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ARCHIVED - RPP 2007-2008
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade


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Section II Our Plans and Priorities in Greater Detail

2.1 Our Strategic Outcomes and Supporting Program Activities

2.1.2 Canada's Commercial Interests Are Advanced Internationally

2.1.2.1 Program Activity: Trade Policy and Negotiations

2.1.2.1.1 Description of Trade Policy and Negotiations Program Activity

Plans and Priorities for the Trade Policy and Negotiations Activity

This program activity contributes to the following departmental priorities:

  • A safer, more secure and prosperous Canada within a strengthened North American partnership.

  • Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.

  • Greater international support for freedom and security, democracy, rule of law, human rights and environmental stewardship.

  • Accountable and consistent use of the multilateral system to deliver results on global issues of concern to Canadians.

  • Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.

  • Better alignment of departmental resources (human, financial, physical and technological) in support of international policy objectives and program delivery both at home and abroad.

Priority 1: A safer, more secure and prosperous Canada within a strengthened North American partnership.

Outcome: Enhanced Canadian trade and investment interests through appropriate rules-based initiatives.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Building on the outcomes of the March 2006 NAFTA Commission meeting and the Trilateral Summit in Cancun, the department will:

    • identify sectors and specific work that can be undertaken within these sectors to remove existing trade impediments;
    • develop the first and second portions of the NAFTA sectoral initiative (10-12 sectors in total) and begin discussion of a legal instrument under NAFTA to capture the expanded initiative;
    • examine the relationship between NAFTA and other free trade agreements (FTAs) to advance common interests and improve NAFTA practices, and examine opportunities for the NAFTA countries to collaborate in trade agreements with other countries; and
    • pursue further liberalization of the NAFTA rules of origin.

Outcome: Market access for Canadian goods, services, technologies and investment maintained and improved.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Work to resolve the impediments of the United States Department of State's International Traffic in Arms Regulations, which undermine the interoperability and partnership of the Canada-United States defence and aerospace industrial base.

Outcome: Trade and investment disputes addressed effectively.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Manage the Softwood Lumber Agreement to maintain a stable relationship within North America and to ensure that exporters take full advantage of all available opportunities while ensuring compliance with the letter and spirit of the agreement, including through the smooth functioning of the binational Softwood Lumber Committee and the technical working groups.

  • Effectively manage NAFTA Chapter 11 (Investment) cases. There were five active cases against Canada as of December 31, 2006.

Outcome: Domestic regulatory and legislative framework under the responsibility of the Minister of International Trade effectively managed.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Complete the export controls goals under the security pillar of the trilateral Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP) to help ensure a safer and secure North America.

  • Implement and operationalize the trilateral SPP Regulatory Cooperation Framework to enhance and streamline regulatory processes in North America.

  • Advance trilateral cooperation on intellectual property enforcement issues through the SPP work plan.


Priority 2: Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.

Outcome: Enhanced Canadian trade and investment interests through appropriate rules-based initiatives.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Seek to conclude ongoing FTA negotiations with the Central American Four (El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua), European Free Trade Area, Singapore and Korea.

  • Work towards free trade with Andean Community, Dominican Republic and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM).

  • Undertake exploratory discussions with other countries with a view to preparing for the start of FTA negotiations.

  • Seek to conclude ongoing negotiations with the European Commission on the Regulatory Cooperation Agreement.

  • Conclude foreign investment protection and promotion (FIPA) negotiations with India and China and launch, by the end of three years, at least 10 new FIPA negotiations with a focus on priority countries in terms of investment protection interests, particularly in Southeast Asia, North Africa and Central Asia.

Outcome: Market access for Canadian goods, services, technologies and investment maintained and improved.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Work with other World Trade Organization (WTO) members to conclude the Doha Development Round negotiations and manage Canada's participation in existing WTO agreements in a way that ensures that our rights with regard to current market access and rules are effectively advanced.

Outcome: Trade and investment disputes addressed effectively.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Use other multilateral and regional forums (e.g. OECD, APEC, G8) to advance Canadian interests in WTO negotiations.

