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Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPS)


Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities


Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and mitigate disease and injury.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC)

Start date: 1995-96

End date: Ongoing

Description: This program supports locally designed and controlled early childhood development intervention strategies for off-reserve Aboriginal children and their families. The program focuses on health promotion, education and school readiness, aboriginal culture and language development, parental involvement, nutrition, and social support.

Expected results: To provide opportunities for the healthy development of Aboriginal pre-school children in urban and northern settings, including the development of positive self-esteem and a desire for learning, and opportunities to develop successfully as young people. The program helps to reduce health disparities experienced by vulnerable children and their families living in conditions of risk by increasing community capacity, helping participants make healthy choices and promoting multi-sectoral partnerships.

Results Achieved: AHSUNC provides comprehensive, culturally-appropriate, early childhood development programming to approximately 4,800 children and their families at 129 sites across Canada. The program mitigates inequalities in health and developmental outcomes for Aboriginal children in urban and northern settings. Improvements have been noted in physical development, health and personal/social development, school readiness, language, literacy and mathematical thinking. Parents have learned about healthy child development and positive parenting skills.

Over the past year, national implementation and training on the Brigance Head Start Screen took place. The Brigance Head Start Screen is a standardized early childhood development screening tool that assesses developmental progress on language development, literacy, mathematics and science, social and emotional development and physical health and development. The 2010 National Administrative Process Survey was completed by 113 sites. The survey showed more than 85% of sites setting aside time every day for physical activity which mitigates the risk of childhood obesity. In addition, sites reported health promotion activities related to injury prevention and oral health: 93% conducted Safety/Fire Drill Training and 83% organized visits from dental health professionals.

The Strategic Fund was also renewed for five years, with regional and national investments to extend the reach of the AHSUNC program focussed on developing a wide range of culturally and linguistically appropriate resources and tools to enhance programming. The AHSUNC Strategic Fund provided support for a well-received Leadership, Administration and Management Training in Yellowknife, NWT for 30 site staff and the development of Inuit specific literacy resources for sites.

Program Activity: Health Promotion
($M)
  Actual Spending 2008-09 Actual Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11 Total Authorities 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11 Variance(s)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 31.3 31.8 29.1 33.6 33.1 (4.0)
Total Other types of transfer
payments
           
Total Program Activity $31.3M $31.8M $29.1M $33.6M $33.1M $(4.0)M

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual spending exceeded planned spending by $4.0M. The variance is due to the program receiving funding for strategic investments of $3.0M in Supplementary Estimates A; a temporary transfer to the regions to support amendments to contribution agreements from the Population Health Fund for $1.3M; and other transfer out of $0.3M to different programs within the Agency.

Audit completed or planned: The program was part of the September Cursor Icon Indicating Link 2009 Audit of Health Promotion Programs.

Evaluation completed or planned: A national impact evaluation was completed in 2006. The next evaluation is scheduled to be completed in 2011-12 and will focus on program relevance and performance in accordance with TBS 2009 Policy on Evaluation.


Community Action Program for Children


Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and mitigate disease and injury.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Action Program for Children (CAPC)

Start date: 1993-94

End date: Ongoing

Description: CAPC provides funding to community-based groups and coalitions to develop and deliver comprehensive, culturally appropriate prevention and early intervention programs to promote the health and social development of children (0-6 years) and their families facing conditions of risk.

Expected results: To enhance community capacity through a population health approach and to respond to the health and development needs of young children and their families who are facing conditions of risk. To contribute to and improve health and social outcomes for young children and parents/caregivers facing conditions of risk, and to continue partnering with multiple sectors in the community.

Results Achieved: PHAC provided funding and support to 441 community based projects in 2010-11.

An evaluation of CAPC completed in January 2010 provided evidence that the program continues to be relevant to the Canadian context; reaches children and families living in conditions of risk; and contributes to their health and social development. A qualitative analysis of CAPC provided evidence of improved child development outcomes, community capacity and personal parental improvement.

