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ARCHIVED - RPP 2006-2007
Fisheries and Oceans Canada

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The Honourable Loyola Hearn, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Fisheries and Oceans



Overview

Plans for 2006-2009 by Strategic Outcome

Supplementary Information

Other Items of Interest

List of Acronyms

List of Tables

 




Overview

In this section:

A Message from Canada's Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

It gives me great pleasure to present Fisheries and Oceans Canada's (DFO) Report on Plans and Priorities for 2006-2007.

Ours is a maritime nation. Bordering three oceans, Canada's coastline is the longest of any country and our continental shelf is among the world's largest. Our waters have played a significant role in shaping our history, culture and economy.

Canada's aquatic resources are among our most valued assets. Each year, our fisheries, oceans and marine sectors contribute billions of dollars to our national economy and employ hundreds of thousands of Canadians. These sectors continue to be the main economic and social driver of many Canadian communities.

Canada's waters are vital to our trade and transportation system. They also serve as a recreational playground for millions of Canadians and visitors each year.

DFO is committed to the sound stewardship of Canada's waters. We do this by delivering services that support three key outcomes:

  • Safe and Accessible Waterways;
  • Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture; and
  • Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems.

To help meet these outcomes, DFO has identified a number of priorities for this year and beyond.

Reducing the tax burden for people entering and exiting the fishery — Fishing enterprises that purchase fuel, buy insurance and equipment will benefit greatly from a reduction in the GST introduced in Budget 2006. Also in the budget was the implementation of a capital gains tax exemption that means that someone selling their enterprise to a family member will not need to pay taxes on the sale at all. The sale of a fishing enterprise outside of the family will see the first $500,000 of the purchase price exempt from capital gains tax.

Working collaboratively with Provinces and Territories — I welcome the involvement and input of provincial and territorial governments concerning DFO policies and decisions. I have heard very clearly from my counterparts that decision-making concerning the fishery is an area of which they have been suspect in the past. As Minister, I will work hard to engage other governments and respond to their concerns, which could mean updating key legislation, regulations and policies that govern DFO operations.

Leading the charge to stop overfishing — I am committed to lead action to stop overfishing on the high seas, in particular on Canada's continental shelf. Fish stocks around the world are under increasing pressure from illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, and Canada will ensure that it takes care of the stocks under its care. International regulation of high seas fisheries is proving less than effective, so we will make Canada one of the most active players on the international stage regarding overfishing, particularly off our east coast, where the effects of this detrimental activity are most profound. Our hope is that we will be able to work collaboratively with other countries to stop overfishing, but if necessary, we are prepared to take action on our own to ensure the survival of these stocks.

Increasing our investment in science — The need for sound scientific advice is critical to my department. DFO has completed a review of its science program with the goal of making it more innovative, adaptive and collaborative. In addition to continuing to implement science renewal initiatives, we will seek opportunities for greater investment in science so that our policies and actions are as well informed as possible.

Addressing the challenges facing Pacific salmon fisheries — On the west coast, DFO will work with the province of British Columbia and other stakeholders to improve the management of our Pacific fisheries and wild salmon habitats. There will be an inquiry into the state of the sockeye salmon fishery on the Fraser River, and we will create and implement plans with our partners to help the stocks recover.

Moving forward on the government-wide Oceans Action Plan — The Oceans Action Plan serves as an overarching umbrella for coordinating and implementing oceans activities and provides a framework for sustainably developing and managing our oceans. DFO will continue to work with other federal departments and agencies on delivering the priorities identified in the Plan.

Strengthening the Coast Guard — I want to ensure that the people who work so hard to keep us safe have what they need to do their jobs with excellence. Canada's new government has already increased funding to the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) by $45 million per year. This money will help the CCG pay for increased gas costs, conduct necessary maintenance and repairs, and strengthen daily operations.

Canada's fisheries and oceans are an important part of our way of life, and my department's goal is to strengthen and sustainably develop these essential resources. In doing so, we will work closely with government partners, industry participants and interested Canadians from coast to coast to achieve the maximum value of this publicly-owned resource.

I sincerely look forward to the year ahead.

______________________________

The Honourable Loyola Hearn, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Management Representation Statement

I submit, for tabling in Parliament, the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) for Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

This document has been prepared based on the reporting principles contained in the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's Guide to the Preparation of Part III of the 2006-2007 Estimates: Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports:

  • It adheres to the specific reporting requirements outlined in the Treasury Board Secretariat guidance;
  • It is based on the department's approved Program Activity Architecture as reflected in its Management, Resources and Results Structure;
  • It presents consistent, comprehensive, balanced and reliable information;
  • It provides a basis of accountability for the results achieved with the resources and authorities entrusted to it; and
  • It reports finances based on approved planned spending numbers from the Treasury Board Secretariat in the RPP.

______________________________

Larry Murray
Deputy Minister

Summary Information

Canada's fisheries and oceans have long played an important role in Canada's development and growth as a nation. They are central elements of the historical, economic and cultural fabric of Canada's coastal communities, providing a strong and reliable resource base around which Canada's national economy and sense of nationhood grew.

Vision

Excellence in service to Canadians to ensure the sustainable development and safe use of Canadian waters.

Canada's fisheries and oceans have seen considerable change over the past decade — the collapse of historically key stocks, international tensions, growing recognition of Aboriginal and treaty rights, and unprecedented expansion of the user base of our oceans. At the same time, there has been growing recognition of environmental challenges such as pollution, species at risk and climate change.

Ensuring safe, healthy and productive waters and aquatic ecosystems for the benefit of present and future generations is the essence of the Department's activities. The Department's work is built around three strategic outcomes — the long-term and enduring benefits that Canadians derive from the Department's vision and efforts. The strategic outcomes are:

  • Safe and Accessible Waterways — providing access to Canadian waterways, and ensuring the overall safety and integrity of Canada's marine infrastructure for the benefit of all Canadians;
  • Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture — delivering an integrated fisheries and aquaculture program that is credible, science based, affordable and effective, and contributes to sustainable wealth for Canadians; and
  • Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems — ensuring the sustainable development and integrated management of resources in or around Canada's aquatic environment through oceans and habitat management, as well as carrying out critical science and fisheries management activities.

Mandate

On behalf of the Government of Canada, DFO is responsible for developing and implementing policies and programs in support of Canada's scientific, ecological, social and economic interests in oceans and fresh waters.

The Department's guiding legislation includes the Oceans Act, which charges the Minister with leading oceans management and providing coast guard and hydrographic services on behalf of the Government of Canada, and the Fisheries Act, which gives responsibility to the Minister for the management of fisheries, habitat and aquaculture. The Department also shares responsibility for the Species at Risk Act with Environment Canada and Parks Canada.

Financial and Human Resources, 2006-2009
  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Financial Resources (millions of dollars) 1,675.8 1,570.3 1,571.7
Human Resources (number of Full-time Equivalents) 10,443 10,321 10,225

Program Activity Architecture

DFO's basis for reporting to Parliament is its Program Activity Architecture (PAA). The purpose of the PAA is to explain the relationship between the activities the Department undertakes and the three strategic outcomes it is working to achieve. The PAA seeks to describe how the Department manages the resources under its control to achieve intended results/outcomes.

DFO's PAA specifies three strategic outcomes:

  • Safe and Accessible Waterways — managed by Canadian Coast Guard, Small Craft Harbours and Science;
  • Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture — managed by Fisheries Management, Aquaculture and Science; and
  • Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems — managed by Oceans Management, Habitat Management and Science.

The PAA also captures the functions required to ensure a solid framework within which managers can effectively deliver services to Canadians. These functions are called Program Enablers. Additional information about the Program Enablers can be found in the section Other Items of Interest.

Each strategic outcome in the PAA is associated with one or more program activities. Each program activity is in turn associated with one or more program sub-activities. The PAA provides a framework that links expected results and performance measures to individual activities. Actual results are reported in terms of PAA activities and sub-activities.

The following diagram shows the logical relationship among DFO's strategic outcomes, program activities and program sub-activities.

DFO's Program Activity Architecture

PAA

Note: DFO modified its PAA slightly for 2006-2007. These modifications included consolidating and renaming several sub-activities relating to science to better reflect the Sector's programs. In addition, the Canadian Coast Guard added two new sub-activities to improve the management and reporting of the Government of Canada's public security priorities: Contributing to Other Government Objectives and Maritime Security.

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes

Canada's Performance, the annual report to Parliament on the federal government's contribution to Canada's performance as a nation, is structured around three areas:

  • Economic Affairs, which demonstrates the increased importance given to the links between the Canadian economy and the natural environment;
  • Social Affairs, which reflects the important role health care plays in Canadian society; and
  • International Affairs, which recognizes the international dimension of government activity needed to advance national aspirations.

Each of these areas is associated with a number of outcomes that the federal government is working to achieve. The following table shows the relationship between these Government of Canada outcomes and DFO's outcomes.

Government of Canada Outcomes
Government of Canada Outcomes Safe and Accessible Waterways Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems
Economic Affairs
Strong economic growth   +  
An innovative and knowledge-based economy + + +
A fair and secure marketplace + +  
A clean and healthy environment + + +
Social Affairs
Safe and secure communities +
International Affairs
A strong and mutually beneficial North American partnership +

Departmental Priorities for 2006-2009

To meet its mandate, DFO has identified twelve priority areas: seven program priorities and five management priorities. The table Departmental Priorities for 2006-2009 provides the planned spending for each priority.

Departmental Priorities for 2006-2009
Departmental Priorities Supported by Program Activity Type1 Planned Spending (millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Program Priorities
Fisheries Renewal Fisheries Management Previous * * *
International Governance Fisheries Management/Strategic Policy Previous 23.4 23.4 17.7
Aquaculture Governance Aquaculture Previous 3.9 3.9 3.9
Oceans Action Plan Oceans Management Previous 7.5
Science Renewal Science Previous * * *
Canadian Coast Guard Rejuvenation Canadian Coast Guard Previous 23.0 54.0 69.0
Environmental Process Modernization Habitat Management Previous * * *
Management Priorities
Human Resources Modernization Program Enablers Ongoing 0.6 0.6 0.6
Management Accountability Framework2 Program Enablers Ongoing 0.1 0.1 0.1
Integrated Planning and Reporting2 Program Enablers Ongoing 0.2 0.2 0.2
Integrated Risk Management Program Enablers Ongoing 3.6 2.9 3.0
Departmental Renewal3 Program Enablers New * * *

1 Priority is new, ongoing or previous. New means the priority was introduced during this planning period. Ongoing means the priority has no end date. Previous means the priority was reported in a prior Report on Plans and Priorities or Departmental Performance Report.

2 Co-ordination is provided by a team within the Human Resources and Corporate Services Sector.

3 The Departmental Renewal Priority also includes the renewal of the Small Craft Harbours Program.

*These priorities are managed within ongoing management responsibilities and commitments. Resources directed specifically to the priority cannot be identified.

Program Priorities

DFO has seven program priorities that reflect the Department's responsibility to balance its commitments with available resources to provide quality services to Canadians.

Fisheries Renewal

Wild fisheries are under increasing environmental pressure, and there is ongoing conflict over fisheries allocations. There is a requirement to better manage environmental impacts of fishing, respond to the need to protect species at risk and participate in broader oceans management initiatives. With the increase in the range of ocean uses, interested groups beyond the traditional fisheries sector seek input into fisheries management decisions.

Aboriginal treaty negotiations and settlements continue to shape the fisheries economy. Challenges exist in addressing commercial access for west coast First Nations and developing new models and approaches to co-management with Aboriginal groups across the country. There also remains strong provincial and territorial interest in fisheries issues, requiring continued and strengthened intergovernmental co-operation.

In the coming years, developing a new governance model for fisheries management, including proposals to modernize the Fisheries Act, will be a priority. Although DFO faces financial constraints and a lack of public consensus on how to manage the fishery, the Department will move forward to revitalize its fisheries management program. The objective of Fisheries Renewal is to ensure a sustainable resource that provides an economically viable and diverse industry, supported by a modern fisheries governance system.

The Fisheries Renewal agenda includes three streams of work to enable program and legislative renewal while putting in place the necessary operational supports:

  • Conservation, Stewardship and Compliance Renewal will focus on improving conservation outcomes through a new relationship with all resource users based on shared responsibility and accountability for resource management and its outcomes.
  • Legislative Renewal will be explored to develop options and innovative regulatory and governance approaches to support Fisheries Renewal.
  • Business Modernization will ensure business structures and practices complement and enable policy, program and legislative renewal.

International Governance

There is a rapidly developing international fisheries and oceans agenda and momentum to address threats to marine ecosystems and biodiversity on the high seas.

High seas overfishing, including illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, is threatening fish stocks and degrading oceans ecosystems worldwide. In the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization's (NAFO) Regulatory Area adjacent to Canada's east coast, overfishing of some stocks that straddle the 200-mile limit continues to be a problem. Since May 2004, Canada has maintained an enhanced enforcement presence in the regulatory area, coupled with sustained diplomatic interventions at all levels. Despite significant success in reducing pressure on moratoria species, and while relations with key NAFO partners are improving, non-compliance remains a problem.

Within existing regional fisheries management organizations, including NAFO, there is a need to establish accountability for effective fisheries management and compliance. Further, there is a need to modernize resource management to take into account ecosystem approaches and broader biodiversity concerns, decision-making processes, compliance and enforcement, and science.

Efforts to achieve permanent solutions to overfishing are part of a broader global effort needed to effect permanent changes in international oceans and fisheries governance. This must be a shared co-operative effort. With three oceans and a history of providing leadership on global oceans issues, Canada is well placed for a role in addressing international fisheries and oceans governance issues.

In 2005, DFO collaborated with other government departments to develop the International Fisheries and Oceans Governance Strategy, a plan to advance Canada's interests in more effective governance mechanisms. This is a long-term strategy, for which three years of funding have been provided to start the process of change. This strategy, rooted in a sustainable development framework, will be delivered through three themes: Understanding Fisheries and Oceans, Managing for Sustainable Fisheries, and Managing for Marine Environmental and Ecosystem Sustainability.

Canada will continue to lead action internationally that results in responsible management of high seas fisheries and the sustainability of high seas ecosystems.

Aquaculture Governance

Canada has enormous potential to be a world aquaculture leader. Strengths include extensive coastlines and productive marine and freshwater resources, a reputation for quality products, proximity to established and growing markets, an effective and efficient transportation infrastructure, an internationally reputable food inspection system, a skilled workforce and strong management expertise. However, obstacles, such as a cumbersome regulatory framework and the existence of critical gaps in responsibility with respect to the governance of the sector, keep Canada from realizing its potential in this area.

To address these challenges, DFO will seek opportunities to create the conditions for the development of an environmentally responsible, internationally competitive aquaculture industry in Canada. DFO will also ensure that the regulations for aquaculture are effective and cost-efficient, while providing for accountability and transparency. Science-based and risk-based decision making will also be part of this approach.

DFO will continue to work toward developing a more integrated government response to emerging aquaculture opportunities and challenges through stronger collaboration with federal, provincial and territorial partners. Together with these partners, DFO will establish a renewed aquaculture management framework. The objectives of the framework will be to clarify roles and responsibilities; establish common goals and standards for environmental monitoring, compliance and reporting; share databases; negotiate cost-sharing arrangements for joint programs; and establish a mechanism for bilateral agreements.

Concerns about contaminants, diseases and the overall healthiness of food have consumers seeking assurances regarding the safety of their food supply. DFO continues to work with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Health Canada and the aquaculture industry to ensure the quality and safety of farmed seafood products. Furthermore, DFO will continue to promote increased public and consumer confidence by undertaking and publicizing measures to support the safety of aquaculture products and the environmental sustainability of aquaculture operations.

