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Minister's Message

The Honourable Peter Van Loan, P.C., M.P.As Minister of Public Safety, I am pleased to present the Correctional Service of Canada’s (CSC) Departmental Performance Report to Parliament for the period ending on March 31, 2009.

The Department of Public Safety is responsible for the delivery of services and activities that directly contribute to public safety, including: policing and law enforcement; conditional release of offenders; emergency management; national security; crime prevention; the protection of our borders; and correctional services.

Fiscal year 2008-2009 was an exciting year at CSC. CSC continued working toward transforming the way it does business and its operations to improve public safety results for Canadians. In highlighting progress made in key priority areas over the past fiscal year, this report underscores the integral role that CSC played in enhancing public safety. This report also demonstrates how initial implementation of the recommendations of the December 2007 CSC Review Panel Report, A Roadmap to Strengthening Public Safety[1], through its Transformation Agenda, has helped CSC achieve progress with respect to its strategic priorities.

Consistent with the strategic priorities identified in the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Service continued to make progress in five key areas, which were developed to manage the changing offender population profile, while enhancing the Service’s contribution to public safety:

  • Safe transition of eligible offenders into the community;
  • Safety and security for staff and offenders in our institutions;
  • Enhanced capacities to provide effective interventions for First Nations, Métis and Inuit offenders;
  • Improved capacities to address mental health needs of offenders; and
  • Strengthened management practices.

The Government of Canada is committed to working towards ensuring that Canadians continue to feel safe in their communities. CSC’s key contribution to this endeavour is to successfully rehabilitate and reintegrate offenders back into our communities.

The Honourable Peter Van Loan, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety



Section 1:Departmental Overview

1.1 Raison d’être

The Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) is an agency within the Public Safety Portfolio. The Portfolio brings together key federal agencies dedicated to public safety, including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the National Parole Board, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, and three review bodies, including the Office of the Correctional Investigator.

CSC’s Mission has guided the organization since 1989. Together with the Correctional and Conditional Release Act, which is CSC’s legislative foundation, The Mission provides the organization with an enduring vision of its raison d’être, as well as a look forward, to where it is going:

The Correctional Service of Canada, as part of the criminal justice system and respecting the rule of law, contributes to public safety by actively encouraging and assisting offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.[2]

The Mission reaffirms the organization’s commitment to public safety and clearly states how CSC will accomplish it. This commitment becomes even more essential particularly in response to the recommendations made by the CSC Review Panel Report, A Roadmap to Strengthening Public Safety[3], through the Transformation Agenda[4].

1.2 Responsibilities

Mandated by the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and related regulations[5], CSC contributes to public safety by administering court-imposed sentences for offenders sentenced to two years or more. This involves managing institutions of various security levels and supervising offenders on different forms of conditional release, while assisting them to become law-abiding citizens. CSC also administers post-sentence supervision of offenders with Long Term Supervision Orders for up to ten years.

In December 2007, the organization was given a new responsibility to strengthen Canada’s federal correctional system by transforming the way CSC conducts its business and its operations to improve public safety results for all Canadians.

After completing an in-depth review of the federal correctional system, an Independent Review Panel delivered its findings in a report entitled A Roadmap to Strengthening Public Safety. This report was endorsed by the Government in Budget 2008 allowing CSC to address some of its current and long standing challenges; better support its current priorities; and provide CSC with an opportunity to integrate transformation initiatives in a way that will contribute to improved public safety results for all Canadians.

As a result of the Review Panel’s report and recommendations, CSC initiated activities in each of the five key areas identified in the report:

  • Offender Accountability
  • Eliminating Drugs from Prison
  • Employability/Employment
  • Physical Infrastructure
  • Enhanced Community Supervision Capacity


FEDERALLY
MANAGED
FACILITIES INCLUDE

  • 57 Institutions[6]
  • 16 Community Correctional centres
  • 84 Parole offices and sub-offices

In general, CSC’s responsibilities include providing services across the country-from large urban centres with their increasingly diverse populations, to remote Inuit communities across the North. CSC manages institutions for men and women, mental health treatment centres, Aboriginal healing lodges, community correctional centres and parole offices. In addition, CSC has five regional headquarters that provide management and administrative support and serve as the delivery arm of CSC’s programs and services. CSC also manages an addictions research centre, a correctional management learning centre, regional staff colleges and a national headquarters.


