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Section II Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome - Quality Federal Policing

Federal Policing provides for the safety and security of Canadians and their institutions, domestically and globally, as well as internationally protected persons and other foreign dignitaries, through intelligence-based prevention, detection, investigation and enforcement of the laws against terrorism, organized crime and other criminal activity.

Program Activity 1: Federal and International Operations

Improve the security of Canadians and the government through law enforcement and investigative services to the federal government, its departments and agencies, and through international policing and peacekeeping.




Program Activity: Federal and International Operations
2008-09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
2008-09 Human Resources
(FTEs)
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned Actual Difference
$802.6 $833.5 $777.5 5,570 4,773 797


Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Performance
Summary
9
Reduced impact of organized crime Percentage of participants who are of the view that the RCMP plays a valuable role in reducing the threat and impact of organized crime

Stakeholders: 92%

Partners: 90%

Stakeholders: Mostly met; 89%

Partners: Mostly met; 86%

Percentage of stakeholders who are of the view that the RCMP provides valuable input into the development of public policy pertaining to organized crime 2008 baseline 93% Somewhat met; 78%
Percentage of participants (partners/stakeholders) who are of the view that the RCMP plays a valuable role in reducing the impact of economic crime (such as credit cards, counterfeit or identity theft) 85%

Stakeholders: Exceeded; 89%

Partners: Mostly met; 81%

Percentage of participants (Canadians) who are of the view that the RCMP is a valuable partner in reducing the impact of economic crime by promoting awareness and education 83% Exceeded; 84%
Percentage of participants who are of the view that the RCMP shares its research related to organized crime with my organization No target set for 2008-2009*

66%

 

Reduced threat of terrorism Percentage of participants (Canadians) who are of the view that the RCMP plays a valuable role in reducing the threat of terrorist activity in Canada

Stakeholders: 84%

Partners: 84%

Stakeholders: Exceeded; 86%

Partners: Mostly met; 83%

Safe and secure
society
Percentage of participants (Canadians) who are of the view that the RCMP makes a valuable contribution to reducing the threat of terrorist activity in Canada and abroad 84%
Exceeded; 86%
Percentage of Canadian police partners who are of the view that the RCMP supports the integration of policing services/law enforcement services
No targets set for 2008-2009* 80%

Percentage of participants who are of the view that the RCMP is sensitive to the unique needs of its partners/stakeholders

No targets set for 2008-2009*

Partners: 72%

Stakeholders: 62%

Percentage of stakeholders who are of the view that the RCMP information and intelligence are relevant
No targets set for 2008-2009* 70%
Percentage of partners who are of the view that the RCMP is a valuable partner in protecting Canadas border No targets set for 2008-2009* 78%
Percentage of stakeholders who are of the view that the RCMP is a valuable partner in protecting Canadas sovereignty
No targets set for 2008-2009* 78%
Percentage of partners who are of the view that the RCMP makes a valued contribution to the development of public policy with respect to international issues
No targets set for 2008-2009* 64%

Percentage of participants who are knowledgeable about the scope of the RCMPs international policing services

No targets set for 2008-2009*

Partners: 56%

Stakeholders: 52%

Percentage of partners who are of the view that Federal and International Operations personnel provide a timely response to international requests
No targets set for 2008-2009* 49%

Percentage of participants who are of the view that the RCMP provides effective support of international operations

No targets set for 2008-2009*

Partners: 64%

Stakeholders: 64%

* No targets were set for these indicators in 2008-2009; information gathered on performance in the 2009 survey will serve as baseline information for future target setting.

Benefits for Canadians

The RCMPs Federal and International Operations (FIO) program activity contributes to protecting public safety and the economic and national security of Canada. More specifically, it protects Canadians from border-related criminality while allowing for the secure and effective international movement of people and goods. It lessens both short- and long-term social and economic harms to Canadians by striking at the roots of organized crime and helps maintain consumer and investor confidence in our economy by targeting all forms of financial crime. International peace and security are promoted through the provision of police-related expertise in failed or fragile states. The sovereignty and stability of Canada and the way of life of its citizens are upheld, through investigation, prosecution and disruption of terrorist criminal activity and other national security threats.

Performance Analysis

The Federal and International Operations program activity achieved much in 2008-2009 to reduce the impact of organized crime, reduce the threat of terrorism, protect economic integrity, and provide Canadians with a safe and secure society. These successes which include the disruption of organized crime groups and activities of groups and/or individuals carrying out terrorist criminal activities (see Section I), the seizure of drugs and contraband (e.g., over 1,000,000 cartons of contraband cigarettes were seized in 2008), and successful court outcomes (e.g., the first two convictions under the 2001 Anti-terrorism Act were secured this fiscal year) demonstrate the breadth of activities undertaken in federal policing.

The program realizes, however, that these largely reactive measures are only part of an effective strategy to address organized crime, terrorism, financial crime and border-related criminality. That is why, in 2008-2009, focus has also been placed on proactive efforts to enhance cooperation, strategies and capacity. Successes on this front include:

