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ARCHIVED - 2008-2009 DPRs - Horizontal Initiatives

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Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

AgriInsurance (AI)
AgriInvest
AgriRecovery - Agricultural Disaster Relief Program (ADRP)
AgriStability
Canadian Agricultural Skills Service (CASS)
MOU with Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) on Food Safety System Recognition
Co-operatives Secretariat (Co-operative Development Initiative)
AAFC-Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Agri-Food Specialists Positions Abroad
Farm Business Services
Rural Development

Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInsurance (AI)

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $1.6 B

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AI includes the Production Insurance program which will aim to reduce the financial impact on producers of production losses caused by uncontrollable natural perils.

Shared Outcome(s):

Expand production loss protection to a broader range of agricultural products to further reduce the need for ad hoc compensation.

Governance Structure(s):

AI is a provincial-territorial program to which the federal government contributes financially under the federal-provincial-territorial Growing Forward Agreement. Governance structure includes various national standards outlined in federal Production Insurance Regulations and federal-provincial-territorial committees (AgriInsurance and Business Risk Management Working Groups as well as Policy Assistant Deputy Ministers).

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Planned Results for 2008-09 Results Achieved in 2008-09
AAFC BRM AgriInsurance $1.6 B

2008-09 to
2011-12

$388.7 M $549.9 M Increased number of new programs and options available to farmers, including new plans for horticulture and livestock sectors. Increased producer participation in provinces and territories that have amended existing plans and that are implementing new plans and options. The number of new programs increased by 13 and there are 19 more options available to farmers.

The total coverage increased by $2.2 B and the acres insured increased by 3.4 M in provinces that have amended existing plans and/or are implementing new plans and options.

  Total
$1.6 B
Total
$388.7 M
Total
$549.9 M
   

Note: Planned spending figures represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. It does not include any additional amounts that may be brought into the Department's reference levels.

Comments on Variances:

The increase in grant and contribution payments is as result of the substantial increase in premiums caused by the increase in grain prices which are reflected in the insurable values.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):

Planning and developments are done jointly with the provinces. Therefore, the expected results are the same, but the achieved results will vary by province.

Contact Information:

Sheldon Friesen
A/Director
Production Insurance and Risk Management Division
Farm Financial Programs Branch
613-773-2068

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Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInvest (Statutory)

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 6, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriInvest is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, it is only possible to provide an estimate of the total cost of the program. The current estimate is that it will cost $847.1 M over five years (2007-08 to 2011-12 fiscal years).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriInvest allows producers to self-manage, through producer-government savings accounts, the first 15 per cent of their margin losses for a production year and/or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues. Under the program, annual producer deposits of up to 1.5 per cent of their allowable net sales are matched by government deposits. Government deposits are cost-shared 60:40 by federal and provincial governments. In combination with the AgriStability program, AgriInvest is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

AgriInvest provides producers with a secure, accessible, predictable, and bankable source of income assistance to address small drops in farm income and manage on-farm risks.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection (FIPA), as well as “Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy” and “Federal / Provincial / Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest”.

The program links to the new, 2009-10 departmental strategic outcome of “a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk” and the Government of Canada’s outcome of “Strong Economic Growth.”

Federal AgriInvest Website

AgriInvest in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)

Shared Outcome(s):

To mitigate the impacts of smaller income losses through the availability of timely and predictable funds.

Governance Structure(s):

The AgriInvest program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM priority. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are cost shared by the federal government and the provinces on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

The AgriInvest program is delivered in Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island and Yukon by the federal government. Governments are currently working with financial institutions to set up the infrastructure necessary for them to establish and hold AgriInvest accounts. In Quebec, the AgriInvest program is delivered provincially by La Financière agricole du Québec.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) BRM Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Planned Results for 2008-09 Results Achieved in 2008-09
AAFC BRM AgriInvest $847.1 M
(for fiscal years 2007/08 to 2011/12)
$170.5 M $197.4 M Reduce producers income loss through participation in BRM programs

As of March 31, 2009, approximately $525 M has been made available to producer to seed their AgriInvest accounts through the federal Kickstart initiative. As of this date, approximately $291 M had been withdrawn and $234 M remained in accounts for producers to access when needed to address small income losses and to invest in their farming operations.

On March 31, 2009, federal program administrators began mailing out letters notifying participants of their benefits under 2007 AgriInvest, their total account balances and how to access the funding in their accounts.

Work continues toward full implementation of AgriInvest, where producer deposits and government contributions will be held by financial institutions for the 2009 program year.

  Total: $847.1 M
(See note)
Total: $170.5 M
(See note)
Total: $197.4 M    

Note:
Planned spending figures represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. Spending reflects all costs incurred by the department (salary, operating, transfer payments). See also the related horizontal initiative on AgriStability, AgriInsurance, and AgriRecovery.

Comments on Variances:

AgriInvest is demand-driven, rather than being funded from a set allocation for each fiscal year. Although the administrative costs of the program remain relatively constant, the variance of the year-to-year grant and contribution payments is directly related to both participation and commodity prices, as producer deposits and government contributions are based on a percentage of their income generated from the sale of commodities for a production year.

The variance between planned and actual spending for 2008-09 can be largely attributed to an increase in the value of grains and oilseeds for the 2007 production year, which resulted in higher than anticipated allowable net sales.

A performance measurement framework is in place for the new BRM suite, which includes performance indicators and targets. Federal and provincial governments are now working to collect the information necessary for reporting and expect to be ready to report on the performance of the new suite of programs in early 2010.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently across provinces and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

Contact Information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
613-773-2100

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Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriRecovery - Agricultural Disaster Relief Program (ADRP)

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity:  Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

On December 6, 2007, program authorities were obtained to implement the ADRP under the AgriRecovery disaster relief framework beginning with the 2007-08 fiscal year.

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Program authorities for the ADRP expire on March 31, 2011.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):

Authorities for the program consist of $440.7 M over four years (2007-08 to 2010-11 fiscal years). This funding is sourced from the $500 M per year in incremental funding for agriculture established in the 2006 federal budget.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriRecovery facilitates the process for federal, provincial and territorial governments to provide short-term, timely assistance to help producers quickly re-establish their income stream and contain the long-term impacts after a small- to mid-size disaster (e.g. disease, pest, weather). Programs under AgriRecovery are developed on a case-by-case basis after an assessment is completed and it is determined that there is need for assistance not covered by existing programs, such as AgriInvest, AgriStability and AgriInsurance.

Under AgriRecovery, the ADRP helps focus the coordination effort, providing fast-tracked programs of up to $20 M (up to $122.6 M per fiscal year) to quickly fund initiatives under AgriRecovery. Programming not eligible under the ADRP may still utilize the AgriRecovery framework and approval from Treasury Board would be required.

Authorities for the program include sub-section 12(5) of the Farm Income Protection Act (FIPA), as well as various agreements for individual programming developed under AgriRecovery. The program links to the Security of the Food System Strategic Outcome in the 2008-09 Program Activity Architecture (and to the new, 2009-10 departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk) and the Government of Canada’s outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

Links to the federal AgriRecovery Website

Shared Outcome(s):

Reduce the economic impact of catastrophic natural disasters on producers through timely assistance not otherwise provided by other programs.

Governance Structure(s):

The AgriRecovery framework, including the ADRP, is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the Business Risk Management priority. Under the ADRP, program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are expected to be cost-shared by the federal government and the provinces on a 60:40 basis, respectively. For AgriRecovery programming outside the ADRP, funding options are negotiated with the provinces on a case-by-case basis.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) BRM Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Specific to AgriRecovery and the ADRP are FTP Task Teams, which are initiated on a case-by-case basis when requested to analyze a disaster and its impacts and, if needed, develop options for an individual disaster assistance program to be brought forward to participating FTP Ministers.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Planned Results for 2008-09 Results Achieved in 2008-09
AAFC BRM AgriRecovery (including the ADRP) $440.7 M ($72.9 M for FY 2007/08 and $122.6 M per year for FYs 2008/09 to 2010/11) $122.6 M $56.3 M (see Comments on Variance) Reduce producers income loss through participation in BRM programs The ADRP has demonstrated its flexibility and ability to meet the objectives of providing timely assistance to minimize/contain the impacts of disasters on agricultural producers, address disaster-specific costs and losses not covered by other government programs and help farming operations return to business operations more quickly.

During the 2008-09 fiscal year, AgriRecovery was utilized by federal and provincial governments to respond to six disasters, including the Duponchelia moth in Ontario, Golden Nematode in Alberta, Bovine Tuberculosis in British Columbia, drought in areas of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and flooding in Manitoba and Prince Edward Island.

  Total: $440.7 M (See note 1 and  2) Total: $122.6 M Total: $56.3 M (see Comments on Variance)    

Notes:

  1. Planned spending figures represent the amounts included in Main Estimates and approved Treasury Board Submissions. See also the related horizontal initiative on AgriInsurance, AgriStability and AgriInvest.
  2. Under AgriRecovery funding is secured for the 2007/08 to 2011/12 fiscal years; however, authorities for the ADRP, which may utilize AgriRecovery funding, currently expire on March 31, 2011.
  3. The Plum Pox Eradication Program includes two components. The survey/research component which accounts for $6.2 M annually and the financial assistance component which is $2.4 M annually. The annual $2.4 M allocation is sourced from funding available for the AgriRecovery. This amount is reported as part of the costs for that program and is not included in the numbers above.

Comments on Variances:

Actual spending for 2008-09 includes total spent for completed programs (Duponchelia, Alberta Potatoes and Bovine TB) and the full funding for programs which have had their unspent funding put into Payables at Year End (PAYE) accounts (Manitoba Forage, Manitoba Forage Restoration and Feed Assistance, PEI Potatoes, and Saskatchewan Drought). Actual spending for all programs to date is estimated at $19.2 M, the rest is currently in PAYE accounts. Actual spending is approximately one-half of the planned spending. This is due to the unpredictable nature of both the occurrence and scope of agricultural disasters.

A performance measurement framework is in place for the new BRM suite, which includes performance indicators and targets. Federal and provincial governments are now working to collect the information necessary for reporting and expect to be ready to report on the performance of the new suite of programs in early 2010.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):

Joint planning and execution (federally and provincially) will be undertaken so that results are consistent.

Contact Information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
613-773-2100


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Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriStability (Statutory)

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriStability is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, it is only possible to provide an estimate of the total cost of the program. The current estimate is that it will cost $3,189 M over five fiscal years (2007-08 to 2011-12 fiscal years).

For the period of 2007-2008, the funding in the amount of $607.5 M pertains to the Canadian Agriculture Income Stabilization (CAIS) program which preceded AgriStability.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriStability is one of the four core pillars that make up the Business Risk Management Suite under Growing Forward.

AgriStability is a margin-based program that provides support when a producer experiences larger farm income losses, which are drops in their margin (eligible farm income, less eligible farm expenses), for the program year of more than 15 per cent of the producer's average margin from previous years (i.e., their reference margin). Thus a payment is triggered under the program when a producer’s program year margin drops below 85 per cent of the reference margin. AgriStability also includes coverage for negative margins, as well as mechanisms to advance a participant a portion of their expected payment during the year when a significant decline in income is expected (interim payments and Targeted Advance Payments). In combination with the AgriInvest program, it is the successor to the CAIS program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act (FIPA), as well as “Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy” and “Federal / Provincial / Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.”

The program links to links to the Security of the Food System Strategic Outcome in the 2008-09 Program Activity Architecture (and to the new, 2009-10 departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk) and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

Federal AgriStability Website
AgriStability in Alberta - Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (AFSC)
AgriStability in Ontario (Agricorp)
AgriStability in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)
AgriStability on Prince Edward Island (PEI Agricultural Insurance Corporation)

Shared Outcome(s):

To mitigate the impacts of larger income losses with margin protection.

Governance Structure(s):

The AgriStability program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM priority. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are cost shared by the federal government and the provinces on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

The AgriStability program is currently delivered in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Yukon by the federal government. In Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and Prince Edward Island, the AgriStability program is delivered provincially.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) BRM Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Expected Results for
2008-09
Results Achieved in
2008-09
AAFC BRM AgriStability $3,189 M for the fiscal years 2007-08 to 2011-12 ($607.5 M pertains to the period of 2007-08 for CAIS which preceeded AgriStability) $699.3 M $377.0 M Reduce producers' income loss through participation in BRM programs AgriStability payments are based on tax information for the program year. Although much of the processing of payments for the first year of AgriStability (2007 program year) was done in the 2008-09 fiscal year, processing will be finalized and performance data will be tallied in the 2009-10 fiscal year.

Performance data collected in 2008-09 related to the 2006 CAIS program. The program covered 52 per cent of Canadian producers (including those in the supply-managed sectors), representing 66 per cent of total market revenue. Although this is below the target of 75 per cent, it still represents a significant portion of the industry. It is also anticipated that participation will improve under the new suite of BRM programs. 40 per cent of participants received a payment under the 2006 CAIS program, which contributed to increasing the margins of participants from 60 per cent of their reference margins to 86 per cent. This was above the target of 80 per cent.

With respect to the processing of 2007 and 2008 AgriStability payments: Where requested by provinces, the Targeted Advance Payments (TAPs) mechanism provided quicker access to these payments for hog and cattle producers ($98 M to 1,713 hog producers for 2007 and $166 M to 3,767 hog and cattle producers for 2008). Changes such as deeper negative margin coverage and an improved inventory valuation method are also expected to benefit those faced with declining incomes and consecutive years of loss. Details of the processing of payments under AgriStability will be provided in 2009-10.

  Total
$3,189 M for the fiscal years
2007-08 to 2011-12
Total $699.3 M (See note) Total $377.0 M    

Note: Planned spending figures represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. It does not include any additional amounts that may be brought into the Department's reference levels. Spending reflects all costs incurred by the department (salary, operating, transfer payments). See also the related horizontal initiative on AgriInvest, AgriInsurance and AgriRecovery.

Comments on Variances:

AgriStability is demand-driven rather than funded from a set allocation for each fiscal year. Although the administrative costs remain relatively constant, the variance of the year-to-year grant and contribution payments is directly related to participation and the needs of the agriculture industry. As such, in good years, the program will cost governments less, while in bad years (i.e., years with dropping commodity prices, disasters, etc.) the costs of the program will be higher.

The variance between planned and actual spending for 2008-09 can be largely attributed to an increase in the value of grains and oilseeds for the 2007 production year. Historically, grains and oilseeds have accounted for a significant portion of coverage under CAIS and higher prices in the sector resulted in both reduced participation and a decrease in the number of payments being triggered as margins in the sector increased.

A performance measurement framework is in place for the new BRM suite, which includes performance indicators and targets. Federal and provincial governments are now working to collect the information necessary for reporting and expect to be ready to report on the performance of the new suite of programs in early 2010.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

Contact information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
613-773-2100


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Name of Horizontal Initiative:  Canadian Agricultural Skills Service (CASS)

Name of Lead Department(s):  Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity:  Innovation and Renewal

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:  April 1, 2003 

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:  March 31, 2008, extended to March 31, 2009 (Program has ended)

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):  $74.58 M over six years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Farmers and/or their spouses were offered assistance for skills development and access to training that could result in increased on-farm or off-farm income. Assistance was provided to develop an individual learning plan and to access training in areas such as improved farm practices and farm business management including accounting, finance, human resource management; training for other employment; or training to acquire skills for starting a new business. Financial support for training such as tuition fees for courses, supplies for courses as well as travel and accommodation was also provided. Further details.

Shared Outcome(s):

(a) Farmers' profitability increased;
(b) Improved choices about sources of income; and
(c) Production of farm products based on market and consumer demands respecting food safety and food quality and environmentally responsible production, and opportunities from science and innovation captured.

Governance Structure(s):

Program development with Renewal federal/provincial/territorial working group. Program delivery by Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), provincial governments and third-party delivery agents.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Planned
Results for 2008-09
Results Achieved in 2008-09
AAFC/Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) Innovation and Renewal Canadian Agricultural Skills Service $74.58 M $12 M $16.3 M (1) Increased implementation by low-income farmers and farm families of skills-based income strategies

(2) Farmers express satisfaction with CASS

(1) 65% have decided to budget for training in the future, compared to 21% in the past.

(2) 89% expressed satisfaction with CASS.

  Total
$74.58 M
Total
$12 M
Total
$16.3 M
   

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates.

Comments on Variances:

The delivery of CASS was in its fourth year in 2008-09. Increased awareness of the program, combined with the CASS cross compliance requirement under the Canadian Farm Families Options Program, resulted in higher uptake than originally anticipated for 2008-09.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):

CASS was delivered through agreements with five provinces (Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Prince Edward Island) and through HRSDC (Service Canada) in the remaining four provinces and the Yukon (CASS was not available in Quebec and only available on demand in Nunavut and Northwest Territories). Provinces that previously delivered the CASS program continued to do so, thereby contributing to AAFC's expected results for the program. Non-federal partners also continued to participate in the Renewal federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) working group, where program issues were addressed as the program entered its last stages. Planning and execution were done jointly (federally and provincially/territorially), so provincial and territorial results to be achieved are aligned.

Contact Information:

Johanne Métayer
Director
Renewal Division
Farm Financial Programs Branch
613-773-2006


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Name of Horizontal Initiative: MOU with Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) on Food Safety System Recognition

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Food Safety and Food Quality

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Original start date under Agricultural Policy Framework was April 1, 2003. The start date for this 2008-09 MOU is April 1, 2008.

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

The end date is March 31, 2009. A new four-year MOU under Growing Forward is expected to be signed during 2009-10.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $12.4 M over six years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The following Food Safety System Recognition initiative will be performed by the CFIA under the MOU during 2008-09:

The System Recognition initiative will provide government recognition of on-farm and post-farm food safety systems developed by national industry organizations. The CFIA will continue the development and delivery of food safety system recognition programs and provide scientific and technical advice to support food safety system development based on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP).

The four elements of this initiative are:

  • On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program
  • Post-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program
  • Scientific and Technical Support
  • Other Activities in support of food safety system development

Shared Outcome(s):

  1. protecting human health by reducing exposure to hazards; and
  2. increasing consumer confidence in the safety and quality of food produced in Canada

Governance Structure(s):

The overall administration of the MOU is delegated to the Director General, Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate, AAFC and the Executive Director, Food Safety and Consumer Protection Directorate, CFIA.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Expected Results for
2008-09
Results Achieved in
2008-09
AAFC Food Safety and Food Quality Work performed by CFIA n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
CFIA Food Safety and Public Health On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program (OFFSRP) $10.0 M for 2003-04 to 2007-08 under APF and $2.4 M for 2008-09 under the first year (continuity) of Growing Forward $2.4 M $2.4 M OFFSR Development
The latter stages of the OFFSRP piloted in consultation with industry and FPT governments


Latter stages of the recognition process were ready to pilot pending decision by FPT committees on implementation options regarding audits and assessments.
Training to industry and government partners on details of above processes provided Training was delayed until the above decision made.
Implementation
On-going technical review of industry-submitted generic HACCP models and producer manuals

Technical review was completed for 1 industry-submitted generic HACCP model and producer manual, and 2 more were initiated.
On-going technical review of industry procedures manual, management system documents and associated manuals Technical review was completed for 1 industry-submitted management manual and associated materials.
Post-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program (PFFSRP) Options for a post-farm food safety recognition program developed Options for a post-farm food safety recognition program are developed and ready for review by FPT committees and industry groups.
Scientific and Technical Support Timely scientific and technical advice to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders provided Timely scientific and technical advice was provided to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders.
Other Activities in support of food safety system development

Hazard Data Base (HDB)
The web-based application developed and implemented for the provision of the HDB technical information to stakeholders to facilitate the development of generic HACCP models



Hazard Data Base user acceptance data testing complete. Analysis of test results to be finalized.
Generic Models
On-farm and/or post-farm HACCP generic models for identified products developed

Generic HACCP models for moulded chocolate and fresh alimentary paste were fully developed and released to stakeholders.
Guidelines
Reference documents for on-farm and/or post-farm that will serve as a tool for industry regarding the safety of identified products/ commodities developed

Food Safety Practices Guidance documents for moulded chocolate and fresh alimentary paste were fully developed and released to stakeholders.
Medicated Feeds Regulations Medicated Feeds Regulations
Regulatory text developed and regulations implemented.


Due to changing priorities, Medicated Feeds Regulations Initiative expired on March 31, 2008 and therefore was not funded in 2008-09. Originally, $17M was allocated to this element and transferred to CFIA.
  Total
$12.4M
Total
$ 2.4 M
Total
$ 2.4 M
   

Comments on Variances:

Piloting of the final stages of the OFFSRP was delayed due to the competing priorities of Growing Forward and Food Safety Action Plan and re-structuring within the responsible FPT committees. User acceptance testing analysis must be finalized to complete HDB project.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact information:

Shelley Monlezun
Director Food Safety and Traceability Programs Division
613-773-1930

Dr. Robert Charlebois
Executive Director
Food Safety and Consumer Protection Directorate
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
613-773-5445


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Name of Horizontal Initiative: Co-operatives Secretariat (Co-operative Development Initiative)

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2003

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2009 (Renewed to March 31, 2013)

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $22.0 M over six years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Co-operatives Secretariat was established in 1987 to help the Government of Canada respond more effectively to the concerns and needs of Canadian co-operatives. The Secretariat advises the government on policies affecting co-operatives, co-ordinates the implementation of such policies, promotes co-operatives within the federal government, and provides a link between the co-operative sector and the many federal departments and agencies with which they interact. The Co-operatives Secretariat is managing the Co-operative Development Initiative (2003-09) and the Agricultural-Co-operative Development Initiative 2006-09.

Shared Outcome(s):

The end outcome of the Government of Canada with respect to co-operatives is the expanded use of the co-operatives model to enhance the economic growth and social development of Canadian rural and urban society. The objectives are to:

  1. raise awareness of the co-operative model and of the role that co-operatives can play in both social and economic development;
  2. promote policies, programs and legislation that support co-operatives development to achieve federal policy objectives, and greater harmonization of efforts; and
  3. encourage the growth of existing co-operatives and the creation of new co-operatives to meet the social and economic needs of Canadians.

Governance Structure(s):

The Co-operatives Secretariat was created to improve the relationship between Canadian co-operatives and federal departments and agencies. Formal mechanisms for collaboration include the Interdepartmental Committee on Co-operatives, dialogue with provincial collaborators and sector working groups. The Co-operatives Secretariat acts as a coordinator for interaction between the government and the co-operative sector. The Secretariat is headed by a Director, and is part of the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat within AAFC. For more details on the functions of the Secretariat, visit their website.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Expected Results for
2008-09
Results Achieved in
2008-09

AAFC/
Co-operatives Secretariat

The Co-operatives Secretariat is liaising with key departments and agencies with legislation, policies and programs affecting co-operatives.

A listing of the 17 departments is available upon request.

Co-operative Development Initiative (CDI):

- Advisory Services

- Innovation & Research

 

Agricultural Co-operative Development Initiative
(Ag-CDI)

Not applicable $22.0 M

(for fiscal years 2003-04 to 2008-09)

$5.1 M $5.4 M Innovative Canadian communities benefiting from economic opportunity Partnership with the co-op sector in CDI program delivery was enhanced by broadening services delivered by the sector. Progress was made to develop a partnership approach involving the sector and academics in building a common research agenda on co-operatives.

Under Ag-CDI, farmers and rural communities were provided with assistance to establish bio-fuel and value added agricultural projects. During the program 45 co-operatives were supported. In addition, the capacity to support the development of agricultural co-operatives was enhanced through creation of tools, learning exchange activities, and research activities which empowered farmers, agricultural stakeholders and communities.

  Total
$22.0 M
Total
$5.1 M
Total
$5.4 M
   

Comments on Variances: Spent $300K more than projected to enhance CDI Advisory Services

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact information:

Donna Mitchell
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
613-759-7113


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Name of Horizontal Initiative: AAFC-Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Agri-Food Specialists Positions Abroad

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Markets and International

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-04 fiscal year

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2008 (extended until March 31, 2009 while an updated MOU was drafted).

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $55.464 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The aim of the Program Activity Markets and International is to contribute to the Strategic Outcome (Security of the Food System) through expanding international opportunities for the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector. Activities under this MOU contributed to the maintenance and development of a competitive agriculture and agri-food sector that has the necessary attributes to position itself strategically to take advantage of new market opportunities, and/or to reposition itself to protect against changing market risks.

A key objective of the Agricultural Policy Framework (APF) International component was to strengthen Canada's market access and market development capacity and gain recognition for Canada's world-leading capabilities to meet the quality demands of highly segmented and increasingly competitive global markets.

This MOU established the operational principles, management practices and performance measurement criteria for the 34 agriculture and agri-food specialist positions in Canadian Embassies and High Commissions located in key export markets. The agricultural specialist's role is to enhance the delivery of services to Canadian agricultural exporters in areas such as agriculture and agri-food business development, investment promotion, market access and advocacy, and market penetration. These 34 positions were transferred to AAFC on April 1, 2008 as a result of the expiry of the MOU respecting how the two departments would manage the positions. However, the two departments saw value in renegotiating a new MOU in 2008-09 which focused on a joint, comprehensive platform to strengthen and enhance the contribution of the two departments to Canada's success in international commerce for agriculture and agri-food products and to advance the interests of Canada in the global market place. The new MOU takes into account the international component of AAFC's Growing Forward framework agreement and DFAIT's Global Commerce Strategy.

Shared Outcome(s):

  1. Improved capacity within the Trade Commissioner Service in each department to deliver in-market support to Canadian agricultural exporters;
  2. Increased recognition in targeted markets of Canada-branded food and agriculture products, recognizing Canada's ability to supply high-quality, safe and innovative products produced in an environmentally responsible manner; and
  3. Improved market access in key markets for Canadian agri-food and agriculture products.

Governance Structure(s): Joint Management Council of Assistant Deputy Ministers

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Planned Results
for 2008-09
Results Achieved in
2008-09
AAFC Markets and International Negotiation of a new MOU $0 M $0 M $0 M Interdepart-mental relationship and roles clarified; investment for subsequent years agreed An updated bilateral MOU guiding the relationship and shared interests between AAFC and DFAIT was negotiated as a draft in
2008-09 and will be signed in 2009-2010.
Agriculture and Food Trade Commissioners (formerly Agriculture and Agri-Food Specialists Abroad) program was extended by one year pending the approval of Growing Forward by the Treasury Board $42.5 M for
2003-04 to
2007-08, and $7.5 M for a one year extension for
2008-09
$7.5 M $7.5 M Agriculture and Food Trade Commissioners deliver in-market support to Canadian exporters, contributing to market development, improved market access and promotion of the Canada brand for food and agriculture. Agriculture and Food Trade Commissioners contributed to an increase in exports of Canadian agriculture, food and beverage products of 20%, from $35 B in
2007-08 to $42.5 B in 2008-09.
DFAIT International Commerce Client Service Fund (CSF) $0.464 M $0.464 M $0.563 M Support initiatives related to agriculture, food and seafood sector Local market CSF was used to leverage funds from the private sector, provinces and AAFC (amounts included above) for specific activities related to increasing exports for the sector.
North America Partnership Program (NAPP) $5.0 M for
2008-09 to
2012-13
$1.0 M $1.0 M Agriculture and Food Trade Commissioners deliver in-market services to industry, and market development/ promotion and trade advocacy in United States markets The $1.0 M was used to fund 4 positions in US missions and to conduct specific activities in US markets aimed at increasing exports to the US.
  Total $55.464 M Total $8.964 M Total $9.063 M    

Comments on Variances:

Sixty-six DFAIT Missions abroad allocated in total $0.1 M more funds under their Client Service Fund allocations to the agriculture, food and seafood sectors due to growing interest from companies (as measured by greater financial partnership in local market initiatives by companies), often resulting in a consequent changing priority for the sector in some markets abroad.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact information:

Bruce Howard
Director, Agriculture and Food Trade Commissioner Service
613-773-1571


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Name of Horizontal Initiative: Farm Business Services

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2003

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2008, extended to March 31, 2009 (Program has ended)

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $109.0 M over six years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

These services provided eligible farmers with access to financial consultants who helped them assess their finances and develop succession, action plans and business plans (financial, marketing, value-added). Further details can be found at the following web link.

Shared Outcome(s):

(a) Farmers' profitability increased;
(b) Improved choices about sources of income; and
(c) Production of farm products based on market and consumer demands respecting food safety and food quality and environmentally responsible production, and opportunities from science and innovation captured.

Governance Structure(s):

Program development and performance measurement by Renewal federal/provincial/territorial working group.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Planned
Results for
2008-09
Results Achieved in
2008-09
AAFC Innovation and Renewal a.  Canadian Farm Business Advisory Services (CFBAS), which has two phases:          
i. Farm Business Assessment (FBA) $55.8 M
over six years,
2003/04-2008/09
$8.8 M $10.2 M

(1) Increased implementation by farmers of business development strategies

(2) Farmers are satisfied with programs.

(1) 85% would consider using a consultant in the future (25% were budgeting for this).

(2) 88% were satisfied with the FBA program.

ii.  Specialized Business Planning Services (SBPS) $26.5 M
over six years, 2003/04-2008/09
$3.1 M $3.2 M

(1) Increased implementation by farmers of business development strategies

(2) Farmers are satisfied with programs

(1) 92% would consider using a consultant in the future (62% were budgeting for this).

(2) 89% were satisfied with the program.

b. Planning and Assessment for Value-Added Enterprises (PAVE) $26.7 M
over six years,
2003/04-2008/09
$.4 M $.4 M

(1) Increased implementation by farmers of business development strategies

(2) Farmers are satisfied with programs

(1) 91% would consider using a consultant in the future (45% were budgeting for this).

(2) 70% were satisfied with the program.

  Total
$109 M
over six years, 2003/04-2008/09
Total
$12.3 M
Total
$13.8 M
   

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates.

Comments on Variances:

Increased awareness of the FBA program, combined with the FBA cross compliance requirement under the Canadian Farm Families Options Program, resulted in higher uptake than originally anticipated for 2008-09 (uptake of SBPS and PAVE was similar to previous years).

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):

Delivery was primarily federal. Non-federal partners delivered Renewal programs where collateral agreements were signed (Quebec and the First Nations Agricultural Council of Saskatchewan Inc.). Non-federal partners participated in the Renewal federal-provincial-territorial working group, where program issues were addressed. Planning was done jointly (federally and provincially) so provincial results to be achieved do not differ.

Contact Information:

Johanne Métayer
Director
Renewal Division
Farm Financial Programs Branch
613-773-2006

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Name of Horizontal Initiative: Rural Development

Name of Lead Department(s): Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Rural and Co-operative Secretariats

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2003

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2008, extended until March 31, 2009 (A renewed Canadian Rural Partnership was approved at the end of the year.)

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $ 71.6 M over six years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Rural Secretariat, through the Canadian Rural Partnership (CRP), helps government to better understand the issues and concerns of rural Canadians and to encourage federal departments and agencies to adjust policies, programs and services to reflect the unique needs of rural communities. Through the CRP, the Government of Canada aims to enhance the quality of life for rural Canadians.

Shared Outcome(s):

The outcome is to enable rural communities to use their innovative capacity to capture the value of local amenities and achieve greater local economic competitiveness. It is based on the following six guiding principles:

  1. community is the cornerstone of rural development;
  2. collaboration across and among governments;
  3. flexible government approach to address rural diversity;
  4. multi-faceted/integrated approach to realize a community's potential;
  5. local leadership underpins the community's capacity; and
  6. business and entrepreneurship are essential components of building strong rural communities.

Governance Structure(s):

The CRP is managed by the Rural Secretariat. It contributes to raising awareness and inclusion of rural Canada in federal policies and programs. For example:

  • The Rural Development Network, a policy maker forum, involves 27 federal departments and agencies;
  • The National Rural Research Network brings together research partners from both academia and government to focus on enhancing knowledge about rural issues to better inform policy making;
  • The Community Information Database, a free web based resource, provides comprehensive and reliable information on economic, social and demographic factors at the community level to support decision making and action; and
  • The Rural Partnership Development Program funds activities that encourage collaborative economic activities at the community level.

These efforts are reinforced by Rural Teams in each province and territory comprised of federal government representatives; most teams also include members from the provincial or territorial government and/or sectoral stakeholders.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Planned Results for
2008-09
Results Achieved in
2008-09
AAFC/Rural Secretariat

A listing of the 27 departments and agencies part of the Rural Development Network

Rural and Co-operative Secretariats The Canadian Rural Partnership (CRP) $71.6 M for fiscal years 2003-04 to 2008-09 $11.6 M $9.9 M Innovative Canadian communities benefiting from economic opportunity

New policies and programs that address rural issues

The Rural Secretariat was instrumental in developing partnership projects, such as the Nunavut Economic Forum, to advance Rural Canada’s social and economic agendas.

A renewed CRP was approved at the end of the year.

  Total
$71.6 M
Total
$11.6 M
Total
$9.9 M
   

Comments on Variances:

Spending under Grants and Contributions were $1.8 M lower than planned due to the fact that the period for program intake was shorter than expected, and that funding was limited to short term projects because of the one-year funding extension to the program.

Results to be achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):  Not applicable

Contact Information:

Donna Mitchell
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
613-759-7113

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Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Horizontal Initiatives



Name of Horizontal Initiative

Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership

Name of Lead Department

ACOA

Lead Department Program Activity

Enterprise Development

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative

April 1, 2006

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative

March 31, 2009

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)

$9.95 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

Tourism offers significant opportunities for economic growth and social development in Atlantic Canada. The sector is important to the economic prosperity of Atlantic Canada. Visitor spending injects $3.29 billion into the regional economy. Tourism employs over 110,000 Atlantic Canadians and represents 5.5% of the region's GDP, compared with 2.3% nationally. The Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership (ACTP) was established in 1991 to promote the Atlantic region as a tourism destination in targeted markets. The ACTP is a nine-member, pan-Atlantic partnership comprising ACOA, the four provincial tourism industry associations and the Atlantic provincial government departments responsible for tourism. For the past 18 years, ACOA has worked with provincial and industry partners to maximize the economic benefits of this sector.

To continue making inroads in key markets, and to continue to bolster the region's tourism industry, the ACTP launched its sixth consecutive multi-year international tourism marketing initiative. This three-year project (fiscal years 2006-2007 to 2008-2009), valued at $19.95 million, supports integrated, research-driven consumer, trade and media relations campaigns to attract more visitors to Atlantic Canada from key markets in the United States, Western Canada, Europe and Japan.

The ACTP initiatives are:

  • United States Marketing Program - to effect greater tourism returns from the New England and mid-Atlantic markets of the United States, and the Alberta market in Canada, through integrated marketing techniques.
  • Overseas Marketing Program - to pursue tourists from the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Japan markets through integrated marketing techniques.

The cost-sharing for this partnership is 50% ($9.975 million) from ACOA, 30% ($5.985 million) from the provinces, and 20% ($3.99 million) from the provincial industry associations. Contributions from ACOA and the provinces are in the form of cash; contributions from industry associations include cash, in-kind and other cash investments in partnership-related activities (e.g. trade registrations and trade partnerships). For further information, see the ACTP website at http://www.actp-ptca.ca/index.html.

Shared Outcomes

The goal of the ACTP is increased tourism-related visitation and revenues from targeted markets.

The ACTP's outcomes aim to:

  • increase Atlantic Canada's competitiveness in targeted markets;
  • promote regional co-operation (federal/provincial/industry);
  • promote incremental marketing activities;
  • achieve economies of scale in marketing;
  • raise awareness of Atlantic Canada as a "top-of-mind" destination; and
  • increase tourism arrivals and tourism revenues for the four Atlantic provinces.

Governance Structures

The activities of the ACTP are governed by a management committee comprising the presidents of the four tourism industry associations, the four provincial deputy ministers responsible for tourism, and two representatives of ACOA. The management committee is responsible for the administration and management of the partnership agreement, approving work plans and budgets, program evaluation, and overseeing the work of its marketing committee. The marketing committee undertakes activities that are coordinated by federal, provincial and industry representatives, and is responsible for implementing ACTP initiatives. A secretariat (annual budget $300,000) oversees the day-to-day operations of the ACTP and is responsible for implementing a communications strategy, as well as annual and end-of-agreement evaluations of the partnership.

Partners:

ACOA is the sole federal funding department. The ACTP partners with the Canadian Tourism Commission on international research and marketing initiatives, on an ad-hoc basis.

Federal departments/agencies:

  • Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (50% of funding)
  • Canadian Tourism Commission (may partner on marketing initiatives on an ad-hoc basis)

Provincial governments: (30% of funding):

  • Province of New Brunswick - Business New Brunswick and the Department of Tourism and Parks
  • Province of Nova Scotia - Department of Tourism and Culture
  • Province of Prince Edward Island - Department of Tourism and Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture
  • Province of Newfoundland and Labrador - Department of Tourism, Culture and Recreation

Private sector organizations: (20% of funding):

  • Hospitality Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Tourism Industry Association of Nova Scotia
  • Tourism Industry Association of New Brunswick
  • Tourism Industry Association of Prince Edward Island


 
Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2008-2009
Actual Spending for
2008-2009
Expected Results for
2008-2009
Results Achieved in
2008-2009
ACOA Enterprise Development United States / Western Canada Marketing Program $8.3 million $2.77 million $2.77 million Return on investment: measurable tourism revenues generated per partner dollar invested in integrated marketing/media campaigns: $14 to $1 $16.99 to $1.00
Number of visitor parties related to the marketing program: 30,000 48,000 visitor parties
Dollar amount of visitor spending on goods/services related to the marketing program: $38.78 million $66.91 million
Overseas Marketing Program $1.2 million $0.4 million $0.4 million Return on investment: measurable tourism revenues generated per partner dollar invested in integrated marketing/media campaigns: $6 to $1 $6.10 to $1.00
Partnerships formed with overseas tour wholesalers: 20 34 partnerships
Dollar amount of visitor spending on goods/services resulting from the Overseas Tour Wholesaler partnerships: $2.4 million $5.5 million

Comments on Variances

The consumer and trade marketing campaigns outperformed expectations.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)

Not applicable.

Contact information

Rob McCloskey
Director General, Tourism Atlantic
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 40
Charlottetown, P.E.I. C1A 7K2
Telephone: 902-626-2479
Email: rob.mccloskey@acoa-apeca.gc.ca

 

 

Name of Horizontal Initiative

International Business Development Program (supporting the International Business Development Agreement)

Name of Lead Department

ACOA

Lead Department Program Activity

Enterprise Development

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative

April 11, 2005

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative

March 31, 2010

Total Federal Funding Allocation

$7.0 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

In May 1994, ACOA entered into an agreement (Canada/Atlantic Provinces Agreement on International Business Development, also known as IBDA) with the four Atlantic provinces, the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, and Industry Canada to "undertake specific measures to optimize regional coordination on a pan-Atlantic scale and combine limited resources to coordinate trade-related activities." With an initial investment in 1994 of $3 million for three years, the agreement was extended in 1997 for an additional $2 million and three years, and, in 2000, for $8 million and four years. Funding was cost-shared 70/30 by the federal (ACOA) and provincial governments.

In 2005, with $7 million from its International Business Development Program (IBDP), ACOA entered a new agreement with its federal and provincial partners to continue the work done in previous years. The commitment to this new IBDA, with the increased funding allocation, attests to both the IBDA's positive results and its significance for the future of the region's international business development

Shared Outcome

The shared outcomes for the IBDA partners support ACOA's trade priority, and are:

  • increased number of new exporters;
  • existing exporters reporting sales to new markets; and
  • existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets.

Since the original IBDA commenced in 1994, the Agency and its partners have administered over 230 projects involving some 4,000 Atlantic Canadian companies. The IBDA assisted 193 companies to begin exporting, 406 exporters to increase their export sales, and 279 exporters to expand into new markets.

Governance Structure

ACOA is the lead organization for this initiative and houses the secretariat responsible for administering the agreement. A management committee, comprising a representative from each of the partners, is responsible for the planning and management of the agreement's programs and the evaluation of projects.

Partners

Federal government (70% funding)

  • ACOA (lead department)
  • Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade - non-funding partner
  • Industry Canada - non-funding partner

Provincial governments (30% funding)

  • Business New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia Business Inc.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development
  • Prince Edward Island Business Development Inc.


 
Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2008-2009
Actual Spending for
2008-2009
Expected Results Results Achieved in
2008-2009
For the life of the 5-year agreement (2005-2006 through 2009-2010) For 2008-2009
ACOA Enterprise Development International Business Development Program $7.0 million $1.7 million $1.8 million Increase the number of new exporters: 40 companies 8 companies 12 companies
Existing exporters reporting sales to new markets: 75 companies 20 companies 25 companies
Existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets: 150 companies 30 companies 33 companies

Comments on Variances

Projects were more successful than planned.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable)

Not applicable.

Contact information

Michel Têtu
Director General, Trade and Investment
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 6051
Moncton, N.B. E1C 9J8
Telephone: 506-851-6496

 

 

Name of Horizontal Initiativ

Team Canada Atlantic

Name of Lead Department

ACOA

Lead Department Program Activity

Enterprise Development

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative

April 1999

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative

March 31, 2010

Total Federal Funding Allocation

$11.27 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

Team Canada Atlantic (TCA) is a partnership of ACOA and the four Atlantic provinces, with support from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Industry Canada, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation.

At the core of the TCA approach is the trade mission, which enables small and medium-sized businesses from across Atlantic Canada to meet with potential buyers, agents, distributors and strategic partners in the United States. The mission format features a comprehensive program that equips private sector participants with the knowledge, contacts and advice they require to make the best of their international opportunities before, during and after their ventures abroad. Missions also provide the Government of Canada and the Atlantic provincial governments with crucial opportunities to promote the region as a tremendous location for foreign investment. For further information, see the TCA website at www.teamcanadaatlantic.com.

Shared Outcome

The objectives of the TCA trade missions are:

  • to increase export-readiness for Atlantic Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs);
  • to develop new partnerships/alliances between Atlantic Canadian SMEs and companies in target markets;
  • to increase export sales of Atlantic Canadian SMEs to new and established markets; and
  • to raise awareness in these markets of Atlantic Canada as a profitable business location.

As of March 2009, Team Canada Atlantic had completed 15 missions to United States markets, involving 590 companies and more than 3,906 business meetings, and resulting in more than $49 million in actual sales.

Governance Structure

A management committee, comprising senior officials of ACOA, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and provincial governments is the decision-making body that directs and oversees the coordination and implementation of the TCA missions. The TCA organizing committee is responsible for organizing the missions, and includes representation from the four provincial trade departments in Atlantic Canada, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and the Team Canada Atlantic Secretariat. The secretariat, housed at ACOA, is responsible for the overall coordination and implementation of the TCA missions.

Partners

  • ACOA
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada - non-funding partner
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) - $7,000/mission


Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2008-2009
Actual Spending for
2008-2009
Expected Results for
2008-2009
Results Achieved in
2008-2009
ACOA Enterprise Development Team Canada Atlantic $11.14 million $274,000 (G&C)

$55,000 (O&M)

$362,760 (G&C)

$56,223 (O&M)

SMEs that have increased export-readiness: 40 37
New exporters: 5 9
Exporters developing new markets: 5 24
AAFC Markets and International Team Canada Atlantic $132,000 $7,000 $7,000 Forecasted export sales by SMEs: $30 million

$24.18 million


Comments on Variances

The increase in recruitment efforts by ACOA and provincial officials contributed to the increase in the number of exporters developing new markets.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)

As Team Canada Atlantic is a federal-provincial initiative, the targeted results are the same for all partners.

Contact information:

Michel Têtu
Director General, Trade and Investment
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 6051
Moncton, N.B. E1C 9J8
Telephone: 506-851-6496

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Canada Border Services Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Supplementary information on the CBSA's participation in horizontal initiatives can be found on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's Web site.

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Canadian Food Inspection Agency

3.2.6.1: CFIA-led initiative


Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Lead Departments Program Activity:
CFIA:
Animal Health Risks and Production Systems
DFO: Science (Diagnostics & Research)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $59.05M (2005-06 to 2009-10) plus $10.33M on-going

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The objective of the NAAHP is to provide protection of Canada’s aquatic resource productivity by minimizing the risk of the spread of infectious diseases of concern within Canada and by providing a national system to support competitive market access by Canadian exporters of aquatic animals and their commodities through a national program that meets international standards for aquatic animal disease control and that allows Canada to apply control measures on imports that pose a risk of introduction of serious diseases into Canada. The NAAHP is built on the CFIA’s established animal health legislative framework, the Health of Animals Act and on DFO’s established aquatic animal health science expertise. The CFIA provides program leadership and direction of field operations and collaborative agreements for aquaculture surveillance, emergency response measures, export certification and import controls. DFO provides the surveillance and monitoring activities and information for wild resources and delivers or oversees the diagnostic and research support requirements for the program. Ongoing funding for this initiative was obtained in June 2005. Roles and responsibilities were agreed to under a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), co-signed with the DFO in February 2006.

Shared Outcome(s):
Sustainable Aquatic Resource Productivity
that supports rural and coastal economies through farming, commercial and recreational fishing and tourism.
Competitive Market Access internally through provision of science-based protection measures and internationally through health certification that meets international standards set by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) for the World Trade Organization (WTO) Sanitary and Phyto-sanitary Measures (SPS) Agreement.

Governance Structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for delivery of the NAAHP. Respective federal roles and responsibilities are outlined in a MoU. An Executive Steering Committee consists of Director General/Executive Directors from both organizations, who are responsible for strategic direction, monitoring and analysis of NAAHP implementation. The CFIA Director of the Aquatic Animal Health Division (Animal Health Directorate, Policy and Programs Branch) and the DFO Director of Aquatic Animal Health Science Division (Ecosystem Science Branch, Science Sector) are also members of the steering committee.
Stakeholder input on NAAHP development is managed through an Aquatic Animal Health Committee (AAHC), which includes provincial and territorial authorities for aquaculture and wild fisheries management, veterinary association representatives, Aboriginal groups and wild and farmed industry stakeholders.

Progress with NAAHP development and implementation is reported to the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers-CFIA committee (CFIA-CCFAM) and to the Agriculture Federal F/P/T Regulatory ADM committees. Where required, reports are also prepared for the F/P/T Council of Canadian Veterinary Officers and the Policy ADM Committee of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

A) CFIA
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
CFIA Animal Health Risks and Production Systems National Aquatic Animal Health Program $32.13M over five years (plus $6.35M ongoing) $6.35M $3.78M
16a. Expected Result for 2008-09 Regulatory amendments based on full consultation (F/P/T, Aboriginal Groups and World Trade Organization).
17a. Results Achieved in 2008-09

Completed consultations and feedback for the proposed regulatory amendment package encompassing import control measures, mandatory & notifiable reporting, emergency response authorities, and provisions for implementation of domestic disease controls.

Completed regulatory amendment package including amendments to the Health of Animals Regulations and Ministerial Declaration changes to the Reportable Disease Regulations

Completed focus group discussion with Aboriginal Peoples (Assembly of First Nations) in December and a report was generated for the CFIA in March 2009. The Department of Justice and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada consulted on accommodation required for Aboriginal engagement. The 2009-10 Business Plan includes a contingency for Aboriginal engagement.

16b. Expected Result for 2008-09 Initiation of discussion on F/P/T MoUs on Emergency Response and delineation of domestic disease control zones.
17b. Results Achieved in 2008-09

Completed cross-country discussions of the Domestic Disease Control Framework (Emergency Response Plans and Domestic Disease Controls) and reported at the CFIA-CCFAM, CCFAM-Deputy Minister (DM) F/P/T Committees.

Case studies were included for feedback from the domestic disease control discussions.

F/P/T MoU discussions were not completed.

16c. Expected Result for 2008-09

Development of priority policies and procedures required to enforce revised regulations.

17c. Results Achieved in 2008-09

Framework decision trees have been completed and set policy and procedure priorities for development have been set. Key policies have been drafted for Import/Export, Surveillance and Domestic Disease Control including Emergency Response, aligned with the Canadian Emergency Management Response System (CEMRS).
Procedures for current export inspections have been developed for implementation in 2009-10.

16d. Expected Result for 2008-09

NAAHP integration into priority IM/IT systems (Shared Information Management System, Automated Import Reference System, Import Control and Tracking System, and the Import Permit System)
Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) and linkage to the DFO LIMS.

17d. Results Achieved in 2008-09

DFO and the CFIA continued ongoing collaborative work and communication toward the development of the LIMS. The CFIA is now an active participant in the DFO-led LIMS Working Group. In addition, the submission of sample forms was developed, in collaboration between the CFIA and DFO, for pilot testing and input into the LIMS in 2009-10.

The CFIA also identified champions from IM/IT to assist NAAHP integration. A national coordinator position has been created to coordinate NAAHP business requirements and relate them to IM/IT solutions.

16e. Expected Result for 2008-09

Training modules for key NAAHP implementation activities.

17e. Results Achieved in 2008-09

The Agency continued the development of the National Training Initiative (NTI). Key activities identified for the NTI include cross-sectional work, supporting Import/Export and the identification of new Emergency Response and Surveillance. Subject matter experts have been identified to learn with representatives from the learning division of the CFIA for the NTI. Work also continued on the development of material design of five training modules, as per the stated priority for this division.


B) DFO
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
DFO Science (Diagnostics & Research) National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System (NAAHLS) $26.92M over five years (plus $3.98M ongoing) $3.98M $5.70M
16a. Expected Result for 2008-09 Laboratory standards and tracking systems meet international requirements for audit/challenge of export certificates and/or import controls – International Standards Organization 17025, the main standard used by testing and calibration laboratories.
17a. Results Achieved in 2008-09

Under the NAAHP, 85 per cent of test method protocols have been developed and undergone analytical (bench) validation for the first round of priority diseases. Seventy-five per cent of tests have undergone diagnostic (field) validation. Approximately 70 per cent of research studies have been completed. With respect to quality assured diagnostic laboratories, all three laboratories have completed approximately 70 per cent of the 230 mandatory requirements necessary for audit/accreditation.

Renovations were completed for the Central and Arctic Region (Winnipeg) laboratory. As part of the federal government’s “Investment in Infrastructure”, DFO has received funding for the Gulf Region (Moncton) NAAHP laboratory renovations. DFO will explore options in 2009-10 to construct a new NAAHP laboratory due to logistical challenges with the current heritage facility.

16b. Expected Result for 2008-09 Development of a contract for the LIMS and infrastructure to deliver accurate, reliable and quality information in support of testing services for declaration of disease freedom, surveillance of “at risk” populations and management of reportable disease incursions.
17b. Results Achieved in 2008-09

The LIMS contract has moved forward and the reporting and recording framework has been established. Software for the LIMS purchased in 2007-08 is being modified to become integrated into the DFO NAAHP laboratories’ overall quality control approach.

Links to CFIA systems remain under business requirement document solutions analysis and the DFO has strong representation in the IM/IT solution discussions.

16c. Expected Result for 2008-09

NAAHP diagnostic support.

17c. Results Achieved in 2008-09

Diagnostic support has been provided for Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia, Koi Herpes Virus, Haplosporidium nelsoni, Infectious Salmon Anaemia and other diseases of NAAHP concern. This has supported export certification and surveillance to support zoning and transboundary (Canada-USA; Canada-France [Saint Pierre and Miquelon]) disease control measure negotiations.

About 90 per cent of all samples collected were analyzed for disease. The remaining ten per cent of samples could not be analyzed due to inadequate specimen size.

16d. Expected Result for 2008-09

NAAHP research support.

17d. Results Achieved in 2008-09

Research on viral strains, carrier species and related CFIA regulatory decision-making needs was undertaken. Results are not yet complete, but are anticipated in 2009-10 before regulatory amendments are in place. These results will support transition agreements with provinces and other DFO sectors pending CFIA regulatory operations implementation.

Nearly 70 per cent of the scientific research requested to date by the CFIA has been completed. Of the remaining amount, test development and validation projects are multi-year in nature.


C) Initiative Total (CFIA and DFO)
Grand Total

$59.05M over 5 years and $10.33M ongoing

$10.33M

$9.48M


18. Comments on Variances: Delays in NAAHP front-end funding were a key issue as specified in a revised business plan in 2009. In addition, several problems were encountered regarding the securing of specialized and rare expertise to deliver the new area of Veterinary Authority responsibility. Full staffing levels were not attained until late 2006, at which time overall program development and horizontal coordination leadership was able to commence.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable.

20. Contact information: Dr. Sharon McGladdery, Director Aquatic Animal Health Division, Animal Health Directorate, Policy and Programs Branch, CFIA (613) 221-1487 or (613) 668-6492. Note: As of July 31, 2009: Dr. Carolyn Inch, A/Director at the same coordinates or c/o Louise LeBrun (613) 221-1472. Dr. Christine Stoneman (613) 990-0361; or Stephen J. Stephen, (613) 990-0292 NAAHP Science, DFO.

3.2.6.2: All Other Horizontal Initiatives

Initiative Profile Results achieved Partners
Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products

This initiative incorporates efforts of six federal government partners to increase public and stakeholder confidence in the pesticide regulatory system, protect public health and the environment and increase the competitiveness of the agri-food and forestry sectors. The CFIA is delivering two of the 13 programs:

  • Enhanced monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residue limits in foods and feed; and
  • Enhanced monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residues in fertilizers and pesticide guarantee verification in fertilizer-pesticide combinations.

A total amount of $5.1 million was allocated to the CFIA to cover these two programs over a seven-year period, beginning in 2002-03 and ending in 2008-09.

The CFIA enhanced compliance testing in children’s foods. Greater than 98 per cent compliance was found in the randomly selected foods. The small sample size prevented the analysis of trends in commodity, brand name, residue or country of origin.

The Agency implemented new inspection programs and updated documents and tools inspectors use in their daily operations to enhance the monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residue limits in fertilizers and pesticide guarantee verification in fertilizer-pesticide combinations. CFIA inspectors were trained on label verification and non-compliance follow-up procedures.