WORKFORCE

  • Approximately 16,500 employees, of whom 85% work in institutions and communities

CSC employs approximately 16,500 staff[7] across the country and strives to maintain a workforce that is reflective of Canadian society. Just over 47% of CSC staff are women. Slightly more than 5.5% are from visible minority groups, approximately 4.5% are persons with disabilities, and approximately 7.7% are Aboriginal. These rates are at or above labour market[8] availability with the exception of women where CSC is slightly below market levels.

Two occupational groups, for the most part exclusive to CSC, represent over half of all staff employed in operational units. The Correctional Officer group comprises 39% of staff, while another 16% of staff are in the Welfare Programmes category, the group that includes parole and program officers who work in the institutions and in the community. The remainder of CSC’s workforce reflects the variety of other skills required to operate institutions and community offices-from health professionals, to electricians, to food service staff-as well as staff providing corporate and administrative functions at the local, regional and national levels. All staff work together to ensure that the institutions operate in a secure and safe fashion and that offenders are properly supervised on release, with specialized initiatives and approaches for Aboriginals, women and offenders with mental health needs.

Volunteers continue to be essential contributors to public safety by enhancing the work of CSC and creating a liaison between the community and the offender. CSC benefits from the contributions of over 9,000 volunteers active in institutions and in the community. CSC volunteers are involved in activities ranging from one-time events to providing ongoing services to inmates and offenders in the community, including tutoring, social and cultural events, faith-based services and substance abuse programming. CSC also supports the involvement of volunteer Citizen Advisory Committees at the local, regional and national levels to provide citizen feedback on CSC policies and practices.

1.3 Strategic Outcome(s) and Program Activity Architecture (PAA)[9]

While many departments have multiple Strategic Outcomes, CSC has one; its contribution to public safety. In all CSC activities, and all decisions that staff make, public safety is the paramount consideration.

CSC’s entire Program Activity Architecture is depicted in the following chart as a single Strategic Outcome with five Program Activities.


Strategic Outcome
The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders, in communities and institutions, contribute to public safety
Program Activities
Custody Correctional Interventions Community Supervision CORCAN[10] (Revolving fund) Internal Services

To achieve the Strategic Outcome, offenders are maintained in "Custody" in institutions. Those who become eligible are transferred to communities under various types of conditional release where they are managed under "Community Supervision"[11]. In both the institution and the community, offenders receive "Correctional Interventions" to help them assume their accountability to become and remain law-abiding citizens. Some interventions begin while the offender is in the institution and continue or are maintained once the offender returns to the community, thus having a positive impact on their social reintegration process. For example, the offender may learn employment-related skills in the institution and then participate in job placement programs once in the community.

CORCAN, a Special Operating Agency of CSC, provides work and employability skills training to offenders in institutions in order to enhance job readiness upon their release to communities, and to increase the likelihood of successful reintegration. CORCAN also offers support services by 53 counsellors across Canada to assist offenders on conditional release in securing employment. CORCAN’s services are provided through partnerships internally and externally with other government organizations, Non-Governmental Organizations, and private enterprises.

The Internal Services Program Activity entails all corporate and administrative services that support the effective and efficient delivery of operational programs and activities across the organization, such as human resources management services, financial management services and information management services.

