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Section 4: Tables

Table 1: Comparison of Planned to Actual Spending, Including FTEs

The following table provides a history of spending by program activity. A comparison of the 2006-2007 Total Planned Spending and the actual expenditures recorded in the Public Accounts are also incorporated.


Program Activity
($ Millions)
Actual
2004–2005
Actual
2005–2006
2006–2007
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
[a]
Immigration Program
206.3
191.1
198.4
197.2
267.5
244.8
Temporary Resident Program
110.3
101.5
89.5
89.1
118.3
104.9
Canada’s Role in International
Migration and Protection
5.0
2.6
4.9
4.9
3.9
2.8
Refugee Program
88.8
80.3
94.0
93.7
88.7
84.1
Integration Program
414.7
445.0
638.6
675.7
630.5
550.6
Citizenship Program
57.7
61.2
85.6
88.2
75.0
71.4
Revitalization of the Toronto
Waterfront [b]
0.0
0.8
115.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
Total [c]
882.8
882.5
1,226.8
1,148.8
1,183.9
1,058.6
Less: Non-Respendable Revenue
(506.6)
(500.8)
(436.1)
(436.1)
(436.1)
(451.6)
Plus: Cost of Services Received
Without Charge [d]
240.6
231.6
223.8
223.8
237.1
237.1
Total Departmental Spending
616.8
613.3
1,014.5
936.5
984.9
844.1
Full-Time Equivalents      
4,039
   

[a] For an explanation of variances, see Section 2: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcomes.

[b] Responsibility for the Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative (TWRI) was transferred to the TBS through an Order in
Council dated February 6, 2006.

[c] Planned spending of $1,148.8 million decreased from Main Estimates, primarily due to the planned transfer of the TWRI. Actual expenditures of $1,058.6 million were lower than total authorities by $125.3 million primarily due to funds set aside for spending in future years through reprofiling. The balance of the reduced requirements ($41.3 million) was mainly due to $21 million in operating lapses identified to be carried forward to the next fiscal year, lower than planned expenditures in settlement programs and other general operating lapses.

[d] Services received without charge include accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), the employer’s share of employees’ insurance premiums paid by the TBS, legal services received from the Department of Justice, and international immigration services provided by DFAIT. (See Table 4)

Table 2: Resources by Program Activity

The following table provides information on how resources were used, by program activity and type of expenditure, in the 2006-2007 fiscal year. For an explanation of the variances in each program activity, see Section 2: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome.


Program Activity
($ Millions)
Operating
[a]
Grants and
Contributions
[b]
Total
Immigration Program
Main Estimates
198.4
0.0
198.4
Planned Spending
197.2
0.0
197.2
Total Authorities
267.5
0.0
267.5
Actual Expenditures
244.8
0.0
244.8
 
Temporary Resident Program
Main Estimates
89.5
0.0
89.5
Planned Spending
89.1
0.0
89.1
Total Authorities
118.3
0.0
118.3
Actual Expenditures
104.9
0.0
104.9
 
Canada’s Role in International Migration and Protection
Main Estimates
2.6
2.3
4.9
Planned Spending
2.6
2.3
4.9
Total Authorities
1.6
2.3
3.9
Actual Expenditures
1.4
1.4
2.8
 
Refugee Program
Main Estimates
94.0
0.0
94.0
Planned Spending
93.7
0.0
93.7
Total Authorities
88.7
0.0
88.7
Actual Expenditures
84.1
0.0
84.1
 
Integration Program
Main Estimates
43.8
594.8
638.6
Planned Spending
45.5
630.2
675.7
Total Authorities
37.1
593.4
630.5
Actual Expenditures
32.2
518.4
550.6
 
Citizenship Program
Main Estimates
85.6
0.0
85.6
Planned Spending
85.2
3.0
88.2
Total Authorities
72.0
3.0
75.0
Actual Expenditures
68.4
3.0
71.4
 
Revitalization of the Toronto Waterfront
Main Estimates
1.2
114.6
115.8
Planned Spending
0.0
0.0
0.0
Total Authorities
0.0
0.0
0.0
Actual Expenditures
0.0
0.0
0.0
 
TOTAL
Main Estimates
515.1
711.7
1,226.8
Planned Spending
513.3
635.5
1,148.8
Total Authorities
585.2
598.7
1,183.9
Actual Expenditures
535.8
522.8
1,058.6

[a] Operating includes statutory votes identified in Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items.