Through work with the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, the CFIA also developed and updated the “Compendium of Fertilizer-Use Pesticides” and documentation for amending the Fertilizer Regulations to allow for the Compendium’s publication.

Lead: Health Canada

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Environment Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada
Public Security and Anti-terrorism (PSAT) Initiative

In the 2001 Budget, the government allocated $7.7 billion in new funds for the PSAT initiative to enhance security for Canadians. As a contributing Agency, the CFIA will:

  • Deliver all federal food inspection, animal health and plant protection measures; and
  • Respond to outbreaks of pests and diseases in plants and animals.

The CFIA enhanced capacity to conduct food inspections and to respond to pest and disease outbreaks in both the plant protection and animal health sectors.

The Agency has enhanced its overall surveillance and detection activities through:

  • Increased awareness of the possibility of deliberate acts of terrorism;
  • Better collaboration with the provinces/territories;
  • Enhanced information-sharing with delivery partners;
  • Increased inspection of live-animal auction markets;
  • Increased facilitation of food safety investigations and food recalls; and
  • Expansion of the Canadian Cattle Identification Program.

The CFIA has also enhanced its laboratory capacity and laboratory biosecurity through the development of business continuity plans and containment guidelines and improvement of laboratory infrastructure.

Lead: Public Safety Canada

  • Provinces/ Territories
  • Canada Border Service Agency
Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness: Focus on Animal and Human Health Issues

A coordinated and comprehensive plan to address both avian and pandemic influenza was put in place starting in 2006.

In 2006, under the umbrella of “Preparing for Emergencies”, the CFIA obtained $195 million over five years to enhance Canada’s state of AI preparedness. Canada’s Avian Influenza Working Group was established in 2006 to update policies, protocols, operating procedures and systems to enhance Canada’s state of preparedness—through collaborations and partnership— in five pillars of strategies and processes:

  • Prevention and early warning;
  • Emergency preparedness;
  • Emergency response;
  • Emergency recovery; and
  • Communications.

Specific project results details are available in Table 7 of the Public Health Agency of Canada’s 2008-09 Performance Report.

Lead: Public Health Agency of Canada

  • Public Safety Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Environment Canada
  • Provinces/Territories
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Chemical, Biological Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI)

The events of September 11, 2001 moved the issues of counter-terrorism and national security to the forefront of the nation’s concerns. The CRTI represents the federal science community’s response and commitment to providing science solutions to these issues. Through the creation of laboratory networks across the federal government that collaborate with industry, academia and first responder communities, and through key research and technology development initiatives, the CFIA will provide new knowledge, technology and capacity necessary for CBRN prevention, preparedness and response.

As well, the CFIA will continue to co-chair the biological cluster of federal laboratories with the PHAC.

Current CRTI-related research initiatives include the following:

  • Developing more effective and rapid detection tests, including those that use high throughput techniques and nanotechnology for sensitive and more efficient detection; and
  • Continuing to develop surveillance and communication networks with provincial partners in order to improve early detection of high-threat animal diseases and to improve linkages with the National U.S. Animal Health Laboratory Network.

In 2008-2009, the CFIA improved the speed of its detection capability for AI and FMD. Research will continue to screen for multiple pathogens simultaneously and to readily cope with the evolution of new variant strains.

The CAHSN achieved the following results:

Objective: A national early warning surveillance system for animal disease threats to public health and the security of the food supply.

Result:

  • Accomplished a comprehensive solution set with surveillance applications, laboratory inter-connectivity, data exchange and available tools for alerting and event management.

Objective: A federal-provincial laboratory network for the rapid diagnosis of serious infectious animal diseases.

Result:

  • Implemented an integrated laboratory cluster with first responder laboratories, early disease detection and enhanced biosafety.

Objective: An information-sharing network linking federal and provincial agencies and departments of animal and human health.

Result:

  • Utilizing the Canadian Network for Public Health Intelligence, a standardized information technology and management platform is in place to connect laboratory systems and surveillance systems across Canada. The platform provides a portfolio of tools and timely information for seamless integration of human and animal health intelligence and is reflective of the principles outlined in the One World, One Health concept.43

Lead: National Defence

  • Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
  • Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  • Canadian Security and Intelligence Service
  • Defence Research and Development Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Environment Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • National Research Council
  • Natural Resources Canada
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  • Transport Canada
Canadian Regulatory System for Biotechnology (CRSB)

The CRSB aims to develop an efficient, credible and well-respected regulatory system that safeguards the health of all Canadians and the environment and permits safe and effective products. It does this by enhancing human resource capacity, improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the regulatory system, improving transparency and public awareness and increasing knowledge to improve decision-making. The CRSB will also continue to provide a bridge to adapt to emerging novel applications of biotechnology, as guided by the CDSR principles and by a strengthened horizontal governance mechanism for shared regulatory policy development and decision-making.

The efficiency and effectiveness of the regulatory system has been improved with respect to horizontal governance of novel applications of biotechnology.

Lead: Rotating (2008-2009 Health Canada)

  • Environment Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada
Growing Forward – Food Safety System Recognition (The CFIA established a MoU with AAFC).

The Food Safety System Recognition initiative will provide government recognition of on-farm and post-farm food safety systems developed by national industry organizations. The CFIA will continue the development and delivery of food safety system recognition programs and provide scientific and technical advice to support Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP)-based food safety system development.44

The four elements of this initiative are:
A. On-Farm Food Safety Recognition program;
B. Post-Farm Food Safety Recognition program;
C. Scientific and technical support; and
D. Other activities in support of food safety system development.

A. On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program

  • Latter stages of the recognition process ready to pilot, pending decision by F/P/T committees on implementation options regarding audits and assessments.
  • Technical review completed for two industry-submitted manuals and two more reviews were initiated.

B. Post-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program

  • Options for a post-farm food safety recognition program were developed and are ready for review by F/P/T committees and industry groups.

C. Scientific and technical support

  • Timely scientific and technical advice was provided to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders.

D. Other activities in support of food safety system development

  • Hazard Data Base user acceptance data testing was completed. Analysis of test results are to be finalized.
  • Food Safety Practices Guidance documents and Generic HACCP models for moulded chocolate and fresh alimentary paste were fully developed and released to stakeholders.

Lead: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Top of Page

Canadian Heritage

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives


  • Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future
  • 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games--Delivering on Our Commitment

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Heritage

Lead Department Program Activity: Promotion of inter-cultural understanding

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $1,110.10M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future (Roadmap) is a Government of Canada policy statement that includes a number of initiatives to strengthen and promote linguistic duality. Fourteen federal institutions have received funds for sectoral programs and activities related to official languages. The Roadmap contributes to the attainment of a strategic outcome for Canadian Heritage (Canadians have a sense of their Canadian identity) and to the Government of Canada's outcome (A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion).

Two key components of the Roadmap are the implementation of an accountability framework and a coordinated government-wide approach to official languages. The Roadmap is a component of the Official Languages Program (OLP), as defined and approved by the Committee of Deputy Ministers on Official Languages in December 2004.

Website: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/slo-ols/pubs/08-13-LDL/index-eng.cfm

Shared Outcome(s):

Three levels of outcomes have been established.

Ultimate outcomes: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in their language of choice.

Three intermediate outcomes:

  • Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English-speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in their language of choice.
  • Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
  • Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.

Eight immediate outcomes:

  • Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
  • Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
  • Improved social and economic development of official-language minority communities (OLMC).
  • Strengthened capacity of language industries.
  • Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
  • Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
  • Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
  • Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.

Governance Structure(s):

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for the implementation of the Roadmap. The Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) (Canadian Heritage) supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. With respect to roles and responsibilities, the OLS is responsible for developing and coordinating the results of the Roadmap. The OLS ensures that all information needed (financial and non-financial) is gathered and that the content of all logic models of the Roadmap's structure is taken into consideration. The OLS is also responsible for the complete implementation and the accountability framework for the Roadmap. This role was given to the OLS by the partners through the development of a Management Framework for the Roadmap, which outlines the activities and results structure, the governance structure, as well as the roles and responsibilities of departments and different interdepartmental committees, while also identifying the relevant operational issues concerning its horizontal implementation. The OLS also supports the governance of the OLP through various mechanisms and committees.

A governance structure has been established: to support the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and to ensure that the Roadmap provides results for Canadians, the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages (CADMOL) was created. This committee acts on behalf of all federal departments, agencies and organizations, and partners in the Roadmap in a variety of ways: it supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and all Ministers who have responsibilities under the Official Languages Act (OLA); it ensures leadership for managing the OLP, including the Roadmap, by making decisions and overseeing the coordination of partners' actions; and it guides the implementation of the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (HRMAF) and oversees the evaluation of the Roadmap. During CADMOL meetings, departments having specific responsibilities under the OLA (for instance, Canadian Heritage, Justice Canada, and the Canada Public Service Agency report on achievements that are specific to their mandate and describe the challenges and issues related to these responsibilities).

Three interdepartmental committees support CADMOL by providing recommendations. Firstly, the Interdepartmental Policy Committee (IPC) provides an information-sharing forum between partners to present a joint approach to strategic issues regarding the OLP. The Interdepartmental Management Committee for the Official Languages Program (IMCOLP) seeks to ensure that interdepartmental coordination of the OLP is formalized and structured, most notably by assessing the implementation of the OLP and strengthening the accountability process. The Coordinating Committee on Official Languages Research (CCOLR) ensures that official-languages research is coordinated. The committees may create working groups as needed to complete specific projects. For example, the Working Group on the HRMAF Revision (Working Group) was created in the summer of 2008.


($ Millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2008-09 Actual Spending for 2008-09 Expected Results for 2008-09 Results Achieved in 2008-09
Ultimate outcomes: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in their language of choice.
Intermediate outcome 1: Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English-speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in their language of choice.
Immediate outcome 1.1: Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
Justice Canada Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs Contraventions Act Fund



Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:



Improved capacity to carry on judicial activities and to deliver extrajudicial services related to federal contraventions in both official languages.
47.46   4.73   Negotiating agreements are multi-faceted processes that require close collaboration of provincial or territorial governments. The Department entered into negotiations with the Government of Newfoundland-Labrador.  While no agreement has yet been signed with the Government of Newfoundland-Labrador, it is anticipated that this agreement will be in place during fiscal year 2009-2010.
Internal Services Contraventions Act Fund 1.92   0.23   N/A
Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training)



Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:



Increased capacity of partners and the Department to implement solutions relating to access to justice in both official languages.
38.02   3.78   The component called the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support fund was renewed with amended terms of reference. The new component on training in both official languages in the area of justice was created. The Pan Canadian Needs Analysis on Training on Both Official Languages in the area of Justice was realized.
Internal Services Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training) 1.89   0.08   N/A
Immediate Outcome 1.2:  Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
Health Canada Canadian Health System



Official language minority community development
Training, Networks and Access to Health Services.



Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:



1) Increased number of health professionals to meet health service needs of OLMCs in both official languages.



2) Increased coordination and integration of health services for OLMCs within institutions and communities.



3) Increased partnerships, interaction of networks in provincial, territorial health systems.



4) Increased awareness among stakeholders that networks are a focal point for addressing health concerns of OLMCs.



5) Increased dissemination and uptake of knowledge best practices to address health concerns of OLMCs.
174.3   27.89   The Terms and Conditions of the Contribution Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities have been extended by one year to enable the continuation of ongoing Program activities in 2008-2009 during the transition year for the implementation of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program.



In 2008-2009, the "Training and Retention of Health Professionals" component generated 822 French-

speaking student registrations in post-

secondary health care training programs outside Quebec, and it was expected that 2,000 health professionals would receive language training in order to better serve the English-speaking community in Quebec.



Networking activities have also continued in 2008-2009, for instance through the organization of meetings and other interactions with provincial/

territorial governments and various health care organizations, and through the organization of and participation in research symposiums. Moreover, work was done to develop new networks in Quebec in the Abitibi, Lower St. Lawrence, Laval and North Shore regions.



Implementation of official languages health projects will start in 2009-2010.
Immediate Outcome 1.3: Improved social and economic development of official-language minority communities (OLMC).
Canadian Heritage Official Languages Minority-Language Education -



Component: Support to Second-Language and Minority-Language Education.



Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:



1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.



2) Increased access of OLMCs to quality education in their language in their milieu.
280.0   56.0   An additional investment of almost $50M to provinces and territories to offer educational programs and activities that promote access to a minority language education to almost 250,000 elementary and high-school students.
Minority-Language Education -



Component: Official-language Monitors



Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:



1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.



2) Improved access of OLMCs to a quality education in their language and milieu.
5.2   1.04   The number of participants in the Odyssée and Accent programs is maintained. These programs allow about 250 students to work as language assistants in minority-language classrooms.
Minority-Language Education -

Component: Summer Language Bursaries



Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages. 2) Improved access of OLMCs to a first-rate education in their language in their environment.
1.7   0.35   The additional contribution has helped to support the Destination Clic program, which helps almost 100 young Francophones outside Québec enrich their first language while discovering new communities in Canada.
Community vitality - Component: Youth Initiatives.

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language. 2) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially for youth).
10.5   No
expenses
in
2008
-
2009
  The program will be implemented in 2009-2010.
Community vitality - Component:  Support to Official-language Minority Communities

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap: Improved capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and improved access to a range of programs and services offered in their language.
22.5   4.5   Investment indicated in the Roadmap has permitted the improvement of programs to create, improve and deliver activities and services intended for OLMC that promote a sense of belonging, such as investments in organizations that support French-language culture and minority community medias.
Community vitality -Component: Intergovern-mental Cooperation.

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap: Increased access of OLMCs to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.
22.5   4.5   Improvement of federal/provincial agreements on services of almost $4M.
Community vitality -Component: Cultural Development Funds

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Increased access to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language. 2) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially in culture).
14.0   No
expenses
in
2008
-
2009
  The program will be implemented in 2009-2010.
Human Resources and Skills Develop-ment Canada Social Development Strengthening NGOs' means for Early Childhood Development

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap: The capacity of NGOs in early childhood in minority environment will be increased.
4.0   0.8   La Commission nationale des parents francophones (CNPF), which chairs and coordinates the Table nationale en développe-

ment de la petite enfance
in official language minority communities (OLMC) is the sole recipient of grant funding under this initiative.

The CNPF, in collaboration with the Table nationale en développement de la petite enfance in official language minority communities, developed a national action plan for implementing the National Framework for Collaboration on Early Childhood Development in Minority Francophone Communities in Canada.

An environmental scan on French language services for families in OLMCs was conducted to help identify gaps and priorities as well as initiatives and tools required in early childhood development in OLMCs. Educational tools were developed and disseminated to centre-based settings in OLMCs--for example, Dream Big Little by Little, a simpleguide to building a francophone identity at home; a Guide on intersectoral collaboration; and the Summary for parents of the Convention on the Rights of the Child.
Skills and Employment Family Literacy Initiative

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap: Community stakeholders can act in the area of family literacy, and tools and support are available and used by those members of OLMCs who need them.
7.5   0.18   Consultations were carried out with key stakeholders to identify priority areas for action and to design the initiative accordingly. The Department approved two projects aiming to increase knowledge of factors that influence participation of new target client groups in family literacy programs. Grant agreements were put in place in March 2009 and projects are expected to be completed in the fall 2009.
Social Development Child Care Pilot Project

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap: New knowledge on child care services for minority Francophone communities.
13.5   2.6   The project is to assess the impact of a French-language preschool program on linguistic development and on the learning ability of young Francophone children living in minority Francophone communities. The first of two years of preschool program delivery and assessment of the children's readiness for schooling in French have been completed in the six participating minority Francophone communities: Saint John and Edmundston (New Brunswick), Cornwall, Durham and Orleans (Ontario), and Edmonton (Alberta).

The scope of the pilot project was extended to be able to measure the children's future achievements in school, 12 and 24 months after the end of the preschool program. Preliminary results will be available in the spring 2010.
Citizenship and Immigration Canada Integration of French-speaking immigrants

Maintain, develop and improve promotional events abroad and the resettlement of Francophone immigrants

Consolidate existing support networks and enhance settlement services

Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC)
Recruitment and integration of immigrants

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

French-speaking immigrants obtain reinforced services of establishment in OLMCs.
20.0   3.03   Organization of targeted promotional and recruitment events in Paris (France) and other European cities where there are significant pools of potential Francophone immigrants.

Destination Canada, an annual job fair in France and Belgium, organized by the Paris Mission's Immigration Services.

Destination Canada in November 2008:

11,000 applications, 2,500 participants selected, 10 provinces, 2 territories, FCFA, RDÉE and 26 employers.

Other information and promotional sessions: 55 sessions, 3,840 participants.

Four fairs: 1,098 visitors in the stands.

Recruitment of Francophone refugees: 260 individuals selected.

Raising the provinces' awareness of Francophone immigration.

Presentations by the Immigration Manager at the Embassy of Canada in Paris (France) and by an official from the French government agency, Pôle emploi international, during the meeting of the federal-provincial economic working group.

Over 90 contribution agreements (for reception, orientation, client needs assessment, language training, needs review, community and newcomer awareness, access to labour market, matching, childcare services for language training) with 50 Francophone service providers were signed under the settlement program.

Three networks set up in Ontario (north, centre-southwest, east) and new settlement services in Francophone schools in Windsor, Edmonton, Halifax and BC.

Free language instruction (LINC) and Enhanced Language Training (ELT) for newcomers to Canada provided in French in Ottawa and New Brunswick. Data on the number of registered students who have completed the course(s) is not available at this time.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Broadcasting Policy and Programs
CTRC Study

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) CRTC report is issued on the availability and quality of broadcasting services to English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada.

2) The findings of the report will inform policy and decision-making on the availability and quality of broadcasting services in English and French linguistic communities in Canada.
Non-
monetary
  N/A   In response to legislation by order in council, the CRTC published a report on March 30, 2009 on the accessibility and quality of broadcasting services offered to Anglophone and Francophone communities in Canada. The report's results will inform policy and decision-

making on broadcasting services offered to Anglophone and Francophone minority communities of Canada. The Government will continue to ensure that its policies and programs meet the needs of official language minority communities, particularly those pertaining to interactive digital media, as indicated in the announcement of the Canada Media Fund. In its report, the CRTC committed itself to analyzing, through its decision-

making process, the effect of its decisions on official language minority communities.
Atlantic Canada Opportuni-ties Agency Community Development Support to francophone immigration in New Brunswick

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap: Enhanced capacity to support francophone immigration in New Brunswick.
10.0   No
expenses
in
2008
-
2009
  The program will be implemented in 2009-2010.
Industry Canada -FedNor Community, Economic and Regional Development (of Ontario) Economic Development  Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of economic issues of OLMCs
10.5   FedNor
0.10



FedNor
(Cash
Management
0.10)



Industry
Canada
0.03
Total:
0.23
  Delivery mechanisms for the initiative are in place.

Updated data to facilitate micro-economic analysis and research (2006 Census).
Industry Canada -Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) Northern Economy 0.4   No
expenses
in
2008
-
2009
  Made stakeholders aware of funding available for 2009-2010
Economic Develop-ment (CED) for Quebec regions Economic Development Economic Development  Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.
10.2   0.16   Implementation of the Economic Development Initiative of the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality: Acting for the Future.

Funding granted to two projects aiming to promote economic development of English-speaking communities in Quebec.
Western Economic Diversifi-cation Canada Research and Analysis

Community Economic Planning, Development and Adjustment

Business Development and Entrepreneur-ship

Innovation
Economic Development  Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of economic issues of OLMCs.
3.2   0.17   Western Economic Development worked to implement the Economic Development Initiative (EDI), and one project was approved in Manitoba Region. The project will support innovation in a Francophone educational institution, Le College Universitaire de Saint-Boniface, by contributing to the acquisition of new equipment and laboratory technologies for the Multimedia Communications Program of its Science Faculty.
Atlantic Canada Opportuni-ties Agency Community Development Economic Development  Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.
6.2   No
expenses
in
2008
-
2009
  The program will be implemented in 2009-2010.
Human Resources and Skills Develop-ment Canada Skills and Employment Enabling Fund for Official-Language Minority Communities

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Contribute to synergies among Government of Canada programming relevant to OLMCs; Contribution recipients are informed and contribute to knowledge building and program/policy issues; Knowledge shared among federal partners, contribution recipients and OLMCs.

2) Program results are available to inform management and program policy issues.

3) OLMCs' access to Government of Canada programs and services.

4) Collaborative arrangements.
69.0   12.0   Fourteen agreements were signed with the delegated organizations in the official languages minority communities (OLMCs) that represent the Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité or the Community Table, one for each province and territory and one at the national level.

Community projects were implemented in OLMCs, such as feasibility studies to support employability and entrepreneurship.

The Enabling Fund has leveraged resources from other levels of government and the private and non-profit sectors to support the delivery of the program in OLMCs.  For example, Community Table-CEDECs (Quebec) generated $1.6M in additional funding from other sources.

Memoranda of Understanding between federal institutions and community partners were signed with both representatives from Anglophone and Francophone minority communities.  The Memoranda of Understanding will help leverage funding and increase cooperation among federal partners to support OLMCs in the areas of human resources and economic development.
Intermediate Result 2: Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
Immediate Result 2.1: Strengthened capacity of language industries.
Public Works and Government Services Canada Linguistic Services            Linguistic Stewardship University Scholarships Program in Translation

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Scholarships help encourage students to pursue post-secondary studies in translation, interpretation and terminology.
8.0   0.10   Ensure funding for PWGSC initiatives under the Roadmap.

Hold consultations with key language sector stakeholders.

Develop terms and conditions of the new Canadian Language Sector Enhancement Program (composed of the Language Industry Initiative and the University Scholarships Program in Translation). Set up a Program management team.
Public Works and Government Services Canada Linguistic Services

Linguistic Stewardship
Language Industry Initiative

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Funded projects help enhance the capacity, diversity and effectiveness of the language sector.
10.0   0.41   Ensure funding for PWGSC initiatives under the Roadmap.

Hold consultations with key language sector stakeholders.

Develop terms and conditions of the new Canadian Language Sector Enhancement Program (composed of the Language Industry Initiative and the University Scholarships Program in Translation). Set up a Program management team.
National Research Council of Canada Information Technologies Languages Technologies Research Centre

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Collaboration with key partners in the implementation of an R&D strategy responsive to industry needs.

2) Innovative tool prototypes for the support of translation and the creation and management of multilingual and multicultural content.

Transfer of knowledge and technology
10.0   2.02   COLLABORATIONS

Eight collaborative projects completed, totalling $830,270 for 2008-2009 (details below).

Third year of collaboration with SRI International (California) and other partners as part of the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)'s GALE project. NRC is participating in GALE project experiments using its statistical machine translation system (PORTAGE) and by working with similar systems in laboratories around the world. These experiments help us improve the PORTAGE technology. Value: US$359,031 (NRC revenue only) for 2008-2009.

Second year of collaboration with the SMART consortium as part of the European Union's IST program. NRC is participating as an expert on statistical machine translation and provides its PORTAGE system as a reference model. This partnership allows us to work with European experts in machine learning (which includes statistical machine translation). Value: $98,070 (NRC in-kind) for 2008-2009.

Collaborated with two companies to develop management functionalities for multilingual content in TikiWiki software. Value: $235,000 (NRC in-kind and revenue) for 2008-2009.

Collaborated with the Government of Ontario on the use of an innovative terminology tool developed by NRC. Value: $29,000 (in-kind) for 2008-2009.

Launched a PORTAGE and PORTAGE-SYSTRAN pilot project with the International Labour Office (ILO-BIT, UN, Geneva, CH). Value as of March 31, 2009: $25,000 (in-kind).

Completed PORTAGE pilot project with a private translation firm. Value as of March 31, 2009: $20,000 (in kind).

Completed one pilot project for the hybrid machine translation system PORTAGE-SYSTRAN with a private translation firm. Value: $15,000 (in-kind).

Provided access to PORTAGE technology for the SISTIL project run by LGS (IBM) and funded through the Government of Quebec's regional program ACCORD. Value: $5,000 (in-kind) for 2008-2009.

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 2008-2009

Filed one new patent application.

Hosted four visiting researchers.

Received and trained four students (PhD, Master's and undergraduate).

Published eight scientific papers.

Organized two symposiums.

Chaired international conference program sub-committee.

Participated on 14 editorial boards for scientific journals.

Participated in 11 international conferences.

Participated in two national conferences.

Held four positions of various editorial responsibilities with international research journals.

Performed 12 re-readings for international research journals.

Performed 12 readings for international conferences.

Participated on five national committees other than conference organizing committees.

Assessed five research proposals for national organizations.

Assessed four research proposals for international organizations.

TRANSFER

Issued one commercial licence for NRC's PORTalign technology (word alignment software) to Multicorpora R&D, which used it to create WordAlign™. NRC generated $5,000 in revenue (licensing fees) for 2008-2009.

Issued four evaluation licences for statistical machine translation software (PORTAGE) to companies to assess how well this technology can be used in the private sector.

Issued seven research licences to Canadian universities (five for statistical machine translation software (PORTAGE) and two for document categorization and classification software (CATÉGO, FACTO) to train university staff highly qualified in these areas.

Transferred three test corpora for machine translation: two to companies and one to a university. Value: supports testing of NRC technology by its partners.

OTHER COLLABORATIVE ACTIVITIES IN 2008-2009

Conducted nine presentations on activities being carried out by IIT-Gatineau.

Organized two external national conferences, workshops or seminars.

Participated in eight meetings of various committees of the Language Technologies Research Centre (LTRC-CRTL), Language Industry Association (AILIA) and the ACCORD program (with several NRC employees attending some of the meetings).

Participated in AILIA's annual fair.
Immediate Result 2.2: Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
Public Works and Government Services Canada Linguistic Services            Linguistic Stewardship Government of Canada Language Portal

Result for 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Canadians have better access to quality language resources in both official languages.
16.0   $1.19   Ensure funding for PWGSC initiatives under the Roadmap.

Purchase upgraded server infrastructure for hosting of Termium free of charge.

Develop and host Language Portal website.

Establish maintenance agreements for Language Portal website and Termium infrastructure.

Ensure compatibility of Termium with Common Look and Feel 2.0 standards.

Make necessary changes to Termium to enable dissemination free of charge over the Internet.

Revise and adapt 244 language-related articles.

Revise and adapt 14 Writing tools.

Revise and adjust 13 Linguistic games.

Establish a project management team.
Canada School of Public Service Foundational learning

Official Languages Learning Language retention services
Expanding Universities'  Access to Language Learning

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Increased access to language training products by Canadians through new partnerships with Canadian universities.
2.5   No
expenses
in
2008
-
2009
  The program will be implemented in 2009-2010.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages Minority-Language Education - Component: Support to Second-Language and Minority-Language Education.

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Increased access of OLMCs to quality education in their language in their milieu.
190.0   38.0   This investment has allowed the provinces and territories to improve their programs and activities that promote the learning of French and English as a second official language for over 2.4 million students, including 295,197 in French Immersion.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages Minority-Language Education -

Component: Summer Language Bursaries



Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Improved access of OLMCs to a first-rate education in their language in their environment.
38.3   7.66   Almost 7,700 scholarship holders take advantage of the Explore program, which offers a cultural exchange that helps learners perfect their comprehension of their second official language.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages Minority-Language Education -

Component: Official-language Monitors

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Improved access of OLMCs to a quality education in their language and milieu.
14.8   2.96   The amount of participants in the Odyssée and Accent programs is maintained. These programs allow about 800 students to work as language assistants in second-language classrooms across the country. 
Canadian Heritage Official Languages Youth Initiatives - Promotion of the linguistic duality

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language.
2.0   No
expenses
in
2008
-
2009
  The program will be implemented in 2009-2010.
Immediate Result 2.3:  Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
Canadian Heritage Cultural Industries National Translation Program for Book Publishing

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
5.0   No
expenses
in
2008
-
2009
  The program will be implemented in 2009-2010.
Canadian Heritage Cultural Industries Musical Showcase Program for Artists from Official-language Communities

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
4.5   0.5   More than 20 musical showcases of regional, national and international size have been funded, ensuring that the objectives of the initiative have been reached.
Intermediate Result 3: Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.
Immediate Result 3.1: Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
Justice Canada Legal Services to Government Accountability and Coordination Framework

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Support to Ministers with statutory or sectoral responsibilities for official languages and to work with them.
2.18   0.33   Legal opinion and advice services for federal institutions: 120 informal and 45 formal opinions; three framework opinions on horizontal issues.

Monitoring, meetings, conferences, training sessions and tools: five courses offered; one major conference organized (being held in 2009-2010); 10 presentations on specific issues.

Tools distributed: three summary reports on language rights cases; three memos on decisions--FFT, SANB, and Caldech.

Meetings: Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages--seven meetings; Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions--six meetings; participation in the work of the Departmental Advisory Committee on Official Languages. Two meetings of the Practice Group; two high-profile cases managed horizontally--SANB and Caldech.
Justice Canada Internal Services Accountability and Coordination Framework 0.15   0.03   N/A
Canadian Heritage Official Languages Accountability and Coordination Framework

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) The Government of Canada has official languages strategies.

2) The partners are supported in the implementation of their official languages initiatives.

3) The quality of information on results (financial and non-financial) provided by the partners is improved.

4) The results of the research on official languages are communicated to the partners.

5) The Minister of Official Languages is advised on official languages files.
13.5   1.91   Development of the new official languages strategy of the Government of Canada: the Roadmap for Canadian Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future and distribution of a 20-page publication.

Update of OLS website.

Presentation of two Treasury Board submissions in cooperation with the 14 Roadmap partners.

Development of a Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (HRMAF) to support the implementation of the Roadmap initiatives.  The HRMAF includes a performance measurement strategy, a risk management analysis, an evaluation strategy and a reporting strategy. It also defines the structure of activities and results, the governance structure, and the roles and responsibilities of partners.

The implementation of a performance measurement strategy will contribute to improve the quality of information on results provided by the partners.

Coordination and presentation of some results of research on official languages to partners.

The first workshop of the 2008 Symposium follow-up meeting was held on March 2009. The OLS gave advice and counsel on a continual basis to the Minister responsible for Official Languages in using briefing notes and organizing meetings.
Immediate Result 3.2: Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.
Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer[1] Policy Direction - Partnerships and Integration Program

Integrity and Sustainability Program
Centre of excellence

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap: Linguistic duality is reinforced in the federal public service.
17.0   3.4   Began reflecting on ways to modernize policy instruments and will continue discussing this issue next year.

Processed 26 interpretation requests.

Provided feedback on 10 policy instruments from other policy centres.

Processed approximately 2,500 opinion, advice and information requests.

Held 81 information sessions. Gave 12 workshops.
Strategic Services Program           Organized 37 awareness activities.

Organized five special events.

Organized one conference for the Network of Champions.

Organized three sessions for the Champions.

Organized one meeting with a Champion.

Organized one Good Practices Forum.

Discussed a new method of collaborating with the Champions and will implement this new method next year.

Discussed a new method of collaborating with the advisory committees and a new method will be implemented incrementally. Set up one working group as part of the new approach of collaboration.

Held three DACOL meetings. Held two CCACOL meetings.
Integrity and Sustainability Program           Requested approximately 180 annual reviews for 2007-2008 and received 155 for 2007-2008 in 2009.

2006-2007 Annual Report tabled in March 2009.
Total 1,110.1   180.79    


[1] In February 2009, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer was created. It aggregates the Canada Public Service Agency and some parts of Treasury Board Secretariat related to compensation and human resources.

Comments on Variances: In the previous 2008-2009 RPP, we were not able to fill cell 14 (Planned Spending for 2008-2009) and cell 16 (Expected Results for 2008-2009) because the Roadmap for Canadian Linguistic Duality: Acting for the Future was only announced on June 19, 2008.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Geneviève Postolec (819) 934-9196





Name of Horizontal Initiative: 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games--Delivering on Our Commitments

Name of Lead Department(s): Department of Canadian Heritage

Lead Department Program Activity:

PA2 - Sustainability of cultural expression and participation

PA7 - Participation in community and civic life

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Fiscal year 2003-04

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $597.1M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Government of Canada is a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games. The 2010 Federal Secretariat within the Department of Canadian Heritage works horizontally to support and promote federal engagement in the planning and delivery of the Games, including the provision of high-quality essential federal services, as well as capital and legacy funding. The Secretariat works with its partners and stakeholders to leverage the Games as an opportunity to advance public policy objectives, establish lasting legacies, and derive maximum benefit for all Canadians.  (www.canada2010.gc.ca)

Shared Outcome(s):

  • Canadian excellence and values will be promoted nationally and internationally;
  • Sport, economic, social and cultural legacies will be established for the benefit of all Canadians, in alignment with federal policy objectives.

Early planning and seamless, cost-effective delivery of mandated federal responsibilities, including federal essential services (security, entry of individuals, etc.), will contribute to high-quality 2010 Winter Games.

Governance Structure(s):

The 2010 Federal Secretariat, under the leadership of the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage, supports the Framework for Federal Coordination (FFC). The FFC is the primary mechanism for promoting horizontal management of the Winter Games. This governance structure consists of three levels:

  • a Deputy Ministers and Heads of Agency Coordination Committee facilitating interdepartmental and intergovernmental consultation and coordination of Games-related issues and commitments;
  • an Assistant Deputy Minister-level Representative Working Group (RWG) reporting on the progress of essential federal service delivery; and
  • Working-level Issue Clusters supporting intergovernmental coordination and information sharing.

In addition, an Essential Federal Services Committee (EFS Committee) has been established under the authority of the RWG to support, promote, coordinate and monitor seamless planning of essential federal services.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for

2008-09
Actual Spending for

2008-09
Expected Results for

2008-09
Results Achieved in

2008-09
Canadian Heritage Sustainability of cultural expression and participation. Participation in community and civic life. Venues - Sport Hosting Program

Paralympics -Sport Hosting Program

Opening Ceremony - Celebration and Commemoration Program

Live Sites - Celebration and Commemoration Program and Cultural Spaces Canada Program

Torch Relays - Celebration and Commemoration Program Secretariat Operation & Management -2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Federal Secretariat
442 62.7 Venues: 24.8

Paralympics: 5.1

Opening Ceremony: 2.6

Live Sites: 2.9

Torch Relays: Nil

Secretariat Operation & Management: 6.3

Total: 41.7
Positive domestic and international exposure. Canada has established sport, social and cultural legacies. The 2010 FS played a pivotal role in enhancing the Government of Canada's profile during the Beijing 2008 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. The 2010 FS collaborated with both the Beijing and Vancouver Games Organizing Committees to develop programming for federal departments participating in the Official Observer Programs, which are key components of the Olympic Games Knowledge Management Program led by the International Olympic Committee. The 2010 FS developed the Beijing 2008 Olympic and Paralympic Summer Games Observer Program Report to document lessons learned and best practices for use in planning the delivery of federal services during the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Organized and delivered one-year countdown events for the 2010 Olympic & Paralympic Winter Games.

The 2010 FS re-launched Canada2010.gc.ca, the Government of Canada's 2010 Winter Games website. The 2010 FS developed and distributed additional promotional items for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Canadian Heritage finalized contribution agreements with VANOC for venue construction, Opening Ceremonies, and Paralympic Games operations. Four other contribution agreements were established with the City of Vancouver and the Resort Municipality of Whistler to establish Celebration Sites during the Games.
Security Group Sol. Gen. (RCMP)

Public Safety & Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC)

Department of National Defence (DND)

Canadian Security Intelligence Agency (CSIS)

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
N/A Police and Security 87.5   Due to national security implications, the Security Group has asked for this information not to be released. Vancouver 2010 Integrated Security will continue functional planning of air security, marine security, road-based security, venue security, and exercise detailed planning.  It is expected to be completed this year.

Major security facilities for games operations are being identified and secured as well as integrated command and control structures.

Detailed functional venue planning will continue into the Standard Operating Procedures phase. Vancouver 2010 Integrated Security will also be working with planners from London 2012, integrating best practices; an overview presentation will take place with the Beijing 2008 Summer Games Security Committee.
Plans continue to be refined and tested, and planning includes participation of all stakeholders and partners.
Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) Efficient and effective border management that contributes to the security and prosperity of Canada. Security 15.8 1.8 1.8 Operational and logistical planning in preparation for the 2010 Winter Games. The CBSA's Olympic and Paralympic Task Force was formed in October 2008 to lead the national and Pacific Region efforts to ensure that we are in the strongest possible position during the Games and participate effectively in the central coordinating infrastructure that has been established at the Privy Council Office.

Development of operational and contingency plans is well underway to ensure that sufficient processes and resources will be in place to deal with increased volumes of travellers and goods.

Implementation of a rigorous project management framework that tracks all project deliverables and expected completion dates.

Continuing to build strong partnerships with other federal government departments, the Vancouver Organizing Committee and key partners and stakeholders. Olympic Federal Coordination Issue Clusters participation.
Citizenship and Immigration (CIC) Maximum contribution to Canada's economic, social and cultural development from migration. Temporary Resident Program 5.0 0.6 0.5 Salary:
0.4  (including Employee Benefit Plan, excluding Public Works & Government Services Canada (PWGSC) Accommodation) Non-Sal: 0.1
Regulatory and policy changes for the accreditation process of Olympic athletes and officials. Input to design, creation and handling of the Olympic Identification and Accreditation Card (OIAC). Continued operational and logistical planning. Delivery of regulatory and policy changes for the accreditation process of Olympic athletes and officials. Provided input for finalization of design, creation and handling of the Olympic Identification and Accreditation Card (OIAC). Defined selected operational and logistical plans. 
Human Resources & Skills Development Canadian (HRSDC) Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning. Foreign workers and immigrants 1.3 0.4 0 The entry of foreign workers is incorporated into the larger nationwide Foreign Worker Program. The entry of foreign workers is incorporated into the larger nationwide Foreign Worker Program.
Health Canada (HC) Reduced health and environmental risks from products and substances, and safer living and working environments. Healthy environments and consumer safety

Health Protection of Foreign Dignitaries

Health Protection of traveling public Health Protection of Public Servants
2.6 0.55 IPP

O&M

$62k Salaries

$17k
Meet stakeholders to identify requirements.

Creation of a Health Canada Network.

Creation of Health Canada operational team including lead environmental health officer, nurse, paramedic and physician. Finalize agreements with stakeholders.
A total of about $230K has been incurred in expenditures by the Workplace Health and Public Safety Program-- Internationally Protected Persons Program (WHPSP--IPP).  However, the Treasury Board Secretariat funding in question was never transferred to our Program.
Environment Canada (EC) Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision-making. Environment Canada - Meteorological Service of Canada - Weather and Environment Operations - MSC Operations Pacific and Yukon 9.3 1.5 1.79 Forecaster training and supporting technologies for Olympic weather services to be implemented. Forecaster training complete, successful delivery of event forecasts during 2009 winter events.

 

Installation and calibration of all monitoring technology complete, including Doppler radar. Dedicated sessions at American Meteorological Society 2009 and Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society 2008 conferences with presentations covering monitoring science and forecasting at the Games. Engagement with Emergency Measures Organizations (EMO) and participation in Exercise Silver (a pre-Games security test exercise). Engagement with VANOC, other levels of government and other federal departments to ensure integrated planning. Engagement with public, media, and industry toward the preparation of weather and climate services for external stakeholders for 2010. Examples: new weather office pages, webcasting online, weather support for the Torch Relay, new Whistler weather radio installation.

Under the World Weather Research Program an international Research Development Project (SNOW V-10) on winter snowcasting in complex terrain has been initiated and will provide a scientific legacy.
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes. Environment Canada - Pacific and Yukon -Sustainability Division 2.6 0.5 0.49 Partnerships with other federal departments, Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC) and the Province of BC are advanced in order to ensure that Sustainability principles are integrated into 2010 Winter Games planning & operations.   Opportunities for showcasing sustainability innovation are identified. Coordinated the development and deployment of the 2010 Greening Government Toolkit for federal government employees, in partnership with PWGSC and the Pacific Federal Council. Identified environmental sustainability initiatives, best practices and lessons learned from the Beijing 2008 Games and incorporated into sustainability planning for 2010. Coordinated the development of an inventory of federal 2010-related sustainability innovations. Organized a Government of Canada sustainability exhibit at the World Conference on Sport and the Environment (WCSE), hosted by VANOC in Vancouver, March 29-31, 2009. Provided support and guidance to a VANOC-directed video that will promote the sustainability story of the 2010 Winter Games. Co-hosted with VANOC a partners' workshop on sustainable/

Aboriginal procurement to identify and share best practices and opportunities to advance sustainability objectives. Participated in VANOC's "Sustainability Star" program to select 2010-related sustainability initiatives for recognition. Provided input to the socio-economic impact study on the 2010 Games being conducted by Price Waterhouse Coopers. Initiated work with other federal departments to develop a federal plan for offsetting federal Games-related carbon emissions.
Efficient and effective environmental assessments Environment Canada - Environmental Stewardship Branch - Environmental Protection Operations - Pacific & Yukon Environmental Protection Operations - Environmental Assessment and Marine Programs 1.5 0.2 0.12 Environmental assessments (EA) and follow-up activities completed. Completed follow-up activities related to 2010 project EAs.
Fisheries and Oceans Healthy and productive aquatic eco-systems. Habitat management 0.8 0.1 0.1 Environmental assessment work conducted as required. Permitting, advice and monitoring for the Sea to Sky Highway Upgrade and the Callaghan Valley Nordic Centre. Continued to advise on the Whistler Downhill Venue, Whistler Athlete's Village, Cypress Snowboarding Venue and Legacy trails associated with the Nordic Venue.
Total 597.1 (includes 2.7 for PHAC in non-security funding and 26.0 for the Canadian Tourism Commission) 68.35 46.73    

Comments on Variances:

For Canadian Heritage, the major difference in planned spending is due to project delays on capital construction of the celebration sites. Vancouver delayed due to the Environmental Assessment process and Whistler due to budget and scope.

HRSDC did not pursue the Treasury Board submission to receive incremental funding under the horizontal initiative. Any activities related to the 2010 Winter Games are being funded from their A-base funding.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

The activities taken by non-federal partners of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games are critical to its success. Each of these partners has provided information on the results of their activities on their respective websites.

  • Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games
  • Government of British Columbia
  • City of Vancouver
  • Resort Municipality of Whistler
  • Canadian Olympic and Paralympic Committees

Contact information: Karen Mackarous  (613) 949-7816

Top of Page

Department of Finance Canada

Table 3: Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime—formerly the National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering

Name of Lead Department(s): Department of Finance Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 2000

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2009–10

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $429,006

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering (NICML) was formally established in 2000 as part of the government's ongoing effort to combat money laundering in Canada. Legislation adopted that year, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act (PCMLA), created a mandatory reporting system for suspicious financial transactions, large cross-border currency transfers, and certain prescribed transactions. The legislation also established the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) to collect and analyze these financial transaction reports and to disclose pertinent information to law enforcement and intelligence agencies. In December 2001, the PCMLA was amended to include measures to fight terrorist financing activities and renamed the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (PCMLTFA).

The NICML was expanded and is now known as Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime. In December 2006, Bill C-25 amended the PCMLTFA to ensure Canada's legislation remains consistent with international anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing standards as set out by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and is responsive to areas of domestic risk. Amendments include enhanced client identification requirements, the creation of a registration regime for money services businesses, and the establishment of an administrative and monetary penalties regime to deal with lesser infractions of the Act.

Shared Outcome(s): To detect and deter money laundering and the financing of terrorist activities, and to facilitate the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences.

Governance Structure(s): Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime is a horizontal initiative involving both funded and non-funded partners. The funded partners include the Department of Finance Canada, the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, FINTRAC, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP); non-funded partners include Public Safety Canada (PS), the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI), Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS). An interdepartmental ADM-level group and a working group, consisting of all partners and led by the Department of Finance Canada, have been established to direct and coordinate the government's efforts to combat money laundering and terrorist financing activities.


($ thousands)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Expected Results for
2008-09
Results Achieved in
2008-09
Department of Finance Canada Financial Sector Policy Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime 3,000 300 316

Consultations with public- and private-sector stakeholders to refine regulatory proposals;

Published regulations pursuant to the amended PCMLTFA; and Effective oversight of Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime.

Consultations with public- and private-sector stakeholders are ongoing. A public-private sector advisory committee was established to facilitate discussions among private and public sector members of the Regime.
Consultations were also held with the real estate and credit union centrals sectors regarding regulatory amendments.

One set of regulatory amendments to the PCMLTFA, which applied to real estate brokers and agents, were published in 2008–09. The amendments address some of the industry's concerns and clarify some of the provisions that came into force in June 2008.

The Department of Finance Canada continues to lead the Regime and make available avenues to address policy and operational issues to ensure Canada has an effective Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime.

Department of Justice Canada The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering

Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime

9,300 100 100 The Criminal Division of the Department of Justice Canada plays a significant role in the Regime. For 2008–09, it is anticipated that the Criminal Division will use the resources it receives to carry out work related to the FATF, including attending FATF-related international meetings, which will total five over the relevant period. Attendance at the meetings is of particular importance during 2008, because Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti‑Terrorist Financing Regime is being evaluated this year against the FATF's 40 + 9 recommendations and the presence of the Division is necessary to ensure proper discussions of the Canadian evaluation report. In addition, the Criminal Division will be the relevant authority to respond to all legal issues that develop out of that evaluation. Resources will also be allocated to ensure the Criminal Division's continued involvement in policy development relating to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, the Human Rights Law Section will receive money to deal with any ancillary constitutional issues raised during prosecutions.

Expected results were achieved.

In addition, the Department of Justice Canada provided updates to the FATF with regard to the Canadian mutual evaluation.
Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) Addressing criminal issues to contribute to a safer world for Canada Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
6,900 2,300 2,269 The Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) plays a significant role in the regime. For 2008–09, it is anticipated that information provided to law enforcement by FINTRAC will result in more prosecutorial legal advice being provided to law enforcement. It will also result in additional charges being laid for money laundering and terrorist financing offences and thus result in an increased workload for prosecutors. The PPSC also has responsibilities related to the PCMLTFA. The planned work includes applications for production orders, increases in border seizure and forfeiture work associated with suspected proceeds of crime, and prosecutions related to offences against the Act. In addition, resources will be used for training of law enforcement personnel and prosecutors and for the development and coordination of policy as it relates to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, PPSC resources will carry out work related to the FATF, including attending a FATF meeting. In 2008–09, the PPSC dealt with a number of files that contained a charge of money laundering or terrorist financing under the Criminal Code (CC)or a charge under the PCMLTFA. Specifically, the PPSC opened 45 new files that included 69 money laundering charges under the CC and 1 charge under the PCMLTFA. In addition, Crown counsel worked on 74 carry-over files that contained 246 charges of money laundering and 5 charges of terrorist financing under the CC and 7 charges under the PCMLTFA. The PPSC recorded pre-charge advice and legal support in almost a quarter (24 per cent) of these new and carry-over files. Over this time period, PPSC counsel provided formal as well as ad hoctraining to police over the course of their investigations. PPSC counsel also obtained 12 production orders under section 60 of the PCMLTFA.
Financial Transactions Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Collection, analysis, and dissemination of financial information Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime 266,591 38,595 40,256 Technology-driven financial intelligence analysis and case disclosures, which are widely used by law enforcement and intelligence agencies, and a program that fosters compliance by the reporting entities. Implementation of amendments contained in Bill C‑25

In 2008–09, FINTRAC had a large increase in the number of case disclosures of financial intelligence made to law enforcement agencies and national security agencies. This year, FINTRAC made 556 case disclosures, compared to 210 in 2007–08 and 193 in 2006–07. This increase is attributed to changes that have been made to the Centre's disclosure process, thus making it more efficient and responsive to the needs of recipient agencies. In addition, with the coming into force of Bill C-25's legislative changes, FINTRAC is able to provide a significantly expanded range of information, enabling the disclosures to have a greater effect.
Assistance and outreach to reporting entities continued, with a particular focus on providing guidance to sectors that have been newly brought under the Regime. FINTRAC conducted over 500 outreach meetings, reaching more than 20,000 individuals, and provided feedback to reporting entities and associations representing all sectors now within the scope of the PCMLTFA.

FINTRAC also conducted a greater number of examinations in all reporting entity sectors. In 2008–09, FINTRAC conducted over 450 such examinations, representing more than a 60-per-cent increase over the previous year. FINTRAC's non-compliance disclosures to law enforcement were also up significantly.

FINTRAC has completed the implementation of virtually all elements of the C-25 legislation. This includes the Money Services Business Registration system and the Administrative Monetary Penalties (AMP) regime.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) Security Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
43,539 5,865 5,670 The CBSA is responsible for administering Part 2 of the PCMLTFA, “Reporting of Currency and Monetary Instruments.” The Cross-Border Currency Reporting (CBCR) Program requires that travellers report the importation and exportation of currency and monetary instruments equal to or greater than $10,000. Part 2 also provides for the enforcement element of the CBCR Program, which includes conducting searches, questioning individuals, and seizing non-reported or falsely reported currency and suspected proceeds of crime. During 2008–09, the CBSA performed more than 2,000 seizures under the Act, totalling over $40 million. Approximately $8 million of this total was forfeited to the Crown, and penalties have been assessed in excess of $900 thousand. Over 170 seizures have resulted in forfeiture as suspected proceeds of crime or funds for the use of terrorist activities. Administratively, border services officers have collected over 32,644 cross-border currency reports.

Access

Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
12,413 1,661

1,762

(see above) (see above)
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Reporting compliance Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime 8,800 2,200 2,200 The projected number of audits is 105, with a projected federal tax recovery of $8,956,905. Ninety-six audits were completed with a total tax recovery of $26.6 million. In this fiscal year, 10 to 12 audits, with an unusually high tax recovery, were completed. The tax recovery amounts are not the norm for these types of files and are the reason for exceeding the Department's projections. These files also require more time to complete, which explains the lower number of audits completed.
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Money Laundering Units Money Laundering Units Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime 57,103 7,978

6,481

Enhanced national and international opportunities for the detection and investigation of money laundering activities;

Development of FINTRAC disclosures, as well as other intelligence, to a point where resources from Integrated Proceeds of Crime Units or elsewhere in the RCMP could then be directed toward investigations that seek to increase seizures; and

Increased resource level in Canada's three major urban centres (Vancouver, Toronto, and Montréal) to help build up the investigative capacity in those centres to conduct investigations on leads related to Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime.

Ten major investigations opened in 2008 have an international component associated with them.

Many major investigations opened in 2008–09 are active files as they are complex in nature and often take years to conclude. Resources are focussed on the deterrence of money laundering by targeting major organized criminals and crime groups. One of these major files in 2008,initiated from a FINTRAC disclosure, is still under investigation and has over 21,000 person hours on it.

There have been 32 major investigations initiated, which have resulted in over $7.6 million seized.

RCMP, Anti–Terrorist Financing Team (ATFT) Special initiatives Canada's
Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime
21,360 5,340 4,102 Through the gathering and analysis of financial intelligence, the ATFT will focus on converting that intelligence into proactive investigations, thus enhancing Canada's ability to detect and deter terrorist financing activities

The ATFT continues to provide support to seven project status investigations of terrorist financing across Canada and to a number of requests for information received from domestic and international agencies.

The ATFT, in conjunction with Canada Border Services Agency, CSIS, FINTRAC, and the RCMP's Proceeds of Crime, took part in a G8-sanctioned law enforcement effort targeting cash couriers at selected international airports. Canadian actions resulted in cash seizures of over $600,000.

ATFT units have restrained bank accounts and a building related to the Department's investigations into the World Tamil Movement in Toronto and Montréal and are in the legal process of having these assets forfeited to the Crown. In 2009, Monin Khawaja was convicted and sentenced to 10 1/2 years for providing material support to a terrorist group. An investigation in BC by the National Security Financial Investigation Unit has led to the laying of a charge of terrorist financing against a male subject related to the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam. This matter is set for trial in May 2010.

The ATFT has provided a tactical package to CSIS to assist on a proposed criminal code listing and has provided assistance on the 2008–09 review of all criminal code listings as conducted by CSIS. 

The ATFT is formalizing relationships with the Canadian Bankers Association and the Office of Superintendent of Financial Investigations by means of memorandums of understanding to ensure continued cooperation. 

The ATFT continues to provide training to the RCMP and partner agencies. Financial investigative members from the various integrated national security enforcement teams and selected partner agency representatives from CSIS, CRA, and FINTRAC attended and presented at the Fall 2008 course. Currently, the ATFT is updating the Terrorist Financing Course to reflect changes requested and feedback from candidates from course attendees. The next course is slated for September 2009.

The ATFT continues to support FATF. Members of the team have attended Caribbean Financial Action Task Force and Asia/Pacific Group on Money Laundering plenary meetings as well as the FATF plenary.

The RCMP and CRA have completed the Department's joint-venture seminars on the use of the Charities Registration Security Information Act, which were begun in 2008 and delivered to field units in Ottawa, Halifax, Montréal, Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, and Toronto. 

The ATFT has been part of the working group. led by Industry Canada, on the revised Investment Canada Act and is now performing background checks on entities at the behest of Industry Canada.
Total 429,006 64,339 63,134    

Comments on Variances: FINTRAC: The planned spending amount did not include additional funding received and approved by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat over the 2008–09 fiscal year. Among the additional resources received are the Strategic Review Reinvestments, NICML re-profiled funds from 2007–08, Secretariat adjustments for Paylist Requirements (Vote 30), and Employee Benefits Plan year-end adjustments.

RCMP, Anti-Terrorist Financing Team: The shortfall in spending is due to the ongoing challenge of staffing all vacant positions and to a number of staff members being seconded to major national security files to assist on the terrorist financing portion of investigations (funded from the budget for national security).