  • Transitioned the Canada/US Border Security Strategy from a law enforcement border strategy encompassing the RCMP and US Border Patrol to an overarching government approach to the border involving numerous departments and agencies in both countries, and achieved the Integrated Cross-Border Maritime Law Enforcement Operations Agreement agreement-in-principle
  • Developed a Contraband Tobacco Enforcement Strategy through extensive consultation with various partners including First Nations communities
  • Launched, with Alberta Health Services, a national Kids and Drugs prevention program
  • Furthered the development of the RCMPs Synthetic Drug Initiative
  • Formed a partnership with the Canadian Crime Stoppers Association to raise public awareness about human trafficking
  • Made significant progress on a Mass Marketing Fraud Enforcement Strategy including acquiring approval to proceed towards a permanently funded National Anti-Fraud Centre
  • Launched a national security-related Suspicious Incident Reporting pilot project with private sector critical infrastructure partners
  • Led the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police Counter-Radicalization and Prevention Project
  • Helped to deliver outreach and awareness sessions to the private sector in seven Canadian cities on the counter-proliferation of dual-use technology and strategic goods
  • Deployed 29 Canadian police officers to aid capacity-building efforts in Afghanistan while continuing peacekeeping missions in Cte dIvoire, Haiti, Israel Kosovo, Sudan, Timor-Leste and Bosnia-Herzegovina, as well as specialized postings in Geneva, Switzerland and to Canadas Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York
  • Implemented an interface between INTERPOL databases through the Canadian Police Information Centre, which will provide direct real-time access to all INTERPOL databases
  • Strategically repositioned the International Liaison Officer program and increased it to 37 Liaison Officers, 26 posts and 23 Countries

Lessons Learned

Challenges, however, remain. While significant progress was made in 2008-2009 to implement the October 2007 recommendations of Nick Le Pan (former Federal Superintendent of Financial Institutions) on the RCMP-led Integrated Market Enforcement Teams, more work remains to be done to continue to build upon current effectiveness. Some shortcomings in the area of domestic and international information sharing were also highlighted in 2008-2009 through external reviews such as the report of the Internal Inquiry into the Actions of Canadian Officials in Relation to Abdullah Almalki, Ahmed Abou-Elmaati and Muayyed Nureddin, and the audit of the Office of the Auditor General on National Security: Intelligence and Information Sharing.

The complexity, size, scope and international nature of many organized crime and terrorism investigations, combined with prolonged court proceedings in other cases, have highlighted resource, program and legislative gaps that need to be addressed to ensure that the RCMP can continue to successfully and comprehensively meet the ever evolving threat environment it is facing. Internal reviews and evaluations of both programs and investigations which commenced or concluded in 2008-2009 have documented some of these challenges and have provided ways forward to address the issues.

While the RCMP continues its examination of the findings from the report of the Internal Inquiry into the Actions of Canadian Officials in Relation to Abdullah Almalki, Ahmed Abou-Elmaati and Muayyed Nureddin, the response to the recommendations of the September 2006 (Part I) report of the Commission of Inquiry into the Actions of Canadian Officials in Relation to Maher Arar, is now posted on the RCMPs website 10. In addition to the measures outlined there, the RCMP is also developing an enhanced information-sharing policy to ensure consistency and to more robustly address concerns regarding information flowing to countries that are suspected of violating human rights, that may accept torture as a practice, or retain the death penalty.

In the context of the Integrated Market Enforcement Teams, it has become increasingly apparent that there is a need to address the current lack of power that Canadian law enforcement officials have to compel third-party witnesses to provide testimony and evidence in capital market investigations something which is seen by experts as a fundamental first step in closing the gap between Canada and comparator countries, such as the United States and the United Kingdom.

Program Activity: Protective Policing Services

Reduce the risks/threats associated with designated foreign missions and Canadian executive sites.




Program Activity: Protective Policing Services
2008-09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
2008-09 Human Resources
(FTEs)
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned Actual Difference
$204.3 $230.4 $213.2 1,224 1,278 54


Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Performance
Summary
11

Reduced impact of terrorism

Safe and secure society

Number of incidents that compromised the safety of RCMP protectees and security of Canadian interests
Zero incidents Met all: 100% free from incidents

Benefits for Canadians

Protective Policing contributes to a safe and secure Canada by ensuring the safety of high profile sites and people. National security interests, Canadian government executives, the foreign diplomatic community serving within Canada, and the general public are all safeguarded by RCMP Protective Policing. Protective Policing Services is central to the RCMP strategic outcome of Protection and supports the strategic priority of Terrorism.

Performance Analysis

Protective Policing continues to focus on delivering professional and innovative protective operations services in order to ensure that the diverse needs of its clients, partners and stakeholders are met. In order to continue to achieve 100% success in ensuring the safety of its protectees and the security of Canadian interests, Protective Policing continues to focus on delivering professional and innovative protective operations services. Through the integration of operations, Protective Policing has achieved more effective use of resources and increased operational proficiency.

Lessons Learned

Protective Policing reviews its security measures and business practices to ensure that clients are provided with appropriate and effective protection services. A team composed of executives from Protective Policing will continue to review best practices by benchmarking their program against various policing agencies worldwide and examining their methods of providing personal and site security. This team also reviews best practices with respect to major event security; international policing partners and forums for information exchange provide the opportunity for consultation.

Protective Policing has been working towards establishing and maintaining an overarching framework for managing security operations at major events. This framework is intended to provide:

  • A whole of government template which will guide collaborative planning and execution of security capabilities
  • A responsive risk-aware decision support system
  • A knowledge management system that identifies best practices, captures lessons, effects change and champions innovation
  • A repository of value-adding tools and technologies
  • Governance (with the authority to link policy, legislation and mandate with functions, tasks, and expertise, within the business planning cycle)

Based on the findings from previous lessons learned from major events in Canada, these considerations are applied to future major events to provide seamless delivery of safe and secure events. Protective Policing continues to strengthen its relationship with participating partners to ensure a transparent fully integrated approach is taken when a major event is held within Canada. One of its ongoing priorities is the establishment of a reusable Major Events Security Framework.

Strategic Outcome - Quality Contract Policing

Contract policing contributes to healthier and safer Canadian communities through effective crime prevention, education, law enforcement and investigation.