  • Ensure effective management and strategic use of WTO and bilateral (e.g. NAFTA) dispute settlement procedures to advance and defend Canadian interests.


Priority 3: Greater international support for freedom and security, democracy, rule of law, human rights and environmental stewardship.

Outcome: Trade and investment disputes addressed effectively.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Use the WTO accession negotiations to advance the rule of law in acceding countries.

  • Use Canada's membership in various multilateral export control regimes to advance Canadian policies concerning export controls of conventional weapons, strategic dual-use goods, biological, chemical and nuclear goods, as well as missile technology and weapons of mass destruction.

Outcome: Domestic regulatory and legislative framework under the responsibility of the Minister of International Trade effectively managed.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Control the trade of dangerous and strategic and sensitive goods and data to ensure the personal security of Canadians and citizens of other countries.

  • Advance Canada's sustainable development (SD) interests related to foreign affairs and international trade through effective promotion of international security and respect for human rights, good governance and the rule of law as prerequisites for SD.

  • Integrate sustainable development into domestic and foreign policy and work with partner departments to integrate environmental considerations into decision making related to trade policy.

  • Promote compliance with the OECD Guidelines on Multilateral Enterprises to foster corporate social responsibility among Canadian firms.

  • Conduct environmental assessments (EAs) of trade negotiations through interdepartmental coordination and consultations with provinces, territories and sectoral experts, and ensure the timely release of EAs to inform negotiators.

  • Negotiate appropriate provisions relating to environmental and labour issues in the context of new free trade agreements.


Priority 4: Accountable and consistent use of the multilateral system to deliver results on global issues of concern to Canadians.

Outcome: Trade and investment disputes addressed effectively.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Effectively manage and enforce obligations under existing WTO agreements to ensure respect for Canada's rights under current market access rules and progress in implementing the International Convention on the Settlement of Investment Disputes.

Outcome: Domestic regulatory and legislative framework under the responsibility of the Minister of International Trade effectively managed.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Provide assistance to Canadian traders in responding to challenges under trade laws in other countries.

Priority 5: Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.

Outcome: Trade and investment disputes addressed effectively.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Provide timely, accurate and relevant responses to export-ready Canadian business clients.

  • Provide assistance to Canadian traders in responding to challenges under trade laws in other countries.

Outcome: Domestic regulatory and legislative framework under the responsibility of the Minister of International Trade effectively managed.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Improve the Export and Import Bureau's export and import permit software to enhance client service.

Priority 6: Better alignment of departmental resources (human, financial, physical and technological) in support of international policy objectives and program delivery both at home and abroad.

Outcome: Continue to adapt services and build partnerships at an accelerated pace.

Outputs/Activities:

  • The department has realigned resources and created two new divisions—one responsible for North American trade policy and the other responsible for implementation of the newly signed Softwood Lumber Agreement. However, the challenges of a global economy have outstripped the department's capacity to respond, and the department will need new resources to pursue the government's aggressive trade policy plans.

Performance Measurement Strategy and Performance Indicators
Strategic Priority 1: A safer, more secure and prosperous Canada within a strengthened North American partnership.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Enhanced Canadian trade and investment interests through appropriate rules-based initiatives.
  • Market access for Canadian goods, services, technologies and investment maintained and improved.
  • Trade and investment disputes addressed effectively.
  • Domestic regulatory and legislative framework under the responsibility of the Minister for International Trade effectively managed.
  • Level of progress in advancing negotiations on agreements and cooperative arrangements (e.g. bilateral, regional and multilateral trade and investment negotiations, issue-specific accords and cooperation agreements).
  • Improvements vis-Ó-vis the scope of rights and obligations achieved through negotiations.
  • Effective domestic implementation of negotiated agreements.
  • Level of progress in maintaining and improving Canada's market access interests within a rules-based system.
  • Extent to which Canadian partnerships are enhanced through collaborative and cooperative initiatives for specific issues and sectors.