Program Activity: Health Promotion
($M)
  Actual Spending 2008-09 Actual Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11 Total Authorities 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11 Variance(s)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 56.0 54.4 53.4 54.8 54.7 (1.3)
Total Other types of transfer
payments
           
Total Program Activity $56.0M $54.4M $53.4M $54.8M $54.7M $(1.3)M

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual spending exceeded planned spending by $1.3M due to transfer of $0.8M from CPNP and $0.5M from other programs.

Audit completed or planned: The program was included in the September 2009 Audit of Health Promotion Programs.

Evaluation completed or planned: The Cursor Icon Indicating Link Summative Evaluation of the Community Action Program for Children: 2004-2009 was completed in January 2010. The program will undergo its next evaluation in 2013-14.


Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program


Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and mitigate disease and injury.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP)

Start date: 1994-95

End date: Ongoing

Description: This program promotes the health of at-risk pregnant women, infants and their families through leadership and support to community groups. The program focuses on reducing the incidence of unhealthy birth weights, improving the health of both infant and mother, and encouraging breastfeeding.

Expected results: To enhance community capacity through a population health approach to respond to the health and development needs of pregnant women and their infants who are facing conditions of risk. To contribute to and improve health outcomes for pregnant women, infants and their families, and to continue partnering with multiple sectors in the community.

Results Achieved: PHAC provided funding and support to 325 community based projects in 2010-11.

An evaluation of CPNP completed in January 2010 provided evidence that the program continues to be relevant to the Canadian context, reaches vulnerable pregnant women and new mothers, is cost effective, and is effecting positive changes in the health practices of pregnant women/new mothers and promoting positive birth outcomes. CPNP participants were shown to have improved use of vitamin-mineral supplements during pregnancy; to cease or reduce alcohol consumption and/or smoking; to have increased initiation and duration of breastfeeding. Moreover, there was a decreased likelihood of low birth weight infants and preterm births among CPNP participants.

Program Activity: Health Promotion
($M)
Actual Spending 2008-09 Actual Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11 Total Authorities 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11 Variance(s)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 27.2 26.4 27.2 27.3 27.0 0.2
Total Other types of transfer
payments
           
Total Program Activity $27.2M $26.4M $27.2M $27.3M $27.0M $0.2M

Comment(s) on Variance(s): n/a

Audit completed or planned: The program was included in the September 2009 Audit of Health Promotion Programs.

Evaluation completed or planned: The Cursor Icon Indicating Link Summative Evaluation of the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program 2004-2009 was completed in January 2010. The program will undergo its next evaluation in 2013-14.


Innovation Strategy


Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and mitigate disease and injury.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Innovation Strategy (IS) previously known as the Population Health Fund

Start date: 1999-2000

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Innovation Strategy is a federal grants and contributions initiative designed to foster and support effective action on and across a broad range of factors that affect the health of Canadians. The IS focuses on innovation and learning in population health to address the determinants of health and to reduce health inequalities. The Strategy supports the development, adaptation, implementation and evaluation of innovative interventions and policy initiatives in various settings and populations in Canada as well as knowledge translation and dissemination based on the systematic collection of results and outcomes of interventions and the promotion of their use across Canada.

Expected results: To increase effective action to reduce health inequalities and their underlying causes. Performance measures include the extent of design and implementation of new promising interventions; the extent of exchange of new knowledge of effective interventions to take action on priority heath issues; and the increase in the number of intersectoral collaborations to address specific determinants of health or combinations of determinants.

Results Achieved: The program has invested more than $27 million over five years to support mental health promotion across Canada. This funding supports the implementation of ten innovative, multi-centre mental health promotion interventions over the period 2010-15. These initiatives will include thousands of children, youth and families in over 50 communities. The program has also invested $7 million over the period 2010-12 in projects to promote healthy weights and prevent obesity. The IS has undertaken capacity building initiatives to ensure effective implementation and evaluation of funded innovative interventions. Initiatives have also strengthened capacity to develop and implement inter-sectoral partnerships. The knowledge being collected and gained from these projects on the impact and effectiveness of interventions will be shared with stakeholders across the country and help shape future projects and programs.