1.4 Summary of Performance - Financial


2008-09 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending[12] Total Authorities Actual Spending
2,231.40 2,371.50 2,231.30

Approximately 75% of CSC’s 2008-2009 Annual Reference Level[13] was dedicated to the provision of care and custody of offenders in institutions and in communities, which includes fixed and semi-fixed costs for security systems, salaries for correctional staff, facilities maintenance, health services, food services, and capital. Approximately 20% was allocated to correctional interventions which includes case management and offender programs. The remaining 5% was dedicated towards community supervision, which includes community-based residential facilities and community-based health services.[14]


2008-09 Human Resources Full-Time Equivalents (FTEs)
Planned[15] Actual Difference[16]
15,945 15,957 12


1.5 Summary of Performance - Operational

 


Strategic Outcome: The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders, in communities and institutions, contribute to public safety
Performance Indicators Targets 2008-09 Performance
Rate of escapes from federal institutions Reduce escapes from federal institutions Escapes were reduced
Rate of inmate deaths by other than natural causes Reduce inmate deaths by other than natural causes Inmate deaths by other than natural causes were not reduced
Rate of assaultive behaviour Reduce assaultive behaviour in the institutions Assaultive behaviour in the institutions was not reduced
Percentage of offenders granted discretionary release  Increase number of offenders granted discretionary release  Discretionary release increased for full parole but decreased for day parole
Percentage of offenders granted parole at earliest possible parole date Increase number of offenders granted parole at earliest possible parole date Number of offenders granted parole at earliest possible parole date decreased
Percentage of offenders under community supervision who incur new convictions Reduce re-offending while on supervision Re-offending was reduced
Percentage of offenders under community supervision who incur new convictions for violent offences Reduce violent re-offending Violent re-offending was reduced
Percentage of offenders under community supervision who incur new convictions for non-violent offences Reduce non-violent re-offending Non-violent re-offending was reduced
Percentage of offenders under community supervision who incur suspensions Reduce number of suspensions The percentage of suspensions and the percentage of suspensions resulting in revocation remained steady

In 2008-2009, CSC contributed to public safety by meeting its targets of reducing the number of escapes from institutions, as well as the numbers of violent and non-violent re-offending by offenders. These are the results of the immediate interventions initiated by CSC as it was launching its Transformation Agenda in response to the recommendations of the Independent Review Panel report, A Roadmap to Strengthening Public Safety. Target results for offenders granted parole at earliest possible parole date are still to be achieved.[17]

Although Safety and security in institutions has been maintained in institutions, targets to reduce the number of inmate deaths by other than natural causes and assaultive behaviour by inmates, as well as targets to increase the percentage of offenders granted discretionary release and release at earliest parole date possible are still to be achieved. This is due to CSC’s ongoing challenges to respond to a changing offender profile. CSC recognizes that it must continue its efforts and investments to transform the way it meets these challenges. Some strategies have produced an immediate impact, while others will need time to show measurable results.

While the prevention of deaths in custody has always been a priority for CSC, there is a need for improvements in several key areas. In a letter to the Correctional Investigator in February 2009, CSC indicated that it was fully committed to finding and implementing appropriate and effective measures that will assist in minimizing and preventing, where possible, deaths in custody. CSC also recognizes the difficult reality that no matter what measures are introduced, that some deaths in custody are inevitable, and the Service will continuously identify opportunities to improve its ability to anticipate and respond to these incidents.

 



 
Program Activity[18] ($ millions) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Main
Estimates
2008-09
Planned
Spending[19]
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
1.0 Custody 1,460.00 1,632.00 1,670.82 1,759.50 1,571.81 Safe and secure Communities
2.0 Correctional Interventions 508.00 424.60 439.08 467.00 519.34 Safe and secure Communities
3.0 Community Supervision N/A 117.60 121.50 126.80 131.65 Safe and secure Communities
4.0 CORCAN -4.50 0.00 0.00 18.20 8.50 Safe and secure Communities
Total 1,963.50 2,174.20 2,231.40 2,371.50 2,231.30  


The variance between total authorities and actual spending is principally related to the reprofile of resources into future years as a result of the Strategic Review, Carry Forward and CORCAN's Revolving Fund.

1.6 Contribution of Priorities to Strategic Outcome

On an average day during the 2008-2009 fiscal year, CSC was responsible for 13,287 federally incarcerated offenders and 8,726 offenders in the community. However, over the course of the year, including all admissions and releases, CSC managed 19,959 incarcerated offenders and 16,744 supervised offenders in the community. [20]

CSC has five over-arching priorities to advance its Strategic Outcome. The five priorities and their contribution to CSC’s Strategic Outcome are described in the following pages. Initiatives presented in A Roadmap to Strengthening Public Safety[21] are also represented in CSC’s plans through its Transformation Agenda.