Strategic Priority 2: Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Enhanced Canadian trade and investment interests through appropriate rules-based initiatives.
  • Market access for Canadian goods, services, technologies and investment maintained and improved.
  • Trade and investment disputes addressed effectively.
  • Level of progress in advancing negotiations on agreements and cooperative arrangements (e.g. bilateral, regional and multilateral trade and investment negotiations, issue-specific accords and cooperation agreements).
  • Improvements vis-Ó-vis the scope of rights and obligations achieved through negotiations.
  • Effective domestic implementation of negotiated agreements.
  • Level of progress in maintaining and improving Canada's market access interests within a rules-based system.
  • Level of progress in effectively managing trade and investment disputes, including consultations and the use of formal dispute settlement procedures, as well as targeted advocacy efforts.
  • Effective implementation of negotiated market access and retaining of agreed-upon levels of domestic market openness.
  • Extent to which Canadian partnerships are enhanced through collaborative and cooperation initiatives for specific issues and sectors.



Strategic Priority 3: Greater international support for freedom and security, democracy, rule of law, human rights and environmental stewardship.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Trade and investment disputes addressed effectively.
  • Domestic regulatory and legislative framework under the responsibility of the Minister of International Trade effectively managed.
  • Effective domestic implementation of negotiated agreements.
  • Delivery of effective export controls to promote a safer and secure economy and improve market access.



Strategic Priority 4: Accountable and consistent use of the multilateral system to deliver results on global issues of concern to Canadians.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Trade and investment disputes addressed effectively.
  • Domestic regulatory and legislative framework under the responsibility of the Minister for International Trade effectively managed.
  • Improvements vis-Ó-vis the scope of rights and obligations achieved through negotiations.
  • Level of progress in maintaining and improving Canada's market access interests within a rules-based system.
  • Level of progress in effectively managing trade and investment disputes, including through consultations and the use of formal dispute settlement procedures, as well as targeted advocacy efforts.
  • Level of progress in finalizing the WTO Environmental Assessment in consultation with stakeholders and timely release to inform the Doha negotiations.



Strategic Priority 5: Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Trade and investment disputes addressed effectively.
  • Domestic regulatory and legislative framework under the responsibility of the Minister for International Trade effectively managed.
  • Effective domestic implementation of negotiated agreements.



Strategic Priority 6: Better alignment of departmental resources (human, financial, physical and technological) in support of international policy objectives and program delivery both at home and abroad.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Continue to adapt services and build partnerships at an accelerated pace.
  • Continuation of department-wide training initiatives such as the training committee and coordination of official language training.
  • Intensification of recruitment efforts via greater departmental coordination for non-rotational staff.
  • Implementation of an in-house training program for new staff.


Financial and Human Resources
Financial Resources ($ millions)
Year 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Total Planned Spending 58.1 43.9 44.0



Human Resources (FTEs)
Year 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
FTEs 432 432 432

2.1.2.2 Program Activity: World Markets/Commercial Relations

2.1.2.2.1 Description of World Markets/Commercial Relations Program Activity

Plans and Priorities for the World Markets/Commercial Relations Activity

This program activity contributes to the following departmental priorities:

  • Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.

  • Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.

  • Better alignment of departmental resources (human, financial, physical and technological) in support of international policy objectives and program delivery both at home and abroad.

Priority 2: Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.

Outcome: Support for international commerce is coordinated interdepartmentally and focused on those regions and countries that offer the greatest opportunities for a significant intensification of bilateral commerce.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Develop, disseminate and implement six multi-year government-wide market plans incorporating market access, trade, investment and S&T-for Latin America and the Caribbean, India, Russia, the Gulf Cooperation Council, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the European Union-which provide the overall framework and individual subsector targets and action plan for the intensification of commerce with the selected priority regions and countries. These initiatives will contribute to bringing greater focus and integration to the full range of government services and tools in support of Canadian business in today's global commerce environment, where global supply chains, trade in services, investment abroad, technology flows, etc., drive international business decisions.

Outcome: Canadian companies are integrated competitively into the 21st-century economy, characterized by world-scale international value chains and global commercial networks.

Outputs/Activities:

  • In cooperation with partner departments and agencies, develop a policy framework, guidelines and tools for the facilitation of Canadian direct investment abroad.

  • Ensure congruence between Canadian direct investment abroad and corporate social responsibility policies.