RCMP, Anti-Money Laundering: The shortfall in spending is due largely to the procurement of ion scanners being delayed to the following fiscal year.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Rachel Grasham
Chief, Financial Crimes Section
Phone: 613-943-2883

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Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Table 5: Horizontal Initiative-Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of Lead Department(s): Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Initiated October 3, 2005; operationalized September 18, 2006

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): Overall DFAIT spending through the Global Peace and Security Fund in 2008-09 totalled $148.9 million (vote 10 only), including horizontal funding to non-DFAIT entities (see below). Total GPSF funding since September 2006 totals $496 million.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Funded from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, the GPSF fills a funding gap by providing dedicated resources for activities to provide timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges. Leadership in this area is not properly the responsibility of the Department of National Defence (DND) and is outside Canada's traditional official development assistance program. Examples of GPSF activities include supporting peace operations and peace processes, facilitating justice and security system reform, enhancing transitional justice and reconciliation, and improving the peacekeeping capacities of military and police in Africa and the Americas. Major recipients of funding are Afghanistan, Sudan and Haiti.

DFAIT works closely with a range of government departments-including the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), RCMP, DND, Correctional Service of Canada (CSC), Canada Border Services Agency and Department of Justice-in addressing the peace and security challenges presented by fragile states. Cooperation with these partners is particularly important in providing critical expertise in the area of justice and security system reform to the civilian components of UN peace operations. In 2008-09, the GPSF entered into arrangements with several major implementing federal government departments. Of particular note was support to peace operations in Sudan through the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the support provided by the RCMP, DND and CSC for the implementation of stabilization and reconstruction projects in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, as well as in Haiti.

Shared Outcome(s):

  • Rapid, integrated and well-coordinated Canadian responses to international requirements for short- and medium-term conflict prevention, stabilization, peacebuilding and reconstruction initiatives.

  • Timely, effective and accountable Canadian contributions for responses to natural disasters and complex emergencies and initiatives aimed at the restoration of peace, security, the rule of law and legitimate government in fragile states.

  • Strengthened capacity of multilateral and regional organisations for peace operations.

Governance Structure(s):

The GPSF is managed by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) Secretariat, located in the International Security Branch of DFAIT. START convenes an interdepartmental advisory board comprising representatives from several domestic and internationally mandated departments to encourage whole-of-government coherence in the development of policy and of integrated conflict prevention, crisis response and stabilization initiatives with respect to fragile states; and to serve as a platform, when appropriate, to coordinate inter-agency responses to significant crises. Chaired by the Director General of START, the advisory board includes representatives from CIDA, DND, the Privy Council Office, the Department of Justice, the Department of Public Safety and some of its portfolio agencies (RCMP, CSC). START also convenes the Interdepartmental Task Force on Natural Disasters Abroad and manages the annual fragile states review exercise.

The GPSF is governed by two senior-level committees: the interdepartmental ADM committee, comprising five ADMs (three from CIDA and two from DFAIT), and the DM-level committee, comprising the DMs of CIDA and DFAIT. Other departments may be invited to these meetings, as appropriate.



($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners1 Total Allocation
(from start to end date)
Planned Spending
2008-2009
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Expected Results for
2008-09
Results Achieved in
2008-09
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) PA 2: Diplomacy and Advocacy Global Peace and Security Program; Global Peace Operations Program; Glyn Berry Program for Peace and Security 496.02 150.03 148.93 Timely, coordinated and cost-effective whole-of-government responses to natural and human-made crises abroad See TPP table
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) PA 1: Federal and International Operations Canadian Police Arrangement and International Police Peacekeeping (IPP) 52.3014 11.45 19.88 Implementation of RCMP international police peacekeeping projects Supported the deployment of over 100 serving police officers to fragile states, including Haiti and Afghanistan
Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) PA: N/A Peace Support Operations in Sudan 97.4322 0.0 32.5 Logistical support to Sudan peace operations (AMIS/UNAMID) Provided logistical support to AMIS/UNAMID
Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) PA 1: Correctional Interventions Operations in Afghanistan and Stabilization and Reconstruction in Haiti 4.14 1.5 1.9 Implementation of GPSF projects in Afghanistan and Haiti Supported the deployment of correction advisers to the Provincial Reconstruction Team in Afghanistan and to Haiti
Department of National Defence (DND) PA 1: Contribute to Canada and the international community Operations in Afghanistan 13.32 8.4 6.3 Supporting the Provincial Reconstruction Team and implementation of projects in Kandahar Supported the implementation of projects in Kandahar
Justice Canada PA 1: Justice policies, laws and programs Operations in Afghanistan and peace building support in Sudan 0.0 1.0 0.1 Implementation of GPSF projects in Afghanistan and Sudan Trained members of the Uganda Law Society in International Criminal Law.
Canadian Border Service Agency (CBSA) PA 1: Security Operations in Afghanistan (Pakistan-Afghanistan border); Canada's support to the Middle East Pease Process; and Stabilisation and Reconstruction in Haiti 0.0 0.7 0.0 Supporting the Provincial Reconstruction Team and Implementation of projects in Kandahar. No disbursements made.
Total   173.0 209.58  


Comment on Variance: Where significant variance exists between planned and actual disbursements, it is due to difficult programming environments, as the GPSF operates in contexts characterized by high degrees of volatility and insecurity. Further, the level of spending of the GPSF through federal partners varies in response to the size of appeals by partner countries and multilateral agencies, which may fluctuate over short periods of time. As such, planned levels constitute notional estimates.

Results to Be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): The GPSF works with a wide variety of implementing partners, including international and regional organisations, such as the United Nations and its bodies, as well as with non-governmental organisations, academic institutions, foreign governments and other legal entities. Expected and actual results achieved by these partners are outlined in their respective appeal documents and in the corresponding project and annual reports. The scope of their results and the degree to which they realize them will be conditioned by the specific environments in which they work.


Top of Page

Department of Justice Canada

Table 4: Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Anti-Drug Strategy

Name of Lead Department(s): Department of Justice

Lead Department Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-08

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12 and ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $578.5 millions

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The National Anti-Drug Strategy was launched by the Government of Canada in 2007, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Its goal is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The prevention action plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use, and to develop and implement community-based interventions & initiatives to prevent illicit drug use. The treatment action plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The enforcement action plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

Shared Outcome(s):

  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced impacts of illicit drug use through prevention and treatment efforts; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.

Governance Structure(s):

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Strategic Initiatives and Law Reform Unit of the Department of Justice Canada.

The Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC), which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources. The ADMSC prepares questions for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the development and implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by the Department of Public Safety Canada, oversees the development and implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy and the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The Communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy including, making decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative and ensuring coordination of communication.

($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual Spending for
2008-09
Expected Results for
2008-09
Results Achieved in
2008-09
Department of Justice A1 Justice policies, laws and programs a. Drug Treatment Courts $16.2 M $3,631,276 $3,631,276 Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court clients. The Drug Treatment Court Information System (DTC IS) is being enhanced to better collect drug substance relapse data. Results are inconclusive at this time given incomplete pilot site data. A recidivism study is also underway.
b. Youth Justice Fund (Treatment Action Plan) $6.8 M $1,588,283 $663,687

Increased collaboration between provincial officials responsible for youth justice services and health services in order to meet the needs of youth in the justice system who use illicit drugs.

Increased number of new or enhanced treatment models for drug-addicted youth in the justice system.

Increased number of mechanisms to share knowledge among justice system stakeholders of what models work well for drug-addicted youth in the justice system.

A total of 11 projects were funded in 2008-2009. Of the 11 projects, 5 were new and funded through contributions, 5 through grants and 1 was an on-going contribution from 2007-2008. The total value of these projects was $549,429 ($462,740 in contributions and $86,689 in grants).

Projects were undertaken in Manitoba, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, British Columbia and New Brunswick. The projects were with 6 provincial government departments, 3 were with front-line community organizations and 2 were with National organizations. The projects included the development and/or implementation of programming models (MB and ON), supporting participation of youth justice system representatives in the development of a province wide anti-drug strategy and program development (PEI), evaluation of existing drug treatment programs (BC), the development and delivery of an Atlantic conference to support the sharing of information and best practices, and support for two national conferences on the issue of youth with illicit substance abuse issues in the justice system. All Recipients have been encouraged to disseminate and share information on their projects as appropriate.

  c. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $3.1 M $616,895 $534,183 Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:
  • exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • maintaining the NADS Governance Structure;
  • leading and coordinating all NADS communications activities;
  • taking lead responsibility for accountability – evaluation and performance reporting.
Policy and Coordination:
  • Initiated the NADS Speaker Series;
  • Organized and hosted the National Forum on Drug Treatment and Youth in Conflict with the Law;
  • Introduced Bill C-15 (minimum penalties for serious drug offences);
  • Oversaw NADS involvement in the new global Political Declaration and Action Plan adopted at the United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs;
  • Participated in meetings and workshops of the OAS Inter-American Anti-Drug Commission (CICAD).

Governance structure:

  • Chaired the NADS, ADM Steering Committee;
  • Chaired multiple meetings of the NADS Policy and Performance Working Group;
  • Participated in meetings of the Prevention and Treatment, and Enforcement Working Groups.

Communications:

  • Organized the Communications Working Group meetings and numerous horizontal meetings between NADS communications advisors;
  • Produced bi-weekly NADS Communications Status Reports
  • Oversaw 22 NADS announcements, including six announcements led by Justice;
  • Oversaw 2 NADS related Ministerial releases: one tri-ministerial message and one message from the Minister of Health;
  • Maintained the NADS website.

Evaluation and reporting:

  • Chaired the Policy and Performance Working Group’s Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting;
  • Refined the performance measurement strategy, identified baseline information and developed reporting templates for uniform reporting;
  • Provided training to partner departments and agencies on the reporting templates;
  • Coordinated the DPR and RPP processes;
  • Produced the first NADS Annual Report.
  • Developed a Request for Proposal for a methodological framework to support cost-effectiveness analysis;
  • Initiated the NADS implementation evaluation.
Health Canada   a. Mass Media Campaign (Prevention Action Plan) $29.8 M $5,958,090 $3,489,000 Increase level of general knowledge and awareness of illicit drugs and the negative health and social effects associated with illicit drug use, among parents and teens

Only the parent-targeted media campaign was released and thus its impact results are limited to information on one target population – parents.

The rate of recall for the TV advertisement increased from 32% in the pre-sample to 73% in the post-sample. An increase in recalling the ad can be translated into a successful increase in parental awareness of illicit drugs health effects.

The sample of parents who recall any advertising (TV, web, radio) rated their overall knowledge about illicit drugs (including the number of drugs they are aware of, the harms associated with these drugs, and the influences of drugs on their children) higher than those parents who did not recall any advertising. These same parents who rated their knowledge as high, also noted an increase in their knowledge of being aware of the number of drugs available, the harms associated with these drugs, and the influences of drugs on their children.

This sample showed an increase in their level of knowledge as attributed to recalling the mass media campaign.

3.4.3 Controlled Substances

b. Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF)

(Prevention Action Plan)

$59 M $9,600,000 $4,889,655

Expected Outputs:

  1. Establish baseline of level of awareness and understanding of illicit drug issues and harmful health and social effects associated with illicit drug use.
  2. Prevention research, knowledge products, resources & tools
  3. National & Community-based Projects
  4. Consultations, Collaborations & Partnerships

Expected Immediate Outcomes:

  1. Increased awareness & understanding of illicit drugs & their negative consequences
  2. Enhanced uptake of knowledge in communities to address illicit drug use & its negative consequences

DSCIF implemented a strategy to build capacity among funded recipients – this includes providing evaluation training and Health Canada standardized tools to collect baseline information/ pre- and post- evaluation information on all funded projects (rather than carrying out project specific outcome evaluations). It is anticipated that this baseline collection of information will begin in Fall 2009, thus the expected output is planned to be achieved in the 2009-10 FY.

Establishing a baseline is now planned for 2009-2010 because the first projects were signed for funding in Q4 2008-09.

Funding was initiated in the Q4 2008-09 on 3 new National DSCIF projects and 60 new Regional DSCIF projects, thus successfully achieving output 3.

Nature of approved and funded projects:

  • 25 projects are targeted at increasing awareness/understanding of healthy lifestyle choices & of illicit drugs & their negative consequences, thus contributing to achieving immediate outcome 1;
  • 30 projects are focused on acquiring/improving capacity (knowledge & skills) to avoid illicit drug use, thus contributing to output 2 and immediate outcome 2; and
  • 8 projects are targeted at increasing the engagement of community structures/networks in health promotion and prevention to prevent illicit drug use among youth (ages 10-24), thus contributing to expected output 4.
3.4 Substance Use and Abuse

c. Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP)

(Treatment Action Plant)

$124.7 M $29,500,000 $1,781,337 Enhanced collaboration on responses to DTFP treatment systems’ issues within and among jurisdictions

Collaboration with jurisdictions is becoming increasingly enhanced:

a) Following the call for proposals, an average of 10 bi-lateral meetings were held with each P/T to discuss and/or clarify issues related to the nature/scope of applications under the DTFP.

b) Feb. 2009: A National-level Best Practices workshop was held [attended by 47 participants from across the country] – providing the opportunity for program planners, policy makers, and front line workers to network/share their experiences in early intervention treatment.

c) Three F/P/T Working Group conference calls were held to allow P/Ts to present their plans for enhancing treatment systems. The Provinces of Nova Scotia and British Columbia and the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) each presented their plans.

d) As of June 2009, the management of the project related to Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside “Transitional Assertive Community Treatment Team and Women’s Residential Program/Day Program for Women Survival Sex Workers” will be transferred to the BC Region.

The roll out of the program has been delayed by 1 year and only 6 projects have been signed to date (4 projects for treatment system improvements; 2 projects on treatment services and program enhancements).

4.1.1.2 First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions

d. National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program

(Treatment Action Plan)

$36 M $5,900,000 $5,600,000

Enhanced capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations

Research applied to NNADP for the purpose of enhancing the program’s services.

Capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations is becoming increasingly enhanced:

Activities included:

  • conducting regional needs assessments;
  • establishing the First Nations Addictions Advisory Panel to guide the development of a new national treatment framework;
  • enhancing the training and certification opportunities of NNADAP workers;
  • supporting accreditation of treatment centres;
  • continuing the design and implementation of 4 mental wellness team pilot projects;
  • launching a pilot impact study in 3 First Nations communities designed to examine NNADAP outputs and outcomes; and
  • continuing work to modernize addictions and treatment services including increased research, regional capacity building, and establishing strategic partnerships with various First Nations organizations.
3.4.3 Controlled Substances

e. Office of Controlled Substances

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$12.8 M $2,142,000 $877,267

Establish baseline measure for “Industry and sites comply with legislation and regulations” (PAA)

Increased understanding of compliance and policy/regulations/legislation

Baseline yet to be established. Rating Guide [for measuring compliance to Precursor Control policies and regulations] to be approved 2009-10.

3 FTEs staffed to increase capacity to monitor compliance.

60% of Licensed Dealers were inspected this year and 98% were partially compliant – this represents an increase in the inspection rate (33%) from 2007-08 and will be input in the Information Database for the purpose of increasing an understanding of compliance to precursor control regulations.

Information Database is near the start of implementation. This DB will ease the monitoring of compliance pursuant to an inspection (Licensed Dealers’ compliance history, etc.). Thus, the use of this DB will serve to increase an understanding of compliance of policy/regulations/legislation.

There were 1419 Loss and Theft reports completed and 575 forgeries reported, thus leading to an effective measurement of compliance to legislation/regulations.

A client survey is currently being developed for distribution in 2009-10. This information will serve to measure the proportion of regulated parties whom are aware of [and understand] legislation and regulations related to controlled substances. This will serve as a baseline for measuring the level of stakeholders’/parties’ understanding of compliance and regulations/legislation.

    f. Drug Analysis Services (Enforcement Action Plan) $49.2 M $11,418,000 $8,400,000

Establish baseline measure for “Illegal drug operations are dismantled in a safe manner” (PAA)

Increased capacity to provide timely and expert support

No results to date since a baseline measure has not yet been established. However, 34 clandestine laboratories were dismantled in 2008-09 with DAS assistance.

Two positions were staffed with NADS resources. Laboratory instrumentation was purchased to increase drug analysis capacity. An increase in timely and expert support occurred this fiscal year:

  • 96% of backlog was eliminated [Backlog = exhibits that had not been analysed and returned to the submitting agency within 60 days of receipt by DAS]
  • reduced average time to respond to analysis requests (from 90 days in 2007-2008 to 59 days in 2008-2009)
  • increased resources allocated to clandestine laboratory investigations (from 3295 hours in 2007-2008 to 4828 hours in 2008-2009)
  • increased number of law enforcement personnel who received training from DAS (from 1266 in 2007-2008 to 1597 in 2008-2009)

MMP « The program will become effective upon Royal Assent»

$3.4 M [1] $700,000 $0
3. Canadian Institutes of Health Research 1.2 Strategic Priority Research

Research on Drug Treatment Model

(Treatment Action Plan)

$4.0 M $974,998 $461,211

Increased knowledge translation and sharing of the trends and related consequences of illicit drugs

CIHR launched two Requests for Applications in April of 2008 with respect to the National Anti-Drug Strategy initiative – one for the Catalyst grant program, and one for the Team grant program. Applications were submitted to CIHR in October of 2008. CIHR funding of the catalyst and team grants commenced in 2008-09 to fund research regarding increased awareness and understanding of illicit drugs and their negative consequences. Funding of the team grants will continue through 2011-12.

4. Department of Public Safety Canada 3.1 Law Enforcement Policy

a. National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.0 M $800,000 $606,000

Safer Communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies

National Coordination of Enforcement Action Plan, specifically, led the Enforcement Action Plan Working Group. Participated and shared knowledge and information with stakeholders through domestic and international forum to further the Enforcement Action Plan (e.g., FPT Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials, National Framework for Action to Reduce the Harms Associated with Alcohol and Other Drug Substances in Canada (May 2008), Canadian, Chief of Police Drug Abuse Committee, Inter-American Drug Abuse Commission (May & December 2008), the United National Commission on Narcotic Drugs (March 2009)). Funded four (4) research and other initiatives in support of the Enforcement Action Plan. Supported the Minister of Public Safety, through briefings to respond to emerging issues related to the Enforcement Action Plan.

Community Safety and Partnerships

b. Crime Prevention Funding and Programming: (Crime Prevention Action Fund & Research and Knowledge Development Fund)

(Prevention Action Plan)

$20.0 M $3,000,000 $3,394,060

Enhanced support for targeted at-risk populations.

Enhanced knowledge in communities to address illicit drug use and its negative consequences.

25 NADS related crime prevention projects funded regionally throughout the country.

On track to be able to report on outputs and early outcomes (i.e. Enhanced support for targeted at-risk populations / enhanced knowledge in communities to address illicit drug use and its negative consequences, etc.) in following year with understanding that projects are in varying stages of implementation.

5. Royal Canadian Mounted Police 1.1.2.7

a. Drug and Organized Crime Awareness Services

(Prevention Action Plan)

$15.1 M $3,010,000 $2,278,000

Increased awareness of illicit drugs and issues related to their use in sport, within school and Aboriginal communities

There were 6213 awareness presentations given during the fiscal year of 2008-2009 targeting 163,612 people which includes youth, parents, aboriginal youth, aboriginal parents and professionals.

For the fiscal year of 2008-2009, 1149 DOCAS training sessions were provided to professionals, parents and students.

A total of 3061 partnerships were established and maintained with other provincial, territorial, municipal, aboriginal, and non government partners as well as with other police agencies/detachments.

DOCAS coordinators distributed 270,550 publications within communities across Canada.

The program Kids & Drugs was launched Nationally November 2008. There were 285 new facilitators trained from communities throughout Canada. A total of 150,000 parent booklets, 4340 training manuals, 22,600 posters and 69,000 magnets and pens were distributed.

A total of 2553 D.A.R.E. classes were conducted (each D.A.R.E. class consists of 10 lessons), as well as 10 presentations to 209 parents. The program reached 67,719 students in 1321 schools and of those, 1266 of the students were Aboriginal.

Drug Endangered Children (DEC) is an early intervention initiative that seeks to stop the cycle of child abuse caused by the exposure to drug activity. It involves a resource guide and training programs for service delivery personnel, supervisors/managers, protocol partners and the general public. This program has been under development in 2008-2009 and will be rolled out nationally in the fall of 2009.

The Aboriginal Shield Program (ASP) is in the final phase of revising all of the manuals to reflect a greater diversity of Aboriginal cultures and to incorporate the latest facts about Canadian drug issues, including emerging social challenges like Aboriginal gangs. The ASP will consist of two 12-lesson manuals for grades 5/6 and 7/8. The first 5 day Aboriginal Shield Community Facilitator Training pilot Course is being held in Ottawa, Ontario in November 2009, and will be represented by 9 Aboriginal communities from across Canada.

Drugs and Sport, a program that was revised in 2008-2009, was delivered 13 times to 549 amateur athletes, and delivered 9 times to 210 professional athletes. 1000 Drugs and Sport publications were disseminated.

Drugs in the Workplace were delivered to 1678 participants.

Two five day Drug Awareness Officer Training (DAOT) courses were held in 2008-2009. A total of 60 police officers, that included municipal, regional, provincial and RCMP, were trained.

3.5.2 Community and Youth Programs

b. National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program

(Treatment Action Plan)

$3.4 M $745,429 $565,494

Inventory of validated risk/needs screening and/or assessment tools that will result in:

Increased police awareness of risk and protective factors of offenders and victims

Increased community satisfaction with RCMP crime -prevention-related services

Increased police awareness of community-based resources and referral procedures

Increased referrals to addictions treatment and intervention programs by police

  • An Expert Advisory Panel was established and terms of reference developed. A first meeting was held late in FY 2008-09.
  • Internal and external partners were identified through presentations and discussions.
  • A program logic model and an evaluation framework were developed.
  • A short-list of potential pilot / implementation sites was developed and consultations initiated.
  • A training package was developed and will be further assessed. Training was delivered in Charlottetown, PEI, Williams Lake, BC, and Surrey, BC, which resulted in, among other things, increased police awareness of risk and protective factors of offenders/victims.
  • A pool of crime prevention professionals was established and will be further developed. For instance, in all 11 RCMP Districts in New Brunswick, the Community Program Officer (CPO) program serves to enhance communities by providing increased preventative and public reassurance programs while supporting core policing operations.
1.1.2.9

c. Marijuana and Clandestine Lab Teams/Proceeds of Crime

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$91.4 M $14,068,000 $12,211,000

Increase capacity to safely dismantle marijuana and synthetic drug operations

Eliminate importation/exportation production and distribution of illicit substances of abuse, specifically to marijuana and synthetic drugs, the diversion of precursor chemicals and the involvement of organized criminals and crime groups in these activities

Eliminate the health and public safety hazards resulting from the illicit production and distribution of marijuana and synthetic drugs

Maintain the integration, collaboration and capacity between sectors, law enforcement agencies, governments, communities and international partners to address the illicit importation/exportation, production and distribution of MGO, SDO, of abuse, the diversion of precursor chemicals and the related health and public safety standards

New positions were deployed with NADS funding to SDO and MGO teams.

Flexibility was afforded to the Divisions to use “A” Based funded positions to bolster the SDO/MGO (NADS) positions across Canada.

The Synthetic Drug Initiative (SDI) was commissioned to address the synthetic drug problem in Canada. Working groups have been formed internally in order to interface on NADS funded positions distributed across the organization. Also an external working group including the RCMP, Health Canada, Canada Border Services Agency, Environment Canada, Revenue Canada, Public Safety, Department of Justice, Public Prosecution Service of Canada and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, has been formed to collaborate on NADS funded positions across Government.

Separate work group has been formed with key Health Canada officials responsible for Policy and Regulatory Affairs for the purposes of making changes / additions to the Precursor Control Regulations, Rescheduling Amphetamine Type Stimulants and updating destruction authorities for seized controlled substances and precursors.

A Joint Forces Operation is currently being sought with Canada Border Services Agency – Intelligence Directorate to enhance the sharing of intelligence and ultimately assist in the stemming of the smuggling of the precursors being imported into Canada by sophisticated organized crime groups. There were 257 MGO seizures, and 20 Clandestine Laboratory seizures made by the NADS teams in 2008/2009. For MGO’s this resulted in the seizure of 182,404 plants, and 6,447 kg of marihuana bud seized as part of these For Clan. Labs, over 150 kg of methamphetamine and 615 kg of MDMA were seized by NADS teams as part of their disruptions. Of the 20 Clan. Labs dismantled, 6 were capable of producing an excess of 10 kg of finished drug product.

6. Correctional Service Canada 3.0 Community Supervision

Case Preparation and Supervision of provincial Offenders

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$23.3 M [2] $3,700,000 $0

Timely case preparation; rate of offenders successfully reintegrated into the community (if legislation regarding mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug offences is passed)

The program will become effective upon Royal Assent

7. National Parole Board of Canada Conditional Release Decisions and Open and Accountable Decision Processes.

Conditional Release and Pardon Decisions

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$7.5 M [3] $2,200,000 $0

Conditional release and pardon decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities

The program will become effective upon Royal Assent.

8. Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions 1.1 Prosecution of drug, organized crime and Criminal Code offences

a. Prosecution and prosecution -related services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$9.9 M $1,300,000 $1,495,299

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) in response to the workload generated by the enhanced RCMP dedicated anti-drug teams and criminal intelligence and technical operations support staff

In 2008-09, the PPSC handled 15,140 prosecution files that related to either drug production or distribution offences or both (pursuant to CDSA 5(1), 5(2), 6(1), 6(2), 7(1) and 7(2)). Of these, 13,405 included distribution offences, whereas 1,735 included production offences*.

The funding for 2008-09 allowed for the hiring of an additional 7.5 FTEs for drug prosecutions conducted by ODPP staff prosecutors and for prosecution support.

(*N.B.: Close to 10% of the total number of files included both production and distribution offences.)

b. Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$33.5 M [4] $8,600,000 $0

Provision of prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations, and prosecution of drug charges under the CDSA resulting from the proposed Minimum Mandatory Penalties

The program will become effective upon Royal Assent

9. Canada Border Services Agency Security

Border Intelligence, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$7.8 M $1,159,000 $1,070,000

The resources will be focused on intelligence gathering, information sharing, enforcement activities, assessment capabilities and laboratory support and services.

Commence implementation and hiring of staff. For the CBSA, the reporting period for the NADS is from September 2007, the commencement of the Strategy, to March 31, 2008.

Criminal Investigations Division (CID): has been working with internal and external partners on this initiative to support and complement enforcement efforts. CID will continue to investigate referrals for offences against the Customs Act in relation to the illegal import and export of precursor chemicals. In 2008/09 CID has opened four criminal investigations, with enforcement partners, into offences linked to smuggling of controlled substances. Two of these have been concluded, with conviction, and the other two cases remain ongoing

Intelligence: Enhancements have been made to the Precursor Chemical Diversion Program within its Intelligence Program to provide for improved functional guidance and direction to enhance the management of regional intelligence drug programs responsible for the identification, suppression and interdiction of contraband and other significant border criminality. Each region has an assigned officer responsible for precursor chemical matters and liaison with law enforcement partners.

Science & Technology

Border Intelligence, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.9 M $636,000 $627,000

The resources will be focused on intelligence gathering, information sharing, enforcement activities, assessment capabilities and laboratory support and services.

Laboratory and Scientific Services: Additional chemists have been hired and workload on precursors has increased from 23 Class A precursors analyzed in 2007-08 to 172 analyzed in 2008-09 (of which a large portion were due to an intelligence target on Gamma-Butyrolactone). Additionally, funds were used to analyze a variety of designer substances and to synthesize precursor primary reference standards.

With respect to research activities, progress has been made on sampling concepts/techniques and work in partnership with both industry and other government departments to develop sampling aids has commenced.

The Laboratory has acquired two existing Contraband Outfitted Mobile Examination Trucks (COMETs) and is currently re-designing the interior to allow for safe sampling and testing of unknown substances in a port of entry setting. The COMETs were obtained in September 2008 and have been used 3 times between January 2009 and March 2009 for suspected precursor sampling in marine mode.

10. Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade 1.2 Diplomacy and Advocacy - International Operations and Programs

Annual Contributions to UNODC and CICAD

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.5 M $900,000 $900,000

Improved capacity of UNODC to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs and international crime at the global level.

Improved capacity of CICAD to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs in the Americas.

DFAIT successfully managed projects involving the provision of training, equipment, technical and legal expertise resulting in increased capacity of beneficiary states and government entities to prevent and combat international crime and drugs.

Capacity building activities addressed both the supply of, and demand for, illicit drugs and also responded to Canadian policy priorities.

11. Canada Revenue Agency 4 Reporting Compliance

Special Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.2 M $788,149 $788,149

15 audits of MGOs and clandestine laboratories

During the fiscal year, CRA performed in excess of 200 audits of individuals involved in the production and sale of marijuana. As a result of NADS funding, CRA was able to perform 15 audits. The 15 audits resulted in $2,965,198 of additional federal tax. The auditees would also be responsible for provincial tax, interest and penalties.

12. Public Works and Government Services Canada 1.7 Specialized Programs and Services

Forensic Accounting Management Group

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$1.5 M $187,850 $187,850

To remove financial incentive for engaging in criminal activity

FAMG provided forensic accounting analysis on three RCMP NADS investigations. The analysis is critical in determining whether the assets of the suspects were derived from criminal activities, thus allowing the Government of Canada to seize these assets and thereby remove the financial incentive for engaging in criminal activities.

13. Financial Transactions and analysis Centre of Canada 4881 Collection, Analysis and Dissemination of Financial Information

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$2.5 M $237,000 $237,000

Enhanced support to law enforcement

Development of financial intelligence

Ensuring compliance in high-risk reporting sectors

FINTRAC continues to increase its capacity to analyze information it receives to create financial intelligence that is relevant to drug-related cases and strengthen the communication with law enforcement and intelligence partners. The funding provided through NADS resulted in additional detection and analytical capacity to pro-actively detect and disclose drug-related cases referred to law enforcement, representing a 10% increase of all drug-related cases disclosed to law enforcement in 2008/2009.

Total $578.5 M $113,360,970 $54,687,468    

Comments on Variances:

1. Department of Justice – b. Funding criteria was established, posted on the internet and sent to Provincial/Territorial representatives. A number of proposals submitted did not meet program criteria or required extensive development work which resulted in lapsing funds. Despite reasonable delivery against government priorities relating to the National Anti Drug Strategy generally, uptake on the new funds allocated for drug treatment as part of the NADS initiative was slow. Once this issue was identified by management, a request was made in September 2008 to reprofile some of the NADS funding. While other NADS partners succeeded in reprofiling NADS funds, the Youth Justice requests were not approved by Justice. Strategies are being developed and implemented to ensure that the variance is addressed.

2. Health Canada – a. When an election is called (as occurred in 2008) all advertising spending comes to a halt, this was when PCO put the NADS mass media campaign (youth component) on hold. Health Canada has been waiting and trying to move forward on this strategy since Sept, 2008. In FY 08/09 due to the lack of approvals, the Department lapsed approx $2.2M.

2. Health Canada – b. DSCIF launched a call for proposals early in the 2008/09 FY, but it had many layers of review and approval, followed by a federal election and then a new minister. After the approvals happened the program was late in the fiscal and a majority of the new projects only had the last quarter of the fiscal to incur approved expenses. DSCIF has reprofiled some money from 08/09 into future fiscal.

2. Health Canada – c. This began as an entirely new program (unlike DSCIF that has simply refocused its money under NADS). Its main recipients are the provinces/territories which, as another level of government, have their own levels of approvals even before an application is submitted. DTFP has reprofiled some money from 08/09 into future fiscal.

2. Health Canada – e. Delays experienced in 2007/08 affected the progress of completed outputs in 2008/09. These delays were due to issues faced during the building of capacity and the development of competency. Despite delays, all OCS outputs have started (including the Information Database, Client Survey, and Compliance Rating Guide). In addition, the variance for disposal is due to the uncertainty of increase demand and impact to the reimbursement of disposal cost for authorized controlled substances.

3. Canadian Institutes of Health Research - The discrepancy is explained by the fact that in the competition only 2 Catalyst Grants were fundable and that only part of the three funded team grants were related to illicit drug use (thus affecting the amount of NADS money allocated to these grants - and causing a lapse in planned NADS spending). It is always difficult to evaluate the uptake of a RFA when it is launched. Only 4 Catalyst Grant applications were received and 8 Team Grant applications. The success rates of the two grant programs are in the normal range.

4. Department of Public Safety Canada – a. Staff turnover resulted in some lapsed funding in 2008-09.

5. Royal Canadian Mounted Police – c. A lot of the Divisions have had difficulty staffing positions, or have had the expected transfers and promotions occur within their areas. As this area is a priority for the RCMP, the Divisions are aware of the importance of staffing these positions.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:
Catherine Latimer
General Counsel and Director General
Strategic Initiative Unit
613-957-9623
clatimer@justice.gc.ca

[1] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

[2] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

[3] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

[4] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

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Environment Canada

Table 7: Horizontal Initiatives


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canadian Group on Earth Observations

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Environment Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 2003

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): No new funds; annual multi-departmental contributions

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Interdepartmental secretariat established to coordinate Canada's participation in the international intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations and advance coordinated, comprehensive and sustained Earth observations in Canada. The Canadian Group on Earth Observations is funded through annual interdepartmental transfers and in-kind contributions.

8. Shared Outcome(s)

  • Enhancing access to global Earth observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international
  • Improving evidence-based decision-making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations

9. Governance Structure(s)

  • Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee (Chair: Assistant Deputy Minister, Meteorological Service of Canada)
  • Directors General Interdepartmental Coordination Committee
  • Canadian Group on Earth Observations working groups and task teams
  • Canadian Group on Earth Observations Secretariat

 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2008-09
15. Actual Spending for
2008-09
16. Expected Results for
2008-09
17. Results Achieved in
2008-09
Environment Canada N/A a) Weather and Environmental Monitoring Not available Salary:
$230,000

O&M:
$140,000

G&C:
$38,000

In-kind:
$25,000
Salary:
$230,000

O&M:
$90,000

G&C:
$88,000

In-kind:
$25,000
a) Federal Earth Observation Strategy initiated;
b) CGEO Working Committees (Soil Moisture, Arctic, and Data Policy) making active progress;
c) CGEO engaged in GEOSS in the Americas initiatives;
d) bilateral activities with U.S.A. initiated
a) Consultations and drafts of the Federal Earth Observation Strategy produced;
b) CGEO Working Committees (Soil Moisture, Arctic and Data Policy) continued to be engaged, and concrete outcomes are being achieved;
c) CGEO engaged in GEOSS in the Americas initiatives, including organizing symposium in Panama;
d) bilateral activities with U.S.A., including bilateral workshop on ice and water
Canadian Space Agency N/A a) Earth Observations Not available $40,000
+ in-kind
$40,000
in-kind not available
As above As above
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada N/A a) Science and Technology Not available $20,000
+ in-kind
$20,000
in-kind not available
As above As above
b) Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration and Environment Not available $20,000
+ in-kind
$20,000
in-kind not available
As above As above
Natural Resources Canada N/A a) Earth Sciences Sector Not available Not available Not available As above As above
b) Canadian Forest Service

 

Not available Not available Not available As above As above
Fisheries and Oceans Canada N/A a) Science and Technology Not available Not available Not available As above As above
Health Canada N/A a) Radiation Not available Not available Not available As above As above
Statistics Canada N/A a) Agriculture Not available Not available Not available As above As above
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada N/A a) Environment Not available Not available Not available As above As above
Total Not available Not available Not available    

18. Comments on Variances: N/A

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

20. Contact Information: Kenneth Korporal, Coordinator, Canadian Group on Earth Observations Secretariat, 373 Sussex Dr., Ottawa ON K1A 0H3, 613-995-2466, kenneth.korporal@ec.gc.ca

For more information: www.cgeo.gc.ca


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Environment Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005 (Great Lakes Action Plan [GLAP] IV resources)

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2010 (expiry of the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem [COA] and GLAP IV resources)

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $40 million over five years (GLAP IV resources), plus departmental A-base

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Through the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative, Environment Canada coordinates efforts to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem and ensures delivery of federal commitments as expressed in the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Environment Canada uses the COA to engage other federal departments and Ontario in delivering Canada's Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments.

Environment Canada's Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative reflects Budget 2005 investments targeted at continuing the work under GLAP to improve the ecological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. A total of $40 million over five years was allocated in GLAP IV to continue the environmental restoration of key aquatic Great Lakes Areas of Concern. Federal departments also use A-base resources to support their efforts towards achieving COA results.

8. Shared Outcome(s): The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement establishes broad, long-term objectives for Canada and the Unites States in restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. The COA provides a short-term plan for achieving Canada's Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments. Through the COA, federal and provincial agencies are guided by a shared vision of a healthy, prosperous and sustainable Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem for current and future generations. The COA also establishes a common purpose and shared goals, results and commitments in four priority areas: restoration of Areas of Concern, reduction of harmful pollutants, achievement of lake and basin sustainability, and coordination of monitoring, research and information.

9. Governance Structure(s): Eight federal organizations are engaged in delivering Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative results under the COA: Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Transport Canada, Infrastructure Canada and Health Canada.

The COA Management Committee is the senior federal-provincial management body responsible for setting priorities, establishing strategies to ensure delivery of the COA, and developing common positions and joint action plans for representing Canadian interests, and engaging in cooperative initiatives with American agencies and the International Joint Commission.

Planning, prioritization and allocation of GLAP IV monies is managed through the federal Great Lakes Executive Committee, which involves the eight federal signatories to COA. The Committee approves strategic directions and priorities for GLAP IV work activities and coordinates federal positions, strategies and initiatives in support of binational activities and discussions.


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2008-2009
15. Actual Spending for
2008-2009
16. Expected Results for
2008-2009
(Please see Appendix for COA Results Statements)
Environment Canada Sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes COA $37.5 million GLAPIV plus departmental A-base. $8.0 million (GLAPIV) plus departmental A-base $4.6 million (GLAPIV)
plus
$2.4 million departmental
A-base
All COA results, except Ann. 2-3.2
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems COA $2.4 million GLAPIV, plus departmental A-base $585 000
(GLAPIV)
plus $4.8 million departmental A-base

$585 000 (GLAPIV)
plus
$4.8 million departmental
A-base

Ann. 1-2.4; Ann. 1-2.6; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-3.1; Ann. 3-3.2; Ann. 3-4.1; Ann. 3-4.2; Ann. 3-5.1; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2.
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Health of the environment Agriculture Policy Framework and Growing Forward Policy Framework $80 million under these frameworks from 2005 to 2009-2010 $16 million $14 million from Growing Forward Ann. 1-1.2; Ann.1-2.2; Ann. 2-2.3; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-2.2; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2
Natural Resources Canada Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources

Ecosystem risk management: Canada understands and mitigates risks to natural resource ecosystems and human health

Port Hope Long-term Low-level Radioactive Waste Mgmt. Project

ESS: Environment and Health Program

CFS Forest Harvesting in Riparian Zones

ESS: Groundwater Mapping Program

CFS Pesticides Program

ESS: Enhancing Resilience to Climate Change Program

Departmental A-base $1.2 million

$1,292,302.00

 

Ann. 1-2.3; Ann. 2-3.1; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-2.4; Ann. 3-5.1; Ann. 4-2.1
Parks Canada

Heritage resources conservation

Public appreciation and understanding

Visitor experience

National Parks

National Marine Conservation Areas

Departmental A-base Figures not available
(see note under Variances, below)
Figures not available
(see note under Variances, below)
Ann. 3-1.1; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-2.2; Ann. 3-3.2; Ann. 3-3.3; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2.
Transport Canada

Environmental protection and remediation

Canadian Ballast Water Program

COA Departmental A-base and
C-base
$709,000
(A-base and C-base)
$709,000
(A-base and C-base)
Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-2.1; Ann. 3-4.1; Ann. 3-4.2
Infrastructure Canada Infrastructure funding programs The Building Canada plan (Building Canada Fund, Provincial-Territorial Base Fund, Infrastructure Stimulus Fund, Green Infrastructure Fund and Gas Tax Fund) Departmental A-base Figures not available
(see note under Variances, below)
Figures not available
(see note under Variances, below)
Infrastructure Canada supports the objectives of the COA with particular emphasis on Ann. 1-1.1 and  Ann. 1-2.1.

Infrastrucgture Canada has a project selection process in place to ensure that projects selected for funding meet specific eligibility criteria. Projects that are to be funded may be determined through a competitive merit-based process, through joint federal-provincial discussions, or the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities may accept an Annual Capital Plan than could include water and wastewater projects.

Health Canada Healthy environments and consumer safety COA Departmental A-base Figures not available
(see note under Variances, below)
Figures not available
(see not under, Variances below)
Ann. 2-3.2
TOTAL
GLAPIV

(plus departmental funding)

$8.6 million
GLAPIV
(plus departmental funding)
$5.2 million
GLAPIV
(plus departmental funding)
 

17. Results Achieved in 2008-2009

Environment Canada
Work continued to achieve progress in restoration of Great Lakes Areas of Concern, including the following:

  • assessing and evaluating contaminated sediments in various Great Lakes Areas of Concern to develop site-appropriate management plans and strategies to address them;
  • developing indicators to assess the efficacy of remedial activities carried out in various Areas of Concern; and
  • providing technical assistance to the town of Nipigon in the preparation of its funding application to upgrade the town's sewage treatment plant from primary to secondary treatment (Nipigon Bay Area of Concern).

Work continued to achieve a better understanding of the state and trends in the Great Lakes Ecosystem. Environment Canada worked with universities and other government agencies on many water and wildlife research projects, including the following:

  • monitoring wildlife populations and assessing wildlife habitat in Great Lakes Areas of Concern;
  • implementing cooperative bi-national monitoring programs in support of Lakewide Management Plans; and
  • hosting, in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the eighth biennial State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference and producing the State of the Great Lakes 2009 Highlights report.

Work continued to reduce the release of harmful substances. Environment Canada worked with the Great Lakes community on projects, including the following:

  • carrying out research and monitoring to detect the possible presence of antibiotics and household personal care products in sewage sludge and effluents. This work will lead to a greater understanding of the extent to which these substances are entering the Great Lakes from municipal water treatment facilities. As the understanding of the sources and the extent of the problem deepens, Environment Canada is developing various approaches to addressing this issue, one such approach being education. As a pilot project in the Lake Superior area, posters and flyers providing information on how to properly dispose of these products were distributed to medical and dental clinics, hospitals, seniors' centres, retirement homes and the Thunder Bay District Health Unit network, as well as to 11 Aboriginal communities. In addition, presentations on this topic were made to community organizations, and a series of public information sessions was held to help prevent these products from entering waterways, including the Great Lakes;
  • monitoring atmospheric pollutants in the Great Lakes Basin with the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network; and
  • setting priorities to reduce toxic substances of emerging concern in the Great Lakes Basin consistent with Environment Canada's Chemicals Management Plan.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Work continued to conduct science, enhance fish habitats and control the negative impacts of established invasive species. Projects included the following:

  • development of the Nottawasaga Bay nearshore habitat program, GIS database and mapping overlay on photographic formats, with plant and substrate surveys of selected shorelines and video footage to document current nearshore habitat;
  • mapping of larval sea lamprey habitat using the RoxAnn Seabed Classification System, and assessing larval density in the Lower Niagara River to estimate its current and potential contribution to the parasitic population in Lake Ontario and to guide future control efforts;
  • mapping of fish habitat along the Moira River, Bay of Quinte, to help Quinte Conservation, so that no net loss of fish habitat occurs in the jurisdictional area (Lake Ontario); and
  • risk assessment, research and monitoring projects to reduce the threat of aquatic invasive species.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Work continued to improve beneficial agriculture management practices, with involvement of the Great Lakes farming community in numerous projects, including the following:

  • carrying out studies, environmental assessments and infrastructure projects to facilitate the provision of a reliable, good quality supply of water for agricultural operations;
  • delivering the Pest Reduction Research Program, which supports registration of low-risk pest control products, improved grower knowledge of best management practices for pesticides, and improved pest management systems through on-farm demonstrations to reduce risks associated with the use of pesticides in the production of priority commodities; and
  • improving management of land and water resources used in agricultural production, including setting up buffers, fencing and alternate watering systems in riparian areas, beneficial nutrient management practices and water use efficiency technologies.

Natural Resources Canada
Work continued towards the achievement of the sustainable development of Canada's energy, forestry and mineral metals resources within the Great Lakes Basin, including the following:

  • completion and approval of the Port Hope Project environmental assessment, with a Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission licensing decision expected in late 2009, and completion of the Port Granby Project environmental assessment (approval pending);
  • enhancing policies and practices to mitigate forestry impacts on creeks and rivers; and
  • enhancing accuracy of pesticide applications on forests to reduce impacts on aquatic organisms.

Parks Canada
Delivers the National Parks and National Marine Conservation Areas programs, and works to develop and maintain a viable protected areas network in the Great Lakes Basin that is relevant to Canadians. Projects included the following:

  • meeting requirements detailed in the Memorandum of Agreement between Parks Canada and the Ontario government leading to the formal establishment and operationalization of the Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area;
  • operating Fathom Five Marine Park (Lake Huron), including protecting and monitoring coastal heritage resources and delivering Great Lakes-focused interpretation and outreach programs;
  • operating five coastal National Parks in Ontario on three Great Lakes and in the St. Lawrence River, including monitoring heritage resources, and delivering interpretation, outreach, stewardship, and visitor experience programs related to the Great Lakes; and
  • working collaboratively with the Ontario government to establish National Marine Conservation Areas on each of the Great Lakes.

Transport Canada
Work continued to ensure compliance with Canada Shipping Act regulations related to the ecosystem health of the Great Lakes. Transport Canada undertook a wide variety of inspection, monitoring and training programs, including the following:

  • boarding vessels to ensure compliance with ballast water regulations;
  • assessing the role of the domestic fleet in moving aquatic invasive species; and
  • supporting Canadian firms in the development of ballast water technology.

Infrastructure Canada
Work continued towards providing funding to eligible infrastructure projects in support of a cleaner environment, including improved wastewater treatment, among other objectives. Under the Communities Component of the Building Canada Fund, as well as through the Infrastructure Stimulus Fund, federal funding has been announced for numerous wastewater infrastructure projects located in communities surrounding the Great Lakes.

Although not approved during the period covered in this report, wastewater infrastructure projects located in the following communities near the Great Lakes were announced in June 2009 as priorities for funding under the Major Infrastructure Component of the Building Canada Fund: Timmins, Owen Sound, Red Rock, Nipigon, Cornwall, South Dundas and Halton Region.

Health Canada
Work continued to enhance environmental health knowledge within the Great Lakes Basin that can be integrated into policies to address risks to human health by all levels of government. Projects included the following:

  • facilitating information sharing among government partners through environmental public health networks regarding environmental risks to human health in the Great Lakes Basin; and.
  • continued implementation of activities to address substances identified under Canada's Chemicals Management Plan that are of human health concern.

18. Comments on Variances

Environment Canada: Dedicated Great Lakes funding (GLAP IV) is received only by Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, who also each contribute departmental A-base towards achieving results under COA. All other partners (federal and provincial) achieve COA results via departmental funding. Reported spending by Environment Canada of GLAP IV resources was less than expected in 2008-2009 due to changes in departmental resource allocations following a restructuring exercise. As mentioned above, Environment Canada also spends A-base funding to achieve COA results; however, exact figures are not available.

Parks Canada: Figures for planned and actual spending are not available, since Parks Canada financial coding systems are not designed to separate out Great Lakes-specific activities.

Health Canada: Health Canada supports work for the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative through the joint Environment Canada-Health Canada Chemicals Management Plan. Specific resource figures are not available, since this spending is not tracked separately in Health Canada's financial system.

Infrastructure Canada: Exact figures are not available for total approved, and planned and actual spending for 2008-2009.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

20. Contact Information: Alison Kennedy, A/Manager, 416-739-5913

For more information: www.on.ec.gc.ca/greatlakes/default.asp

Appendix: COA Results Statements

PRIORITY 1: AREAS OF CONCERN
Result 1.1 Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial or municipal wastewater to achieve delisting targets in Nipigon Bay and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) Areas of Concern (AOC)
Result 1.2 Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources to meet delisting criteria in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC
Result 1.3 Contaminated sediment management strategies developed for the Wheatley Harbour AOC and implemented in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC
Result 1.4 Plans in place and being implemented to rehabilitate fish and wildlife habitats and populations to meet delisting targets in the Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs
Result 1.5 Informed, effective collaboration among governments, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in Nipigon Bay, Jackfish Bay, Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs
Result 1.6 Environmental monitoring and reporting to document improvements and track environmental recovery
Result 2.1 Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from municipal sewage treatment plants, combined sewer overflows, urban stormwater and industrial wastewater towards delisting targets in St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region, and Bay of Quinte AOCs
Result 2.2 Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources towards achieving the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) delisting criteria in St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, and Toronto and Region AOCs
Result 2.3 Progress made in developing sediment management strategies to reduce ecological and human health risk from contaminated sediments in Thunder Bay, Peninsula Harbour, St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Port Hope and Bay of Quinte AOCs
Result 2.4 Long-term management plans being developed and priority actions for delisting being implemented for rehabilitation and protection of fish and wildlife habitats and populations in St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region, and Bay of Quinte AOCs
Result 2.5 Informed, effective collaboration among governments, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in AOCs
Result 2.6 Identify monitoring needs, undertake required studies and evaluate results to assess environmental recovery and support remediation strategies in AOCs

PRIORITY 2: HARMFUL POLLUTANTS
Result 1.1 Reduction in releases of Tier 1 substances beyond the 2005 achievements towards the goal of virtual elimination
Result 2.1 Reduction in releases of Criteria Air Pollutants
Result 2.2 Coordinated activities to reduce releases from municipal wastewater
Result 2.3 Develop and initiate a program for the Sound Management of Chemical Substances in the Great Lakes Basin
Result 3.1 Improved understanding of the sources, fate and impacts of harmful pollutants in the Great Lakes Basin
Result 3.2 Human health risks from harmful pollutants are understood and addressed in the Great Lakes Basin

PRIORITY 3: LAKE AND BASIN SUSTAINABILITY
Result 1.1 Increased awareness and appreciation of the Great Lakes and their contributions to social, economic and environmental well-being
Result 1.2 Increased stewardship actions that work towards a balance between human well-being and prosperity, and healthy aquatic ecosystems
Result 1.3 Sustainable use of land, water and other natural resources to provide benefits from the Great Lakes now and in the future
Result 1.4 Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and resources
Result 2.1 Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial and municipal wastewater, combined sewer overflows and urban stormwater sources, consistent with actions specified in binational Lakewide Management Plans and binational lake action plans
Result 2.2 Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural sources by undertaking actions specified in the binational Lakewide Management Plans and binational lake action plans
Result 2.3 Identification of contaminated sediment and development of sediment management plans to reduce the release and impact of sediment-bound contaminants on the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem
Result 2.4 Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes water quality
Result 3.1 Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and habitats are protected, restored and sustained consistent with binational Great Lakes planning
Result 3.2 Progress on rehabilitation of Great Lakes native species to restore the health of aquatic ecosystems, consistent with binational Great Lakes planning
Result 3.3 Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, habitats and species
Result 4.1 Implementation of the National Action Plan to Address the Threat of Aquatic Invasive Species in the Great Lakes
Result 4.2 Enhanced knowledge about the harmful impacts of aquatic invasive species on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, food webs and species
Result 5.1 The impacts of climate change on the Great Lakes ecosystem composition, structure and function, including biodiversity (organisms and their habitat), water quality and quantity, human health and safety (including access to clean drinking water), social well-being and economic prosperity, are understood by governments and the Great Lakes community
Result 6.1 The potential risks to Great Lakes drinking water intakes are identified and assessed, and early actions to address risks are undertaken
Result 6.2 Develop knowledge and understanding of water quality and quantity issues of concern to the Great Lakes as drinking water sources

PRIORITY 4: COORDINATION OF MONITORING, RESEARCH AND INFORMATION
Result 1.1 Responsive and comprehensive monitoring and research programs
Result 2.1 Improved reporting on environmental conditions, changes and progress
Result 2.2 Increased sharing of data and information among governments, organizations and Basin residents


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Implementation of the Species at Risk Act

2. Name of Lead Department: Environment Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Biodiversity is conserved and protected

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2000

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing (Current approval of sunsetting resources portion ends in 2011-2012)

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $713 million

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): This horizontal initiative supports the development and implementation of the National Strategy for the Protection of Species at Risk and the Species at Risk Act (SARA) that came fully into force in June 2004. Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada are the departments and agency responsible for the protection of species at risk under federal jurisdiction. The three departments received funds from Treasury Board in 2000 for the "Implementation of the National Strategy for the Protection of Species at Risk and their Critical Habitat", in 2003 for the "Implementation of the Act respecting the protection of wildlife species at risk in Canada" and in 2007 for "Delivering results under the Species at Risk Act".