Program Activity: Health Promotion
($M)
  Actual Spending 2008-09 Actual Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11 Total Authorities 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11 Variance(s)
Total Grants 1.4 2.2 7.5 0.5 0.3 7.2
Total Contributions 6.5 5.5 3.8 8.7 8.2 (4.4)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity $7.9M $7.7M $11.3M $9.2M $8.5M $2.8M

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance in grant spending was $7.2M due to transfer of $6.6M from grants to contributions; transfer of $1.0M to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research through Supplementary Estimates C; and other transfers of $0.6M. Actual spending in contributions exceeded planned spending by $4.4M mainly due to transfer from grants, which was offset by transfers out of $1.4M to other programs within PHAC.

Audit completed or planned: The IS was included in the September 2009 Audit of Health Promotion Programs.

Evaluation completed or planned: The Cursor Icon Indicating Link Population Health Fund Evaluation 2008 covering the period of 2005-08 was completed in 2009. The next evaluation is planned for completion by 2014-15.


Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada


Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and mitigate disease and injury.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada (FI)

Start date: January 2005

End date: Ongoing

Description: Contributions towards the Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada.

Expected results: Projects funded at the national and regional levels will result in increased knowledge and awareness of the nature of HIV and AIDS and ways to address the disease; increased individual and organizational capacity to address HIV and AIDS; and enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS.

Results Achieved: In 2010-11, national funding streams supported six projects under the Specific Populations Fund, seven projects under the National Voluntary Sector Response Fund, one under the Knowledge Exchange Fund, and six under the Non-Reserve First Nations, Inuit and Mtis Communities HIV/AIDS Project Fund.

A further 21 projects across Canada under the Non-reserve First Nations, Inuit and Mtis and Inuit and Mtis Communities fund were approved for funding starting in 2011-12. These projects aim to promote the prevention of HIV infection; facilitate access to diagnosis; treatment and social supports for Aboriginal people living with HIV/AIDS and those at risk; and enhance the capacity of service providers to deliver culturally relevant, community-based interventions among Canada's off-reserve First Nations, Inuit and Mtis populations.

A total of 20 projects were funded through national funding streams for a total of $7.4 M. PHAC's Regional Transfer Payment Funds, through the AIDS Community Action Program (ACAP), supported 43 time-limited and 84 operational projects across Canada, for a total of $12.4M.

Increased Knowledge and Awareness

Under the AIDS Community Action Program, projects reports from five of the seven regions-representing approximately 85 percent of ACAP funding-reported that 43,264 members of the target populations were reached through a variety of interventions intended to increase knowledge about HIV transmission and risk. Of those reached 19,400 (or 45%) reported that their knowledge about transmission and risk had increased as a result of the intervention and approximately 20% of the target population identified their intention to adopt behaviours that would reduce risk. Currently ACAP projects are involved in an outcome assessment evaluation with the purpose of collecting participant level data to examine increased practice of health behaviours, increased knowledge and awareness of HIV/Acquired immune deficiency syndromeand increased access to programs and services.

Under the Knowledge Transfer and Exchange Fund, project reports indicate that funded activities increased the knowledge of HIV among front-line workers across Canada. A survey of users showed that 92% of respondents indicated that the activities were useful or very useful in providing information, and that they enabled users to respond to the needs of clients and their community. Eighty-six percent of respondents used information provided to change work practices, or establish or adapt programming. As a result, the capacity of community based organizations to develop and deliver programs and services increased. Front line workers reported using funded services frequently-almost 70% used them at least monthly.

In one case, reports indicate that the rate of knowledge of Aboriginal women who are aware of their HIV status increased from 45% to 69% over the course of four years.

Individual and Organizational Capacity

Based on a comparison of total numbers of volunteers and total numbers of volunteer hours reported in 2009-2010, and 2010-11 by nationally funded projects, volunteer engagement increased from 23 to 30 hours per volunteer.