  • Conduct intelligence-sharing and matchmaking exchanges with Canadian and foreign companies seeking to participate in the Airbus 350 (A350) global value chain.

  • In the context of a pilot initiative, select and develop a business relationship with one foreign-based multinational enterprise with global operations, decentralized decision making and a willingness to engage in intensified commerce with Canada.

  • Organize six international commerce missions led by the Minister for International Trade, the Secretary of State (Foreign Affairs and International Trade), Deputy Minister or Assistant Deputy Ministers for International Trade.

Outcome: Canadian companies have the ability to move foreign employees, buyers and partners quickly across borders into Canada to attract and retain high value-added components of global value chains.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Benchmark the economic ramifications of business visa delays and refusals abroad and at Canadian ports of entry; sensitize Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) to these ramifications; and advocate with CIC and CBSA to develop a dedicated business travel visa application form.

  • Implement a standard departmental process for addressing "national economic interest" assessments in support of selected foreign official and business visa applicants.

  • Develop and deliver a pre-posting business visa training module for DFAIT and CIC staff.


Priority 5: Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.

Outcome: Support and intermediary services provided to Canadians through the Trade Commissioner Service (TCS) will correspond to the new exigencies of the 21st-century global marketplace.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Review and clarify the definition of TCS clients and core services in the context of the new international commerce paradigm.

  • Train and provide tools on corporate social responsibility to all new staff being assigned to regional offices in Canada and to missions abroad in the summer of 2007 as well as to new heads of missions being assigned to countries with a heavy concentration of Canadian investment.

  • Revamp the Horizons intranet site (an information tool to support the efficiency and effectiveness of trade commissioners) to make it more relevant and user friendly.

Outcome: Strengthened and increased profile of regional offices in Canada.

Outputs/Activities:

  • More fully integrate regional offices with missions and headquarters in the delivery of investment and S&T services, training and skills development.

  • Increase assignment of career Foreign Service officers in regional offices.

  • Complete deployment of the electronic client relationship management tool (TRIO) to headquarters, regional offices and Canadian missions abroad.

  • Develop and implement an action plan to expand the TCS domestic network to include representation in Quebec City and other centres in southern Ontario as appropriate.

Outcome: Canadian businesses compete on an equal basis with their competitors from other nations thanks to innovative, value-added e-services from government agencies.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Through proactive leadership in the interagency Government Online Trade Services (GOTS) Executive Committee, increase value and reduce interdepartmental duplication in the provision of government services for exporters.

  • Interconnect the Virtual Trade Commissioner (VTC) with the Industrial Cooperation Program (ICP) of the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA); and undertake some joint VTC development with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.


Priority 6: Better alignment of departmental resources (human, financial, physical and technological) in support of international policy objectives and program delivery both at home and abroad.

Outcome: Completion of a consolidated and strengthened organizational structure of the branch at headquarters.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Develop a sound human resources strategy to ensure that investments in human resources fully support the needs of Canadian business and the priorities of the department, in line with the approved organizational structure.

Outcome: Missions deliver an integrated and multifaceted international commerce program in each of their respective markets.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Guide and assist missions abroad in the development of business and market plans in line with departmental priorities.

Outcome: Resources abroad are allocated in those markets and regions that offer the most promising opportunities for growth and competitiveness for Canadian business.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Building on the experience and results of the past four years, conduct a detailed review exercise to ensure that FTE allocations at missions reflect commercial priorities and service demands from clients.

  • Continue the development of profiles for international commerce positions abroad and in regional offices to ensure an effective match of talent with openings.

  • Extensively review resources abroad to ensure that they are allocated to those markets and regions that offer the most promising opportunities for Canadian business. In each of the past four years, the department has conducted a detailed review exercise to ensure that staff allocation abroad reflects commercial priorities and service demands from clients. To date, about eight positions per year have been redeployed as a result of this exercise. For 2007-2008, the Minister has mandated a more extensive review that may see as many as 30 to 40 positions moved or reprofiled over the next three years.