8. Shared Outcome(s):

  • Implementation of SARA
  • Protection of species at risk
  • Protection of biodiversity

9. Governance Structure(s):

  • Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) - federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for wildlife
  • Canadian Wildlife Deputy Ministers
  • Canadian Wildlife Directors Committee (CWDC) - federal, provincial and territorial directors responsible for wildlife
  • Associate Deputy Ministers Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada)
  • Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada)
  • Director General Operations Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada and others)

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2008-2009 15. Estimated Actual Spending for 2008-2009 16. Expected Results for 2008-2009 17. Results Achieved in
2008-2009
Environment Canada Wildlife is conserved and protected Environment Canada Species at Risk Program $424,000,000 $50,970,500 $46,454,968
  • General administration of SARA
  • Annual Report to Parliament
  • Preparation for and participation in Parliamentary five-year review of SARA as required
  • Minister's Roundtable
  • Finalization of supporting policies under the National Framework for Species at Risk
  • Management of listing process
  • Continued implementation of the SARA evaluation action plan
  • Preparation of ministerial response statements
  • Finalization of bilateral agreements with provinces and territories
  • Consultations on listing and recovery strategies
  • Working with COSEWIC to adopt an ecosystem approach to the assessment of species at risk
  • Regulatory amendments
  • Preparation of recovery strategies
  • Development of risk management framework to provide guidance to priority recovery strategies
  • Development of outreach material
  • SARA enforcement and compliance promotion
  • Implementation of recovery strategies
  • General administration of SARA
  • Annual reports (2006 and 2007) to Parliament
  • Preparation for, participation in and Government response to Parliamentary five-year review of SARA
  • The 2008 Minister's Roundtable was held on December 16, 2008. Recommendations received are being considered.
  • Policies under the National Framework for Species at Risk were developed and primary stakeholder groups were consulted.
  • Management of listing process
  • Progress Report was drafted to show work responding to SARA evaluation action plan
  • Preparation of ministerial response statements
  • Negotiations underway to finalize bilateral agreements with provinces and territories
  • Consultations on listing and recovery strategies
  • Working with COSEWIC to adopt an ecosystem approach to the assessment of species at risk
  • Regulatory amendments to Schedule 1 of SARA published January 17, 2009
  • Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada prepared a total of 3 proposed recovery strategies (covering 3 species) and 9 final recovery strategies (covering 11 species), which were posted on the SARA Public Registry
  • Development of risk management framework to provide guidance to priority recovery strategies
  • Draft Risk and Priorities Framework developed.
  • Revised SARA Fact sheets.
  • Developed outreach and educational materials.
  • Plans developed for compliance promotion of all changes to List of Wildlife Species at Risk
  • Maintain Species at Risk Public Registry
  • Implementation of activities identified in recovery strategies
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Fisheries Management Fisheries and Oceans Canada Species at Risk Program $176,500,000 $24,806,000 $24,193,700
Parks Canada Heritage
Resources
Conservation
Parks Canada Species at Risk Program $102,500,000 $14,100,000 $9,287,000
Total $713,000,000 $89,257,500 $79,935,668    

18. Comments on Variances:

  • Environment Canada: The lapsing amount is due to several factors notably staff vacancies and lag time in staffing new positions and shift of A-base SARA funds to support complementary activities in other wildlife programs (including protected areas, migratory bird program).
  • Parks Canada: 2008-2009 was a year of transition for providing funding allocations to individual national parks and national historic sites with significant species at risk.  This led to significant underspending in 2008-2009.
  • The mechanism for allocating funds has been developed and funds carried forward have been allocated to appropriate national parks and national historic sites in 2009-2010.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

  • Assessment and reassessment of species, subspecies and populations by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC)
  • Leveraged funding and various public- and private-sector stewardship activities for the protection of species at risk habitat through the Habitat Stewardship Program
  • Development of recovery strategies by provinces and territories
  • Research and education efforts to recover Canadian species at risk through the Endangered Species Recovery Fund
  • Protection of important or critical habitat through the Aboriginal Critical Habitat Protection Fund

20. Contact information:
Mary Taylor
Director
Conservation Service Delivery and Permitting Division
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
819-953-6283
Mary.Taylor@ec.gc.ca


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP, which was succeeded by the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan [FCSAP], approved March 2005)

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Environment Canada and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced (Environment Canada); Management Policy Development and Oversight (Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat)

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAAP commenced on April 1, 2003; FCSAP has been in effect since April 2005

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAAP funding to March 31, 2008. Replaced by FCSAP in April 2005, and this funding is expected to continue for 15 years. Currently, funding has been approved until March 31, 2011.

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $1,709.6 million

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): FCSAAP and its successor, FCSAP, are long-term mechanisms in place to address federal contaminated sites having the highest risks for human health and the environment. At the end of March 2004, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $3.5 billion. Although responsibility for the management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with the responsible custodial departments, the overall program is administered jointly by Environment Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

8. Shared Outcome(s): Reduce federal financial liability and risks to human health and the environment, including fish habitat. Increase public confidence in the overall management of federal real property through the effective risk management or remediation of individual federal contaminated sites.

9. Governance Structure(s): Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers' Steering Committee is supported by the Director Generals' Committee, the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group and the FCSAP Secretariat at Environment Canada, which provides overall program coordination.


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)* 14. Planned Spending for 2008-2009 15. Estimated Actual Spending for 2008-2009** 16. Expected Results for 2008-2009*** 17. Results Achieved in
2008-2009
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Enterprise Activities Asset Management $5,465,649 $666,320 $621,866

Variance:
- $44,434
(reallocated internally)

Remediation and risk management for three projects (three sites)

Assessment of approximately 12 sites

On-going remediation of one site

Assessment of eight sites

Canada Border Services Agency Corporate Management and Direction Infrastructure and Environment $1,620,212 $211,785 $211,785 Remediation and risk management for one project (one site) In-situ remediation continued at one site. Human health and environmental risks were actively managed and monitored.
Canadian Food Inspection Agency N/A N/A $183,783 $0 $0 Not applicable Not applicable
Correctional Service of Canada Internal Services Facilities and Asset Management Services $10,368,094 $1,534,331 $1,605,755
 
Variance:
+$71,424
(additional funds spent were carried forward from previous years)
Remediation and risk management for three projects (three sites) Three remediations and seven assessments were completed in 2008-2009.
Environment Canada
(includes Projects, Expert Support, and FCSAP Secretariat)
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are assessed $ 93,775,119  12,689,636 $9,589,766

Variance:
-$3,099,870
(-$1,937,495 lapsed;
-$1,162,375 reallocated internally)

Projects
Remediation and risk management for eight projects (89 sites)
Assessment of approximately 26 projects (125 sites)
Projects
Remediation projects: eight projects (for 47 sites)
Assessment projects: 32 projects (for 172 sites).
Risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are managed Expert Support

Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the ecological risk evaluation of federal contaminated sites
Provision of ecological risk assessment training and guidance
Participation in the project submission process including review of information provided by departments and provision of ecological risk evaluation score

Secretariat
Supports the Director General, Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering committees and the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG), administers most aspects of the program, including management of project selection process, program guidance, training, reporting and data management through the development and maintenance of secure website

Expert Support

Provided guidance and expert advice to 16 custodial departments for the management of their sites so that risk to the environment is eliminated or minimized
Developed and delivered national training to custodial and expert support departments on the application and use of the 2008 Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment's Canada-wide Standards for Petroleum Hydrocarbons in soils
Reviewed project eligibility requirement documents and provided ecological risk evaluation scores to ensure that remediation and risk management projects are eligible for funding
 
Secretariat
1.Prepared funding documents for ministerial approval; provided training, coordinated the fall 2008 project submission process and annual reporting
2. Completed and coordinated approval of the FCSAP Formative Evaluation, rolled out of the FCSAP Web portal, provided ongoing secretariat support to the working group and the Federal Contaminated Sites, Director General and Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee
3.Developed or updated numerous guidance documents
4.Coordinated the project and funding proposal for the Accelerated FCSAP program announced in Budget 2009
5. Developed a FCSAP Performance Measurement Strategy and Risk Profile

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
(includes Projects and Expert Support)
Internal Services Contaminated Sites: FCSAP projects $100,102,485 $17,130,722 $16,430,322

Variance:
-$700,000
(carried forward)

Projects
Assessment of approximately 732 sites
Remediation and risk management for 153 sites
Assessment activities were performed at 778 sites, of which 69 sites require no further action and have been closed.

Remediation and/or risk management activities were performed at 164 sites, of which 32 sites require no further action and have been closed.

Based on a review of historical information, the Department identified an additional 742 sites that require no further action. The Department closed a total of 843 sites in the 2008-2009 fiscal year (742+69+32).

FCSAP: Expert Support Expert Support
Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the risk management of federal contaminated sites
Participation in the project submission process, including review of information provided by departments and provision of fish habitat portion of ecological risk evaluation score
Expert Support
Provided scientifically sound guidance and expert advice to custodial departments for the management of federally owned and/or managed contaminated sites so that impacts to fish and fish habitat are eliminated or minimized
Reviewed project eligibility requirement documents and provided input into ecological risk evaluation scores to ensure that remediation and risk management projects are eligible for funding
Health Canada
(includes Projects and Expert Support)
First Nations and Inuit Health First Nations and Inuit Health Protection $51,167,054 $7,355,638 $7,353,158

Variance:
-$2,480
(custodian lapsed)

Projects
Remediation and risk management for eight projects (eight sites)
Completed two of seven projects; remediation ongoing with five of seven remaining projects
Contaminated Sites Healthy Environments, Consumer Safety Branch Expert Support

Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the human health risk management of federal contaminated sites
Provision of human health risk assessment training and guidance and the development of soil quality guidelines.
Public Involvement and Public Outreach
Planning support as well as training in risk communication and other public involvement training courses
Participation in the project submission process, including review of human health related information provided by departments and provision of human health risk score

1. PQRAs were peer-reviewed and scored for 51 federal sites, in support of the FCSAP funding process.
2. RA training sessions were conducted in Toronto, Ottawa, Halifax and Montréal, on assessing risks of vapour intrusion.
3. Public Involvement (PI) training sessions were conducted in Vancouver, Calgary, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montréal and Halifax: Improving Stakeholder Relationships; Selecting and Implementing PI Techniques; Communicating Health Risk Information to Stakeholders.
4. Regional and NCR RA staff provided advice on the remedial plans and related issues on 40 contaminated sites, including Goose Bay, Labrador, Faro Mine, Yukon, Val Cartier Quebec, various sites located on First Nations lands in Ontario, Historic gold mine sites in Nova Scotia, etc.
5. Regional and NCR PI staff provided PI advice relating to 10 federal sites: three in Quebec, three in B.C./Yukon, one in each of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and Nova Scotia.

Guidance Development:
1. Revisions to the following previously published (2004) RA guidance documents are now complete or nearly so: PQRA, part 1; PQRA part 2 (TRVs); PQRA part 3 (peer review).
2. RA guidance documents are complete or nearly so for the following:
Detailed Quantitative Risk Assessment (DQRA) for chemicals; DQRA for radiologicals; Environmental Site Investigation; Writing a Statement of Work for RA contracts; Supplemental guidance on assessing risk of country food contamination; supplemental guidance on airborne contaminants at contaminated sites; Vapour Intrusion.
3. Soil quality guidelines are nearing completion for eight substances: cadmium, nickel, chromium, barium, zinc, beryllium, n-hexane and perchloroethylene. 4. A new PI guidance document, Involving Aboriginal Peoples in Contaminated Sites Management, has been completed.
5. A new 14-minute, bilingual multimedia tool on Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) has been completed that explains the basics of HHRA to stakeholders and emphasizes the role and value of stakeholder participation in the risk assessment process.
6. A new e-learning tool has been completed that teaches the basics of HHRA in a simple web-based module format.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Responsible Federal Stewardship Contaminated Sites Remediation $833,790,704 $111,753,358 $ 90,830,503

Variances:
-$20,922,855 (-$19,023,098; reprofiled; -$1,899,757 lapsed)

Indian and Inuit Affairs
Remediation and risk management at 43 projects (81 sites)
Assessment of approximately 2745 sites
Remediation and risk management at 43 projects (80 sites)

Assessment of approximately 2794 sites

Northern Land and Resources Contaminated Sites Northern Affairs
Remediation and risk management for 26 projects (29 sites)
Assessment of approximately 113 sites
Northern Affairs
Remediation and risk management work carried out on 22 projects (25 sites)
Assessment work undertaken at 152 sites, including 114 new sites assessed
Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated Management of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infrastructure, and properties in the Montréal area N/A $795,672 $109,734 $59,734

Variance:
-$50,000
(carried forward)

Remediation and risk management for one project (one site) Ongoing remediation and risk management for one project (one site)
Marine Atlantic Inc. Corporate Management FCSAP (projects) $120,000 $0 $0 Not applicable; joined program in 2009 Not applicable; joined program in 2009
National Defence Contribute to Canada and the international community Contribute to the international community in accordance with Canadian interests and values $380,070,345 $65,358,805 $64,720,715

Variance:
-$638,090
(lapsed)

Remediation and risk management for 77 projects (144 sites)
Assessment of approximately 219 sites
Remediation and risk management for 68 projects (125 sites). Work completed on 13 sites.

Assessment for 50 projects (136 sites). Assessment completed on 53 sites.

National Capital Commission Real Asset Management Land and real asset management $8,410,400 $1,619,433 $1,469,600

Variance:
-$149,833
 (carried forward)

Remediation and risk management for three projects (three sites)
Assessment of approximately 54 sites
Remediation and risk management for three projects (three sites)

Assessment of 69 sites

National Research Council Internal Services Environmental Operations $4,835,000 $0 $0 Not applicable; joined program in 2009 Not applicable; joined program in 2009
Natural Resources Canada Corporate Management The provision of relevant and timely policy analysis and advice for decision-making on government priorities and departmental responsibilities $27,915,806 $474,000 $466,806

Variance:
-$7,194
(carried forward)

Remediation of one project (one site)

Assessment of approximately 16 sites

 Remediation for one project (one site)

Assessment of 10 sites

Parks Canada Conserve Heritage Resources Active Management and Restoration $38,814,369 $4,531,933 $2,885,904

Variance:
-$1,646,029
(carried forward)

Remediation and risk management for 20 projects (26 sites)
Assessment of approximately 38 sites
Remediation and/or risk management for 14 projects (11 sites)
Assessment of approximately 19 sites
Public Works and Government Services Canada
(includes Projects and Expert Support)
Federal Accommodation and Holdings FCSAP (projects) $31,810,173 $4,893,181 $4,822,181

Variance:
-$71,000
(lapsed)

Projects
Remediation and risk management at 13 projects (17 sites)
Assessment of approximately 41 sites
Projects
Remediation and risk management at 14 projects (18 sites)
Assessment of approximately 41 sites
  FCSAP (expert services) Expert Support
Development of project management tools, dissemination of information on innovative technologies and technologies used at individual projects
Expert Support
Developed project management tools, disseminated information on innovative technologies, and technologies used at individual projects
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Corporate Infrastructure and Internal Services   $23,100,214 $6,453,020 $2,262,579

Variance:
-$4,190,441
(-$2,158,900 carried forward; -$2,031,541 lapsed)

Remediation and risk management for 14 projects (15 sites)
Assessment of approximately 647 sites
Remediation and risk management for 14 projects (15 sites)
Assessment of approximately 661 sites
Transport Canada Sustainable Transportation Development and the Environment Environmental Programs $150,768,926 $14,475,720 $12,736,200

Variance:
-$1,739,520(reprofiled)

 

Remediation and risk management for 17 projects (17 sites)
Assessment of eight sites
Remediation and risk management for 14 projects (14 sites)
Assessment of five sites
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Management Policy Development and Oversight Assets and Acquired Services $2,747,200 $480,804 $480,804 Ensures consistency with Treasury Board policies on management of federal contaminated sites, reviews financial aspects of proposals, administers fund and advises Environment Canada on monitoring of government-wide progress Advice on the management of federal contaminated sites to custodian departments and to the Environment Canada Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan Secretariat; maintenance of the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory; chaired and coordinated planning for the 2008 Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop, held in Vancouver, British Columbia, from April 28 to May 1, 2008
Unallocated program management resources $0 $0 $0  
Accommodation charges $9,046,626 $1,430,446 $1,430,446  
Total     $1,774,907,831 $251,168,866  $217,978,144

Variances: $33,190,722 ($4,712,356 carried forward; $20,762,618 reprofiled; $6,580,363 lapsed; $1,206,809 reallocated internally; -$71,424 funds brought forward from previous years)

   
Notes:
*  Treasury Board approved as of June 11, 2009
** Based on information provided by custodians in June 2009; does not include custodian cost share. Program reporting for 2008-2009 will not be finalized before the fall of 2009.
***  Note that custodians have flexibility with respect to activities undertaken and often the number of sites actually worked on will vary from what was planned due to unforeseen delays (weather, difficult access to remote locations, etc.) or changes in custodian priorities.

18. Comments on Variances: See comments in column 15.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

20. Contact Information: FCSAP.PASCF@ec.gc.ca

For more information: www.federalcontaminatedsites.gc.ca/

 

Clean Air Agenda

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Lead Department Program Activity
3.3 - Clean Air Program
Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Transport Canada, Health Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, National Research Council, Industry Canada

Start Date
April 1, 2007
End Date March 31, 2011

Description


The Clean Air Agenda is a fundamental component of the Government of Canada's broader efforts to address the challenges of climate change and air pollution, with a view to building a clean and healthy environment for all Canadians. These challenges are being addressed through:

  • Regulatory initiatives in the industrial, transportation, consumer and commercial sectors; and
  • A range of program measures to complement the regulatory initiatives, for example, the "ecoACTION" programs, initiatives for adapting to climate change, approaches for improving indoor air quality and participating in international actions.

The 2008-2009 marked the second year of the Clean Air Agenda's four year mandate. This horizontal Agenda involves nine federal partners who deliver on 44 programs aimed at:

  • Reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants;
  • Reducing health risks to Canadians due to air pollutants;
  • Maintaining Canadian competitiveness and providing economic benefits through innovations to reduce the impacts of climate change;
  • Reducing risks of climate change to communities through adaptive actions; and
  • Promoting Canada's international action on climate change.

Environment Canada provides federal leadership for the Clean Air Agenda through the coordination of the efforts made by its CAA federal partners, including the responsibility to collectively report to Canadians on the framework.

Clean Air Agenda Long Term Outcomes

  • Health, economic and environmental benefits for Canadians have been realized.
  • Risks to the health of Canadians and the environment resulting from exposure to air pollution have been reduced.
  • Risks to communities, infrastructure and to the health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change have been reduced.
  • Innovations related to reducing air pollution and addressing climate change have maintained Canadian competitiveness and provided economic benefits.
  • Trans-boundary movement of air pollutants has been reduced.
  • Indoor air quality has been improved.
  • Canada's emission of air pollutants has been reduced.
  • Canada's emission of GHGs has been reduced.
  • Canadians and communities have taken actions to reduce their vulnerabilities from and have adapted to predicted impacts of climate change.
  • International trends on climate change are consistent with Canada's interests.

Results achieved in 2008-2009


For consolidated Agenda-level results, please refer to Canada's Performance Report 2008-2009 on the TBS website: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/reports-rapports/cp-rc/2008-2009/cp-rc03-eng.asp#clean

For more detailed information on Clean Air Agenda results achieved in 2008-2009, the following tables detail results achieved at the Theme and Program Level.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period Total 2008-2009 Planned Spending
Actual Spending for 2008-2009
$ 2.2 B $ 549.7 M $ 463.4 M

CAA Theme-Level Reporting
CARA Theme
Clean Energy Theme
Clean Transportation Theme
Indoor Air Quality Theme
Adaptation Theme
International Actions Theme
Partnerships Theme
Management and Accountability Theme

Theme: Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA)

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Health Canada

Description of Theme programming

CARA is an integrated, nationally consistent approach to reduce emissions of both air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs), intended to protect the health and environment of Canadians, and to avoid falling further behind our trading partners. The regulations and targets to be pursued under CARA are designed to:

  1. Substantially reduce air pollutant and GHG emissions (20% reduction from 2006 levels by 2020) and air pollutants from major source sectors;
  2. Provide industry with the long-term certainty and level playing field needed to make significant, synergistic and cost-efficient investments to reduce emissions;
  3. Strengthen Canada's ability to engage effectively in international discussions, such as negotiating additional reductions in the transboundary flow of air pollutants from the US and influencing international GHG negotiations; and
  4. Improve indoor air quality.

Expected achievements in 2008-2009 from Theme programming

No expected results for 2008-2009 were defined in the Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities 2008-2009 at the Theme level; please refer to program expected results.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides, and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Results achieved in 2008-2009

In support of the reduction of air emissions:

Progress was made in developing and implementing the Regulatory Framework for Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions, including the complementary offset system, and the infrastructure to support the system. The plan to reduce emissions by 20% in 2020 from 2006 levels is on track, however, the economic downturn and the renewed engagement by the new US Administration has required that we fine-tune our approach.

Environment Canada worked intensively, with affected sectors, provinces and non-government organizations, on development of a comprehensive air management system, including an approach to national regulations of industrial emissions of air pollutants consistent with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEPA).

The support of science was very successful as illustrated by the timely delivery of science describing the air quality co-benefits on human and environmental health from proposed GHG emission regulations; assessing the impact of marine emissions in support of the North American application to the International Maritime Organization to establish an emissions control area, and; science to support the development of on- and off-road transportation regulations. Ongoing refinement and use of the Air Quality Benefit Assessment Tool continued in order to estimate health benefits of proposed air pollution reductions: such as the development of methodologies for the analysis of life expectancy and quality-of-life impacts of ozone and particulate matter.

In support of a more efficient and cleaner transportation sector:

The Government increased the efficiency and stringency of its regulations and regulatory approaches by:

  • Developing a series of amendments to regulations for on-road, off-road and marine vehicles and engines to reduce emissions;
  • Developing Canadian positions and proposals to reduce emissions from ships operating in Canada-U.S. and international waters;
  • Initiating a biodiesel fuel assessment on human health, and
  • Developing an approach to regulating emissions from light-duty motor vehicles pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, resulting in a new approach to motor vehicles regulations

In support of safer and energy efficient consumer products:

The Government published three regulations for 1) architectural paints, 2) auto refinish products and 3) certain consumer products to reduce emissions of volatile organic compounds which contribute to the formation of smog.

The Government amended the Energy Efficiency Regulations to include new performance standards for 7 products previously unregulated and increased the stringency of 4 existing standards. Notable standards included those for general service light bulbs and gas furnaces. The amendment also prescribed labelling requirements for the three most commonly used light bulbs. In addition 3 new Energy Star specifications have been introduced in Canada and 14 existing specifications made more stringent to increase energy efficiency.

Numerous initiatives were also conducted to address the issue of residential wood combustion, especially in urban areas, to better scope and design regulatory and non-regulatory instruments such as a collaboration with the Municipality of Whitehorse, Yukon Environment and Yukon Health in the development and implementation of an ambient air quality monitoring study of wood smoke emissions within the city of Whitehorse.

In support of improving air quality in Canadian households and buildings:

The priority list of indoor air contaminants was finalized in consultation with federal, provincial, non-governmental and industry stakeholders, and work on assessments of the first priority substances was initiated. These assessments will form the basis of new Canadian Residential Indoor Air Quality guidelines, which will be used to reduce Canadians' exposure to these substances.

Residential Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for carbon monoxide and ozone were finalized for publication in Canada Gazette, Part I, for public consultation.

Draft indoor air assessments were completed for particulate matter and NO2; guidelines will be developed and published in Canada Gazette, Part I, for public consultation, in 2009-2010. These guidelines will provide the scientific foundation for developing measures to reduce Canadians' exposure to these two substances.

More than 40 companies across Canada are now certified for radon testing service, providing a better service to the Canadian public; there were none in 2007-2008.

A pilot radon/thoron testing survey was conducted in Winnipeg to assess health risks from exposure to thoron.

In support of more accurate reporting, as well as easier compliance on air emissions:

Instruments were developed to secure effective management of air emissions, such as:

  • The (draft) Guide for Protocol Developers for the Offset System;
  • Canada's Credit for Early Action Program: Final Program Guide;
  • Canada's Kyoto Protocol National Registry;
  • The most comprehensive database ever collected by EC on industrial air emissions; and
  • The (draft) requirements for regulatory reporting, quantification and verification.

Analysis of the energy, emissions and economic consequences of achieving the Government's proposed greenhouse gas emission reduction target were also conducted, supporting the development of effective regulatory measures.

Click here for CARA program-level details.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2008-2009 Planned Spending for Theme programming Actual Spending for 2008-2009
$347,300,000
$76,006,683
$62,634,047

Theme: Clean Energy

Lead Department

Natural Resources Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Description of Theme programming

Energy production and use is responsible for the majority of Canada's greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollution emissions. The Government's Clean Air Agenda combines a regulatory agenda for major energy-related sources of emissions with complementary program measures, which encourage action in key areas that cannot be effectively addressed through regulation.

As part of the Clean Air Agenda, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) are delivering the ecoENERGY Initiatives - a set of measures to promote smarter energy use, increase clean energy supply, and support the development and deployment of clean energy technologies.

The suite of Clean Energy initiatives has been designed to complement the regulatory aspects of the Clean Air Agenda by highlighting existing government work and introducing new measures that immediately address important sources of emissions and that will facilitate the transition to major emissions reductions that will be required by regulation over the longer term.

As the lead department for the Clean Energy theme, NRCan is responsible for collecting, collating and reporting information on the progress of Clean Energy programming.

Expected achievements in 2008-2009 from Theme programming

No expected results for 2008-2009 were defined in the Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities 2008-2009 at the theme level; please refer to program expected results.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and criteria air contaminants (CACs).
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

Results achieved in 2008-2009

All reporting is for 2008-09 unless otherwise stated.

Immediate Outcomes

Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • Since 2007, six provinces have announced changes to their housing codes to achieve the EnerGuide Rating System (ERS) 80 level (equivalent to R-2000) by 2012.
  • Nearly all provinces and territories (except PEI and NFLD) participate in the Building Energy Code Collaborative (a provincial-territorial-federal committee seeking energy efficiencies in building codes), with 8 provinces having codes or code-related projects.
  • Began negotiations for contribution agreements for eight CCS projects, to start in 2009-2010.

Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • 191 companies became Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC) leaders by committing to improve energy efficiency, and many other companies are involved in delivering energy efficiency projects through federal programming. CIPEC leaders report annually on energy-efficient measures implemented and results achieved at their company.

Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • Signed 11 contribution agreements for residential pilot projects under ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat, which are expected to result in the installation of 6100 solar domestic water heaters by 2010.
  • Funded 25 projects in 24 Aboriginal and northern communities (18 renewable energy and 7 energy efficiency).
  • Increased low-impact renewable energy to 3 Terawatt hours and by 849 MW.
  • The Carbon Budget Model - CBM-CFS3, which is used to calculate forest carbon stocks and stock changes for the past (monitoring) or into the future (projection) - was downloaded more than 500 times by users in 42 countries since its release. A 2008 workshop on the model was attended by 31 trainees from 5 countries, including participants from 3 provinces.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • 760 Industrial Energy Managers attended Dollars to $ense workshops.
  • Opportunities to reduce GHGs have been identified in 130 Aboriginal and Northern off-grid communities.
  • Held 77 events and announcements - including the expansion of the ecoENERGY Retrofit-Home program and numerous ecoENERGY Renewable Initiative projects across the country - with Ministers and MPs in support of clean energy and ecoENERGY programs. Made Clean Tech Minutes videos available to satellite TV stations.

Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

  • Conducted analysis to support climate change negotiations on rules for post-2012 international accounting of forests.
  • Provided policy support to Environment Canada for the development of the Regulatory Framework for Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions.
  • Undertook policy work - including research, analysis, capacity-building and briefing of senior management - on clean energy technologies such as carbon capture and storage (CCS).
  • Updated NRCan's MAPLE-C forecasting model. Continued to extend the model's parameters to estimate emissions levels up to the year 2030.

Intermediate Outcomes

Adoption of energy efficiency products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • To date, 94,000 homeowners have received grants in support of energy efficiency upgrades. Grants averaged $1,112 per household.
  • In 2008-2009, signed 279 contribution agreements with Small and Medium Organizations for energy efficiency upgrades.
  • In 2008-2009, trained more than 4,300 housing professionals, builders, and energy advisors.

Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • Installed 297 solar thermal systems in the Industrial/Commercial/Institutional sectors (202 solar air systems, 95 solar water systems).
  • Signed 40 new contribution agreements with power production companies representing 1,790 MW of new renewable power capacity in Canada and 5,935 GWh/year of additional production.

Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • Made significant progress in a broad range of clean energy Research and Development projects to reduce technical (and other) risks. For example, began initial development in the Canadian Hydrogen Airports Project to demonstrate the potential of hydrogen fuelled vehicles and power generation technologies to significantly reduce the emission of greenhouse gases and urban air pollutants from ground support equipment at airports. Also, developed two new biomass technologies for harvesting propagation material and recovering juvenile woody biomass.

Final Outcomes

Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

  • Since 2007, the ecoENERGY Efficiency Initiative under the Clean Energy theme has saved an estimated 2.1 Mt of GHGs.
  • The ecoENERGY Renewable Initiative saved an estimated 2.14 Mt of GHGs in 2008-2009.
Click here for Clean Energy program-level details.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2008-2009 Planned Spending for Theme programming Actual Spending for 2008-2009
$1,177,040,000
$206,877,000 $202,535,424

Theme: Clean Transportation

Lead Department

Transport Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada

Description of Theme programming

The Clean Transportation Theme program measures will work towards: improved management of sustainable transportation infrastructure in communities; improved efficiency and reduced emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHG) from the movement of goods; and improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions from the personal vehicle fleet.

Expected achievements in 2008-2009 from Theme programming

No expected results for 2008-2009 were defined in the Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities 2008-2009 at the theme level; please refer to program expected results.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or criteria air contaminants (CAC);
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcome

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Results achieved in 2008-2009

In 2008-2009, the twelve programs under the Clean Transportation Theme were in their second year of operation, building upon the organizational groundwork established during the first year. Performance under this theme should still be considered at this point in time in terms of outputs, rather than outcomes, however there are some promising outcomes being achieved in terms of the uptake of new technologies and best practices. Recent changes in general economic conditions may affect the reach of these programs: the moderation of fuel prices reduced consumers' incentives to purchase more fuel-efficient vehicles and to drive less; the decline in economic activity reduced investments in new equipment and technologies in the freight industries; and there was a sharp decline in purchases of new vehicles of all types.

Financial incentives and assistance was provided to members of the transport sector to increase uptake of emission-reducing technologies. In 2008-2009, over 117,000 ecoAuto Rebate applications were processed, and almost $120 million was distributed to eligible applicants. $6.9 million was spent during the year to retire 17,000 older vehicles under the National Vehicle Scrappage Program. Six projects, which will receive funding of about $2 million, continue to be implemented under the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund, and an additional nine projects for $3.5 million in funding were selected in January, 2009 and are underway. The two rounds of funding under the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund have allowed an uptake of 1254 pieces of emerging technology equipment across four modes of transportation. Similarly, fifteen projects with funding of $3.7 million are underway under the Freight Technology Incentives Program, and an additional 17 projects, with funding of $3.8 million, were selected in February, 2009. The two rounds of funding under the Freight Technology Incentives Program have allowed an uptake of 1654 pieces of proven technology equipment.

Under the ecoMobility Program, 14 projects worth $3 million were selected, of which three contribution agreements were signed in 2008-2009 and the remainder are under negotiation; proposals for a second round of funding were received on May 1, 2009. Following a competitive process, the Port Metro Vancouver was awarded $3 million in funding (including $2M under the Marine Shore Power Program and $1M under the Western Economic Diversification) to implement marine shore power at Canada Place - the first such initiative in Canada and the third in the world.

Ensuring that businesses and consumers have access to good information about fuel saving technologies and best practices is an important objective of the Clean Transportation theme, as this builds knowledge, awareness and capacity to adopt these strategies. In 2008-2009, a wide range of information services (including guidelines, toolkits, reports, workshops, conferences, awards, webinars, and website presentations) were made available by the transportation programs. There were over 461,000 visits to the ecoAuto Rebate Program website. The ecoTechnology for Vehicles Program provided information to over 50,000 people via its website and outreach activities.

Through training and education efforts, Clean Transportation Programs seek to change people's behaviour in favour of more sustainable transportation options. For example, under the ecoMobility Program, several transportation demand management (TDM) learning events took place over the year to foster implementation and measurement of TDM policies and programs at the municipal level. Almost 112,000 new drivers applied fuel efficient driving practices that they learned from the training materials provided under the ecoEnergy for Personal Vehicles Program. Under the ecoEnergy for Fleets program, the capacity of transportation professionals to reduce emissions was enhanced through training and through the provision of decision-support tools and information materials, including workshops. There were over 35,000 such knowledge transfer opportunities.

The completion and dissemination of research studies is essential to inform government, industry and consumers on matters ranging from program design to the availability and cost-effectiveness of emission-reducing technologies. In 2008-2009, the National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry completed a number of studies to examine the feasibility of mandating heavy truck speed limiters. These included traffic modeling to better understand the safety effects from differential car-truck speeds on highways, quantifying the environmental benefits from fuel savings and reduced greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), and an assessment of the trade and competitiveness impacts of a speed limiter mandate. The ecoTechnology for Vehicles Program evaluated the fuel efficiency, emissions and safety performance of 14 advanced vehicle technologies (including full electric, plug hybrid, clean diesel, hydrogen fuel cell, hydrogen internal combustion engine and advanced gasoline vehicles), and initiated several studies of the market and regulatory barriers to the introduction of these new technologies. Four research studies and technical reviews (idling, eco-driving, driver training retention, and consumer buying habits) were completed under the ecoEnergy for Personal Vehicles Program and were used to update driver behaviour programs. The National Vehicle Scrappage Program conducted a baseline survey of owners of older vehicles to measure awareness of vehicle scrappage programs and impacts of older vehicles on the environment.

Continuing improvements are being made to the measurement of program outputs and outcomes, so as to ensure that tangible outcomes will be measured as the programs complete their mandates.

Click here for Clean Transportation program-level details.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2008-2009 Planned Spending for Theme programming Actual Spending for 2008-2009
$461,716,953
$219,357,630 $160,359,768

Theme: Indoor Air Quality

Lead Department

Health Canada

Federal Theme Partners

National Research Council of Canada

Description of Theme programming

Health Canada and National Research Council of Canada are responsible for implementation of the Indoor Air Quality Theme as an integral element of the government's broader Clean Air Agenda (CAA). This CAA Theme consists of two elements; the Indoor Air Research and Development initiative (National Research Council Canada) and the Radon Program (Health Canada). Together these initiatives will contribute to Theme results by supporting the research, development and dissemination of knowledge of indoor air quality risks and ways by which these risks can be managed. By generating and sharing knowledge about indoor air pollutants and how they can be managed, the Indoor Air Quality Theme elements will support informed decision-making by governments, industry and consumers on cost-effective means to reduce harmful exposures and, in so doing, reduce health risks. While the findings from these two research-based initiatives can provide useful input to potential regulatory initiatives under the Clean Air Agenda, their utility extends well beyond that, most notably by helping to identify and target non-regulatory measures that address indoor air concerns.

Expected achievements in 2008-2009 from Theme programming

No expected results for 2008-2009 were defined in the Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities 2008-2009 at the Theme level; please refer to program expected results.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Radon Strategy

Immediate Outcomes

Improved awareness by public, property managers, and governments of health risks and causes of reduced indoor air quality and strategies to improve it:

  • 20 % of Canadians are aware of specific technical solutions to improve air quality (2010-2011).

Development and support of technological solutions for improved indoor air quality:

  • Technically sound infrastructure and knowledge in place to support and assess indoor air quality improvement technologies (2010-2011).

Increased knowledge of health impacts and mitigation strategies related to indoor air pollution:

  • One research intervention field study on ventilation, air distribution and health conducted (2011).

Indoor Air Research and Development Initiative

Immediate Outcomes

Increased knowledge of health impacts and mitigation strategies related to indoor air pollutants

  • One research intervention field study on ventilation, indoor air quality and health conducted (2010-2011).

Increased knowledge and support for the development of technological solutions for improved indoor air quality

  • One common publicly available data set (2010-2011).
  • Four papers, published in peer-reviewed journals (two in 2009-2010, and two in 2010-2011).

Results achieved in 2008-2009

Radon Strategy

  • In 2008-2009 radon testing was performed in about 600 federal buildings located in the National Capital Region, Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia.  The results demonstrated by this activity move towards improved awareness by the public, property managers and governments of health risks and causes of reduced indoor air quality and strategies to improve it.
  • During 2008-2009 Health Canada participated in more than 20 stakeholder engagements (for a total of 34+ since the Radon Strategy commenced in 2007-2008) across Canada. The stakeholders have used this information to communicate to Canadians via the inclusion of radon information on their websites and to create communications materials for the public and clients and customers.
  • Health Canada through a third party contractor completed an engagement campaign to encourage retailers and manufacturers of radon testing devices to increase availability and access to radon test kits for the Canadian public. To date three of the five retailers carry test kits and a fourth retailer has indicated an intention to carry them in 2009-2010.
  • In 2008-2009 two new radon brochures were created, one for consumers and one for health professionals. In addition a co-branded factsheet was developed with the Canadian Lung Association and distributed to the public.
  • In 2008-2009 Health Canada proposed amendments to the Canada Labour Code and Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations (COHSR) to harmonize the radon action level for federal employees referenced in those documents with the Canadian Radon Guideline and provided this information to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The purpose of the proposed changes to the COHSR is to amend the wording to reflect the same radon action level as the Canadian Radon Guideline at 200 Bq/m3.
  • Health Canada in collaboration with the National Research Council and provincial and industry partners made recommendations for radon resistant technologies to be required in all new home constructions. These recommendations have been accepted by the Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes for inclusion in the 2010 version of the National Building Code. If all provinces and municipalities include and enforce this requirement, all new homes constructed in Canada would have the capability to allow homeowners to reduce radon levels below the current Canadian Radon Guideline of 200 Bq/m3.
  • Health Canada in collaboration with Natural Resources Canada, performed aerial surveys of southwestern Ontario and central New Brunswick to assess the levels of uranium and other radioactive precursors of radon gas. The purpose of the map is for use by all levels of government (federal, provincial and municipal) to assist them in prioritizing efforts for educating Canadians to the risks associated with radon exposure and encouraging homeowners to test and remediate their homes.

Indoor Air Research and Development Initiative

  • Field Study on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and Ventilation (Activity 1):
    • 77 home visits completed (out of the proposed 80-120; with the remaining visits to occur in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011), including collection of 5 questionnaires per home, and parameters analysed. The main results were, that more than 50% of the homes had a moderate to poor air exchange rate, at least in the asthmatic child's bedroom, which will qualify them for interventions (= improvement of ventilation rate or air movement). Also a variety of different heating and ventilation systems were found: information thereof is the key input for modelling and measurements in the Indoor Air Research Laboratory.
    • Indoor Air Research Laboratory (formerly 'Facility'), which will support the field study will be ready to model the interventions by August 2009. the IARL was built in four phases: phase A (called 'site services and building', i.e. mainly the building structure) was completed in FY 2007-2008; phase B (called 'flexible mechanical, electrical and control systems installation', among this different HVAC systems, ductwork etc.) was started in FY 2007-2008 and completed in 2008-2009; phase C ('interior finish, including electrical, painting, communication), was completed in FY 2008-2009; phase D ('finishing works') was started in FY 2008-2009; phase D will be completed in FY 2009-2010 (safety equipment, building sign, etc.).
    • Memorandum of Understanding between Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ) (medical partner of field study) finalized, except for the clause concerning the intellectual property. We expect that the MOU will be signed in July 2009.
    • Laboratory capacities and methods upgraded and enhanced to analyse fourteen indoor air quality and four ventilation parameters. Context: because many parameters affect indoor air quality and potentially adversely impact the respiratory health of asthmatic children, a very broad set of indoor air quality parameters was described in the field study protocol. With respect to the Theme's objectives, the more exact and comprehensive we are able to determine the ventilation rates or air flows (as dependent variable of the indoor air quality field study) and the indoor air quality parameters (as independent variables), the better we can associate these parameters with the medical endpoint, in this case the health of asthmatic children, more specifically the number of reported asthma days, and the better we can answer questions related to the health and well-being of Canadians.
  • Evaluation of Indoor Air Quality Technologies and Solutions (Activity 2):
    • Canadian IAQ Solutions Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) formed and fully functional (inaugural meeting January 2009). The purpose/mandate/goal of TAC is to provide advice, guidance and recommendations for the selection of three "IAQ Solution Technologies" (IAQ-ST), their assessment technology protocols and subsequent reports and support transfer of findings/protocols to public and industry. Results of technology transfer include: publicly available data sets relating to Indoor Air Quality solutions/technologies; publications in peer-reviewed journals; and possible protocols adoption by a standards organization. This activity is important because advice, guidance and recommendations and technology transfer support by TAC will ensure we achieve the desired results.
    • Status of first IAQ solution technology (which will be portable air cleaners): literature and web scan completed; development of criteria and evaluation/ranking systems for prioritizing these technologies completed; first of three protocols developed on the first IAQ-ST assessing the performance of portable air cleaners; adaptation of NRC's Full Scale Chamber as test facility to simulate residential ventilation systems; and adaptation and upgrade of analytical capabilities, specifically regarding the generation of fine and ultra-fine particulates, and the generation of volatile organic compounds (VOC).
  • Canadian (formerly 'National') Committee on Indoor Air Quality and Building (CCIAQB; Activity 3):
    • Full Committee (FC) formed. The working group became a full committee in November 2008, after sufficient members had been recruited. The CCIAQB's first steps were to develop a business plan, to examine strategies, and to identify areas where further studies are needed. The goal of the Canadian Committee on Indoor Air Quality and Buildings is to improve indoor air quality in buildings, and ultimately, the health of occupants, by providing a national forum and clearinghouse for 'best-of-knowledge' information on the design and operations of buildings as they affect indoor air quality.
    • Executive Committee with 6 members formed, for guidance, facilitation of processes, tabling drafts to FC. The Executive Committee's role is to sharpen the focus of the Committee and to ensure a cost-effective management of the committee's business in-between meetings of the Full Committee.
    • Formulation and recommendation of 3 Requests for Proposals to narrow indoor air quality research gaps to FC. It is very important to fill research gaps, as inadequate indoor air quality might adversely affect the health and well-being of Canadians.
Click here for Indoor Air Quality program-level details.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2008-2009 Planned Spending for Theme programming Actual Spending for 2008-2009
$23,000,000 $6,417,000 $6,417,000

Theme: Adaptation

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Health Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada

Description of Theme programming

The six Adaptation programs will begin to help Canadians build their capacity to adapt, by developing knowledge, information, tools and/or collaborative arrangements that they need to take action to successfully reduce their risks. These initiatives differ from many of the programs within the Clean Air Agenda as they do not contribute to reductions of greenhouse gases, but rather support the critical complementary activity of adaptation to climate change impacts.

About half of the total funding will build capacity to respond to diverse risks across the country and remain relevant to many economic sectors and regions. The other half will be targeted to address three urgent risks: (i) the North , where impacts of a changing climate are already very visible, vulnerability of communities and infrastructure is high, and the federal government has unique constitutional and land claims obligations toward Aboriginal people and northerners; (ii) human health , which faces particular risks through changing climate conditions and extremes, and the spread of infectious diseases; and (iii) infrastructure , in which governments and firms will invest hundreds of billions of dollars over the next decade, which must be designed to endure climate conditions that will differ from those of the past.

Expected achievements in 2008-2009 from Theme programming

No expected results for 2008-2009 were defined in the Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities 2008-2009 at the Theme level; please refer to program expected results.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and to reduce air quality related health impacts;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.

Results achieved in 2008-2009

While it is early days for the adaptation theme programs, progress is evident, especially with respect to increasing the availability of adaptation and air quality information and products. For example, the Improved Climate Change Scenarios Program completed development of the new Canadian global climate model and began testing the new regional climate model. Model output was disseminated via the Canadian Centre for Modeling and Analysis website and climate scenarios delivery was expanded with the addition of a server at name Yukon type College. The atmospheric hazards network also expanded to include all five regions of Canada.

The Climate Change and Health Adaptation in Northern/Inuit Communities Program developed a climate change application guide that resulted in 14 of 15 project applications for FY 2009-2010 meeting the application criteria. Also in the north, ten aboriginal and northern communities identified key risks and vulnerabilities to climate change impacts through the Program Assist Northerners in Assessing Key Vulnerabilities and Opportunities. In addition, 12 adaptation action plans identifying concrete community priorities and the action to manage risks were developed and 9 adaptation tools produced. Finally, eight communities completed climate change risk management strategies.

The Regional Adaptation Collaboratives Program solicited letters of interest from across the country and selected five to develop full proposals. The Innovative Risk Management Tools Program initiated development of adaptation tools in the areas of infrastructure, planning, energy, and risk management.

The national Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) and Forecast Program delivered AQHI forecasts on the Weather Office website for 26 locations across Canada. Memoranda of Agreement with provincial and municipal partners were developed to support outreach to Canadians. Enhancements, including improved accessibility, were made to the national AQHI portal web site. Development of an e-learning course for health professionals on the AQHI was begun. As the Index becomes more available across the country and is reported regularly by the media, the final outcomes indicating behaviour change and reduced incidence of air quality related mortality and morbidity will be measurable.

As part of the Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System Program, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) produced tick distribution risk maps. Five proposals for contribution funding from academic institutions were approved. Under the Heat Alert and Response System project, Health Canada developed heat health information products and a heat monitoring system framework. An assessment of the scientific information and methodologies available on heat and human health was conducted. Memoranda of Agreement were signed with three communities to pilot a heat alert and response system and discussions were initiated with a fourth pilot community.

To effectively develop and implement adaptation measures to cope with a changing climate, the adaptation theme programs enhanced collaboration with a variety of partners. The Assist Northerners in Assessing Key Vulnerabilities and Opportunities program strengthened existing partnerships that were based on years of collaboration with aboriginal organizations, territorial governments, and federal government departments. New partnerships were established with engineers, planners, and the financial sector, as well as with national and international climate change experts in developing adaptation tools.

Progress was also made in the area of increasing capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science. For example, the program, Assist Northerners in Assessing Key Vulnerabilities and Opportunities, funded 21 projects that supported aboriginal and northern capacity building and training initiatives. The Improved Climate Change Scenarios Program regional training sessions on the use of scenarios were well-attended all across Canada. Several adaptation theme programs hosted workshops with their targeted stakeholders.

For more details on the theme results, please refer to the individual program results.

Click here for Adaptation program-level details.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2008-2009 Planned Spending for Theme programming Actual Spending for 2008-2009
$115,900,000
$26,045,025
$20,348,100

Theme: International Actions

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Industry Canada

Description of Theme programming

This theme aims to advance Canada's international action, improve Canadian air quality and reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Funding in the amount of $50M is required to implement the following:

  1. Engage in the development of a Particulate Matter (PM) Annex and lay the groundwork for a potential cross border emissions trading annex for air pollutants under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement.
  2. Continue to engage across a number of multilateral fora, on behalf of the Canadian Government, in strategic international climate change discussions and negotiations.
  3. Undertake actions related to compliance with existing treaty obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol, including: payment of assessed contributions, provision of discretionary administrative funding, development of a tradable unit tracking system; and also contribution to other international climate change initiatives.
  4. Seek membership in the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate.

Expected achievements in 2008-2009 from Theme programming

No expected results for 2008-2009 were defined in the Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities 2008-2009 at the Theme level; please refer to program expected results.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies and negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and research and development opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome

  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.

Results achieved in 2008-2009

Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.

  • Prepared Canadian Chief Negotiator as well as Ministers, Deputy Ministers and other senior officials for several departments (NRCan, DFAIT, EC) representing Canada in a range of interdepartmental, bilateral and multilateral meetings related to clean energy and climate change.
  • Work towards securing agreement on a post 2012 Framework.
  • Represent Canada's interest in on-going and long-term climate change negotiations under the UN.
  • Participation in other key multilateral discussions on climate change including OECD, G8, MEP UN.
  • To facilitate bilateral engagement process, several training workshops were organised: Net Zero Energy workshop in Australia as well as the workshops for foreign missions in Latin America and in the Caribbean.

Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies & negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.

  • Canada and the United States continued discussions in 2008 towards the development of a PM Annex under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement. Significant analytical work was undertaken to develop and advance Canada's positions on the development of a pollutant emission management area, on pollutants of concern, and on potential emission reductions commitments for mobile sources.

Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

  • Continued to contribute expertise to the Expert Group on Technology Transfer, established under the UNFCCC, with the purpose of analyzing and identifying ways to facilitate and advance technology development, transfer, negotiating and implementation activities.
  • Provided leadership on recommendations that advanced the launch of 20 large-scale CCS demonstration projects through the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF).
  • Established APP operations including the creation of an APP Secretariat (to coordinate Canada's APP activities at both the national and international levels) and a DG-Interdepartmental Steering Committee (EC, NRCan, Industry Canada and DFAIT to oversee Canada's involvement in APP.
  • The APP Secretariat started a consultation process with stakeholders which led to the establishment of public-private domestic working groups for all eight APP Task Forces.
Click here for International Actions program-level details.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2008-2009 Planned Spending for Theme programming Actual Spending for 2008-2009
$50,000,000
$10,700,838 $9,741,268

Theme: Partnerships

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

--

Description of Theme programming

This program was proposed by the federal government in support of Turning the Corner: A Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution but has not been launched. The main objective is to improve capacity of communities and individuals to take action on clear air and climate change by stimulating the trial of new actions and purchases, which may have lasting benefits and result in significant reductions over the longer-term, which will lead Canadians to take positive environmental actions at home, school and workplace.

The goal would be to ensure that funded projects have measurable results and can be replicated by other groups or organizations. CACP would fund programs in the following areas: Home and outdoor energy efficiency - Encourage energy and water efficiency, waste reduction and the replacement or purchase of more energy-efficient products or technologies, including energy-efficient home appliances, lighting, lawn mowers and the purchase of energy from renewable sources; School-based sustainability - Improve the energy efficiency of school operations and facility management by engaging custodians, principals, teachers, students and parents. The program includes an educational component to engage teachers and students in learning about energy efficiency, water efficiency and waste reduction; and Greening the workplace - Inspire employees to adopt environmentally friendly behaviours at work and to encourage business owners and managers to implement measures to reduce energy consumption and associated emissions in their daily operations.

Expected achievements in 2008-2009 from Theme programming

No expected results for 2008-2009 were defined in the Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities 2008-2009 at the Theme level; please refer to program expected results.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • A decision on whether to launch the Clean Air Community Partnerships (CACP) Program is pending.
  • If the program is launched:
    • Program materials and tools, including application forms, proposal evaluation tools, project tracking database, and GHG/CAC valuation tools would be developed.
    • An RMAF would be developed for the CACP program, including the development of an evaluation plan, indicators, and performance measures.
    • Promotional materials for the CACP program (including web site) would be developed and distributed to appropriate stakeholders.
    • Proposals for Strategic Investment projects would be approved and contribution agreements would be developed and implemented.
    • An Inter-departmental Advisory Committee would be established for the CACP program.
    • A Proposal Review Committee would be established.

Intermediate Outcomes (If launched)

  • Community initiatives that provide incentives for Canadians to take action on Clean Air and Climate Change are funded.
  • Program Governance Structure is designed and implemented.
  • Program Management Systems and Evaluation Tools and are developed.

Final Outcomes (If launched)

  • A greater number of Canadians are engaged in protecting our environment, including our air, water, land, climate and nature.
  • Communities and individuals are better able to manage and take a lead on environmental issues.

Results achieved in 2008-2009

In preparation for possible launch, program materials and tools, including application forms, proposal evaluation tools, and greenhouse gas / criteria air contaminants valuation tools were developed.

Click here for Partnerships program-level details.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2008-2009 Planned Spending for Theme programming Actual Spending for 2008-2009
$12,000,000 $3,000,000 $345,217

Theme: Management and Accountability

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Transport Canada, Health Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, National Research Council, Industry Canada

Description of Theme programming

The Management and Accountability Theme sets the path for the Clean Air Agenda, Horizontal Management, Accountability and Reporting Framework (CAA-HMARF) which facilitates management and reporting of financial and non-financial performance information at the program level within 8 themes on a consolidated basis (at the theme and agenda levels) across participating departments and agencies. This then ensures that ongoing monitoring and assessment of progress in achieving objectives and expected outcomes against financial investments is made; and facilitates the setting of priorities and reallocating of resources, as appropriate ensuring engagement of the governance structure within the CAA-HMARF.

Expected achievements in 2008-2009 from Theme programming

No expected results for 2008-2009 were defined in the Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities 2008-2009 at the Theme level; please refer to program expected results.

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for implementing, managing and reporting on CAA activities
  • Appropriate balance of departmental and horizontal CAA accountabilities
  • Coherent CAA program architecture
  • Effective alignment of resources to CAA priorities
  • Effective and timely collection and reporting of performance information

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Active engagement of partner departments and agencies in horizontal aspects of CAA activities
  • Effective decision-making regarding CAA activities
  • Improved accountability of federal government to parliamentarians and Canadians for CAA expenditures and activities

Final Outcome

  • Increased ability to achieve CAA outcomes

Results achieved in 2008-2009

The Management and Accountability Theme continued to implement the horizontal management, accountability and reporting framework for the 44 programs and 8 Themes of the Clean Air Agenda (CAA), with focus on meeting targeted short term results and ensuring accountability for progress toward longer term CAA outcomes. While the first year of implementation (2007-2008) involved building the institutional context in which federal partners could work collectively, this second year of the four year mandate (2007-2011) saw progress towards more engagement on horizontal issues.

Over 2008-2009, foundational management components were implemented (e.g., CAA Program Activity Architecture, a performance logic model). These provided the basis for an organized, cohesive and methodical approach for the ongoing collection and analysis of performance information and reporting of results. This also supported the development of a database of comprehensive and consistent performance information for use in developing future programming while ensuring continued transparent approaches to horizontal management and accountability were supported and detailed integrated information was made available to Parliament on investments made within the context of the Clean Air Agenda. With respect to the CAA program architecture, there was ongoing support for the overall logic model for the CAA. This was reinforced by additional investments made to the CAA as part of the 2009 Budget Economic Action Plan.