Program Activity 3: Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing

Improving the health and safety of Canadian families and their communities by preventing and investigating crime, enforcing the law as well as protecting life and property.



Program Activity: Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing
2008-09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
2008-09 Human Resources
(FTEs)
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned Actual Difference
$1,045.2 $1,218.2 $1,120.2

17,902

17,298 604


Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Performance
Summary
12

Highest quality police services/programs

Prevention and reduction of youth involvement in crime as victims and offenders

Safe and healthier Aboriginal communities

Percentage of Canadians who agree that the RCMP plays a valuable role/fulfils its strategic priority of contributing to safer and healthier Aboriginal communities 80% Mostly met; 74%
Percentage of Canadians who agree that the RCMP plays a valuable role/fulfils its strategic priority of preventing and reducing youth involvement in crime as victims and offenders 84% Mostly met; 81%

Benefits for Canadians

The Contract Policing program activity allows the RCMP to provide consistent policing services to Canadian communities by establishing standardized policies, procedures and protocols based on best practices and vast experience. The size of the RCMP offers economies of scale to equip, train and develop a professional police service, and the RCMP assumes all responsibilities as an employer under Canadian labour laws and federal regulations. The Contract Policing program activity allows the RCMP to mobilize some 30,000 employees, put a national focus on programs, and contribute to public policy with the aim to make every community in its jurisdiction a safer place.

In the event of planned or unforeseen policing events, acts of terrorism, or emergencies and disasters, the RCMP can effect rapid deployment of law enforcement personnel who can relocate freely, respond to the need, and work with an integrated approach. The presence of the RCMP across Canada provides an excellent conduit for intergovernmental relationships.

Canadians agree that regular members in red serge, at local community, national and international events, stand as icons representing peace, order, stability and equality.

Performance Analysis

The 2008 federal budget provided $60 million, over two years, for the National Crime Prevention Strategy, in addition to the existing annual investment of $33 million. This money went towards providing support for vulnerable families and children at risk, preventing youth gangs and drug-related crime, and preventing recidivism among high-risk groups. The RCMP has been and continues to be actively involved in these initiatives. The funds have helped support community-based prevention and intervention projects, targeting youth at risk.

In 2008-2009, the RCMP continued to progress in its efforts to prevent and reduce the involvement of youth in crime as both victims and offenders, with a focus on early intervention, solid community partnerships, and engagement with youth to develop their potential. An example of RCMP efforts is the National Youth Officer Program, a partnership between police, schools and other stakeholders focused on helping youth become contributing members of their communities. The national program provides guidance to police officers working with youth, specifically in a school environment. The program was expanded in 2008-2009 to include all grade levels. A national advisory committee was established, with representation from the RCMP, Sret du Qubec, Ontario Provincial Police, Peel Regional Police, Committee of Ontario Youth officers, Ottawa Police Service and Toronto Police Service, and a framework for cooperation on youth crime prevention in Canada was developed. A Youth Officer Resource Centre, an RCMP website featuring best practices and age-appropriate presentations for policy use in schools, was made available to other police services. The RCMP continued to promote evidence-based evaluations of its crime prevention programs in 2008-2009.

The RCMP also initiated several alternative policing models in 2008-2009 to improve community safety. The Community Program Officer (CPO) program provides communities with civilian, unarmed, non peace officers who focus exclusively on crime prevention, community engagement/mobilization and crime reduction. The Community Safety Officer (CSO) program involves unarmed, uniformed, peace officers who focus exclusively on reassurance efforts, crime prevention, community policing, investigational support and community safety. These service delivery options assist in balancing the proactive, preventative and reactive demands placed on core policing resources and pilots are underway across the country.

Efforts to improve community safety must also include measures to improve road safety. The RCMPs vision is to have the safest roads in the world by the year 2010 through the dedicated application of problem solving, partnership building, enforcement and education strategies, and evaluation of programs, based on and informed by quality data collection. This year, more than 23 Drug Recognition Expert courses were delivered. These courses are designed to train police officers in the detection of low level alcohol and drug impaired drivers. In addition, more than 16 Criminal Interdiction courses were delivered. These courses help develop peace officers observational, conversational and investigative skills in addition to teaching indicators of traveling criminals and detecting couriers with contraband. In building expertise in the field of traffic services, the RCMP enhances public safety both on and off Canadian roadways.

In 2008-2009, there was a continued focus on emergency preparedness by all levels of government. In preparation for an emergency or disaster event, the RCMP has developed Emergency Operations Plans to establish the policy, organization, coordination procedures and response patterns for emergency or disaster event responses. The plans promote integration, partnerships and interoperability, and contribute to the creation of safe homes and safe communities. To date, all RCMP Divisions have completed their Emergency Operations Plans.

Contributing to safer and healthier Aboriginal communities requires cultural sensitivity and cultural competence. The RCMP continued its commitment to working collaboratively with Aboriginal organizations, communities, partners and stakeholders to improve and contribute to the safety and well-being of Aboriginal communities. The focus is on preventing crime through social development and fostering open dialogue and trusting relationships with the Aboriginal population.

The RCMP successfully addressed the May 2008 National Day of Action, through partnerships with other federal departments and agencies, First Nations Chiefs of Police and Aboriginal organizations involved in planning and responding to this national event. All 52 events during the National Day of Action were peaceful and occurred without incident. The RCMP is looking to apply the best practices from the National Day of Action to develop a coordinated response that can be applied to any large event in the future in which Aboriginal groups play an active role. The RCMP continues to rely on its network to lead a collective response to unannounced events.