Performance Measurement Strategy and Performance Indicators
Strategic Priority 2: Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Support for international commerce is coordinated interdepartmentally and focused on those regions and countries that offer the greatest opportunities for a significant intensification of bilateral commerce.
  • Canadian companies are integrated competitively into the 21st-century economy, characterized by world-scale international value chains and global commercial networks.
  • Canadian companies have the ability to move foreign employees, buyers and partners quickly across borders into Canada in order to attract and retain high value-added components of global value chains.
  • Six government-wide market plans produced, disseminated and implemented on Latin America and the Caribbean, India, Russia, the Gulf Cooperation Council, ASEAN and the European Union.
  • Framework, guidelines, requisite tools and communication plan and materials for Canadian direct investment abroad developed and distributed to government departments and agencies, regional offices, missions abroad and the private sector.
  • A congruent and consistent set of policies and guidelines for Canadian business offered by Canadian direct investment abroad and corporate social responsibility programs.
  • Two Canadian firms pursuing participation with Tier 1 suppliers on the A350 or other aerospace programs.
  • Two new Canadian firms pursuing participation in global value chains generated by the multinational enterprise identified for the pilot initiative.
  • Six international commerce missions organized.
  • Benchmark study of economic impacts of visa and port of entry refusals and delays completed and received.
  • Contingent upon the concurrence of CIC, interdepartmental negotiations completed and agreement in principle reached on a new e business visa application form and associated modification to CIC's electronic software to permit tracking of e-business visas.
  • Completed training module for key bilateral commercial relations officers on national economic interest.



Strategic Priority 5: Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Support and intermediary services provided to Canadians through the TCS will correspond to the new exigencies of the 21st-century global marketplace.
  • Strengthened and increased profile of regional offices in Canada.
  • Canadian businesses compete on an equal basis with their competitors from other nations thanks to innovative, value-added e-services from government agencies.
  • Review of TCS clients and core services completed and clarifications communicated to government departments and agencies, missions abroad, regional offices and the private sector.
  • All new staff being assigned to regional offices and to missions abroad in the summer of 2007, as well as new HOM being assigned to countries with a heavy concentration of Canadian investment, are trained on corporate social responsibility.
  • Review of Horizons site completed and revamped site launched.
  • Six newly recruited Foreign Service officers assigned to the regional offices.
  • New TCS office opened in Quebec City.
  • Contract awarded for GOTS roadmap study and initial decisions on streamlining of government trade services taken and implemented.
  • TRIO deployed to all foreign missions.
  • Contingent upon the concurrence of CIDA, interdepartmental negotiations concluded and CIDA interconnected with the VTC.



Strategic Priority 6: Better alignment of departmental resources (human, financial, physical and technological) in support of international policy objectives and program delivery both at home and abroad.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Completion of a consolidated and strengthened organizational structure of the branch at headquarters.
  • Missions deliver an integrated and multifaceted international commerce program in each of their respective markets.
  • Resources abroad are allocated in those markets and regions that offer the most promising opportunities for growth and competitiveness for Canadian business.
  • Branch fully resourced to fulfill its mandate.
  • Missions abroad develop and implement international commerce activities that are fully integrated (trade, investment and S&T), multifaceted and focused on the opportunities offering the greatest potential and results.
  • Human resources plan in place and implementation initiated.
  • 60 positions identified for review and assessed with a view to reallocate or reprofile 30 to 40 over the medium term.
  • Completion of position profiles for Canada-based positions abroad and in the regional offices for which relevant data are received.


Financial and Human Resources
Financial Resources ($ millions)
Year 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Total Planned Spending 48.7 48.0 48.0



Human Resources (FTEs)
Year 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
FTEs 1,096 1,096 1,096

2.1.2.3 Program Activity: International Business Development

2.1.2.3.1 Description of International Business Development Program Activity

Plans and Priorities for the International Business Development Activity

This program activity contributes to the following departmental priorities:

  • Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.

  • Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.

Priority 2: Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.

Outcome: Increased success of Canadian companies internationally.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Intervene and consult with partner departments and federal agencies in order to define and develop consensus around Canada's international commerce objectives.

Outcome: A new model for the delivery of the department's support and intermediary services to Canadian business.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Provide high-quality advice to senior management and the Minister on a commerce strategy that is an integral component of the government's economic plan. This process will be bolstered by integrating departmental program activities and policy objectives with respect to trade, investment and innovation into the mix.