Click here for Management and Accountability program-level details.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2008-2009 Planned Spending for Theme programming (as adjusted mid-year)
Actual Spending for 2008-2009
$5,000,000
$1,250,000 $1,029,395

Program: Industrial sector regulatory actions

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • GHG elements of the regulations drafted, including common elements, the sector-specific schedules, and quantification and reporting provisions.
  • Draft GHG regulations published in the Canada Gazette, Part I with a public comment period.
  • Affected sectors and stakeholders consulted.
  • Comments from the public, industry and non-governmental organizations responded to following publication of draft regulations.
  • Air pollutant elements of the regulatory framework finalized.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Since May 2008, the government worked intensively with affected sectors, provinces and non-government organizations on development of a comprehensive air management system, including an approach to national regulations of industrial emissions of air pollutants consistent with the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA).

Although substantial elements of the GHG regulations were drafted, the economic downturn and the renewed engagement by the new US Administration has required that we fine-tune our approach.

  • Drafting instructions for GHG regulations developed.
  • Draft quantification protocols for GHG process emissions developed.
  • Analysis of data submitted by industry in response to Dec 2007 CEPA s.71 notice for greenhouse gasses and air pollutants.
  • Analysis of air pollutant emissions and sources undertaken.

Consultations with stakeholders were continued through 2008-2009, initially to get feedback on the proposed framework.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$60,500,000
$10,272,000 $10,153,620

Program: Transport sector regulatory actions

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Final regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) for marine spark-ignition engines and off-road recreational vehicles published.
  • Proposed regulations under CEPA 1999 for heavy-duty on-road and off-road diesel engines and for off-road large spark-ignition engines published.
  • Compliance promotion, regulatory administration, and compliance monitoring and verification activities undertaken for the vehicle and engine emission regulations.
  • National marine emissions inventory and forecast, air quality modelling and ecosystems effects analyses completed to support a decision to proceed with a North American SOx Emission Control Area designation. Evaluation conducted of the benefits and costs of such a designation.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Marine Spark-Ignition Engine and Off-road Recreational Vehicle Emission Regulations: Progress has been made on the development of the final regulations. Publication of final regulations in Canada Gazette Part II is anticipated in 2009-2010

Amendments to the Off-Road Compression-Ignition Engine Emission Regulations: Development of the proposed amendments to incorporate more stringent U.S. Tier 4 standards is on-going with an anticipated publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I, in 2009-2010.

Amendments to the On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations: Development of the proposed amendments to incorporate On-Board Diagnostic System requirements for heavy-duty vehicles is on-going with an anticipated publication in the Canada Gazette, Part I, in 2009-2010.

On-going administration of vehicle and engine emission regulations including registering and tracking Notices of Defect; registering and tracking temporary import declarations; and responding to technical inquiries from regulatees seeking clarification regarding elements of the regulations.

National marine emissions inventory and forecast, air quality modelling and ecosystems effects analyses were completed. These analyses supported the decision to proceed jointly with the U.S. to apply for an Emission Control Area designation on March 27, 2009. Additional analyses such as cost effects, traffic assessments were also conducted.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$24,200,000
$4,380,000
$3,088,395

Program: Transportation sector regulatory actions

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

C00 - Sustainable Transportation Development and the Environment

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Motor Fuel Consumption Regulations published by the end of 2008.
  • Regulatory development including drafting of regulations, a completed regulatory impact assessment, performance measurement, consultations with stakeholders and cost-benefit analysis.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Note that regulations in the following three areas have not yet been developed. Therefore it is not yet possible to measure impacts even at the immediate outcomes stage. The following are immediate outputs.

Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Regulations

  • Undertook a comprehensive analysis of proposed April 2008 United States fuel economy rulemaking and California emissions regulations in a Canadian context,
  • Sustained collaboration with Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada, Industry Canada and Finance Canada through regular working group meetings; and
  • Collaborated with Environment Canada on the development of an alternate approach to regulating emissions from motor vehicles pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, resulting in a new approach to motor vehicle regulations.

Emission Reductions from Rail

  • Continued to support the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Railway Association of Canada on emission reductions in the rail sector;
  • Commenced preliminary work on the development of rail emission regulations for 2011, including informal consultations with key railway stakeholders (met with the Railway Association of Canada on two occasions and briefed the MOU steering committee);
  • Supported publication of the annual Locomotive Emissions Monitoring report for 2007, in accordance with the terms of the Memorandum of Understanding; and,
  • Met with the United States Environmental Protection Agency to discuss potential collaboration on criteria air contaminant and GHG regulations. The Environmental Protection Agency agreed to provide information on the development and implementation of U.S. Rail criteria air contaminates regulations. There was informal agreement to collaborate on GHG regulations.

Emission Reductions from Ships

  • Emissions control area (ECA) proposal was developed for marine ships operating in Canadian and United States coastal waters to control air pollution from ships. This proposal is now before the International Maritime Organization for consideration.
  • Supported the International Maritime Organization in developing a draft framework to guide the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships - targeted for presentation at the United Nations climate change negotiations at Copenhagen in December 2009.
  • Continued support, in the context of the International Maritime Organization of Maritime Conventions including one focused on ship air pollution.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$22,500,000
$4,684,500
$2,152,280

Program: Transportation sector regulatory actions

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 - Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

Provision of support for regulations implemented for model year 2011 and published in the Canada Gazette by December 2008

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Immediate Outcome: Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.

Results: Ongoing analysis and support has been provided to advance the development of light-duty vehicle fuel efficiency regulations. However, publication in the Canada Gazette has been delayed primarily because of a shift in approach in Canada. Delays were also incurred while waiting for US regulations to be finalized and amendments to the Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act to be finalized and tabled.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$3,200,000 $1,628,783
$576,109

Program: Consumer and commercial products regulatory actions

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Three volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration regulations for consumer products, architectural paints and auto refinish coatings published in the Canada Gazette, Part I.
  • Stakeholders consulted on further VOC reduction initiatives; associated strategies developed.
  • Instrument development activities, cost-benefit analysis and other measures (e.g. guidance documents) are initiated for the development of a regulation to control the design of residential wood-burning appliances manufactured, imported for sale, and sold in Canada.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The three VOC Concentration Regulations for certain consumer products, architectural paints and auto refinish products were published in Canada Gazette part I on April 26, 2008.These three regulatory initiatives will reduce emissions of VOCs which contribute to the formation of smog.

Initiated and completed two research studies: Residential Wood Combustion industry socio-economic study; Emissions factor study of certified residential wood appliances. These studies will enhance capacity to conduct cost-benefit analysis and to enhance departmental emissions inventory in support of a future regulation to reduce emissions from residential wood burning appliance products.

Enhanced an understanding of the importance of emissions from residential wood combustion appliances to local air quality which, in turn, will support the rationale for future management action, as well as provide a basis from which to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention, such as a product regulation, by:

  • Collaborating with the Municipality of Whitehorse, Yukon Environment and Yukon Health in the development and implementation of an ambient air quality monitoring study of wood smoke emissions within the city of Whitehorse.
  • Providing expertise and assisting in the development of an ambient air quality pilot study, funded by Health Canada and led by Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ) (still being implemented). This pilot study focussed on the Montreal area.

Initiated research study to assess the prevalence of outdoor wood boiler use across Canada (ongoing) in order to inform the effective design and use of management instruments to address this product.

Continued review Canadian Standards Association (CSA) B415.1 Performance Testing of Solid-Fuel-Burning Heating Appliances standard. Final publication of the revised standard is anticipated by March 2010. As input for CSA B415.1, a verification testing program of 4 central residential wood heating appliances was completed by March 2009. Participated in review and development of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards for solid-fuel burning standards in collaboration with US partners. The CSA and ASTM standards detail product emission limit requirements and testing protocols.

Collaborated with other jurisdictions in order to exchange research and policy expertise in the development and implementation of management instruments to improve residential wood combustion products. Participated in discussions regarding US EPA review of their wood burning appliance regulation; maintained engagement with other Canadian jurisdictions through the Intergovernmental Working Group for Residential Wood Combustion (IGWGRWC)

Initiated drafting of discussion documents detailing regulatory and non-regulatory instruments scope and design of residential wood combustion products.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$12,000,000
$2,875,000
$2,120,372

Program: Consumer and commercial products regulatory actions

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • 10th amendment to the Energy Efficiency Regulations as supported by CARA published in December 24 2008.
  • Work on subsequent amendments on track.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The 10th amendment to the Energy Efficiency Regulations was published December 24, 2008 and contained new performance standards for 7 products previously unregulated and increased the stringency of 4 existing standards. The standards will result in GHG emissions reductions of 9.69 MT per year in 2020 from what would otherwise be the case. Notable standards included those for general service light bulbs and gas furnaces. The amendment also prescribed labelling requirements for the three most commonly used light bulbs. In addition 3 new Energy Star specifications have been introduced in Canada and 14 existing specifications made more stringent.

Amendments to the Energy Efficiency Act were approved by the Senate on March 12, 2009.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$32,000,000 $7,774,000 $6,507,457

Program: Indoor Air Quality Management Actions

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1 - Healthy Environments and Consumer safety

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Assessments initiated of the two highest-priority contaminants identified on the priority list of indoor air contaminants.
  • Two new guidelines and/or objectives completed for indoor air contaminants (NO2 and particulate matter).
  • Standards for radon testing developed.
  • National radon database established to consolidate information and make it available.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • The priority list of indoor air contaminants was finalized in consultation with federal, provincial, non-governmental and industry stakeholders, and work on assessments of the first priority substances was initiated. These assessments will form the basis of new Canadian Residential Indoor Air Quality guidelines, which will be used to reduce Canadians' exposure to these substances.
  • Residential Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for carbon monoxide and ozone were finalized for publication in Canada Gazette, Part I, for public consultation
  • Draft indoor air assessments were completed for particulate matter and NO2; guidelines will be developed and published in Canada Gazette, Part I, for public consultation, in 2009-2010. These guidelines will provide the scientific foundation for developing measures to reduce Canadians' exposure to these two substances.
  • Supported and promoted training and certification of radon testing service providers to better service the Canadian public - there are now more than 40 companies certified and available across Canada to conduct testing as compared to none in 2007-2008.
  • A working group of the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Radiation Protection Committee was initiated in January 2009 to develop a common approach and format for mapping radon potential. This Working Group has agreed upon the types of data to be used for mapping and will continue its efforts to finalize a common mapping format to ensure consistency in radon mapping from province to province.
  • Revised Health Canada radon web pages to add new information and resources and make the information more current and useful to the public - 50% increase in web traffic and 168% increase in orders of radon information compared to 2007-2008.
  • Maintained the National Radon Laboratory in support of federal/provincial radon testing projects by increasing and improving the radon testing equipment available for federal testing projects and by beginning the implementation of a laboratory quality management system to ensure the services and measurements provided by the Laboratory meet or exceed the requirements and specifications for the projects under the radon program.
  • Completed a pilot radon/thoron testing survey in Winnipeg to assess health risks from exposure to thoron.
  • Twelve radon research papers were published or are in press related to radon testing and mapping in support of the radon risk management program.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$17,500,000
$4,000,000
$3,282,887

Program: Science in support of regulatory activities and accountability

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Ongoing science advice provided in the development and publication of regulations and objectives/guidelines for air pollutants.
  • Continued calculation of the predicted outcomes of proposed sectoral emission reductions.
  • Continued applications and provision of input from air quality modelling systems to economic and health valuation models, including applications for current and proposed regulatory approaches.
  • Publication and communication of results of a multidisciplinary particulate matter (PM) and ozone study.
  • Assessment to support the development of ambient objectives for PM and ozone.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Program 5 Output 1: Air quality objectives and guidelines are based on sound scientific information.

  • The scientific integrity and scope of the long-term environmental target for acid deposition mitigation in Canada (i.e., zero exceedences of critical loads) was improved through EC's continued effort to update critical load maps for acid deposition with new information from western Canada and updated information for parts of eastern Canada.
  • The adequacy of current targets to promote recovery of aquatic ecosystems was assessed through EC's continued efforts to monitor chemical and biological responses of lakes to reductions in acidifying emissions.

Program 5 Output 2: Measurements intended to "set-the-baseline" for tracking the benefits of regulations on the health and environmental effects of air pollutants across Canada.

  • EC's capacity to define the air quality, human health and environmental impacts of domestic and international emissions improved as EC continued to add new sites and additional analytical capacity to the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN).
  • EC's capacity to define urban air quality and the human health impacts of local emissions improved as EC continued to add new sites and analytical capacity to the National Air Pollution Surveillance Network (NAPS), the EC-led, federal-provincial air monitoring network.
  • Our understanding of population exposure to criteria air pollutants in SW Ontario was increased as a result of the completion of sophisticated analyses of air quality data.
  • Our understanding of the factors governing the transport of ground-level ozone and the sources and composition of particulate matter in ambient air were improved as a result of the collection of new measurements.
  • Our understanding of population exposure to pollutants from specific sources was improved as a result of new measurements of criteria air pollutants in urban areas.
  • Our understanding of the scale and scope of mercury pollution in Canada was improved as a result of the initiation of new field studies.

Program 5 Output 3: Results from an improved air quality model describing future air quality conditions resulting from the implementation of air pollutant regulations.

  • New features were added to the EC's air quality model (AURAMS), including a new "self-nesting" capability that will permit urban-scale simulations to be performed. The model execution speed was also increased by 30%.
  • The performance of AURAMS was evaluated through model intercomparisons with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's air quality model and several other peer air-quality models.
  • A framework was developed to facilitate the linkage between the computationally complex air quality and regional climate models which is the first step towards the creation of a single model capable of predicting air quality in a changing climate.
  • The development of the next generation of air quality model (GEM-MACH) is continuing and delivered an initial comprehensive on-line version of the smog component.

Program 5 Output 4: Scientific information to support the development of air quality regulations, targets, objectives and guidelines; scientific support for Canadian positions and strategies during international negotiations.

  • The co-benefit on air quality and concomitant human and environmental health benefits from proposed GHG emission regulations was determined using a comprehensive air quality modeling framework.
  • EC's comprehensive air quality modeling framework continued to improve through the refinement of linkages between the air quality model outputs and the environmental health benefits valuation modeling components.
  • In support of a North American application to the International Maritime Organization to establish an emissions control area (ECA), EC's comprehensive air quality modeling framework was used to determine the impact of marine emissions on human health and mortality and the acidification of the environment.
  • In support of the development of transportation regulations, EC's air quality modeling framework was used to determine the contribution of on- and off-road transportation to air quality across Canada.
  • In support of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program and the UNEP Chemicals Branch, EC contributed to the Technical Background Report to the Global Atmospheric Mercury Assessment (2008)
  • In support of the UNEP Global Mercury Partnership, EC contributed to the Interim Report of the Mercury Fate and Transport Partnership Area entitled "Mercury Fate and Transport in the Global Atmosphere: Measurements, Models and Policy Implications" (2008)
  • EC continues to actively contribute to the scientific basis of international discussions on air quality through contributions to the AMAP Mercury Assessment (due 2011), NARSTO Assessment of the Technical Feasibility of Implementing a Multi-Pollutant Air Quality Management Framework in North America (due 2009), Subcommittee 2 of the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement, the World Meteorological Organisation and the Committees and Working Groups of the UN ECE LRTAP Agreement.

Program 5 Output 5: Domestic scientific assessments of smog, acid deposition, mercury and other air pollutants describing emission sources, trends and the forecasted benefits of regulatory actions under CARA on air quality, human health and the environment.

  • The 2009 Canadian Smog Assessment and 2008 Canadian Atmospheric Assessment of Agricultural Ammonia were edited and revised in preparation for publication.
  • The process to produce the Canadian Mercury Science Assessment (due 2012-2013) was officially launched.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$40,100,000
$9,685,000
$9,060,100

Program: Science in support of regulatory activities and accountability

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1 - Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • The risks and benefits of fuel options in Canada assessed (one for 2008-2009).
  • Particulate matter and ozone (smog) assessments completed.
  • Ongoing scientific studies on exposure of Canadians to air pollutants completed.
  • Air Quality Benefits Assessment Tool (AQBAT) applied to estimate health benefits of air pollution reductions in support of regulatory actions put forward in the timeframe.
  • Development and testing of the Air Health Indicator (AHI) finalized by March 31, 2009. Report on AHI in the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators report.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The air quality exposure and assessment studies undertaken will assist in the development of regulations and air quality objectives with a goal of reducing population exposures to air pollutants and improving human health. Science support for the development of the regulatory framework for air emissions is now underway.

  • An assessment of 10%-blended ethanol has been finalized, a biodiesel fuel assessment has been initiated, and preliminary work has been undertaken on risk assessment methodology for evaluating proposed greenhouse gas emission reduction and mitigation technologies.
  • The comprehensive outdoor air particulate matter and ozone (smog) assessment was developed for public consultation in 2009-2010.
  • Scientific studies on the exposure of Canadians to air pollutants were continued in 2008-2009. The collection of baseline data for a range of air pollutants typically found in residences was completed for the Regina Indoor and Outdoor Air Quality Study and data analysis continues. A similar collaborative study was initiated in Eastern Canada. Exposure modeling techniques were studied in order to develop methodologies to estimate the Canadian population's exposure to source-specific air pollutants in a more precise manner. Epidemiological studies were conducted to evaluate the relationship between population exposure to air pollution and mortality, hospital admissions, emergency room visits, and infant health. Epidemiology panel studies were also undertaken, using indoor, outdoor and personal air-pollutant exposure monitoring techniques to assess children's exposure to source-specific pollutants and the relation to their cardiovascular and respiratory outcomes. In addition, new methods of analyzing air monitoring results were investigated which will be used to analyze results from future field studies. These studies will directly support the development of air quality objectives and guidelines to protect health.
  • Ongoing refinement and use of the Air Quality Benefit Assessment Tool (AQBAT) continued in order to estimate health benefits of proposed air pollution reductions. Methodologies for the analysis of life expectancy and quality-of-life impacts of ozone and particulate matter were being developed and will be applied to AQBAT. A study was undertaken to develop risk estimates specific to the most highly susceptible segments of the population. New health endpoints, such as pregnancy outcomes, were also studied. Scientific data were collected and are under analysis. These studies provide support for the parameters used in AQBAT to assess the degree to which human health and environmental quality are expected to improve due to proposed or new actions to reduce emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants and greenhouse gases.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$71,300,000 $15,517,400 $10,679,748

Program: Emissions reporting

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • National emission inventories, trends and projections compiled, published and submitted to comply with the reporting obligations of domestic and international agreements.
  • The design of a single-window reporting system to support the sector regulations is completed; development and testing of the system are initiated.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

  • Maintenance of existing institutional capacity to deliver an enhanced monitoring, accounting and reporting system and submission of a UN compliant national GHG inventory system and national inventory report (QA/QC, linking facility data and National Inventory);to meet international reporting obligations under UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol (see above 2008-2009 expected results as per HRPP).
  • Maintenance of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program to ensure compliance with CEPA 1999 and Regulatory Framework for Air Emissions reporting requirements, including integration of S46 and S71 Gazette Notices (done in consultation with Strategic Priorities Directorate).
  • Quantification and verification guidance for CARA regulations.
  • Information, analysis and advice to support domestic development of GHG regulations under the Regulatory Framework for Air Emissions and international negotiations under UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol.
  • Publication of the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) air pollutants emissions inventory for 2006, and the 2007 facility level emissions.
  • Compilation of the 2007 NPRI air pollutant emissions inventory.
  • Technical studies and measurements were undertaken to improve the emission estimates for the steel and the aluminium industry, the electric power generating sector, and transportation vehicles.
  • Compilation of emission data files to support air quality modeling in Canada and in the U.S.
  • On-going developments to upgrade the NPRI's data collection system named One-Window to National Environmental Reporting System (OWNERS).
  • Submission of compliant 2007 national emission summaries for air pollutants to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) as required to fulfill the reporting obligations for the protocols that have been ratified by Canada under the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP).
  • Information analyses and advice provided to support the negotiation of the UNECE LRTAP Gothenburg protocol, the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) Stockholm Convention, and amendments to the Canada/US Air Quality Agreement.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$39,000,000 $8,950,000
$9,478,437

Program: Emissions trading

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • The emission trading provisions for the GHG regulations are completed, including design of domestic offset system.
  • Contribute to design of trading systems for air pollutants that will allow possibility of future cross-border trading with the U.S.
  • Participate in International Civil Aviation Organization's work on emission trading for aviation.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Regulatory Framework for Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  • The Government of Canada published details of its Turning the Corner regulatory framework for industrial greenhouse gas emissions in March, 2008. Drafting of regulations for industrial greenhouse gas emissions, which included provisions for an emission trading system was started.
  • The government also published an overview of the Offset System for Greenhouse Gases, including eligibility criteria for offset projects, and an overview of the Credit for Early Action program. Work was undertaken in the spring and summer of 2008 to develop the policy set out in these two documents. For the offset system, this work led to a draft Guide for Protocol Developers, which was released for public comment in August 2008. Work on the Credit for Early Action program resulted inCanada's Credit for Early Action Program: Final Program Guide on June 28, 2008. Phase 1 was completed. Work on Phase 2 has been suspended while the government assesses its approach to greenhouse gas.

National Registry

  • In 2008-09, Canada's Kyoto Protocol National Registry was established and tested and found to meet UNFCCC requirements. The National Registry is a legal obligation under the Kyoto Protocol. It is used to show the holding of Canada's Assigned Amount Units, as specified in the Kyoto Protocol and related decisions of the Meeting of the Parties under the protocol.
  • Contribution to the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) work on emissions trading for aviation
  • Canada co-chairs ICAO's Market-based Measures Task Force (MBMTF), which is identifying market-based options to reduce emissions from international aviation. The task force produced four draft documents on: local air quality impacts associated with aviation; the role of offsets in reducing aviation emissions; the benefits and challenges of linking an aviation emission trading system with other emission trading systems; and voluntary emission trading systems. These documents will be used by ICAO in international discussions related to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from aviation.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$10,000,000
$2,480,000 $2,714,133

Program: Enforcement advice and reporting on progress

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Guidance developed on analysis techniques, plus preliminary analysis for a State of the Air report, including emissions information, ambient levels and trends, current vs. projected air quality conditions, impacts on ecosystems, and ecosystem recovery and visibility.
  • Enforcement advice provided and incorporated into the regulatory proposals.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx, SOx, VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

This program pursued the development and the improvements of the information sources fundamental to reporting on the state of the air by:

  • Completing a source apportionment analysis of Particulate Matter at Five Canadian Cities using receptor modelling, a technique that examines speciated ambient PM measurements and works backwards to identify which pollutants and which sources are primarily responsible for contributing to the PM2.5 levels we observe at various locations across the country.
  • Continuing with improvements and application of the Emissions Mapping and Information Tool (EMIT), a mapping software extension that provides a simplified method for extracting detailed air pollutant emissions data down to a municipal scale.
  • Conducting air flow analysis at several locations across Canada and nearby U.S. sites to compare with ambient data in order to identify source regions and atmospheric factors that are associated with elevated PM2.5 and ozone concentrations. This information can be combined with emissions data to define airsheds and source regions that contribute to elevated pollutant levels.
  • Expanding previous receptor modelling analysis of Canadian urban PM2.5 speciation monitoring sites to include an examination of nearby rural PM2.5 stations. This analysis will be used to help apportion the source contributions of PM2.5 that come from local source versus those that are transported into (and out of) urban areas.

Enforcement advices have been provided in support of the development of regulatory approaches.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$7,000,000 $1,760,000
$405,130

Program: Policy Development, Analysis and Coordination

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Strategic-level policy options developed to support the achievement of the objectives of the federal Clean Air Regulatory Agenda.
  • Analysis related to economic impacts of air pollution and GHG mitigation policy options and measures undertaken as the regulation is developed.
  • Development of a more robust in-house energy, emission and economy model is initiated.
  • Analysis conducted with respect to prospective emissions reduction actions for achieving current and future GHG targets.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors:
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx, SOx, VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides; and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved:
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

An updated energy, emissions and economy outlook was developed which served as the baseline for assessing the energy, emissions and economic consequences of the Government's industrial regulatory agenda. This baseline serves as the basic building block for the analytical work.

The energy, emissions and economic consequences of achieving the Government's Turning the Corner greenhouse gas emission reduction target were analyzed. The results served to shape the overall industrial regulatory greenhouse gas emission targets.

Since Government decided to review the GHG regulatory approach set out in Turning the Corner in light of economic circumstances and the opportunity to work with the U.S. Administration, the work in the latter part of 2008/ early part of 2009 focused on further policy analysis of options for aligning with the U.S. approach, and recognizing the current economic circumstances. Consultations with stakeholders were continued through 2008-2009, initially to get feedback on technical elements of the regulations, and later to get feedback on the overall regulatory approach in light of the Minister's commitment to work with the U.S.

In May 2008, the federal government agreed to take more time to finalize the air pollutant regulatory framework, and to work in cooperation with provinces and stakeholders to develop an alternative framework to Turning the Corner. Extensive consultations were held with affected sectors, provinces and non-government organizations on the key elements of the alternative framework. The goals were to develop an alternative framework that was broadly acceptable, achieved the Governments environmental and health goals, and maintained a strong regulatory role for the federal government.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$8,000,000
$2,000,000 $2,415,380

Program: ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Partnerships with stakeholders developed.
  • Communications and marketing products developed.
  • Training on software tools and energy-efficient building techniques provided.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Immediate Outcomes

As part of the ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses program, NRCan currently maintains 50 agreements at both the provincial and territorial level with a variety of partners (figure represents both the Buildings and Houses subcomponents).

Formation of partnerships in all provinces/territories to reduce energy use; Greater understanding of opportunities and benefits by jurisdictions to adopt more stringent building and housing energy codes and/or other regulatory instruments (Buildings and Houses)

  • As of the end of 2008-2009 six provinces have announced changes to their housing codes to achieve the EnerGuide Rating System (ERS) 80 level by 2012. In addition, all provinces and territories (except for PEI and NFLD) participate in the Building Energy Code Collaborative, with 8 provinces having codes or code-related projects.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • Greater knowledge and understanding among all stakeholders regarding opportunities and benefits of energy efficient buildings and houses; Greater awareness and understanding of market transformation through a labelling system (Buildings and Houses)
    • In 2008-2009 the number of program participants increased from the previous year. More than 600 individuals participated in New Housing and Buildings workshops/charettes during this time.
    • In 2008-2009, over 257,000 existing homes and 11,500 new homes were rated and labelled.
    • Seven building labelling pilot projects are currently underway with organizations across Canada. They cover 323 buildings.
    • Labelling provides potential home buyers with information regarding the energy efficiency rating of a house. Providing this information makes energy efficient homes relatively more attractive and steers the market towards increased efficiency.

Intermediate Outcomes

Adoption of energy efficiency products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • 2,750 builders and related professionals trained per year (Buildings and Houses).
    • In 2008-2009 more than 1800 building professionals took part in technical support workshops and over 4300 housing professionals, builders, and energy advisors were trained.

Final Outcomes

Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

  • Since program inception, an estimated 1.0 Mt of GHGs were saved as the result of this program
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$61,000,000
$17,420,000
$14,805,030

Program: ecoENERGY Retrofit

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

For homeowners:

  • Collaborative agreements with provinces, territories, utilities and other stakeholders signed.
  • Incentives provided directly to property owners who implement home energy retrofits.

For small and medium-sized organizations:

  • Awareness raised through communications materials.
  • Information sessions held.
  • Projects received and reviewed.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Immediate Outcomes

Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • Collaboration with provinces/territories, utilities, municipalities, First Nations and other stakeholders (Retrofit: Homes).
    • At the end of 2008-2009, agreements had been signed with nine provinces and two territories.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • Increased property owner and industry awareness of the potential for, and methods of, reducing energy use and emissions in housing (Retrofit: Homes).
    • As of the end of 2008-2009 48,043 calls to the 1-800-OCanada Line were made, in addition to an unrecorded number of emails to various contact websites.

Intermediate Outcomes

Adoption of energy efficiency products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • Reduced energy consumption/energy savings from the increased rate of retrofits to low-rise housing (Retrofit: Homes).
    • As of the end of 2008-2009, 94,000 homeowners received grants in support of energy efficiency upgrades that will reduce their annual energy consumption. Grants averaged $1,112 per household. All regions of Canada, except one province and one territory, have matching programs that provide homeowners with seamless access to both orders of government support for home retrofits.
  • Small and Medium Organizations implement energy efficiency projects (Retrofit: small/medium organizations).
    • 279 contribution agreements were signed in 2008-2009 with Small and Medium Organizations in support of energy efficiency upgrades (SMOs have fewer than 500 employees or less than 20,000 square metres in their buildings).

Adoptions of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • Increased adoption of energy efficient and renewable energy technology, systems and products (Retrofit: Homes).
    • As of the end of 2008-2009, approximately 20% of Retrofit- Homes participants installed water conservation equipment and/or renewable energy technologies.

Final Outcomes

Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

  • Energy savings, which convert to reduced energy-related industrial GHG emissions and CACs (Retrofit: small/medium organizations).
    • As of the end of 2008-2009, the ecoENERGY Retrofit program has resulted in an estimated 0.4 Mt of GHG savings (0.32 Mt from Retrofit-Homes; 0.087Mt from Retrofit-SMO).
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$520,000,000* $93,706,000
$99,774,175

*The ecoENERGY Retrofit: Homes Program was allocated $300 million of additional funding in the 2009 federal budget.

Program: ecoENERGY for Industry

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Leadership networking meetings conducted.
  • Policy, program and analytical studies conducted.
  • Benchmarking studies, best practices guides and tools developed.
  • Energy managers trained.
  • New companies engaged.
  • New energy assessments funded.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcomes

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Immediate Outcomes

Involvements by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • Industry is committed to reduce energy use (Industry).
    • Ten Energy Assessment Studies are currently underway with the objective of identifying energy-saving opportunities.
    • In fiscal year 2008-2009, 191 companies registered their commitment to improved energy efficiency and became Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC) leaders.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • Industry develops capacity to identify and implement energy saving projects and practices (Industry).
    • In fiscal year 2008-2009, 760 Industrial Energy Managers attended Dollars to $ense workshops. Attending workshops is one facet of CIPEC participation. CIPEC participation has been shown to reduce energy consumption by industrial facilities.
    • Six benchmarking studies, technical guides and other tools were developed in 2008-2009 leading to improved energy efficiency in Canadian Industry.

Intermediate Outcomes

Adoption of energy efficiency products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • Industry implements energy efficiency projects and practices (Industry).
    • A survey of 2007-2008 new CIPEC members indicates that approximately 80% of new CIPEC registrants have energy use reduction targets.

Final Outcomes

Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

  • Improved industrial energy intensity and energy savings, which convert to reduced energy-related industrial GHG emissions and CACs (Industry).
    • Since program inception, ecoENERGY for Industry has led to an estimated 0.736 Mt of GHG savings.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$18,000,000
$4,300,000
$4,217,508

Program: ecoENERGY for Renewable Power

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Detailed project proposals received and reviewed.
  • Contribution agreements signed.
  • Capacity of renewable energy increased.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcomes

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Immediate Outcomes

Production of clean electricity from renewable sources such as wind, biomass, hydro and solar energy leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • Increased low-impact renewable energy generation to 3 Terawatt hours (includes full yearly production from previous fiscal year and partial production in fiscal year 2008-2009).
  • Increased renewable energy capacity in Canada by 849 MW based on projects that were commissioned in fiscal year 2008-2009.

Intermediate Outcomes

Increased production of clean electricity from renewable sources resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • 68 new notices of application were registered between April 1, 2008 and March 31, 2009, for a total of 233 registered projects under the program to date. Projects supported through this program include, for example, wind energy projects larger than 1 MW.
  • 40 new contribution agreements with power production companies were signed during the year, representing projects that will generate 1,790 MW of new renewable power capacity in Canada and 5,935 GWh/year of additional production. As of the end of 2008-2009, the program had signed contribution agreements with 52 proponents in total.
  • 29 of the 52 projects with signed agreements have been commissioned as of the end of 2008-2009, representing 1,592 MW in generating capacity.

Final Outcomes

Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean electricity production.

  • The expected GHG reduction from all 29 commissioned projects is 1.41 MT of CO2 to date, based on annual production from projects commissioned in 2007-2008 and partial production of projects commissioned in 2008-2009. When all 29 commissioned projects are producing for a full year, the expected annual GHG emission reductions will be about 2.14 MT/year.
  • Once all 52 projects are commissioned, the expected GHG emission reductions will be about 4.2 MT/year
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$276,000,000
$39,786,000
$32,417,368

Program: ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Project applications received and reviewed.
  • Contribution agreements signed.
  • Increased use of renewable energy.
  • Contribution to the development of renewable thermal energy capacity, and contribution to clean air by displacing fossil-fuel-based energy use for space heating and cooling and water heating.
  • Increased green heating and cooling technology market size through the implementation of 8 pilot projects, installation of 175 units, certification of 2 systems, development of 1 tool and 1 standard, and the administration of 1 annual survey.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcomes

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Renewable Heat Outcomes

  • 195 systems were installed in the Industrial/Commercial/Institutional sectors in 2007-2008 (171 solar air systems, 24 solar water systems).
  • 297 solar thermal systems have been installed in the Industrial/Commercial/Institutional sectors in 2008-2009 (202 solar air systems, 95 solar water systems).

The systems installed under the program in 2007-2008 are expected to result in energy savings of 52,236 JG/year and achieve 3.3 kilotonnes of GHG reductions per year. The systems installed in 2008-2009 are expected to result in annual savings of 91,018 GJ of energy and 5.5 kilotonnes of GHGs.


Increased deployment of solar water technology in residential sector market (Renewable Heat).

  • 11 pilot projects contribution agreements were signed in 2008-2009. If all of the committed systems are installed, it will result in 6,100 solar domestic water heaters by 2010.
  • 96 systems were installed under the Pilot Projects contribution agreements in 2008-2009.

Increased renewable energy industry capacity to meet growing deployment demand (Renewable Heat).

  • Development of equipment standards is underway.
  • Agreements have been signed with 9 companies for the certification of domestic solar water heating systems. These agreements are intended to defray the costs for these certifications and encourage growth within the industry.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$36,000,000 $8,262,000 $8,695,344

Program: ecoENERGY Technology Initiative

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Technology and knowledge products developed to reduce technical risks of clean energy technologies, with a view to commercial acceptability.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcomes

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Immediate Outcomes

Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • Increased collaboration and capacity within Canada's energy S&T innovation system (Technology).
    • Completion of call for proposals process, followed by proposal assessment and due diligence for large scale projects in carbon capture and storage (CCS) completed. Eight projects selected (in BC, Alberta and Saskatchewan, and negotiations for contribution agreements begun, with projects to start in 2009-2010.

Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • Reduced technical risks of clean energy technologies towards commercial acceptability (Technology).
    • Significant progress in broad range of R&D projects to reduce technical (and other) risks in the areas of low emission industrial processes, energy efficient built environment, clean transportation systems, distributed power generation, sustainable bioenergy, and clean coal and CCS. For example:
      • Development of Community Energy Solutions Roadmap on behalf of the Demand Side Management Working Group of the Council of Energy Ministers. Roadmap on schedule for release in Fall 09.
      • Initial development begun in the Canadian Hydrogen Airports Project to demonstrate the potential of hydrogen fuelled vehicles and power generation technologies to significantly reduce the emission of greenhouse gases and urban air pollutants from ground support equipment at airports.
      • Two new biomass technologies for harvesting propagation material and recovering juvenile woody biomass developed.
      • Six distributed power generation cost-benefit analysis case studies developed, with guidance from an industrial advisory group.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$226,440,000 $32,749,000 $33,631,748

Program: Policy, Communications, Monitoring and Reporting

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Advice, policy options and recommendations developed in support of energy and environment policy.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcomes

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Immediate Outcomes

Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

  • Decisions related to forest carbon and GHGs reflect the best information and analysis available.
    • Analysis on-going to inform decisions related to negotiations on rules for post-2012 international accounting for forests.
  • Canada's international monitoring reporting commitments related to forest carbon and GHGs are met.
    • Provision of forest-related information on areas and GHG emissions for 1990-2007 to Environment Canada for inclusion in the 2009 National Inventory Report.
  • Policy, research and advice that supports reductions in GHGs and CACs.
    • Provided timely strategic advice, information, analysis of policy options and recommendations to the Minister and senior officials on climate change and clean air issues in support of policy and program development and decision making.
    • Provided high-quality advice and recommendations that influenced refinements to the Regulatory Framework for Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions.
    • Continued to expand NRCan's knowledge base and capacity for providing policy advice on carbon capture and storage (CCS).
    • Worked closely with Environment Canada and other federal departments and agencies on climate change modelling activities; reference case development on GHG emissions, and energy production and consumption; and sectoral economic assessments for the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda.
    • Updated NRCan's MAPLE-C forecasting model to the year 2030.

Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • CFS carbon knowledge and tools are transferred to governments and stakeholders.
    • Strong interest continued in use of the Carbon Budget Model (CBM-CFS3) with over 500 downloads of the model from 42 countries. A workshop on the model was attended by 31 trainees from 5 countries, including participants from 3 provinces. Joint projects continued with Russia and Mexico on using the model.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • Improved understanding and modeling of forest carbon dynamics and the impacts of climate change, land-use change and forestry practices.
    • 12 high impact publications in scientific literature, including on the implications of mountain pine beetle on carbon stocks and on the CBM-CFS3. Three of these received extensive national and international attention; two garnered significant media coverage.
  • Improved understanding of decision-makers about options for how forests contribute to GHG goals domestically and through international negotiations.
    • Forest-related analysis used to support development of Canadian positions in international climate change negotiations.
    • CFS science and policy experts participated in numerous presentations and discussions in Canada (e.g. to senior federal, provincial, territorial and industry officials).
  • Greater understanding among Canadians of the benefits of the federal government's Clean Energy Agenda programs.
    • 77 events and announcements with Ministers and MPs were made in support of clean energy and ecoENERGY programs, including the expansion of the ecoENERGY Retrofit - Home program and numerous ecoENERGY Renewable Initiative projects across the country.
    • A variety of information products were produced for various audiences, including information kits, brochures, videos, news releases and other promotional materials.
    • There were more than 80 media calls relating to the ecoENERGY Initiatives.
    • Clean Tech Minutes videos were made available to satellite TV stations.

Intermediate Outcomes

Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • Market awareness and acceptance.
    • Helped to recognized industry leaders for achievements in energy efficient practices and products through the ENERGY Star Awards, CIPEC Awards and ecoENERGY for Vehicle Awards. These awards help to increase the profile of Clean Energy programs and associated best practices, and provide smarter consumer options to Canadians.
    • Videos on carbon capture and storage technology (CCS) were created for the G8 Energy Ministers meeting and CEM to highlight Canada's leadership and achievements.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$24,560,000 $6,904,000 $4,938,002

Program: ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities

Department

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.4 Community Infrastructure

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • GHG reduction opportunities identified.
  • Funding allocated for up to 25 renewable energy or energy efficiency projects.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcomes

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program, delivered by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), contributes to Government of Canada's commitment of greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions under the Clean Air Agenda (CAA). It equips Aboriginal and northern communities with the knowledge and tools to increase the energy efficiency of community infrastructure, to access renewable energy opportunities and to implement cost effective renewable energy projects. Not only does the Program promote environmentally sustainable communities, but it provides the funding to allow Aboriginal and northern communities to be able to access economic development opportunities that will directly benefit their communities.

In 2008-2009, INAC provided $2.69 million in contributions to 25 renewable energy and energy efficiency projects within 24 of the approximately 650 Aboriginal and northern communities within Canada. Funding contributions were provided for a range of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects. Examples of projects receiving funding include the installation of photovoltaic systems, wind energy evaluations, small hydro installations, and hydro generation feasibility studies.

The following provides a breakdown of work achieved in 2008-2009:

  • 34 applications for renewable energy and energy efficiency funding were received in FY2008-2009, an increase of 13 applications over those received in the first year of the program (2007-2008). Of the 34 applications received, 25 projects were approved and received funding.
  • The 25 funded projects include 18 Renewable Energy projects and 7 Energy Efficiency projects.
  • 24 Communities benefited from the 25 funded projects.
  • Opportunities for GHG reductions have been identified in 130 off-grid communities. An Off-Grid Framework will be developed and used to facilitate implementation of future renewable energy and energy efficiency projects within these 130 communities.
It is projected that the renewable energy and energy efficiency projects supported by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program in 2008-2009 will result in a reduction of 1.089 MT CO2e (over a 20-year period) once the projects are commissioned. Once commissioned, these projects will create new sources of renewable power and reduce the reliance of Aboriginal and northern communities' on fossil fuels and therefore result in a decrease of GHG emissions.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$15,000,000 $3,750,000
$4,056,249

Program: ecoMobility

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

  • Project proposals reviewed and contribution agreements for transportation demand management (TDM) initiatives signed and implemented.
  • Tools and program modules to support TDM project implementation developed, including guidelines for the measurement of the impact of TDM projects.
  • Advisory committee formed to provide resources and coordination for capacity building initiatives to support TDM project implementation.
  • TDM learning events to foster ongoing implementation and measurement of TDM policies and programs.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period


Immediate Outcomes
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

In 2008-2009, the program results listed below contributed to increasing capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances and increased awareness, knowledge and acceptance of energy efficient transportation technologies and best practices.

The contribution component of the program is intended to support the implementation and performance measurement of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) projects that aim to increase the use of sustainable transportation options such as transit, carpools, cycling and walking and reduced travel through telework. Through the program, the government is helping find ways to meet transportation needs while protecting the environment.

In January 2009, fourteen projects were announced for funding under ecoMOBILITY's first round of contribution agreements. To date, three have been signed and the others are currently being negotiated. The second funding round was announced in March 2009 with a May deadline. First round recipients attended an ecoMOBILITY workshop in February 2009 where they presented their projects, shared information with other recipients and were provided guidance on topics such as performance measurement. During the workshop, recipients were also informed that they would be invited to be part of a new ecoMOBILITY Advisory Committee (EAC) that is being formed to ensure relevance of program to the Transportation Demand Management (TDM) stakeholders and to maximize stakeholders' program inputs.

The ecoMobility Program developed a number of tools to support project implementation of the TDM community. Tools included Standard TDM Impact Measurement Guideline; Sustainable Transportation Options Guide for Small and Rural Communities; Compendium of Canadian Survey Research on Consumer Attitudes and Behavioural Influences Affecting Sustainable Transportation Options; and International Walk to School Week Implementation Kit.

A marketing strategy has being initiated to widely disseminate these tools to the TDM community through the EcoMobility Stakeholder Database, the TDM learning events; the ecoMobility web site; and through the electronic ecoMobility newsletter under development.

Various learning events were organized or sponsored by the ecoMobility program to foster ongoing implementation and measurement of TDM practitioners' activities. Such events included:

  • Webinar on Sustainable Transportation Options at Post-secondary Institutions.
  • EcoMobility provided workshops to TDM practitioners to set up new nodes: NGO network and the Active and Safe Routes to School (ASRTS) node. The ASRTS experience was so conclusive that a partnership was later developed between the members to join efforts in reaching common goals.
  • During the TDM annual summit of the Association for Commuter Transportation (ACT) Canada, TC provided 2 workshops (performance management guidelines and TDM guidelines) and sponsored speakers (Thinking and Working Like a Social Marketer, TDM Measurement, Monitoring and Reporting Guidelines and Creative Thinking for TDM Professionals).

EcoMobility also sponsored the Association du transport et des routes (AQTR) 2008 conference « Innover pour mieux financer les transports urbains ».

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$9,300,000 $1,778,700 $1,260,893

Program: ecoTechnology for Vehicles

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Fuel efficiency, emissions and safety performance of advanced-technology vehicles evaluated.
  • Public-awareness-raising events conducted across Canada (e.g. presentations of advanced-technology vehicles, public exhibitions, demonstrations, ride and drives).
  • Information on the program, the technologies, and the vehicles disseminated to the public.
  • Barriers to Canadian market penetration of eco-technologies identified through test results and studies of market trends.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

In 2008-2009, the program results listed below contributed to increasing capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances and increased awareness, knowledge and acceptance of energy efficient transportation technologies and best practices.

eTV acquired 14 advanced vehicle technologies in 2008-2009, including full-electric, plug-in hybrid, clean diesel, hydrogen fuel cell, hydrogen internal combustion engine and advanced gasoline vehicles. eTV evaluated the fuel efficiency, emissions and safety performance of these vehicles and disseminated the results to over 50,000 Canadians by attending 19 public-outreach events throughout 2008-2009; by providing in-depth information via its web site; by producing 5 videos with 15 multimedia animations; by publishing 50 technology articles and 18 technical bulletins and; by releasing its annual report. eTV has also initiated a number of barrier studies in partnership with stakeholders and auto industry to identify market trends, consumer and regulatory barriers in addressing the penetration of emerging advanced technologies. For example, eTV has initiated a study with the Vancouver Fuel Cell Vehicle Program (VFCVP) to examine the barriers related to parking hydrogen fuel cell vehicles in underground facilities. The study will focus on the potential risks associated with hydrogen leakage in an enclosed environment, and whether vehicle standards and/or building codes are sufficient to mitigate any potential for ignition in this event. Similarly, eTV is fine-tuning plans for a study with the Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association. The study is a broader examination of potential barriers to the early introduction of hydrogen vehicle fleets, and the mitigation strategies that could be adopted. The focus will be on wider vehicle standards, refuelling standards, and some discussion of the hydrogen refuelling infrastructure required to encourage the deployment of these vehicles in Canada.

eTV staff participated in various industry consultations, work groups, conferences and seminars to share knowledge and best practices with regards to advanced technology vehicles.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$14,100,000 $4,214,230 $2,347,650

Program: National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Federal, provincial and territorial ministers agree upon a common approach for reviewing whether speed limiters that restrict large trucks to a maximum of 105 km/h should be mandatory. Transport Canada, on behalf of the provinces and territories, conducts a review of the implications of such a requirement from a safety, environmental, economic and operational perspective.
  • Work plan and project schedule to undertake the necessary assessment of a speed limiter requirement is developed and endorsed.
  • A federal-provincial steering committee is established to guide the requisite studies.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

In 2008-2009, the program results listed below contributed to increasing participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities and increased awareness, knowledge and acceptance of energy efficient transportation technologies and best practices.

On behalf of the provinces and territories, Transport Canada completed 6 studies initiated in 2007-2008 to examine the feasibility of mandating heavy truck speed limiters. This included traffic modelling to better understand the safety impact from differential car-truck speeds on highways, quantifying the environmental benefits from fuel savings and reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and an assessment of the trade and competitiveness impacts of a speed limiter mandate in both the Canadian and North American context. In 2008-2009 the results from these studies confirmed the 2007-2008 preliminary estimates that a national mandate for heavy truck speed limiters would result in estimated annual diesel fuel savings of 228.6 million litres (1.4% of the total diesel fuel consumed by road vehicles in Canada in 2006) and annual GHG savings of 0.64 megatonnes. The studies' reports can be viewed on the following TC web site:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/roadsafety/safevehicles/motorcarriers/speedlimiter/index.htm

Two provinces, Ontario and Quebec, have implemented heavy truck speed limiter regulations and one other province (NB) is examining the merits of harmonizing with their regulations. The National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry (NHITI) is available to applicants to offer co-funding to assist with the development of enforcement capacity for these new requirements. As Transport Canada supports the implementation of heavy truck speed limiters, the NHITI may also assist other provinces investigate the feasibility of speed limiter legislation.

TC continued its involvement in the Task Force on Vehicle Weights and Dimensions Policy working group to improve uniformity in regulations governing the weights and dimensions of commercial vehicles operating between provinces and territories. The working group has made progress toward weight and dimensional thresholds that could better accommodate environmental technologies such as wide-base single tires and rear-mounted aerodynamic devices.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$5,400,000 $643,180 $389,025

Program: Freight Technology Demonstration Fund

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Contribution agreements negotiated for technology demonstration projects; and implementation started.
  • Case studies of previous demonstration program produced and disseminated on Web-based information network.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcome

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The Freight Technology Demonstration Fund provides funding for demonstration to test and measure the emissions impact of new and underutilized freight transportation technologies in real world conditions.

In 2008-2009, the program results listed below contributed to increasing the uptake technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG and CAC.

Of the 8 projects selected in 2007-2008 for $2.4M in funding as part of the first round of the demonstration program, 6 are underway with contribution agreements in place and final reports expected in 2009-2010.

In January 2009, Transport Canada selected an additional 9 projects for $3.5M in funding as part of the second round of demonstration funding. One contribution agreement was finalized in 2008-2009 and negotiations were well underway for the remaining eight.

The selected portfolio of the above projects for both rounds of funding supports a mix of technologies that include: innovative port crane technologies, ultra low emitting Genset locomotives technology, route and mode optimization software, hybrid electric and advanced electric delivery vehicles, bundled advanced truck technologies (i.e. aerodynamic truck technologies, advanced auxiliary power technologies for trucks, single tire technologies and long combination vehicle options for trucks). Every Canadian region is represented in the selected portfolio.

A majority of the selected projects have started to install and utilize the technology thus beginning to achieve GHG and CAC emission reduction. Those reductions will be quantified and reported in the final report provided by the recipient at the end of the project starting in 2009-2010.

Each recipient will collect and analyze data such as fuel use, time of operation, workload and distance traveled in a predefined methodology. This will allow an accurate calculation of GHG and CAC emissions reduction.

The Demonstration Fund was well subscribed as it received almost 50 applications requesting funding in the second round. The high volume and quality of applications has necessitated the commitment of the remaining contribution funding envelope.

The two rounds of funding have allowed an uptake in technology of 1254 pieces of equipment (see above mix of technology) across four modes of transportation.

24 case studies from previous technology projects supported by TC were published on Transport Canada's ecoFREIGHT website detailing results.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$9,300,000 $2,967,047 $3,020,220

Program: Freight Technology Incentives Program

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Contribution agreements negotiated for technology purchase and installation projects and for the provision of financial incentives.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The Freight Technology Incentive Program provides incentives for companies to purchase and install underutilized freight transportation technologies that reduce greenhouse gas and/or criteria contaminants.

In 2008-2009, the program results listed below contributed to increasing the uptake technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG and CAC.

The 15 projects selected in 2007-2008 for $3.7M in funding as part of the first round of the incentives program are underway with contribution agreements in place and final reports expected in 2009-2010.

In February 2009, Transport Canada selected an additional 17 projects for $3.8M in funding as part of the second round of the incentives program. At the end of 2008-2009, negotiations were underway for all the 17 projects.

The selected portfolio of projects for both rounds of funding supports a mix of technologies that include: ultra low emitting Genset locomotives technology, alternative fuel for baggage tractors, refurbishing marine engine with latest fuel efficient technology, bundled advanced truck technologies (i.e. aerodynamic truck technologies, advanced auxiliary power technologies for trucks, single tire technologies and long combination vehicle options for trucks). Every Canadian region is represented in the selected portfolio.

The Incentives Program was well subscribed as it received over 180 applications requesting funding in the second round representing almost a three fold increase of the first round. The high volume and quality of applications has necessitated the commitment of the remaining contribution funding envelope.

The two rounds of funding have allowed an uptake in technology of 1654 pieces of equipment (see above mix of technology) across four modes of transportation. 7 case studies on a range of technologies implemented in Canada were published on Transport Canada's ecoFREIGHT website detailing results of its projects.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$9,350,000 $3,153,563 $2,721,684

Program: ecoFreight Partnerships

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Annual progress reports under voluntary emission reduction MOUs with air and rail industries (signed in 2005 and 2007 respectively) received and approved.
  • Voluntary emissions agreement with the marine industry negotiated.
  • Conference held in collaboration with industry to support rail emission reductions.
  • Workshop or consultation with freight forwarders and shippers to build capacity for more environmentally sustainable decision-making hosted and sponsored.
  • One freight shippers' survey on environmental practices sponsored.
  • Major study completed on modal emission footprints and development of an emission reduction tool for shippers.
  • Freight-related award sponsored.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

In 2008-2009, the program results listed below contributed to increasing participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities and increased awareness, knowledge and acceptance of energy efficient transportation technologies and best practices.

As required under the Terms and Conditions of the Railway Association of Canada Memorandum of Understanding, the 2007 Annual Report for rail emissions was released in early 2009 by the Railway Association of Canada. The 2008 Annual Report for air emissions is expected to be released in the 2009-2010 fiscal year.

In addition, the Duty Cycle Project and the Emissions Factors Update Project were funded under the Railway Association of Canada Memorandum of Understanding. The purpose of the Duty Cycle and the Emissions Factors Update Project was to consolidate locomotive emissions data from a variety of reports available in the public domain into a uniform dataset, and then to update the emissions factors pertinent to diesel locomotives types in service on Canadian railways. Using this dataset, average emissions factor values for both individual locomotive types and locomotive mixed-fleet operations were calculated. Updated Emission Factors were used to produce the 2007 Annual Report on Locomotive Emissions Monitoring published according to the Memorandum of Understanding signed between the Railway Association of Canada, Environment Canada and Transport Canada concerning railway diesel locomotives operating in Canada.

Progress was made on the release of the 2007 Annual Emissions Report for the Air Memorandum of Understanding. The 2007 report was released in spring 2009. The 2008 annual report is expected to be released in fall 2009.

Preliminary discussion has taken place with the marine industry on the development of an approach for a voluntary Memorandum of Understanding to reduce air emissions.

The ecoFREIGHT Partnerships organized a rail conference in May 2008. The conference attracted 115 senior industry delegates from Canada and the United States, including federal and provincial Government representatives, suppliers, manufacturers, as well as many railway operators. The conference participants provided positive feedback on the quality of panellists, the format and the topics covered, and suggested that similar event should be organized every 2 years.