[b] For more details on grants and contributions, see Table 10: Details of Transfer Payment Programs.

Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items

This table identifies the way Parliament votes resources to the Department in the Main Estimates (Votes 1, 2 and 5) and provides statutory details (denoted by “S”) for information purposes.


  Vote
($ Millions)
2006–2007
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
[a]
Total
Authorities
[b]
Actual
[c]
1 Operating expenditures
471.9
470.1
489.6
440.2
2 Debt write-off
0.0
0.0
1.0
1.0
5 Grants and contributions
711.7
635.5
598.7
522.8
(S) Salary and motor car allowance
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans
43.1
43.1
40.5
40.5
(S) Refund of amounts credited to
revenues in previous years
0.0
0.0
53.9
53.9
(S) Court awards
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.1
  Total [d]
1,226.8
1,148.8
1,183.9
1,058.6

[a] Total Planned Spending from the 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities.

[b] Total Authorities from the 2006-2007 Public Accounts, which include Main Estimates plus Supplementary Estimates.

[c] Total Actual Spending from the 2006-2007 Public Accounts. For an explanation of variances by program activity, see Section 2: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcomes.

[d] Planned spending of $1,148.8 million decreased from Main Estimates, primarily due to the planned transfer of the TWRI. Actual expenditures of $1,058.6 million were lower than total authorities by $125.3 million primarily due to funds set aside for spending in future years through reprofiling. The balance of the reduced requirements ($41.3 million) was mainly due to $21 million in operating lapses identified to be carried forward to the next fiscal year, lower than planned expenditures in settlement programs and other general operating lapses.

Table 4: Services Received Without Charge

The following table identifies the cost of services provided without charge by other government departments.

SERVICES


($ Millions) 2006–2007
Accommodation
• Public Works and Government Services Canada
30.0
Employer’s Share of Employee Benefits Covering Insurance
Premiums and Expenditures
• Treasury Board Secretariat
20.3
Workers’ Compensation Costs
• Human Resources and Social Development Canada
0.1
Legal Services
• Justice Canada
38.7
International Immigration Services
• Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
148.0
Total Services Received Without Charge
237.1

Table 5: Loans, Investments, and Advances (Non-budgetary)


Year-to-Year Changes
($ Millions)
2004–2005 2005–2006 2006–2007
Opening balance
$42,494,280
$41,942,973
$40,271,171
New loans and accrued interest
$14,120,206
$13,573,606
$13,049,038
Receipts (amount collected)
($13,757,773)
($15,245,408)
($14,261,861)
Write-offs
($913,740)
$0.00
($978,102)
Closing Balance
$41,942,973
$40,271,171
$38,080,246

Total Authority is $110 million under section 88 of IRPA.

Table 6: Sources of Non-respendable Revenue


Program Activity
($ Millions)
Actual
2004–2005
Actual
2005–2006
2006–2007
Planned Actual
Immigration Program
Immigration cost-recovery fees for permanent residents
149.2
130.1
154.5
164.9
Immigration rights fees [a]
165.8
145.0
73.5
74.1
Interest on the Immigrant Loans Program
0.9
0.8
1.0
0.7
Temporary Resident Program
Immigration cost-recovery fees for
temporary residents
132.0
142.7
140.0
147.2
Canada’s Role in International Migration
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Refugee Program
Immigration cost-recovery fees for refugees
6.9
11.2
11.0
14.0
Integration Program
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Citizenship Program
Citizenship cost-recovery fees
26.0
38.1
33.7
27.6
Right of citizenship fees
18.4
26.9
22.3
18.4
Subtotal
499.2
494.8
436.0
446.9
Other Revenues
Access to Information fees
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
Refunds of previous years’ expenditures [b]
7.0
5.7
Nil
4.0
Miscellaneous [c]
0.3
0.2
Nil
0.6
Total Revenue [d]
506.6
500.8
436.1
451.6

[a] As of May 3, 2006, the Right of Permanent Residence Fee was reduced from $975 to $490, which results in lower revenues in 2006-2007.

[b] Refunds of previous years’ expenditures include recovery of bad debts, adjustments to prior years’ payables and refunds of previous years’ expenditures.

[c] In 2004-2005, miscellaneous revenues associated with forfeitures was transferred to CBSA as part of the transfer of responsibilities effective October 8, 2004.