The RCMP developed a proposal for the Community Officer (CO) Program in 2008-2009. The program proposal focuses on the recruitment, selection and training of Aboriginal members to provide policing services for Aboriginal communities, and is one of a number of enhanced service delivery options under development for presentation to jurisdictions policed by the RCMP. Efforts in 2008-2009 focused on developing training standards, a risk assessment, task bank, job evaluation and classification, selection standards, recruitment strategies, and program evaluation criteria. If approved, the first Community Officer troop could begin training in the third quarter of 2009-2010 and could include candidates from the western Provinces and the northern Territories.

The RCMP made significant progress towards the national implementation of the Police Resourcing Model (PRM). In 2008-2009, the RCMP increased the number of trained resourcing analysts from three to eight, covering three additional Divisions. This key workload-based measurement tool will better support the planning and resourcing processes by providing up-to-date staffing and deployment information for frontline police officer requirements.

Lessons Learned

Intense public scrutiny of police continued in 2008-2009, particularly with regard to the use of force. To enhance the effectiveness, consistency, transparency and accountability of its use-of-force policy, the RCMP revised its Incident Management Intervention Model (IMIM). The IMIM is the framework by which RCMP members assess and manage risk through justifiable and reasonable intervention. It helps members choose the appropriate intervention option, based on the subjects behaviour and the totality of the situation. In 2008-2009, the RCMP focused on developing training for all members on the new model. Training is expected to start in 2009-2010.

Following several reports recommending that the RCMP compile information on use of force incidents and maintain the information in a database, the RCMP created a standardized format of reporting subject behaviour and officer responses to behaviours exhibited, which is referred to as SB/OR reporting. In 2008-2009, SB/OR reporting was piloted at RCMP detachments across the country. The goal is to implement SB/OR reporting nationally by fall 2009 following the national adoption of the revised IMIM.

Once the national rollout of SB/OR is completed, the RCMP will be able to generate reports from the information housed in the SB/OR database.

Following a decision by Human Resources and Social Development Canada that RCMP resourcing practices fell outside Section 124 of the Canada Labour Code, a national back-up policy was developed, outlining occurrences requiring a multiple member response, including calls of violence or where violence is anticipated; domestic disputes; occurrences involving the use, display or threatened use of a weapon; occurrences involving a subject posing a threat to self or others; areas where communications are known to be deficient; and occurrences or situations where the member believes a multiple member response is required based on his or her risk assessment. The policy was formally published in 2008. Included in the policy is a requirement for detachments to complete a risk assessment and back-up plan; these plans were completed in 2008-2009.

Strategic Outcome - Quality Policing Support Services

Through its Policing Support Services, the RCMP helps Canadian law enforcement agencies optimize their delivery of proactive policing services and programs. This support includes critical intelligence, equipment, tools, systems, technology and education.

Program Activity 4: Criminal Intelligence Operations

Sharing of managed criminal information and intelligence in the detection of and prevention of crime of an organized, serious or national security nature.



Program Activity: Criminal Intelligence Operations
2008-09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
2008-09 Human Resources
(FTEs)
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned Actual Difference
$74.9 $99.7 $77.4 631 551 80


Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Performance
Summary
13
Enabling sustainable, intelligence-led policing Number of strategic divisional collection plans developed and actioned on an ongoing basis through the divisional intelligence steering committee All RCMP divisions Somewhat met
Delivering quality criminal intelligence Percentage of RCMP clients who agree that criminal intelligence is actionable Targets have yet to be determined as the Criminal Intelligence Program is in the process of reorganizing Not met
Expanding and sharing the criminal intelligence knowledge base amongst law enforcement Percentage of RCMP documents meeting the sharing criteria of partner agencies Still in progress; targets have yet to be determined as the Criminal Intelligence Program is in the process of reorganizing Not met
Building and strengthening new and existing partnerships Percentage of law enforcement partners who agree that the RCMP Criminal Intelligence Program provides value 90% Somewhat met; 63%
Envisioning, developing and enabling the use of technology and information management Percentage of identified functionality requirements delivered for records management system 60% Not met; still in progress
Developing and supporting its employees Percentage of vacant positions staffed 95% Mostly met

Benefits for Canadians

The Criminal Intelligence Program (CIP) provides a cohesive structure and singular direction for intelligence within the RCMP, and is an important service to investigative and law enforcement partners in the detection, disruption and prevention of criminal activity at all levels in Canada and internationally. The Program provides a benefit to Canadians by supporting the RCMPs strategic priorities of reducing the threat and impact of organized crime, reducing the threat of terrorist criminal activity, preventing and reducing youth involvement in crime as victims or offenders, contributing to Canadas economic integrity through crime reduction, and contributing to the long-term wellness and safety of Aboriginal communities. Not only does the Criminal Intelligence Program support the RCMPs strategic outcome of Quality Policing Support Services, but it also directly supports those of Quality Federal Policing and Quality Contract Policing by providing strategic and tactical intelligence, working with investigators in specific program areas, and promoting strategies to expand the identification and sharing of information and intelligence on transnational organized crime groups affecting Canada to enhance public safety.

Performance Analysis

In 2008-2009, the Criminal Intelligence Program ensured RCMP representation in the Strategic Alliance Group (SAG), thereby enhancing the organizations role in this international forum and building on partnerships in the effort to counteract transnational organized crime. The SAG is composed of five member countries: Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Australia. The RCMP brought forward a recommendation to establish a full court press on Methamphetamine and Ecstasy enforcement, which was endorsed by all SAG countries. The RCMP took the lead on the development of this recommendation to actual performance measures in all five member countries. The 2008-2009 year also marked the beginning of the Criminal Intelligence Programs Project Phoenix, a multi-year investment into enhancing the criminal intelligence capacity within the RCMP. In its first year, the National Program Support and Development Branch was created, thereby providing solid foundational support to program development overall.