Priority 5: Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.

Outcome: Enhanced trade finance and risk management tools for high-risk markets.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Design and deliver training courses and seminars to trade commissioners and to CIDA officials on trade finance, foreign investment and the aid market to Canadian companies interested in entering risk markets.

Performance Measurement Strategy and Performance Indicators
Strategic Priority 2: Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Increased success of Canadian companies internationally.
  • A new model for the delivery of the department's support and intermediary services to Canadian business.
  • Level of consensus among partner departments, other levels of government and stakeholders in support of a global commerce strategy.
  • Number of specific leads disseminated to Canadian businesses.
  • Number of strategic, targeted missions led by senior management.
  • A fully integrated approach to program delivery developed and approved.



Strategic Priority 5: Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Enhanced trade finance and risk management tools for high-risk markets.
  • Number of clients participating in training sessions and seminars related to the aid market.
  • Number of clients pursuing related opportunities.
  • Contract awards (by number and dollar amount).
  • Increased collaboration between trade commissioners and CIDA officials at missions on global commercial activities.
  • Level of use of departmental technology tools by clients (e.g. IFInet website).


Financial and Human Resources
Financial Resources ($ millions)
Year 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Total Planned Spending 737.1 770.3 779.1



Human Resources (FTEs)
Year 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
FTEs 455 455 455

2.1.2.4 Program Activity: Promotion of Foreign Direct Investment and S&T Cooperation

2.1.2.4.1 Description of Foreign Direct Investment and S&T Cooperation Program Activity

Plans and Priorities for the Promotion of Foreign Direct Investment and S&T Cooperation Activity

This program activity contributes to the following departmental priority:

  • Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.

  • Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities


Priority 2: Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.

Outcome: Increased foreign investment in Canada.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Improve investment prospecting by developing services and standards, updating priority market and sector assessments, identifying potential foreign investors, using private-sector champions for targeted corporate calls, preparing value propositions and business cases, and developing an aftercare strategy for investment retention and expansion.

  • Collaborate with investment partners through coordination activities and capacity building.

Outcome: Increased awareness and knowledge of Canadian capabilities and advantages as well as an increased interest in Canada as a location for investment.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Develop assessments for priority sectors and subsectors and communicate with regional offices and missions abroad to help keep them informed of Canadian supply-side capacity and interest in pursuing international business opportunities.

  • Support Canadian business through international business development advice to sector associations via the Program for Export Market Development–Trade Associations (PEMD-TA) program.

  • Assist in providing financial assistance to trade associations across Canada through the PEMD-Associations program.

Outcome: An improved regulatory environment for Canadian and foreign-owned businesses relating to investment and science and technology efforts, leading to stronger adoption of new technologies by Canadian business and improved commercialization performance in global innovation markets.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Implement a global innovation network involving government science agencies, provinces, universities and business.

  • Offer matchmaking and partnering services and events for innovation clients and partners with international R&D experience to increase the commercialization of technologies in established innovation and/or technology markets.

  • Identify and prepare partners for a series of business-related activities (licensing agreements, technology sales, joint venture and equity investment agreements).

  • Provide mentoring and market support services to Canadian innovation clients and partners that are new to international R&D and commercialization activities.

Outcome: Enhanced partnerships among federal, provincial and territorial governments to achieve increased awareness among policy departments and provinces/territories of the need to improve Canada's investment climate.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Engage in research and analysis-based policy advocacy on investment issues with provinces/territories and partner departments and raise Canada's profile as an investment destination through the market research program, sector-specific marketing tools and participation in signature events.

  • Program meetings and take advantage of a number of tools (e.g. online, face-to-face advisory meetings, roundtables, ad hoc meetings) to deliver advice developed through consultation with provinces, territories, municipalities and stakeholders. Partnerships will be formed to affect input into departmental policies, programs and services.

Outcome: Increased awareness among missions and foreign businesses of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative (APGCI) and the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Design and implement both a strategy to promote the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor and strategic programming in the fields of investment, public diplomacy and education marketing, focusing first on the B.C.-Canada Pavilion in Beijing (May-September 2008) and then the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.