The ecoFREIGHT Partnerships also supported the Research and Development conference as part of the Railway Association of Canada Annual General Meeting in September 2008. This conference was also an opportunity for the industry to learn more about technology and the environment. The ecoFREIGHT Partnerships sponsored "Greening the Supply Chain" event organized by the Trade and Transport Logistics in November 2008.

The ecoFREIGHT Partnerships program sponsored the SCL Green Supply Chain Award. Recipients of this annual award are selected on the basis of strong environmental leadership and their firm commitment to promoting green transportation standards. The Award was presented in May 2008 to XTL Transport Inc.

The program sponsored the environmental section of the Canadian Industrial Transportation Association's (CITA) 2008 survey. CITA submitted a summary report in November 2008. ecoFREIGHT Partnerships have been supporting the environmental section of that survey since 2005. The continuous support provides the department with basic trend information. The 2008 survey indicated an increase in key elements such as the consideration by shippers of environmental issue when selecting a transportation service provider as well as their knowledge of GHG and CAC effects also increased.

Transport Canada is exploring options for the development of relevant tools for shippers and forwarders, including a potential emissions calculator. Some preliminary discussions have been held with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on an emissions calculator model.

Transport Canada officials represented the Government of Canada at the following international events:

  • The 2009 Ministerial Conference on Global Environment and Energy in Transport, held in Tokyo, Japan.
  • The 2008 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development and the International Transport Forum Global Forum on Sustainable Development: Transport and Environment in a Globalising World in Mexico.
  • The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Working Group on Transport meeting in Mexico.
  • The 2008 International Transport Forum in Germany, the theme of which was 'Transport and Energy: the Challenge of Climate Change'.

The ecoFREIGHT Partnerships information is provided through the ecoFREIGHT Web site, which is updated regularly. The website was enhanced by the posting of 24 case studies that provide information on results and lessons learned for previously funded projects.

Official departmental presentations were provided at the Pollution Probe conference in March 2008, Globe 2008 and the Association of Canadian Port Authorities in February 2009. Those conferences were an opportunity to inform the industry of strategies and technologies that reduce emissions.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$6,550,000 $1,856,510 $1,224,726

Program: Marine Shore Power Program

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Contribution agreements for shore power demonstration selected and negotiated.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

In 2008-2009, the program results listed below contributed to increasing the uptake technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG and CAC.

The Marine Shore Power Program held a first funding Round on August 25, 2008. The program received three applications and selected the application from the Port Metro Vancouver for the Canada Place project. The project was announced on December 17, 2008 and the contribution agreement was signed on February 5, 2009.

The Canada Place cruise ship shore power project is the third cruise ship shore power project in the world and the first of its kind in Canada. The Port Metro Vancouver installed shore power infrastructure at the east and west berths of the Canada Place Cruise Ship Terminal in Vancouver harbour, in time of the 2009 cruise ship season. The total cost of this project is $9 million with $2M provided by Marine Shore Power program. Port Metro Vancouver has partnered with Holland America, Princess Cruises and BC Hydro for this endeavour. Transport Canada, Western Diversification Canada and British Columbia Ministry of Transportation are financial contributors to this major initiative. The project is proceeding according to schedule.

Several other port authorities throughout the country have shown interest in the technology and are exploring its potential for their facility.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$6,000,000 $2,302,510 $1,502,547

Program: Analytical and Policy Support

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Policy advice provided to Minister(s) and senior management on sustainable transportation issues.
  • Information collected and analyzed and analytical frameworks, strategies and policies developed that support sustainable transportation.
  • Federal and stakeholder coordination on issues related to sustainable transportation improved.
  • Awareness increased among decision-makers regarding the benefits of sustainable transportation and implementation options.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The following activities will position TC favourably to provide recommendations and advice on policies and programs that influence transportation technologies and practices as well as increasing the uptake of technologies that reduce fuel consumption and GHG emissions and as such support the Program's immediate, intermediate and final outcomes.

Policy advice was provided to Minister(s) and senior management on sustainable transportation issues in relation to Cabinet meetings and for the Minister's participation at the 2008 International Transport Forum.

Information collected and analyzed and analytical frameworks, strategies and policies developed that support sustainable transportation such as:

  • An assessment of available federal data and gaps analysis were performed. In addition, discussions were initiated with the Province of Quebec in developing a federal/provincial data strategy and work is proceeding at identifying opportunities for cooperation.
  • TC conducted two technology projects aimed at reducing the burden and increasing the quality of data collected from the Canadian Vehicle Survey (use of assisted-GPS cell phones to collect information on vehicle trip data; development of a passive data logger that collects engine performance information, spatial information).
Awareness increased among decision-makers regarding the benefits of sustainable transportation and implementation options such as:

  • Progress has been made to develop and launch an online version of the Sustainable Transportation Lens (an educational tool for integrated decision-making) and hold training workshops offered for Transport Canada employees.

Federal and stakeholder coordination on issues related to sustainable transportation such as:

  • Preliminary discussions were held with U.S. officials and academic community on the data and modelling studies with a view to improve data and modelling capacity.
  • Aviation emissions issues addressed at Aircraft Noise and Emissions Committee (ANEC) intradepartmental meetings throughout the year, as well as working group meetings with Marine Policy and Marine Safety Directorates.
  • An interdepartmental working group on active transportation was established to develop a Canadian Active Transportation Framework.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$4,000,000 $1,222,890 $712,822

Program: ecoAUTO Rebate Program

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Website updated and visits tracked.
  • Specialized displays set up in dealerships.
  • Pamphlets distributed.
  • Radio advertisements aired.
  • Media events held.
  • Inquiries received and/or responded to (on toll-free line).
  • Applications received.
  • Applications recommended for funding.
  • Accuracy rate of recommendations.
  • Vehicle identification numbers and registrations validated.
  • Studies conducted.
  • Analytical tools developed.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The purpose of this program was to encourage the purchase of new fuel-efficient vehicles by offering rebates to eligible recipients that buy or enter into leases of 12 months or more for an eligible vehicle registered for use in Canada. New 2006, 2007 and 2008 model year vehicles with a Combined Fuel Consumption Rating (CFCR) of 6.5 L/100km or less for new automobiles, 8.3 L/100km or less for new minivans, sport utility vehicles and other light trucks and an E85 rating of 13.0L/100km for new Flex-Fuel vehicles were eligible for a rebate.

The Program was delivered in partnership with Service Canada. SC's responsibilities included processing of mail/applications, responding to client enquiries and making recommendations for payment to Transport Canada (TC). TC has the overall responsibility for the direction of the Program, including overall program design, policy direction and issuing grant payments.

To be eligible under the program applications must have been received before March 31, 2009 and eligible vehicles must have been purchased between March 20, 2007 and December 31, 2008.

In 2008-2009, the program results listed below contributed to increasing the uptake technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG and CAC and Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities.

  • over 182, 300 ecoAUTO Rebate applications processed over 2 years (over 117, 300 in 2008-2009)
  • $191.2M distributed to eligible applicants over 2 years ($119.9M in 2008-2009)
  • ecoAUTO website and application form updated to reflect Program deadlines
  • 875,165 web visits over 2 years (461,233 for 2008-2009)
  • approximately 34,000 brochures/pamphlets distributed over 2 years (25,000 for 2008-2009)
  • the number of eligible vehicle meeting the fuel consumption requirements increased from 21 to 32 in model year 2007 to model year 2008
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$252,700,000 $170,415,000 $121,884,296

Program: ecoAUTO Rebate Program

Department

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Departmental Program Activity

--

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Website updated and visits tracked.
  • Specialized displays set up in dealerships.
  • Pamphlets distributed.
  • Radio advertisements aired.
  • Media events held.
  • Inquiries received and/or responded to (on toll-free line).
  • Applications received.
  • Applications recommended for funding.
  • Accuracy rate of recommendations.
  • Vehicle identification numbers and registrations validated.
  • Studies conducted.
  • Analytical tools developed.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Service Canada has received:

  • 124,500 pieces of mail.
  • 54,322 inquiries on the toll-free line.
  • 15,286 Website visits from April 1,2008 to August 29, 2008 (Web stats unavailable from September 2008 to March 31, 2009).

Service Canada has conducted 129,837 vehicles identification and has validated 128,326 registrations.

The program is a joint responsibility between Transport Canada (TC) and Service Canada. TC will report the result of the other performance criteria.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$11,300,000 $6,000,000 $7,717,322

Program: ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 - Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Capacity to track the auto industry's progress towards interim targets.
  • Increased consumer awareness of the impact of vehicle purchase choice and use on fuel efficiency.
  • Collaborative agreements with the auto industry.
  • Increased program knowledge of consumer buying and driving habits.
  • New drivers educated on fuel efficiency.
  • Collaborative agreements signed with proponents to deliver targeted outreach activities.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Immediate Outcomes

Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices:

  • As a result of 4 research studies and technical reviews (idling, eco-driving, driver training retention, consumer buying habits), the program team learned how some key messages could be improved and clarified for program audiences. This information was used to update the Auto$mart program materials and idling campaign materials, as well as to inform the development of further driver behaviour programs and guides for vehicle consumers. Consequently, programs will more efficiently and effectively impart fuel saving information to Canadian drivers.

Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities:

  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities occurred as a result of 14 new entities committing to engaging in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities in addition to the continuation of activities initiated by 4 entities in 2007-2008.

Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances:

  • Capacity to address emissions through better driving practices and more efficient vehicle purchases was enhanced through extensive training and through the provision of information materials such as educational media articles. There were over 55 million such knowledge transfer opportunities.

Intermediate Outcome

Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC:

  • In 2008-2009, 111,746 new Canadian drivers applied best practices for efficient driving as a result of being trained on, retaining, and employing fuel efficient driving techniques.

Final Outcome

Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation:

  • As of 31 March 2009, a 0.06 MT GHG reduction was estimated to be achieved since the inception of the program in 2007, as a result of program activities such as driver training and campaigns to improve driver habits. The 0.06 MT GHG reduction excludes the impact of the Memorandum of Understanding with the auto industry, for which a measurement methodology is still being finalized. At least 2.4MT of GHG reduction is expected to be reported from the MOU in 2009.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$21,000,000 $5,311,143 $5,643,241

Program: ecoENERGY for Fleets

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 - Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Awareness of program benefits increased through the delivery of 25 training workshops.
  • Awareness of benefits of energy-efficient technologies increased through the delivery of eight research projects.
  • Development and/or implementation of best practices by commercial/institutional transportation industry through delivery of two-day conference.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Immediate Outcomes

Increased capacity to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances:

  • The capacity of transportation professionals to address emissions through their decision making was enhanced through training and workshops and through the provision of information materials at conferences, seminars, trade shows, and online. There were over 35,000 such knowledge transfer opportunities.

Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices:

  • As a result of 3 research studies (on aerodynamics, tires, idle-reduction), the program team became more informed on opportunities for reducing emissions from the trucking sector. This information is being used to plan outreach initiatives, and as a result the program expects to provide more comprehensive messaging for the trucking sector.

Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities:

  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities occurred as a result of 10 new entities (commercial fleets and research centres) committing to engaging in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities in addition to the continuation of activities initiated by 4 entities in 2007-2008.

Intermediate Outcome

Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC:

  • An increase in the use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions or criteria air contaminants occurred as a result of 1,446 professional drivers and fleet managers trained in fuel efficiency best practices applying these practices on the road and within fleets in order to secure fuel savings and GHG emission reductions.

Final Outcome

Reductions in energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants from transportation:

  • As of March 31 2009, a 0.05 MT GHG reduction was estimated to be achieved since the inception of the program in 2007, as a result of program activities such as education for fleet managers and professional drivers and a campaign to reduce unnecessary idling at truck stops.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$22,000,000 $6,338,862 $5,019,058

Program: Vehicle Scrappage

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Program launched in all provinces.
  • Vehicles scrapped.
  • Smog-forming emissions reduced.
  • Increased awareness of:
    • impact of older vehicles program itself;
    • sustainable transportation options.
  • Release of harmful and toxic substances from improper recycling prevented for vehicles scrapped through the program.
  • Through incentives, Canadians try more sustainable transportation modes.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009


  • Local not-for-profit organizations were supported in six provinces to deliver local vehicle scrappage programs in 2008. In February 2009, the National Vehicle Scrappage Program, called "Retire Your Ride"/"Adieu bazou", was launched in all provinces by Clean Air Foundation, the national not-for-profit organization who is delivering the program with a network of local organizations.
  • In 2008-2009, 17,000 old high-polluting vehicles were retired. Canadians choose among a suite of incentives as a reward for retiring their older (model year 1995 and earlier) vehicles, including transit passes, car share memberships, bicycle coupons, new vehicle discounts and $300 cash.
  • Advertising and outreach activities by program delivery agents communicated the impacts of old vehicles on the environment and the reasons for Canadians to scrap them.
  • A National Code of Practice for responsible recycling of vehicles was developed, printed and distributed to vehicle recyclers, who must adhere to the code to participate in the program.
  • A baseline survey of owners of older vehicles was conducted to measure awareness of vehicle scrappage programs and the impacts of old vehicles on the environment.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$92,000,000 $13,154,000 $6,916,284

Program: Indoor Air Research and Development Initiative

Department

National Research Council

Departmental Program Activity

1.1 Research and development

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Test protocol for field study established and validated in pilot study.
  • Research facility built and equipped with instruments to support research field study on ventilation and health.
  • Canadian advisory committee on indoor air quality solution technologies.
  • National committee on indoor air quality established and operational.
  • Benchmark survey on indoor air quality awareness conducted.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Increased knowledge of health impacts and mitigation strategies related to indoor air pollutants.
    • One research intervention field study on ventilation, indoor air quality and health conducted (2010-2011).
  • Increased knowledge and support for the development of technological solutions for improved IAQ.
    • One common publicly available data set (2010-2011).
    • Four papers, published in peer-reviewed journals (2 in 2009-2010, and 2 in 2010-2011).

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Field Study on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and Ventilation (Activity 1)

  • Study design (= test protocol) completed and approved by Scientific Steering Committee, external scientific reviewers, and Ethic Boards from Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ) and NRC.
  • Pilot study successfully finished, evaluated and test protocol improved.
  • 77 home visits completed, including collection of 5 questionnaires per home, and parameters analysed.
    • Context: The number of homes to be investigated will range from 80 - 120. The target number of investigations per home is 6 (3 times before intervention, and 3 times after the interventions). Please note, that interventions will only be performed in 50 % of the homes. This results in a minimum number of 80 homes x 6 visits (home owners or other conditions permitting) = 480 home visits. The outstanding home visits will be performed in the FYs 2009-2010 and 2010-2011.
    • The main results were, that more than 50 % of the homes had a moderate to poor air exchange rate, at least in the asthmatic child's bedroom, which will qualify them for interventions (= improvement of ventilation rate or air movement). Also a variety of different heating and ventilation systems were found: information thereof is the key input for modelling and measurements in the Indoor Air Research Laboratory.
  • Indoor Air Research Laboratory (formerly 'Facility'), which will support the field study will be ready to model the interventions by August 2009.
    • Context: The Indoor Air Research Facility is a highly complex, world-wide unique and state-of-the-art research facility, consisting of a shell (= exterior walls and roof), interior flexible subdivisions (interior walls, suspended ceilings etc.), different types of ventilation systems to accommodate various situations in the field, and versatile, state-of-the art research equipment (e.g. for ventilation rate measurements, imaging of air flows etc.). Due to a) limited human resources (caused by delayed staffing, which was only completed in November 2008-2009), b) winter conditions, and c) speed up the overall construction process, the IARL was built in four phases: phase A (called 'site services and building', i.e. mainly the building structure) was completed in FY 2007-2008; phase B (called 'flexible mechanical, electrical and control systems installation', among this different HVAC systems, ductwork etc.) was started in FY 2007-2008 and completed in 2008-2009; phase C ('interior finish, including electrical, painting, communication), was completed in FY 2008-2009; phase D ('finishing works') was started in FY 2008-2009; phase D will be completed in FY 2009-2010 (safety equipment, building sign, etc.).
    • The construction and commissioning of the IARL were delayed, as
      • the duct work was not as airtight as specified; mitigation and resolving issues among the various subcontractors delayed the project for more than 4 months;
      • unanticipated leaks in the building envelope were discovered, which reduced the airtightness of the building, and which had to be sealed; and
      • controls of HVAC and lighting systems were required additional commissioning efforts that were not anticipated.
  • Memorandum of Understanding between INSPQ (medical partner of field study) finalized, except for the clause concerning the intellectual property.
    • Context: based on a MOU draft from 2007-2008, Principal Investigator from INSPQ and project manager at NRC exchanged a series of revisions, until an agreement was achieved on the content. However, as IP policies at NRC have changed, lawyers at NRC and INSPQ are adapting the IP clauses, until they are acceptable to both organizations. We expect that the MOU will be signed in September 2009.
  • Laboratory capacities and methods upgraded and enhanced to analyse 14 IAQ and 4 ventilation parameters.
    • Context: because many parameters affect the Indoor Air Quality and potentially adversely impact the respiratory health of asthmatic children, a very broad set of IAQ parameters was described in the field study protocol.
    • Methods for determining the concentration of IAQ parameters were implemented (where necessary), upgraded/ enhanced and validated. New methods were established as well. Some parameters are analysed by direct reading or logging instruments in the field, but some are only sampled and eventually processed in NRC's chemical and microbiological laboratories.
    • With respect to these 'lab' parameters, laboratory capacities had to be adapted, upgraded or enhanced; consequently equipment had to be purchased, commissioned and calibrated.
    • Regarding the ventilation parameters: the ventilation rate and airflow, which is/are the dependent variable(s) in the field study (the results will also drive the design of the interventions) have to be characterised as exactly and comprehensively as possible. Therefore 4 methods related to ventilation and airflow were enhanced and validated as well.
    • With respect to the theme's objectives, the more exact and comprehensive we are able to determine the ventilation rates or air flows (as dependent variable of the IAQ field study) and the IAQ parameters (as independent variables), the better we can associate these parameters with the medical endpoint, in this case the health of asthmatic children, more specifically the number of reported asthma days, and the better we can answer questions related to the health and well-being of Canadians.

Evaluation of Indoor Air Quality Technologies and Solutions (Activity 2)

  • Canadian IAQ Solutions Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) formed and fully functional (inaugural meeting January 2009).
    • The purpose/mandate/goal of TAC is to provide advice, guidance and recommendations for the selection of 3 "IAQ Solution Technologies" (IAQ-ST), their assessment technology protocols and subsequent reports and support transfer of findings/protocols to public and industry.
    • The TAC includes representatives from Federal Partners (HC, PWGSC, CMHC, NRCan); Provincial agencies (IRSST, BC Centre for Disease Control/National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health); Industry Associations (HRAI, BOMA; NGO (Ontario Lung Association).
    • Definition of mandate completed, including Tech Transfer of research findings and assessment protocols.
    • Results of technology transfer:
      • Publicly available data sets relating to Indoor Air Quality solutions/technologies (by 2010-2011).
      • Publications in peer-reviewed journals (2 in 2009-2010; 2 in 2010-2011).
      • Possible protocols adoption by a standards organization.
    • This activity is important because advice, guidance and recommendations and technology transfer support by TAC will ensure we achieve the desired results.
  • Status of first IAQ solution technology, which will be portable air cleaners:
    • Literature and web scan completed (identification of over 40 candidate technologies).
    • Development of criteria and evaluation/ranking systems for prioritizing these technologies completed, based on health relevance, measurable impacts on health-relevant pollutants, assessment protocol development needs, product availability, labelling support, and time/cost feasibility.
    • Protocol developed on the first IAQ-ST assessing the performance of portable air cleaners. The protocol is one of the 3 products to be developed.
    • Adaptation of NRC's Full Scale Chamber as test facility to simulate residential ventilation systems.
    • Adaptation and upgrade of analytical capabilities, specifically re. the generation of fine and ultra-fine particulates, and the generation of volatile organic compounds (VOC).

Canadian (formerly 'National') Committee on Indoor Air Quality and Building (CCIAQB; Activity 3).

  • Full Committee (FC) formed.
    • Commitment from 16 members from industry, regulation/research and public interest groups.
    • Technical and scientific support to the FC secured through members of HC and NRC.
    • The goal of the Canadian Committee on Indoor Air Quality and Buildings is to improve indoor air quality in buildings, and ultimately, the health of occupants, by providing a national forum and clearinghouse for 'best-of-knowledge' information on the design and operations of buildings as they affect indoor air quality.
    • The mandate of the committee is to:
      • Solicit and review relevant and available information;
      • Identify gaps and unresolved issues;
      • Provide a national discussion forum;
      • Recommend studies, where gaps are identified;
      • Develop "best-of-knowledge" positions and best practices;
      • Disseminate knowledge, based on validated information;
      • Support adaptation of uniform requirements, best practices and guidelines for the design and operation of buildings, where required; and
      • Provide guidance for the evaluation of solutions and technologies, related to IAQ.
  • The committee started as a working group tasked with identifying and fine-tuning of the mission and mandate of the committee, along with developing a roster of potential members for recruitment (mainly activities in FY 2007-2008). The working group became a full committee in November 2008, after sufficient members had been recruited. The CCIAQB's first steps were to develop a business plan, to examine strategies, and to identify areas where further studies are needed.
  • Executive Committee with 6 members formed, for guidance, facilitation of processes, tabling drafts to FC.
    • EC drafted a business plan for discussion and approval by FC. The business plan will focus the committee's priorities in delivering timely and relevant information where it is needed most, i.e. at the level of design professionals and facility managers.
    • The Executive Committee's role is to sharpen the focus of the Committee and to ensure a cost-effective management of the committee's business in-between meetings of the Full Committee. A successful 1st meeting of the Executive took place in March 2009.
    • Formulation and recommendation of 3 Requests for Proposals to narrow IAQ research gaps to FC.
    • The Executive Committee has reviewed several proposals to narrow down research gaps, with the technical support from HC and NRC. The refined proposals will be tabled at the next Full Committee meeting in June 2009.
    • Context: It is very important to fill research gaps, as inadequate Indoor Air Quality might adversely affect the health and well-being of Canadians. Indoor Air Quality is a vast field with some knowns, and many unknowns, reaching from methods for sampling of indoor air contaminants, measurement strategies, low-emitting materials, ventilation systems, to sound IAQ and health studies. Narrowing and closing research gaps will be the basis of relevant, targeted and sound studies, which will allow a better insight into the associations between indoor air quality and adverse health effects, the positive effects of reducing indoor air contamination, and provide more sophisticated knowledge about the impact of systems and technologies designed for the improvement of IAQ.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$8,000,000 $2,717,000 $2,717,000

Program: Radon Strategy

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer safety

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Radon levels assessed in a designated group of Government of Canada buildings; results are shared and risk mitigation measures are discussed.
  • Ongoing engagement of key stakeholders, sustaining messages and targeting education and awareness activities.
  • Knowledge related to radon increased.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Improved awareness by public, property managers, and governments of health risks and causes of reduced indoor air quality and strategies to improve it:
    • 20% of Canadians are aware of specific technical solutions to improve indoor air quality (2010-2011).
  • Development and support of technological solutions for improved IAQ:
    • Technically sound infrastructure and knowledge in place to support and assess IAQ improvement technologies (2010-2011).
  • Increased knowledge of health impacts and mitigation strategies related to indoor air pollution:
    • One research intervention field study on ventilation, air distribution and health conducted (2011).

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Radon levels assessed in a designated group of Government of Canada buildings; results are shared and risk mitigation measures are discussed:

  • In 2008-2009 radon testing was performed in ~600 federal buildings located in the National Capital Region, Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia. The purpose of this testing is to identify buildings where employee exposure to radon exceeds the Canadian Radon Guideline (200 Bq/m3) and the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations (COHSR) (800 Bq/m3) of the Canada Labour Code.  Results for buildings tested have been made available to appropriate departmental representatives and occupational health and safety committees for dissemination to employees. Testing completed to date has shown that approximately 10% of buildings, predominately located in Manitoba, have levels of radon elevated above 200 Bq/m3. The results demonstrated by this activity move towards improved awareness by the public, property managers and governments of health risks and causes of reduced indoor air quality and strategies to improve it.

Ongoing engagement of key stakeholders, sustaining messages and targeting education and awareness activities:

  • During 2008-2009 Health Canada participated in more than 20 stakeholder engagements (for a total of 34+ since the Radon Strategy commenced in 2007-2008) across Canada where the National Radon Strategy was presented and discussed with building and real estate industry professionals, radon testing and mitigation service providers, non-governmental organizations, provincial authorities and medical professionals to raise awareness of the risks of radon exposure. The stakeholders have used this information to communicate to Canadians via the inclusion of radon information on their websites (for example the Canadian Lung Association and Canadian Cancer Society and various provincial government sites have included radon information) and to create communications materials for the public and clients and customers.
  • Health Canada through a third party contractor completed an engagement campaign to encourage retailers and manufacturers of radon testing devices to increase availability and access to radon test kits for the Canadian public. Five major home improvement retailers were engaged to review the objectives of Health Canada's radon outreach activities and to invite them to participate by stocking radon test kits in their stores. To date three of the five retailers carry test kits and a fourth retailer has indicated an intention to carry them in 2009-2010.
  • In 2008-2009, two new radon brochures were created, one for consumers and one for health professionals. More than 90,000 copies of these new brochures were distributed across Canada. In addition a co-branded factsheet was developed with the Canadian Lung Association and distributed to the public.
  • In 2008-2009 Health Canada proposed amendments to the Canada Labour Code and Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations (COHSR) to harmonize the radon action level for federal employees referenced in those documents with the Canadian Radon Guideline and provided this information to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The current COHSR refers to the old radon guideline of 800 Bq/m3. The purpose of the proposed changes to the COHSR is to amend the wording to reflect the same radon action level as the Canadian Radon Guideline at 200 Bq/m3.
  • Health Canada in collaboration with the National Research Council and provincial and industry partners made recommendations for radon resistant technologies to be required in all new home constructions. These recommendations have been accepted by the Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes for inclusion in the 2010 version of the National Building Code. This is an early completion, by 5 years; of this planned activity (the original target had been to have changes approved for inclusion in the 2015 version of the Code). The changes to the Code will require all new homes constructed in Canada to include a rough-in for a radon reduction system which can be activated should the home test high for radon levels following the completion of construction. If all provinces and municipalities include and enforce this requirement, all new homes constructed in Canada would have the capability to allow homeowners to reduce radon levels below the current Canadian Radon Guideline of 200 Bq/m3.

Knowledge related to radon increased:

  • Health Canada in collaboration with NRCan, performed aerial surveys of south western Ontario and central New Brunswick to assess the levels of uranium and other radioactive precursors of radon gas. This information can be used to predict areas of high indoor radon concentration and will be used to map areas where there is a higher potential for elevated radon levels in homes in Canada. The purpose of the map is for use by all levels of government (federal, provincial and municipal) to assist them in prioritizing efforts for educating Canadians to the risks associated with radon exposure and encouraging homeowners to test and remediate their homes.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$15,000,000 $3,700,000 $3,700,000

Program: Assist Northerners in Assessing Key Vulnerabilities and Opportunities

Department

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Departmental Program Activity

Northern Land and Resources

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

Pending

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecasting Program of the Adaptation theme received TB approval in 2007-2008, while other programs were not approved until early April 2008 - some results were reported in 2007-2008 (see below)

Immediate Outcomes

  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.

Intermediate Outcome

  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and to reduce air quality related health impacts;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) program funded a total of 21 projects. The range of projects funded include climate change risk assessments, climate change information needs and gaps analysis, community/regional adaptation planning, building capacity for adaptation planning, as well as support toward development of scenarios and strategies. The following provides a breakdown of work achieved as a result of the funded projects:

  • 10 Aboriginal and northern communities undertook risk assessment, management and communication initiatives; Through these initiatives communities identify key risks and vulnerabilities with regards to climate change impacts and can develop risks management plans to address those risks. Risk management planning is linked to the community planning processes already in place at the community level
  • 21 projects supported Aboriginal and northern capacity building and training initiatives; Through projects funded under the program, there is a requirement that Aboriginal and northern communities and governments be involved throughout implementation to retain knowledge and capacity to implement identified courses of action, as well as develop and implement future initiatives at the community level. The program aims at building capacity for conducting risk assessments, developing community plans, connecting science and traditional knowledge in planning exercises, and implementing adaptation actions for managing climate change risks at the community level.
  • 12 adaptation action plans identifying concrete community priorities and course of action to manage climate change risks;
  • 9 adaptation tools produced; these tools will be made available to Aboriginal and northern communities throughout Canada to support them in assessing key risks and vulnerabilities with regards to climate change and to develop plans to manage those risks. Examples of such tools include a community adaptation planning tool developed in Nunavut through a partnership between the territorial government, the federal government and the Canadian Institute of Planners, and a risk management tool developed by an Aboriginal organization.
  • 15 projects (of the 21 funded projects) identified risks and impacts and produced risk management strategies;
  • 8 community level climate change risk management strategies.
  • INAC has strengthened partnerships established through years of collaboration with territorial governments, other federal departments, Aboriginal governments and organizations, as well as communities. These partnerships constitute a strong basis for developing common priorities for moving forward in addressing Aboriginal and northern communities needs to develop and implement adaptation measures to cope with a changing climate.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$14,000,000
$2,550,000 $2,236,842

Program: National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.2 - Weather and Environmental Prediction Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) forecasts for 14 locations within British Columbia provided, encompassing four census metropolitan areas (CMAs) where the AQHI implementation will have been completed.
  • AQHI forecasts and outreach support for seven CMAs involved in implementation pilots.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecasting Program of the Adaptation theme received TB approval in 2007-2008, while other programs were not approved until early April 2008 - some results were reported in 2007-2008 (see below).

Immediate Outcome

  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.

Intermediate Outcome

  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and to reduce air quality related health impacts;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009


  • Produced and delivered on the Weather Office website twice daily AQHI forecasts and current AQHI values for Toronto and 14 locations in British Columbia implemented in FY 2007-2008. In FY 2008-2009, the AQHI forecasts were added for 11 communities: Brampton ON, Burlington ON, Mississauga ON, Newmarket, ON, Oakville ON, Oshawa ON, Ottawa ON, Saint John NB, Halifax NS, Quebec, QC and Gatineau QC. The province of British Columbia suspended their AQI in favour of the AQHI. There has been some increase in usage; however, the program is still focussed on implementation.
  • Produced and delivered the existing program of AQI forecasts and advisories in the provinces of NL, PEI, NS, NB, QC, MB, SK and AB and provided technical and scientific support for the provision of forecasts by Ontario Ministry of the Environment.
  • Provided AQHI forecast outreach support in the communities involved in implementation activities. This outreach provided awareness, promotion and education of the AQHI forecast program in the communities involved. In future, we expect this investment in outreach to equip citizens to may better use of the AQHI.
  • An AQ2008 Workshop was conducted to bring together the partners (provinces, NGOs, municipalities and academia) to share technical and outreach lessons learned with implementation.
  • Enhanced map graphics to improve accessibility of AQHI on the National portal website, (airhealth.ca). National trends in queries regarding AQHI will be determined and analysed through access data obtained from Weather Office and other supporting platforms for AQHI forecast dissemination.
  • Inputted to the audit of AQHI development conducted by the Commissioner of Sustainable Development which was publicly released in March 2009 and reflected favourably on the development of the program.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$21,300,000 $5,200,000 $5,033,173

Program: National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Guidance document completed and provided to seven CMAs and the AQHI introduced in these areas.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecasting Program of the Adaptation theme received TB approval in 2007-2008, while other programs were not approved until early April 2008 - some results were reported in 2007-2008 (sse below).

Immediate Outcome

  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.

Intermediate Outcome

  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and to reduce air quality related health impacts;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009


  • The Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) provides Canadians with local air quality conditions and forecasts, as well as information to promote healthy behaviour in response to air quality conditions. By the end of FY 2008-2009, the AQHI was available in 26 locations across Canada, including 10 Census Metropolitan Areas (major urban centres with a population over 100,000). These locations include Halifax, Saint John, Quebec City, Ottawa-Gatineau, Toronto, Oshawa, Vancouver, Victoria, Kelowna, Abbotsford and other communities in British Columbia.
  • In 2008-2009 Memoranda of Agreement were developed with provincial and municipal partners, including the British Columbia Ministry of Healthy Living and Sport, Toronto Public Health, Institut national de santé publique du Quebec, Nova Scotia Environment and New Brunswick Department of Health. Through these Memoranda of Agreement, partners at the local and provincial level were able to: develop and disseminate marketing and outreach materials to the public, engage health and environment non-government partners and develop strategies for sustaining the promotion of the AQHI over the long term.
  • Through a contract with the University of British Columbia, an e-learning course on the AQHI designed for health professionals was under development in the 2008-2009 fiscal year and will be available in 2009. Other activities included preliminary development of a national marketing campaign, hosting a stakeholders workshop on the AQHI in Niagara Falls in November 2008, and several meetings with stakeholders across the country to prepare for future implementation.
  • Throughout the implementation of the index, there has been and will continue to be considerable effort taken in tracking the effectiveness of the communications and outreach materials which will raise awareness of the existence of the index and how to use it. By the end of the four year period we will be able to report on direct outcomes such as increased public availability of the AQHI, dissemination of materials and the level of participation in AQHI outreach. Once the index is available across the country and is reported regularly by media outlets such as the Weather Network and other media, we will be able to measure the awareness level of the availability of the AQHI, the likelihood of Canadians to seek out the AQHI, and the level of knowledge of appropriate actions to take in response to air quality conditions. It is only after these outcomes are shown to have increased that the final outcomes which indicate behaviour change and reduced incidence of air quality related mortality and morbidity will be measurable.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$8,700,000 $2,800,000 $1,741,160

Program: Improved Climate Change Scenarios

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 - Weather and Environmental Prediction Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

Pending

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecasting Program of the Adaptation theme received TB approval in 2007-2008, while other programs were not approved until early April 2008 - some results were reported in 2007-2008 (see below).

Immediate Outcome

  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.

Intermediate Outcome

  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and to reduce air quality related health impacts;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Subcomponent 1
Development of the new Canadian global climate model (CanCM4) is complete, and includes a sophisticated representation of the sulphur cycle, improved radiative transfer, cloud physics, and ocean processes. An extension of this model to include the carbon cycle is also complete and a wide range of historical and future simulations have been conducted. An improved version of the carbon cycle version is nearing completion. A new Canadian regional climate model, based on the atmospheric physics package in CanCM4, has been constructed and initial testing is well underway. Global and regional climate model output continues to be disseminated to users via the CCCma web site (www.cccma.ec.gc.ca). These models will be used to provide updated climate change information, based on the latest scientific developments, contributing to the awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change.

Subcomponent 2
Expansion of the Canadian Climate Change Scenarios Network (www.cccsn.ca) to regional server nodes was commenced with the addition of a server at Yukon College. The CCCSN is a public access website for global climate change models. A series of regional training sessions on the use of scenarios were held across Canada with over 100 users from other government departments, provinces, territories, municipalities and the private sector. Ongoing technical support for the network was provided, as well as model verification and targeted downscaling in vulnerable areas (e.g. selected Arctic communities).

Subcomponent 3A
The atmospheric hazards web tool (www.hazards.ca) was expanded nationally to all 5 Regions of Canada. A gap analysis was completed on information needs for specific regional nodes. Research was commenced nationally to address gaps identified. An assessment study of how atmospheric hazards are being incorporated into existing community emergency response plans was initiated this year and will be completed in 2009-2010.

Subcomponent 3B
A team of researchers Identified selected key atmospheric hazards for further assessment of the impact of future climate extremes (e.g. wind, rain on snow, snow loads) for codes and standards, as well as inclusion under Subcomponent 3A. Key stakeholder consultations were completed with codes and standards agencies (e.g. Building Code Commission, Canadian Standards Association, Transportation Associations of Canada, Engineers Canada) to investigate incorporation of selected climate change parameters into existing design criteria). Work was commenced on targeted climatic design criteria for inclusion of values in National codes and standards.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$15,000,000
$5,210,730 $3,567,788

Program: Climate Change and Health Adaptation in Northern/Inuit Communities

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

4.1 First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

No expected results for 2008-2009 were defined in the Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities 2008-2009 at the Theme level; please refer to the program expected results.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecasting Program of the Adaptation theme received TB approval in 2007-2008, while other programs were not approved until early April 2008 - some results were reported in 2007-2008 (see below).

Immediate Outcome

  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.

Intermediate Outcome

  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and to reduce air quality related health impacts;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Immediate Outcomes

#10 Increased availability/access to adaptation information and products
We developed a climate change application guide in consultation with federal partners and Aboriginal organizations, which is available in print form and electronically on the Assembly of First Nations website and the Arctic Health Research Network website. The application guide was designed to assist communities in developing community-based research projects, writing proposals and budgets. The guide was distributed to northern First Nations and Inuit communities and resulted in 15 project applications for FY 2009-2010, 14 of which met the application criteria. This is the first year for the guide.

#11 Increased capacity (additional resources, tools, knowledge base) to conduct and apply adaptation science
We funded 10 community-based projects across the North (two in the Yukon, three in the Northwest Territories, four in Nunavut and one in Nunatsiavut) that actively hired and trained community members as well as youth and elders. The funding has assisted in the development of a number of resource tools including the development of a publication on the relationship of sea ice to Inuit, on sea ice changes and ice safety from an Inuit perspective.

#12 Greater collaboration to address climate change and health related impacts
The Program has worked closely with our federal partners (Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch of Health Canada, Northern Region of Health Canada, the Public Health Agency, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, and Natural Resources Canada) as well as First Nations and Inuit organizations (Assembly of First Nations, Council of Yukon First Nations, Arctic Health Research Network, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Pauktuutit, and Nunavut Research Institute). We delivered over 10 presentations on the program to these partners. The presentations were designed to disseminated information about the links between climate change and health effects, to give examples of these links and ideas on research projects important for northern communities to enable them to think about appropriate research proposals. The audiences includes medical officers of health, health practitioners, environmental experts, community planners and community representatives to ensure we disseminated information to the various players involved in climate change adaptation measures. The presentations and guide resulted in 14 successful community proposals for 2009-2010 being submitted, and many more showing interest.

Intermediate Outcomes

#6 Increased use of adaptation information and products
We produced an application guide tailored for northern communities as well as two posters used at the Health Canada Science forum and the annual ArcticNet conference - Arctic Change. The presentations and guide resulted in 14 successful community proposals for 2009-2010 being submitted, and many more showing interest.

#7 Increased awareness of climate change risks
The Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program has presented at numerous national and international conferences, created posters, visited communities to discuss the many health issues around climate change in the North. We also conducted three community-centered climate change and health workshops to increase awareness around the issues, the funding program and to help community representatives write a proposal. The workshops provided clarity on links between climate change and health, elements of an acceptable research proposal and adequate budgets.

#8 Increased capacity to act on climate change issues among target populations.
The 2008-2009 funding has allowed the 10 northern communities to conduct their own research, learn from this research and disseminate findings on climate change and health to their communities. An example is data to provide valuable information to residents regarding the conditions and safety level of local sea and lake ice, with the potential for reducing accidents, injuries and anxiety relating to the changing ice environment.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$7,000,000
$2,405,000 $1,823,420

Program: Innovative Risk Management Tools / Regional Adaptation Action Partnerships

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1 Adapting to a Changing Climate and Hazard Risk Management

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

Pending

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecasting Program of the Adaptation theme received TB approval in 2007-2008, while other programs were not approved until early April 2008.

Immediate Outcome

  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.

Intermediate Outcome

  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and to reduce air quality related health impacts;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Two phases of Regional Adaptation Action Partnerships program were carried out in 2008-2009:

  1. Letter of Interest (LOI) Phase - a) Raised awareness of the program from April to June 2008; b) Received 10 LOIs by August 2008, covering all regions of Canada; c) Evaluation of the LOIs was done by an expert Review Committee in September 2008; d) 5 LOIs were selected for the Proposal Phase e) Funding criteria for the proponents was refined.
  2. Proposal Phase - a) Kick-off meeting was held in February 2009; b) Consultation was given on additional funding conditions; c) Introduced an 'Adaptation Continuum' to monitor the progress of Regional Adaptation Collaboratives' Contribution agreement recipients.

In the area of Innovative Risk Management Tools, progress was made in the following sectors:

  1. Infrastructure and Planning - a) Contribution agreements with Engineers Canada and Canadian Institute of Planners were prepared.
  2. Energy Sector - a) In June 2008, co-chaired Council of Energy Ministers (CEM) adaptation working group; b) delivered an adaptation workshop with the energy industry; c) designed a work plan which was approved by CEM in September 2008; d) Started implementation of the work plan with Pembina Institute and in consultation with the Federal Provincial Territorial working group.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$35,000,000
$3,955,400 $2,858,592

Program: Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System to Protect the Health of Canadians

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

No expected results for 2008-2009 were defined in the Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecasting Program of the Adaptation theme received TB approval in 2007-2008, while other programs were not approved until early April 2008 - some results were reported in 2007-2008 (see below).

Immediate Outcome

  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.

Intermediate Outcome

  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and to reduce air quality related health impacts;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Heat Alert and Response Systems Project

Health Canada worked to raise awareness of the nature of heat as a health risk in communities among key stakeholders, with the aim of identifying local "heat champions." This awareness-raising process resulted in the identification of three communities interested in participating in the pilot heat alert and response systems (HARS) project (Fredericton, Windsor, Winnipeg). One additional community will be identified for the pilot in FY 2009-2010.

Two Advisory Groups have been established and membership includes leading national experts in relevant fields including epidemiology, emergency management, public health, and human physiology. The mandate of the Heat Alert and Response Systems Advisory Group is to provide advice and guidance on the implementation of Health Canada's "Developing Heat Resilient Communities and Individuals in Canada" project. The mandate of the Health Professional Information and Training Advisory Group is to provide advice and guidance on the design, development and distribution of training tools for health care professionals.

A baseline inventory and assessment were conducted of current science in the field of heat and human health, in order to guide future scientific work. Research activities were carried out, including surveys to assess the Canadian public's existing awareness and understanding of the health risks of climate change.

In 2008-2009 (Year 1 of the program), Health Canada assessed existing international state-of-the-art heat monitoring and surveillance techniques and developed an environmental heat monitoring system framework for Canadian communities. A heat monitoring framework has been designed to allow communities to measure four variables impacting heat-related health impacts (temperature, humidity, wind, and solar load) to provide a more accurate assessment of heat as a health risk in communities in Canada. The framework will be piloted in the summer of 2009.

Work conducted this year lays the groundwork for the development of management committees in each community, which will support local collaboration among interested parties in the development, implementation and evaluation of a HARS pilot in each community in subsequent years. Heat-health information products were developed for public distribution during implementation of the pilot studies. A project management framework was developed and approved to guide implementation.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$7,900,000
$2,450,000 $1,848,023

Program: Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System to Protect the Health of Canadians

Department

Public Health Agency of Canada

Departmental Program Activity

1.2 Disease Prevention and Control

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

Pending

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

The Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecasting Program of the Adaptation theme received TB approval in 2007-2008, while other programs were not approved until early April 2008 - some results were reported in 2007-2008 (see below).

Immediate Outcome

  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.

Intermediate Outcome

  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and to reduce air quality related health impacts;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.

Final Outcome

  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The Pilot Infectious Disease Impact and Response System (PIDIRS) program has completed a directed solicitation process with five academic institutions for contribution funding. The proposals received have all been approved by internal and external review processes. The contributions will fund just less than 2 years of research that will provide public health stakeholders with the knowledge and tools necessary for decision making on surveillance, intervention and control of key infectious diseases with an environmental origin (particularly vector-borne and waterborne infectious diseases).

Four pilot regions across Canada have agreed to participate in the community-based approach to assessing infectious disease risk associated with climate change. Memoranda of agreement have been finalized and pilot community work will commence in June and July 2009 and last for approximately 15 months. When complete, the work of these pilot communities will serve as a template for other jurisdictions across the country to development and implement adaptation strategies relative to the surveillance, intervention and control of key infectious diseases with an environmental origin (particularly vector-borne and waterborne infectious diseases).

Eight national (3) and international (5) professionals with knowledge of climate change, infectious diseases and adaptation have committed to participation as members of the program advisory committee (AC). The AC's mandate is to, via its subject matter knowledge, provide the PIDIRS program with on-going guidance and advice on scientific priority setting, direction and facilitation of strategic linkages.

Data gathering for scientific studies on tick-borne disease distribution data has occurred and risk maps have been published. This initial academic research has directly supported theme outcomes by providing surveillance knowledge to further development of intervention and control of vector-borne diseases.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$7,000,000
$1,473,895 $1,239,102

Program: International Obligations

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

4.2 Relations with other governments and partners are managed in support of environmental priorities

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Kyoto registry established.
  • Canada's financial obligations respected.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies and negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome

  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Canada met its international funding obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) for 2008-2009 which allows Canada to continue participating in international dialogue on climate change. Canada also made voluntary contributions to the UNFCCC.

Canada continued to provide financial support to non-UN agencies including the OECD, with the goal of enhancing understanding of the international policy options for the development of a future climate change agreement.

Canada participated in bilateral activities including: The Canada-Mexico Partnership (hosted by Canada), the Canada China Working Group on Climate Change (hosted by China) and bilateral meeting in Poznan on the margins of the UNFCCC conference of the parties.

Canada participated in technology-related international partnerships that complemented the UN climate change process in order to promote and support the development of clean technologies needed to reduce GHG emissions and address climate change. These partnerships included the Asia Pacific Partnership, the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership and the Methane to Markets Partnership.

Canada established a National Registry to account for its transactions of Kyoto units as required by each Annex I Party in order to facilitate the assessment of compliance and the operation of the Kyoto mechanisms.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$2,892,000 $623,000 $841,250

Program: International Obligations

Department

Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Departmental Program Activity

1.3 Global Issues

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009

Canada's financial obligations to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Secretariat respected.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies and negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome

  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The provision of these funds is required as part of our Treaty obligations, and has allowed us to remain a participant in good standing. These funds, combined with the contributions of other countries, have enabled the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to conduct four negotiations sessions in 2008-2009 and allowed the secretariat to undertake necessary preparatory work and outreach activities. These efforts are designed to progress towards a successful outcome on an international climate change agreement for the post-2012 period in December 2009.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$1,908,000 $477,000 $477,000

Program: International participation and negotiations

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

4.2.3 Long term global climate change regime

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Canada's interests at international climate change meetings represented.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies and negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome

  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Canada's interests internationally were supported by the following activities:

  • Worked towards securing agreement on a Post-2012 Framework in the short-to-medium term (3-5 years) and contributing to the long term stabilization of global concentrations of GHGs;
  • Represented Canada's interests in ongoing climate change negotiations under the UN;
  • Participated in other multilateral discussions on climate change, including OECD, G8, MEP
  • Harmonized international and domestic policy positions in order to have a consistent approach with respect to climate change
  • Provided policy documents and advice to Ministers, Deputy Ministers and other senior officials in support of policy development and decision-making.
  • Used Canada's network of Embassies and other Missions to advocate Canadian positions on climate change issues, and gather insight into positions of other Parties.
  • Participated in the Expert Group on Technology Transfer, established under the UNFCCC to analyze and identify ways to facilitate and advance technology development and transfer activities.
  • Participated in the Least Developed Countries Expert Group (LEG), established under the UNFCCC to advise least developed countries on the preparation of national adaptation programs of action (NAPAs).
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$11,400,000 $2,900,000 $4,182,016

Program: International participation and negotiations

Department

Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Departmental Program Activity

1.3 Global Issues

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Canada's interests at international climate change meetings represented.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies and negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome

  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) continues to provide substantive analytical and policy input for the formulation and presentation of Canadian views for the negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and its Kyoto Protocol. Provision of timely and substantial input to senior officials has enabled informed participation and engagement in international processes. DFAIT participates actively in the UN process, leads negotiations on adaptation and coordinates negotiations on aspects related to the Kyoto Protocol. In addition, DFAIT advocates Canada's positions within other multilateral processes, e.g., the G8, the Major Economies Forum process, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), Arctic Council, Commonwealth, other UN events, and through bilateral channels through DFAIT's network of Embassies and other Missions abroad. DFAIT also participates actively in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) deliberations.

Of particular note, DFAIT:

  • Leads the UNFCCC negotiations on adaptation, and the interdepartmental adaptation policy and analysis working group. This group has produced several analytical papers that have influenced Canada's position on adaptation within the UNFCCC negotiations. DFAIT is also an active contributor to the analytical work of the other working groups.
  • Coordinates the negotiations under the Kyoto Protocol.
  • Organized a successful training workshop for Canada's foreign missions in the Latin American and Caribbean region during 2008-2009 to compliment the workshops held in Europe and Asia in 2007-2008 to facilitate the bilateral engagement process.
  • Provides support to Canada's member on the UNFCCC's Least Developed Country Expert Group.

In 2008-2009, DFAIT provided contributions to support activities within several organizations (including supplementary funding to the UNFCCC Least Developed Countries Expert Group and inventory development programme; the Organization of American States; the Global Climate Observing System Secretariat and the Center for Clean Air Policy) through which Canada can advance its interests with regard to adaptation in the most vulnerable countries, tracking of greenhouse gas reductions, and climate change policy development.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$6,400,000 $1,650,000 $1,420,060

Program: International participation and negotiations

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy
2.1.2 Domestic and International Clean Energy Policy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Canada's interests at international climate change meetings represented.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies and negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome

  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009


  • Prepared NRCan's Minster, Deputy Minster and other senior officials for representing the department and Canada in a range of strategically selected interdepartmental, bilateral and multilateral meetings related to clean energy and climate change.
  • Worked closely with Environment Canada to provide analysis and policy input for the development and articulation of Canada's positions and policies on international climate change, both inside and outside the United Nations Framework Convention of Climate Change (UNFCCC).
  • Continued to contribute expertise to the Expert Group on Technology Transfer, established under the UNFCCC, with the purpose of analyzing and identifying ways to facilitate and advance technology development, transfer, negotiating and implementation activities.
  • Worked closely with DFAIT to provide policy input and specific departmental expertise for the development and articulation of Canada's positions on climate change, including on technology, in preparation for the G8 Summit in Italy, in July 2009.
  • Provided leadership on recommendations that advanced the launch of 20 large-scale CCS demonstration projects through the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF).
  • Monitored, analyzed, and reported on major US and international climate change policy developments, including other countries' negotiating positions.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$5,200,000 $1,514,000 $1,356,403

Program: Asia-Pacific Partnership

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

4.2.3 Long-term global climate change regime

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Governance structure and project approval guidelines for Canadian participants established.
  • Canada participates actively in meetings of the Partnership.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies and negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome

  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Canada has been an active participant in the APP since joining the Partnership, but did not fund any APP projects during 2008-09.

Internal organization

  • Canada established APP operations including the creation of an APP Secretariat (to coordinate Canada's APP activities at both the national and international levels) and a DG-level Interdepartmental Steering Committee (EC, NRCan, Industry Canada and DFAIT to oversee Canada's involvement in APP)
  • The APP Secretariat started a consultation process with stakeholders which led to the establishment of public-private domestic working groups for all eight APP Task Forces.
  • Canada's APP Secretariat engaged all Canadian industrial sectors covered by the APP Task Forces. This engagement covered business and professional associations, their members and individual companies that expressed an interest in APP, including for example: the Cement Association of Canada; the Aluminium Association of Canada; the Canadian Steel Producers' Association, the Net Zero Energy Housing Coalition and industry associations representing renewable energy sectors (wind, solar, etc.). Private sector participants in Canada's APP activities have generally funded their participation, including overseas travel, at their own expense.

Project Participation

  • Canada participated in and contributed to a number of existing projects including as example:
    • Aluminium Task Force -management of Perfluorocarbon (PFC) Emissions
    • Steel Task Force - Indicators for energy saving and State-of-the-Art Clean Technology Handbook

Canadian Leadership

  • Canada accepted the role co-Chair of the Cement Task Force.
  • Canada accepted the role of Chair of the Renewable Energy and Distributed Generation Task Force (REDGTF). Canada nominated an internationally known Environment Canada expert on biofuels, Dr. Terry McIntyre to replace the incumbent Korean Chair.
  • Canada successfully hosted in Vancouver the sixth meeting of the APP's governing body, the Policy Implementation Committee Meeting (PIC).
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$18,882,000 $2,738,166 $818,629

Program: Asia-Pacific Partnership

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Establishment of governance structure and project approval guidelines supported for Canadian participants and their participation in meetings of the Partnership.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies and negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome

  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009


  • Canada hosted the 7th Policy and Implementation committee meeting in Vancouver, October 2008, and took advantage of this venue to advance our strategic interests with respect to climate change and air pollution.
  • NRCan was one of three federal departments present at the meeting and promoted Canadian expertise in the clean energy technology field through, in part, bilateral discussions with member countries on possible cooperation in APP projects.
  • Canada accepted the Chair of the Renewable Energy and Distributed Generation Task Force with NRCan providing technical expertise in support of Canadian activities in the Task Force.
  • Through NRCan's initiative, Canada tabled its first APP flagship Project, intended to develop an International Coalition on Net Zero Energy Housing. Private sector participation continues to be significant in this project. Bilateral exchanges between Canada Japan, South Korea and Australia continue to highlight international cooperation in energy efficient technology.
  • In addition, over the last year, NRCan has provided expertise to several APP Task Forces, including Buildings and Appliances, Power generation and Transmission, Renewable Energy and Distributed Generation, Coal Mining and Cleaner Fossil Energy. Participation at these task force meetings has formed the basis of NRCan activities over the last year, and has required extensive travel by NRCan's national leads. Attendance allows for the exploration of possible collaboration activities and the promotion of present and future Canadian led projects.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$878,000 $198,672 $198,672

Program: Asia-Pacific Partnership

Department

Industry Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Industry Canada represented at meetings of the Partnership.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies and negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome

  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

Canada participated in the work of all but one of the APP Task Forces and facilitated the involvement of the Canadian private sector in the work of the APP.