Regional project data from all seven regions reported over 5000 volunteers who donated 159,312 hours (contributing an average of 31 hours per volunteer). There were over 2400 new volunteers. Significant training of over 900 sessions was reported by six of seven regions for both staff and volunteers.

Engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS

Community-based organizations developed new partnerships with communities and provinces and territories to improve access to prevention and control programs and treatment. Partnerships increased at least 10% per year over the last two years.

Regional projects in six of the seven regions reported over 650 partnerships. Projects in five regions reported a total of 63 partnerships with local and provincial governments across a number of key sectors, and a total of 48 collaborative partnerships with researchers and/or academics (a substantial increase over the last two years). Additionally, in Quebec, 33 projects reported partnerships with government and 11 projects reported partnerships with researchers. Examples of the nature and results of partnerships with researchers include: exploring models of rehabilitation programming for people living with HIV; exploring and documenting innovative models of HIV service delivery; strengthening community-based research skills and knowledge; and greater involvement and access to research expertise. Results of partnerships with the public and voluntary sector include: increased ability to reach populations at risk and provide care, treatment and support to newly diagnosed cases of HIV; increased access to nutritious foods for women and families with HIV; and increased access to medical appointments and to programs and services in general for target populations.

Program Activity: Disease and Injury Prevention and Control
($M)
  Actual Spending 2008-09 Actual Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11 Total Authorities 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11 Variance(s)
Total Grants 0.4 0.3 6.0 0.2 0.0 0.2
Total Contributions 21.3 21.1 16.7 21.4 19.9 1.5
Total Other types of transfer
payments
           
Total Program Activity $21.7M $21.4M $22.7M $21.6M $19.9M $1.7M

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Funds were transferred from Grants to Contributions. The variance of $1.7M consists of: $0.5M contribution programming deferred under the national funding stream for community-based social marketing because of delays in internal processes; and $1.2M in transfers to other programs for joint action on Federal Initiative outcomes including: 1) $45,000 to Hepatitis C Prevention, Support and Research program for increased knowledge and awareness of Hepatitis C; 2) $0.3M to Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative for increased capacity, knowledge and awareness on issues of new prevention technologies; and 3)$0.8M to Canadian HIV/AIDS Research Initiative for catalyst research on HIV co-infection, and knowledge dissemination.

Audit completed or planned: The program was part of the September 2009 Audit of Health Promotion Programs.

Evaluation completed or planned: In 2009-10 the Cursor Icon Indicating Link Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada Evaluation Report (2004-07) was approved. An evaluation report summarizing AIDS Community Action Program 2007-09 was finalized in 2010-11. The report will be available online. The next evaluation of the FI to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada is planned for completion by 2013-14.


National Collaborating Centres for Public Health


Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and mitigate disease and injury.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: National Collaborating Centres for Public Health (NCCPH)

Start date: 2004-05

End date: Ongoing

Description: Contributions to persons and agencies to support health promotion projects in community health resource development, training/skill development and research. The focus of the NCCPH program is to strengthen public health capacity, translate health knowledge and promote and support the use of knowledge and evidence by public health practitioners in Canada in collaboration with provincial/territorial and local governments, academia, public health practitioners and nongovernmental organizations.

Expected results: Increased opportunities for collaboration and networking between health portfolio partners, NCCs and other external organizations; increased knowledge translation activities-knowledge synthesis, translation and exchange-and the application of scan and research findings by researchers and knowledge users; knowledge gap identification-gaps are identified, acting as catalysts for new research; increased availability of knowledge for evidence-based decision making in public health with consequent increased use of evidence to inform public health programs, policies and practices; and improved public health programs and policies.

Results Achieved: Strategic review of program supported renewal for five years (2010-15). The NCCs are regularly invited to present to the Public Health Network Council and the Council of Chief Medical Officers of Health to inform on the use of evidence in policy and decision making in public health.