Analysts with the CIP Integrated Border Enforcement Teams, in conjunction with the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), drafted joint reports such as the Smuggling Networks Efforts to Move Ecstasy from Canada to the US and Cocaine Smuggling from the US into Canada. These reports were created under the auspices of the DHS and CBSA Joint Intelligence Assessments Program, a bi-national forum for improving intelligence-sharing and analytic collaboration between the US and Canada. Joint RCMP, DHS and CBSA assessments present a collective view from each country on threats to the US-Canada border, covering a wide range of issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism and human smuggling.

Lessons Learned

Policing in Canada and abroad has undergone significant changes in recent years, reflecting the transformations taking place in society, in general, from such factors as advancements in technology and communications, demographic shifts, and the evolution of transnational criminal and terrorist networks. The RCMP Criminal Intelligence Program has developed a business case that outlines a multi-year investment to enhance the criminal intelligence capacity within the RCMP and provide an opportunity for strategically rethinking the role of intelligence, especially within the context of Canadas national law enforcement agency. The business case provides a multi-dimensional approach for the direction of the Criminal Intelligence Program. The life cycle of the business case will allow the Program to implement initiatives to better provide a full range of timely, accurate, relevant and actionable intelligence products and services to all four levels of policing. In order to narrow the gap between its current and desired state of operations, the Program identified a need for additional resources, both human and technological, to achieve its full operational objectives in support of municipal, provincial/territorial, national and international policing.

Program Activity 5: Technical Policing Operations

Increase the effectiveness of frontline members and partners in investigations, law enforcement and detection of terrorism and operate in a safe and secure environment.



Program Activity: Technical Policing Operations
2008-09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
2008-09 Human Resources
(FTEs)
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned Actual Difference
$216.2 $254.1 $249.7 1,515
1,522 7


Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Performance
Summary
14
Leading-edge policing and security technology The number of files Technical Operations has assisted Canadian law enforcement (including RCMP) with operational investigations
2008-2009 target of 240 represents an increase of 10% over previous years performance (218) Exceeded; assisted on 274 files
Timely and high quality scientific tools, techniques and information management technology The number of times Technical Operations has assisted Canadian law enforcement (including RCMP) with operational investigations Target of 3,800

(Baseline for 2007-2008 was 3,627)

Exceeded; assisted on over 3,900 requests
The number of polygraph examinations performed on potential suspects and witnesses in serious criminal investigations Maintain the demand for polygraph examinations Met all; conducted 1,600 polygraph tests on potential suspects and witnesses in serious criminal investigations
Research and develop performance specifications for electronic security for the 2010 Olympics at 25 venues 100% completed Met all; completed 100% of specifications for Perimeter Intrusion Detection System (PIDS)
The number of sites protected and maintained with video and electronic surveillance 120 VIP sites maintained Met all; maintained and monitored 120 VIP sites
The number of tactical queries conducted on the National Sex Offender Registry to assist law enforcement in the event of sexual offences Increase of 10% over previous years performance (125 in 2007-2008) Exceeded; conducted 165 tactical queries on the National Sex Offender Registry

Benefits for Canadians

RCMP Technical Operations provides direct, specialized investigative and operational services to frontline police officers in covert and overt environments, and direction and advice on government and corporate security. Technical Operations contributes to all of the RCMPs strategic priorities and, in particular, organized crime and terrorism investigations, by providing state-of-the-art technological tools, procedures, and research and development to enable the effective, lawful interception of communications as well as electronic and physical surveillance. By leading specialized investigations in relation to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives (CBRNE) events, Technical Operations contributes to reducing the threat of terrorist criminal activity.

Performance Analysis

Technical Operations realized significant achievements by undertaking a number of initiatives designed to enhance the safety, security and integrity of sites and systems. It continued participating in working groups that develop proposals and policy, as well as legal and operational responses to investigative challenges. Additionally, Technical Operations incorporated new flexibility and logic into security procedures and increased accountability requirements while integrating sound risk management and financial practices. Technical Operations continued its work of underpinning corporate security in the Forces operational and administrative functions.

Lessons Learned

Technical Operations is committed to and aligned with the strategic priorities of the RCMP. Its strengths are rooted in innovation and its ability to address the multiple complex requirements of clients and stakeholders. This includes partnerships forged with the law enforcement community, both on a national and international level. Technical Operations is now structured into seven distinct branches; an internal program review indicated that commonalities existed between some branches. As a result, Departmental Security and Technical Security Branches have been merged to form a consolidated security policy centre within Technical Operations, known as the Departmental Security Branch. Engagement from senior management has been very positive. By combining like specialists into larger units, the same clients are being served but with greater effectiveness and operational flexibility. It is hoped that this reorganization will benefit not only the RCMP and its clients, but also the security experts in the two branches, allowing those who are interested to expand their expertise as well as their careers. At the same time, a decision was made to transfer the Counter Technical Intrusion Section from the Technical Security Branch to the Protective Services Branch since it would have been the only technical area with a direct service delivery component and the Protective Services Branch already offers technical services to similar clients.

Program Activity 6: National Police Services

Delivering support to Canadas law enforcement community with sophisticated and reliable services.