In this context, consultations with key domestic industrial sectors were held.

Relevant departments provided advice and input to the APP Secretariat and inter-departmental working group in developing Canada's governance structure and operational guidelines. Input and advice on potential project selection criteria were also provided.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$240,000 $50,000 $50,000

Program: PM Annex

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Coordination and groundwork in preparation for PM Annex (particulate matter) negotiating sessions with the U.S.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.
  • Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies and negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of national circumstances.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.

Final Outcome

  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009


  • Canada and the United States continued discussions in 2008 towards the development of a PM annex under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement. Significant analytical work was undertaken to develop and advance Canada's positions on the pollutant emission management area, pollutants of concern, and potential emission reductions commitments for mobile sources.
  • Intercessional work on the PM continued, focusing on exchanging information on emissions and ambient monitoring and reporting obligations in each country and increasing understanding of potential emission reduction commitments for stationary sources.
  • EC Officials engaged in consultations in key transboundary regions to build strategic support for Canada's negotiating position. Analysis continued on the impacts and potential benefits of further reducing PM emissions, on the relationship between ammonia emissions and transboundary flows of particles, and on the potential contribution of long range transport to North American particle levels.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$2,200,000 $550,000 $397,238

Program: Clean Air Community Partnerships

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 - Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Program materials and tools, including application forms, proposal evaluation tools, project tracking database, and greenhouse gas / criteria air contaminants valuation tools developed.
  • Program launched.
  • Funding of community initiatives to reduce emissions is leveraged.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period


Immediate Outcomes

  • A decision on whether to launch the Clean Air Community Partnerships (CACP) Program is pending.
  • If the program is launched:
    • An RMAF would be developed for the CACP program, including the development of an evaluation plan, indicators, and performance measures.
    • Promotional materials for the CACP program (including web site) would be developed and distributed to appropriate stakeholders.
    • Proposals for Strategic Investment projects would be approved and contribution Agreements would be developed and implemented.
    • An Inter-departmental Advisory Committee would be established for the CACP program.
    • A Proposal Review Committee would be established.
Intermediate Outcomes (If launched)

  • Community initiatives that provide incentives for Canadians to take action on Clean Air and Climate Change are funded.
  • Program Governance Structure is designed and implemented.
  • Program Management Systems and Evaluation Tools and are developed.
Final Outcomes (If Launched)

  • A greater number of Canadians are engaged in protecting our environment, including our air, water, land, climate and nature.
  • Communities and individuals are better able to manage and take a lead on environmental issues.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

In preparation for possible launch, program materials and tools, including application forms, proposal evaluation tools, and greenhouse gas / criteria air contaminants valuation tools were developed.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$12,000,000 $3,000,000 $345,217

Program: Management and Accountability

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

Program's expected achievements in 2008-2009


  • Regular reporting on finances and results for all Clean Air Agenda (CAA) programs undertaken through existing mechanisms.
  • Operational governance structure is put in place.
  • Financial management strategy to provide an integrated view of financial information across the CAA is operationalized.
  • Performance measures to understand outcomes/results, as well as to support regular measurement of progress at the program, theme and on a consolidated basis are developed.
  • Approach to manage risks within the themes and on a consolidated basis is developed.
  • Evaluation plan for the program/thematic levels of the CAA is finalized.

Program's expected results over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for implementing, managing and reporting on CAA activities.
  • Appropriate balance of departmental and horizontal CAA accountabilities.
  • Coherent CAA program architecture.
  • Effective alignment of resources to CAA priorities.
  • Effective and timely collection and reporting of performance information.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Active engagement of partner departments and agencies in horizontal aspects of CAA activities.
  • Effective decision-making regarding CAA activities.
  • Improved accountability of federal government to parliamentarians and Canadians for CAA expenditures and activities.

Final Outcome

  • Increased ability to achieve CAA outcomes.

Program's achieved results in 2008-2009

The Management and Accountability Theme implemented the horizontal management, accountability and reporting framework to support accountability for and transparency about progress made on the Clean Air Agenda (CAA) and effective use of federal investments. This work built on the foundation created in 2007-2008 for supporting the CAA for the balance of its mandate.

The activities lead by the Management and Accountability Theme over 2008-2009 included:

  • Producing regular reports on finances and performance results for all Clean Air Agenda (CAA) programs through existing mechanisms for public reporting to Parliament. The key reports which provided consolidated financial and performance information on the progress of the CAA were:
    • The CAA Horizontal Performance Report 2007-2008;
    • Report in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Canada's Performance Report 2007-2008; and
    • The CAA Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities 2009-2010.
  • Implementing the governance structure for the horizontal management of the CAA, in particular through frequent meeting of the Directors General Theme Leads, as the senior operational level of governance, to discuss management challenges and priorities for horizontal management and engagement. This also resulted in engagement of all levels of the governance structure for the horizontal management of the CAA in the approval of planned and actual financial and performance results for publication.
  • Developing management tools to support an integrated and consolidated view of financial information across the CAA. These tools were used to inform horizontal management discussions and decision-making processes.
  • Applying performance measures established for the CAA through the development of foundational and follow up reports. This enabled measuring of progress at the program, theme and agenda levels, on a consolidated and ongoing basis.
  • Updating risk management priorities for the CAA. This resulted in ongoing dialogue about risk management.
  • Finalizing planning for all the CAA Theme Evaluations which will, in turn, inform management decisions.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2008-2009 Program's actual spending in 2008-2009
$5,000,000 $1,250,000 $1,029,395
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Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

FINTRAC is involved in the following horizontal initiatives as a partner:

  1. Anti-Money Laundering / Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime (AML/ATF)
  2. Public Security and Anti-Terrorism Initiative (PSAT)
  3. National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS)

Supplementary information on horizontal initiatives can be found at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hidb-bdih/home-accueil-eng.aspx.

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Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Health of the Oceans (HOTO)

Name of Lead Department(s): Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: Oceans Management

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2007

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $61.5 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Building on the achievements of the Oceans Action Plan, the Health of the Oceans Initiative is a five-year, $61.5 million commitment by five departments — DFO, Transport Canada, Environment Canada, Parks Canada and INAC — to improve the health of the ocean environment. For its part, Fisheries and Oceans Canada will receive $23.2 million to support its protection and conservation work. Key DFO initiatives include establishing nine new Marine Protected Areas (including six under the Oceans Act), conducting scientific research to support designation of the new Marine Protected Areas, creating four new national Oceans Centres of Expertise, and enhancing spill-response capacity and emergency planning in the Arctic Ocean. For a complete list, see the table below. DFO will co-ordinate the entire Health of the Oceans Initiative. This will include bi-annual performance monitoring, the preparation of summary annual reports and preparation for a final summative evaluation.

Shared Outcome(s):

  • New Oceans Centres of Expertise
  • Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy: finalization of planning guidelines for federal MPA network
  • Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy: preparation of a status report of federal MPA
  • Federal-Provincial-Territorial Marine Protected Areas MPA network (2012)
  • Marine Protected Areas establishment
  • Collaboration with the World Wildlife Fund-Canada
  • Delivery of a suite of indicators to assess and monitor Arctic ecosystems
  • Integrated Oceans Management and Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) assessment tools linkage

Governance Structure(s): This initiative is subject to interdepartmental government through the Assistant Deputy Ministers Interdepartmental Committee on Oceans, supported by a shadow Director General Committee. This Governance structure reviews the initiatives on a regular basis including review and approval of annual reports to Ministers on the progress of this initiative.

Expected Results 2008-09:

  • Establish four Oceans Centres of Expertise to develop and implement common tools and approaches in the five LOMAs to protect deep-sea corals and sponge reefs, incorporate traditional ecological knowledge, develop information management and exchange standards, and accelerate progress in addressing coastal management issues.
  • Establish a federal network of MPAs that will strengthen and be managed within an integrated oceans management framework.
  • Develop a National (federal-provincial-territorial) marine protected area network in Canada's three oceans (target 2012).
  • Establish six new MPAs within the existing LOMAs and establish a national monitoring and reporting system for all Oceans Act MPAs.
  • Collaborate with World Wildlife Fund-Canada to encourage greater involvement by environmental non-government organizations(ENGOs) in the Health of the Oceans Initiative and integrated oceans management.
  • Develop a State of the Arctic Basin Report, use common ecosystem-monitoring strategies in shared and boundary waters, and initiate development of a demonstration project in the Beaufort Sea to test Ecosystem Based Management(EBM) in shared waters (2008-2009).
  • Through the Canada-US Gulf of Maine Steering Committee, build on the trans-boundary collaboration on and management of groundfish stocks; through the Gulf of Maine Council, build on co-operation between states and provinces. Advance Canada-US collaboration in the Gulf of Maine regarding integrated fisheries and oceans management. Support the work plan that DFO and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (USA) signed November 17, 2006.
  • Build linkages between integrated management carried out under the Health of the Oceans Initiative and other tools, such as project environmental assessments and strategic environmental assessments conducted under the authority of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.

Results Achieved 2008-09

Centres of Expertise (COEs) (HOTO #16)

The four centres were established and began operations. Work plans were developed with input from the Director General of Oceans and Regional Directors. Activities included presentations to provide context and background and to present the goals and objectives of the COEs; consultations to seek input on the proposed work plans; and participation in regional, national and international efforts as they related to the individual mandates of the centres.

MPA Implementation, Strategy and Network (HOTO #19, #13, #14)

A number of workshops contributed to preparation of the penultimate draft of the Federal Guide to Collaborative Planning of MPAs, which provides guidance for implementing a more systematic approach to MPA planning and establishment. The guide will be ready for approval early next fiscal year.

An agreement has been reached among partner government agencies that Canada's national network of MPAs will actually be a national system of bioregional networks of MPAs, and that national Science advisory processes would be followed to delineate those bioregional planning areas and to develop guidance on designing the networks. This national system will be developed in the context of integrated management (IM), and existing IM governance structures will be used where they exist (e.g., in Large Ocean Management Areas). An integrated management approach aims for a collective approach to MPA network development in order to contribute to broader conservation objectives and consider impacts on all aspects of an ecosystem.

An informal interdepartmental MPA network has been established to facilitate ongoing collaboration and exchange among federal MPA practitioners. DFO, EC and PCA also sought opportunities to jointly consult on establishment of new MPAs to limit duplication.

DFO regions of Quebec, Gulf, Newfoundland and Labrador, Central and Arctic and Pacific all conducted ecological and biological assessments followed by consultations. Preparation of the final reports and area of interest recommendations are in progress and should be announced in the next fiscal year. The Central and Arctic region is putting forward recommendations for two areas of interest.

As for the Maritimes region, consultation with Federal and Provincial partners took longer than anticipated and are still ongoing; this resulted in having to delay the public consultations on proposed AOIs until 2009-2010. It is currently anticipated that consultations with the public will begin in late summer or early fall 2009; this entails a likely recommendation to be put forward to the Minister no sooner than late fall 2009 or early winter 2010.

Collaboration with WWF (HOTO #17)

WWF has taken part in a number of DFO activities related to the Placentia Bay/Grand Banks Large Oceans Management Area operations in an effort to advance the oceans agenda and contribute to conservation and protection objectives. WWF-Canada participated by providing expert advice on activities such as the selection of areas of interest, the prioritization of conservation objectives, the development of social, economic and cultural objectives in an integrated management plan, stakeholder consultation process, and the development and subsequent implementation of a Cold Water Coral Conservation Strategy for the Newfoundland and Labrador Region.

Arctic Council (HOTO #15)

Activities conducted are part of a broader work plan under the Arctic Council's Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment (PAME) Working Group; this model facilitates collaboration with relevant stakeholders as they relate to shared and boundary waters. The following activities were conducted in 2008-2009:

  • Review and validation of indicator suites to assess and monitor Arctic Ecosystems.
  • Finalized report on Best Practices in Ecosystem Based Management in the Arctic. A Canadian chapter is included. The report was approved and released at the Arctic Council's Ministerial meeting in early 2009.
  • Preliminary discussions were held between HQ and the Central and Arctic region to encourage involvement in the development of a pilot project to test the Large Marine Ecosystem approach and framework in Beaufort Sea in collaboration with the US.

Gulf of Maine (HOTO #18)

The Ecosystem Overview component of the report was jointly completed by DFO Maritimes and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Northeast Region. For each major section of the report, two lead authors - one from the US and one from Canada - were identified and collaborated in its development. Rather than the traditional approach of focusing on individual species or activities, the EO took a broader community approach and aimed to describe marine community structure and ecosystem linkages. The completion of the EO has ensured that a common understanding of the current ecological conditions in the Gulf of Maine was available to all interested organizations. The report will provide a common basis for planning and management activities as well as contribute to more effective and informed decision-making.

DFO has continued active participation in activities with both the Gulf of Maine Council and the CA-US Steering Committee and ensured that the relationships between Canadian and US federal departments as well as State and Provincial Governments are in place to facilitate ongoing collaborative activities.

Preliminary discussions with NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Northeast Region have begun to explore the relationship between the US Northeast Region Oceans Council (NROC) and the Canadian Regional Committee on Oceans Management (RCOM). These will form the basis for establishment of more formal linkages, regional governance mechanisms and potential shared activities.

Integrated Oceans Management (HOTO #20)

Integrated Oceans Management approach and tools were presented to various stakeholders in an effort to raise awareness and streamline efforts. A report was also developed in an attempt to reconcile the terminology between Oceans Integrated Management and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. The Pathways of Effect National Working Group (PoE-NWG) was established and finalized the holistic Pathways of Effects model as well as established a sub-group to initiate the drafting of a guidance document for the development and use of pathways of effect (PoEs). Two draft Sector PoEs were developed: oil and gas, and shipping. Draft Terms of Reference for a pilot project (Marine Shipping) were developed in consultation with First Nations, the shipping industries, and federal partners.

 


($ thousands)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of
Programs for
Federal
Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2008-09
Actual
Spending for
2008-09
Fisheries and Oceans Oceans Management Federal Marine Protected Areas Strategy Implementation in DFO 1,250.0 250.0 250.0
Development of a Federal-Provincial-Territorial MPA Network 2,500.0 525.0 525.0
Arctic Council - Ecosystem Projects 1,000.0 200.0 71.8
Oceans Centres of Expertise (Coastal, Corals, Data Integration, TEK) 3,000.0 700.0 880.8
Collaboration with World Wildlife Fund (WWF) 213.0 42.6 42.6
Gulf of Maine (at DFO) 750.0 250.0 227.0
Marine Protected Areas Establishment 5,250.0 1,350.0 1,255.7
Habitat Management Integrated Management and Canadian Environmental Assessment Act Assessment Tools Linkages 1,450.0 250.0 193.6
Science for Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems Ecosystem Science Support and Advice on Health of the Oceans 5,500.0 1,100.0 1,100.0
Canadian Coast Guard Spill Capacity and Emergency Response Strategy 2,260.0 750.0 267.2
Environment Canada Biodiversity and Corporate services Federal Marine Protected Areas Strategy - Implementation in EC 1,250.0 250.0 103.8
Marine Wildlife Areas Establishment 2,000.0 507.0 To be
determined
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision making and Corporate services Sable Island Weather Station 4,000.0 800.0 800.0
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes and Corporate services Gulf of Maine (at EC) 751.0 250.0 250.0
Parks Canada Agency Heritage Places Establishment Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy Implementation in Parks Canada 1,250.0 194.0 182.4
National Marine Conservation Area in Lancaster Sound 5,000.0 1,000.0 114.4
Transport Canada Transportation Safety and Security and Internal Services Enforcement of Ballast Water Regulations 4,500.0 966.5 966.5
Pollution Prevention - Surveillance 13,000.0 2,381.3 2,798.3
Pollution Prevention - Dash 7 Outfitting 5,000.0 1,600.0 1,378.9
Arctic International Marine Shipping Assessment 550.0 140.0 149.4
Pollution Prevention - Ship Waste Reduction Strategy 800.0 100.0 25.0
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Northern land Resources Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment/Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment from land-based sources of pollution 175.0 75.0 73.5
Total 61,449.0 13,681.4 11,655.9

Comments on Variances:

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): —

Contact information:

Harvey Brodkin

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

200 Kent Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0E6

Telephone: 613-991-6692

Email: Harvey.Brodkin@dfo-mpo.gc.ca


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Health Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:

Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children.

2. Name of Lead Department(s):

Health Canada (HC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity:

First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

ECD component - October 2002.
Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) component- December 2004

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

ECD component - ongoing.
ELCC component - ongoing

6. Federal Funding Allocation:

ECD: $320 million 2002-03 to 2006-07 ($60 million in 2002-03 and $65 million thereafter). Ongoing: $65 million per year.

ELCC: $45 million 2005-06 to 2007-08 ($14.5 million in 2005-06; $15.3 million in 2006-07; $15.2 million in 2007-08). Ongoing: $14 million per year.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The ECD Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children was announced on October 31, 2002. The Strategy provides $320 million over five years to: improve and expand existing ECD programs and services for Aboriginal children; expand ECD capacity and networks; introduce new research initiatives to improve understanding of how Aboriginal children are doing; and work towards the development of a "single window" approach to ensure better integration and coordination of federal Aboriginal ECD programming. 

In December 2004, as first phase of a "single window", Cabinet approved an additional $45 million over three years (beginning fiscal year 2005-06) and $14 million ongoing to improve integration and coordination of two ECD programs-- Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR) and the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative (FNICCI).

The objectives of these funds are to increase access to and improve the quality of ELCC programming for First Nations children on reserve, and improve integration and coordination between the two programs through joint planning, joint training and co-location. 

The Strategy also includes Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)-funded child/day care programs in Alberta and Ontario.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The ECD component complements the September 2000 First Ministers F/P/T ECD Agreement. It seeks to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children by improving the developmental opportunities to which Aboriginal children (and their families) are exposed at an early age (0-6 years).

The ELCC component complements funding released to provinces and territories under the March 2003 Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Childcare (ELCC) to improve access to ELCC programs and services.

9. Governance Structure(s):

The ECD component complements the September 2000 First Ministers F/P/T ECD Agreement. It seeks to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children by improving the developmental opportunities to which Aboriginal children (and their families) are exposed at an early age (0-6 years).

The ELCC component complements funding released to provinces and territories under the March 2003 Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Childcare (ELCC) to improve access to ELCC programs and services.


($ millions) Note: all funding ECD unless identified as ELCC
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2008-09 15. Actual Spending for 2008-09 16. Expected Results for 2008-09* 17. Results Achieved in 2008-09
Health Canada
Electronic Link:

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/
fniah-spnia/famil/
develop/
ahsor-papa_intro-eng.php
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services a. Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR) $107.595 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$21.519/
year).
$21.519/
year ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$21.519 $23.896
(ECD and ELCC)
Program expansion and enhan-
cement

Increase integration, coordination, access, and quality
The number of outreach programs (i.e. providing AHSOR programming to children and families in their homes) was increased and existing centre-based programming supplemented with new outreach activities and home visiting.

In 2008-09, FNIHB increased training of community AHSOR staff and completed a study of the status of AHSOR capital facilities to understand community capital requirements.

Working with our partner departments, we completed a series of 17 interdepartmental pilot projects (8 projects coordinated by INAC in 2008-09) to improve integration and coordination among AHSOR, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada's (HRSDC) FNICCI, and INAC funded daycares in Alberta and Ontario.
ELCC
$24.000 (2005-06 through to 2007-08,
$7.500 in 2005-06, $8.300 in 2006-07;
$8.200 in 2007-08).
$7.500 in 2008-09 and ongoing

Committed in 2005.
$7.500
Electronic Link:

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/
fnih-spni/famil/
preg-gros/
intro_e.html
b. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (FASD-FNIC) $70.000 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$10.000 in 2002-03 and $15.000 thereafter).
$15.000/
year ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$15.000 $11.013 Program expansion and enhan-
cement
Program enhancements undertaken in 2008-09 include pilot implementation of evidence-based models for community coordinators, continued support for mentoring projects including training activities for community-based workers, initiation of a review of the mentoring program including early outcomes, improved linkages with Non-Governmental Organizations such as the Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres, and reviews of evidence-based approaches to support program delivery.
c. Capacity Building $5.075
(2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$1.015/
year).
$1.015/
year ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$1.015 $1.086 Increased capacity As part of the 2002 ECD capacity-building component, Health Canada provides funding to build capacity and expertise relating to early childhood development to National Aboriginal Organizations. In 2008-09, funds were provided the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, and the Native Women's Association of Canada. As well, INAC is providing annual funding to Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada. In 2008-09, funding enabled these organizations to contribute to the development of the ECD Strategy through strategic planning and capacity building in their own organizations.

Funding from the ECD component also continued to support the development of an Aboriginal service providers' network named the Aboriginal Children's Circle of Early Learning (ACCEL). During 2008-09, ACCEL was updated and maintained by the National Aboriginal Health Organization.

Horizontal training funding was provided to regions to support training for ECD workers in AHSOR and FNICCI sites. A working group with representation from AFN, INAC, HC and HRSDC is working to develop a laddered ECD training strategy that will lead to culturally appropriate certification of providers of early learning and child care programming for First Nations children living on reserve, and supports coordination between AHSOR, FNICCI and INAC funded daycares in Alberta and Ontario. A document to guide the Horizontal Training Strategy was completed in 2008-09 and work to implement the strategy will continue in 2009-10.
PHAC
Electronic Link:

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/
dca-dea/
programs-mes/
ahs_main_e.html
Child and Adolescent Health Promotion a. Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) $62.880 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$12.576/ year and ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$12.576 $11.368 Program expansion and enhancement by increasing number of special needs and parental outreach workers; enhance special needs training; serve another 1000 children Special needs requirements, curriculum development, training and capacity requirements have been identified.
b. Capacity Building $2.500 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; $0.500/year) and ongoing

Committed in 2002
$0.500 $ 0.236 Horizontal coordination, engagement and development of tools and resources to build capacity Collaboration on special needs;
development; Delivery of National ECD Training;
Contribution on horizontal ECD activities
HRSDC
Electronic Link:

http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/
eng/employment/
aboriginal_
employment/
childcare/
index.shtml
Lifelong Learning - Health Human Resources (HHR) a. First Nations and Inuit child Care Initiative (FNICCI) $45.700 (2002-03 through to 2006-07; $9.140/year) and ongoing.

Committed in 2002
$9.140 $15.640 (ECD and ELCC) Program expansion and enhancement

Increase program integration, coordination, access and quality.
Approximately 8,500 child care spaces in 462 First Nations and Inuit sites through 58 Aboriginal Human Resource Development Agreement (AHRDA) holders
ELCC
$21.000 (2005-06 through to 2007-08; $7.000/year). $6.500/ year ongoing.

Committed in 2005
$6.500
Electronic Link:

http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/
eng/hip/sd/
300_UEYInfo.shtml
  b. Research and Knowledge $21.200
(2002-03 through to 2006-07); $4.240/year and ongoing.

Committed in 2002
$4.240 $2.700 Information on the well-being of Aboriginal children through an Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the Aboriginal component of "Understanding the Early Years" (UEY) The results of the Aboriginal Children's Survey of 2006 were released in October 2008. This first-time national survey provides information on the development and well-being of First Nations children living off-reserve, Métis children and Inuit children under the age of six.

The project with the Prince Albert Grand Council, under the Understanding the Early Years Initiative (UEY), engaged the community and started its data collections. Several other UEY projects included activities for Aboriginal children and their families
INAC The people- social development a. Family Capacity Initiatives $5.050 (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07; 1.010/year)
2007-2008 and ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$1.010 $0.999 Enhance strategic partnerships (measured by number of early childhood development interdepartmental pilot projects) Undertook eight Early Childhood Development interdepartmental pilot projects ending March 31, 2009
Total ECD
(2002-03 to 2006-07): $320.000
($60.000 in 2002-03 and $65.000/year thereafter); $65.000/year ongoing.
ECD: $65.000/
year ongoing.
$66.938 (ECD and ELCC)    
ELCC
(2005-06 to 2007-08):
$45.000
($14.500 in 2005-06; $15.300 in 2006-07; $15.200 in 2007-08); and $14.000/year ongoing.
ELCC: $14.000
/year ongoing.

18. Comments on Variances:

Planned spending represents the total program budget including departmental corporate costs. Actual expenditures are net of corporate costs, resulting in an over-estimation of variances.

Actual spending for HC FASD and AHSOR may be underestimated in regions where funding for FASD and AHSOR is integrated or clustered with that of other programs.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

N/A

20. Contact information:

Cathy Winters, Senior Policy Coordinator
Children and Youth Division
Community Programs Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
Health Canada
Telephone: (613) 952-5064
E-mail: cathy_winters@hc-sc.gc.ca


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:

Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (the Action Plan)

2. Name of Lead Department(s):

The lead is shared between Health Canada (HC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

3. Lead Department Program Activity:

  • HC: Health Products, Consumer Products, Food Safety, and Pesticide Regulation;
  • CFIA: Food Safety;
  • PHAC: Health Promotion, Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, and Infectious Disease Prevention and Control;
  • CIHR: Strategic Priority Research.

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Fiscal Year 2008-2009.

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Fiscal Year 2012-2013 (and ongoing).

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):

$489.4 million over five years ending in Fiscal Year 2012-2013 (and $126.7 million ongoing).

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The federal government is responsible for promoting the health and safety of Canadians. A key part of this role is ensuring that the products used by Canadians are safe. Adverse consequences associated with unsafe products impact not only the Canadian public, but also the Canadian economy. The Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (Action Plan) is a horizontal initiative aimed at modernizing and strengthening Canada's safety system for food, health and consumer products. A number of recent high-profile incidents, such as lead and ingestible magnets in children's toys, food borne diseases in fresh produce, and the global withdrawal of some prescription medicines, have underscored the need for government action.

The Action Plan modernizes Canada's regulatory system to enable it to better protect Canadians from unsafe consumer products in the face of current realities and future pressures. The Action Plan bolsters Canada's regulatory system by amending or replacing outdated health and safety legislation with new legislative regimes that respond to modern realities, and by enhancing safety programs in areas where modern legislative tools already exist. The Action Plan ensures that Canadians have the information they need to assess the risks and benefits associated with the consumer and health products they choose to use, and to minimize risks associated with food safety.

The Action Plan is an integrated, risk-based plan and includes a series of initiatives that are premised on three key pillars: active prevention, targeted oversight and rapid response. We focus on active prevention to avoid as many incidents as possible and work closely with industry to promote awareness, provide regulatory guidance, and help identify safety concerns at an early stage. Targeted oversight provides for early detection of safety problems and further safety verification at the appropriate stage in a product's life cycle. To improve rapid response capabilities and ensure the government has the ability to act quickly and effectively when needed we work to enhance health risk assessments, strengthen recall capacity, and increase the efficiency in responding and communicating clearly with consumers and stakeholders.

In addition to addressing the concerns outlined above, the Action Plan provides a platform for Canada to actively participate in the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP), in particular by supporting commitments to increase the safety of imported products within North America. It also enables Canada to better align with US standards, which will have a positive impact on consumer confidence and the business climate.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

  • Increased knowledge of food risks and product safety (scientific and surveillance/monitoring);
  • Increased industry awareness and understanding of regulatory requirements;
  • Increased industry compliance with safety standards;
  • Increased consumer awareness and understanding of safety risks associated with health and consumer products and food;
  • Strengthened oversight and response to safety incidents;
  • Increased consumer confidence in health and consumer products and food;
  • Increased trade-partner confidence in Canadian controls, which meet international standards
  • Increased availability of safe and effective products; and
  • Level playing field where imports can be demonstrated to meet Canadian requirements.

9. Governance Structure(s):

The Minister of Health and the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada have joint responsibility and accountability for results, and for providing information on progress achieved by the Action Plan.

A Governance Framework has been established and endorsed by all of the partner departments/agencies. To facilitate horizontal coordination, the following Director General (DG)/Executive Director (ED) level Task Forces have been established: Health Products Task Force, Consumer Products Task Force, Food Task Force, Communications Task Force, and the Legislative and Regulatory Task Force. The Task Forces report to a DG/ED level Coordinating Committee. An Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)/Vice President (VP) level Steering Committee provides direction to the Coordinating Committee. An Oversight Committee of Deputy Heads facilitates the provision of high level guidance to the Steering Committee.

Health Canada's Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) provides the Secretariat function for the Action Plan and plays an integral role in supporting the ongoing operation and decision-making of the governance committees, oversight and integration of performance against commitments, and advice to senior management. SPB is also the lead for coordinating the implementation of the legislative and regulatory initiatives.

Health Canada's Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch (HECSB) and the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), along with the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), work together to implement Action Plan activities related to consumer products.

Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) has primary responsibility for implementing Action Plan activities related to health products with support from Health Canada's Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) on one initiative (increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness).

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) work together to implement Action Plan activities related to food safety.

The Public Affairs, Consultation and Communications Branch (PACCB) provides communications support for all of the above activities and will coordinate or lead many of the horizontal Departmental activities under the Consumer Information Strategy.


($ millions) Note: all funding ECD unless identified as ELCC
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2008-09 15. Actual Spending for 2008-09 16. Expected Results for 2008-09* 17. Results Achieved in 2008-09
Health Canada Health Products Active Prevention 57.6 13.9 14.00 Improved timeliness of pre-market reviews
  • For brand name pharmaceuticals and generic drug submissions, 87% of the 482 submissions met the approved service standards. This percentage is close to meeting the standard of 90% of drug submissions to be reviewed within the approved timelines.
  • For biologic submissions, 96% of the 102 submissions met the approved service standards, exceeding the standard of 90%.
  • For Medical Device Class II, III and IV type applications, 73% of the 6,523 submission reviews met the approved service standards (missing the standard of 90% of Class II, III, IV medical device applications within the approved timelines).
Increased awareness and understanding of the safe use of health products by consumers and health care professionals
  • 102 risk communications, advisories/warnings were posted on the Health Canada and Med Effect Canada websites.
  • In collaboration with Health Canada, Marketed Authorization Holders (MAHs) issued 60 risk communications, advisories/warnings and are posted on the Health Canada and Med Effect Canada websites.
  • CD-ROMs were developed and distributed to stakeholders on "HPFB Overview and Key Publications" and 2 e-learning modules have been developed and currently under review on: "How drugs make their way to Canadians" and "How health products are regulated in Canada". These modules will eventually be distributed to patient and consumer stakeholders.
  • A Consumer Information Bureau has been created to provide a standardized approach to consumer communications, centralized development of policies and tools, and ongoing communications guidance.
  • Several outreach campaigns or activities were conducted:
    • "A cough and cold" campaign related to cough medicine and children ran from December 2008 to the spring of 2009. Distribution partnerships with nurses, pharmacies, child care centres, Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS), college of family physicians were established to make information available to consumers in many venues.
    • A campaign directed at consumers and health professionals to promote the Med Effect system for adverse reaction reporting was launched.
    • News Canada articles on natural health products were produced and will eventually be released in community papers and on websites.
Targeted Oversight 34.6 2.1 1.75 Enhanced capacity of HC and industry to identify and respond to risk issues
  • 152 Periodic Safety Update Reports (PSURs) Level 1 Screening and 35 PSURs Level II Full Reviews were reviewed. PSURs are standard reports used internationally by regulatory authorities to systematically monitor the safety of marketed drug products.
  • A total of 4 new signals were specifically derived from PSUR review in 2008-09.
Increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions
  • In accordance with the implementation plan for the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN), initial funding in 2008-2009 was applied to support establishment of program infrastructure, as opposed to directly funding projects addressing priority research areas. Preliminary work was thus undertaken to develop processes that will support the generation and dissemination of new research knowledge on real world safety and effectiveness of drugs. In 2008-2009, progress on this preliminary work included identification of priority research topics by Health Canada and initial staffing of the network coordinating office by CIHR.
Rapid Response Existing Resources Existing Resources Existing Resources Improved ability to respond with better tools when safety incidents occur
  • Implementation of modern compliance and enforcement tools (e.g., recall authorities, increase in fine and penalties) will be more effective in deterring non-compliance once the legislation to modernize the Food and Drugs Act is reintroduced to Parliament. This reintroduced legislation will allow a better oversight of drug products as committed in the 2008 Speech from the Throne.
Consumer Products Active Prevention 41.0 1.5 0.84 Increased awareness and understanding of product safety obligations and standards and regulatory requirements by industry
  • Existing industry guidance documents updated and distributed (e.g., Guide for Surface Coatings, Second Hand Products Booklet, Consumer Chemicals Retailer Fact sheet & Children's Sleepwear).
  • Preliminary work on transitioning from Hazardous Products Act to the new Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (e.g., industry guidance on new legislative and regulatory obligations).
  • Memorandum of Agreement was signed with the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) to support the national standards system.
  • Contract with the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) to develop an ISO Guideline on Product Safety.
  • Task group formed through National Public Safety Advisory Council to develop a national approach to electrical product safety.
Increased awareness and understanding of consumer product safety issues by consumers
  • Subscriptions to the Consumer Product Safety Recall website increased from 5000 to 6600 in 2008-09. The data indicates that there continues to be an increasing number of Canadians who are becoming aware of consumer product safety issues.
  • Public opinion research conducted in 2008-09 to establish consumer awareness baseline.
  • A Consumer Information Bureau has been created to provide a standardized approach to consumer communications, centralized development of policies and tools, and ongoing communications guidance.
  • Update to product safety website to include new user friendly electronic news letter (link: Consumer Product Safety News).
Targeted Oversight 15.7 0.6 0.22 Improved timeliness and quality of information and data on consumer product safety incidents
  • Legislative authorities for mandatory reporting of product safety incidents drafted.
  • Incident form has been created, guidance documents and policies to support industry reporting developed.
  • The initial planning phase for mandatory reporting IT system completed.
  • Revamped website for Canadians to find timely information about recalled consumer products (link: Consumer Product Recalls).
Increased sharing of information, data and knowledge with international regulators
  • Monthly communications with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) continue, 3 joint recalls; work-plans for Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with China drafted; participation on international committees/caucuses continues.
More and better data on accidents, injuries, illnesses and deaths due to consumer products
  • Continuation of development of National Coroners' Database through collaboration with Provincial and Territorial Chief Coroners and Chief Medical Examiners and Statistics Canada. Data quality assessment is underway. MOUs for data sharing are being finalized, in anticipation of joint preparation of first annual report in 2009-2010.
  • Arrangements to expand the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program, with one more facility ready to begin data collection on April 1, 2009.
Rapid Response 17.9 0.9 1.10 Improved legislative authority and regulatory tools
  • New Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) drafted and tabled in Parliament (link: Bill C-6).
Improved risk-based monitoring of consumer products
  • Increased capacity (regional product safety officer) for compliance and enforcement activities.
  • Of the 6 product categories, 3 resulted in similar compliance rates (88.3% compliant) as the previous cycle, indicating that non-compliance continues to exist in lead in surface paint of toys and in children's jewellery, bedding textiles.
  • The decrease in compliance rates (72.6% compliant) for Halloween costumes, second hand children's products was attributed to the emergence of new materials, and the high turnover in the marketplace of retailers.
  • Introduction of a new complaints protocol procedure to ensure timely response to consumer product safety issues (link: Report Your Consumer Product Complaint).
Pesticide Regulation Active Prevention 6.9 0.6 0.30 Increased industry (manufacturers and retailers) awareness of risks and related regulatory requirements
  • Progress made towards development of a formal risk management strategy, including the drafting of a compliance risk assessment template to be incorporated into decision-making process.
  • Conducted program (registrant inspection) that included assessing a selected sample of industry representatives to determine their level of knowledge of new regulatory requirements and to collect information related to risk factors (e.g., lack of quality control program linked to non-compliance).
  • Updated analysis of implicated consumer products and industry including the following metrics (April 2009): 414 registrants; 1975 registered domestic class products; 1601 to Canadian registrants.
  • More than 300 discount retail stores were interviewed to confirm retailer knowledge of regulatory requirements and to check for the presence of consumer pesticides. It was concluded that an ongoing outreach strategy would be needed to support compliant behaviour. A review of marketplace inspections (2003-2006) was conducted.
  • Consultations were held with the following stakeholder groups in the interest of strengthening existing partnerships: FPT, US EPA, CCSPA, CBSA and PMAC. Consultations will continue in 2009-10. Extensive discussions were held with a key retailer regarding textiles treated with pesticides, claiming antimicrobial properties. Note: This key retailer has a voluntary code of conduct re: compliance with federal regulatory requirements.
  • Outreach: PMRA began targeted outreach activities in 2008/09 by focussing efforts on areas of immediate concern. In support of this targeted approach, PMRA created a homemade pesticide fact sheet, and a beg bug pest note.
Rapid Response 8.0 0.7 0.70 Improved monitoring of pest management products using a risk management approach
  • 274 individual situations of known or suspected non-compliance were investigated to determine if there were violations of Pest Control Products Act and Regulations. This resulted in 413 confirmed violations involving 133 products. Most of these were addressed with an education letter as the corrective action.
  • Work was done to update an existing database to track consumer product non-compliance and provide a basis for more accurate reporting.
  • A number of adverse effects related to pet products were reported through the Incident Reporting program. Follow up included an investigation and analysis of product to confirm that the cause was not compliance related. A product advisory was issued and follow up is underway to pin point the source of the problem with the registrants.
  • Lab method development work was initiated related to the analysis of products that were the object of a complaint or detected non-compliance.
  • Updated Administrative Monetary Penalties (AMP) Regulations were drafted to reflect the new Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), awaiting publication in Canada Gazette I.
Food Nutrition Active Prevention 29.6 3.3 3.23 Establishment of the appropriate instrument or mix of instruments, including regulatory and non-regulatory measures (standards, policies, etc.) to address immediate areas of concern
  • 13 guidance/educational tools and documents were developed with respect to allergens, toxins, emerging food borne pathogens and bioactives.
  • As well, 4 standards, frameworks and policies were modified or developed for the FCSAP high priorities areas (allergens, natural toxins, emerging food borne pathogens and bioactives).
Rapid Response 1.3 0.2 0.18 Increased public understanding of food safety risks, alert systems and safety systems
  • Consumer education was rolled out through mechanisms such as nationwide distribution of newspaper inserts in a variety of publications.
  • Information on food recalls was increased through media relations, web information, news releases and fact sheets.
  • Targeting of at-risk populations and key stakeholders was enhanced through partnerships, alternate languages and non-traditional media, e.g., the development and translation of information on melamine into Chinese dialects.

The following consists of number of hits in 2008-2009 for Health Canada's food product information sites:

Canadian Food and Inspection Agency Food Safety Active Prevention 114.2 14.3 8.37 Increased understanding of food safety risks by HC, PHAC & CFIA
  • Tri-departmental collaboration on identification of various processes (e.g., risk profiling and prioritization) and tools (e.g., influence diagrams) designed to help assess and set priorities among existing and emerging food safety risks.
  • Modified and applied multi-factorial risk prioritization framework for use by decision makers to prioritize risks.
  • Reviewed and scoped risk assessments and models existing for fresh produce.
  • Targeted surveys were designed and validation of additional laboratory methods was carried out for certain high risk areas including imported ingredients, produce, mycotoxins in cereals, and undeclared allergens.
  • Established SOPs, agreements and contracts for incorporating produce into existing sampling/data analysis activities.
  • Participated at conferences, booths and science forums (including the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors Conference) and developed various promotional material (e.g., information sheets, outbreak summary reports) for training purposes (e.g., Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors Conference); provided demonstrations based on outbreak summary reports to P/T nation-wide.
  • Completed draft narrative reviews of antimicrobial resistance in fish and shellfish and in fruits and vegetables.
  • Initiated sampling of imported and domestic finfish and shellfish in 7 provinces.
  • Initiated tri-departmental discussions on sharing fruit and vegetable samples and isolates.
  • Evaluated and conducted a preliminary implementation of next-generation laboratory methods in collaboration with US Center for Disease Control (CDC) and PHAC Laboratory for Food borne Zoonoses (LFZ).
  • Increased capacity and initiated testing for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) testing.
  • MOU established between CFIA and PHAC (PulseNet Canada) to provide real-time surveillance and sub-typing of foodborne pathogens.
  • Health Canada/CFIA Working Group was established for targeted surveys, risk mapping and prioritization with respect to food safety.
Increased industry understanding of and engagement in the development and implementation of food safety risk mitigation processes
  • Informal discussions held with industry to share preliminary information and establish key industry contacts.
  • Briefing material including manuscripts, presentations, and technical reports on the four FCSAP priority areas (allergens, natural toxins, emerging foodborne pathogens and bioactives) was developed in plain language.
Increased engagement by Canadians in the regulatory system / Increased industry knowledge regarding food labelling
  • Stakeholder consultations (including consumers) completed in Spring 2008 on revised Product of Canada policy.
  • Communication with industry on how to comply with revised Product of Canada regulations was carried out.
  • Ongoing collaboration with industry throughout pre and post-implementation of revised policy was provided to ensure industry awareness and understanding of requirements and to provide advice on the practical application of these requirements.
Targeted Oversight 77.0 4.2 3.00 Increased verification of industry food safety measures
  • Revised food safety guidelines were developed for further consultation and eventual implementation by industry as part of their preventative strategies.
  • Inspection and sampling frequencies were enhanced in high risk areas.
Improved ability to monitor and control importation of food
  • Preliminary work completed to facilitate the assessment, entry approval and inspection decisions related to imported fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • Efforts were initiated to better identify importers and imported food products as well as domestic producers.
  • Border blitz guidelines were finalized, in consultation with CBSA, with the goal of increased interception of non-compliant products prior to distribution in Canada.
Rapid Response 32.2 4.4 3.01 Increased public understanding of food safety risks, alert systems and safety systems
  • Consumer education was rolled out through mechanisms such as nationwide distribution of newspaper inserts in a variety of publications.
  • Information on food recalls was increased through media relations, web information, news releases and fact sheets.
  • Targeting of at-risk populations and key stakeholders was enhanced through partnerships, alternate languages and non-traditional media, e.g., the development and translation of information on melamine into Chinese dialects.
Public Health Agency of Canada Health Promotion Targeted Oversight 4.5 0.27 0.25 More and better data on accidents, injuries, illnesses and deaths due to consumer products
  • Continuation of development of National Coroners' Database through collaboration with Provincial and Territorial Chief Coroners and Chief Medical Examiners and Statistics Canada. Data quality assessment is underway. MOUs for data sharing are being finalized, in anticipation of joint preparation of first annual report in 2009-2010.
  • Arrangements to expand the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program, with one more facility ready to begin data collection on April 1, 2009.
Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Targeted Oversight 3.5 0.13 0.13 Engagement of risk assessment stakeholders
  • A plan was developed to disseminate knowledge on injury risks assessment using the Canadian Best Practices Portal.
  • Through the work plan activities and in consultation with the Directorate of Agencies for School Health BC and the Joint Consortium for School Health (JCSH), a contractor was hired to review the JCSH Injury Prevention Scan.
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Active Prevention 18.3 2.1 1.07 Increased understanding of food safety risks by HC, PHAC & CFIA
  • Tri-departmental collaboration on identification of various processes (e.g., risk profiling and prioritization) and tools (e.g., influence diagrams) designed to help assess and set priorities among existing and emerging food safety risks.
  • Modified and applied multi-factorial risk prioritization framework for use by decision makers to prioritize risks.
  • Reviewed and scoped risk assessments and models existing for fresh produce.
  • Targeted surveys were designed and validation of additional laboratory methods was carried out for certain high risk areas including imported ingredients, produce, mycotoxins in cereals, and undeclared allergens.
  • Established SOPs, agreements and contracts for incorporating produce into existing sampling/data analysis activities.
  • Participated at conferences, booths and science forums (including the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors Conference) and developed various promotional material (e.g., information sheets, outbreak summary reports) for training purposes (e.g., Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors Conference); provided demonstrations based on outbreak summary reports to P/T nation-wide.
  • Completed draft narrative reviews of antimicrobial resistance in fish and shellfish and in fruits and vegetables.
  • Initiated sampling of imported and domestic finfish and shellfish in 7 provinces.
  • Initiated tri-departmental discussions on sharing fruit and vegetable samples and isolates.
  • Evaluated and conducted a preliminary implementation of next-generation laboratory methods in collaboration with US Center for Disease Control (CDC) and PHAC Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses (LFZ).
  • Increased capacity and initiated testing for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) testing.
  • MOU established between CFIA and PHAC (PulseNet Canada) to provide real-time surveillance and sub-typing of foodborne pathogens.
  • Health Canada/CFIA Working Group was established for targeted surveys, risk mapping and prioritization with respect to food safety.
  • Initiated food-borne outbreak summary module.
Canadian Institute of Health Research Strategic Priority Research Targeted Oversight 27.1 0.00 0.00 -- --
Total $489.4 $49.2 $38.15    

* It should be noted that the above Expected Results (Column 16) reflect immediate outcomes over a multi-year period for the Action Plan. As such, only preliminary progress on these initiatives is anticipated in FY 2008-09.

18. Comments on Variances:

Health Products
In 2008-2009, the targets for the reviews of pharmaceutical and generic drug submissions were missed as a result of submission volume increases, timing of submission filings, increases in pre-submission meetings, and post-market activities such as periodic safety update reports with conditions and health hazard evaluations. With respect to Medical Devices reviews, targets were missed due to a shortage of resources and increases in application volumes.

Health Canada will be able to respond with better tools (e.g., recall authorities, increase in fine and penalties) when safety incidents occur once the legislation to modernize the Food and Drugs Act is reintroduced to Parliament.

Consumer Products
2008-09 resources were allocated to the following high priority areas: i) drafting and tabling of the new Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), ii) increased capacity (regional product safety officers) to support compliance and enforcement activities.

Delays in the tabling of the new CCPSA legislation delayed progress on strategies which were dependant or partially dependant upon the legislation.

Food Safety
The first year of the Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan was considered a "ramp up" year for the CFIA. Significant efforts were put in place to bring on additional capacity and to provide the necessary training for new and re-assigned employees. Additionally, unforeseen events in food safety (i.e. listeriosis outbreak) resulted in the re-direction of expert resources and challenges in our ability to complete various initiatives. Funds lapsed are being carried forward.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

N/A

20. Contact information:

Hélène Quesnel, Director General
Policy Development Directorate
Strategic Policy Branch
Health Canada
Telephone: (613) 952-3484
E-mail: helene_quesnel@hc-sc.gc.ca

Weblinks


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:

Chemicals Management Plan

2. Name of Lead Department(s):

Health Canada/Environment Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity:

Sustainable Environmental Health

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

FY 2007-2008

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

FY 2010-2011

6. Federal Funding Allocation:

$299.2 M

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) is part of the Government's comprehensive environmental agenda and is managed jointly by Health Canada (HC) and Environment Canada (EC). The activities identified in this plan build on Canada's position as a global leader in the safe management of chemical substances and products, and focus upon timely action on key threats to health and the environment. It includes risk assessment, risk management, monitoring & surveillance, as well as research on chemicals which may be harmful to human health or the environment.

The CMP also puts more responsibility on industry through realistic and enforceable measures, stimulates innovation, and augment Canadian competitiveness in an international market that is increasingly focussed on chemical and product safety.

HC and EC collectively manage the CMP funding and ensure that it is aligned with human health and environmental priorities.

The following program areas were involved in CMP activities in 2008-2009:

In Health Canada:

  • Health Products and Food Branch:
    • Food Directorate
    • Policy, Planning, and International Affairs Directorate
  • Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:
    • Product Safety Programme
    • Safe Environments Programme
  • Pest Management Regulatory Agency

In Environment Canada:

  • Environmental Stewardship Branch
    • Chemical Sectors Directorate
    • Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Directorate
    • Public and Resources Sectors Directorate
    • Energy and Transportation Directorate
    • Environmental Protection Operations Directorate
  • Science and Technology Branch
    • Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
    • Wildlife and Landscape Sciences Directorate
    • Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate
    • Water Science and Technology Directorate
  • Enforcement Branch
  • Strategic Policy Branch
    • Economic Analysis Directorate

8. Shared Outcome(s):

High-level outcomes for managing the CMP include:

  • Canadians and their environment are protected from the harmful effects of chemicals;
  • identification, reduction, elimination, prevention or better management of chemicals substances and their use;
  • direction, collaboration and coordination of science and management activities;
  • understanding of the relative risks of chemicals substances and options to mitigate;
  • biomonitoring and environmental monitoring of substances;
  • risk assessment and risk management; and
  • informed stakeholders and the Canadian public.

9. Governance Structure(s):

  • HC shares the lead on the CMP with EC. The CMP consists of five inter-related program elements (listed below) to be planned, delivered and evaluated within an integrated framework, managed jointly by HC and EC.

    Governance is assured through a joint HC/EC Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee) and the Interdepartmental Chemicals Management Executive Committee (CMEC). These Committees were established to maximize the coordination of efforts, while minimizing duplication between the two departments.
  • The CMP ADM Committee provides strategic direction, coordination and a challenge function for the overall implementation and review of results and resource utilization on CMP initiatives. The Committee serves as a high-level forum for making recommendations on chemicals management to respective Deputy Ministers.

The CMEC is the key management committee at the Director General level to support the development of joint EC-HC strategic directions. It is also a formal body for joint consultations and cooperation to ensure timely and concerted actions in implementing the CMP work activities in an integrated fashion. The CMEC reports to the ADM Committee, providing recommendations on program implementation, results and resource utilization.


($ millions) Note: all funding ECD unless identified as ELCC
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2008-09 15. Actual Spending for 2008-09 16. Expected Results for 2008-09* 17. Results Achieved in 2008-09
Health Canada Sustainable Environmental Health

(Chemicals Management Sub-Activity)
a. Risk Assessment $9.9 M $2.5 M $2.5 M    
b. Risk Management $50.1 M $12.4 M $10.4 M1    
c. Research $26.6 M $5.9 M $2.2 M2    
d. Monitoring & Surveillance $34.0 M $5.3 M $5.3 M    
e. Program Management $5.4 M $1.5 M $1.4 M3    
Consumer Products a. Risk Assessment $12.6 M $2.4 M $2.3 M    
Pesticide Regulation a. Risk Assessment $9.9 M $2.5 M $2.5 M    
b. Risk Assessment $13.6 M $3.3 M $3.3 M    
Pesticide Regulation a. Risk Assessment $3.3 M $0.8 M $0.8 M    
b. Risk Assessment $12.5 M $2.4 M $2.4 M    
c. Research $2.5 M $0.4 M $0.4 M    
d. Monitoring & Surveillance $1.1 M $0.2 M $0.2 M    
Food & Nutrition a. Risk Assessment $3.8 M $0.8 M $0.1 M3    
b. Risk Assessment $6.2 M $1.3 M $1.6 M1    
c. Research $1.2 M $0.3 M $1.0 M1    
d. Monitoring & Surveillance   $1.0 M $0.4 M    
Environment Canada Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced a. Research $2.1 M $1.5 M $2.7 M    
b. Monitoring & Surveillance $26.4 M $6.9 M $6.9 M    
c. Risk Assessment $13.1 M $3.1 M $3.1 M    
d. Risk Management $64.9 M $16.1 M $15.2 M    
Sub-Total (Environment Canada) $106.5 M $27.6 M $27.9 M2    
Sub-Total (Health Canada) $192.7 M $42.0 M $38.3 M2    
Grand Total: $299.2 M $69.6 M $66.2 M    

16. Expected Results for 2008-2009 (From 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities):

Health Canada:

Increase level of Canadian public awareness of chemical management issues and actions being taken

Risk assessments are conducted and risk management objectives are met for regulations and other control instruments for substances and the products of biotechnology

Declining trends in levels of risk, adverse reactions, illnesses and injuries from toxic chemical substances in the environment and their use and/or the risk of exposure to Canadians

Enhanced knowledge of environmental hazards and evidence on which regulatory decisions are based

Environment Canada:

Direction, collaboration and coordination of science and management activities

Increased knowledge of the risks of toxic chemical substances through research and options to mitigate

Risk assessments conducted in a timely fashion as required

Risk management objectives are met, e.g. effective controls identified and implemented

Enhanced knowledge of stakeholders and the Canadian public regarding risk assessment/management activities, including knowledge on the effectiveness of control actions

Risks to Canadians' health and their environment posed by harmful chemicals are reduced

Canadians and their environment are protected from the harmful effects of chemicals

17. Results Achieved in 2008-2009:

A key component of the CMP is taking immediate action on the 200 highest priority chemicals. Through the "Challenge to Industry", information is being collected that will be used to make decisions regarding the best approach to protect Canadians and their environment from risks that certain substances may pose. These 200 substances were divided up into a number of Batches, to be assessed sequentially by 2010.

All of the CMP Risk Assessments that were scheduled for 2008-2009 were completed. These included the release of the final Screening Assessment Reports for Batches 1 to 3 and the draft Screening Assessment Reports for Batches 4 and 5. In total, draft risk assessment reports were published for 73 substances, or classes of substances, and final assessment reports for 54 substances, or classes of substances. In addition, a draft assessment report on Aluminum salts was published and a list of moderate priorities was developed for consultation. Hazard profiles for three petroleum streams (representing more than 50 high priority petroleum substances) were completed, as well as a draft assessment of heavy fuel oil.

Under the Challenge, the launch of Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) section 71 notices information collection for Batches 6-9 took place. A Compliance Promotion Plan for information gathering initiatives under the CMP is underway. Stakeholder information sessions were held in Halifax, St. John's, Winnipeg and Vancouver to explain the Challenge, including providing guidance on how to submit information and communicating timelines.

The development of risk management options for Challenge substances is on track. Risk management approaches were published for 22 toxic priority substances in three batches (1, 2 and 3), as well as risk management scopes for five potentially toxic substances in two batches (4 and 5). Scientific, legal and economic analyses and enforcement advice is being taken into consideration. Consultations with affected industry stakeholders and the Canadian public will continue throughout the program's life-cycle.