Program Activity: Public Health Preparedness and Capacity
($M)
  Actual Spending 2008-09 Actual Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11 Total Authorities 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11 Variance(s)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 8.8 8.8 8.3 8.6 8.6 (0.3)
Total Other types of transfer
payments
           
Total Program Activity $8.8M $8.8M $8.3M $8.6M $8.6M $(0.3)M

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Additional funding has been provided from other PHAC program areas to support expanded work plan activities.

Audit completed or planned: Recipient audits of NCC centres are planned to occur on a rotating basis.

Evaluation completed or planned: The Cursor Icon Indicating Link Formative Evaluation of the National Collaborating Centres for Public Health Program (NCCPH) was completed in 2008-09. An evaluation of Public Health Tools, including the National Collaborating Centres for Public Health, is planned for completion by 2013-14. The evaluation will focus on program relevance and performance in accordance with TBS 2009 Policy on Evaluation.


Healthy Living Fund


Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and mitigate disease and injury.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Healthy Living Fund (HLF)

Start date: June 2005

End date: Ongoing

Description: The HLF supports healthy living activities with community, regional, national and international impacts by funding and engaging the voluntary sector, and by building partnerships between and collaborating with governments, non-governmental organizations and other agencies.

Expected results: Funds will be used to build public health capacity and develop supportive environments for physical activity and healthy eating. Projects will help to strengthen the evidence base, contribute to knowledge development and exchange and help in the formation of health promotion activities.

Results Achieved: Objectives of the HLF are to support effective, sustainable community actions and systems that build community capacity to provide supportive environments for health. Contribution funding targeted Canadian voluntary, not-for-profit organizations to undertake national initiatives that directly support the Agency's mandate, goals and priorities in the area of physical activity and healthy eating and their relationship to healthy weights.

Funding was provided to the Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute for data collection and surveillance activities. This work supports the monitoring of physical activity levels of children and youth against targets set by federal and provincial/territorial ministers of Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation. Data will be used to inform stakeholder communities of current physical activity levels and conditions that influence participation.

In partnership with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, PHAC funded knowledge syntheses to inform future physical activity guideline development with a focus on (a) physical activity among preschool-aged children; and (b) physical activity among people with disabilities.

PHAC also approved funding for a project with Physical and Health Education Canada to undertake the development of an after-school framework to promote physical activity for children and youth. By addressing four key areas-policy development, capacity building, knowledge development and program delivery-the initiative will enable the delivery of quality after-school programs focussed on increased access to physical activity and healthy eating.

Program Activity: Health Promotion
($M)
  Actual Spending 2008-09 Actual Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11 Total Authorities 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11 Variance(s)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 7.8 7.4 5.2 4.2 4.0 1.2
Total Other types of transfer
payments
           
Total Program Activity $7.8M $7.4M $5.2M $4.2M $4.0M $1.2M

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual spending was lower by $1.2M than planned spending due to transfer of $0.3M to CIHR through Supplementary Estimates B to fund projects in Physical Activity; and transfers to other programs with PHAC of $0.9M.

Audit completed or planned: The program was part of the September 2009 Audit of Health Promotion Programs. There were no audits planned for fiscal year 2010-11.

Evaluation completed or planned: The Cursor Icon Indicating Link Formative Evaluation of the Integrated Strategy on Healthy Living and Chronic Diseases, of which the Healthy Living Fund is a part, was completed in 2009-10.


Canadian Diabetes Strategy (non-Aboriginal elements)


Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and mitigate disease and injury.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Diabetes Strategy (non-Aboriginal elements) (CDS)

Start date: 2005-06

End date: Ongoing

Description: The CDS engages provinces, territories and stakeholders at the national and regional levels in order to improve information and services available to Canadians living with or at higher risk of developing diabetes. This is achieved through community-based programming, support for diabetes surveillance systems, and collaboration on knowledge development and exchange related to risk factors and determinants for diabetes and its complications.

Expected results: Improved capacity to apply best practices and clinical practice guidelines to better screen, educate and counsel at-risk Canadians; healthier public policies in organizations across sectors and jurisdictions to address high-risk populations; early detection and management of diabetes; increased organizational capacity for policy, program, services and research development; increased awareness of diabetes risks, complications and prevention strategies for high-risk populations; and, increased knowledge among high-risk populations of skills and behaviours necessary to prevent diabetes and its complications.