Oceans Action Plan

Oceans issues are complex and cut across jurisdictions, sectors, international boundaries and communities of interest. This calls for the involvement of citizens, communities, stakeholders, Aboriginal organizations and all levels of government.

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The Oceans Act came into force in 1997 and established the legislative framework for a co-ordinated federal approach to oceans. The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans has the lead responsibility to develop and implement a national strategy for the management of Canada's estuarine, coastal and marine ecosystems. In July 2002, the Government of Canada released Canada's Oceans Strategy, which outlines how the Oceans Act will be implemented.

Canada's Oceans Action Plan (OAP) is a renewed commitment by the Government of Canada to build on this solid legislative and policy framework. The OAP will serve as the overarching umbrella for co-ordinating and implementing oceans activities across 20 federal departments and agencies. The OAP will take a phased approach, with early action on immediate priorities. The initial focus for this year and next will be on five priority oceans areas, including the Scotian Shelf, Placentia Bay/Grand Banks, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Beaufort Sea and the Pacific North Coast.

OAP priorities will be delivered as described below:

  • International Leadership, Sovereignty and Security involves protecting Canada's economic interests and rights on the continental shelf and in the Arctic, addressing overfishing and protecting high-seas biodiversity.
  • Integrated Oceans Management for Sustainable Development involves striking an effective balance between economic opportunities and marine conservation objectives through open and collaborative Integrated Management planning in the five priority oceans areas. Establishing ecosystem-based approaches to science and developing new oceans technologies will provide essential support for decision making.
  • Health of the Oceans involves leading the development of a federal Marine Protected Areas strategy that includes marine protection initiatives of other federal departments. It also involves protecting fragile marine environments and supporting actions (e.g., increased surveillance) to counter sea-based sources of pollution. This includes innovative regulations to prevent marine pollution from ships and to reduce the risk of aquatic invasive species.
  • Science and Technology involves building an environment to allow Canada's world-leading oceans technology sector to grow. There will be an early emphasis on seabed mapping and ecosystem science to support Integrated Management, and on implementing pilot projects in Placentia Bay to demonstrate the potential of new oceans technologies.

Science Renewal

High-quality, timely and relevant scientific advice is required for sound policy development and informed decision making. Through science-policy integration, and in collaboration with other science organizations, the Science program supports the achievement of DFO's outcomes and government-wide priorities.

The demand for scientific information and advice on complex issues of importance to Canadians will continue to increase. To better respond, the Science program needs to be flexible, relevant and sustainable. This requires a more innovative and adaptive approach to the way science is performed and collaborative partnerships are established. It also has implications for the delivery of scientific advice, services and products to clients and stakeholders. Science Renewal initiatives will contribute to the increased scope and depth of scientific activities, build a national capacity for aquatic science, ensure transparency and credibility of scientific advice, and contribute to scientific innovation and commercialization of technology.

In the coming years, DFO will renew its Science program to enhance the delivery of scientific information, advice and services in support of better policy development, decision making and service to Canadians. Work on Science Renewal will include the following:

  • Carrying out long-term strategic and multi-year operational planning in collaboration with clients and partners. This planning will be based on ongoing risk assessments of priorities needing science support. Such planning will be supported through national enabling strategies, including strategies for human resources, funding, partnering, Science vessels, and equipment acquisition and maintenance.
  • Focusing on providing stability for long-term public-good monitoring and data management, while maximizing flexibility in the areas of scientific research, advice, services and products to respond to evolving departmental and federal government priorities. Implementation of a renewed program will be supported by the realignment of the Science budget, including strategic investments to better address the highest priorities.

Canadian Coast Guard Rejuvenation

A visible symbol of Canadian identity and sovereignty, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) is recognized both nationally and internationally as representing excellence in maritime services.

CCG is a Special Operating Agency within DFO that delivers its programs and services through the government's civilian fleet of vessels and a broadly distributed shore infrastructure that includes marine communications and traffic services centres, major bases, multi-tasked lifeboat stations, rescue centres with Canadian Forces, aids to navigation, and hundreds of other assets, such as radio towers, throughout the country. CCG also manages and operates the Canadian Coast Guard College in Sydney, Nova Scotia.

With its widely distributed fleet and shore infrastructure and personnel, CCG is instrumental in saving lives, facilitating maritime commerce, responding effectively to pollution incidents, protecting the aquatic environment and supporting maritime security. CCG stands ready to respond to national and international emergencies and disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina. CCG also continues to support critical DFO and Government of Canada priorities in scientific research and fisheries enforcement activities, including supporting Canada's interest in NAFO, the assessment of the status of the fisheries resource and the monitoring of ocean variability and change.

On April 1, 2005, the Canadian Coast Guard became a Special Operating Agency (SOA) within Fisheries and Oceans. As an SOA, the Coast Guard is striving to be a client-focused organization that is accountable and results oriented in its service.

As it continues to implement SOA status, the Coast Guard has committed to taking a more structured approach to client and stakeholder relations both within and outside the federal government. Over the next year, the Coast Guard is putting in place or reinvigorating:

  • A new governance structure within the federal government for relations with the various departments and agencies that receive support or services from the Coast Guard; and
  • Advisory bodies with external clients and stakeholders, such as the commercial shipping industry and ports, recreational boaters and the fishing industry, at both the national and regional levels.

The commitment to establish these advisory bodies is a critical part of implementing the Special Operating Agency. Their purpose is to improve communications, to better understand the needs and requirements of the recipients of Coast Guard services, and to work together on matters of common interest. As an SOA, the CCG is committed to addressing levels of service, service standards, costs of service and fees in an open and transparent fashion with all internal and external clients and stakeholders. Establishing these bodies is only the first step. Over time, it will be important to continue to improve agreements on levels of service, performance expectations and accountability frameworks. All are critical to the Agency and its clients, as Coast Guard and stakeholders work to provide the right asset or service at the right cost at the right time.

SOA status has strengthened the Coast Guard identity within DFO. Additional strengthening measures will be undertaken in the coming years. The focus for 2006-2007 will be the establishment of a permanent memorial at the Coast Guard College to honour all those who lost their lives carrying out Coast Guard duties since the Coast Guard was formed in 1962. In addition, a review of the Coast Guard uniform policy will be undertaken in response to various requests for changes and improvements.

The Coast Guard will continue to be an active participant in the broader federal maritime security agenda to improve Canada's maritime domain awareness capacities, on-water enforcement and responsiveness capacities and international (United States Coast Guard), interagency and interdepartmental collaboration. Working with its partners, the Agency will implement the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway system Marine Security Enforcement Team initiative with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to improve security through armed on-water patrols. The Agency will also continue to participate in the multi-departmental Marine Security Operations Centres, led by the RCMP and Department of National Defence. In addition, CCG will participate fully in the strategic and operational planning and policy development under way across government.

Coast Guard is proceeding with Fleet Renewal; Budget 2006 reaffirmed support for this key aspect of Coast Guard rejuvenation. Procurement processes are under way to acquire two new offshore fisheries science vessels and eight new mid-shore patrol vessels. Four of the latter will be dedicated to enhancing maritime security on the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway under a joint program with the RCMP. These four vessels will be additions to the Fleet; the others will replace aging vessels that will be taken out of service.

Fleet Renewal also involves effective management of the existing Fleet. New authorities will be sought to facilitate the multi-year management of capital funds for the Fleet and to better align refits with operational requirements. It will also see more effective life-cycle management of the Fleet through implementation of the Integrated Technical Services Strategy.

Under modernization efforts, CCG reaffirms its commitment to innovation and to a focus on continuous improvement. CCG strives to improve its service delivery by taking full advantage of new technologies and by developing strategic partnerships to leverage efforts with the private sector, academia and other levels of government. The Canadian Coast Guard will transform its marine service delivery through technology-based productivity improvements, client service innovations and alternative service delivery. One key initiative is Marine Aids Modernization, which will reduce the cost of providing aids to navigation without reducing the level of service. This involves implementing new technologies and contracting out the commissioning, decommissioning and maintenance of equipment where it is viable and makes sense to do so. A longer term and broader modernization plan will be developed through risk-based analysis, in accordance with ministerial direction and in consultation with clients and stakeholders.

CCG is committed to developing and maintaining high competencies in operational and technical personnel through effective training that meets international standards. The Canadian Coast Guard College, an internationally recognized, bilingual maritime institution, will take on a greater role in becoming a focal point for broad human resource planning. Coast Guard will implement collective staffing by increasing the use of a pre-qualified pool, developing a Ships Crew Recruitment Strategy and working with unions to establish permanent relief pools.

Environmental Process Modernization

The Department's Habitat Management Program is the key federal regulatory program with a mandate to conserve and protect fish habitat. Its responsibilities under the Fisheries Act, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and now the Species at Risk Act (SARA) affect a wide range of individuals, communities and businesses.

In the past, there was growing concern among various levels of government, industry sectors and conservation groups about the way in which the Department was implementing its habitat management responsibilities.

In response to these concerns, DFO launched its Environmental Process Modernization Plan (EPMP) in 2004 to make the Habitat Management Program more effective in protecting and conserving fish habitat. EPMP will improve the efficiency of program delivery and ensure that it is integrated with other responsibilities and interests and is more closely aligned with the principles of smart regulation and sustainable development.

There are six elements in the Environmental Process Modernization Plan:

  • A program-wide, science-based Risk Management Framework for identifying projects posing the greatest risk to the environment;
  • Referral streamlining of low-risk projects so that resources can be reallocated to higher risk reviews and other priorities;
  • An improved management of major projects, including new policy guidance and new organizational structures, to increase the predictability, timeliness and harmonization of decision making;
  • Formalized partnerships with industry sectors, provinces, territories, municipalities, conservation groups and others to enhance understanding, adopt common agendas and integrate DFO's responsibilities with the interests of key stakeholders where possible;
  • Internal measures, including mandatory training for all staff, the adoption of new governance structures and national operating procedures, to improve predictability and the coherence of decision making; and
  • Modernization of habitat compliance to clarify compliance rules and improve compliance and compliance effectiveness.

Management Priorities

In addition to the above program priorities, DFO is committed to five priorities that will affect the internal workings of the Department. These priorities are driven by the government-wide agenda to improve the management of the public service and its programs. The priorities described below are aimed at improving the management of DFO's human resources, implementing a management accountability framework, improving planning processes, integrating risk management and ensuring that the Department can live within its fiscal limits.

Human Resources Modernization

All components of the new Public Service Modernization Act have now come into force, with the last piece of legislation, the new Public Service Employment Act, coming into effect on December 31, 2005. The new legislation brings about significant changes in the way people are managed in the public service. To ensure the continued success and full implementation of Human Resources Modernization in DFO, the Department will focus on the following:

  • Developing and implementing effective human resource planning, within DFO's Integrated Planning Framework;
  • Modernizing staffing policies and processes, to take full advantage of the flexibilities offered through the new Public Service Employment Act;
  • Advancing the Department's priority to establish national structures and national model work descriptions with a view to update and review employees' positions, as required by the collective agreements and based on the Management Accountability Framework;
  • Continuing to enhance labour relations through improved union-management consultations and increased use of informal conflict resolution;
  • Ensuring alignment of DFO's learning strategy and programs with the government's broad framework for learning in the public service;
  • Developing and implementing a comprehensive and integrated human resource monitoring and reporting framework; and
  • Developing and implementing policies, procedures and a monitoring framework for assuming the responsibility for directly hiring executives.

Management Accountability Framework

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The Treasury Board Secretariat has developed a Management Accountability Framework (MAF). The framework provides a vision for modern public service management in 10 main management expectations. The MAF has evolved into a means of measuring performance with a standard set of indicators. The Department has received its 2005 MAF assessment. In 2006-2007, DFO will discuss this assessment with Treasury Board Secretariat and respond to the observations by implementing necessary improvements.

Integrated Planning and Reporting

In 2004-2005, the Department began implementing an integrated planning framework to align strategic, business, financial and human resource plans and processes. The focus to date has been on the integration of human resource and business plans, including the development of performance measures.

Over the next three years, DFO will expand the integrated planning framework to include other planning activities, such as capital planning, and will develop a performance measurement framework for DFO. Challenges facing DFO in this further integration include dealing with incompatible timelines for various planning activities, integrating planning activities with performance reporting, setting up a planning structure using the Program Activity Architecture (PAA) and developing solid plans in the face of fiscal uncertainties.

Structuring plans according to the PAA has been complicated by the need to integrate and challenge plans prepared at sector, regional and Agency (CCG) levels. DFO will continue to make improvements in the process and to connect with the responsible leads of other planning activities to bring planning schedules into line.

Integrated Risk Management

DFO will implement Integrated Risk Management in April of 2006 across all regions and sectors and in the Agency. This will involve holding approximately 60 workshops across the Department. The results of these workshops will be integrated into the Department's Integrated Planning Framework and aggregated according to the strategic outcomes set out in the Program Activity Architecture.

Integrated Risk Management will be used for annual planning, for the support of key decisions and for the management of major projects.

Departmental Renewal

Fisheries and Oceans Canada is committed to living within the Department's means while addressing chronic budgetary shortfalls and financial pressures, identifying a permanent source of funds for contributing to government-wide reallocation and generating financial flexibility to address new priorities. The Department will ensure the decisions made in the coming years consistently reflect these aims.

The Department will continue to manage its finances, renew policies and programs, and modernize management to assess and implement policy and program changes. Within this context, DFO will undertake a number of initiatives to ensure that ongoing operations are sustainable. For example, the Department will continue to develop a strategic management plan for information management and technology, focusing on renewed governance, within DFO and with stakeholders, to ensure program sustainability. DFO will also move forward with an information technology infrastructure rationalization initiative that will capitalize on the potential to streamline and achieve future and ongoing savings in the management of DFO's information technology infrastructure.

DFO has also been working on possible new directions for the Small Craft Harbours Program. A new direction is intended to place the Program on a more sustainable basis, while addressing evolving Program requirements and client needs. These development efforts will continue to be a priority.

 




Plans for 2006-2009 by Strategic Outcome

In this section:

Safe and Accessible Waterways

Surrounded by the Arctic, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and home to the Great Lakes, Canada is one of the foremost maritime nations in the world. Canada boasts the world's:

Providing access to Canadian waterways and ensuring the overall safety and integrity of Canada's marine infrastructure for the benefit of all Canadians.

  • Longest coastline (243,792 kilometres) — stretched out as a continuous line, it would circle the equator more than six times (25% of the world's coastline);
  • Largest freshwater system — Canada's two million lakes and rivers cover 7.6% of its landmass (755,000 square kilometres);
  • Longest inland waterway (3,700 kilometres) — from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Lake Superior;
  • Largest archipelago — Canada's Arctic islands, including six of the world's 30 largest islands, cover 1.4 million square kilometres; and
  • World's greatest tidal range — 16 metres in the Bay of Fundy and Ungava Bay.

Canada's oceans and inland water system, and their resources, have played an important role in the country's history, identity and culture. Eight of the 10 provinces and all three territories have ocean shorefront, and nearly a quarter of Canadians live in coastal communities. Canada's inland water system — particularly the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Great Lakes — has also played a pivotal role in Canada's development.

Canada's oceans, shorelines and inland waters support a growing number of industries and uses. Shipping, fishing, aquaculture, ecotourism, boating, oil and gas extraction, and other ocean activities contribute an estimated $20 billion a year to the Canadian economy.

The Safe and Accessible Waterways strategic outcome is delivered through three program activities:

  • Canadian Coast Guard;
  • Small Craft Harbours; and
  • Science.