Program Activity: National Police Services
2008-09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
2008-09 Human Resources
(FTEs)
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned Actual Difference
$159.3 $174.9 $183.1 1,477 1,225 252


Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Performance
Summary
15

Leading-edge policing and security technology

Partner satisfaction with the effectiveness of RCMP technology and investigative techniques 75% Exceeded; 85%
Comprehensive, real-time intelligence and threat assessments Percentage of client satisfaction with Criminal Intelligence Service Canada criminal intelligence products 75% Met all; 75%
Increased efficiency and effectiveness of policing Percentage of targets met for the forensic laboratory system 75% There has been a steady decrease in turnaround times for all Biology service requests.
Due to the complexity of the targets, it is difficult to provide one overall statement summarizing performance. For this reason, a detailed breakdown of performance indicators and statistics for the forensic laboratory system is available in Supplementary Table 14. 16
Timely and high quality scientific tools, techniques and information management technology Number of files in the criminal record backlog Elimination of the criminal backlog in 2012 following completion of the Real Time Identification Project Not met; As of March 31, 2009, there were 553,564 files in the criminal record backlog.
Partner satisfaction that the RCMP provides valuable support and services to the IM/IT community 75% Mostly met; 72%
Timely and high quality scientific tools, techniques and information management technology Partner satisfaction that the RCMP is a valued leader in the development of IM/IT solutions for interoperability 75% Mostly met; 64%
High quality learning and training opportunities and support Client satisfaction with the CPC Kirkpatrick Survey Model Scale factor of 4 (i.e., 80%), based on a scale of 1 to 5 where 1 refers to very dissatisfied and 5 refers to very satisfied In 2007-2008, results were reported at 4.2 on a scale of 1 to 5. No results are available for 2008-2009 as the survey is under review.

Benefits for Canadians

National Police Services advances safety and security for Canadians by providing direct support to government, stakeholders and RCMP priorities by focusing on the themes of tackling violent crime, averting the threats of terrorism and organized crime, and supporting intelligence gathering and analysis. This is accomplished by the provision of forensic analyses of criminal evidence, criminal records information, identification services, technological support, enhanced learning opportunities, the coordination of criminal information and intelligence, and the reduction of firearms-related incidents.

Performance Analysis

In 2008-2009, National Police Services demonstrated leadership in the development and delivery of leading edge policing and security technology. The Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (CPCMEC) continued to combat Internet-facilitated child sexual exploitation through the expansion of the Child Exploitation Tracking System (CETS), which is used at 41 locations throughout Canada and holds information on over 7,000 investigations. As of March 31, 2009, more than 250 Canadian and numerous other international victims of Internet-facilitated child sexual exploitation were identified by Canadian law enforcement agencies, often in collaboration with the CPCMEC. Other National Police Services initiatives include enhanced security requirements for accessing the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) system. As of March 31, 2009, 85 percent of CPIC users (both RCMP and external agencies) were using Strong Identification and Authorization. In addition, in partnership with the Vancouver and Toronto police services, Forensic Science and Identification Services (FS&IS) developed a prototype robot which will provide radiation detection and 3D imagery, thereby strengthening Canadas response to potential chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive threats to public safety and security.

Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC) has made great strides in building an integrated team of intelligence officers dedicated to collecting, evaluating and disseminating criminal information. CISC shares criminal intelligence with Canadian law enforcement agencies to support their response to the threat of organized and serious crime. The development of the Canadian Criminal Intelligence Model will enable effective intelligence-led policing through the establishment of standards for intelligence-related structures, processes and practices. As well, over 260 user agencies and over 2,400 users were actively engaged with the use of the Automated Criminal Intelligence Information System (ACIIS). There were over 2.3 million transactions on ACIIS, an increase of 40 percent from the previous year, and there were almost 71,000 ACIIS entries, representing an increase of 39 percent from 2007. CISC Central Bureau has taken the lead in coordinating its third national strategic firearms collection and analysis effort on behalf of the Canadian law enforcement community in response to the Investments to Combat the Criminal Use of Firearms federal government initiative. CISC produces many reports, including the National Threat Assessment, the National Criminal Intelligence Estimate, the Sentinel Watch List and the Report on Organized Crime. A significant outcome stemming from the Outlaw Motorcycle Gang national strategy has been CISCs leading role in revitalizing the expert witness program.

In 2008-2009, National Police Services took several steps to improve the delivery of forensic laboratory services most notably through the hiring of additional staff and the establishment of a third Evidence Recovery and Analytical site in Edmonton. The Biology services backlog has been steadily decreasing over the last fiscal year. Statistics also indicate a steady decrease in turnaround times for all Biology service requests, most notably for those relating to routine homicides and sexual assaults. Performance indicators for all activities related to the RCMPs forensic laboratory system for 2008-2009 can be found in Supplementary Table 14 17. This information is provided in response to the recommendation contained in the Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 7 Management of Forensic Laboratory Services (May 2007) regarding the provision of performance information to parliamentarians. As of March 31, 2009, the National DNA Data Bank held 158,493 samples within the Convicted Offender Index (COI) and 48,268 samples within the Crime Scene Index (CSI). This has resulted in 11,503 COI to CSI hits and 1,788 CSI to CSI hits. The Canadian Integrated Ballistic Identification Network accumulated a total of 1,188 hits since its inception in March 31, 2009, all connecting firearms to crimes or linking crime scenes.

The Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services (CCRTIS) national repository of fingerprint and criminal record information holds approximately 4.1 million criminal records, supported by an additional 35 million documents. CCRTIS is enhancing the efficiency of the national repository through the Real Time Identification (RTID) Project. RTID will replace outdated paper processes and legacy systems with re-engineered workflows and automation. Phase 1 of RTID included a new Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and the automation of criminal record verifications for civil purposes. Although RTID Phase 1 contributed to the elimination of the fingerprint backlog, the criminal records backlog will continue to fluctuate until the RTID Project is fully implemented. RTID Phase 1 also resulted in the new AFIS contributing to thousands of latent fingerprint identifications that were not possible with previous technology. In addition, CCRTIS improved its service delivery time from months to days; it is now able to provide response times in three business days for electronic civil fingerprint verifications that are not linked to a criminal record.