Results Achieved: In 2010-11, 40 organizations received funding from the CDS in two streams. National organizations carry out their activities across the country, whereas the regional stream supports local organizations which are able to target the unique needs of their communities. Examples include the following.

The Canadian Pharmaceutical Association developed and disseminated diabetes patient care resources and trained 500 pharmacists across the country through live and online workshops to counsel people with or at risk of developing diabetes that come through their pharmacies. The Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging developed a physical activity program geared for older Canadians with diabetes. Linkages were made with Diabetes Education Centres across the country and diabetes educators and community leaders were trained to deliver the program. The Canadian Association of Wound Care researched best practices to reduce foot complications in people with diabetes (which left unmanaged can lead to limb amputation). Print and Web-based resources were developed, translated into 12 languages, and disseminated to physicians, Diabetes Education Centres and local community organizations in order to raise awareness of the importance of proper foot care for people living with diabetes.

Many of the populations at high risk of developing diabetes face significant challenges in accessing, understanding, and acting upon information that can help them identify their risk and effectively manage their condition. This may be because of language barriers, cultural practices, or living in remote underserved locations. The focus of the regional community-based projects (34 in total) was on the development and implementation of diabetes awareness and self-management initiatives geared to specific populations such as, Nova Scotians of African descent, East Asians living in Alberta, low income populations in Toronto and rural communities in Saskatchewan and British Columbia. As a result, these Canadians were made aware of their risk and provided the support, often from trained peers to whom they could relate, to effectively manage their diabetes or pre-diabetes. In many of these programs emphasis was placed on the prevention of serious cardiovascular complications as well as consideration of the importance of mental health issues, which are prevalent in people living with diabetes.

Program Activity: Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation
($M)
  Actual Spending 2008-09 Actual Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11 Total Authorities 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11 Variance(s)
Total Grants 0.3 0.7 1.2 0.0 0.0 1.2
Total Contributions 2.6 2.3 4.9 4.2 4.1 0.8
Total Other types of transfer
payments
           
Total Program Activity 2.9 3.0 6.1 4.2 4.1 2.0
Program Activity: Surveillance and Population Health Assessment
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1
Total Other types of transfer
payments
           
Total Program Activity 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1
Total Program Activities $3.0M $3.1M $6.3M $4.3M $4.2M $2.1M

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The grant funding of $1.2M was transferred fully to contributions. However, contribution actual spending was lower than planned spending due to transfer of $0.5M to CIHR through Supplementary Estimates B and other various transfers to different programs within PHAC of $1.6M.

Audit completed or planned: In 2010-11 an audit of the Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Program was completed. The Canadian Diabetes Strategy was part of this audit.

Evaluation completed or planned: An evaluation on the CDS for the period 2004-09 was completed in February 2010 as part of the Cursor Icon Indicating Link Promotion of Population Health Grant and Contribution Programs: Summary of Program Evaluations, 2004-09. Evaluations of the grants and contributions components of Chronic Diseases Prevention and Mitigation (including the Integrated Strategy on Healthy Living and Chronic Disease) are planned for 2013-14.


Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative


Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and mitigate disease and injury.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative (CHVI)

Start date: 2007-08

End date: 2016-17

Description: The CHVI is a collaborative undertaking between the Government of Canada and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to contribute to the global effort to develop a safe, effective, affordable and globally accessible HIV vaccine. This collaboration, formalized by a Memorandum of Understanding signed by both parties in August 2006 and renewed in July 2010, builds on the Government of Canada's commitment to a comprehensive, long-term approach to address HIV/AIDS. Participating federal departments and agencies are the Agency, Health Canada, Industry Canada, the Canadian International Development Agency, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

The CHVI's overall goals are to: advance the basic science of HIV vaccine discovery and social research in Canada and low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs); support the translation of basic science discoveries into clinical research, with a focus on accelerating clinical trials in humans; address the enabling conditions to facilitate regulatory approval and community preparedness; improve the efficacy and effectiveness of HIV Prevention of Mother-to-Child services in LMICs by determining innovative strategies and programmatic solutions related to enhancing the accessibility, quality, and uptake; and ensure horizontal collaboration within the CHVI and with domestic and international stakeholders.