Operating Environment

International trade and marine traffic are growing steadily, and competition for waterway use is increasing. There is more and more pressure to enhance maritime security measures, increase the federal presence in Canadian waters and improve on-water response capability in such areas as conservation and protection and anti-smuggling activities. Increases in domestic traffic will increase waterway congestion, add to the competition for certified marine personnel and further complicate internal and trans-border security concerns. It will also necessitate additional hydrographic charting and ocean science services. Canadians and other countries expect that the Coast Guard will minimize the loss of life, injuries and property damage resulting from maritime incidents and support environmental protection efforts.

The Canadian Coast Guard's strategic response to this complex operating environment is to focus on its state of readiness to best react to marine emergencies through operation response and to mitigate risks through prevention programs and services to promote safety. In this context, "safety" refers to people's personal and economic well-being, the protection of infrastructure and the protection of the ocean and freshwater environments. Coast Guard, as a national institution, is optimizing program service delivery as a Special Operating Agency to best meet the varying needs of diverse clients and stakeholders. As a visible and active operational presence along Canada's marine borders, the Canadian Coast Guard is also a strong symbol of national identity and Canadian sovereignty.

Departmental efforts remain focused on providing access and ensuring the overall safety and integrity of Canada's marine infrastructure.

Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents (FTEs), Safe and Accessible Waterways
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Safe and Accessible Waterways 696.5 717.6 737.6
Program Enablers1 141.1 137.2 135.4
Total 837.6 854.8 873.0
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Safe and Accessible Waterways 5,026 5,026 5,011
Program Enablers1 870 875 882
Total 5,896 5,901 5,893

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on Program Enablers.

Program Activity: Canadian Coast Guard

Description from Part II — The Main Estimates: Provision of maritime services that contribute to the enhancement and maintenance of maritime safety and commerce; protection of marine and freshwater environment; oceans and fisheries resource management; security; and other government maritime priorities via maritime expertise, Canada's civilian fleet, a broadly distributed shore infrastructure, and collaboration with various stakeholders.

Expected Results

  • Minimal loss of life, injury and property damage resulting from marine incidents
  • Effective and efficient management of waterways that support marine commerce
  • Sustainability of the marine and freshwater environment through timely and effective response
  • A marine infrastructure that provides efficient services to all clients
Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Canadian Coast Guard
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Canadian Coast Guard 565.4 605.0 626.0
Program Enablers1 112.2 111.4 111.6
Total 677.62 716.42 737.6
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Canadian Coast Guard 4,604 4,604 4,589
Program Enablers1 700 731 723
Total 5,304 5,335 5,312

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on the Program Enablers.

2Totals do not reflect respendable revenue. For details on respendable revenue, see the table Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue.

Canadian Coast Guard Sub-activities

The Canadian Coast Guard program activity is delivered via nine program sub-activities:

  • Aids and Waterways Services — delivering Aids to Navigation, Waterways Management, and Marine Safety Information services to support marine safety, accessibility of waterways, and environmental protection, including maintenance dredging of the Great Lakes Connecting Channels (treaty obligation);
  • Marine Communications and Traffic Services — providing marine distress/safety communications and co-ordination, conducting vessel screenings, regulating vessel traffic movement and providing information systems and public correspondence on a 24/7 basis;
  • Icebreaking Services — providing icebreaking and related services (ice routing and information, harbour breakouts, information provision, routing assistance, etc.) to facilitate safe and expeditious movement of maritime traffic through and around ice-covered Canadian waters;
  • Search and Rescue Services — with the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary, providing and leading the maritime search and rescue component of the federal search and rescue program with the primary goal of saving lives at risk in Canada's maritime environment;
  • Environmental Response Services — as the lead federal agency for ship-source spill response, delivering environmental incident preparedness and response services that protect the marine environment under Canadian jurisdiction and providing response assistance to other countries under international agreements (for north of 60°, CCG is the sole response organization);
  • Coast Guard College — operating as the Canadian Coast Guard's training authority; preparing marine personnel to deliver Coast Guard services and programs to the highest of standards;
  • Maritime Security — providing leadership of the Government of Canada's maritime security priorities within Fisheries and Oceans Canada with a focus on the provision of on-water services, maritime domain awareness and maritime expertise;
  • Contribution to Other Government Objectives — delivery of civilian marine services (expertise, personnel and infrastructure (vessels and aircraft)) on behalf of other government departments or in support of agencies and organizations in the achievement of the Government of Canada's maritime priorities; and
  • Coast Guard Fleet Services — management, operation and maintenance of the CCG Fleet (vessels and aircraft) for the purpose of delivering civilian marine services in support of the Government of Canada's maritime priorities.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity

The Department will focus on the following plans for CCG sub-activities during the current planning period.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity
Plans Expected Results Performance Indicators
Aids and Waterways Services
  • Ongoing operations as described above this table
  • Rejuvenation Agenda — Proceed with the Marine Aids Modernization project to ensure that DFO provides an effective and efficient service responding to users' changing needs
  • Reinvest in strategic assets to address compliance with Canada Shipping Act standards
  • Safe and effective vessel transits and movements and access to ports
  • Public/stakeholder confidence in aids and waterways services
  • Number of incidents incidents attributed to aids to navigation
  • Number of incidents attributed to waterways conditions
  • Level of public confidence
Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS)
  • Ongoing operations as described above this table
  • Rejuvenation Agenda — Install an Automatic Identification System at 80 remote sites sites, interfacing the system at MCTS centres and implementing a Long-Range Vessel Identification and Tracking (LRIT) capability; replace the Communication Control System at 22 MCTS centres and provide training at the Coast Guard College; implement the Global Marine Distress and Safety System via Very High Frequency Digital Selective Calling at selected sites, including the St. Lawrence River and Great Lakes Basin; continue to migrate to a single national Vessel Traffic Management Information System to link and filter all data to government agencies and the marine industry
  • Reduced number and severity of maritime incidents with human, property and environmental consequences
  • Efficient movement of shipping
  • Public/stakeholder confidence in marine communications and traffic services
  • Number of incidents detected; shipping accidents — collisions, groundings and strikings
  • Vessel movement per incident
  • Level of public confidence
Icebreaking Services
  • Ongoing operations as described above this table
  • Safe, timely and efficient vessel transits and movements through ice-infested waters
  • Reduced flooding caused by ice jams (further resulting in less property damage and shore erosion)
  • Enhanced Arctic sovereignty
  • Public/stakeholder confidence in icebreaking services
  • Number of vessels damaged by ice
  • Number of flood control tasking
  • Number of route assistance and ice information requests
  • Icebreaker availability
  • Level of public confidence
Search and Rescue Services
  • Ongoing operations as described above this table
  • Rejuvenation Agenda — Update the search and rescue program needs needs analysis to identify demand and determine an equitable approach to deliver search and rescue services across Canada; renew the service delivery partnering arrangements with the CCG Auxiliary
  • Minimized loss of life and injuries to people at risk in marine incidents
  • Reduced number and severity of search and rescue incidents
  • Public/stakeholder confidence in search and rescue services
  • Percentage of lives saved relative to lives at risk
  • Level of public confidence
Environmental Response Services
  • Ongoing operations as described above this table
  • Rejuvenation Agenda — Renew CCG's role as a response organization to ensure that CCG enhances its efficacy as the lead federal agency for managing responses to marine pollution incidents; invest in a rejunvenated training and exercise program plan as well as a national environmental response strategy
  • Minimized adverse impacts of marine pollution incidents
  • Public/stakeholder confidence in environmental response services
  • Effectiveness of response to number of spills
  • Level of public confidence
Coast Guard College
  • Ongoing operations as described above this table
  • Rejuvenation Agenda — Develop a more focused and businesslike institution with a renewed mandate to supply officers and technical experts to the CCG fleet; attain financial sustainability through a resource review and the adoption of appropriate management frameworks
  • Highly qualified Canadian Coast Guard personnel providing safe and effective delivery of the Canadian Coast Guard programs and services
  • A Canadian Coast Guard ready to face current and future demographic changes
  • National and international recognition for excellence in delivery of specialized marine training and expertise to Canadian and international partners and clients
  • Under development
Maritime Security
  • Ongoing operations as described above this table
  • Recognition of CCG/DFO as a value-added and proactive partner in the delivery of multi-agency solutions for enhanced maritime security
  • Number of public security and anti-terrorism initiatives DFO/CCG is involved in
  • Level of confidence of federal security community
Contribution to Other Government Objectives
  • Ongoing operations as described above this table
  • Client service requirements met in a safe and efficient manner
  • Under development
Coast Guard Fleet Services
  • Ongoing operations as described above this table
  • Rejuvenation Agenda — Continue the Fleet replacement strategy, including the acquisition of 8 mid-shore patrol vessels and 2 offshore fisheries science vessels; implement vessel life extension projects to return vessels to a baseline condition; bring Fleet Renewal Plan of 2011-2015 forward for approval in 2006-2007 to replace various types of vessels; develop human resource plan for seagoing personnel; introduce plan for rotational crewing system for discussion; improve fleet information management, as well as fleet financial planning, pricing and costing
  • Client service requirements met in a safe and efficient manner
  • Safe delivery — number, type and level of risk of hazardous occurrences; number and nature of non-conformities
  • Efficient delivery — vessel utilization percentage, vessel non-assignment percentage, actual maintenance percentage, actual multi-tasking percentage
  • Effective delivery — actual service delivery percentage, actual CCG and client delays

Program Activity: Small Craft Harbours

Description from Part II — The Main Estimates: Operation and maintenance of a national system of harbours critical to Canada's commercial fishing industry.

As part of the Departmental Renewal initiative, the Small Craft Harbours Program will continue to work on possible new directions intended to place the Program on a more sustainable basis, while addressing evolving program requirements and client needs.

Expected Results

  • A network of harbours essential for Canada's commercial fishing industry that is open, safe, efficient and in good repair
  • Program directions adjusted to place the Program on a more sustainable basis, while addressing evolving program requirements and client needs
  • Major repairs and maintenance to core fishing harbours undertaken
  • Recreational and non-core fishing harbours divested and core fishing harbours modified to better meet demand
  • Strong, professional and independent Harbour Authorities operating and managing core fishing harbours
Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Small Craft Harbours
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Small Craft Harbours 95.6 77.5 74.5
Program Enablers1 17.6 12.8 10.7
Total 113.3 90.3 85.2
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Small Craft Harbours 125 125 125
Program Enablers1 107 79 80
Total 232 204 205

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on the Program Enablers.

Small Craft Harbours Sub-activities

The Small Craft Harbours program activity is delivered via three program sub-activities:

  • Operations — operating, through client-run Harbour Authorities, a national system of harbours critical to Canada's commercial fishing industry; co-ordinating efforts to maintain and recruit Harbour Authorities; providing support and guidance on harbour management; addressing the changing needs of commercial fishing and aquaculture industries; and ensuring environmental compliance with federal, provincial and municipal regulations;
  • Maintenance — providing strategic direction for harbour and facility development, repair and maintenance; providing the comprehensive program and project planning required to develop and maintain core harbours; and promoting efficient and effective project delivery mechanisms to ensure harbour safety and optimal management of client needs; and
  • Divestiture — divesting harbours not essential for Canada's commercial fishing industry; monitoring compliance with terms and conditions of divestiture agreements pursuant to divestiture of non-core harbours; implementing safety measures and ensuring minimal maintenance at non-core harbours as required; and undertaking pre-divestiture repairs or providing equivalent grants in support of divestiture.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity

Ongoing operations account for the majority of the resources used to carry out Small Craft Harbours sub-activities. In addition to ongoing operations, the Department will focus on the following plans for Small Craft Harbours sub-activities during the current planning period.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity
Plans Expected Results Performance Indicators
Operations
  • Achieve greater economies of scale, for example, by facilitating larger geographic groupings
  • Encourage Harbour Authorities (HAs) to share the costs of harbour administration, operation and professional management
  • Use the existing network of HA Advisory Committees to communicate with HAs
  • Increase the number of existing core fishing harbours managed by HAs
  • Support superior environmental management by monitoring the Environmental Management Plans in place and ensuring compliance with federal, provincial and municipal regulations
  • Efficient and effective management of core fishing harbours by Harbour Authorities
  • Compliance with environmental and health and safety standards
  • Percentage of existing core fishing harbours managed by Harbour Authorities
  • Percentage of core fishing harbours that have Environmental Management Plans in place
Maintenance
  • Identify and implement strategic opportunities to improve project delivery by investigating alternative delivery mechanisms
  • Increase the role of HAs in project management
  • Prepare and implement an annual expenditure plan to ensure that current harbour facilities have safe structural and operating conditions and can accommodate changes in client mix over the longer term
  • Condition and functional adequacy of harbours essential for Canada's fishing industry that meet client expectations
  • Cost-effective and efficient management of maintenance and repair activities
  • Performance ratings at core fishing harbours
  • Condition of facilities at core fishing harbours
Divestiture
  • Conduct pre-divestiture repairs or provide equivalent grants, with priority going to the harbours with the most urgent requirements or best opportunities
  • Implement safety measures at non-core fishing and recreational harbours pending divestiture
  • Divestiture of recreational and low-activity fishing harbours with minimal negative impact on communities
  • Non-core fishing harbours pending divestiture that are safe, and active recreational harbours that remain operational
  • Number of recreational and low-activity fishing harbours divested per year
  • Number of harbours divested annually versus total number of harbours to be divested
  • Percentage of facilities at non-core fishing harbours and of recreational harbours that are "fair", "good" or "very good"
  • Percentage of "fair", "good" or "very good" performance ratings at non-core harbours

Program Activity: Science

Description from Part II — The Main Estimates: Provision of scientific research, monitoring, advice, products and services and data management in support of safe and accessible waterways. These functions are provided through a network of research facilities in collaboration with other government departments, private sector, academia and international organizations.

In addition to bringing the two Science programs (hydrography and ocean science) together, to improve synergy and integration of effort, Science will directly support the departmental priority on International Governance through the provision of information, data and evidence in support of Canada's Sovereign claim under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). Science will also undertake additional hydrographic charting in high-risk areas to help ensure the safe navigation of mariners in key areas and in areas of increased industrial activities where current charts are less than adequate.

Expected Results

  • Science information (oceanographic information and hydrographic products and services) are used to achieve: a) Safe navigation and b) Sovereignty and protection

Performance Indicators

  • Annual distribution of hydrographic charts, publications and information brochures
  • Proportion of service targets met
  • Work completed for Canada's claim to the continental shelf under UNCLOS
Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Science
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Science 35.5 35.1 37.1
Program Enablers1 11.2 13.0 13.1
Total 46.7 48.1 50.1
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Science 298 298 298
Program Enablers1 63 66 80
Total 361 364 378

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on Program Enablers.

Science Sub-activities

Science in support of safe and accessible waterways is delivered by means of two program sub-activities:

  • Providing products and services for navigation — providing up-to-date, timely and accurate hydrographic products and services through surveys, measures and charts that describe the physical features of Canada's oceans, seas, rivers and lakes; and
  • Supporting maritime safety and security and Canadian sovereignty — providing hydrographic data and information to support territorial claims and international disputes associated with limits and boundaries, as well as undertaking oceanographic research and monitoring that enable the forecasting of ocean conditions and provide insight into the impacts of climate change on navigation.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity

Ongoing operations account for the majority of the resources used to carry out Science sub-activities in support of safe and accessible waterways. In addition to ongoing operations, the Department will focus on the following plans for Science sub-activities in support of safe and accessible waterways during the current planning period.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity
Plans Expected Results
Providing Products and Services for Navigation
  • Continue to apply a risk-based approach and level of service initiative to the management of the hydrographic portfolio of navigational products
  • Undertake additional hydrographic charting in high-risk areas
  • Initiate the development of a model for increased private-sector participation in printing and distributing Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS) navigational products
  • Improved and more up-to-date charts and other navigational products
  • Increased accuracy and detail of navigation products
  • Increased access to and use of navigation tools by mariners and industry
  • Increased integration of nautical information and products
Supporting Maritime Safety and Security and Canadian Sovereignty
  • Provide information, data and evidence to support Canada's claim to the outer limits of the continental shelf under Article 76 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea
  • Improved ability to forecast ocean events and ice conditions
  • More hydrographic and ocean event data available to users to ensure security and safety (e.g., Department of National Defence, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, CCG)
  • Increased data to negotiate offshore Canadian jurisdiction


Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Delivering an integrated fisheries and aquaculture program that is credible, science based, affordable, and effective, and contributes to sustainable wealth for Canadians.