As an immediate response for advancing the Transformation Agenda, CSC undertook numerous rapid initiatives, that could be quickly implemented and create the energy and momentum for implementing the Transformation Agenda. Despite a challenging and rapid transformation pace, CSC maintained focus on its other responsibilities.

 


Operational Priority 1:
Safe Transition of Eligible Offenders into the Community.
In the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities, CSC’s Result Commitment for this priority was to prevent an increase in the level of violent re-offending by federal offenders returning to the community.
Type[22]
Ongoing
Status
CSC successfully met its commitments in relation to this priority in 2008-2009. The percentage of federal offenders in communities convicted of a violent offence while under CSC supervision has declined from 1.39% (227) in 2006-2007 to 1.22% (202) in 2007-2008[23]. It has also declined for offenders in communities convicted of a violent offence within two years of the end of their sentence, from 5.97% (266) in 2005-2006 to 4.84% (217) in 2006-2007[24]. Both rates are at their lowest in the five years they have been measured. The rates for offenders convicted of a violent offence within five years of the end of their sentence have remained steady, from 9.56% (434) in 2002-2003 to 9.57% (422) in 2003-2004[25].

A 2008 evaluation[26] of Correctional Programs demonstrated that high-risk offenders who participated in Violence Prevention Programs were 29% less likely to be readmitted after release, including for technical revocations. When compared to matched samples of offenders who did not participate in Violence Prevention Programs, those offenders who participated were 41% less likely to return to custody for a new offence and 52% less likely to be readmitted with a new violent offence.

The 2008 evaluation also determined that, when compared to matched samples of offenders who did not participate in Substance Abuse Programs, those offenders who participated were 45% less likely to return to custody for a new offence and 63% less likely to be readmitted with a new violent offence.

As for the Community Maintenance Program, the 2008 evaluation demonstrated that offenders who participated were 29% less likely to be readmitted after release, including for technical revocations. When compared to matched samples of offenders who did not participate in the Community Maintenance Program, those offenders who participated were 40% less likely to return to custody for a new offence and 56% less likely to be readmitted with a new violent offence.

As part of its 2008 Strategic Review, CSC proposed a reinvestment strategy to significantly increase the capacity to deliver Violence Prevention, and Community Maintenance Programs. This strategy had a very important impact on the enrolment and completion rates in these programs. In 2008-2009, 955 offenders (including women and Aboriginal offenders) enrolled in the Violence Prevention Program presenting an increase of 66% from 575 in 2007-2008, with a 77% completion rate. As for the Community Maintenance Program[27], 1,931 offenders were enrolled in 2008-2009, presenting an increase of 78% from 1,085 in 2007-2008, with a 67% completion rate. Also in 2008-2009, 5,167 were enrolled in the Substance Abuse Program, presenting a decrease of 8% from 5,593 in 2007-2008, with a 71% completion rate. This is explained by the restructuring of this program and the fact that the reinvestment strategy focused on the Violence Prevention and the Community Maintenance programs.

Additional performance analysis is provided in Section 2.
Linkages to Strategic Outcome
Strategic Outcome: The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders, in communities and institutions, contribute to public safety.

Program Activity:
  • Custody
  • Correctional Interventions
  • Community Supervision
In 2008-2009, CSC's ultimate goal was to sustain its public safety results through specific and concrete plans identified in its 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities as well as its Transformation initiatives. For example, CSC focused on improving its methods of interception and interventions to reduce the presence of drugs in the institutions through more technologically advanced detection systems as well as the review of the inmate visiting protocol to improve the screening of visitors and better control access to the institutions. These efforts allowed CSC to provide a more reasonable, safe, secure and humane custody, which means a more positive environment for offenders to benefit from interventions and participate in correctional programs that address their identified individual needs and contribute to their successful rehabilitation and to public safety, through their safe transition (reintegration) into the community.