[d] 2006-2007 Actual Revenue of $451.6 million is $15.5 million higher than the 2006-2007 Planned Revenue of $436.1M. The increase is primarily in Immigration Program ($10.7 million increase) and Temporary Resident Program ($7.2 million increase). This reflects a higher than planned volume of permanent and temporary resident applications and associated fees revenue.

NOTES:

  • Fees are charged in recognition of full Government of Canada costs of providing services.
  • All revenue is deposited into the Consolidated Revenue Fund and is not available for respending by the Department.
  • A listing of CIC fees can be found at www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/fees/fees.asp.

Table 7-A: User Fees


        2005–2006 Planning Years
User Fee Fee Type Fee-Setting
Authority
Date Last Modified Forecast
Revenue
Actual Full Cost Performance Standard Performance Results Fiscal Forecast Estimated
Full Cost

Right of Permanent Residence Fee (RPRF)

Regulatory

Financial Administration Act (FAA); IRPA and IRP Regulations. 

May 3, 2006.

$73,500

$74,132

There is no cost associated with this fee as it is charged in recognition of the tangible and intangible benefits of acquiring permanent resident status in Canada. This fee was established as part of the 1995 Federal Budget.

This fee is payable by persons who acquire permanent resident status in Canada. (See New Permanent Residents in 2006 table) Protected persons and dependent children do not pay the RPRF.

This fee is closely linked to the processing of permanent resident applications.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$73,500
$73,500
$73,500

There is no cost associated with this fee as it is charged in recognition of the tangible and intangible benefits of acquiring permanent resident status in Canada. This fee was established as part of the1995 Federal Budget.

Permanent Residence Application Fee, Permanent Resident Card Fee, Permanent Resident Travel Document Fee, and Sponsorship Application Fee for Family Classes

Regulatory

IRPA and IRP Regulations.

June 28, 2002

$164,000

$177,031

$282,600

Permanent Residence Applications
Overseas: Contributes to the achievement of Government immigration levels by issuing visas in line with established annual targets. Priority processing is given to the reunification of immediate family members (spouses, partners and children) and to skilled workers nominated by provincial governments. [Note: Detailed processing times by overseas mission and by immigration category are updated each quarter on CIC’s Web site. Overseas DFAIT Web site now give link to CIC site to ensure data consistency.]

Domestic: Recent average processing times for
Case Processing Centres are published on CIC’s
Web site. The processing times are estimates
only and are updated weekly.
(www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/times/index.asp)

Permanent Resident Card
Domestic: Same as previous.

Permanent Resident Travel Document
Overseas: Processed expeditiously.

Permanent Residence Applications
Overseas: Immigrant Visas: In calendar 2006, overseas missions delivered 96.7 percent of the overall visa target. A total of 217,003 immigrant visas were issued abroad.
In calendar year 2006, missions finalized
50 percent of immediate Family Class
applications within 4 months, 70 percent
within 7 months and 80 percent within 9
months. Missions finalized 50 percent of
provincial nominees within 8 months, 70
percent within 10 months and 80 percent
within 12 months.

Domestic: Sponsorship: 99% of undertakings (spouse, child) are currently processed within 32 days. Other classes: First-stage approval for in-Canada PR applications is currently between 6-19 months depending on the immigrant category.

Permanent Resident Card: Domestic: Cards for new PRs are processed within 3-4 weeks. Initial, replacement or renewal of PR card for existing PRs is currently 30 days.

Permanent Resident Travel Document Overseas: Recent processing times indicate that 70% of applications are decided within 2 days.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$171,200
$178,900
$178,900

$282,600
$282,600
$282,600

Work Permit Fee (individual and performing artist groups)

Regulatory

IRPA and IRP Regulations. 

January 2, 1997

$27,300

$33,565

$73,500

Overseas: Processed expeditiously.
Past processing times by overseas mission and by category are updated regularly on CIC’s Web site.

Domestic: Recent average processing times for Case Processing Centres are published on CIC’s Web site. The processing times are estimates only and are updated weekly. (www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/times/index.asp)

Overseas: In calendar year 2006, 72 percent of applications were finalized within 28 days.

Domestic: Recent average processing times are 24 calendar days at CPC-Vegreville.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$27,300
$27,300
$27,300

$73,500
$73,500
$73,500

Study Permit Fee

Regulatory

IRPA and IRP Regulations. 

June 1, 1994

$20,000

$18,874

$33,100

Same as previous

Overseas: In calendar year 2006, 76 percent of applications were finalized within 28 days.