Commercial and recreational fishing are important sources of revenue in parts of Canada where few other economic opportunities exist. The Atlantic fishing industry employs more than 84,000 people and the Pacific fisheries provide employment for 14,000 fishers and plant workers. Despite declines in the historically valuable groundfish stocks of Atlantic Canada and the lucrative salmon fisheries of the Pacific coast, abundant harvests of snow crab, lobster and shrimp are pushing Canadian fishery exports to new highs. In 2004, Canada's fish and seafood exports reached $4.5 billion — the highest value on record. And Canadian sport fishing continues to inject billions of dollars into local economies each year.

Canada's commercial fishery is characterized by a multitude of small operators and a handful of large vertically integrated companies that are continually faced with challenges in light of a complex mix of biological, economic and social factors. After record landed values in the commercial fishery in 2004, the industry is now facing a number of important economic and resource issues. A high Canadian dollar that is hurting our exports of fishery products, competition with countries such as China, as well as price and resource declines in Atlantic shellfish and Pacific salmon fisheries are hampering the long-term viability of harvesting and processing operations that are crucial to many rural and remote coastal communities.

The viability of many of Canada's coastal communities is directly linked to the health of the fisheries. As world demand for fish and seafood products soars, there is a need to be increasingly vigilant about the health of our fisheries and the integrity of the ecosystems that support them. New technologies have made it easier to catch and process far more fish than can be harvested sustainably. In other words, there simply may not be enough wild fish to keep pace with the rising demand.

The decline of some historically valuable stocks in the 1990s made it clear that ecosystems are complex living systems that respond to human activity and global environmental changes in unpredictable and variable ways. The job of Fisheries and Oceans Canada is to continue to understand the complex factors governing fish abundance through sound science, to regulate the harvest and to preserve fish habitat so Canadian fisheries will remain viable.

Fisheries Management Renewal (FMR) is a package of program renewal undertakings that promote a strong and healthy resource and an improved relationship with resource users and other stakeholders. It sets out to achieve three objectives: strong conservation outcomes, shared stewardship, and stable access and allocation. The FMR agenda is being implemented in concert with Science Renewal, especially in regard to the achievement of strong conservation outcomes, which include an increasing focus on the scientific study and evaluation of Canada's aquatic ecosystems.

The growing world demand for fish, coupled with the inability of wild fish stocks to sustainably meet demand, has kindled much interest in aquaculture — the farming of fish, shellfish and aquatic plants. Aquaculture currently produces nearly a third of the fish and shellfish consumed worldwide; by 2010, it could account for nearly half of the world's fisheries production. In Canada, aquaculturists are cultivating everything from salmon and halibut to mussels and scallops. In doing so, they are bringing much-needed economic diversification to many coastal communities.

This strategic outcome is about delivering an integrated fisheries and aquaculture program that is credible, science based, affordable, and effective, and contributes to sustainable wealth for Canadians. This will result in sustainable fisheries and aquaculture. Ensuring conservation and sustainable use of Canada's fisheries resources depends on sound scientific research and advice and on developing a modernized fisheries management regime that is integrated with the broader oceans management agenda.

This strategic outcome is delivered through three program activities:

  • Fisheries Management;
  • Aquaculture; and
  • Science.

Operating Environment

DFO continues to pursue a renewal agenda that focuses on modernizing the decision-making system and building new relationships with resource users based on shared stewardship. Efforts will be guided by the principles of ecosystem-based management, predictability, stability and transparency. The challenge is to create the conditions for improving the economic viability and performance of the fishing and aquaculture sectors.

These changes are essential to meeting the challenges of the Species at Risk Act, mitigating the effects of climate change and achieving sustainable fisheries. DFO will work with other levels of government and resource users to develop recovery strategies for fisheries facing serious conservation and socio-economic challenges.

The Department is committed to fostering the growth of a sustainable aquaculture industry. It will do this by enhancing public confidence in the sector, increasing the industry's global competitiveness, seeking to maintain a healthy environment, ensuring healthy fish products and co-operatively managing aquatic resources based on sound science.

Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture 535.1 430.0 423.0
Program Enablers1 121.2 116.1 111.2
Total 656.3 546.2 534.2
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture 2,572 2,497 2,490
Program Enablers1 690 696 684
Total 3,262 3,193 3,174

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on the Program Enablers.

Program Activity: Fisheries Management

Description from Part II — The Main Estimates: Conservation of Canada's fisheries resources to ensure sustainable resource utilization through close collaboration with resource users and stakeholders.

Expected Results

  • Conservation of stocks and habitat
  • Sustainable resource use for present and future generations
Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Fisheries Management
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Fisheries Management 379.5 285.0 282.0
Program Enablers1 63.7 64.3 63.6
Total 443.2 349.3 345.6
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Fisheries Management 1,502 1,473 1,473
Program Enablers1 414 429 426
Total 1,916 1,902 1,899

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on the Program Enablers.

Fisheries Management Sub-activities

This program activity is delivered via five program sub-activities:

  • Resource management — delivering policies, programs and plans, in partnership with industry, to manage and protect fishery resources, to ensure sustainability and provide for the fair allocation and distribution of harvestable surpluses among those dependent on the resource;
  • Aboriginal policy and governance — providing policy advice on Aboriginal fishing issues, negotiating agreements on the management of Aboriginal fisheries, integrating agreements into overall management frameworks, advising on land claims and self-government, and promoting fisheries-related economic opportunities for Aboriginal communities;
  • Salmon Enhancement Program — focusing on fish production to preserve vulnerable stocks and sustain fisheries, increasing public awareness and building community involvement capacity;
  • International fisheries conservation — negotiating and administering international treaties and agreements affecting conservation, allocations, the conduct of bilateral and multilateral fisheries relations with other countries, the settlement of issues related to maritime boundary disputes, and the formulation and presentation of international fisheries conservation advice to the Minister; and
  • Conservation and protection — deploying Fishery Officers to ensure compliance with the legislation, regulations and fishing plans relating to conservation and sustainable use of the resource through promotion, monitoring and enforcement.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity

Ongoing operations account for the majority of the resources used to carry out Fisheries Management sub-activities. In addition to ongoing operations, the Department will focus on the following plans for Fisheries Management sub-activities during the current planning period.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity
Plans Expected Results
Resource Management
  • Continue to prepare and implement Integrated Fisheries Management Plans for all key fisheries
  • Modernize fisheries management by clarifying policy direction and programming
  • Integrated management of fisheries resources in collaboration with stakeholders
  • A modernized fisheries management regime
Aboriginal Policy and Governance
  • Negotiate and implement fisheries agreements with First Nations and Aboriginal communities and promote integrated commercial fisheries
  • Provide policy advice and support in regard to maintaining and enhancing relations with Aboriginal communities and First Nations
  • Modernize fisheries management by clarifying policy direction and programming
  • Negotiation and implementation of fisheries agreements with First Nations and Aboriginal communities in fulfilment of federal fiduciary responsibilities
  • Promotion of integrated commercial fisheries
Salmon Enhancement Program
  • Continue fish production at hatcheries
  • Continue fish habitat restoration projects and initiatives
  • Continue community outreach, partnering and education
  • Strategic enhancement of wild stocks and fish habitat
  • Increased awareness and stewardship to conserve and protect fish and fish habitat
International Fisheries Conservation
  • Negotiate and administer bilateral and multilateral fisheries treaties and governance agreements related to trans-boundary, highly migratory, straddling and external fish stocks on the high seas
  • Develop and implement a governance strategy on long-term foreign overfishing and fishing on the international high seas
  • Assertion of Canadian interests with respect to internationally managed fish stocks
  • Sound international fisheries governance
  • Protection of Canadian sovereignty
Conservation and Protection
  • Deploy Conservation and Protection personnel to promote compliance and deter non-compliance activities
  • Promote compliance and enforcement activities on the Fraser River
  • Modernize fisheries management by clarifying policy direction and programming
  • A high level of compliance with fisheries legislation and regulation in the delivery of effective compliance programs
  • A more strategic, integrated, innovative, risk-based compliance program

Program Activity: Aquaculture

Description from Part II — The Main Estimates: Creation of conditions for a vibrant and innovative aquaculture industry that is environmentally and socially responsible, economically viable and internationally competitive.

Responsibility for aquaculture development is shared among the federal, provincial and territorial governments. DFO, as the lead federal department for aquaculture, works to renew and strengthen the management framework for aquaculture by engaging other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments, and industry and aquaculture stakeholders in helping to establish the conditions for vibrant and responsible aquaculture development.

DFO works to ensure that the aquaculture support programs it develops and delivers are fully integrated into the Department's policy approach, and that the advice and guidance provided to industry, the review of site applications, the issuance of applicable licences, and the review of applications under other government department programs are aligned with DFO's objectives and priorities.

Recognizing the critical importance of public, consumer and investor confidence in Canadian aquaculture, DFO seeks to engage stakeholders, Aboriginal peoples and other interested Canadians in meaningful dialog on aquaculture issues to ensure its policies, advice and the programs it delivers reflect the priorities of Canadians and keep pace as aquaculture grows in Canada.

Expected Results

  • Informed and objective decision making
  • Sound and integrated governance
  • Enhanced environmental monitoring, compliance and auditing
  • Stakeholder/partner engagement
  • A streamlined regulatory environment, harmonized standards and practices and enhanced public confidence to support the development of aquaculture in Canada

Performance Indicators

  • Increase in aquaculture production, i.e., growing, competitive, market-focused industry with good environmental and social performance
  • Percentage of decisions complying with a risk/evidence/science-based decision-making approach
  • Percentage of regions with operating federal and joint federal/provincial/territorial review bodies
  • Creation of codes of conduct by industry that address federal requirements
Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Aquaculture
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Aquaculture 2.7 2.7 2.7
Program Enablers1 0.8 0.7 0.7
Total 3.5 3.4 3.4
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Aquaculture 27 27 27
Program Enablers1 5 5 5
Total 32 32 32

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on the Program Enablers.

Program Activity: Science

Description from Part II — The Main Estimates: Provision of scientific research, monitoring, advice, products and services and data management in support of sustainable fisheries and aquaculture. These functions are provided through a network of research facilities in collaboration with other government departments, private sector, academia and international organizations.

Science will provide direct support to established priorities through the following initiatives:

  • International fisheries and oceans governance — improve knowledge about the structure, functioning and properties of high seas ecosystems, as well as the ecological impacts of fishing. The new knowledge will enable Canada to join the global community in contributing to a sound scientific base in support of international fisheries governance regimes.
  • Science Renewal — continue to realign science efforts in support of a broader ecosystem-based scientific approach to the monitoring and assessment of the status of fishery resources.
  • National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP) — continue implementation of the NAAHP. Science will establish a National Diagnostic and Research Laboratory System for the delivery of information required to support new aquatic animal health regulations being developed by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
  • Aquatic Invasive Alien Species — begin implementation of Canada's Action Plan to Address the Threat of Aquatic Invasive Species.

Expected Results

  • Scientific information to support a program vision of sustainable harvest and culture of fish and other aquatic resources and to contribute to sustainable wealth and environment

Performance Indicators

  • Scientific production by Fisheries and Oceans
  • Canadian confidence in DFO Science
  • Level of partnering in scientific research
  • Variance from planned resourcing
  • Number of responses to requests for science advice
Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Science
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Science 152.9 142.3 138.3
Program Enablers1 56.7 51.2 46.9
Total 209.6 193.5 185.2
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Science 1,043 997 990
Program Enablers1 270 263 253
Total 1,313 1,260 1,243

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on the Program Enablers.

Science Sub-activities

Science in support of sustainable fisheries and aquaculture is delivered through six program sub-activities:

  • Monitoring and assessing the status of fishery resources — providing scientific advice on the status of stocks and conservation objectives for fish, invertebrate and marine mammals, in support of decision making on sustainable harvest levels and international negotiations on the management of straddling stocks;
  • Supporting the assessment and recovery of species at risk — conducting research and monitoring, including strategies, action plans and identification of critical habitat, to provide advice on the status of aquatic species, the issuance of permits and agreements, and the recovery of species at risk;
  • Researching aquatic invasive species and monitoring aquatic animal diseases — providing advice, including surveillance, detection and reporting of diseases of national and international importance in wild and cultured aquatic animals, to assist efforts to prevent the introduction of aquatic invasive species and animal diseases and to control them when they are introduced;
  • Supporting sustainable aquaculture and understanding aquaculture-environment interactions — undertaking research directed toward improved production and environmental performance of the aquaculture industry and the increased understanding of interactions between aquaculture and the environment;
  • Applying genomics and biotechnology to aquatic ecosystems — developing and adopting leading-edge genomics and biotechnology tools to improve the Department's ability to protect endangered species, manage opening and closing of fisheries, avoid overexploitation of resources, prosecute poachers, improve aquaculture practices, control disease outbreaks, remediate contaminated sites, and regulate aquatic organisms with novel traits; and
  • Contributing to science management in DFO and the Government of Canada — providing national management functions to support the Science program within the Department and across federal science-based departments and agencies.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity

Ongoing operations account for the majority of the resources used to carry out Science sub-activities in support of sustainable fisheries and aquaculture. In addition to ongoing operations, the Department will focus on the following plans for Science sub-activities in support of sustainable fisheries and aquaculture during the current planning period.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity
Plans Expected Results
Monitoring and Assessing the Status of Fishery Resources
  • Support Canada's strategy to curb overfishing and strengthen international fisheries governance by improving knowledge of the structure, functioning and properties of high seas ecosystems, as well as the ecological impacts of fishing
  • Assist Fisheries and Aquaculture Management in applying the precautionary approach, implementing the Pacific Wild Salmon Policy, developing and implementing a Wild Atlantic Salmon Policy and providing advice on conservation objectives
  • Increased knowledge of stock-specific conservation requirements and impacts of harvesting for use by decision makers
  • Increased knowledge of sustainable fisheries practices for use by industry and subsistence fishers
Supporting the Assessment and Recovery of Species at Risk
  • Provide information to the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada in support of its efforts to identify and assess species that may be at risk
  • Provide advice on the issuance of Species at Risk Act (SARA) permits and agreements by the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans under Section 73 and 74 of the Act
  • Provide advice on the recovery of species at risk; this includes developing and implementing recovery strategies and action plans, identifying habitats necessary for the survival and recovery of the species, and evaluating the chances of recovery
  • Support consultations on 22 species that are candidates for Schedule 1 listing (Species at Risk Act)
  • Increased knowledge to support recommendations for SARA listing and for the issuing of permits
  • Increased knowledge in support of actions for the recovery of listed species
Researching Aquatic Invasive Species and Monitoring Aquatic Animal Diseases
  • Start implementing Canada's Action Plan to Address the Threat of Aquatic Invasive Species by undertaking research to address high-priority species, pathways of invasion and geographic locations; work will continue on planning activities associated with the rapid response to newly discovered introductions, and the development of the national Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) database; methodologies for detecting new invasions, tracking the spread of established populations and assessing risk will also be examined
  • Support Policy Sector in the development of a national regulatory framework for AIS
  • Continue implementing NAAHP; Science will establish a National Diagnostic and Research Laboratory System for delivery of information required to support new aquatic animal health regulations being developed by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  • Assist with the development of new aquatic animal health regulations under the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's Health of Animals Act and work with the Agency to ensure delivery of federal responsibilities
  • Increased knowledge of pathways, controls and impacts of aquatic invasive species for use by decision makers
  • Enhanced ability to prevent serious disease outbreaks and certify aquatic animal health status in support of the Canadian fish/seafood trade
Supporting Sustainable Aquaculture and Understanding Aquaculture-Environment Interactions
  • Develop and operationalize a national integrated aquaculture science framework
  • Provide scientific information and advice on the interactions between aquaculture and the environment, notably on the science underpinning aquaculture performance, monitoring requirements, operational standards and best management practices
  • Co-ordinate and engage in collaborative research and development in support of sustainable aquaculture and the commercialization of innovations
  • Increased knowledge for use by decision makers for the development of aquaculture policies and guidelines
  • Increased knowledge of sustainable aquaculture practices for use by the aquaculture industry
Applying Genomics and Biotechnology to Aquatic Ecosystems
  • Continue to identify genetic markers to improve species and strain identification
  • Develop and apply genomic tools to detect and monitor aquatic animal diseases, as well as environmental stress in aquatic ecosystems
  • Develop bio-remediation technologies to support remediation of contaminated sites
  • Conduct research on the genetics, biology, physiology, behaviour, and fitness of novel and transgenic fish in support of the Department's regulatory obligations to administer the New Substance Notification Regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act
  • Continue to fulfil a regulatory role through implementation of the New Substance Notification Regulation Program for notifications of aquatic organisms with novel traits, including genetically engineered fish for import or manufacture; also develop new aquatic-specific regulations
  • Increased knowledge and use of biotechnology by decision makers managing aquatic resources
  • Increased knowledge and capacity to assess applications for novel aquatic organisms
  • Improved processes for evaluation/approval of novel aquatic organisms
Contributing to Science Management in DFO and the Government of Canada
  • Continue to implement the renewal of the Science Program with a view to finishing in the next two to five years; this will include implementing components of the Expenditure Review Committee reductions
  • Continue to integrate the Department's science and technology efforts with the broader national agenda for science and technology
  • Pursue opportunities to build knowledge and recognition of DFO's scientific achievements through strategic public outreach initiatives with national partners
  • Effective and efficient use of resources (e.g., financial, human, facilities)
  • Contribution to interdepartmental federal science and technology initiatives

Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems

Canada's oceans and inland water resources have played a crucial role in the nation's history and identity, and they are inherent to Canada's environmental, social and economic prosperity and well-being. Oceans and freshwater are a finite resource, yet the scale and diversity of oceans-related activities are growing dramatically. Commercial fishing fleets, fish farmers, recreational boaters, ecotourists, cruise ship operators, offshore oil and gas developers, and marine transport companies all compete for their share of the ocean.

Sustainable development and integrated management of resources in or around Canada's aquatic environment through oceans and fish habitat management.

The fundamental principle that guides DFO's objective of maintaining healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems is sustainable development. This approach seeks to support an array of economic activities while adhering to environmental protection standards and supporting the social needs of communities, including those of Aboriginal peoples. The Department applies the principle of sustainable development by adopting key practices, such as the precautionary approach, integrated management, ecosystem and watershed planning, partnering arrangements with stakeholders, and effective and efficient regulation.

Canada's fisheries, waterways and aquatic ecosystems are part of a complex and increasingly vulnerable system. The effects of the numerous challenges faced by the country's waterways are often cumulative, and there is a pressing need for a long-term, integrated plan designed to minimize those threats. Aquatic ecosystems must be protected to ensure the continuation of their ability to produce food, harbour aquatic life, provide recreational opportunities and bring economic stability to coastal communities through job creation.

Operating Environment

In the coming months and years, Canada is expected to experience strong economic growth, especially in the energy and mining sectors, which will have socioeconomic and environmental effects across the country as well as internationally. Much of this development is expected in especially sensitive areas, such as the North.

The annual value of oceans activities is estimated to be in the range of $22 billion and includes, for example, fishing, shipping, transportation, offshore oil and gas-related initiatives.

With respect to onshore natural resource-based economic sectors (e.g., energy development, forestry, mining), it is estimated that $200 billion of forecast development will occur in the next few years. For example, in Alberta, total investment for the energy sector through 2013 is expected to be $80 billion. Increased pipeline activity has led to more than $5 billion in pipeline proposals for oil export to the United States and Asia from Alberta and British Columbia. In the North, there is also the possibility that within the next five years, as many as 12 mines will be developed in the Northwest Territories, 22 in Nunavut and four in the Yukon. These activities will have a significant impact on oceans and inland waters both now and in the foreseeable future and will need to be managed in a sustainable way if the potential benefits to local communities are to be realized and the environment protected.

This growth will be characterized by an increase in the volume of work to be reviewed and managed and also by the complexity of the projects. In particular, there are heightened expectations for consultation with stakeholders, as well as higher legal thresholds for consultations with Aboriginal communities before making regulatory decisions.

Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems 136.0 124.1 123.7
Program Enablers1 45.9 45.3 40.9
Total 181.9 169.4 164.6
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems 1,059 1,011 955
Program Enablers1 225 214 212
Total 1,284 1,225 1,167

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on the Program Enablers.

Program Activity: Oceans Management

Description from Part II — The Main Estimates: Conservation and sustainable use of Canada's oceans, in collaboration with others, through integrated oceans management plans which include marine protected areas and marine environmental quality objectives.

http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/canwaters-eauxcan/oceans/index_e.asp

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Expected Results

  • Increased collaboration between all key stakeholders involved in managing Canada's oceans
  • Improved wealth and opportunities for coastal communities
  • Increased conservation of marine and coastal environments
  • Improved health of the oceans

Performance Indicators

  • Oceans Action Plan Phase I deliverables completed and used to inform the development of Oceans Action Plan Phase II
  • Establishment of Regional Implementation Committees within Large Ocean Management Areas
  • Completion of workplan for Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers - Oceans Task Group
  • Completion of five Ecosystem Overview and Assessment Reports and identification of Ecologically and Biologically Significant Areas
  • Percentage of the seven potential Marine Protected Areas to be designated by 2009
Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Oceans Management
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Oceans Management 26.0 18.7 18.7
Program Enablers1 7.1 5.3 5.1
Total 33.1 24.0 23.8
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Oceans Management 114 116 102
Program Enablers1 46 37 36
Total 160 153 138

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on the Program Enablers.

Oceans Management Sub-activities

The Oceans Management program activity is delivered through three program sub-activities:

  • Integrated Management — adopting spatially based planning and management processes of Canada's ocean resources, through the use of an ecosystem-based approach to manage, conserve and protect sensitive marine ecosystems;
  • Marine Protected Areas — designating Marine Protected Areas to protect priority sensitive marine areas through special regulatory measures; and
  • Other Oceans Management — enhancing leadership, federal co-ordination and collaboration with other levels of government to achieve common oceans objectives in the delivery of the Oceans Action Plan.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity

Ongoing operations account for the majority of the resources used to carry out Oceans Management sub-activities. In addition to ongoing operations, the Department will focus on the following plans for Oceans Management sub-activities during the current planning period.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity
Plans Expected Results Performance Indicators
Integrated Management
  • Continue the integrated management planning of five priority Large Ocean Management Areas: Placentia Bay/Grand Banks, Scotian Shelf, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Beaufort Sea and the Pacific North Coast; in the initial phase, the main focus will be ecosystem overview reports and mapping of sensitive marine areas
  • Continue to address governance issues in integrated management planning
  • Develop federal-provincial-territorial agreements on oceans priorities as required
  • Develop agreements with First Nations or Aboriginal organizations
  • Conclude the Canada-BC Memorandum of Understanding on Oceans
  • Regional Implementation Committees established for each of the five Large Ocean Management Areas
  • Active involvement of the Oceans Technology Group to facilitate advancement of integrated management
  • Signing of federal and provincial Memorandums of Understanding and other agreements related to oceans management
  • Science-based guidance to oceans stakeholders and regulations focused on sustainable development goals
  • Number of Regional Implementation Committees involved in the implementation of the Oceans Action Plan Phase I
  • Provinces, territories, First Nations and stakeholders engaged and actively participating in implementation of Oceans Action Plan Phase I and development of Oceans Action Plan Phase II
  • Percentage of Large Ocean Management Areas with Ecosystem Overviews and Assessment Reports completed and Ecologically and Biologically Significant Areas identified
Marine Protected Areas
  • Implement the federal Marine Protected Area (MPA) strategy
  • Communicate a government-wide strategy for MPAs
  • Designate MPAs on a priority basis as approved by the Minister in all three of Canada's oceans
  • Identify candidate MPAs in the five priority Large Ocean Management Areas (LOMAs) as building blocks of the national network
  • Increased understanding and protection of the marine environment within the five priority LOMAs and MPAs
  • Designation of new MPAs by March 2007
  • Implementation of the federal MPA strategy
  • Completion of the designation process for the establishment of identified MPAs
  • Identification of areas of interest in the 5 LOMAs as components of the national MPA network
Other Oceans Management
  • Finalize seismic guidelines designed to mitigate the effects of seismic sound on the marine environment
  • Co-operation with federal, provincial and territorial agencies implementing the seismic guidelines
  • Eighteen deliverables of Oceans Action Plan Phase I implemented through collaborative arrangements with provinces and regions
  • Mitigation of seismic noise in the marine environment through adoption of seismic guidelines

Program Activity: Habitat Management

Description from Part II — The Main Estimates: Protection and conservation of freshwater and marine fish habitat, in collaboration with others, through a balanced application of regulatory and non-regulatory activities including reviewing development proposals, conducting environmental assessments and monitoring compliance and effectiveness.

As part of the departmental priority Environmental Process Modernization, the Habitat Management Program is focusing on the implementation of the Environmental Process Modernization Plan. The expected results of these efforts include healthy and productive fish habitat.

Expected Results

  • Healthy and productive fish habitat available to sustain the production of fish species and populations that Canadians value

Performance Indicators

  • Number of habitat compensation plans developed to create and/or replace fish habitat lost as a result of development projects
Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Habitat Management
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Habitat Management 56.6 55.5 55.2
Program Enablers1 14.1 13.8 13.2
Total 70.7 69.3 68.4
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Habitat Management 452 451 451
Program Enablers1 95 96 96
Total 547 547 547

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on the Program Enablers.

Habitat Management Sub-activities

The Habitat Management program activity is delivered through three program sub-activities:

  • Conservation and Protection of Fish Habitat — reviewing, assessing and monitoring activities in and around water to ensure compliance with the Fisheries Act and Species at Risk Act;
  • Environmental Assessment — conducting Environmental Assessments (EAs) of proposed projects or activities under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) before making decisions under the Fisheries Act and in accordance with the Species at Risk Act; and
  • Other Habitat Management — providing services in support of Fisheries Act referrals and EA activities.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity

Ongoing operations account for the majority of the resources used to carry out Habitat Management sub-activities. In addition to ongoing operations, the Department will focus on the following plans for Habitat Management sub-activities during the current planning period.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity
Plans Expected Results Performance Indicators
Conservation and Protection of Fish Habitat
  • Implement these aspects of EPMP: risk management, referral streamlining, partnering and modernization of habitat compliance
  • Implement Expenditure Review Committee reductions: $1.5 M in 2005-2006, $0.8 M in 2006-2007, $0.8 M in 2007-2008, as well as 42 FTEs by 2007-2008
  • Proponents' projects completed with minimal or no adverse effects on fish habitat
  • Partners and stakeholders aware and supportive of fish habitat management objectives
  • Number of Letters of Advice and authorizations issued
  • Number of partnership agreements/arrangements
  • Percentage of proponents that comply with the requirements of the habitat protection provisions of the Fisheries Act
  • Use of Operational Statements for low-risk activities by proponents, industry associations and provinces
  • Number of National Operational Statements developed and approved
  • Degree to which Operational Statements have been incorporated into industry Best Management Practices; co-ordinated with provincial permitting systems
  • Expenditure Review Committee decisions implemented
Environmental Assessment
  • Participate with other federal government departments to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the EA process
  • Implement the aspect of EPMP dealing with improved management of environmental assessment for major projects
  • Environmental effects considered in a timely, co-ordinated and effective manner before regulatory decisions are made under the Fisheries Act
  • Number of EA screenings, Comprehensive Studies, Panels initiated, ongoing or concluded
  • Number of projects requiring CEAA review that incorporate Habitat Management Program requirements and advice
  • Number of EAs for major projects that are harmonized with provinces and other federal responsible authorities
Other Habitat Management
  • Implement the aspect of EPMP that focuses on improving the predictability and coherence of decision making
  • Awareness of habitat management concepts, objectives, principles and practices by Habitat Management Program staff
  • Percentage of staff who have completed individual training under the Mandatory Training Program

Program Activity: Science

Description from Part II — The Main Estimates: Provision of scientific research, monitoring, advice, products and services and data management in support of healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems. These functions are provided through a network of research facilities in collaboration with other government departments, private sector, academia and international organizations.

Science will provide direct support to established priorities through the following initiatives:

  • Oceans Action Plan — developing Ecosystem Overview and Assessment Reports and identifying Ecologically Significant Areas for each of the five Large Ocean Management Areas;
  • Environmental Process Modernization Plan — providing advice concerning the evidence linking human activities to impacts on fish habitat and examining the scientific foundation for the application of risk-management principles to the management of fish habitat;
  • Northern Energy Development — providing advice on the Mackenzie Gas Pipeline Project to support decision requirements associated with the environmental impact assessment, regulation (Fisheries Act) and monitoring;
  • International Polar Year — participating in the Program, with the objective of building on and supporting the Department's and the Government of Canada's knowledge requirements associated with climate change impacts and adaptation, and the health and well-being of northern communities; and
  • Science Renewal — continuing to realign Science efforts in support of a broader ecosystem-based scientific approach to healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems.

Expected Results

  • Science information used to support the integrated management of healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems for the benefit and enjoyment of Canadians

Performance Indicators

  • Scientific production by Fisheries and Oceans
  • Canadians' confidence in DFO Science
  • Level of partnering in scientific research
  • Number of responses to requests for science advice
Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, Science
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Science 53.4 49.8 49.7
Program Enablers1 24.7 26.2 22.6
Total 78.1 76.1 72.3
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Science 493 445 405
Program Enablers1 84 82 81
Total 577 527 486

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

1Financial and human resources for Program Enablers have been prorated across program activities. The section Other Items of Interest provides further information on the Program Enablers.

Science Sub-activities

Science in support of healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems is delivered through three program sub-activities:

  • Assessing the impacts of development on aquatic ecosystems — providing scientific advice on potential impacts, mitigation measures and risks associated with development activities and toxic chemicals and contaminants on aquatic ecosystems in support of the Department's habitat management authorities and oceans management (e.g., Fisheries Act, the Policy for the Management of Fish Habitat, Species at Risk Act, Oceans Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act);
  • Assessing aquatic ecosystems and supporting integrated oceans management — providing sound ecosystem-based science and integrated multi-disciplinary data management to support the integrated management of oceans resources and spaces; and
  • Monitoring, understanding and predicting variation and change of ocean climate — conducting research and monitoring that enable the prediction of ocean influences on and responses to climatic change and variability, as well as the assessment of potential impacts on ecosystems, fish and mammal populations to enable mitigation and adaptation strategies for the management of aquatic ecosystems.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity

Ongoing operations account for the majority of the resources used to carry out Science sub-activities in support of healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems. In addition to ongoing operations, the Department will focus on the following plans for Science sub-activities in support of healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems during the current planning period.