The Chief Information Officer Sector demonstrated considerable progress in information management technology initiatives designed to enhance interoperability and information-sharing among law enforcement agencies through large-scale initiatives such as the National Integrated Inter-agency Information (N-III) Project. New versions of the Integrated Query Tool (IQT) and the Police Information Portal (PIP) were developed to enable access to data for an increased number of police and federal agency partners. In 2008-2009, 32 police agencies contributed to PIP and two federal partners (FINTRAC and CBSA) had access to information from the Police Reporting and Occurrence System (PROS) using IQT. The RCMP collaborated with the Government of Alberta in the development of an Alberta-based Records Management System (RMS) system that would effectively interface with the Police Reporting and Occurrence System (PROS). Alberta was successfully moved from a standalone RMS model, that could have created silos of record management and isolate that province from other systems, to a fully integrated model that works with PROS nationwide.

In 2008-2009, the training needs of the law enforcement community were met by the Canadian Police College through the provision of approximately 200 sessions of more than 55 advanced and specialized police training courses and workshops to approximately 4,000 police officers. As well, the College continued to pursue formalizing its exchange program with the Australian Institute of Police Management through a Memorandum of Understanding. Nine new or updated courses and workshops were created including the Aboriginal Gang Prevention and Diversion Strategy Course, the Integrated Financial Investigation Course: Investment Fraud, and the Writing for Analysis Workshop. The College also delivered six executive workshops to 116 police executives and managers in response to the evolving needs of policing and continued to be actively involved in providing specialized/advanced police training in foreign countries by delivering workshops to 132 police officers in four countries. In addition, the College hosted and trained in Canada 85 officers from more than 20 different countries.

Lessons Learned

Forensic Science and Identification Services (FS&IS) has undertaken considerable measures to improve its service delivery standards, and although progress has been made in areas such as client consultation, prioritization of casework, improved quality systems, and reporting mechanisms, FS&IS recognizes that the goals and effectiveness of certain initiatives have not been realized to the degree expected, from both an FS&IS and client perspective. Concerns raised through client consultations and employee feedback have highlighted the need for FS&IS to become better integrated and improve its forensic investigation process. As a result, FS&IS has initiated a transformation project to improve service delivery and to develop an effective forensic investigation process based on a systems approach. This holistic and intelligence-led approach will assist in addressing challenges relating to: efficiency and effectiveness; governance, structure and accountability; client-centered service delivery; employee engagement; client and stakeholder expectations; performance management; and operational capacity. It is anticipated that the new service-delivery model will be fully implemented in the spring of 2011.


Strategic Outcome - Canadian Firearms Centre

The Canadian Firearms Program (CFP) enhances public safety by reducing the risks to Canadian communities from firearms.

Prior to June 2008, the Canada Firearms Centre (CAFC) was a service line within the RCMPs National Police Services. Direct service delivery of the CAFC was composed of the Firearms Registry, the Licensing Directorate and the Operations Directorate (which included the Central Processing Site in Miramichi, NB). In June 2008, the CAFC and the RCMPs Firearms Support Services Directorate (FSSD) were merged to form an integrated entity called the Canadian Firearms Program (CFP), and aligned under the new umbrella of Policing Support Services (PSS).

The five sections that comprised FSSD were the National Weapons Enforcement Support Team, the Canadian National Firearms Tracing Centre, the Tactical Analysis Unit, the Crown Attorney Program and the Firearms Reference Table. This amalgamation of the two firearms-related groups was both logical and strategic. It enhanced the capacity and effectiveness of the CFP and sharpened the programs focus on support to law enforcement. Streamlining and elimination of redundancies in the CFP have led to further restructuring and renaming of its component groups, which will be reported in the 2009-2010 DPR. The results in this document are linked to the RCMPs 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities, which predates the realignment of the CAFC and FSSD. Where possible, performance indicators for FSSD from the 2008-2009 RPP have been added to those shown in this DPR.

Program Activity 7: Canadian Firearms Centre

Reduce access to firearms for those who pose a threat to public safety, and increased understanding and knowledge of program requirements by clients, community organizations and Canadians.



Program Activity: Canadian Firearms Centre
2008-09 Financial Resources
($ millions)
2008-09 Human Resources
(FTEs)
  Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Planned Actual Difference
Firearms Registration $13.6 $23.8 $8.4 131 65 66
Firearms Licensing and Support Infrastructure $62.9 $62.5 $57.4 297 283 14


Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Performance
Summary
18

Prevent access to firearms for those who are known to pose a threat to public safety

Number of known at risk individuals whose firearm possession licence is revoked or who are prohibited from possession of firearms No individuals subject to prohibition orders or licence revocations retains possession or acquisition privileges
Met all

Operational information made available for policing and law enforcement purposes

Number of queries to the firearms database used by frontline police (Canadian Firearms Registry Online) 10% increase in CFRO queries from previous year Exceeded; 24.2% increase
Affidavits produced in support of firearms crime prosecutions 100% of requests Met all
Safe use and storage of firearms Number of participants in safety courses Consistent number of participants from year to year Exceeded; 2,895 additional participants
Increased understanding and knowledge of program requirements by clients and stakeholders Compliance rates for licence renewals and/or new owners Individuals in possession of firearms renew their licences Mostly met

Benefits for Canadians

Aligned with the Government of Canada and the RCMPs commitment to safe homes and safe communities, the goal is to enhance public safety by providing police and other law enforcement organizations with operational and technical support and expertise which is vital to the prevention and investigation of firearms crime. The CFP also helps reduce firearms-related death and injury in Canadian communities by controlling and promoting responsible firearms ownership, use and storage. The CFP supports the RCMPs national strategic priorities of reducing the threat and impact of organized crime, reducing the threat of terrorism, reducing youth involvement in crime as victims and offenders, and contributing to safer and healthier Aboriginal communities.