 


Operational Priority 2:
Safety and Security of Staff and Offenders in our Institutions.
In the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP), CSC’s Result Commitment for this priority was to prevent an increase in the level of violent behaviour, assaultive behaviour, and illicit drugs within institutions.
Type[28]
Ongoing
Status
CSC did not meet all of its commitments in relation to this priority in 2008-2009. The percentage of offenders testing positive during random urinalysis tests has decreased from 13.0% (844) in 2007-2008 to 7.9% (499) in 2008-2009. This reflects removal of legitimate prescription drugs from the test results. Without this change, the results remain at 13%. CSC did not succeed in preventing increases in the rates of security incidents in institutions. The rates of assaults on staff by inmates increased from 1.82% (215) in 2007-2008 to 2.11% (265) in 2008-2009, and on inmates by other inmates increased from 2.50% (501) in 2007-2008 to 2.81% (560) assaults in 2008-2009. The rate of injuries to both staff and inmates caused by inmates also increased. Injuries to staff increased from 0.38% (45) in 2007-2008 to 0.41% (51) in 2008-2009, and injuries to inmates increased from 2.49% (500) in 2007-2008 to 2.62% (522) in 2008-2009.

CSC succeeded in advancing key plans in its Transformation Agenda, such as: 1) implementing new communications vehicles aimed at warning the public of the impact and the penalties for introducing drugs into institutions, 2) promulgating a revised national policy on processes for searching, detaining and arresting individuals believed to be introducing drugs in the institutions, 3) promulgating new searching protocols at the front entrances of all institutions to ensure an effective and consistent approach across the country, 4) completing the acquisition and distribution of stab-resistant vests to designated front line correctional staff, 5) assessing and evaluating the need for stab-resistant vests for other staff, including at women’s institutions, and 6) the implementation of a smoke-free environment in all federal institutions.

Additional performance analysis is provided in Section 2.
Linkages to Strategic Outcome
Strategic Outcome: The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders, in communities and institutions, contribute to public safety.

Program Activity:
  • Custody
CSC continued to provide reasonable, safe, secure and humane custody, which contributed to public safety. This included reducing the entry and consumption of drugs, which are an important cause of aggression, intimidation, and violence, and a revised national policy on processes for searching, as well as detaining and arresting individuals believed to be introducing drugs in the institutions. These measures will contribute to public safety by providing offenders with a custodial environment where they can focus on their rehabilitation and the appropriate behavioural changes.

 


Operational Priority 3:
Enhance Capacities to Provide Effective Interventions for First Nations, Métis and Inuit Offenders
In the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities, CSC’s Result Commitment for this priority was to prevent the gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal correctional results from widening.
Type[29]
Ongoing
Status
CSC met most of its commitments in relation to this priority in 2008-2009.

The gap narrowed between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal offenders convicted of violent or non-violent offences within two years of the end of their sentence. The percentage decreased more for Aboriginal offenders, from 14.82% (114) in 2005-2006 for 769 offenders released to 12.47% (98) in 2006-2007[30] for 786 offenders released. The percentage decreased less for non-Aboriginal offenders, from 11.04% (407) in 2005-2006 for 3,688 offenders released to 9.86% (365) in 2006-2007[31] for 3,702 offenders released.

The gap widened between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal federal offenders convicted of violent or non-violent offences in communities while under CSC supervision. The percentage decreased for Aboriginal offenders, from 9.80% (260) in 2006-2007 for 2,652 offenders released to 9.43% (261) in 2007-2008[32] for 2,768 offenders released. The percentage also decreased for non-Aboriginal offenders, from 6.76% (926) in 2006-2007 for 13,696 offenders released to 6.00% (827) in 2007-2008[33] for 13,790 offenders’ released.

The gap also widened between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal offenders convicted of violent or non-violent offences within five years of the end of their sentence. The percentage increased for Aboriginal offenders, from 24.10% (180) in 2002-2003 for 747 offenders released to 24.62% (177) in 2003-2004[34] for 719 offenders released. The percentage decreased for non-Aboriginal offenders, from 17.88% (678) in 2002-2003 for 3,793 offenders released to 17.80% (657) in 2003-2004[35] for 3,690 offenders released.