Plans for 2006-2009 by Sub-activity
Plans Expected Results
Assessing the Impacts of Development on Aquatic Ecosystems
  • Provide advice on the Mackenzie Gas Pipeline Project to support decisions related to the environmental impact assessment, regulation (Fisheries Act) and monitoring; this will include delineating critical fish habitat in rivers and lakes draining into the Mackenzie River and undertaking a study of sensitive fish species
  • Delineate and map the habitats of the coastal Beaufort Sea and Mackenzie Delta, assess beluga whale habitat requirements in the eastern Beaufort Sea, and study the impacts of oil and gas exploration on ringed and bearded seals
  • In support of the Environmental Process Modernization Plan (EPMP), conduct a peer review of advice on the evidence linking the effects of human activities on fish habitat; also provide advice on the scientific foundation for the application of risk-management principles to the management of fish habitat
  • Increased use of scientific advice and supporting information related to the impacts of industrial activities on the aquatic environment
  • Increased science-based mitigation measures for human and industrial activities
Assessing Aquatic Ecosystems and Supporting Integrated Oceans Management
  • Provide advice to support knowledge requirements associated with the Oceans Action Plan (OAP); this will involve developing Ecosystem Overview and Assessment Reports and identifying ecologically and Biologically Significant Areas for each of the five Large Ocean Management Areas
  • Increased use of Science advice (e.g., data and modelling) by decision makers in the integrated management of Canada's oceans
Monitoring, Understanding and Predicting Variation and Change of Ocean Climate
  • Deliver a co-ordinated program for providing the data needed for oceans ecosystem assessments
  • Conduct research to understand the effects of climate change and climate variation on aquatic ecosystems
  • Apply operational models to the prediction of variation in ocean climate
  • Participate in International Polar Year with the objective of building on and supporting the Department's and the Government of Canada's knowledge requirements associated with climate change impacts and adaptation
  • Decision makers make increased use of forecast impacts of climate change on aquatic ecosystems
  • Policy makers make increased use of knowledge of oceans' influence on climate and climate change

 




Supplementary Information

In this section:

Introduction

This section presents key financial information for the 2006-2009 period, as well as information on other reporting requirements. The financial information presented typically includes forecast spending for 2005-2006 and planned spending for each of the three years in the planning period.

The information in the table Departmental Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents through to the table Resource Requirements by Agency, Branch or Sector, 2006-2007 reflects the proration of Program Enabler resources across program activities. These financial and human resources are separately managed by individual Program Enablers. For further information on Program Enablers, see the section Other Items of Interest.

The figures in the following tables have been rounded to the nearest millions of dollars. Figures that cannot be listed in millions are shown as 0.0.

Departmental Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents

The table Departmental Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents presents forecast spending for 2005-2006 and planned spending for 2006-2007, 2007-2008 and 2008-2009.

The first column presents forecast spending for 2005-2006. Total Main Estimates are adjusted to account for Special Governor General Warrants, which were necessary because of the dissolution of Parliament. The last three columns present planned spending for the three planning years. The planned spending is based on the Main Estimates.

Departmental Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents
(millions of dollars) Forecast Spending 2005-2006 Planned Spending 2006-2007 Planned Spending 2007-2008 Planned Spending 2008-2009
Canadian Coast Guard 647.1 657.2 658.4 643.7
Small Craft Harbours 102.1 101.1 78.4 77.1
Science - Safe and Accessible Waterways 46.6 44.0 44.9 47.1
Fisheries Management 368.0 397.3 333.3 331.5
Aquaculture 5.1 3.4 3.4 3.4
Science - Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture 174.5 198.8 183.7 175.8
Oceans Management 21.6 32.7 23.8 23.7
Habitat Management 66.3 63.8 62.6 62.0
Science - Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems 58.9 65.2 62.6 59.9

Budgetary Main Estimates (gross) 1,490.2 1,563.4 1,451.1 1,424.26
Non-Budgetary Main Estimates (gross)
Less: Respendable Revenue (50.1) (50.1) (50.1) (50.1)

Total Main Estimates 1,440.1 1,513.4 1,401.0 1,374.1

Add: Forecast Adjustments
Amounts approved for inclusion in Supplementary Estimates and funded through Special Governor General Warrants
Funding to support core operational requirements such as Canadian Coast Guard operations, conservation and protection activities and research 42.7
Collective bargaining agreements 40.2
Operating Budget Carry Forward 14.6
Funding to support activities to address foreign overfishing in the northwest Atlantic Ocean 12.6
Funding to support core operational requirements such as Canadian Coast Guard operations, conservation and protection activities and research 11.0
Funding to ensure the sustainable development and management of Canada's oceans (Oceans Action Plan) 6.3
Public security initiatives (National Security Policy) 4.4
Paylist shortfalls 4.4
Funding to increase federal, regional and science capacity in order to respond to the Mackenzie Gas Project and related resource development (Mackenzie Gas Project) 4.1
Funding to support the implementation of a strategy designed to protect Canada's natural resources through early detection of unknown diseases of pests (Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada) 3.7
Funding to implement measures to protect Canadian aquatic resources from serious diseases, to secure trade and to improve governance (National Aquatic Animal Health Program) 3.5
Government of Canada Response to Hurricane Katrina 3.5
Project definition for the acquisition of eight mid-shore patrol vessels for marine security in the St. Lawrence Seaway and on the Great Lakes 2.5
Project definition for an information technology infrastructure project that will improve the Department's information technology management and hardware 2.0
Funding related to assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites 1.6
Preliminary Project Approval to proceed with the acquisition of two Offshore Fisheries Research vessels for the Canadian Coast Guard 1.0
Funding to modernize human resources management in the Federal Public Service (Public Service Modernization Act) 0.9
Corporate Administrative Shared Services 0.8
Funding for projects to reform the classification of jobs within the Federal Public Service 0.6
Reinvestment of royalties from intellectual property 0.6
Interim funding in response to the Supreme Court Decision in R. v. Powley to support research, multilateral discussions and capacity development for Métis organizations 0.3
Funding for settlement and implementation of the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement 0.3
Funding to undertake projects related to the development and application of biotechnology (Canadian Biotechnology Strategy) 0.3
Funding related to government advertising programs 0.3
Funding related to the reform and modernization of Canada's regulatory system in order to respond better to the needs of citizens and to enable business innovation and growth 0.1

Subtotal: Amounts approved for inclusion in Supplementary Estimates and provided through Special Governor General Warrants 162.1

Add: Planned Spending Adjustments
Atlantic Salmon Endowment Fund   30.0
Biotechnology   0.9
Canadian Coast Guard Fleet Renewal   21.0 52.0 67.0
Expanding AIS Shore Stations into Upper Great Lakes   0.2 2.0 2.3
Garden City Divestiture   5.0
IM/IT Consolidation   10.9 8.3 2.4
Marine Security Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels   3.0 8.0 25.8
Real Property Disposition Revolving Fund   1.1
Reduced Cost of the New Ministry - Regional Responsibilities   0.0 0.0 0.0
Transformational Plan   99.0 99.0 99.0
Winter Olympics - Includes operations for Paralympic Games   0.2 0.1 0.1
Procurement Savings (2.2) (8.0)

Subtotal: Planned Spending Adjustments (2.2) 162.4 169.4 197.5

Less:
Items not available for use in current year (64.5)

Total Planned Spending 1,535.6 1,675.8 1,570.4 1,571.6

Less: Non-respendable Revenue (49.1) (51.9) (51.7) (51.7)
Plus: Cost of Services Received without Charge 93.1 94.6 95.3 96.8

Net Cost of Program 1,579.6 1,718.4 1,614.0 1,616.8

 

Full-time Equivalents 10,293 10,444 10,321 10,225

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

Resources by Program Activity

The table Resources by Program Activity, 2006-2007 presents the 2006-2007 Main Estimates by program activity and by vote.

Some program activities do not have their own capital budget. In such cases, the capital resources shown are allocations from planned capital spending that are of benefit to individual program activities.

Resources by Program Activity, 2006-2007 (millions of dollars)

  Operating Capital Grants and
Contributions
Less Respendable Revenue Non-Budgetary Total Main Estimates Adjustments1 Total Planned Spending

Safe and Accessible Waterways
Canadian Coast Guard 535.2 117.0 4.9 (50.1) 607.1 70.6 677.7
Small Craft Harbours 78.0 22.5 0.5 101.1 12.2 113.2
Science 42.3 1.6 0.0 44.0 1.4 45.4
Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture
Fisheries Management 288.1 3.6 105.6 397.3 45.9 443.2
Aquaculture 3.4 0.0 3.4 0.0 3.5
Science 185.4 13.2 0.3 198.8 10.8 207.6
Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems
Oceans Management 31.8 0.3 0.6 32.7 0.4 33.1
Habitat Management 63.2 0.6 63.8 6.9 70.7
Science 56.0 9.2 0.0 65.2 12.9 81.4

Total Planned Spending 1,283.4 168.1 111.9 (50.1) 1,513.4 162.4 1,675.8

1Adjustments incorporate planned spending not included in the Main Estimates.

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

Voted and Statutory Items

There is a net increase of $73.3 million between the 2005-2006 Main Estimates and the 2006-2007 Main Estimates. This net increase, shown in the table Voted and Statutory Items in the Main Estimates, 2006-2007, consists of:

  • Increases related to Compensation for Collective Bargaining Agreements ($51.3 million), Marshall Plan ($41.7 million), International Fisheries and Governance ($20.4 million), Y2K Loan End of Repayment ($7.9 million), National Aquatic Animal Health Program ($7.6 million), Oceans Action Plan ($7.5 million), Northern Energy Development Federal Response ($5.0 million), Capital Carry Forward ($5.0 million), Marine Security — Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels ($4.4 million), Contaminated Sites ($4.2 million), Invasive Alien Species ($4.0 million) and various other minor increases ($0.8 million).
  • The above increases were offset by the Fisheries Access Program reprofile ($47.5 million), Expenditure Review Committee Savings ($20.8 million), the Air Cushion Vehicle reprofile ($11.8 million) and the Employee Benefit Plan Adjustment ($6.4 million).
Voted and Statutory Items in the Main Estimates, 2006-2007 (millions of dollars)
Vote/Statutory Item Vote/Statutory Wording 2006-2007 Main Estimates 2005-2006 Main Estimates
1
Operating Expenditures 1,111.0 1,029.4
5
Capital Expenditures 168.1 175.3
10
Grants and Contributions 111.9 119.8
(S)
Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Canada salary and motor car allowance 0.1 0.1
(S)
Contributions to Employee Benefit Plans 122.3 115.5

  Total - Fisheries and Oceans Canada 1,513.4 1,440.1

Net Cost of Program

The table Net Cost of Program provides the net cost of the Department's activities. The Department receives accommodation services from Public Works and Government Services Canada, legal services from Justice Canada, and worker's compensation coverage from Human Resources and Social Development Canada. In addition, Treasury Board Secretariat covers the cost of the employer's share of employees' insurance premiums. These services received without charge are added to the net planned spending for the year, and the planned non-respendable revenue is deducted to arrive at the net cost of the program.

Net Cost of Program, 2006-2007 (millions of dollars)

Total Planned Spending 1,675.8

Plus: Services Received without Charge
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada 41.4
Contributions covering employers' share of employees' insurance premiums and expenditures paid by Treasury Board Secretariat 48.2
Worker's compensation coverage provided by Human Resources and Social Development Canada 1.2
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by Justice Canada 3.8

Total Services Received without Charge 94.6
Less: Non-respendable Revenue (51.9)

2006-2007 Net Cost of Program 1,718.4

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

Summary of Capital Spending by Program Activity

The table Summary of Capital Spending by Program Activity (millions of dollars) presents the total forecast major capital spending for 2005-2006. The table also presents the planned major capital spending by program activity for the next three fiscal years. The figures for 2005-2006 include all in-year financial adjustments.

Some program activities do not have their own capital budget. In such cases, the capital resources shown are allocations from planned capital spending that are of benefit to individual program activities.

As a result of capital reprofilings and carry forwards, the planned major capital spending for 2006-2007 of $168.1 million is increased from the original major capital budget allocation of $153.6 million. The 2006-2007 major capital budget allocation has been affected by the following financial adjustments:

  • Increases related to a $12.0 million reprofile from the major capital budget of fiscal year 2005-2006 for the creation of an Automatic Identification System, part of a federal initiative to improve marine safety and security; and a reprofile of the 2004-2005 major capital carry forward to 2006-2007 in the amount of $5 million; and
  • Decreases related to a $1.4 million transfer to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada for the completion of a small craft harbour project in the Newfoundland region; and a $1.1 million reprofile of funds to future years for the acquisition of an Air Cushion Vehicle (Canadian Coast Guard) for the Quebec region.

The planned spending for 2007-2008 has also increased from the original major capital budget allocation of $153.6 million as a result of two reprofiles from previous fiscal years. The two reprofiles are: $10.6 million to purchase an Air Cushion Vehicle (Canadian Coast Guard) for the Quebec region and a $6.0 million continuation of the federally funded Automatic Identification System initiative.

The planned spending for 2008-2009 is also increased from the original major capital budget allocation of $153.6 million because of a $5.7 million continuation of the reprofiled funding for the Quebec region's Air Cushion Vehicle project.

Summary of Capital Spending by Program Activity (millions of dollars)
  Forecast Spending 2005-2006 Planned Spending 2006-2007 Planned Spending 2007-2008 Planned Spending 2008-2009
Safe and Accessible Waterways
Canadian Coast Guard 113.6 157.0 193.5 220.9
Small Craft Harbours 30.7 34.2 35.1 30.4
Science 1.5 2.2 4.1 4.0
Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture
Fisheries Management 9.6 6.9 7.7 8.4
Aquaculture 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0
Science 6.0 20.0 16.9 15.3
Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems
Oceans Management 0.7 0.5 0.3 0.3
Habitat Management 2.2 0.8 0.5 0.5
Science 3.8 12.6 15.1 11.8

Total 168.3 234.1 273.2 291.6

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

The table Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue (millions of dollars) presents the forecast revenues for 2005-2006 and planned revenue for the three planning years by program activity.

Respendable revenue refers to funds collected for the recovery of the cost of services. These are collected by the Canadian Coast Guard in regard to Marine Navigation Services, Icebreaking Services and the management of the maintenance dredging program for the St. Lawrence Shipping Channel on behalf of industry. The Department is permitted to spend the sums received as respendable revenue.

Non-respendable revenue refers to funds collected for fishing licences, hydrographic charts and various other departmental products and services. The Department is not allowed to respend these revenues.

Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

Respendable Revenue1

  Forecast Revenue 2005-2006 Planned Revenue 2006-2007 Planned Revenue 2007-2008 Planned Revenue 2008-2009
Canadian Coast Guard
Maintenance Dredging Services Tonnage Fees in the St. Lawrence Shipping Channel 4.6 4.6 4.6 4.6
Marine Navigation Services Fees 27.8 27.8 27.8 27.8
Coast Guard Radio Tolls 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Employee Deductions for Employee Housing 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Icebreaking Services Fees 13.8 13.8 13.8 13.8
Canadian Coast Guard College 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7

Total Respendable Revenue2 50.1 50.1 50.1 50.1

Non-Respendable Revenue1

  Forecast Revenue 2005-2006 Planned Revenue 2006-20073 Planned Revenue 2007-20083 Planned Revenue 2008-20093
Canadian Coast Guard
Aids to Navigation Services in the Deep Water Channel between Montreal and Lake Erie 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2
Rental of Land, Buildings and Equipment 0.2 0.2 0.2

  0.1 0.4 0.4 0.4
Small Craft Harbours

Small Craft Harbour Revenue 1.6 1.3 1.2 1.1
Science - Safe and Accessible Waterways
Sale of Charts and Publications 2.1 2.1 2.0 2.0
Technology Transfer Licences 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.5

  2.4 2.6 2.5 2.5
Fisheries Management
Commercial Licences 44.6 47.2 47.1 47.1
Rental of Land, Buildings and Equipment 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
  44.8 47.4 47.3 47.3

Habitat Management

Rental of Land, Buildings and Equipment 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
Science - Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems

Technology Transfer Licences 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

Total Non-Respendable Revenue2 49.1 51.9 51.7 51.7

Total Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue 99.2 102.0 101.8 101.8

1For respendable revenues, planned revenue refers to revenue targets whereas for non-respendable revenues it reflects the forecast of revenues for the year in question.

2Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

3These amounts are subject to revision in light of the External Charging Review.

Resource Requirements by Agency, Branch or Sector

The table Resource Requirements by Agency, Branch or Sector, 2006-2007 presents 2006-2007 total planned spending by program activity and by sector.

Resource Requirements by Agency, Branch or Sector, 2006-2007
(millions of dollars)

  Canadian Coast Guard Small Craft Harbours Fisheries and Aquaculture Management Oceans and Habitat Science Program Enablers Total
Safe and Accessible Waterways
Canadian Coast Guard 565.5 112.2 677.7
Small Craft Harbours 95.6 17.7 113.3
Science 35.5 11.2 46.7
Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture
Fisheries Management 379.5 63.7 443.2
Aquaculture 2.7 0.8 3.5
Science 152.9 56.7 209.6
Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems
Oceans Management 26.0 7.1 33.1
Habitat Management 56.6 14.1 70.7
Science 53.4 24.6 78.1

Total Planned Spending 565.5 95.6 382.2 82.6 241.8 308.1 1,675.8

Note: Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.

User Fees

DFO continues to modernize how it manages external charging as a means to improving fairness, efficiency and accountability when collecting external charges, including user fees. To facilitate this reform, DFO initiated the External Charging Review in 2004-2005.

The Review has been and will be conducted in conformity with all applicable legislation, policies and procedures. This includes the User Fees Act, the government's Policy on Service Standards for External Fees, as well as DFO's new vision and principles for guiding external charging decisions.

When the Canadian Coast Guard became a Special Operating Agency in 2005, it committed to developing a strategy that would resolve the systemic revenue shortfall associated with Marine Services Fees (made up of Marine Navigation Services Fees and Icebreaking Services Fees) and to pursuing revenue opportunities through the aforementioned review.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada does not plan to introduce or amend any user fees during 2006-2007, pending the completion of its External Charging Review.

Major Regulatory Initiatives

Major Regulatory Initiatives
Legislation and Regulations Planned Results
Fisheries Act
  • Development of proposals to revise the legislation in support of policy reviews in the areas of fisheries and habitat management
 
  • Development of a legislative package to be tabled at a time determined by the Government
Contraventions Regulations
  • Add schedules of offences and fines to reflect various fishery regulations under the Contraventions Act
 
  • Decriminalize process for lesser fishery regulation violations, and reduce and simplify compliance procedures
Species at Risk Regulations
  • Development of regulations and management of aquatic species listing under the Species at Risk Act
 
  • Identification, protection and sustainability of threatened and endangered aquatic species
Amendments to Provincial and Territorial Fishery Regulations  
  • Improved fisheries management and enforcement in co-operation with provincial and territorial governments
Nunavut Fishery Regulations
  • Development of Nunavut Fishery Regulations for the Nunavut Territory
 
  • Regulate fishing in the Nunavut territory in co-operation with the territorial government and in accordance with the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement
Marine Protected Areas
  • Establishment of selected Marine Protected Areas in Canada
 
  • Conservation and protection of ecosystems in distinctive areas of Canada's marine environment
Fishing and Recreational Harbours Regulations
  • Regulatory amendments to update the list of harbours under the administration of the Department
 
  • Reflect the ongoing divestiture of Small Craft Harbours
Marine Mammal Regulations
  • Regulatory amendments to regulate marine mammal watching activities
 
  • Better protection of marine mammals and human safety by regulation of whale watching and other marine mammal watching activities
Coastal Fisheries Protection Regulations
  • Incorporating NAFO measures into the Coastal Fisheries Protection Regulations
 
  • Better management for NAFO fisheries
Seismic Mitigation Regulations
  • Establish a framework governing seismic activity in the marine environment
 
  • Regulatory standards governing seismic activity in the marine environment in co-operation with provincial and territorial governments, interest groups and industry
Fishery (General) Regulations
  • Provide Variation Order authority to the Province of Nova Scotia
 
  • Province will be able to issue variation orders in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding with the Province of Nova Scotia

Details on Project Spending

Over the next three years, the following projects will exceed or are expected to exceed the Department's delegated project approval authority.

2006-2007

  • Acquisition of two Offshore Fisheries Science Vessels
  • Acquisition of eight Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels
  • National Communications Control System — Marine Communications and Traffic Services Modernization
  • Search and Rescue Lifeboat Replacement — Phase II
  • Acquisition of an Air Cushion Vehicle
  • Automatic Identification System — Security Funding
  • Configuration Management and Technical Data Management Systems
  • IM/IT Security Enhancements

2007-2008

  • Acquisition of two Offshore Fisheries Science Vessels
  • Acquisition of eight Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels
  • National Communications Control System — Marine Communications and Traffic Services Modernization
  • Acquisition of an Air Cushion Vehicle
  • Automatic Identification System — Security Funding
  • Configuration Management and Technical Data Management Systems
  • IM/IT Security Enhancements

2008-2009

  • Acquisition of two Offshore Fisheries Science Vessels
  • Acquisition of eight Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels
  • National Communications Control System — Marine Communications and Traffic Services Modernization
  • Acquisition of an Air Cushion Vehicle
  • Configuration Management and Technical Data Management Systems

For further information on the above-mentioned projects, see http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/20062007/p3a-eng.asp.

The Major Capital Projects table illustrates all planned and ongoing major capital projects which exceed the Department's project approval authority. The Department's project approval authority is:

  • $2 million for new Information Technology projects
  • $5 million for replacement Information Technology projects
  • $20 million for all other projects

The phase of each project is identified according to the following Treasury Board definitions:

  • Indicative Estimate (I) — This is a low quality order of magnitude estimate that is not sufficiently accurate to warrant Treasury Board approval as a cost objective.
  • Substantive Estimate (S) — This estimate is one of sufficiently high quality and reliability so as to warrant Treasury Board approval as a cost objective for the project phase under consideration.
  • Preliminary Project Approval (PPA) — This defines Treasury Board's authority to initiate a project in terms of its intended operational requirement, including approval of, and expenditure authorization for, the objectives of the project definition phase. Sponsoring departments and agencies are to submit for PPA when the project's complete scope has been examined and costed, normally to the indicative level, and when the cost of the project definition phase has been estimated to the substantive level.
  • Effective Project Approval (EPA) — Treasury Board's approval of, and expenditure authorization for, the objectives of the project implementation phase. Sponsoring departments and agencies are to submit for EPA only when the scope of the overall project has been defined and when the estimates have been refined to the substantive level.
(millions of dollars) Current Estimated Total Cost Forecasted Spending to March 31, 2006 Planned Spending 2006-2007 Planned Spending 2007-2008 Planned Spending 2008-2009 Future Year Spending Requirement
CANADIAN COAST GUARD
Quebec
Acquisition of Air Cushion Vehicle
(S-EPA)
27.9 0.3 5.4 11.8 6.4 4.0
Multi-province
Acquisition of two Offshore Fisheries Science Vessels
(I-PPA)
187.0 0.3 17.3 32.3 45.3 91.3
Acquisition of eight Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels (I-PPA) 146.5 0.6 8.1 26.8 42.8 67.8
National Communications Control System - Marine Communication and Traffic Services Modernization
(I-PPA)
41.6 1.7 6.5 6.5 6.5 20.3
Search and Rescue Lifeboat Replacement - Phase II (S-EPA) 41.1 38.8 2.1
Automatic Identification System - Security Funding (S-EPA) 20.0 2.0 12.0 6.0
Configuration Management and Technical Data Management Systems (I-PPA) 10.4 0.6 3.8 4.6 1.3
PROGRAM ENABLERS - Information Management and Information Technology *
Multi-Province
IM/IT Security Enhancements (S-EPA) 6.8 4.5 1.0 1.2

*The projects outlined above exceed the Department's delegated approval authority for Informatics projects. As part of the Department's Program Enabler function, Informatics projects are conducted on behalf of all program activities. We have listed the Informatics project separately instead of allocating the annual costs of the project across all nine program activities which would dilute and create repetition in the information presented.

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Over the next three years, Fisheries and Oceans Canada will manage the following transfer payment programs in excess of $5 million:

  • Aboriginal Aquatic Resources and Oceans Management Program;
  • Fisheries Access Program (2005-2006 and 2006-2007 only); and
  • Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy.

Further information on these transfer payment programs can be found at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/20062007/p3a-eng.asp.

Aboriginal Aquatic Resources and Oceans Management Program
Start Date:
August 31, 2004
End Date:
Ongoing
Total Funding:
Ongoing

Purpose of Transfer Payment Program (TPP):
The Aboriginal Aquatic Resources and Oceans Management (AAROM) program is designed to assist Aboriginal groups in developing the capacity to play a more active role in key areas of fisheries and oceans management. The program applies in areas where DFO manages the fishery, and with Aboriginal groups that have not yet signed a comprehensive land claims agreement that addresses the matters under AAROM. Where the Aboriginal group has signed a comprehensive land claims agreement, and one or more of the matters covered by the AAROM Program are not dealt with in the agreement, the group would be eligible to apply for support in those matters not covered in the agreement.

Objective(s), expected result(s) and outcomes:
I) the development of an AAROM collaborative management body and supporting infrastructure; II) an Aboriginal Fishery Officer (AFO) initiative; and III) an Economic Opportunities sub-component to support developmental opportunities related to commercial fisheries access and/or aquaculture. Particular emphasis is placed on Aboriginal participation in multilateral decision-making and advisory processes that involve fishers, scientists, industry representatives, conservation groups, DFO officials, and other government departments.

(millions of dollars) Forecast Spending
2005-2006
Planned Spending
2006-2007
Planned Spending
2007-2008
Planned Spending
2008-2009
Program Activity (PA) Fisheries Management
Total Grants
Total Contributions 11.5 14.3 15.4 16.1
Total Other Transfer Payments
Total PA 11.5 14.3 15.4 16.1
Total TPP 11.5 14.3 15.4 16.1

Fisheries Access Program
Start Date:
February 8, 2001
End Date:
March 31, 2007
Total Funding:
$353.4 M

Purpose of Transfer Payment Program (TPP):
To retire access to diverse fisheries (including licences, quota, vessels and gear); to transfer access to diverse fisheries to First Nations to be held as communal holdings by the Aboriginal group; and to provide new vessels, gear and equipment to Aboriginal groups so they can fish the access provided.

Objective(s), expected result(s) and outcomes:
To provide First Nations with access to commercial fisheries, and assistance in building and managing fishing capacity, while maintaining a peaceful and orderly fishery.

(millions of dollars) Forecast Spending
2005-2006
Planned Spending
2006-2007
Planned Spending
2007-2008
Planned Spending
2008-2009
Program Activity (PA) Fisheries Management
Total Grants 0 * 0
Total Contributions 35.3 57.7 * 0
Total Other Transfer Payments 0 0
Total PA 35.3 57.7 * 0
Total TPP 35.3 57.7 * 0

Note: The Planned Spending 2006-2007 includes approximately $27M carried forward from 2005-2006. The Forecast and Planned Spending excludes the At-sea Mentoring Program.

* The Department will be requesting an extension to the program until March 31, 2008, therefore spending in 2007-2008 will occur. Nevertheless it is impossible, at this time, to predict the level of spending under FAP, because First Nations who entered into Fisheries Agreements must agree to extend their Fisheries Agreement. The planned spending for 2007-2008 will be within Fisheries and Oceans approved level of budget for FAP.


Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy
Start Date:
June 11, 1992
End Date:
Ongoing
Total Funding:
Ongoing

Purpose of Transfer Payment Program (TPP):
The Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) provides for the effective management of the Aboriginal fishery in a manner consistent with the Sparrow decision. In addition, the Allocation Transfer Program supports Aboriginal groups in achieving self-sufficiency through participation in commercial fisheries.

Objective(s), expected result(s) and outcomes:
Management of the Aboriginal fisheries including opportunities in habitat management, science and enforcement activities. Voluntary retirement of commercial licences and the issuance of new licences to eligible Aboriginal organizations in a manner that does not add to the existing effort on the resource.

(millions of dollars) Forecast Spending
2005-2006
Planned Spending
2006-2007
Planned Spending
2007-2008
Planned Spending
2008-2009
Program Activity (PA) Fisheries Management
Total Grants
Total Contributions 31.5 31.6 30.4 28.7
Total Other Transfer Payments
Total PA 31.5 31.6 30.4 28.7
Total TPP 31.5 31.6 30.4 28.7

Alternative Service Delivery

Alternative service delivery refers to the use of alternative organizational forms and delivery mechanisms to deliver a department or agency's mandate. For DFO, this includes Marine Aids Modernization, where service will be contracted out wherever effective and efficient.

Further information on this alternative service delivery initiative can be found at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/20062007/p3a-eng.asp.

Name of Initiative Current Status Projected Implementation Date Contact
Contracting out of floating aids(buoys) Renewal of existing contracting out options (currently 43% of all 11,196 floating aids nationally are under contract). Current objective is to have 50% by region. Number of buoys still to contract out to meet objective:
  • Newfoundland: 99
  • Maritimes: 0
  • Qu├ębec: 510
  • Central & Arctic: 1591
  • Pacific: 175
  • Total: 2375
This ASD option is dependent on the maintenance requirements as determined by the life cycle management analysis.
CCG has contracted out aids to navigation for decades. Current objective of 50% is planned for 2006-2009. Director General
Maritimes Services
(613) 990-5608
Contracting out of fixed aids 4% of all 6,093 fixed aids are currently under contract. Currently performing life cycle and cost benefit analysis to determine ASD (contracting out) options and feasibility for remaining fixed aids. Pending the results of the life cycle and cost benefit analysis - where advantageous contracting out will be implemented over the 2006-2009 period. Director General
Integrated Technical Support
(613) 998-1638

Horizontal Initiatives

Horizontal initiatives are programs or initiatives in which partners from two or more organizations have agreed under a formal funding agreement to work toward the achievement of shared outcomes. DFO is a partner on five horizontal initiatives led by other government departments:

  • Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products (Pest Management Regulatory Agency - Health Canada);
  • Canadian Biotechnology Strategy (Industry Canada);
  • Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (Environment Canada and Treasury Board Secretariat);
  • Implementation of the Act Respecting the Protection of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada (Environment Canada); and
  • Marine Security (Transport Canada).

Further information on these horizontal initiatives can be found at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/20062007/p3a-eng.asp.