Domestic: Recent average processing times are 37 calendar days at CPC-Vegreville.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$20,000
$20,000
$20,000

$33,100
$33,100
$33,100

Temporary Resident Visa Application Fee and Extension of Authorization to Remain in Canada as a Temporary Resident Fee

Regulatory

IRPA and IRP Regulations. 

January 2, 1997

$88,800

$90,534

$102,300

Overseas: Temporary Resident Visas: Processed expeditiously. Past processing times by overseas mission and by category, are updated regularly on CIC’s Web site.

Domestic: Extensions: Recent average processing times for Case Processing Centres are published on CIC’s Web site. The processing times are estimates only and are updated weekly. (www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/times/index.asp)

Overseas: In calendar year 2006, 62% of TR visa applications were finalized within 2 days.

Domestic: Extension of status: Recent average processing times are 34 calendar days at CPC-Vegreville.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$88,800
$88,800
$88,800

$102,300
$102,300
$102,300

Temporary Resident Permit Fee

Regulatory

IRPA and IRP Regulations.

January 2, 1997

$2,500

$2,321

$6,900

Overseas: Processed expeditiously.

Domestic: Recent average processing times for Case Processing Centres are published on CIC’s Web site. The processing times are estimates only and are updated weekly. (www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/times/index.asp)

Temporary Resident Permit: Recent processing times are 34 calendar days at CPC-Vegreville.

Overseas: TRPs are processed to overcome an inadmissibility identified during the processing of any type of visa application. There are no data on processing times for TRPs. They are processed expeditiously but the variability in the complexity of the cases and the inadmissibilities that are being addressed means that there can be no service standard.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$2,500
$2,500
$2,500

$6,900
$6,900
$6,900

Restoration of Temporary Resident Status Fee

Regulatory

IRPA and IRP Regulations. 

June 28, 2002

$1,400

$1,932

Costs of Restoration of Temporary Resident Status are not reported separately in CIC’s Cost Management Model. These costs are included in Temporary Resident Visa, Study Permit, and Work Permit Costs.

Recent average processing times are published on CIC’s Web site and are updated regularly. (www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/times/index.asp)

Recent processing times are 34 calendardays at CPC-Vegreville.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$1,400
$1,400
$1,400

Costs of Restoration of Temporary Resident Status are not reported separately inCIC’s Cost Management Model. These costs are included in Temporary Resident Visa, Study Permit, and Work Permit Costs.

Other immigration services (Rehabilitation; Authorization to return to Canada; Immigration Statistical Data; Certification and replacement of immigration documents)

Regulatory

IRPA and IRP Regulations.

Various

$1,500

$1,853

$2,200
[note 8]

Certification & replacement of immigration document within 6-8 weeks. Overseas: Authorizations to Return to Canada (ARCs) are processed expeditiously but due to the extremely variable nature and complexity of ARC cases there is no service standard.

Replacement of immigration documents currently within 6-8 weeks. Overseas: See comments for service standards.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$1,500
$1,500
$1,500

$2,200
$2,200
$2,200
[note 8]

Right of Citizenship Fee (ROCF)

Regulatory

FAA; Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations.

January 2, 1997

$22,300

$18,370

This fee was established as part of the 1995 federal budget. It is charged in recognition of the tangible and intangible benefits of acquiring citizenship status in Canada.There is no cost associated with this fee.

This fee is payable by persons obtaining citizenship status. (See section on Citizenship for details.)

Persons under 18 years of age do not pay the ROCF.

This fee is linked to acquisition of citizenship status. (See  Change of Citizenship Fee.)

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$22,300
$22,300
$22,300

This fee was established as part of the 1995 federal budget. It is charged in recognition of the tangible and intangible benefits of acquiring citizenship status in Canada. There is no cost associated with this fee.

Change of Citizenship Fees: Grant, Retention, Resumption, Renunciation of Citizenship

Regulatory

Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations.

January 2, 1997

$27,900

$22,443

$68,600

Recent average processing times are published on CIC’s Web site and are updated regularly. () www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/times/index.asp

In 2006-07, processing times for individuals applying to become a citizen (grant of citizenship) were reduced from 15-18 months to 12 months.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$27,900
$27,900
$27,900

$68,600
$68,600
$68,600

Citizenship Status Document Fees: Proof of Citizenship and Search for Record of Citizenship

Regulatory

Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations.