Through the National Weapons Enforcement Support Team (NWEST), the CFP assists with efforts to reduce the illicit trafficking of firearms supported by organized crime. NWEST responded to 3,983 requests for assistance with firearms investigations from police services across Canada during 2008-2009, assisting in dealing with individuals whose firearms posed a threat to their communities. In November 2008, Canadian police services began reporting seized and recovered firearms to the CFP under the Public Agents Firearms Regulations, via a secure web interface. The resulting national database enables investigators to track seized and recovered firearms back to registered owners and suppliers, if any, and establish trafficking patterns. It also enables statistics-based research into criminal misuses of firearms. Public agencies reported that they had seized approximately 8,000 firearms between November 2008 and March 31, 2009.

The CFP is an active player in firearms-related cross border issues, including the Canada-US Cross Border Crime Forum. It supports Canadas efforts with the Organization of American States (OAS) and the United Nations, and works with Interpol to combat the illicit trafficking in small arms. The CFPs Firearms Reference Table is a world standard for identifying firearms linked to criminal activity, as well as other firearms. In partnership with the Canadian Police Knowledge Network (CPKN), the CFP now provides e-learning on how to identify firearms and use the Firearms Reference Table. Canada is recognized globally for its firearms controls and expertise in this area.

Although people younger than 18 years of age cannot own firearms, they may obtain a licence that will allow them to borrow non-restricted firearms for purposes such as hunting and target shooting. The CFP promotes and regulates the safe storage and handling of firearms for all gun owners and users, which reduces the risk of suicide, accidental discharge, and antisocial uses of guns by young family members of firearms owners. Firearms outreach and education initiatives have a special emphasis on youth, including a recent partnership with the Canada Safety Council.

The CFP engages and supports Aboriginal people to improve individual and community safety by providing safety training, firearms verification and licence and registration assistance to Aboriginal communities. Leaders of Aboriginal communities have expressed support for this initiative, which respects their role in the process. CFP strengthened existing and new Aboriginal partnerships and is currently leading four initiatives to provide firearms education and outreach programs.

Performance Analysis

The 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities identified several expected results from the CFP. The target metrics for these results were fully met or exceeded, with the exception of increased understanding and knowledge of program requirements, which was mostly met.

One metric, the number of queries by police on the Canadian Firearms Registry Online (CFRO) database, highlights the importance of the CFP to law enforcement. The number of database queries increased by almost 25 percent from the previous fiscal year, to over 3.5 million. Along with the thousands of investigative support requests to NWEST, trace requests to the National Firearms Tracing Centre, and requests for affidavits in support of firearms prosecutions, this shows how valuable the CFP and its operational information are to Canadian policing and law enforcement organizations.

The CFPs effectiveness in preventing access to firearms for those who are known to pose a threat to public safety was measured against a performance indicator focused on licences. A firearms possession and acquisition licence is required to purchase or take possession of firearms. CFP met its important public safety goal of ensuring that no individual whose licence had been revoked or refused by the CFP, or who was prohibited from possessing firearms for any other reason, retained possession or acquisition privileges.

Another public safety metric is participation in firearms safety training. Over 89,000 Canadians attended the firearms safety course in 2008, compared to 86,600 in 2007. This indicates that the national firearms safety curriculum is being delivered to large numbers of the firearms-possessing public, contributing to the RCMPs commitment of safe homes and safe communities for Canadians. It also shows that provincial partners who deliver the training are satisfied with its efficacy. Some of these courses were delivered in remote communities by Aboriginal partners, improving the safety of these communities and enhancing the image of the RCMP.

Efforts are being made via police outreach, the CFP website, media campaigns, pamphlet mailouts and other communications vehicles to educate police officers and other firearms clients with respect to the requirements of the Firearms Act and the support to law enforcement available through the CFP. The increase in CFRO queries is an indirect measure of increasing awareness amongst police officers, as is the number of NWEST calls. Feedback from targeted stakeholder groups has been good.

The CFP is growing in acceptance within the law enforcement community, as evidenced by a recent public endorsement by the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, the Canadian Police Association, and positive feedback in the RCMPs annual policing partner survey.

Lessons Learned

Some remaining public misconceptions regarding the future of the program were factors in a number of clients not renewing their firearms licences at the point of their five-year expiration, in spite of being sent a renewal notice by the CFP. Some non-renewals are related to clients no longer being in possession of their firearms or being deceased, but over 100,000 clients still have firearms registered to them. This number represents only about five percent of the population of firearms owners, but nevertheless the federal government renewed a compliance initiative in May 2008 to address it. This initiative included a waiver on fees for renewing firearms licences and the ability to obtain a new possession-only licence without having to go through additional safety training. In parallel, the CFP introduced new procedures and new technology to reduce the number of outdated addresses in the programs database, which would decrease the percentage of licence renewal notices being returned by Canada Post.

Concurrently, the CFP continued to advise local law enforcement agencies across the country regarding individuals who remained in possession of firearms with an expired licence in their jurisdictions, as this is an offence under the Firearms Act.