For substances where current exposure is not a risk, but where there are concerns that additional exposure could harm human health or the environment, the Significant New Activity (SNAc) provisions of CEPA provides for information gathering and assessment prior to the commencement of this significant new activity or use. The implementation of SNAcs for approximately 50 high priority health substances is on-going. Approximately 145 high environmental hazard chemical substances no longer in commerce have been addressed through this process.

The Government of Canada sought advice and input from the CMP Stakeholder Advisory Council (Non-governmental Organizations / Industry) on the implementation of the CMP, and the fostering of dialogue on issues pertaining to the CMP. The Government also sought council from the Challenge Advisory Panel on application of precaution in the CMP Challenge decisions.

Under the CMP Monitoring and Surveillance Fund, 12 multi-year projects were initiated. Preliminary results from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) were released, showing a significant decrease in blood lead levels since 1978. Draft background material for the CHMS Exposure Report is under development. Content for CHMS Cycle 2 is developed and finalized, with younger children included in the survey (targeted to begin in the fall 2009).

Health Canada initiated a Canadian maternal infant research study to monitor environmental chemicals in mothers and newborns. Recruitment for the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) project is underway at several sites across Canada. Results of the study will inform risk management decisions and identify potential sources of exposure and predictors of exposure to environmental chemicals.

National programs have been set up to monitor priority compounds in wastewater and landfills and environmental monitoring and surveillance programs of chemicals in air, water, sediments, fish and birds have been integrated and augmented across the country.

An extensive, competitive research program on CMP priorities has been initiated, with $2.5M being allocated in FY2008-2009. The CMP themes and priorities addressed included: effects, exposure, tool/model development, endocrine disrupting compounds, metals, mixtures, perfluorinated alkyl compounds, and medium priority substances (2600 substances) - classes of concern. A directed research program in the amount of $500K to address regulatory-determined gaps in Bisphenol A (BPA) knowledge was initiated as well. All funded projects have been reviewed for progress and recommended for continued funding in 2009-10.

Other CMP activities undertaken in FY 2008-2009 included:

  • Work to determine the list of substances to be included in an inventory update of CEPA's Domestic Substances List of chemicals known to be in Canadian commerce between 1984 and 1986 and work for determining the proposed approach for data collection for the next round of priorities.
  • Ongoing assessment of the 312 substances identified as requiring further screening (out of 1200 lower risk substances that are unlikely, given current evidence, to pose a threat to the environment).
  • Accelerating the re-evaluation of 401 older pesticides, to determine if these pesticides meet today's health and environmental standards (330 (82%) of the 401 older pesticide active ingredients were address as of March 31, 2009.)
  • Registered new pesticide products to replace products and/or uses no longer considered acceptable: fourteen new pesticide active ingredients were registered, four of which were joint reviews or work shares with other jurisdictions.
  • Pesticide companies are now required to report all health and environmental pesticide incidents to Health Canada. To date, over 2,000 pesticide incident reports have been received and posted on the web. Trends are assessed and regulatory action taken, when applicable.
  • Developing regulations and guidelines to address risks posed by toxic substances in existing consumer products and cosmetics, including work on regulations to prohibit BPA in baby bottles.
  • Working closely with stakeholders to finalize and implement a framework to revise the list of more than 9,000 substances used in products regulated under the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA) that were in commerce between January 1987 and September 2001, known as the In Commerce List (ICL). Substances on the revised ICL will be categorized, prioritized and undergo health and environmental risk assessments.
  • Consulting with stakeholders to develop Environmental Assessment regulations to address the potential environmental and human health impact of new substances contained in products regulated under the F&DA.
  • Investigation of existing and development, where necessary, of new Best Management Practices (BMPs) to mitigate exposure to the environment of substances/products regulated under the F&DA.
  • Ongoing identification of food related uses and/or occurrence for high priority chemicals completed with refinement proceeding as Challenge progresses.
  • Enhancement of food surveillance activities (planning, implementing, reporting), targeting contaminants of environmental origin to support standard setting.
  • Continued review of current F&DA Regulations relating to contaminants in food underway with efforts to modernize instruments regulating food borne contaminants.
  • Plans for the improvement and expansion of the CMP Web Site have been developed. The Chemical Substances website was managed and maintained timely postings and the development of additional communication products is underway.
  • Public opinion research was conducted which determined that 23% of Canadians have heard of the activities of the federal government on chemicals of which 7% are aware of the CMP.

18. Comments on Variances:

  • $2M was transferred from Sustainable Environment Health (Risk Management) to the Food and Nutrition program to support delivery of food-related risk assessment (additional $0.8M), risk management (additional $0.7M) and monitoring and surveillance (additional $0.5M) given the number of food-related chemicals assessed under CMP this year.
  • $2.5 M in Major Capital was carried over by Health Canada to 2009-2010 and $1.2M in research funding was transferred from HC to EC as part of pooled joint research funds held at Health Canada based on identified research priorities.
  • $100K was transferred from Sustainable Environment Health (Program Management) to the Health Products Program (2.1) to support coordination of input into CMP risk assessments.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

N/A

20. Contact information:

Suzanne Leppinen, Director
Horizontal and International Programs
Safe Environments Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
Telephone: (613) 941-8071
E-mail: suzanne_leppinen@hc-sc.gc.ca

Mark Cuddy, Director
Environmental Stewardship Branch Coordination
Environmental Stewardship Branch
Environment Canada
Telephone: (819) 994-7467
E-mail: Mark.Cuddy@ec.gc.ca


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:

Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products.

2. Name of Lead Department(s):

Health Canada (HC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity:

Pest Regulation

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

FY 2002-2003

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

FY 2008-2009

6. Federal Funding Allocation:

$143M

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The initiative is a part of the federal government's commitments as outlined in the Treasury Board submission Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products. The Treasury Board submission and its associated Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) describe the integrated approach by which initiatives will be measured, managed and reported throughout their life cycle. An important element of the commitments made through the Treasury Board submission is that stakeholders and public will be kept informed through a transparent management system. The participating departments will work together for shared outcomes; measure performance on delivery; and review progress achieved. This initiative incorporates efforts of six federal government partners to increase public and stakeholder confidence in the pesticide regulatory system, to protect health and environment, and to increase the competitiveness of the agri-food and forestry sectors. Research and monitoring in the area of pesticides is being coordinated with their regulation.

Under this initiative, the presence and effects of pesticides in the environment, in marine and freshwater ecosystems, and in the forest environment are being monitored. The initiative enhances monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residue limits in foods, in feed, of pesticide residues in fertilizers, and pesticide guarantee verification for fertilizer-pesticide combinations. Reduced-risk pesticides and biological pesticides for forestry are being developed and their use facilitated. Commodity-based risk reduction strategies for the agriculture and agri-food sector are being developed and implemented. Programs improving access to agricultural minor-use pesticides and reduced-risk pesticides for agricultural use are being established. Research to support the introduction of minor-use pesticides that pose a reduced risk to the environment is being conducted. A reporting system to track adverse effects of pesticides has been developed, and information on these effects will be collected and recorded. Collectively, this work is being conducted to achieve public confidence in increased conservation and protection of human health and the environment while contributing to the competitiveness of Canada's agricultural sector.

The information presented in this table has been organized along the following three main themes of this initiative:

  • Research and Monitoring, carried out by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the Department of Fisheries and Ocean (DFO), Environment Canada (EC), Health Canada's PMRA, and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)
  • Developing and Implementing of Commodity Specific Risk Reduction Strategies, carried out by AAFC and Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA).
  • Generation of Data to Support the Registration of Reduced Risk and Minor Use Pesticides for the Agricultural and Agri-food Sector and Reduced Risk Pesticides and Biopesticides for Forestry, carried out by AAFC, HC's PMRA and NRCan.

8. Shared Outcomes:

Immediate Outcomes:

  • increased knowledge by the PMRA about pesticides and alternatives;
  • registration of reduced-risk and minor-use pesticides;
  • access to safer pest management practices and products; and
  • compliance for safer food, feed, fertilizers and fertilizer-pesticide combinations.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • a regulatory system that better protects health and environment and contributes to the competitiveness of the agri-food and forestry sectors;
  • use of safer pest management practices and products; and
  • increased transparency of pesticide regulation.

Final Outcome:

  • Increased public and stakeholder confidence in pesticide regulation, protected health and environment as well as increased competitiveness of the agri-food and forestry sectors.

9. Governance Structure(s):

  • Health Canada (HC) -- Executive Director of PMRA
  • Environment Canada (EC) -- Director General, Conservation Strategies Directorate and Director General, National Programs Directorate
  • Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) -- Director General, Fisheries, Environment and Biodiversity Science
  • Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) -- Director General, Science Branch, Canadian Forest Service
  • Agriculture and Agri-Foods Canada (AAFC) -- Assistant Deputy Minister of the Farm Financial Programs Branch and Assistant Deputy Minister of Research Branch, Executive Director, Pest Management Centre
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) -- Vice President, Programs
  • Deputy Minister Committee (DMC) -- Deputy Minister from Health and AAFC
  • AAFC / PMRA Joint Management Committee: Assistant Deputy Minister of the Farm Financial Programs Branch, AAFC, Assistant Deputy Minister of Research Branch, AAFC, Executive Director, PMRA, Health Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat (ex-officio member).

($ millions) Note: all funding ECD unless identified as ELCC
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2008-09 15. Actual Spending for 2008-09 16. Expected Results for 2008-09* 17. Results Achieved in 2008-09
I. Research and Monitoring
AAFC   (a) Conducting research to support the introduction of minor-use pesticides that pose a reduced risk to the environment. $8.0M $0

Funding associated with this activity sunset as of March 11, 2008.
$0 N/A N/A
CFIA Plant Health Risks and Production Systems (b) Enhanced monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residue limits in food and feed. $2.7M $0.25M $0.25M Laboratory testing of samples consumed by children (500 to 1000 samples).

Publish results in a public report.

Follow-up inspections for non-compliant samples with the aim of preventing similar occurrence in the future.

Food recalls as required, for risk mitigation and removal of hazardous foods from the market place
The objectives were to assess the compliance of foods consumed by children aged 1 to 15 years. The foods tested represented a random selection of foods marketed to, consumed in greater quantity by, or first eaten by children in the targeted age group. The pesticide residue results showed a high level of compliance with established limits (> 98%). There was no trend observed in pesticide levels with commodity, brand name, residue or country of origin.

The results to be published in a public report pending final approval.

The survey results showed nothing of concern requiring follow-up inspections for non-compliant samples and food recalls and removal of hazardous foods.
CFIA Plant Health Risks and Production Systems (c) Enhanced monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residues in fertilizers and pesticide guarantee verification in fertilizer-pesticide. $2.4M $0.25M $0.17M Develop monitoring and surveillance policies and programs, and advise inspectors on appropriate follow-up. Inspection Memorandum I-4-93, a document identifying inspection activities and sample quotas for the year, was provided to inspection staff. The Fertilizer Inspection Manual was reviewed, updated and distributed to inspection staff. To facilitate label verification in the field and maintain consistency, a list of all registered fertilizer-pesticides and labels were updated and made available to inspectors. Training was provided across Canada to inspection staff on enforcement and non-compliance procedures, as well as on label verification, to improve consistency in the delivery of inspection activities. Inspectors were guided on the significance of sample analytical results and on appropriate non-compliance follow-up procedures.

A new inspection program (Program 4C) was implemented to increase awareness and compliance of products requiring registration. Distribution sites and major warehouses were targeted to identify and detain non-registered fertilizer-pesticides.

A new inspection program (Program 5C) was implemented to address the complaints that certain lawn care companies are allegedly adding pesticides to their lawn fertilizer treatments without disclosing this information to consumers.

Registration guidelines for fertilizer-pesticides were finalized and posted on the Fertilizer Section's webpage.

Checklists were created to increase efficacy and uniformity in product registration submission (for companies) and review (for evaluators).
Increase interaction with the PMRA to obtain the most up-to date pesticide safety and labelling information. The CFIA and PMRA worked together on the review and update of 3 fertilizer-pesticide Brochures of the Compendium of Fertilizer-Use Pesticides (CFUP).

CFIA participated in the Summative Evaluation of the Building Public Confidence TB Initiative.
Update the Compendium of Fertilizer-Use Pesticides (CFUP), which contains information regarding registration, guarantees and proper labelling. Various updates were made to the CFUP (introduction, list of Brochures, Brochures content, Approved Brands list) to ensure compliance with PMRA's label information and re-evaluations of active ingredients.
Work to develop regulatory changes to facilitate updating the Compendium more regularly, and, if successful, provide Compendium updates more regularly to the producers of mixtures and to the CFIA's inspection staff. Substantiation documentation was developed for a regulatory amendment to change the definition of the CFUP in the Fertilizer Regulations to allow publication of its 3rd Edition.
Sample fertilizer-pesticide combinations to verify guarantees.

Sample fertilizers suspected to be contaminated with pesticides.
Inspectors took 80 samples of fertilizer-pesticides for pesticide guarantee verification, 69 samples of fertilizer products for the presence of pesticide residues, and 10 samples of fertilizer products for the lawn care companies monitoring program. The decrease in number of samples taken is due to the reduced availability of products containing pesticides following the ban on cosmetic use pesticides in various provinces.
Conduct investigation and compliance activities (anticipated based on sampling and inspection frequencies). 9 fertilizer-pesticides were sampled for pesticide guarantee verification under our Complaint and Compliance Inspection Program as they were flagged as being poor performers from previous fiscal years.

Also, 12 fertilizer-pesticides were verified for registration compliance.

Follow-up actions on the 15 non-compliant samples included information letters, warning letters, product detentions and on-site visits.
Analyse samples submitted by inspectors and develop new methods, as required. The number of samples analyzed was 84 for pesticide guarantee verification, 67 for pesticide contamination audit, and 10 for the lawn care companies' audit.

The compliance rate was 82% for the verification of pesticide guarantees in fertilizer-pesticides and 100% for the verification of pesticide residues in fertilizers.

Method development was conducted to simplify and speed-up the extraction/clean-up process for the determination of pesticide residues in fertilizer samples.
DFO Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems (d) Monitor and research the presence and effects of pesticides in marine and freshwater ecosystems. $7.9M $1M $1M DFO will provide the PMRA with final reports on regional National Fund projects. These research projects will be focused to address key research knowledge gaps, as they were in 2008-2009, after consultation with PMRA.
  • DFO will provide the PMRA with a yearly report from DFO's Centre for Environmental Research on Pesticides (CERP).
  • CERP will conduct laboratory and field based studies to quantify impacts of exposure to priority pesticides on fish and fish habitat. Impacts will be quantified in terms of reproductive success, growth and energy metabolism. Priority research will be identified in consultation with PMRA.
  • After consultation with the PMRA and other agencies, DFO will design and initiate new research projects related to the theme "Potential Impacts of Pesticides on Fisheries Resources".
  • Final report is ongoing. Anticipated delivery to PMRA is October 2009 for the 2008-09 projects.
  • CEPR has conducted laboratory exposures of fathead minnows to environmentally relevant concentrations of glyphosate, chloropyralid, chloropyrifos and atrazine. Growth and survival have been measured and fish are being reared to reproductive age to assess reproductive potential. A summary of these studies will be included in the October report to PMRA.
  • After consultation with PMRA, it was determined that DFO could provide useful results regarding the effects of mixtures of chloropyralid, chloropyrifos and glyphosate on fish and fish habitat. Benthic invertebrates were specified as a useful surrogate measure of fish habitat quality.
EC Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized (e) Monitor and research on presence and effects of pesticides in the environment. $7.6M $1.0M $1.0M EC's commitment to the BPC will continue for 2008-09. Based on Cycle 1 results and the preliminary results in the first year of Cycle 2, EC will set out to deliver on a schedule of research and monitoring projects on the presence and impacts of pesticide in the environment. The Pesticide Program Coordinating Committee (which has PMRA membership) will continue to assess priorities for pesticide science at EC. Specifically, EC will:
  • continue its research and monitoring activities;
  • continue to support research and monitoring to determine the environmental concentrations and impacts of in-use pesticides in the environment;
  • produce an annual report and make it available to the PMRA;
  • provide science advice to meet regulatory data gaps and knowledge deficiency as well as to improve risk assessment methods; and
  • provide support and advice to PMRA on pesticide related science policy and issue management.

These priorities will be delivered through various research, monitoring and surveillance activities. In the coming year, status updates will be provided on the following:

Air surveillance: Investigations on downwind concentrations of compounds that are deemed to have a high mammalian or avian toxicity and investigations on ambient air concentrations in regions of high pesticide use.

Water surveillance: The focus will continue on high risk priority watersheds where data gaps exist. Linking water monitoring to watershed modelling ((in association with the National Agri-Environmental Standards Initiative (NAESI)) will provide for wider results coverage through an increase in predictive power and assisting in the rationalization of water monitoring sampling designs. There will be a greater focus on specific issues, e.g., wetlands, urban areas, source waters, agriculture and priority pesticides (through previous monitoring and with interpretation tools such as the modified 'A Pesticide Priority Listing Evaluation Scheme' (APPLES), a prioritization tool developed with the PMRA). There will also be a concerted effort for continued efforts of establishment and assessment of trends especially as they relate to performance outcomes.

Aquatic effects: The focus of the aquatic effects work will be on integrating the effects of pesticides on aquatic food webs (including multitrophic-level) with exposure (including fate). Using novel assessment approaches, new data for a range of insecticides, herbicides and fungicides widely used in Canada, and commonly encountered in field surveillance programs will be generated. Species, populations and community resiliency may also be evaluated. The potential biological impact from pesticide runoff in high risk situation may be explored for the purpose of assessing the effectiveness of risk mitigation measures.

The impacts of pesticide mixtures (linked to current NAESI deliverable) and cumulative effects investigations (e.g., nutrients), along with the impact assessments following chronic and pulse exposures may also be considered.

Terrestrial effects: There will be a concerted effort to focus the current terrestrial deliverables for birds and mammals on Species at Risk Act (SARA) -listed species and other species of concern, as well as on areas of perennial conflict between wildlife and pesticide use such as the lower BC Mainland. Priority will be given to pesticides causing acute intoxications (e.g. cholinesterase-inhibiting insecticides) or broad contamination of terrestrial food chains (second generation anticoagulant rodenticides). Efforts will be focused also on comparing dietary and non-dietary (dermal, preening and inhalation) routes of exposure to pesticides in order to improve our ability to assess new pesticides and better predict impacts. For terrestrial life-stages of amphibians, the effort will be to continue work on an amphibian test protocol. For plants, the efforts will focus on improvement of routine phytotoxicity tests in greenhouses and on risk assessment with validation through in-situ research.

EC will also continue to work with the PMRA in the implementation of the existing EC/PMRA Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in order to better integrate and coordinate research with regulation. The MOU has four components, Science Policy, Knowledge Generation, Issue Management and Compliance Promotion and Enforcement.

EC will continue working on providing leadership in the development and implementation of a federal, coordinated pesticides science strategy for research and monitoring through the Interdepartmental Committee. Furthermore, EC will participate in the proposed 6NR MOU.

EC will continue to contribute to PMRA's pesticide assessments where appropriate, will coordinate with PMRA on the development of environmental quality guidelines and will continue to provide science/policy advice on key Government of Canada policies as they relate to pesticide management and use in Canada.
EC was able to meet its commitments under the BPC initiative. We maintained activities addressing the following areas:
  • science policy;
  • research and monitoring;
  • issue management and communications;
  • enforcement and compliance promotion
  • EC maintained its coordination efforts for the third and final year of the 2nd Cycle of the PSF to further support research and monitoring projects on the presence and effects of pesticides in the environment.
  • EC supported the 10 on-going research and monitoring projects building on existing knowledge from previous years, and related projects.
  • EC is currently participating in the Building Public Confidence Memorandum to Cabinet - Treasury Board Summative Evaluation.
  • EC continued to provide ongoing science advice to PMRA to meet regulatory data gaps, reduce knowledge deficiencies, and improve risk assessment methods. EC provided significant input into PMRA's activities regarding:
    • Provided comments on the re-evaluation of endosulfan
    • Responded to a PMRA request on quintozene
    • Pesticide concentrations in surface water, current monitoring practices, new initiatives, and trends of commonly found pesticides
  • EC coordinated PSF projects with the completion of the national agri-environmental standards initiative (NAESI), an initiative under the Agricultural Policy Framework (PSF water monitoring data used with NAESI watershed modelling, NAESI performance standards used to create Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) water quality guidelines).
  • EC showcased PSF achievements at national and international venues in order to facilitate the exchange of information that will help achieve PSF objectives and use of this information to inform decision makers and Canadians.
  • EC presented outcomes and results of PSF projects to
    • Senior EC management.
    • 6NR pesticide workshop and meetings.
    • Pesticide FPT Committee at various workshop and meetings.
  • EC maintained its relationship to meet with industry in order to promote the development of Canadian Environmental Quality Guidelines of pesticides.
  • EC chairs the CCME pesticide sub-committee involving key partners (PMRA, industry and the jurisdictions). Largely through EC's efforts, the sub-committee has proposed a revised water quality guideline for carbaryl, endosulfan, glyphosate, and 2,4-D, as well as an approach to develop benchmarks for pesticides with small datasets.
  • In terms of publications, EC scientists continue to produce a number of scientific peer-reviewed publications and presentations.
  • EC established a 3rd cycle of research and monitoring of pesticide presence and impacts in the environment. PSF Cycle 3 priorities were established based on GoC priorities as well as previous knowledge.
  • Under PSF Cycle 3, EC has set out to deliver on 12 new research projects and two monitoring projects that are linked to regulatory decision-making priorities for the GoC.
HC(PMRA) Pesticide Regulation (f) Linking pesticide regulation and research. $4.2M $0.8M $0.8M Identify and communicate annually PMRA's research and monitoring priorities to 6NR partners through regular meetings and other avenues, as needed. Continue facilitating discussion to identify linkages between 6NR research results and their use in regulatory decision making by PMRA, as well as opportunities for collaborative research among the 6NR.

Facilitate the two-way communication and coordination between regulation and research between governments within Canada (through PMRA's FPT Committee) and internationally as well as with the private and academic sectors, through presentations linking research and regulation at regional, national and international meetings (e.g., through SETAC, CSA, IUPAC).

Improve risk assessment procedures particularly in the area of environmental fate prediction (e.g., water modelling and exposure assessment). Strengthen PMRA's capacity to implement probabilistic risk assessment methods where appropriate.
There were several 6NR working group meetings and one DG level meeting in 2008-09. PMRA updated their research needs and communicated to 6NR. PMRA is in regular communication with 6NR researchers and/or program managers to help prioritize pest or pesticide related research and monitoring. PMRA shares information of its re-evaluation timetable in order to help target research and monitoring and ensure that data are generated to coincide with re-evaluation timelines.

On an on going basis PMRA consults with scientists in 6NR departments on issues of mutual concern. During the 2008-09 fiscal year, PMRA continued to incorporate results of monitoring into risk assessments, particularly re-evaluations and to use research results to refine risk assessment methods.

In 2008-2009 the PMRA presented its methodologies and research needs at numerous regional, national and international meetings (e.g., OECD, NAFTA, PMRA FPT Committees, Conferences, etc). In addition, the PMRA made presentations to stakeholders explaining how research results are used in pesticide regulation.

Within the Environmental Assessment directorate, the probabilistic risk assessment working group continues to increase its capacity to conduct and review probabilistic risk assessments as needed. The group continues to interact with counterparts in 6NR depts and other jurisdictions (EPA, EU) to exchange information, tools, and approaches for advanced risk assessments including the use of probabilistic methods.

PMRA continues to work with 6NR partners towards refining approaches to water modelling for use in risk assessments.
HC (PMRA) Pesticide Regulation (g) Conducting research to support the introduction of minor-use pesticides that pose a reduced risk to the environment. $3.5M $0

Funding associated with this activity sunset as of March 21, 2008
$0 N/A N/A
NRCan Adapting to a changing climate and hazard risk management (h) Research and monitor pesticides in the forest environment. $3.5M

(Funds allocated under the CFS pest management program through its own funding, outside of the BPC program)
$0.5M

(BPC funds $1.0M split between 2 CFS projects reduced by reallocation to $0.7M now split $0.3M and $0.4M)
$0.3M Coordination of the Enhanced Pest Management Program (EPMM). Review of final reports of two projects funded for one year only.

Review of proposals, and fund selected projects including: Environmental impact assessment of alternative pest control options, Modeling wildlife, exposure and risk relative to systemic insecticides, and Updating the Edaphic Indicator Research Tool.

Sponsor and provision of input into the 2008 National Forest Pest Management Forum.

Continuation, integration and coordination of NRCan work with the activities of the PMRA and other members of the 6NR Working Group on Pesticides.

Provision of input in the 2008 Summative Evaluation.
Reports were reviewed and funds provided to two projects: a) Adapting a spray advisor decision support system to Canadian conditions, and b) Analysis of the environmental fate and effects of Neem applied as a systemic insecticide.

NRCan researcher presented a scientific paper titled "Protecting Aquatic Habitats in Natural & Urban Forest Landscapes", at the 6NR Workshop on Habitat Protection (April, 2008). At this workshop, participants initiated discussions on a potential PMRA Policy for Habitat Protection

NRCan sponsored and provided input into the 2008 National Forest Pest Management Forum (December 2008). Presentations on NRCan's pest management research were made at the Forum and at SERG International - A Partnership in Forest Pest Management Research Workshop (February 2009). At both these meetings NRCan met with PMRA, other federal and provincial departments, pest managers, industry and other stakeholders.

The PMRA is currently committed to engage with NRCan and other participating departments and agencies, in the planning and completion of the BPC Summative Evaluation, now due in December 2009.
II. Developing and Implementing commodity specific risk reduction strategies
AAFC PAA currently under review (a) Commodity based risk reduction strategies $19.3M $2.5M $1.0M Fiscal year 2008-09 is a transition year from APF to Growing Forward policy. Discussions on how the programs will evolve will take place during the course of the year at which time associated future funding decision will be made.

Pesticide risks to health and the environment assessed for grower identified priority pest management issues and priority risk issues selected for support in coordination with PMRA

Development and implementation of up to 4 risk reduction strategies based on pesticide risk priorities

Stakeholders engaged in pesticide risk solution development for priority pesticide risk issues

Engage stakeholders to develop a review and updating program for published crop profiles and update up to 6 previously published profiles

Collection of data for up to 6 crops through regional focus groups for the purpose of updating profiles and tracking success of the program

Continued funding for ongoing research and implementation projects
7 priority pest management issues identified for pesticide risk reduction strategy work initiation or continuation
  • 4 strategies developed in priority areas
  • Stakeholders engaged in 4 working groups to develop reduced risk pest management solutions
  • Total of 14 new tools and practices made available to growers during FY 08-09 including four new and one improved decision support tools to reduce / optimize pesticide use (fusarium headblight, canola flea beetle); four technology transfer factsheets published for producers (carrot trimmer, weed control); one new tool (drift recovery sprayer) developed for use in grape production; four biopesticides registered in Canada for the first time, and available to growers
  • 3 reduced risk product dossiers submitted to PMRA: BioSave 10 LP, Agriphage (Category A), GF-120 (label expansion)
  • Feasibility study undertaken for sustainable approach to crop profile data collection and maintenance; finalization and publication of 4 crop profiles
HC(PMRA) Pesticide Regulation (a) Commodity based risk reduction strategies $25.7M $4.0M $4.0M Ongoing consultations with stakeholders to assist PMRA in determining priority regulatory needs. Work share with other government departments and 6NR.

Work on pesticide risk indicator: consult, build and validate database

Together with AAFC and other Directorates at PMRA, assess the risk reduction potential of stakeholder identified pest management priorities. Workshare with AAFC on new crop profiles and issue documents and finalising existing documents. Work with AAFC to define areas where cross commodity work can be accomplished.

Risk reduction strategies will be developed for issues that have a demonstrated potential to reduce pesticide risk. Where possible, strategies will be developed based on common themes rather than be restricted to single pest-crop combinations. Stakeholder consultations will be held throughout the year as required.
A NAFTA project dealing with trade issues has been initiated at HC entitled the "US/Can Grower priority Database". This database will identify trade barriers which exist due to regulatory or maximum reside limit differences between Canada and the Unites States and will identify Canadian grower's priority regulatory needs. PMRA has been consulting with stakeholders to determine their priority registration needs on a commodity group basis.

Phase 1 of the pesticide risk indicator model (development) is complete. Phase 2 (publication of technical and public documents) is planned for 2009/2010 and further enhancements are under development.

PMRA finalized the commodity based risk reduction strategies for 18 of the commodity based projects. The potential to reduce risk was assessed for all stakeholder identified priorities. AAFC and PMRA continue to work cooperatively on the biopesticide initiative. Quarterly meetings are held with AAFC to assess where cross commodity collaboration can occur.

An organophosphate replacement strategy with lowbush and highbush blueberry has been initiated. As part of this strategy work, PMRA facilitated communication between stakeholders (registrants, researchers, grower organizations and provincial and federal government) to identify pest management priorities and potential solutions. A potato silver scurf strategy is ongoing.
III. Generation of data to support the registration of reduced-risk and minor-use pesticides for the agricultural and agri-food sector and reduced-risk pesticides and biopesticides for forestry
AAFC   (a) Improving access to agricultural minor-use pesticides, and reduced-risk pesticides for agricultural use. $33.7M $0

Funding associated with this activity sunset as of March 21, 2008
$0 N/A N/A
HC(PMRA) Pesticide Regulation (a) Improving access to agricultural minor-use pesticides, and reduced-risk pesticides for agricultural use. $20.8M $0.0

Funding associated with this activity sunset as of March 21, 2008
$0 N/A N/A
NRCan Adapting to a changing climate and hazard risk management (b) Develop and facilitate the use of reduced-risk pesticides and biological pesticides for forestry. $4.1M

(Funds allocated under the CFS pest management program through its own funding, outside of the BPC program)
$0.5M

(BPC funds $1.0M split between 2 CFS projects reduced by reallocation to $0.7M now split $0.3M and $0.4M)
$0.4M If first year progress reports are satisfactory, fund the following three EPMM proposals for a second year 2008-2009: A pheromone-based management method for slowing the spread of the spruce longhorn beetle;
Autodissémination de champignons entomopathogenes pour le contrôle des populations d`insectes forestiers indigènes et exotiques nuisible;

Towards the development of a Bacillus thuringiensis product for control of sawflies Provision of funds for the salary and work of the CFS minor use research coordinator housed at the Agriculture Minor Use Centre Ottawa. Coordination and facilitation of registration of minor use pesticides for uses in woody ornamental, urban forest, and woodlands. Liaison with the PMRA and other government departments on pest management issues.

Input into Implementation of the 6NR Work Plan on Pesticides.
Three projects were funded for a second year in 2008-2009, on insect pheromones, entomopathogens, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) products for the control of forest pests.

Presentations/Reports were made to stakeholders at the 2008 National Forest Pest Management Forum in Ottawa and at the 2009 SERG-International Workshop in Winnipeg.

Funds were provided for the salary and work of an NRCan-CFS scientist housed at AAFC's Minor Use Centre in Ottawa. NRCan-CFS collaborated with AAFC to obtain data needed for the PMRA registration of minor use pesticides for their use on woody ornamentals, urban forests, and woodlands.

Coordinated 18 projects on outdoor woody ornamentals including poplars, Christmas trees, and reforestation nurseries.

Made four final submissions to PMRA and/or registrants for registrations of pest control products for minor uses on reforestation nurseries, poplars and outdoor woody ornamentals.

NRCan also collaborated with the USDA Forest Service on registration of a pheromone that attracts spruce and Douglas fir bark beetle. As a result, NRCan is the Canadian registrant of the pheromone.

NRCan provided input into the Implementation of the 6NR Work Plan on Pesticides.

18. Comments on Variances:

N/A

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

N/A

20. Contact information:

Bev Cardinal, Manager
Planning and Special Initiatives Section
Strategic Planning, Financial and Business Operations Division
Pest Management Regulatory Agency
Health Canada
Telephone: 613-736-3420
E-mail: bev_cardinal@hc-sc.gc.ca


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:

Federal Tobacco Control Strategy 2007-2011

2. Name of Lead Department(s):

Health Canada (HC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity:

Substance Use and Abuse

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

2001-02

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

2007-08 and ongoing

6. Federal Funding Allocation:

$361.0M

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) establishes a framework for a comprehensive, integrated, and multi-faceted approach to tobacco control. It focuses on four mutually reinforcing components: protection, prevention, cessation and product regulation.

The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) 2007-2011 is driven by the longstanding commitment of the government of Canada to reduce the serious and adverse health effects of tobacco for Canadians. FTCS 2007-2011 is lead by Health Canada and involves several federal partners.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The goal of the FCTS 2007-2011 is to reduce overall smoking prevalence from 19% in 2005 to 12% by 2011. The FTCS 2007-2011 objectives are to:

  • Reduce the prevalence of Canadian youth (15-17) who smoke from 15% to 9%;
  • Increase the number of adult Canadians who quit smoking by 1.5 million;
  • Reduce the prevalence of Canadians exposed daily to second-hand smoke from 28% to 20%;
  • Examine the next generation of tobacco control policy in Canada;
  • Contribute to the global implementation of the WHO FCTC; and
  • Monitor and assess contraband tobacco activities and enhance compliance.

9. Governance Structure(s):

Resources for the implementation of the FTCS were allocated to a number of departments and agencies. Health Canada (HC) is the lead department in the FTCS and is responsible for regulating the manufacture, sale, labelling and promotion of tobacco products as well as developing, implementing and promoting initiatives that reduce or prevent the negative health impacts associated with smoking.

The partner departments and agencies are:

  • Public Safety Canada (PS) (formerly Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada) - administers contribution funding for monitoring activities in connection with determining levels of contraband tobacco activity. The Department also provides policy advice and support on smuggling issues.
  • Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (formerly Department of Justice) - Is responsible for monitoring federal fines imposed in relation to tobacco and other types of offences, and for enforcing and recovering outstanding fines.
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) - is responsible for the enforcement of laws in relation to the international movement of tobacco products (including the illicit manufacture, distribution or possession of contraband tobacco products).
  • Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) (formerly the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency) - is responsible for ensuring the assessment and collection of tobacco taxes and monitoring tobacco exports.
  • Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) (previously part of the former Canada Customs and Revenue Agency) - is responsible for monitoring and assessing the level of contraband tobacco in Canada and internationally, reporting to the Dept of Finance to assist in the development of sound tax policies.

($ millions) Note: all funding ECD unless identified as ELCC
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2008-09 15. Actual Spending for 2008-09 16. Expected Results for 2008-09* 17. Results Achieved in 2008-09
1. HC HC

3.4 Substance Use and Abuse
FTCS $284.2M $78.9M $67.6M Complete an evaluation to assess the impacts of the first five years of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy.

Work with 8 regional offices and partner with several National Aboriginal Organizations across Canada for program delivery and development.
A summative (impact-based) evaluation of the FTCS (2001-06) including all Tobacco Control Programme components - (i.e. contribution funded projects, regulatory interventions, research and policy development); First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB); International Affairs Directorate (IAD); and federal partners was conducted.

HC supported over 100 First Nations and Inuit projects at the national, regional and community level aimed at cessation and tobacco awareness with a particular emphasis on youth, young adults and pregnant women.
2. PS

Regulations and Compliance
FTCS $3.0M $0.6M $0.6M Enhanced partnership arrangement with Akwesasne Mohawk Police.

Leading in preparation and participation in the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Controls negotiations for a Protocol in illicit tobacco.
See Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners above.

Public Safety leads the Canadian Delegation in the preparation and participation to negotiate a global Protocol to reduce illicit tobacco which takes place in Geneva. Two sessions of the Intergovernmental Negotiating Body (INB) have taken place, with the third session in June/July 2009.
3. ODPP

Regulations and Compliance
FTCS $11.2M $2.2M $2.3M
  1. Prioritize fine recovery for fines ordered under cigarette contraband and tobacco sales to youth convictions.
  2. Increase the number of fines satisfied by a minimum of 15 percent.
  3. Analyze trends and prioritize the most effective and least costly recovery methods.
  4. Prioritize payment of fines over incarceration, but enhance enforcement measures when appropriate.
  5. Reduce costs to client departments in regards to fees incurred for Crown counsel attending motions for extensions in the delay to pay a fine.
  1. The number of cigarette contraband and other tobacco-related fines has gone from 1,920 files in 2002 to 892 files as of March 31, 2007, a reduction of over 53.5 percent. There were 826 files in the inventory in 2005-06. This year's figure is mostly due to the increase in convictions for selling tobacco to minors and an increase in cigarette contraband across the country which has resulted in more convictions.
  2. The number of fines that were satisfied as of March 2007 was 423 as compared to 491 in March 2006, a reduction of 14 percent. This may be due to the fact that additional emphasis is being given to attempting to recover long-standing fines which by nature are more difficult to recover.
  3. Priority is given to the most cost-effective methods of recovery, in particular, demand letters, telephone calls and negotiating payment agreements. To date, approximately 27,000 interventions have been made, resulting in the recovery of over $32 M in past-due fines as of March 2007.
  4. Incarcerations for non-payment of fines totalled 66 in 2007 as compared to 60 in 2006. Of these 66 offenders, 15 subsequently opted to pay their fine rather than remain in incarceration.
  5. Crown counsel assigned to Fine Recovery Units oppose all motions for payment extensions heard at court, resulting in a decrease in counsel fees to client departments for these hearings.
4. RCMP

Regulations and Compliance.
FTCS $8.6M $1.7M $834.492
  1. Provide the Department of Finance, Health Canada and other partners with current updates on illicit tobacco trade activities.
  2. The RCMP monitors illegal activities at and along the CAN/U.S. border through the use of strategic detection and surveillance equipment.
  3. Expand cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners.
  1. Regular reports on the illicit tobacco situation were provided to Finance and Health Canada. Side bar reports and presentations provided to other partners and key Ministerial entities upon request, such as the Government of Canada Task Force on Illicit Tobacco, the Senior Revenue Officials Conference and the Interprovincial Investigations Conference. The Tobacco Analysts also attend regular meetings to brief the Department of Finance.
  2. Improved border security through the use of sophisticated technology which permits detection and monitoring of illegal border intrusions, resulting in vital intelligence.
  3. Co-hosted the 2008 Joint U.S./Canada Tobacco Diversion Workshop with American and Canadian agencies and presently preparing the 2009 Workshop to be held in September 2009. One National Tobacco Analyst met, in February 2009, with some American Law Enforcement personnel (U.S. Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms Agency) to share investigative information about a major tobacco manufacturer who may be involved in illegal activities in Canada and the U.S. Two National Tobacco Analysts gave a total of 8 information sessions on the illicit trade of tobacco at four law enforcement courses/workshops in Canada and the U.S.
5. CRA / CBSA

PA1 Taxpayer and Business Assistance

(Total allotment to CRA, includes Customs/CBSA $50.0M and $4.0M to CRA)

Assessment and Benefit Client Services
Branch (previously Assessment and Collections)

Excise and GST/HST Rulings Directorate/ Legislative Policy and Regulatory Affairs Branch
FTCS $54.0M $10.8M (10.0M to CBSA and $0.8 to CRA allocated between two CRA areas.  
  1. Systems adjustments and maintenance to reflect the legislative changes that affect rates, reporting and refunds as well as program changes to include duty-free shops and ships stores.
  2. Verify Export activity.
  3. Expand cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners.
  4. Work with stakeholders to monitor and assess the effectiveness of measures used to reduce contraband tobacco.
  5. Provide the Department of Finance with advice in the development of policy and the determination of the magnitude and timing of future tax increases.
  6. Support RCMP enforcement activity.
  1. Systems and reporting capabilities were maintained as required to meet program requirements.
  2. The Tobacco Enforcement Verification Program (field) effectively monitored the movement of exported tobacco products.
  3. Co-hosted the 2008 Joint U.S./Canada Tobacco Diversion Workshop with American and Canadian agencies and presently preparing the 2009 Workshop to be held in September 2009. One National Tobacco Analyst met, in February 2009, with some American Law Enforcement personnel (U.S. Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms Agency) to share investigative information about a major tobacco manufacturer who may be involved in illegal activities in Canada and the U.S. Two National Tobacco Analysts gave a total of 8 information sessions on the illicit trade of tobacco at four law enforcement courses/workshops in Canada and the U.S.
  4. Participated on a number of committees dealing with the monitoring and control of tobacco products, including those dealing with interprovincial issues. Co-hosted the Tobacco Diversion Workshop with Canadian and U.S. participation.
  5. Met with the Department of Finance as required. Provided industry and product information.
  6. Supported RCMP enforcement activity by providing information about specific tobacco transactions as well as expert testimony and affidavits.
5. CRA / CBSA

PA1 Taxpayer and Business Assistance

(Total allotment to CRA, includes Customs/CBSA $50.0M and $4.0M to CRA)

Assessment and Benefit Client Services
Branch (previously Assessment and Collections)

Excise and GST/HST Rulings Directorate/ Legislative Policy and Regulatory Affairs Branch
FTCS $54.0M $10.8M (10.0M to CBSA and $0.8 to CRA allocated between two CRA areas.  
  1. Systems adjustments and maintenance to reflect the legislative changes that affect rates, reporting and refunds as well as program changes to include duty-free shops and ships stores.
  2. Verify Export activity.
  3. Expand cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners.
  4. Work with stakeholders to monitor and assess the effectiveness of measures used to reduce contraband tobacco.
  5. Provide the Department of Finance with advice in the development of policy and the determination of the magnitude and timing of future tax increases.
  6. Support RCMP enforcement activity.
  1. Systems and reporting capabilities were maintained as required to meet program requirements.
  2. The Tobacco Enforcement Verification Program (field) effectively monitored the movement of exported tobacco products.
  3. Co-hosted the 2008 Joint U.S./Canada Tobacco Diversion Workshop with American and Canadian agencies and presently preparing the 2009 Workshop to be held in September 2009. One National Tobacco Analyst met, in February 2009, with some American Law Enforcement personnel (U.S. Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms Agency) to share investigative information about a major tobacco manufacturer who may be involved in illegal activities in Canada and the U.S. Two National Tobacco Analysts gave a total of 8 information sessions on the illicit trade of tobacco at four law enforcement courses/workshops in Canada and the U.S.
  4. Participated on a number of committees dealing with the monitoring and control of tobacco products, including those dealing with interprovincial issues. Co-hosted the Tobacco Diversion Workshop with Canadian and U.S. participation.
  5. Met with the Department of Finance as required. Provided industry and product information.
  6. Supported RCMP enforcement activity by providing information about specific tobacco transactions as well as expert testimony and affidavits.
6. CBSA Security

Access
FTCS $28,470 $5,694 $4,993
  1. Provide advice to Department of Finance on matters that will impact the future tax structure on tobacco.
  2. Monitor and report on the contraband tobacco situation in Canada.
  3. Expand cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners.
  1. Attended monthly meetings with Department of Finance and partners to discuss and serve as a reference for questions on tobacco issues.
  2. Provided monthly analysis of the national contraband situation by compiling reports received from the Regions. Partnered with RCMP in annual risk assessment of the nature and extent of tobacco contraband activity. Coordinated development of tobacco intelligence in the Regions. The capabilities of our officers/analysts to infiltrate the marketplace, gather intelligence, liaise with other agencies and process their files has resulted in: an increase in targets for examination, both companies and individuals; identification of possible risk elements not previously perceived; awareness of emerging trends and threats.
  3. Actively participated in Joint Force Operations with law enforcement partners across the Regions. Co-hosted the Joint U.S./Canada Tobacco Diversion Workshop 2006 with American and Canadian agencies. Developed and maintained contact with international tobacco enforcement personnel.
Loss of Duty Free Licensing $21,500 $4,300 $4,300
Travellers Division         Collection of the tobacco duties imposed on personal importations of returning Canadians In 2006-2007 CBSA front line officers collected duties and taxes from previously exempted personal importations of tobacco.
Grand Total: $361.51M $95.20M $73.08M    

16. Comments on Variances:

In 2008-09, the realignment of departmental programs and a shift in priorities resulted in delays of certain projects. Furthermore, the proroguement of government caused delays in obtaining project approvals.

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

N/A

20. Contact information:

Brenda Paine, Director
Office of Policy and Strategic Planning
Controlled Substance and Tobacco Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
Telephone: (613) 941-9826
E-mail: brenda_paine@hc-sc.gc.ca

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Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Table 5: Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships Program

Name of Lead Department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: Labour Market

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 3, 2003

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $290.0 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership program was initially an $85 million initiative beginning in 2003 to 2009. Budget 2007 expanded and extended the program through an additional investment of $105 million for 2007-2012. In Canada’s Economic Action Plan, the Government is investing an additional $100M over three years in ASEP to help Aboriginal people participate in the work force and get the training they need to make the most of employment opportunities. The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership is targeted at developing the skills of Canada's Aboriginal workforce, promoting maximum employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments across Canada and providing lasting benefits for Aboriginal communities, families and individuals.

The Aboriginal Skills and Employment partnership program is an opportunity driven initiative that is implemented through formalized partnerships between the private sector and Aboriginal communities (and others such as the province and training institutions). The partnerships are responsible for jointly developing and managing comprehensive, multi-year skills development plans that will ensure long-term highly skilled sustainable employment as a result of the projects. The comprehensive Aboriginal training-to-employment plan covers a broad continuum ranging from basic skills, literacy and academic upgrading, through job-specific training and apprenticeships to retention counselling and other on-the-job supports. The plan must have a commitment from the employers to provide at least 50 long-term (sustainable) jobs for Aboriginal people. The partnership must also make a significant financial contribution to the training plan and must develop a governance model that will manage and oversee the project.

http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/general/public/asep-pcea/asep-pcea-eng.asp

Shared Outcome(s): Long term sustainable employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments.

Governance Structure(s):

  • Aboriginal Skills and Employment partnership is a national, centrally managed program. It promotes the maximum employment of Aboriginal people through a collaborative approach.
  • The implementation of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment partnership projects requires the participation of Aboriginal organizations the private sector, provincial governments and others as appropriate and may involve collaboration with regional Service Canada officials.
  • Aboriginal Skills and Employment partnership proponents receive direct support through a multi-year contribution agreement negotiated by HRSDC based on a human resources development plan. Aboriginal Skills and Employment partnership proponents are responsible for interim and final financial and performance reports.

($ millions)
* 2008-09 allocation and spending totals for other government departments are not available at the date of the publication of the DPR
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2008-2009
Actual Spending for
2008-2009
Expected Results for
2008-2009
Results Achieved in
2008-2009
1. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Labour Market Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships 290.0 40.2 25.3
  • Aboriginal clients served: 3,600
  • Interventions completed: 1,800
  • Clients returned to employment following an ASEP intervention: 1,500
  • Savings to Social assistance: $1.5M
  • Aboriginal clients served: 2505
  • Interventions completed: 2646
  • Clients returned to employment following an ASEP intervention: 2055
  • Savings to Social assistance: Ongoing
Natural Resources Canada PA1 (a) ASEP New Brunswick Project not available* not available* not available* N/A N/A
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada PA1 (a) ASEP Manitoba Hydro Northern not available* not available* not available* N/A N/A
(b) Nunavut Fisheries Training not available* not available* not available* N/A N/A
(c) Mine Training Society not available* not available* not available* N/A N/A
Western Economic Diversification PA1 (a) ASEP Manitoba Hydro Northern not available* not available* not available* N/A N/A
Total 290.0 40.2 25.3    

Comments on Variances: The variance is mainly due to re-profiling of funds into future years due to deferrals of projects into next fiscal year because of delays in project proposal starts dates.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:
Glenda Restoule, Director
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program
Skills and Employment Branch
819-956-8860
glenda.restoule@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Youth Employment Strategy

Name of Lead Department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: Labour Market

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 18, 1999

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Youth Employment Strategy supports Canadian youth as they move into the world of work. The Strategy plays a role in developing Canada's workforce by providing young Canadians with access to programs and services to help them gain the skills, knowledge, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment and make a successful transition into the labour force.  The Youth Employment Strategy is designed to respond to labour market challenges facing youth, aged 15 to 30. The Strategy has three program streams: Skills Link, Career Focus and Summer Work Experience, which includes the Canada Summer Jobs initiative. Skills Link provides youth-at-risk with opportunities to develop skills they need to find work or return to school. Career Focus helps post-secondary graduates find work in their area of specialization. Summer Work Experience helps secondary and post-secondary graduates acquire career-related skills and financing for their education through summer jobs.  The Government of Canada's support to young Canadians is a shared responsibility and a partnership effort among many departments and organizations. Human Resources and Skills Development, along with 10 other federal government departments, work cooperatively with other levels of government, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, and private sector, not-for-profit and voluntary sector organizations to deliver Youth Employment Strategy initiatives.

www.youth.gc.ca/

Shared Outcome(s): The shared outcomes of partners for the common key results are:

  • Number of youth served
  • Number of youth employed / self-employed
  • Number of youth returning to school

Governance Structure(s): The Youth Employment Strategy has in place an umbrella Results-based Management and accountability Framework (RMAF) that represents a commitment among the eleven participating federal departments to undertake ongoing collection of common performance management data to ensure effective overall performance management of the program.

As lead department, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada with Service Canada chairs and is responsible for the coordination and management of an Interdepartmental Operations Committee that is responsible for reporting on the implementation of the Youth Employment Strategy. The Evaluation Steering Committee is another Youth Employment Strategy interdepartmental committee. There is also a Communications Sub-Committee reporting to the Operations Committee.

Youth Employment Strategy initiatives are delivered nationally, regionally and locally using a variety of funding instruments, such as contribution agreements and some direct delivery methods. Transfer payments are provided primarily by participating departments through contribution agreements and service delivery agreements in support of participants' remuneration and overhead costs.


($ millions)
* Planning spending totals include both grants and contributions and operating funds while actual spending totals may not include operating funds.
** Canadian Food Inspection Agency is no longer involved in YES as of 2008-09.
*** Results include only Environment Canada’s International Environmental Youth Corp (IEYC) program. Environment Canada results will be reported in full in the 2009-10 DPR.
**** Results are not complete. Full Industry Canada results will be reported in the 2009-10 DPR.
***** Results are for 2007-08. Results for 2008-09 will be reported in the 2009-10 DPR.
****** Results for 2008-09 will be reported in the 2009-10 DPR.
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2008-2009*
Actual Spending for
2008-2009*
Expected Results for
2008-2009
Results Achieved in
2008-2009
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Labour Market a. Career Focus Ongoing 13.0 11.3 Service Canada
  • Clients Served: 400-600
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 300-375
  • Return to School: 10-30
  • Contribution agreements: 80-110
  • Funds Leveraged: $2-4M
HRSDC
  • Clients Served: 454
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 90% or 408
  • Return to School: 10% or 45
  • Contribution agreements: 14
  • Funds Leveraged: $10,812,694.
Service Canada
  • Clients Served: 427
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 227
  • Return to School: 33
  • Contribution agreements: 90
  • Funds Leveraged: $10,018,498
HRSDC
  • Clients Served: 363
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 226
  • Return to School: 0
  • Contribution agreements: 12
  • Funds Leveraged: $5.1M
b. Skills Link Ongoing 149.4 139.7
  • Clients Served: 14,000-16,000
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 5,950-6,250
  • Return to School: 1,250-1,350
  • Contribution agreements: 1,100-1,300
  • Funds Leveraged: $65-80M
  • Clients Served: 16,073
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 5,961
  • Return to School: 1842
  • Contribution agreements: 966
  • Funds Leveraged: $55,722,745
c. Summer Work Experience (Canada Summer Jobs) Ongoing 101.4 94.4
  • Clients Served: 41,000-48,000
  • Employed or Self-Employed: N/A
  • Return to School: N/A
  • Contribution agreements: 26,000-30,000
  • Funds Leveraged: N/A
  • Clients Served: 36,464
  • Employed or Self-Employed: N/A
  • Return to School: N/A
  • Contribution agreements: 20,866
  • Funds Leveraged: N/A
2. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada   Career Focus Ongoing 1.1 0.6 N/A
  • Clients Served: 90
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 82
  • Return to School: 8
3. Canadian Food Inspection Agency**   Career Focus Ongoing 0.1 N/A N/A N/A
4. Canadian International Development Agency   Career Focus Ongoing 6.4 5.6 N/A
  • Clients Served: 388
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 78
  • Return to School: 38
5. Canadian Heritage   Career Focus Ongoing 0.9 0.9 N/A
  • Clients Served: 89
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 23
  • Return to School: 9
  Summer Work Experience Ongoing 9.8 7.6 N/A
  • Clients Served: 1672
  • Employed or Self-Employed: N/A
  • Return to School: N/A
6. Environment Canada   Career Focus Ongoing 3.3 1.3 N/A
  • Clients Served: 18***
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 15***
  • Return to School: 2***
7.Industry Canada   Career Focus Ongoing 9.8 8.7 N/A
  • Clients Served: 1094
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 83
  • Return to School: 139
  Summer Work Experience Ongoing 7.4 5.2 N/A
  • Clients Served: 860****
  • Employed or Self-Employed: N/A
  • Return to School: N/A
8.National Research Council   Career Focus Ongoing 5.4 4.8 N/A
  • Clients Served: 312
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 148*****
  • Return to School: 3*****
9.Natural Resources Canada   Career Focus Ongoing 0.6 0.5 N/A
  • Clients Served: 50
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 38
  • Return to School: 3
10.Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation   Skills Link Ongoing 1.0 1.0 N/A
  • Clients Served: 164
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 30
  • Return to School: 8
11.Indian and Northern Affairs Canada   Skills Link Ongoing 14.0 14.1 N/A
  • Clients Served: N/A******
  • Employed or Self-Employed: N/A***
  • Return to School: N/A******
  Summer Work Experience Ongoing 12.6