Priority 5: Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.

Outcome: Stronger technology adoption by Canadian business, improved commercialization of Canadian technologies in global innovation markets, and better positioning of Canadian firms in international technology value chains.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Provide mentoring and market support services to Canadian innovation clients and partners that are new to international R&D and commercialization activities.

  • Implement a global innovation network involving government science agencies, provinces, universities and business.

  • Offer matchmaking and partnering services and events for innovation clients and partners with international R&D experience to increase the commercialization of technologies in established innovation and/or technology markets.

  • Identify and prepare partners for a series of business-related activities (licensing agreements, technology sales, joint venture and equity investment agreements).

Priority 6: Better alignment of departmental resources (human, financial, physical and technological) in support of international policy objectives and program delivery both at home and abroad.

Outcome: Enhanced logistical and managerial support to the Minister, to government partners such as Transport Canada and Canadian Heritage, and to other public and private-sector partners in implementing both the APGCI and the 2010 Winter Games.

Outputs/Activities:

  • Promote the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor and strategic programming in investment, public diplomacy and education marketing, focusing first on the B.C.-Canada Pavilion in Beijing (May-September 2008) and then the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.

Performance Measurement Strategy and Performance Indicators
Strategic Priority 2: Greater economic competitiveness for Canada through enhanced commercial engagement, secure market access and targeted support for Canadian business.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Increased foreign investment in Canada.
  • Increased awareness and knowledge of Canadian capabilities and advantages as well as an increased interest in Canada as a location for investment.
  • An improved regulatory environment for Canadian and foreign-owned businesses relating to investment and science and technology efforts, leading to stronger adoption of new technologies by Canadian business and improved commercialization performance in global innovation markets.
  • Enhanced partnerships among federal, provincial and territorial governments to achieve increased awareness among policy departments and provinces/territories of the need to improve Canada's investment climate.
  • Enhanced logistical and managerial support to the Minister, to government partners such as Transport Canada and Canadian Heritage, and to other public and private-sector partners in implementing both the APGCI and the 2010 Winter Games.
  • Increased awareness among missions and foreign businesses of the APGCI and the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games.
  • Better positioning of Canadian firms in international value chains, enabling better results of technology commercialization in global markets.
  • Canada's investment competitiveness ranking in international benchmarking studies.
  • Foreign investors' opinion of Canadian investment climate, through surveys.
  • Conversion rates for target-to-lead, lead-to-prospect and prospect-to-investment.
  • Assessments developed for initial set of priority sectors.
  • Advice provided to sectoral associations receiving PEMD financial assistance.
  • Increase in the growth rate of high and medium-high technology intensity exports, and in technology share of manufacturing exports.
  • Movement into the top third in OECD rankings for commercialization results for high and medium-high technology intensity exports.
  • Proportion of policy departments and provinces/territories that have considered effecting changes recommended by DFAIT to improve the investment climate.
  • Extent to which missions have suitable information to promote the Asia-Pacific Gateway and the 2010 Games.



Strategic Priority 5: Strengthened services to Canadians, including consular, passport and global commercial activities.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Stronger technology adoption by Canadian business, improved commercialization of Canadian technologies in global innovation markets, and better positioning of Canadian firms in international technology value chains.
  • Degree to which global innovation network is implemented.
  • Number of Canadian companies participating in global value chains.
  • Number of matchmaking events held.



Strategic Priority 6: Better Alignment of departmental resources (human, financial, physical and technological) in support of international policy objectives and program delivery both at home and abroad.
Key Priority Indicators:
1- to 3-year planned outcomes As demonstrated by
  • Enhanced logistical and managerial support to the Minister, to government partners such as Transport Canada and Canadian Heritage, and to other public and private sector partners in implementing both APGCI and the 2010 MC programs.
  • Extent to which missions have suitable information to promote the Asia-Pacific Gateway and the 2010 Games.


Financial and Human Resources
Financial Resources ($ millions)
Year 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
Total Planned Spending 17.2 17.9 18.5



Human Resources (FTEs)
Year 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010
FTEs 107 107 107