The overall results demonstrate that progress was made in 2008-2009 with respect to this priority. This is the outcome of the plans outlined in the 2008-2009 RPP, as well as significant progress of key initiatives and the Transformation Agenda related to Aboriginal Offenders, aimed at improving CSC’s capacity to address the unique needs and risks of Aboriginal offenders, including Aboriginal women offenders. This included 1) implementation of the Aboriginal Relapse Prevention Maintenance Program for women offenders, 2) the increasing of the opportunities for released Aboriginal offenders to be employed in their communities through collaboration between CSC (CORCAN) and other federal departments (Human Resources and Skills Development Canada) and initiatives that address labour market shortages.

Additional performance analysis is provided in Section 2.
Linkages to Strategic Outcome
Strategic Outcome: The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders, in communities and institutions, contribute to public safety.

Program Activity:
  • Custody
  • Correctional Interventions
  • Community Supervision
CSC continued to enhance its capacity to provide effective interventions for First Nations, Métis, and Inuit offenders in order to achieve correctional results comparable to non-Aboriginal offenders. CSC also worked horizontally with other government departments, such as Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, to address the challenges that contribute to the disproportionate representation of Aboriginal peoples in the criminal justice system. By focusing on this priority, CSC is contributing to reducing over-representation of Aboriginal offenders in correctional facilities and thus improves public safety.

 


Operational Priority 4:
Improved capacities to address mental health needs of offenders.
In the 2008-2009 RPP, CSC’s Result Commitment for this priority was to sustain current correctional results for federal offenders with mental health disorders.
Type[36]
Ongoing
Status
CSC met most of its commitments in relation to this priority in 2008-2009. The percentage of federal offenders with mental health disorders returning to federal custody within two years of the end of their sentence decreased from 17.22% (57) in 2005-2006 to 14.29% (55) in 2006-2007[37]. The percentage increased for those offenders with mental health disorders returning to federal custody within five years of the end of their sentence, going from 17.60% (44) in 2002-2003 to 23.83% (61) in 2003-2004[38].

The overall results demonstrate that progress was made in 2008-2009 with respect to this priority.

CSC continued to focus on initiatives to implement key components of the Mental Health Strategy. As such, CSC introduced a mental health screening system into the offender intake assessment process. In 13 of the 16 identified intake sites, over 1300 offenders received mental health screening. Fifty-seven[39] additional staff have been hired for the delivery of primary mental health care in institutions. Capacity has been improved to provide mental health services to offenders in the community through discharge planning, hiring of mental health professionals in the community, contracting with community service providers and volunteers, and the provision of mental health awareness training to CSC/Community Correctional Centres/Community Residential Facilities staff. Under the Community Mental Health Initiative, over 650 offenders with serious mental disorders received services in 2008-2009. In addition, a total of 43 contracts for specialized services for offenders with mental health disorders served 775 offenders. The Service continued to focus on the enhancement of psychological and psychiatric services at institutions and Regional Treatment Centres. A Mobile Treatment Assessment Consultation team has been created on a pilot basis to assist front-line staff in managing women offenders with severe mental health and behavioural needs. CSC will continue to work with federal, provincial, territorial and community partners, including the Mental Health Commission of Canada, to identify best practices related to assessment, intervention and discharge planning.

Additional performance analysis is provided in Section 2.
Linkages to Strategic Outcome
Strategic Outcome: The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders, in communities and institutions, contribute to public safety.

Program Activity:
  • Custody
  • Community Supervision
Over the last few years, CSC has witnessed an increase in the proportion of offenders diagnosed with mental health problems at admission to CSC. To respond to this trend, CSC continued to focus on improving its capacity to assess and address the mental health needs of offenders in order to improve their correctional results thus contributing to public safety.  For example, in 2008-2009, an enhanced clinical screening and mental health assessment process at intake[40] was implemented, and over 57[41] additional staff were hired to provide primary mental health care to offenders. Also in 2008-2009, enhanced services were provided to offenders in the community under the Community Mental Health Initiative[42], where 50[43] new staff were hired. Approximately 14% of referrals for community services and discharge planning services were for women offenders, and approximately 33% were for Aboriginal offenders.

 


Operational Priority 5:
Strengthening Management Practices
In the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities, CSC’s Result Commitment for this priority was to have a stronger contribution to public safety in priority areas as measured by:
  • Reductions in Workplace Conflicts in the areas of harassment, staff grievances, and improvements in mutual respect, trust and accountability as reflected in employee surveys.
  • Improvements in management practices as reflected in Management Accountability Framework assessments by the Treasury Board Secretariat.
  • Improvements in the areas of ethics, integrity, fairness, and respect, as measured through assessment against baseline data from employee surveys.
Type[44]
Ongoing
Status
  1. With respect to harassment, the results from the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey show that 43% of CSC employees indicated to have been the victim of harassment on the job in the last two years, which is up from 39% in the 2005 survey.  The actual number of filed complaints has been on the decline, going from 260 in 2005-2006, to 197 in 2007-2008, to 161 in 2008-2009, the lowest in the past five years.  The difference between the actual number of complaints and the surveys results can be explained by the high number of employees that indicated their clients as their harasser.

    The results of the 2008 survey also show that 64% of employees consider being treated with respect, 70% felt they can disagree with their superiors and 46% said they have confidence in their superiors.
     
  2. Similar to the 2007-2008, the results from the 2008-2009 Management Accountability Framework assessment (Round VI) were encouraging for CSC.  Out of the 21 indicators used, CSC received eight areas of management rated as strong, 11 rated as acceptable, two rated as opportunity for improvement and none rated as attention required.

  3. Following the Values and Ethics workshops delivered in 2007-2008, subsequent workshops were delivered to 14 out of the original 17 planned sites to different participants in 2008-2009.  Approximately 2200 employees participated. In both series of workshops, the participants completed a Values and Ethics Climate Assessment survey prior to the session.  Follow-up workshops were completed in three sites as part of the Collaborative Change Protocol, to design plans for improving the ethical climate.

    2007-2008 served as a benchmark year and 2008-2009 the measuring year for the Ethical Climate. There has been a noticeable improvement for 2008-2009 in the areas of ethics, integrity, fairness, and respect: safer conditions for ethical behaviour, fair workload, risk prevention, senior leadership behaviours, global ethics climate and collaboration to name a few.
Linkages to Strategic Outcome
Strategic Outcome: The custody, correctional interventions, and supervision of offenders, in communities and institutions, contribute to public safety.

Program Activity:
  • Internal Services
Following CSC’s previous Management Accountability Framework assessment, CSC focused on three areas where additional attention was required: Values and Ethics, improving its Internal Communications and Strengthening its Human Resources Management. Through improvement in these areas CSC has advanced its priority on Strengthening Management Practices.  These areas are also sub-activities in CSC’s Internal Services program activity.  CSC contributed to its public safety commitment by improving the management of its activities generally (Management Accountability Framework) and specifically in the areas that make for a productive workplace.  CSC implemented strategies in support of recruitment, professional development, succession planning, informal conflict management as well as ethics. Furthermore, incident investigations are being conducted and completed in a more timely and transparent fashion.

1.7 Risk Analysis

During fiscal year 2008-2009, CSC continued to face significant challenges in mitigating various risks that impact on delivering effective correctional services which lead to public safety results for Canadians.

The offender population profile continues to change. Offenders sentenced to federal custody have criminal histories involving violent offending, mental health problems, substance abuse problems, gang and organized crime affiliations and higher rates of health issues such as infectious disease. These challenges were recognized in the CSC Review Panel Report, A Roadmap to Strengthening Public Safety [45].

CSC’s Corporate Risk Profile identifies various risks and strategies for mitigating them in the areas of:

  • Sustaining an aging physical infrastructure;
  • Addressing potential pandemic readiness;
  • Reducing re-offending and violence;
  • Implementing the CSC Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management and introducing Deployment Standards for correctional officer positions;
  • Responding to offender physical and mental health issues;
  • Creating the capacity to meet the needs of Aboriginal Offenders;
  • Effectively managing financial and technological resources;
  • Building and sustaining partnerships and relationships; and
  • Fostering a responsive and adaptive organization.

To mitigate the risks it faced in 2008-2009 and to support executive decision-making, CSC monitored progress against its Corporate Risk Profile and mitigation strategies through a quarterly review by the Executive Committee (EXCOM).

To further meet the challenges posed by the current offender population and to respond to the 109 recommendations from the CSC Review Panel Report, A Roadmap to Strengthening Public Safety[46], CSC continued implementing its long-term Transformation Agenda launched in February 2008. The first part of fiscal year 2008-2009 was dedicated to engaging staff and partners across the country in discussions on the observations and recommendations contained in the Review Panel’s Report. These discussions focused on developing a vision and strategy for change and assisting staff in establishing and aligning their thinking and gaining a commitment to transformation. As 2008-2009 progressed, CSC undertook numerous rapid initiatives that were quickly implemented creating the energy and momentum for implementing the Transformation Agenda. CSC made real progress in many areas, including safety and security, correctional assessment and program interventions; mental health, community corrections and victim services. More initiatives materialized as the end of 2008-2009 got closer, including the identification of an Integrated Correctional Program Model[47] and new communications products in support of eliminating drugs from institutions.

As it headed into the Phase 2 of its Transformation Agenda, CSC developed additional project plans, building on its short-term initiatives. These plans are reflected in CSC’s 2009-2010 Report on Plans and Priorities[48].

Like many government departments, CSC continued to face the risks posed by the retirement of many experienced staff and strong competition in the labour market to attract diverse professionals and skilled workers. Attracting and retaining a skilled workforce that is able to succeed in a difficult working environment continued to be a challenge in 2008-2009. CSC continued to manage these risks through its Strategic Plan for Human Resource Management. The organization continued to place emphasis on recruitment and retention strategies for health care professionals, trades, and other occupational groups. This included pursuing strategies to improve the recruitment and development of Aboriginal staff members and other employment equity groups in addition to new actions to improve workplace health and nurture effective labour-management relationships (consistent with the Public Service Modernization and Public Service Labour Relations Acts). The Service has implemented the Correctional Officer deployment standards, effective April 1, 2009[49]. CSC also continued to develop and implement learning and developmental strategies for staff and approaches to establish interdisciplinary teams to support the diverse supervisory requirements specific to the work of correctional officers.

As a next step toward Integrated Risk Management, CSC launched an exercise in 2008-2009 to create a Functional Risk Profile. Based on the Program Activity Architecture it focuses on key risks with implications at the operational and activity levels. It is a single alternative to multiple national and regional risk profiles. The Functional Risk Profile should further position CSC to manage organizational and strategic risks proactively and meet the Management Accountability Framework requirement for integrated risk management.

1.8 Expenditure Profile

The overall growth in expenditures is mainly attributed to increased salary costs stemming from collective bargaining adjustments, compensation for inflationary increases and from additional funding provided in Budget 2008 to address several challenges. These included elements such as the "rust out" of CSC’s institutional facilities, maintenance of basic safety and security within institutions, meeting basic legal and policy program obligations, improving results in the areas of community program delivery and increasing control of its institutions.

Spending Trend Graph

[D]


Voted and Statutory Items ($ millions)
Vote # or Statutory Item (S) Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording 2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Main
Estimates
2008-09
Actual
Spending50
30 Operating expenditures $1,562.60 $1,645.80 $1,717.10 $1,827.70
35 Capital Expenditures $124.50 $140.60 $263.60 $198.00
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans $181.00 $181.20 $193.50 $195.60
(S) CORCAN Revolving Fund -$2.80 -$4.50 $ 0.00 -$8.50
(S) Spending of proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets $0.20 $0.80 $ 0.00 $1.50
Total $1,865.50 $1,963.90 $2,147.20 $2,231.30


The variance between actual spending in 2008-2009 and 2007-2008 is mainly due to the following factors: inflation costs, collective agreements increases, and implementation of initiatives linked to the provision of additional resources from Funding Integrity projects and Transformation initiatives.