i.e. excluding one-time funding for special programs) of $71.5 million for 2012-13 and $57.8 million starting 2013-14. Since CTC’s budget is organized by calendar year, the aforementioned appropriations will translate into annual appropriations of $61.3 million for 2013 and $57.8 million for 2014. Consistent with this decision and with the objectives of the Federal Tourism Strategy, the CTC’s activities are aligned to focus resources on markets of strategic importance to Canada’s tourism industry.

Building on the 2012 to 2016 Corporate Plan, the CTC’s corporate objectives outlined in the 2013-17 Corporate Plan, are to:

The CTC has outlined four strategic priorities to guide the CTC in achieving the corporate objectives listed above. The four strategic priorities are as follows:

Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program

Table 94. Expenditures by Strategic Outcome and Program - Budgetary - Canadian Tourism Commission
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Canadian economy benefits from strong tourism demand from Canadian Tourism Commission’s (CTC) markets.
Marketing and Sales
0 58,631,899 45,974,802
Tourism Research and Communications
0 3,933,336 3,644,000
Experiential Product Development
0 1,100,000 1,092,000
The following program supports all strategic outcomes within this organization.
Internal Services
0 8,367,567 7,122,000
Funds not allocated to the 2013-14 Program Alignment Architecture 82,033,975 0 0
Total 82,033,975 72,032,802 57,832,802

Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board

Raison d’être

The Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board is referred to as the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) in its day-to-day activities. The TSB is an independent agency created in 1990 by an Act of Parliament. It operates at arm’s length from other government departments and agencies to ensure that there are no real or perceived conflicts of interest. TSB’s sole objective is to advance air, marine, rail and pipeline transportation safety. This mandate is fulfilled by conducting independent investigations into selected transportation occurrences to identify the causes and contributing factors and the safety deficiencies evidenced by an occurrence. TSB then makes recommendations to reduce or eliminate any such safety deficiencies and reports publicly on its investigations.

The TSB is part of the President of the Privy Council’s portfolio.

Organizational Estimates

Figure 44. Organizational Estimates - Budgetary - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board

The following chart presents the organizational breakdown of voted and statutory budgetary expenditures and estimates for the past three years.
Table 95. Organizational Estimates (dollars) - Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board
  2011-12 Expenditures 2012-13 Main Estimates 2012-13 Estimates To Date 2013-14 Main Estimates
Note: Additional details by organization are available on the Treasury Board Secretariat website - www.tbs-sct.gc.ca.
Budgetary
Voted
10 Program expenditures
28,230,467 26,479,048 26,479,048 26,063,130
Total voted
28,230,467 26,479,048 26,479,048 26,063,130
Total Statutory
3,563,314 3,574,920 3,574,920 3,505,079