Sustainable Development Strategy

http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/sds-sdd2005-06/Index_e.htm

Mouse

In response to the recommendations of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, DFO's 2005-2006 Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS) was developed as a companion document to the Departmental Strategic Plan — Our Waters, Our Future. DFO clearly links sustainable development commitments to the Department's strategic outcomes, and continues to make significant progress in ensuring that environmental, social and economic aspects are systematically considered in planning and policy development documents. The Department's renewed vision effectively entrenches sustainable development into long-term direction setting and business planning, as DFO works in partnership to derive economic and social benefits from Canada's oceans and freshwater resources while conserving the ecological integrity of those resources.

DFO's 2005-2006 Sustainable Development Strategy outlines three main goals: Sustainable Programs, Good Governance and Enhanced Partnerships, and Sustainable Operations. Under these goals, the objectives and targets over the coming year include work related to:

  • Protection and recovery strategies for aquatic species at risk;
  • Addressing climate change;
  • Ecosystem Overview Reports;
  • Marine Protected Areas;
  • Integrated Oceans Management Plans;
  • International Fisheries and Governance;
  • Canadian Council on Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers Initiatives;
  • Marine Aids Modernization Project;
  • Environment Management Systems;
  • Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan;
  • Small Craft Harbour Compliance with Environmental Regulations and Standards;
  • Environmental Management Plans at Essential Harbours; and
  • Increased capacity and better management of Aboriginal fisheries.

Measurements of success will be based on the review of the identified indicator and target completion date for each planned action. Reporting on performance will be done through a report card included in the next Sustainable Development Strategy.

The 2007-2010 SDS will present a revised approach based on lessons learned. A broader consultation base will help guide the development of achievable short- and long-term targets, the implementation of concrete measures and the report on sustainable development achievements for the Department.

One of the commitments outlined in the 2005-2006 Sustainable Development Strategy is the implementation of a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) system. DFO is committed to ensuring that the Department completes SEAs in conformance with the 2004 Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. DFO's SEA Handbook, released in May 2005, assists managers, policy and program officers in deciding when and how to undertake an SEA. The Department is working to ensure that all Memoranda to Cabinet, Treasury Board Submissions and major policy initiatives include an SEA in the coming year.

As part of its SDS, DFO has an Environmental Management System (EMS) in place to manage, track and improve its environmental performance on an ongoing basis. Environmental aspects identified as part of this EMS include contaminated sites, wastewater, storm water effluent, halocarbons, hazardous material and waste, air emissions, solid non-hazardous waste, water consumption and energy conservation.

Internal Audits and Evaluations

http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/communic/cread/audits/index_e.htm

Mouse

The Audit and Evaluation Directorate developed a three-year audit and evaluation workplan for the fiscal years 2005-2006 to 2007-2008 through a systematic risk-based process to ensure that proposed audits and evaluations add value to the Department and assist in the achievement of departmental priorities and strategic outcomes. The workplan is updated each year and approved by the Departmental Audit and Evaluation Committee. It ranks audit and evaluation projects in decreasing priority order. In any given fiscal year, the audits and evaluations may be postponed to other fiscal years, or be modified or cancelled based on changing priorities, new initiatives or other factors. Modifications are fully documented and approved by the Departmental Audit and Evaluation Committee.

The workplan for 2005-2006 to 2007-2008 includes the following audits and evaluations for 2006-2007. The start date is indicated in terms of fiscal year quarter: for example, Q1 refers to April-June 2006.

Internal Audits and Evaluations

Audits Start Date

Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary Q1
Follow-up Audit of the Overall Financial Management Control Framework Q1
Financial Statements Audit Q1
Official Languages and Translation Q2
Recruitment for Specialized Occupations Q3
Capital Investment Management Framework Q3
Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management Program Q4
Follow-up Audit of the Occupational Health and Safety Audit Q4

Evaluations Start Date

Maritime Security Initiatives Q1
Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary Q1
Conservation and Protection Line Reporting Pilot Evaluation in the Pacific Region Q1
Canadian Shellfish Program Q2
Fraser Basin Initiative (Results-based Management and Accountability Framework/Risk-based Audit Framework) Q2
Canada's Oceans Action Plan — Phase I Initiative Q3
Utilization of Science Advice (Science Requested Evaluation) Q3
Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management Program Q4

 




Other Items of Interest

In this section:

Organizational Information

Fisheries and Oceans Canada is a largely decentralized department with almost nine of every ten employees situated in regions outside the National Capital Region. The Department operates across Canada from six regions, as well as from the national headquarters in Ottawa. The regions are as follows.

Organizational Information

Each of the six regions is headed by a Regional Director General (RDG) in a regional headquarters. The RDGs are responsible for organizing and managing the delivery of programs and activities in their regions through area offices, in accordance with national and regional priorities and within national performance parameters set for each program and activity.

The national headquarters in Ottawa — under the leadership of the Deputy Minister, Senior Associate Deputy Minister, Commissioner of the Canadian Coast Guard and five Assistant Deputy Ministers — is responsible for establishing national objectives, policies, procedures and standards. It also runs some national programs and monitors departmental activities nationwide to ensure the quality and consistency of service delivery.

The Canadian Coast Guard is a Special Operating Agency within DFO under the leadership of the Commissioner and organized into five regions, each headed by an Assistant Commissioner.

The rest of the Department is organized into five sectors, each headed by an Assistant Deputy Minister. Assistant Deputy Ministers are responsible for establishing national objectives, policies, procedures and standards for their respective sectors and business lines.

The Deputy Ministers, Assistant Deputy Ministers and Regional Directors General work closely together in managing the Department and its operations.

Regional Directors General and Assistant Deputy Ministers report directly to the Deputy Minister.

This organizational and governance information is shown in the accompanying figure.

Organizational and Governance Information

Organizational and Governance Information

The Departmental Management Committee (DMC) is the Department's senior decision-making body. The Committee is chaired by the Deputy Minister. Other members include the Senior Associate Deputy Minister; the Assistant Deputy Ministers; the Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner of the Canadian Coast Guard; the Regional Directors General; the Senior General Counsel, Legal Services; the Director General of the Executive Secretariat; the Director General, Communications; the Executive Director, Aquaculture Management; and the Director General, Audit and Evaluation.

DMC meets regularly as DMC-Management, DMC-Policy or DMC-Human Resources. DMC is supported by the following senior management committees: Policy Committee, Human Resource Committee, Legal Risk Management Committee, Departmental Audit and Evaluation Committee, Investment Management Board, Information Management/Information Technology Management Board and the Science Management Board.

Legal Framework

The legal authority for DFO's programs and activities is found in the following statutes and their respective regulations. These statutes set out DFO's legal mandate, powers and duties.

  • Atlantic Fisheries Restructuring Act,1 R.S.C. 1985, c. A-14
  • Canada Shipping Act,2 R.S.C. 1985, c. S-9
  • Coastal Fisheries Protection Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-33
  • Department of Fisheries and Oceans Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. F-15
  • Fisheries Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. F-14
  • Fisheries Development Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. F-21
  • Fisheries Improvement Loans Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. F-22
  • Fishing and Recreational Harbours Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. F-24
  • Freshwater Fish Marketing Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. F-13
  • Great Lakes Fisheries Convention Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. F-17
  • Oceans Act, S.C. 1996, c. 31
  • Resources and Technical Surveys Act,3 R.S.C. 1985, c. R-7
  • Species at Risk Act,4 S.C. 2002, c. 29

1Certain sections of this Act are also the responsibility of the Ministers of Industry, Finance and State (Privatization and Regulatory Affairs).

2The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans has some responsibilities under this Act. The majority of the Act is administered by the Minister of Transport.

3The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans has some powers under this Act. However, those powers also exist under the Oceans Act.

4The Minister of the Environment is the responsible Minister for the Act, but the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans is a competent Minister with respect to aquatic species.

In addition, DFO is required to comply with constitutional statutes and laws of general application, such as:

  • the Charter of Rights and Freedoms;
  • the Financial Administration Act;
  • the new Public Service Labour Relations Act;
  • the new Public Service Employment Act;
  • the Official Languages Act;
  • the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act; and
  • the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.

Program Enablers

Program Enablers refers to the corporate functions that support the delivery of DFO's plans and priorities. In DFO, Program Enablers represent approximately 17% of total employees and consist of Executive Direction, Strategic Policy, Communications, Legal Services, Human Resources and Corporate Services. Executive Direction includes the offices of the Minister, Deputy Minister, Associate Deputy Minister, Regional Directors General and Area Managers; Audit and Evaluation Directorate; Values, Integrity and Conflict Resolution; Executive Secretariat and the Fisheries Resource Conservation Council.

The work of the Program Enablers is ongoing and multi-faceted; for example, they provide financial management support, prepare news releases and analyze policy issues. They work together with the programs described in the section Plans for 2006-2009 by Strategic Outcome to deliver departmental and government priorities and initiatives.

The financial and human resources shown below are the sum of the prorated resources presented in the section Plans for 2006-2009 by Strategic Outcome.

Planned Spending and Full-time Equivalents, DFO
  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Financial Resources
(millions of dollars)
308.1 298.7 287.3
Human Resources
(number of FTEs)
1,786 1,786 1,768

Program Enablers Sub-activities

The Program Enablers program activity is delivered through six sub-activities.

Executive Direction

  • Providing leadership and direction to the Department to ensure the effective and efficient delivery of the Department's mandate and achievement of its strategic outcomes
  • Providing timely and informed advice to the Minister
  • Implementing the audit and evaluation policies, programs and initiatives of the Government of Canada and DFO
  • Developing and implementing DFO's integrated risk management initiatives
  • Ensuring adherence to the Access to Information Act and Privacy Act
  • Ensuring awareness of and compliance with the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Service within DFO

Strategic Policy

  • Providing strategic advice, services and policies to ensure the sustainable development and safe use of Canada's oceans and aquatic resources
  • Providing strategic advice and co-ordination for the legislative and regulatory priorities of DFO

Communications

  • Working with program and policy leads across the Department to guide communications activities that support the goals and priorities of the Department and are consistent with the Government of Canada Communications Policy

Legal Services

  • Providing legal services and counsel to the Department in support of policy development, program implementation, legislative and regulatory drafting, regulatory prosecutions and civil litigation
  • Designing and implementing programs, reports and materials that enhance legal awareness

Human Resources

  • Delivering policy and procedural advice, services and training to managers and employees on organization and classification, human resource planning, succession planning, learning and career development, performance management, staffing and recruitment, employment equity and diversity, official languages, labour relations, compensation, human resource management systems, awards and recognition, and management trainee/career assignment programs

Corporate Services

  • Providing support to the Department's core areas of corporate review, finance and administration; real property management, safety and security; environment; and information management and technology services

The following table identifies the expected results and performance indicators for each of the Program Enabler sub-activities.

Expected Results and Performance Indicators
Expected Results Performance Indicators
Executive Direction
  • Improved management practices, policies and internal control systems in DFO through the audits, evaluations and follow-up audits carried out according to the Annual Audit and Evaluation Workplan
  • Improved organizational objectives in DFO achieved through the implementation of Integrated Risk Management in departmental decision making
  • Percentage of audits, evaluations and follow-up audits in the annual workplan that are completed or started
  • Percentage of recommendations approved or implemented, totally or partially
  • Number of sectors that have implemented risk-based planning for their activities
  • DMC-approved governance model for future implementation
Strategic Policy
  • Senior management, including the Deputy Minister and Minister, properly prepared to make departmental policy decisions and representations
  • Enhanced capacity within DFO to conduct complex economic research and analysis
  • Increased information and analytical base upon which decisions are made on departmental programs and policies (evidence-based policy making)
  • Increased credibility with respect to the Department's policies, program and approaches to natural resource management
  • Effective Canadian participation in international meetings
  • Enhanced capacity within DFO for legislative and regulatory initiatives
  • Senior management satisfied that policy decision-making process is strategic and properly informed from a whole-of-department perspective
  • Number of highly skilled economists and quantitative analysts recruited
  • Number of economic and statistical analyses prepared to support the development and assessment of existing and new programs and policies
  • Number of requests to provide economic advice and analysis or to use DFO as a valuable source of economic information and analytical expertise
  • Canadian positions promoted and adopted internationally
  • Number of requests for new legislative and regulatory initiatives and their implementation as "Smart Regulations"
Communications
  • Increased transparency with media and citizens
  • Informed and engaged managers and employees in DFO
  • Total number of media interactions (proactive and responsive)
  • Balance of tone in media coverage
  • Total General Inquiries requests and response rates per established service standards
  • Number of Internal Communications activities
Legal Services
  • Legal risk anticipated and mitigated
  • Programs, reports and materials that enhance legal awareness
  • Number of legal risk (litigation) and high-impact case committee meetings
  • Number of legal awareness products delivered
Human Resources
  • Continued implementation of Human Resource Modernization and effective delivery of human resource advice and services in DFO, in line with the People Component of the Management Accountability Framework
  • Number of positions using national model work descriptions
  • Number of managers trained to exercise their delegated responsibilities
  • Number of Human Resource Advisors validated by the Public Service Commission
  • Effectiveness of regional/sector Human Resource plans
  • Assessment of compliance or movement toward compliance with the 12 statutory requirements of the Employment Equity Act
  • Increase in the number of employees who meet the language requirements of their position, and reduced official language complaints
  • Increase in the number of employees who have a learning plan
  • Establishment of a career and succession management program for the EX group
  • Departmental support for development programs such as the Management Trainee Program and the Career Assignment Program
  • Number of union/management meetings
  • Continued use of both formal and informal recognition mechanisms
Corporate Services
  • Effective stewardship of DFO Real Property custodial inventory
  • Safe and healthy work environment for employees in DFO
  • Efficient management of government information
  • Reliable, secure and responsive information technology infrastructure
  • Departmental finances managed according to government policies and regulations
  • Departmental staff with the tools and information required to manage effectively
  • Ratio of capital investment to asset replacement value
  • Number of safety hazards reported and addressed by management
  • Number of Management of Government Information Policy Readiness Indicators met
  • Number of contaminated sites assessed, risk managed and cleaned up
  • Percentage availability of IT infrastructure during working hours
  • Percentage of DFO staff that rate Finance and Administration tools and information as Excellent, Very Good or Good
  • Percentage of Treasury Board decisions that are made without conditions

Contacts for Further Information

Region Name Telephone
Newfoundland and Labrador Jan Woodford (709) 772-7622
Maritimes Kathy Kieley (902) 426-3866
Gulf Terrance Boucher (506) 851-7757
Quebec Marcel Boudreau (418) 648-7316
Central and Arctic Lawrence Swift (519) 383-1830
Pacific Deborah Phelan (604) 666-8675
Headquarters Anne Lamar (613) 990-0219

 




List of Acronyms

In this section:

List of Acronyms

CEAA Canadian Environmental Assessment Act
CEPA Canadian Environmental Protection Act
CHS Canadian Hydrographic Service
DFO Fisheries and Oceans Canada
DMC Departmental Management Committee
DPR Departmental Performance Report
EA Environmental Assessment
EMS Environmental Management System
EPMP Environmental Process Modernization Plan
FMR Fisheries Management Renewal
FTE Full-time Equivalent
HA Harbour Authority
LOMA Large Ocean Management Area
MAF Management Accountability Framework
MCTS Marine Communications and Traffic Services
MPA Marine Protected Area
NAAHP National Aquatic Animal Health Program
NAFO Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization
OAP Oceans Action Plan
PAA Program Activity Architecture
PWGSC Public Works and Government Services Canada
RDG Regional Director General
SAR Search and Rescue
SARA Species at Risk Act
SCH Small Craft Harbours
SDS Sustainable Development Strategy
SEA Strategic Environmental Assessment
SOA Special Operating Agency
UNCLOS United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea