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2007-08
Departmental Performance Report



Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Canadian Polar Commission






Supplementary Information (Tables)






Table of Contents




Loans, Investments and Advances (Non-Budgetary)


($ millions) Actual 2005–06 Actual 2006–07 2007–08
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Co-operative Relationships
Loans to native claimants 22.0 16.5 39.1 39.1 39.1 27.1
Loans to First Nations in British Columbia for the purpose of supporting First Nations' participation in the British Columbia Treaty Commission process 28.7 28.3 35.4 35.4 35.4 26.0
Economic Development
Loans and guarantees of loans through the Indian Economic Development Account 48.5
Northern Economy
Loans to the Government of the Yukon Territory for making second mortgage loans to territory residents 0.3
Provision of Inuit Loan Fund for loans to Inuit to promote commercial activities (net) 6.6
Loans for the establishment or expansion of small businesses in the Yukon Territory through the Yukon Territory Small Business Loans Account (net) 5.0
 
Total Department 50.7 44.8 74.5 74.5 134.9 53.1
Canadian Polar Commission
N/A
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.



Sources of Non-Respendable Revenue


($ millions) Actual 2005–06 Actual 2006–07 2007–08
Main Estimates Planned Revenue Total Authorities Actual Revenue
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Governance and Institutions of Government
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 2.3 6.8 2.3 2.3 2.3 3.5
Miscellaneous revenues 0.1 0.4
Co-operative Relationships
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 1.0 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.5
Return on investments 9.4 7.3 9.4 9.4 9.4 6.7
Miscellaneous revenues 0.1 0.1
Claims Settlements
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 1.0
Return on investments 3.0
Miscellaneous revenues 0.2
Northern Governance
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 0.1
Managing Individual Affairs
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 0.1
Education
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 3.0 5.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 7.3
Miscellaneous revenues 0.2 1.0
Social Development
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 6.1 9.2 6.1 6.1 6.1 8.5
Miscellaneous revenues 0.2 1.9
Healthy Northern Communities
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 0.1 0.2 0.2
Clarity of Title to Land and Resources
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.1
Responsible Federal Stewardship
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 0.2 0.5 0.2 0.2 0.2 2.1
First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 2.2 0.1 2.2 2.2 2.2 0.2
Other non-tax revenues 0.1
Northern Land and Resources
Return on investments:
— Norman Wells Project profits 131.9 123.3 113.0 113.0 113.0 115.8
— Other 0.5 0.5 0.5
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 0.2 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.8
Adjustments of Prior Year's Payables at Year End 0.3 0.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.1
Canada mining 77.9 18.7 32.0 32.0 32.0 63.6
Quarrying royalties 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.4
Oil and gas royalties 14.5 15.4 18.0 18.0 18.0 23.6
Land, building and machinery rentals 0.2 0.1 0.3
Rights and Privileges 4.1 4.1 4.1
Other non-tax revenues 29.5 32.0 1.7 1.7 1.7 28.8
Economic and Employment Opportunities for Aboriginal People
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Economic Development
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 0.8 2.6 0.8 0.8 0.8 1.7
Return on investments 0.4 3.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4
Miscellaneous revenues 6.6 6.7 0.2
Community Infrastructure
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 4.7 11.5 4.7 4.7 4.7 7.0
Return on investments 1.2 1.4 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.6
Miscellaneous revenues 0.2 0.7
Northern Economy
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 0.4 0.3 0.2
Co-operative Relations
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 0.4 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.9
Departmental Management and Administration
Refunds of previous years' expenditures 5.3 5.3 5.3 5.3
Miscellaneous revenues 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7
 
Total 299.8 248.3 209.7 209.7 209.7 284.9
Canadian Polar Commission
N/A
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.



A. User Fees Act


User Fee Fee Type Fee-setting Authority Date Last Modified 2007–08 Planning Years
Forecast Revenue ($000) Actual Revenue ($000) Full Cost ($000) Performance Standard Performance Results Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue ($000) Estimated Full Cost ($000)
Canada Mining Regulatory Territorial Lands Act See Section B: Proposed amendments 6,600 5,671 Note 1 Current service standards are set in existing legislation and regulation: Northwest Territories and Nunavut Mining Regulations (NTNUMR)
CMR — amendments
All applications processed within set time lines. 2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
6775
6775
6775
Note 1
Territorial Land Use Regulatory Territorial Lands Act

Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act
1996 278 278 Note 1 Current service standards are set in existing legislation and regulation All permits were issued within the regulated time frame. 2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
139
139
139
Note 1
Territorial Lands Regulatory Territorial Lands Act 1996 2,300 2,033 Note 1 Performance standards vary depending on research, negotiations and environmental assessment decisions and are shared with clients throughout the process. Performance standards vary depending on research, negotiations and environmental assessment decisions and are shared with clients throughout the process. 2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
2320
2320
2320
Note 1
Frontier Lands Registration Regulatory Territorial Lands Act

Canada Petroleum Resource Act
1988 88 89 Note 1 Standard requests to be processed within 10 working days. Requests that require additional research take additional time to process (requestor is advised of the delay at the time the request is made). All standard requests were processed within the established timeline. A number of request necessitated further research which resulted in additional processing time. 2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
88
88
88
Note 1
Territorial Quarrying Regulatory Territorial Lands Act

Mackenzie Valley Land Use Regulations
2003 0 0 Note 1 The issuance of a quarrying permit leads to the granting of a Land Use Permit. As such, there is no time line set in regulations to process/issue/reject a quarrying permit application. Permits are issued once pre-conditions are met. 2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
0
0
0
Note 1
Territorial Water Regulatory Northwest Territories Waters Act 1992 16 21 Note 1 Performance standards vary depending on research, negotiations and environmental assessment decisions and are shared with clients throughout the process. All permits and letter patent were issued once all pre-conditions were met. 2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
16
16
16
Note 1
Nunavut Waters and Nunavut Surface Rights Tribunal Act 2002 (Note 2)
Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act 2003
Territorial Coal Regulatory Territorial Lands Act 2003 0 0 Note 1 Exploration permits are issued once consultations are complete. Permits are issued upon completion of consultations. 2008–09
2009–10
2010–11
0
0
0
Note 1
Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA) Other products and services Access to Information Act 1992       Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request. On-time responses provided in 93% of requests completed during fiscal-year 2007–08. 2008–09
2008–09

2009–10
2009–10

2010–11
2010–11
1,500
2,700

1,500
3,000

1,500
3,300
2,000


2,500


3,000
s.11(1)(a) 1,340 1,810  
s. 11(1)(b) 3,353 3,037 1,144
Date Last Modified
The Northwest Territories and Nunavut Mining Regulations (NTNUMR) are currently in the process of modernization. On November 29, 2007 by Order in Council the Canada Mining Regulations (CMR) was amended to the NTNUMR. During this process amendments were made to the Royalty and Leasing sections, with the remainder of the regulations left as they were written in 1977; amendments to these regulations is on going.
Note 1: The fee or service triggers a series of activities related to land and resource management and the protection of the environment, all of which are controlled by the nature and scope of the resource development projects, e.g. mine development.

Note 2: The Water Regulations under the Nunavut Waters and Nunavut Surface Rights Tribunal Act are currently in the process of being written. Industry and other stakeholders have not yet been extensively consulted. Changes to the fee structure are still under consideration.

B. Policy on Service Standards for External Fees


External Fee Service Standard Performance Result Stakeholder Consultation
Canada Mining Current service standards are set in existing legislation and regulation: Northwest Territories and Nunavut Mining Regulations (NTNUMR)
CMR — amendments
All applications processed within set time lines. The NTNUMR (former CMR) are currently in the process of modernization. The royalty sections of the NTNUMR were amended in 1999, but the remainder of the regulations were left as they were written in 1977.

The metric system is being introduced in this round of amendments, thereby changing the fee schedule to reflect the amounts required by hectares instead of acres. The mining industry and other stakeholders were consulted by various methods of consultation and no complaints about the changes were submitted. One new fee is being added to discourage nuisance protests against a claim.

During this process amendments were made to the Royalty and Leasing sections, with the remainder of the regulations left as they were written in 1977; amendments to these regulations is on going.
Territorial Land Use Current service standards are set in existing legislation and regulation. All permits were issued within the regulated time frame. Stakeholder consultation varies. It is done through regional communications strategies and various outreach activities as well as industry specific fora.
Territorial Lands Performance standards vary depending on research, negotiations and environmental assessment decisions and are shared with clients throughout the process. All lease and letter patent were issued once all pre-conditions were met (e.g. environmental assessment decisions, lease negotiations). Stakeholder consultation varies. It is done through regional communications strategies and various outreach activities as well as industry specific fora.
Frontier Lands Registration Standard requests to be processed within ten working days. Requests that require additional research will take additional time to be processed (requestor to be advised of the delay at the time the request is made). All standard requests were processed within the established timeline. A number of request necessitated further research which resulted in additional processing time. Stakeholder consultation varies. It is done through regional communications strategies and various outreach activities as well as industry specific fora.
Territorial Quarrying The issuance of a quarrying permit leads to the granting of a Land Use Permit. As such, there is no time line set in regulations to process/ issue/ reject a quarrying permit application. Permits are issued once pre-conditions are met. Stakeholder consultation varies. It is done through regional communications strategies and various outreach activities as well as industry specific fora.
Territorial Coal Exploration permits are issued once consultations are complete. Permits are issued upon completion of consultations. Stakeholder consultation varies. It is done through regional communications strategies and various outreach activities as well as industry specific fora.
Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA) Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request. On-time responses provided in 93% of requests completed during fiscal-year 2007–08. The service standard is established by the Access to Information Act and the Access to Information Regulations. Consultations with stakeholders were undertaken by the Department of Justice and the Treasury Board Secretariat for amendments done in 1986 and 1992.
Other Information
Although application fees are stable from one fiscal year to another, as requesters become more familiar with the Act, they learn to specify theirs requests enough to avoid paying search and photocopy fees.



Details on Transfer Payments Programs


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners — The Government
Start Date: N/A
End Date: Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: Good governance, effective institutions and cooperative relationships for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners.
Results Achieved: See the results chart.
($ millions) Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance (Actual vs Planned)
Governance and Institutions of Government
Grants 253.4 270.5 366.3 277.7 277.7 (88.6)
Contributions 270.4 330.1 245.0 322.9 322.9 77.9
 
Sub-Total 523.8 600.6 611.4 600.7 600.7 (10.7)
Co-operative Relationships
Grants 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.6
Contributions 65.7 66.0 69.1 69.6 69.6 0.5
 
Sub-Total 65.7 71.6 74.7 75.3 75.3 0.5
Claims Settlements
Grants 493.2 1,320.9 1,320.7 827.5
Contributions 1.4 1.4 1.4
 
Sub-Total 493.2 1,322.3 1,322.1 828.9
Northern Governance
Grants
Contributions 2.5 2.0 0.2 1.3 1.3 1.2
 
Sub-Total 2.5 2.0 0.2 1.3 1.3 1.2
Total
Grants 253.4 276.1 865.2 1,604.2 1,604.1 738.9
Contributions 338.6 398.2 314.3 395.3 395.3 81.0
 
Total Transfer Payment Program 592.1 674.3 1,179.5 1,999.6 1,999.4 819.9

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners — The People
Start Date: N/A
End Date: Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: Strengthened individual and family well-being for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners.
Results Achieved: See the results chart.
($ millions) Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance (Actual vs Planned)
Managing Individual Affairs
Grants 2.1 1.8 1.4 1.4 1.4
Contributions 6.6 5.7 6.7 6.7 6.2 (0.5)
 
Sub-Total 8.7 7.5 8.1 8.2 7.6 (0.5)
Education
Grants 29.9 32.1 36.4 36.7 35.8 (0.6)
Contributions 1,483.7 1,532.6 1,528.8 1,576.1 1,576.1 47.4
 
Sub-Total 1,513.6 1,564.7 1,565.2 1,612.8 1,611.9 46.8
Social Development
Grants 8.0 8.8 10.0 8.9 8.8 (1.2)
Contributions 1,268.6 1,330.8 1,310.4 1,413.0 1,413.0 102.6
 
Sub-Total 1,276.5 1,339.6 1,320.4 1,421.9 1,421.8 101.4
Healthy Northern Communities
Grants 43.7 44.6 45.5 45.5 45.5
Contributions 4.5 4.2 14.5 7.6 6.7 (7.8)
 
Sub-Total 48.2 48.8 60.0 53.1 52.2 (7.8)
Total
Grants 83.7 87.3 93.3 92.5 91.5 (1.7)
Contributions 2,763.4 2,873.3 2,860.4 3,003.4 3,002.0 141.6
 
Total Transfer Payment Program 2,847.1 2,960.6 2,953.7 3,095.9 3,093.5 139.8

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners — The Land
Start Date: N/A
End Date: Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: Sustainable use of lands and resources by First Nations, Inuit and Northerners.
Results Achieved: See the results chart.
($ millions) Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance (Actual vs Planned)
Clarity of Title to Land and Resources
Grants 4.7 1.3 3.5 2.8 0.9 (2.6)
Contributions 3.0 1.0 2.2 2.2 2.2
 
Sub-Total 7.7 2.3 3.5 5.0 3.1 (0.4)
Responsible Federal Stewardship
Grants
Contributions 15.6 86.8 27.5 59.4 53.9 26.4
 
Sub-Total 15.6 86.8 27.5 59.4 53.9 26.4
First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment
Grants
Contributions 54.5 9.5 18.0 9.7 9.7 (8.3)
 
Sub-Total 54.5 9.5 18.0 9.7 9.7 (8.3)
Northern Land and Resources
Grants 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1
Contributions 35.6 27.9 17.3 28.6 28.6 11.3
 
Sub-Total 36.7 29.0 18.4 29.6 29.6 11.3
Total
Grants 5.8 2.4 4.6 3.9 2.0 (2.6)
Contributions 108.7 125.2 62.7 99.8 94.3 31.6
 
Total Transfer Payment Program 114.5 127.6 67.3 103.7 96.3 29.0

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners — The Economy
Start Date: N/A
End Date: Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: Aboriginal People and Northerners close the economic gap
Results Achieved: See the results chart.
($ millions) Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance (Actual vs Planned)
Economic and Employment Opportunities for Aboriginal People
Grants
Contributions 62.2 0.9 0.2 0.2 0.2
 
Sub-Total 62.2 0.9 0.2 0.2 0.2
Economic Development
Grants 328.7 242.1
Contributions 132.7 123.6 146.8 127.1 127.1 (19.8)
 
Sub-Total 461.4 365.7 146.8 127.1 127.1 (19.8)
Community Infrastructure
Grants 77.9 80.6 84.5 91.3 91.2 6.8
Contributions 938.7 1,070.3 1,068.5 1,032.2 1,032.2 (36.3)
 
Sub-Total 1,016.6 1,150.8 1,153.0 1,123.6 1,123.5 (29.5)
Northern Economy
Grants
Contributions 13.7 19.7 22.5 20.8 20.3 (2.1)
 
Sub-Total 13.7 19.7 22.5 20.8 20.3 (2.1)
Total
Grants 406.5 322.6 84.5 91.3 91.2 6.8
Contributions 1,147.4 1,214.4 1,237.8 1,180.2 1,179.8 (58.0)
 
Total Transfer Payment Program 1,553.9 1,537.0 1,322.3 1,271.6 1,271.0 (51.2)

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners — The Office of the Federal Interlocutor
Start Date: N/A
End Date: Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: Promoting collaborative engagement of government and stakeholders, resulting in demonstrative improvement in socio-economic conditions of Métis, non-status Indians, and urban Aboriginal conditions
Results Achieved: See the results chart.
($ millions) Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance (Actual vs Planned)
Co-operative Relations
Grants
Contributions 28.5 29.2 23.6 27.2 27.1 3.5
 
Total Transfer Payment Program 28.5 29.2 23.6 27.2 27.1 3.5



Horizontal Initiatives

First Nations Water Management Strategy

Lead Department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Start Date: May 2003 (official announcement)
End Date: 2008 (end of funding)
Total Federal Funding Allocation: $1.6 billion over 5 years

Description
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and Health Canada (HC) have developed a seven-part First Nations Water Management Strategy (FNWMS) to be implemented over a five-year period, beginning in 2003–2004. The strategy allows for the development and implementation of: (1) a plan to upgrade and build water and waste-water facilities to meet established design, construction and water quality standards with a priority on identified facilities; (2) an effective water quality monitoring program combined with a comprehensive and coordinated compliance and reporting regime that will improve the detection of drinking water problems in a timely manner, thereby reducing the possibility of risk to health; (3) an effective and sustainable operation and maintenance (O&M) program designed to ensure the safety of the residents and the protection of the assets with a priority on identified high-risk facilities; (4) a plan for the continued expansion and enhancement of training programs, to ensure that all operators have the skills, knowledge and experience required to fulfill their responsibilities, supported by the introduction of mandatory certification requirements for all operators; (5) a set of integrated water quality management protocols with clearly defined roles and responsibilities consistent with national performance standards along with improvements in emergency response procedures; (6) a public awareness campaign aimed at informing both First Nation decision-makers of their roles and responsibilities in ensuring the safety of water supplies within their communities and First Nation households of measures they can take to protect the quality of water within their home and community; and (7) a comprehensive set of clearly defined standards, protocols and policies, using a multi-barrier approach.

The strategy will also require the establishment of closer partnerships amongst key federal, provincial/territorial, industry and other public sector partners. These partnerships will assist in areas such as watershed management and source water protection as well as advances in science and technology. Most importantly, the implementation of the strategy and the development of a detailed plan will require close collaboration with First Nations. The strategy is consistent with the broader national approach and is modelled on the enhanced management regimes in place or being implemented in most provinces and territories. The FNWMS includes an additional $600 million in funding over five years (from 2003–2004 to 2007–2008). Of that $600 million, $115.9 million goes to HC for their part in the strategy, while the remaining $484.1 million funds INAC's participation in the strategy. This $600 million in funding is in addition to INAC's normal annual funding to water initiatives in First Nations and HC's Drinking Water Safety Program (DWSP) funds that go to First Nations, which are also included in this template. Combining the FNWMS funds and the normal annual funding by both departments into First Nation water issues, the total federal funding allocated over 5 years will be $1.6 billion.

Shared Outcome(s)

  • Reduction in the health risk level of drinking water in First Nations.
  • Increased awareness of the importance of clean drinking water and the responsibilities involved in keeping it clean.
  • Water standards will be met by all facilities.

Governance Structure(s)

  • Strategic Water Management on Reserve Committee (SWMRC)
  • Interdepartmental Waters ADM Committee (IWAC)
  • Federal Advisory Committee (FAC) on municipal wastewater effluent
  • Interdepartmental Working Group on Drinking Water (IWGDW)
  • Regional Water Teams
  • Directors General Steering Committee on Public Health

Federal Partners Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for 2007–08 Actual Spending for 2007–08 Expected Results for 2007–08 Results Achieved in 2007–08
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada First Nations Water Management Strategy $1.471 billion $305.8 million $305.8 million Number of trained or certified operators greater than in the previous year. The number of water operators who achieved first level of certification or greater increased from 37% of all operators (418 out of 1,117) in March 2007 to 59% of all operators (719 out of 1,213) in March 2008. All First Nations are provided access to certified supervision through 24-hour hotlines and the Circuit Rider Training Program.
Number of high-risk facilities less than in the previous year. The number of high-risk community water systems decreased from 97 out of 746 (13% of all systems) in March 2007 to 77 out of 766 (10% of all systems) in March 2008.
Health Canada Drinking Water Safety Program including the First Nations Water Management Strategy $140.9 million ($115.9M for the First Nations Water Management Strategy and $25M A-based) $31.7 million ($5 million A-based and $26.7 million for the FNWMS) $22.8M (Actual spending is under estimated because resources from some regions were not all properly coded.) Increased capacity of First Nations to monitor drinking water quality. The building of capacity in First Nations communities to monitor their drinking water quality and detect potential problems was facilitated through the community based water monitor program. In 2007–2008, 541 out of 687 community sites[1] had access to a community based water monitor.
Purchase of lab kits. A total of 540 out of 687 community sites[1] had access to portable laboratory kits for testing during 2007–2008.
Increase EHOs to support drinking water quality monitoring. In 2007–2008, 100 out of 109 EHO positions were staffed.

In 2002, monitoring for bacteriological contaminants in distribution systems only met, on an average, 29% of the frequency recommended in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality (GCDWQ). In March 2008, 87% of piped drinking water distribution systems with five or more connections were monitored weekly.

A total of 149,296 water samples were taken and analyzed in First Nations communities.

In all:

— 30,446 bacteriological samples were analysed in accredited laboratories which represents a 14% decrease from last fiscal year;

— 142,558 bacteriological samples were analyzed using a portable lab kit (Colilert) which represents a 23% increase from last fiscal year;

— 12,378 samples were analyzed for chemical parameters; and

— 384 samples were analyzed for radiological parameters.
Implementation of early warning database. Six out of the seven regions have a water database in place to monitor sample results.
Investigate waterborne diseases and waterborne outbreaks There were no instances where gastrointestinal illness was identified as a possible waterborne disease outbreak.
Total   $1.6 billion $337.5 million $328.6 million    
[1] Total community sites taken from the First Nation Water Management System 2006–2007 Performance Indicators report (February 14, 2008)

Contact Information
Erin Ovenden
A/Manager, Infrastructure Operations
INAC, SEPRO-CD, Water Management
Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington, Room 2008
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H4
Telephone: 819-997-0594
Fax: 819-953-1034
ovendene@inac-ainc.gc.ca

Contact Information for Health Canada
Dominique Poulin
A/Program Manager
Drinking Water Program
Environmental Health Division
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
(613) 954-6655
Dominique_poulin@hc-sc.gc.ca

International Polar Year

Lead Department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada — Northern Affairs Program
Start Date: April 1st 2007
End Date: March 31st 2012

Description
To support Canada’s participation in International Polar Year (IPY), the Government of Canada has invested $150 million over five years. This funding is being used to carry out an innovative and multidisciplinary Arctic science program. The Government of Canada Program for IPY is led by INAC in conjunction with five lead federal departments and agencies: Environment, Fisheries and Oceans, Health, National Sciences and Engineering Research Council (on behalf of Industry), and Natural Resources. IPY will bring opportunities to welcome many top international scientists and other visitors to Canada. Canada’s significant involvement and investment in the International Polar Year 2007–2009 contributes to the government’s stewardship of Canada’s Arctic. The Government of Canada IPY Program is working with northern communities in developing and conducting activities such as research, training and capacity building.

Key areas of the Government of Canada Program for IPY include:

  • new science and research in and for the North, which includes the involvement of northern communities
  • ensuring the health and safety of scientists and communities conducting research in the North
  • communication information about the program and the science undertaken
  • building capacity, through training opportunities for youth and Northerners aimed at enhancing participation in northern scientific research
  • ensuring that the resultant scientific knowledge and data are properly managed, archived and made accessible; and
  • support for the appropriate procedural, regulatory and infrastructure framework for conducting scientific research.

The distribution of funds among federal departments and agencies is according to their involvement in the various aspects of the program, including the science and research program, support for logistics, communications and outreach, training, and capacity building. Funding is being provided to support Northern IPY Coordinators who act as points of contact on IPY matters for northern communities and researchers. They are working with the relevant licensing and permitting bodies to provide information and advice on licenses and permits needed for IPY initiatives.

The Northern IPY Coordinators maintain a regional network to support all aspects of Canada’s IPY Program. The work that they are doing to identify key issues for IPY in northern communities and organizations, to provide a contact between community groups and IPY researchers and facilitate the involvement of northerners in the development of IPY initiatives are an important component of the IPY program.

Shared Outcome(s)
Increased understanding (of impacts of a changing climate and of health and well-being of northern communities) that informs policy and decision making, and contributes to recognition of Canada as an expert on the Canadian North. Enhanced northern research capacity through newly trained scientists, knowledge and skills transfer to Northerners, and greater participation in planning and delivery of research by Northerners.

Governance Structure(s)

  • Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) Committee on IPY (chaired by the ADMof Northern Affairs, INAC);
  • IPY Federal Program Office (housed at INAC);
  • Director Generals, Communications Committees on IPY; and
  • IPY Advisory Subcommittees.

The Government of Canada Program for IPY works in conjunction with the Canadian IPY National Committee and the Canadian IPY Secretariat who link to the International Joint Committee for IPY and IPY committees from other participating countries.


Federal Partners Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for 2007–08 Actual Spending for 2007–08 Expected Results for 2007–08 Results Achieved in 2007–08
Indian Affairs and Northern Development Government of Canada Program for IPY $56,617,380 $18,243,505 $7,397,207 Initiate a targeted science and research program to address priorities on climate change impacts and adaptation and health and well-being of northern communities Set 44 scientific projects underway; of which, preliminary results are starting to be gathered and shared with the scientific community.

Researcher’s workshop was conducted to identify synergy among projects.

Call for proposals were launched, generating significant interest, notably in communication/ training projects, where demand exceeded funding available.
Health Canada   $158,234 $46,656 $46,656 N/A
Environment Canada   $11,169,875 $4,396,989 $3,838,341 Two projects measuring atmospheric pollutants (Intercontinental Atmospheric Transport of Anthropogenic Pollutants and Investigation of the Depletion of Ozone and Mercury) have sampled persistent organic pollutants, mercury and ozone across the Arctic. Sampling stations in Asia are in the process of being set up.

The cryosphere project is using both satellite and ground measurements (Canada-US snowmobile traverse of the tundra). Outreach has been accomplished and Inuit communities were taught to use satellite-derived ice maps. Preliminary results from the Arctic freshwater systems project note increased flow rates in the Mackenzie system and that melting permafrost will likely alter the ecology of tundra lakes.

The weather and environmental prediction initiative designed to validate the Numerical Weather Prediction model over the Arctic during IPY is showing promising results.
Fisheries and Oceans   $31,542,477 $16,528,862 $16,035,549 Produced the first ever single season snap-shot of Canada’s surrounding oceans to provide a foundation for a long term Arctic monitoring program.

Research on wildlife has produced interesting findings which have been shared at the international level. Researchers have actively engaged Northerners in their research activities.
Natural Resources   $3,063,000 $1,024,660 $866,387 All IPY science projects were initiated. The major start-up activities included project planning, partnership negotiations, site selection, data collection and preliminary analysis.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council   $31,290,669 $12,040,668 $12,087,323 24 projects involving 40 academics are being supported

The projects contributed to the study of the polar regions environment and results suggest that climate is a strong driver of environmental changes in these regions which could lead to cascading effects on plants, wildlife, water and on northern communities.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research   $9,747,988 $3,838,211 $3,838,210 IPY proposals fall into 4 sub-themes: Reducing Health Disparities Improving Health Outcomes and Well-being; Building and/or Sustaining Healthy, Resilient Communities; Examining the Links Between Climate Change, Human Health, and Well-being; and Ecosystem and Community Vulnerability, Resilience and Adaptive Capacities.
Canadian Food Inspection Agency   $414,500 $182,300 $182,400 Identified commercial dip stick kit for E. coli 0157 screening and MSRV method for Salmonella screening of enrichment cultures

Trained Nunavik Research Centre staff on primary enrichment culture techniques; the use of screening tests; and transportation of Dangerous Goods to enable them to send samples to Ottawa.

Commercially available toxoplasmosis test kits were evaluated for use on tissue fluid and serum under ideal conditions using experimentally infected swine.

Trichinellosis digestion testing was completed on 363 wildlife samples. Genotyping on Trichinella isoliates in process.

Assistance and advice on equipment and laboratory setup was provided to northern laboratories to prepare them for trichinellosis testing.
Parks Canada Agency   $1,350,000 $578,863 $33,322 Various field work completed in the Torngat Mountains, including draft ecosystem maps, which will be pursued in 2008 field work.

Consultations with stakeholders to assist in the field work.
Public Health Agency of Canada   $617,000 $350,000 $254,315 Sample and data analysis of initial time point samples to be nearly completed; hiring of student to perform final analysis (2007–2010).

Optimized the HPV genotyping test, conducted a pilot test with DynaLife laboratory for the transfer of the specimens and communication of the results, and we have tested 300 cervical specimens and reported the results.
Agriculture and Agri-food   $156,400 $40,500 $40,500 Cores were drilled and sampled from three research sites in the Mackenzie Valley. All of the samples were analyzed for carbon, pH, fibre content, macrofossil composition, and bulk density; while half were selected for radiocarbon dating. The findings of this research were presented at the IPY Mackenzie Project workshop held in Edmonton in March, 2008
Canadian Museum of Civilization   $795,200 $263,400 $194,615 A helicopter survey and inventory of archaeological sites was completed along 200 km of the southern coast of Baffin Island, and excavations were undertaken at Cape Tanfield near Kimmirut. The information recovered contributed to knowledge of relations between Indigenous occupants of the area and the mediaeval Norse or other early Europeans.

Archaeological excavation of two ancient Inuit houses near Resolute Bay recovered information on the occupation history of the site, as well as evidence dating one of the houses to the 13th or 14th centuries. Both projects were carried out in cooperation with local communities, and included the training of students from Kimmirut and Resolute Bay.
Centrally Earmarked Funds   $3,077,277 n/a   A Treasury Board submission will be developed to access this funding in support for Logistics and Health Safety proposals as well as Science Projects  
Total   $150,000,000 $57,534,614 $44,814,825    

Contact Information
Kathleen Fischer
Executive Director
International Polar Year Federal Program Office
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
10 Wellington Street, Room 745
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H4
Tel: 819-934-6085
Fax: 819-934-0584
fischerk@ainc-inac.gc.ca

Labrador Innu Comprehensive Healing Strategy

Lead Department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Health Canada, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Start Date: June 2001
End Date: March 2010

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)
Cabinet approved the Labrador Innu Comprehensive Healing Strategy (LICHS) in June 2001 and provided $81 million over three years including: $59 million for INAC; $20 million for Health Canada and $2 million for Solicitor General. The initial LICHS ended March 2004, but was extended for one-year; INAC received a further $15 million to provide basic programs and services; and Health Canada received $5.5 million to continue the work already begun under the LICHS. Cabinet approved a new 5-year strategy for INAC and Health Canada (HC) partners in December 2004. Budget 2005, provided funds of $102.5 M for fiscal years 2005–06 to 2009–10 for the continuation of the LICHS.

Description
The LICHS was developed by INAC, HC and former Solicitor General in response to the 2000 gas-sniffing crisis facing the Labrador Innu to help resolve the serious health, social and safety issues in the communities of Davis Inlet and Sheshatshiu. While notable progress has been achieved, many serious issues remain. To address these issues, INAC and HC sought Cabinet approval and funding for the continuation of the LICHS. The proposed approach responded positively to the priorities in the October 2004 Speech from the Throne for addressing the needs of Aboriginal Canadians.

Shared Outcome(s)
The partners, in consultation with the Innu, developed the following 5-year vision with respect to the continuation of the LICHS. This vision is for the federal government, the province and the Innu to work in partnership to: advance Innu community healing; build increased Innu capacity for the management and delivery of some government programs; conclude a land claim Agreement-in-Principle; address issues arising from sexual, physical and emotional abuse; achieve improvements in health, education, family and social well-being, economic development, community development, public safety and First Nation governance; and, manage the LICHS in an integrated and effective fashion.

Governance Structure(s)
Main Table. Chaired by the Chief Federal Negotiator, Labrador Innu file. Membership includes representatives of the Labrador Innu leadership, province of Newfoundland and Labrador, and federal partners to the LICHS. Tripartite sub-committees for: reserve creation, education, new school at Sheshatshiu, income support, child youth and family services, economic development, health, and evaluation.


Federal Partners Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation for the latest LICHS (2005–06/ 2009–10) Planned Spending for 2007–08 Actual Spending for 2007–08 Expected Results for 2007–08 Results Achieved in 2007–08
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Sheshatshiu School design $0.1M 0 0 Design completed.

Construction to begin by Spring 2007 and Project Management team established
Contract awarded and construction commenced Spring 2007.

Construction resumed Spring 2008
Education $14.8M $3.075M $6.6M Complete Implementation plan for MUN recommendations

Undertake community consultations

Negotiate Education Agreements with the province of Newfoundland for provision of education services to the Innu communities
Implementation Plan completed, community consultations completed

Joint Transition Authority established.

Transition Facilitator contracted.

Education Agreements in place.
Child, Youth and Family Services (CYFS) $27.9M $5.6M $9.1M Negotiate CYFS Agreement with province of Newfoundland

Establish a CYFS Committee of the Main Table
Agreement in place.

CYFS Committee established.
Income Support $6.1M $1.3M $1M Negotiate Income Support Agreement with province of Newfoundland Income Support Agreement in place.
Electrification — Natuashish $6M $1M $3.3M Electrification for community of Natuashish. Electrification for community of Natuashish.

Treasury Board funding of $1M insufficient to cover actual costs.
Airport Agreement — Natuashish $0.5M $0.1M $0.106M Current airport agreement shares costs to operate airport at Natuashish. Cost shared with province of Newfoundland to operate airport at Natuashish. Treasury Board funding of $1M insufficient to cover actual costs.
Facilities O&M Capacity Building $3.6M $0.75M $0.75M Facilities Manager to run operations of buildings. Operation of buildings for MIFN (dozer operations, fork lifts, training, etc.)
Housing Capacity Building $0.6M $0.06M $0.06M Provide capacity building in support of Natuashish Housing Authority Funds directly to band/ongoing capacity building provided.
Lands and Trust Services (LTS) Capacity Building $1.4M $0.12M 0 Training, capacity building funds accessed through LTS regular programming. LICHS Funding used for other priorities, however, training funds accessed through ARO LTS
Reserve Creation $0.2M 0 0 Reserve Creation Reserve Creation Completed
Devolution Planning and Transition $0.8M $0.15M $0.15M Innu capacity improved via: Child, Youth and Family Services (CYFS) and Income Support Tripartite Committees, and Education Working Group Tripartite committees on the devolution of CYFS and Education held meetings.

Members of the CYFS committee have been briefed on both the Directive 20 and Enhanced Prevention Frameworks.

Innu are currently deliberating on their preferred approach.

A Transition Facilitator was contracted for the year through the Education Committee to create a work plan and guide the devolution process.

Steps in this direction include the initial stages of establishing community level committees and consideration of various governance structures.

A Main Table Coordinator role was established to support and coordinate Innu participation.
New Paths (Outpost) $1M $0.2M $0.2M Complete New Paths Projects. 150 Innu participated in the initiative, Innu see this as essential component of healing.
Strategies for Learning $2.2M $0.4M $0.4M Establishment of JTA, recruitment of Transition Faciliator

Continued implementation of Philpott Recommendations
JTA established.

Trans Fac contracted for 2007–08

Ongoing implementation of Philpott Recommendations (i.e. Home School Liaisons and Nutrition Program)
Planning and Consultation $0.5M $0.1M $0.11M Hold four Main Table sessions Four Main Table sessions held
Safe houses $1.4M $0.4M $0.4M Complete construction, recruit and train staff, develop operations manuals and finalize programming. Youth Safehouse in Sheshatshiu and dual purpose safehouse in Natuashish operating 24 hours, 7 days a week
Health Canada Addictions/Mental Health $13.73M $2.71M $2.77M Construction of a Healing Lodge in Natuashish and implementation of day treatment services. Healing Lodge constructed, day treatment program operating.
Maternal/Child Health $5.3M $1.1M $0.7M Construction of a Wellness Centre in Natuashish, implementation of wellness model. Wellness Centre constructed, program delivery implemented.
Community Health Planning $2.27M $0.45M $0.14M Increase community engagement, increase community capacity for evidence based planning, completion of several evaluation activities leading to increased program effectiveness. Began process of community health planning in Sheshatshiu, two program evaluations completed in each community in maternal and child health, and addictions programs.
Management and Support $4.32M $0.84M $0.73M Improved coordination of health services Development and approval by Main Table of Health and Healing sub-committee work plans. Launch of position of Director, Integrated Management.
Safe Houses $1.65M $0.4M $0.4M Complete construction, staff, and finalize programming. Construction, staffing and programming completed.
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Safe Houses $0.95M $0.8M   Complete construction Completed construction and fit-up.
Total   $95.32M $19.555M $26.916M    

Comments on Variances
Child Youth and Family Services (CYFS) had a $3.1 million deficit. The nature of CYFS programming makes it difficult to stay on projected budget as increase costs associated with one case can significantly affect budget numbers.

Education had a $3.525 million shortfall due to insufficient funding allocation.

Electrification had a $2.3 million deficit due to insufficient funding allocation.

Income support had a $300,000 surplus due to a decrease in the number of people accessing the program.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners
Collaboration and coordination between federal departments, Innu and the provincial government were enhanced through the meetings of the Main Table, the Integrated Management Committee and the support provided by the Director of Integrated Management (a joint INAC/HC position).

Contact Information
Stelios Loizides
Senior Policy Analyst
Social Program Reform Directorate
Social Policy and Programs Branch
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
10 Wellington Street
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H4
(819) 997-6717

Mackenzie Gas Project and Induced Exploration

Lead Department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Lead Department Program Activity: Northern Affairs Organization
Start Date: April 1, 2004
End Date: March 31, 2009
Total Federal Funding Allocation: $225,000,000

Description
Increased demand and rising prices for energy-efficient natural gas across North America have led Imperial Oil Resources, Conoco-Phillips Canada, Shell Canada Limited, ExxonMobil Canada (commonly known as the Producers) and the Aboriginal Pipeline Group (APG) to develop natural gas resources in the Mackenzie Delta and transport them via a 1200 kilometre gas pipeline and an 800 kilometre oil pipeline through the NWT to southern markets. The proposed Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) is a $16.2 billion project. Initially, 830 million cubic feet per day of northern Canadian natural gas would be available to transport at start up which is targeted for 2013. Although the pipeline itself will bring economic benefits to Canada, of equal importance is that the transportation infrastructure will spur continued exploration and development of the 82 trillion cubic feet of remaining recoverable natural gas and 5 billion barrels of oil located in the NWT, northern Yukon and Beaufort Sea that could be tapped by a Mackenzie Valley pipeline. It would open up a new energy producing region that would be a major contributor to North American energy supply.

In recognition of the significant contribution of oil and gas exploration and development activities to creating economic benefits, contributing to strong and healthy Aboriginal and northern communities and opening up a new frontier energy supply region, the Government of Canada is contributing capacity funds for federal and regional agencies to implement environmental and regulatory responsibilities, to strengthen the government’s scientific expertise, to support northerners’ participation in the environmental assessment (EA) and regulatory process and their ability to take advantage of economic opportunities.

Shared Outcome(s)

  • Coordinated federal response to the MGP’s project definition and construction stages and to induced oil and gas activities
  • Effective implementation of environmental assessment/regulatory processes
  • Research relevant to the environmental assessment and regulatory review of the MGP and induced oil and gas activities
  • Supporting northerners’ participation in economic opportunities

Governance Structure(s)

  • Senior Officials Committee
  • Federal Hearings Committee
  • Interdepartmental Working Groups
  • Crown Consultation Unit

Federal Partners Names of Programs for Federal Partners* Planned Spending for 2007–08 Actual Spending for 2007–08 Expected Results for 2007–08 Results Achieved in 2007–08
Parks Canada   $162,000 $162,000 Follow-up on the MGP EA process to ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of the national parks, historic sites and rivers located in the NWT. Met expected results by participating in MGP hearings, filing two written submissions, responding to Joint Review Panel Information Requests, and participating on MGP interdepartmental committees such as the Federal Hearings Committee and the Joint Coordination Committee.
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada   $20,700,000 from budget 2005 plus $2,931,500 reprofiled and $1,891,900 carried forward from 2006–07 for a 2007–08 total of $25,523,400 $22,560,400 Coordinated federal government’s response to the MGP that avoids duplication and overlap with other federal departments and agencies, as well as northern boards.

Follow-up on the EA of the MGP and related regulatory obligations.

Implement resource management responsibilities.

Support community capacity to participate in the EA/regulatory process and to take advantage of economic opportunities.
Coordinated federal government’s involvement in the joint review of the MGP to ensure an efficient, effective and transparent assessment process.

Followed up on regulatory obligations related to the MGP.

Coordinated the Government of Canada science program in support of northern energy development, including significant in-house research and assessment programs and joint initiatives with other partners and industry through the Environmental Sciences Research Program.

Implemented resource management responsibilities, (land tenure, and administration of benefit plan provisions and royalty policy, etc.) for ever increasing levels of industry activity.

Developed and implemented environmental monitoring programs and participated in multi-stakeholder planning processes, including Integrated Oceans Management and the Beaufort Sea Strategic Regional Plan of Action.

Supported community capacity to participate in the EA of the MGP and to take advantage of economic opportunities.
Department of Fisheries and Oceans   $6,700,000 $6,700,000 Provision of scientific advice on longstanding responsibilities such as the status of fish stocks, while having enough flexibility to respond to newer issues such as the threat of invasive species, increasing oil and gas exploration and development activity, and species at risk. An adaptive organization that is better aligned with the department's requirements for scientific knowledge and Government of Canada priorities. Participated in panel hearings and aboriginal consultation.

Provision of scientific advice on longstanding responsibilities such as the status of fish stocks, responded to newer issues such as the threat of invasive species, increasing oil and gas exploration and development activity, and species at risk.
Environment Canada   $8,838,000 plus $400,000 reprofiled from 2006–07 for a 2007–08 total of $9,238,000 $7,114,192 The department will focus on its responsibilities pursuant to the EA of the MGP under its legislation and key national policies on such matters as climate change, pollution prevention, wildlife conservation, species-at-risk, emergency preparedness, and others as appropriate.

Follow-up on the MGP EA process and initiate related regulatory obligations.
The department participated in the regulatory preparedness process and Crown consultations.

The department also focussed on its responsibilities pursuant to the EA of the MGP with respect to key national policies such as climate change, pollution prevention, wildlife conservation, species-at-risk and emergency preparedness.
National Energy Board   $1,700,000 $250,000 Exercise regulatory mandate in assessing the MGP pipeline.

The Board is working with a number of regulatory agencies to ensure that environmental assessment and related regulatory issues are dealt with in a coordinated and timely manner.
At the request of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, the NEB provided operational funding in the amount of $250k to support the important work of the Northern Gas Pipeline Secretariat.

The NEB continued to work with a number of regulatory agencies in addressing a number of initiatives to ensure that potential regulatory issues are dealt with in a coordinated and timely manner.
Natural Resources Canada   $4,900,000 plus $346,000 reprofiled from 2006–07 for a 2007–08 total of $5,246,000 $4,835,300 Validate industry assessments (science) to ensure that appropriate mitigation measures have been taken to minimize environmental impacts, protect the public interest and assess the cumulative effects of individual projects on the broader northern landscape and people. Coordinated on-going provision of unique federal geo-scientific expertise (8-10 ESS scientists) in the MGP EA review on several of key physical environment issues, e.g. seismic hazard assessment, permafrost and geo-technical issues, slope stability, coastal processes/land submergence, and environmental management and monitoring.

NRCan scientists gave testimony and technical reviews to the Joint Review Panel and stakeholders on 16 topics under consideration in the environmental assessment process: seismic hazards; subsidence at Taglu and Niglintgak; Mackenzie Delta storm surges vs design elevation; Niglintgak remote sump and drilling wastes; ice movements and barge-based gas processing; bathymetry in barge routes and dredging; permafrost and design of well pads; ground ice and the gathering system; baseline terrain and permafrost conditions; slope processes and stability; climate change and extremes; climate change impacts on baseline conditions; climate change and sea level rise; soil-pipe interactions; MGP and Enbridge pipelines proximity and crossings; monitoring.

Provided funding and legal support for the MGP Crown Consultations Unit.
Transport Canada   $4,000,000 $3,056,000 Responsible for the regulatory oversight of the transportation system. Increased level of safety regulatory oversight for federally-regulated transportation operators in the project area (increased inspections, audits, outreach, and issuance of transportation documents for the air, rail, marine and dangerous goods sectors).

Provision of clear transportation-related information and recommendations to the Joint Review Panel.

Provision of clear transportation-related information to aboriginal groups in the project area as part of the GOC Aboriginal consultation process.
Total   $52,039,400 $44,677,892    

*For purposes of this initiative, provided below is a list of common themes that apply to all seven departments involved in the MGP. They are the following:

  • Environmental Assessment Process: Activities required in response to environmental assessment processes
  • Regulatory and Legal Obligations: Northern Boards, departmental permitting, issuance of authorization etc., and other approvals, legal surveying
  • Environment and Resource Management: Responsibilities dealing with water, lands, conservation
  • Coordination, Management and Communication: Resources to coordinate the activities of the various oil and gas pipeline actors, and to manage the overall federal responsibilities
  • Consultation: Departmental and Crown Consultation Unit consultations
  • Science: Research projects supporting EA and regulatory review of the MGP and oil and gas development
  • Legal Services: Support for negotiations, litigation and agreements

Comments on Variances:
Progress on the MGP is behind schedule due to delays in the joint review panel (environmental assessment) of the project. Actual expenditures of federal departments are therefore less than anticipated at the beginning of the fiscal year. MGP funds not required in fiscal year 2007–08 for northern energy development were: reprofiled or carried forward for northern energy initiatives in fiscal year 2008–09; lapsed at the end of fiscal year 2007–08; or utilized for other departmental priorities in fiscal year 2007–08 consistent with the Expenditure Management System.

Contact Information
Sheila Riordon
A/Director General
Northern Oil and Gas Branch
(819) 953-9393

Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Lead Department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada — Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
Lead Department Program Activity: Co-operative Relations
Start Date: 2007
End Date: 2012
Total Federal Funding Allocation: $68.5 million

Description
The Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) was developed in 1997, to help respond to the needs facing Aboriginal people living in key urban centres. Through the UAS, the Government of Canada seeks to partner with other governments, community organizations and Aboriginal people to support projects that respond to local priorities.

In 2003 and 2004, the UAS was allocated $50 million over a four-year period to build on existing partnerships while providing additional funding to community pilot projects in a small number of cities to learn what works well and what does not.

In 2007, the Government of Canada made a long-term commitment on Aboriginal issues by investing $68.5 million over 5 years to help respond effectively to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres. The UAS is now in 13 cities and these cities represent more than 25% of Canada’s total Aboriginal population. The 13 cities include: Vancouver, Prince George, Lethbridge, Calgary, Edmonton, Prince Albert, Regina, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Thompson, Ottawa, Toronto and Thunder Bay.

Shared Outcome(s)
OFI will work to achieve the following shared outcomes:

  • Targeting of urban Aboriginal socio-economic needs within new and renewed federal initiatives, where appropriate;
  • Improving access and coordination of programs and services;
  • Coordination of policy research, knowledge and information sharing in the urban Aboriginal area; and
  • Improving horizontal linkages and policy harmonization within the federal government and seeking opportunities for partnership (i.e. the federal government, provincial, municipal governments, Aboriginal groups and private sector).

To accomplish these objectives, UAS projects will strategically focus investments in three priority areas (improving life skills, promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families).

Governance Structure(s)
All 13 UAS designated communities have established community-based Steering Committees that are the catalysts for planning, making funding decisions, and coordinating work through the Urban Aboriginal Strategy — along with other community activities — to respond to urban Aboriginal issues. A Steering Committee is composed of a cross section of the Aboriginal community, to ensure its decisions reflect broad community concerns and priorities. These Steering Committees include representation from the local Aboriginal community, the federal government, other levels of government and the private sector. The inclusive nature of the Steering Committee is indicative of the principle of partnership that underlies the UAS, particularly in keeping with the objective to establish strong and active partnerships between government and community.

In some of the designated cities under the UAS, federal funding is administered through a community entity (an incorporated organization having been delegated authority for delivering UAS projects on behalf of the various partners). Regardless of whether funding is delivered by a community entity or by federal officials (shared delivery model) or a combination of the two, funding through the UAS is designed to promote cooperation with other key partners (including other federal departments) and stakeholders in support of community interests.


Federal Partners Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) Planned Spending for 2007–08 Actual Spending for 2007–08 Expected Results for 2007–08 Results Achieved in 2007–08
Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and non-Status Indians Urban Aboriginal Strategy $68,500,000 $8,233,781 Actual Spending Figures will be known in the Fall, 2008 UAS projects will strategically focus investments in three priority areas (improving life skills, promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families). During the 2007–08 fiscal year, the UAS entered into nine partnership arrangements with five federal government departments. Through the UAS’ partnership arrangement the UAS leveraged, $664,754 from other federal departments and agencies.
Human Resources and Social Development Homeless Partnership Strategy $104,700 $57,700 $57,700 Changes in Housing Status — To provide 12 transitional units furnished for youth to move from care to transitional housing.

Risk Reduction — To provide 12–15 Youth with a safe place to live that will reduce risk and provide life skills and transition to independent living.
Recipient to report on project results in July 2008.
$171,634 $114,259 $114,259 Improve the life skills and increase the health outcomes of 660 individuals through assistance provided by the Community Linkages Soup Bus Program. Recipient to report on project results in July 2008.
$1,344,000 $200,000 $200,000 Transition Measure — providing 58 new daycare openings. Recipient to report on project results in July 2008.
$184,123 $12,919 $12,919 Mentorship Initiative that provides mentors for women who are leaving the safety and support of the Centre. Mentors are selected from past Centre programs who are dedicated to remain on a healing journey. Program includes a comprehensive training program and ongoing supports. Recipient to report on project results in July 2008.
Service Canada Skills Link $200,000 $50,376 $50,376 Assist 300 Aboriginal individuals within the program Project Horizon. The program is a pre-employment program targeted to Aboriginal adults who have not worked. Recipient to report on project results in July 2008.
Canadian Heritage Urban Multipurpose Aboriginal Youth Program $302,113 $55,000 $55,000 To undertake a large impact horizontal program that promotes the potential of urban Aboriginal youth in Calgary. This will be accomplished through the creation of 560 additional skills development opportunities, providing cultural awareness to 2500 individuals, retaining 360 Aboriginal students in school, providing health promotion measures to 1300 Aboriginal individuals and implementing risk reduction measures for 5 Aboriginal people. The results from this project include: 808 youth exposed to additional skills development opportunities; 4445 people provided with cultural awareness through 43 different events; 1162 students promoted to stay in school through 99 workshops; 2900 youth exposed to heath promotion and 32 workshops held focusing on risk reduction for Aboriginal people.
$271,975 $120,000 $120,000 Formerly incarcerated men complete the 'In Search of Your Warrior' program by March 31, 2008, which includes personal development, life skills, job readiness, enhance self-esteem and a positive re-integration into community. As well, a five year funding arrangement with the Correctional Service of Canada for this type of programming will be in place by March 31, 2008. Recipient to report on project results in July 2008.
Status of Women Women's Community Fund $265,750 $48,500 $48,500 Through the Mobile Access Program Project, increase the number of safe places for 1000 sex workers per month in Vancouver, through increasing access to violence prevention services and information on health and addiction treatment services and decrease preventable deaths. The services include providing employment opportunities for women who have exited the sex trade and who are building their skills to create alternatives to sex work. Through the Mobile Access Program Project, increase the number of safe places for 1114 sex workers per month in Vancouver.
National Film Board In-kind $71,300 $6,000 $6,000 Provide 12–14 Aboriginal youth with an interest in the film industry with career training as part of the Dreamspeaker Film Festival. Recipient to report on project results in July 2008.
Total   $2,915,585 $664,754 $664,754    

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners
The UAS increases urban Aboriginal program coordination within the Government of Canada to maximize its investments and enable greater federal program alignment with provincial and municipal programming.

The UAS has proven effective in leveraging both monetary and in-kind contributions. There were over 168 projects funded during the 2007–08 fiscal year. In addition to contributions from other government departments, non-federal government partners have contributed almost $5,039,368 during the 2007–08 fiscal year to support the federal contributions under UAS. In some communities, partnerships have formed between the federal government departments, provincial government, municipal government, Aboriginal organizations, non-profit organizations and employer associations to support the UAS project initiatives in thirteen cities. Although the data above identify examples of projects that received financial support from other federal departments, other projects funded through the UAS received non-financial support from a number of federal departments.

Contact Information
Allan MacDonald
Director General
Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
66 Slater Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Telephone: (613) 992-8186



Sustainable Development Strategy

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) has now completed the first year of implementation of its Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS). The Strategy has two areas of focus: 1) Supporting Sustainable Communities — focused on both external programming around planning, community development, and environmental stewardship for First Nations, Métis, and Northerners; and 2) Building a Culture of Sustainability — focused on further enhancing the sustainable development (SD) of internal operations.

The Strategy consists of fifteen result-oriented commitments, most of which are also reflected in INAC’s strategic outcome plans. The targets have been reported on in the Report on Plans and Priorities and also in this performance report. All commitments support one or more of the Federal SD goals and Greening Government Operations (GGO) goals. A separate detailed annual progress report is also produced by the Department and submitted to the Commissioner on Environment and Sustainable Development.

Varying levels of progress have been made on the fifteen commitments in the Strategy over the past year, with two targets experiencing challenges. The development of Comprehensive Community Planning (CCP) strategy has not made any progress. The development of a Departmental Environmental Management System (EMS) has been modified to focus on developing an EMS for department-owned material and real property. Completion of all commitments is still expected by the end of the Strategy period. Highlights include:

  • significant progress on examining quality of life in remote communities;
  • the launch of two climate change programs : the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program (which has provided funding support of more than $1.6 million for 13 projects), and the Aboriginal and Northern Climate Change Adaptation Strategy;
  • significant social investments including $55.6 million for five new shelters and increased support for existing ones, over $70 million for First Nations education, and a reduction in high risk water systems;
  • a focus on environmental initiatives including remediation of contaminated sites, implementation of the Environmental Performance Framework, and development of a green procurement policy for the Department; and
  • increased integration of sustainable development into internal operations.

Objective/
Commitment
Federal SD Goal Including GGO Goals SDS Departmental Expected Results for 2007–2008 Performance Measure from Current SDS Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007–2008
Supporting Sustainable Communities
Improved departmental and federal co-ordination and harmonization of program planning and implementation in support of long-term planning
The Comprehensive Community Planning (CCP) Strategy approved and implemented in collaboration with First Nations. Sustainable Communities Communication and awareness plans and activities.

CCP tool kit.

Baseline data available
Number of communities engaged in comprehensive community planning. Communication and awareness plans and activities are ongoing in five regions (British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Atlantic, and Yukon).

British Columbia and Atlantic regions have developed CCP tool kits that they are sharing with other regions and First Nations.

No progress on developing Department CCP Strategy.

Preliminary baseline data is available: 109 communities engaged in CCP.
Identify the factors that influence the sustainability of remote communities south of 60 and determine how INAC policies could be modified to better address the challenges. Sustainable Communities Partnerships, proposals, and funding.

Comparative data on remote communities and government policies.

Research results and recommendations.
Number of recommendations.

Number of recommendations acted upon.
Partnerships have been established within and outside the Department.

Some comparative data on remote communities has been assembled through a literature review.

Results of the literature review, a draft conceptual framework, and some regional/sectoral meetings have been collected.
Enhanced social and economic capacity in Aboriginal communities through educational and social programming
Graduate more Aboriginal learners from high schools and post-secondary institutions. Sustainable Communities New reformed programs and relationships.

System that will allow performance measurement and reporting.

A legislative framework and regional education.

Organizations for the delivery of second-level services participation rates.
High school graduation rates.

Post-secondary education.
Education authorities renewed for one additional year.

Special Education Program evaluation completed and an Action Plan produced to strengthen program evaluation, reporting, and performance.

Produced and commissioned a series of reports on education reform.

First Nations Jurisdiction over Education in British Columbia Act supports a tripartite partnership between British Columbia First Nations, the Province, and the Government of Canada.
Enhance the Family Violence Prevention Program (FVPP). Sustainable Communities Awareness campaign.

Professionally trained staff.

Four to five new shelters.
Number of families able to transition back into community.

Percentage of participants with increased awareness of personal safety situation.
FVPP is developing program brochures for stakeholders and clients.

$55.6M investment will be allocated to operational support and provide training opportunities for staff.

Plans announced for construction of five new shelters (Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, British Columbia).
Housing, water, and wastewater facilities to First Nations that meet standards applicable to other comparable Canadian communities
Increase the amount of affordable and suitable housing while building capacity to ensure effective management and control by First Nation communities. Sustainable Communities Twenty First Nations each year will develop the capacity to create home ownership initiatives. Number of First Nations with housing by-laws and land codes.

Percentage of First Nations houses that are owned by occupants.
Announced creation of the new $300M First Nations Market Housing Fund, to allow First Nation families and individuals greater access to market-based housing, including home ownership on reserves.

INAC and CMHC started a compregensive evaluation of the Governments’s role and performance in First Nation housing, and is considering policy alternatives to existing on-reserve housing programs.
Reduce the number of high-risk and medium-risk sites identified in the National Assessment of Water and Wastewater Systems in First Nation Communities. Sustainable Communities and Clean Water Remedial plans for high-risk systems, oversight operators who ensure operations and management of systems, and a regulatory regime for drinking water in First Nation communities. Reduction in the number of high- and medium-risk systems.

Increase in the number of certified operators.
Creation of 24-hour hotlines, through which circuit rider trainers provide oversight and technical support to First Nations.

Third-party provision contracting to provide additional oversight, supervision, and mentoring.

Remedial plans for all high-risk systems were developed and implemented.
Sound environmental practices in First Nation, Inuit, and Northern communities
Support development of energy management initiatives in First Nation, Inuit, and Northern communities. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Reductions Greenhouse gas tracking report.

Project tracking report.
All INAC regions and sectors developed an approach to integration of renewable energy and energy efficiency in their business lines.

Number of Aboriginal and Northern communities with renewable energy or energy efficiency projects implemented.
Offered funding support for more than $1.6M with 13 projects approved.

GHG emissions tracking table keeps track of estimated GHG emissions saving over the project life cycle.

Project tracking table keeps track of all projects, whether proposed or funded.
Support development of First Nation, Inuit, and Northern communities to adapt to the impacts of climate change. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions Support community level work. Number of Aboriginal and Northern communities with completed climate change risk assessments or adaptation strategies.

Number of Aboriginal and Northern communities implementing climate change risk management or adaptation strategies.

All INAC regions and sectors developed an approach to integration of climate change risk management in their business lines.
INAC supported key Northern and Aboriginal communities and organizations to identify impact and adaptation knowledge gaps, and to adapt needs and actions at the community level.

Integrated RMAF/RBAF was completed.
Reduce the number of contaminated sites south of 60. Sustainable Use of Natural Resources Approval of a three-year National Contaminated Sites Management Plan.

Approved funding from Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP).
Regionally approved a three-year Contaminated Sites Management Plan.

Regionally submitted FCSAP applications.

A percentage decrease in Class I and Class II contaminated sites liabilities.
All regions have implemented a three-year Contaminated Sites Management Plan (identification and assessment of Class I and II sites; management and remediation of high risk sites; and sharing of best practices).

A three-year National Contaminated Sites Management Plan has been approved.

All regions submitted applications to FCSAP.

Funding from FCSAP approved for 2007-08 in the amount of $4,648,513.
Increase the number of Northern contaminated sites in remediation phase or completed. Sustainable Use of Natural Resources Contaminated Sites Management Plan.

Remediation plans.

Detailed work plans and quarterly reports.
Contaminated Sites Management Plan approved by Associate Deputy Minister.

Absolute number of sites in remediation phase or completed.
Contaminated Sites Management Plan drafted.

Regional plans developed for each territory.

Remediation completed at two sites.

Two sites have almost completed remediation, and nine sites are in Step Eight of the remediation process.

Annual detailed work plans are drafted to plan the remediation phase, and quarterly reports are completed to report on plans.
Building a culture of sustainability
Improved sustainable development integration within INAC
Raise awareness of sustainable development within the Department. Governance for Sustainable Development Communications plan.

Baseline data and comparison data.

Environmental Sustainability Network members and events.
Level of sustainable development awareness. Communications plan for tabling was implemented and an internal communications plan is in progress.

An external communications plan is drafted.

An SD awareness survey was conducted in March 2007.

Internet and intranet sites are being revised.
Improve the integration of the sustainable development considerations within the Department. Governance for Sustainable Development SDS commitments appear in strategic outcome (SO) plans.

Timely annual SD reports.

Strategy to improve linkages with SO tables.

Officers trained in SEA, electronic tracking registry for SEA.
SD reporting coincides with DPR reporting and SDS4 commitments are included annually in DPR and RPP.

Number of preliminary scans and SEAs completed.

The results of SEAs are reported on in all MCs and TB submissions.
Most SDS commitments appear in SO plans.

First Annual SD report in production.

A strategy to improve the linkage with the SO tables is in progress.
Promote sound environmental management practices into departmental operations
Implement IIABL’s Environmental Stewardship Strategy (ESS) Environmental Performance Framework through the integration of sound environmental management practices into IIABL departmental operations. Governance for Sustainable Development National fuel tank inventory.

National waste site inventory.

Standardized national policy and protocols on waste management.
A completed tank inventory database.

A completed waste site inventory database.

An approved IIABL Waste Management Policy.

An approved IIABL Environmental Performance Framework.
Waste site inventory is under development.

Fuel tank inventory is under development.

National policy on waste management remains in the very preliminary stages of development.
Sustainable development will be firmly integrated into corporate systems (finance, human resources, information management, audit and evaluation, and administrative services) nation-wide
Develop and implement an Environmental Management System (EMS) for department-owned material and real property. Governance for Sustainable Development Baseline data regarding the environmental impacts of department-owned material and real property is collected. Policies and procedures for department-owned material and real property are updated and comply with federal requirements.

Baseline data regarding the environmental impacts of department-owned material and real property is collected.

Results of EMS for department-owned material and real property are quantified and reported.
Amended commitment 2.3.1 approved.
Develop and implement a Green Procurement Strategy for INAC. Governance for Sustainable Development A Green Procurement Policy and supporting guidance, tools, training, and awareness is created and promoted throughout the Department. The dollar value and quantity of green procurement is documented.

Historical data and rates of consumption between past years and the current year are measured and documented.
Literature review of green procurement and related issues completed.

Preliminary model of a simplified process map of the procurement process was drafted.

Terms of reference for an expert level working group on green procurement drafted.



Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Parliamentary Committees

Government Response to the Sixth Report of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, "No Higher Priority: Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education in Canada".

The Sixth Report of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, "No Higher Priority: Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education in Canada" was adopted by the Committee on February 8, 2007, presented to the House on February 12, 2007, and concurred by the House on June 19, 2007.

The Report included recommendations that INAC improve the following elements: the creation of positive outcomes through modern communication tools; the financial management of student funding; the data collection and tracking; the allocation and delivery of post-secondary education funding; the Indian Studies Support Program; and the access to post-secondary programming.

For further information, see the June 12, 2007 Government Response to the Sixth Report of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, "No Higher Priority: Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education in Canada".

Government Response to the Fifth Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples, "Negotiation or Confrontation: It's Canada's Choice".

In this Report, the Senate Committee made the following four recommendations: an increase in funds available for settlements; the establishment of an independent body within two years; adequate resources for the existing process; and the adoption of new guiding principles. The Government of Canada accepted these recommendations recognizing that the retooling of the Specific Claims Process requires careful consideration and a phased approach.

For more information on the Department’s response, see the June 13, 2007 Government Response to the Fifth Report of the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples, "Negotiation or Confrontation: It's Canada's Choice".

Following the response, INAC has taken the following actions in order to address the Parliamentary Committee recommendations:

  1. An amount of $250 million per year has been identified for ten years for the resolution of specific claims.
  2. The Specific Claims Tribunal Act, which establishes an independent tribunal, was introduced in November 2007, received Royal Assent on June 18, 2008, and comes into force on October 16, 2008.
  3. A resource request is currently underway to ensure adequate funds are available for the specific claims process.
  4. The adoption of new guiding principles has occurred through the development of the legislation and also through changes to the government's internal processing of specific claim submissions.

Government Response to the Seventh Report of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development on "Aboriginal Housing".

The Seventh Report of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development on "Aboriginal Housing" was adopted by the Committee on March 22, 2007 and presented to the House on March 29, 2007.