Expected results:

  • Increased readiness and capacity in Canada and LMICs
  • Increased and improved collaboration and networking
  • Strengthened contribution to global efforts to accelerate the development of safe effective, affordable and globally accessible HIV vaccines

Results Achieved:

  • Renewal of funding and increase in duration of the partnership between the Government of Canada and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Input from stakeholder consultation resulted in the launch of a competitive process to coordinate the CHVI Research and Development Alliance
  • CHVI Advisory Board announcement and appointment of co-chairs
  • On-going support to domestic and international stakeholders in addressing HIV vaccines policy issues, building capacity and promoting global harmonization of regulatory pathways, and improving preparedness
Program Activity: Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation
($M)
Actual Spending 2008-09 Actual Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11 Total Authorities 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11 Variance(s)
           
0.0 0.9 9.3 1.1 1.0 8.3
           
$0.0M $0.9M $9.3M $1.1M $1.0M $8.3M


Comment(s) on Variance(s): The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Government of Canada announced in February 2010 that they would not move forward with the manufacturing facility and in July 2010, announced the renewal of the CHVI, with the establishment of the Research and Development Alliance as its cornerstone.

Audit completed or planned: None.

Evaluation completed or planned: The CHVI Evaluation was completed in 2010-11. The final report will be available on line. A Performance Measurement Strategy is underway and will be implemented in 2011-12.


Hepatitis C Initiative


Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and mitigate disease and injury.

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Hepatitis C Initiative (HCI)

Start date: April 2000

End date: March 31, 2020

Description: Payments provided every five years to provinces and territories to improve access to health care and treatment services to persons infected with hepatitis C through the blood system. The final payment will occur in 2014-15.

Expected results: Improved access to current emerging antiviral drug therapies, other relevant drug therapies, immunization and health care services for the treatment of hepatitis C infection and related medical conditions.

Results Achieved: The number of persons infected with hepatitis C in Canada demonstrates the continued need for an initiative of this nature. The Initiative provides $300M in transfer payments over a 20-year period to assist P/Ts in the provision of hepatitis C health care services for persons infected with hepatitis C through the blood system prior to January 1, 1986 and post July 1, 1990. Although the proportion of those infected with hepatitis C through the blood system represents just over one-tenth of estimated cases, the use of the funds to enhance the provision of health services across Canada have made all persons with hepatitis C potential beneficiaries of the HCI. One of the key activities of the Agency is to continue to lead federal programs to address HIV, sexually transmitted and blood borne infections (including viral hepatitis) and tuberculosis; the focus of this work is on effective prevention initiatives, education and awareness activities, diagnosis, care, equitable access to treatments, and support of those persons in Canada infected with, affected by or vulnerable to infectious diseases.

The federal government distributed the required funds according to the agreements. From 2000-01 to 2004-05, $200.6M was transferred to the P/Ts. Another $49.7M payment was made to the provinces in 2009-10 and the final $49.7M payment will be made in 2014-15.

Program Activity: Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation
($M)
  Actual Spending 2008-09 Actual Spending 2009-10 Planned Spending 2010-11 Total Authorities 2010-11 Actual Spending Variance(s) 2010-11
Total Grants          
Total Contributions          
Total Other types of transfer
payments
  49.7      
Total Program Activity $0.0M $49.7M $0.0M $0.0M $0.0M $0.0M

Comment(s) on Variance(s): n/a

Audit completed or planned: None.

Evaluation completed or planned: An evaluation of the first five years of the program (2000-05) was completed in 2006. Further evaluation of the program will be incorporated in a larger evaluation of community-associated infections, which is currently scheduled to be completed in 2012-13.