In this Report, the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development on Aboriginal Housing recommends that the Department and its federal partners: commit to significantly increased annual investment in Aboriginal housing based on actual regional construction and repair costs; define specific roles and responsibilities of, and specific measures to be undertaken by, each department and agency at every stage; include comprehensive measures for capacity-building within Aboriginal communities in areas of construction and maintenance; define mechanisms and processes for federal-provincial-territorial collaboration with respect to programs and funding to meet off-reserve and Northern housing needs; and set clear target dates for implementation and completion of every stage.

For more information on the Department’s response, see the October 17, 2007 Government Response to the Seventh Report of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development on "Aboriginal Housing".

Following the response, INAC has taken the following actions in order to address the Parliamentary Committee recommendations:

Housing Operations

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), Health Canada (HC), and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), developed the National Strategy to Address Mould in First Nation Communities. The objective of the National Strategy is to develop sufficient awareness and capacity among First Nation home occupants, communities, and institutions, so that they can prevent and remediate existing mould problems. The National Strategy received approval from senior officials from the above mentioned organizations and is currently undergoing co-ordination and planning for implementation.

Budget 2005

The Government of Canada invested $295 million over five years to help stabilize on-reserve housing conditions. This was a shared investment between (Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND) — $192 million and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation — $103 million. As of March 2008, DIAND and CMHC data showed that funding from Budget 2005 allowed for the construction of 5,991 new units; the renovation of 2,299 units; and the creation of 5,119 new serviced lots.

First Nations Housing Market Fund

The First Nations Market Housing Fund (the Fund) officially opened for business on May 5, 2008. It is being run by a board of nine independent trustees jointly appointed by the Ministers of Human Resources and Social Development, and Indian Affairs and Northern Development. The Fund is being managed in the initial years by CMHC, however, the intent is to transfer it to First Nations control in the future.

In the initial year of operation, prior to the Fund generating any investment income, existing capacity development funding from both Indian Affairs and Northern Development and CMHC will be directed to market-based housing initiatives and will support any capacity training for First Nations as directed by the Fund trustees.

1996 Housing Policy

The Government of Canada's response to the Seventh Report of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, prepared jointly by INAC and CMHC, committed to reviewing the 1996 On-reserve Housing Policy and to improving policy implementation by promoting the consistent use of housing plans by First Nations and by reviewing these plans. As part of an evaluation of Budget 2005 spending on First Nations housing, INAC’s Audit and Evaluation Branch undertook an assessment of the 1996 On-reserve Housing Policy. INAC and CMHC will respond to the research and policy recommendations of that assessment. In addition, INAC took steps toward improving the delivery and performance monitoring of its housing program by starting to develop a Housing Procedures guide to be implemented across all regions.

External Audits

Government response to the Auditor General of Canada and to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development (CESD) on the October 2007 Report of the Auditor General on Inuvialuit Final Agreement.

The Report, tabled in the House of Commons on October 30, 2007, stated that the Department should develop and implement clear processes for ensuring the timely exchange of lands under the Inuvialuit Final Agreement, and for cleaning up and returning control of parcels of land that are no longer required by the federal government. The Report also mentioned that INAC should clearly communicate the Government of Canada's contracting obligations in relation to the Inuvialuit Final Agreement to federal organizations; and provide guidance on how to fulfil their contracts. INAC should also meet its responsibilities related to the economic review: develop a strategic approach toward implementing Canada's obligations under the Inuvialuit Final Agreement; develop performance indicators to measure progress toward meeting the principles of the Inuvialuit Final Agreement; and publicly monitor and report progress to other signatories.

The Department’s response, prepared on behalf of the Government of Canada, stated that INAC accepted all recommendations and has developed an action plan to respond to the Auditor General’s recommendations. Furthermore, INAC is taking steps to ensure that the action plan is carried out, and will report regularly to the Office of the Auditor General as to the progress made on each recommendation.

INAC, in consultation with Treasury Board Secretariat and Public Works and Government Services Canada, also agreed to provide guidance to departments on the appropriate level of monitoring required to ensure compliance with this Agreement's, and similar agreements', contracting provisions, as reflected in Treasury Board policy requirements.

Government response to External Audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada and the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

No reports were held during the period.



Internal Audits


Name of Internal Audit Audit Type Status Completion Date Electronic Link to Report
Specific Claims — Settlements Management Control Framework Completed June 2007 Preliminary survey only — Report not published
Audit of Income Assistance Transfer Payment Completed September 2007 Preliminary survey only — Report not published
INAC Grants and Contributions Management Control Framework Framework for Audit Performance Completed October 2007 Work instrument copies available upon request
Indian Registration Process/Certificate of Indian Status and Indian Registry System Threat risk Assessment Completed June 2008 Posting pending
Land and Estate Management Management Control Framework Not undertaken due to change in priorities N/A N/A
System Under Development — First Nations and Inuit Transfer Payments Project Management and System Control Framework Completed June 2007 System under Development Audit of the First Nations and Inuit Transfer Payment System Project
Audit of the Implementation of the Yukon Northern Affairs Program Devolution Transfer Agreement Management Control Framework Completed September 2007 Planning concluded with recommendation to not conduct audit work due to low risk
Staffing Transaction (NWT) Human Resources Management Practices Completed December 2007 Audit of Staffing Transactions
Audit of the Office of the Federal Interlocutor Programs and Operations Management Control Framework/
Transfer Payment Control Framework
Completed February 2008 Posting pending
Entity Level Controls Preliminary Survey for Audit of External Reporting Management Controls Completed April 2008 Preliminary survey only — Report not published
Audit of Healthy Northern Communities — Knowledge and Adaptation Transfer Payment Completed December 2007 Planning concluded with recommendation to not conduct audit work due to low risk
Preliminary Survey of Specific Claims Management Control Framework Completed June 2007 Preliminary survey only — Report not published
Preliminary Survey: Information Management/ Information Technology (IM/IT) Policy, Planning and Management IM/IT Management Control Framework Completed December 2007 Preliminary survey only — Report not published
Preliminary Survey: IM/IT Applications Development and Support IM/IT Applications in progress or under development Completed December 2007 Preliminary survey only — Report not published
Special Study: Complaints and Allegations Management Controls Completed December 2007 Not posted — Special Study
Regional Headquarters Management Practices Reviews Management Practices Completed Various Dates Atlantic, Alberta, Manitoba, Yukon
Review Reports
Audit of Capital Facilities and Maintenance Transfer Payments/ Management Control Framework Reporting Phase November 2008 N/A
Follow-up Audit of Child and Family Services Follow-up Audit Cancelled due to OAG Audit Report N/A N/A
Audit of Post Secondary Education Transfer Payments/ Management Control Framework Planning phase completed November 2008 N/A
Follow-up Audit on the Industry Canada 2006 Audit of Aboriginal Business Canada Follow-up Audit Planning Phase Completed November 2008 N/A
Audit of Capacity Development Transfer Payments/ Management Control Framework Planning Phase Completed February 2009 N/A
Horizontal Departmental Audit of Grants and Contributions — Quality Assurance and Intervention Policy Management Control Framework Deferred to 2008–09 February 2009 N/A
Audit of Contingent Liabilities, Special Purpose Accounts (Trusts) and Payroll Management Control Deferred to 2008–09 in the form of specific audits N/A N/A
Horizontal Departmental Audit of Human Resource Planning and Resourcing Human Resource Management Practices Planning Phase Completed Audit Focusing on Staffing Practices November 2008 N/A

Evaluations


Name of Evaluation Program Activity Evaluation Type Status Completion Date Electronic Link to Report
Income Assistance The People: Social Development Summative Completed December 2007 Evaluation of the Income Assistance Program
National Child Benefit Reinvestment The People: Social Development Summative Completed December 2007 Evaluation of the National Child Benefit Reinvestments Initiative
First Nations Water Management The Land: First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment Summative Completed December 2007 Summative Evaluation of the First Nations Water Management Strategy
Office of the Federal Interlocutor Office of the Federal Interlocutor Summative Completed February 2008 Evaluation of the Federal Interlocutor's Contribution Program and Powley: Management of Métis Aboriginal Rights
Special Education The People: Education Formative Completed December 2007 Formative Evaluation of the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada — Special Education Program
First Nations Child and Family Services The People: Social Development Summative Completed March 2007 Evaluation of the First Nations Child and Family Services Program
Gender-Based Policy Analysis The Government: Governance and Institutions of Government Impact Completed June 2008 N/A
Strategic Investment in Northern Economic Development The Economy: Northern Economy Formative Underway Fall 2008 N/A
Comprehensive Land Claims The Land: Clarity of Title to Land and Resources Summative Underway Fall 2008 N/A
Contaminated Sites The Land: First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment Summative Underway Fall 2008 N/A
Electronic Link to Evaluation Plan: Evaluation Plan 2007–2008 to 2011–2012



Travel Policies

Special Travel Authorities of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Indian and Northern Affairs follows the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Special Travel Authorities
Authority: N/A
Coverage: N/A
Principal difference(s) in policy provisions: N/A
Principal financial implications of the difference(s): N/A

Travel Directive of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada follows the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Travel Directive, Rates and Allowances
Authority: N/A
Coverage: N/A
Principal difference(s) in policy provisions: N/A
Principal financial implications of the difference(s): N/A