January 2, 1997

$5,800

$5,184

$20,700

Recent average processing times for proof of citizenship are published on CIC’s Web site and are updated regularly. (www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/times/index.asp)

In 2006-07, processing times for the issuance of a citizenship certificate (proof of citizenship) were reduced from 5-7 months to 3 months.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$5,800
$5,800
$5,800

$20,700
$20,700
$20,700

Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA)

Other products and services

Access to Information Act.

1992

$100

$79

$1,800
[note 9]

Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time maybe extended pursuant to Section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request.

The Access to Information Act provides fuller details: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-1/218072.html.

CIC received 10,497 requests under the Access to Information Act in 2006-07 and completed 10,667 requests during the same period (some requests carried over from previous year). CIC provided a response within 30 days following receipt of the request in 67.8% of cases. Response time was extended in 32.2 percent of cases.

Overall, CIC met deadlines for 95% of the requests over the course of the year.

2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

$100
$100
$100

$1,800
$1,800
$1,800
[note 9]

User Fees       Total
$435,100
Total
$446,318
Total
$591,700
  Sub-total:
Sub-total:
Sub-total:
$442,300
$450,000
$450,000
$591,700
$591,700
$591,700
 

NOTES:

Note 1: Source 2006–2007 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Note 2: All amounts are net of current year remissions.

Note 3: 2004–2005 full costs and estimated full costs include an estimate for OGDs and represent the best available cost data. Participating OGD’s in CIC’s Cost Management Model for 2004–2005 are DFAIT, PWGSC, Social Sciences Humanities and Research Council of Canada, IRB, RCMP, Court Administrative Services, Federal Court Trial Division, Federal Court of Appeal and HRSDC. CBSA, Department of Justice and CSIS costs are not included.

Note 4: Processing times are an average and change regularly depending on application intake. Overseas processing times are not an average.

Note 5: All fees or modifications to fees that existed before the UFA came into force on March 31, 2004 are not subject to that legislation. Therefore:

  • Performance standard, if provided, may not have received Parliamentary review,
  • Performance standard, if provided, may not respect all requirements under the UFA (e.g., international comparison, independent complaint address), and
  • Performance result, if provided, is not legally subject to the UFA.

Note 6: Statistics for domestic regions were current as of March 31, 2007.

Note 7: Source 2006–2007 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Note 8: Full costs include only rehabilitation cases and authorization to return to Canada costs.

Note 9: Source Annual Report 2005–2006 — Privacy Act, Access to Information Act.

Table 7-B: Policy on Service Standards for External Fees

Information on CIC’s Policy on Service Standards for External Fees can be found at www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr2/06-07/index_e.asp.

Table 8: Progress Against Department’s Regulatory Plan

Information on CIC’s progress against its Regulatory Plan can be found at www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr2/06-07/index_e.asp.

Table 9 : Status Report on Major Crown Project

The following is a summary of major Crown projects involving the Department. Supplementary information on major Crown projects can be found at
www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/dpr2/06-07/index_e.asp.


Major Crown Project Description
Global Case Management
System (GCMS)

The GCMS is a multi-year program that will replace several aging, archaic and incompatible core business systems of CIC and the CBSA, some of which are 30 years old and support over 240 points of service across Canada and around the world. It is an integrated, case-management-based set of applications and infrastructure components that will support the client operations of CIC and the CBSA.

Once in place, the GCMS will improve overall program integrity, effectiveness and client service delivery. It will also facilitate communications and data sharing between CIC and the CBSA and with our other partners for the purposes of the administration of IRPA. In addition, the GCMS will provide the technological foundation to support new business initiatives and capitalize on innovative technology by replacing outdated systems that are extremely difficult to support and maintain.


Table 10: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


Program Activity
($ Millions)
Actual
2004–2005
Actual
2005–2006
2006–2007
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Integration Program – Grants
Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord [a]
160.8
188.4
196.2
196.2
193.9
Institute for Canadian Citizenship
0.0
0.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Total Grants
160.8
188.4
199.2
199.2
196.9
Canada’s Role in International Migration
and Protection – Contributions
Migration Policy Development
0.3
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.4
International Organization for Migration
1.2
1.1
2.0
1.9
1.1
Immigration Consultants Program
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Integration Program – Contributions
Host Program [c]
3.1
3.3
7.4
6.7
5.0
Immigrant Settlement and Adaptation
Program [b]
38.4
42.9
104.4
73.0
70.2
Resettlement Assistance Program [e]
42.5
39.7
44.6
44.6
44.1
Contributions to Provinces
45.7
49.0
87.5
82.8
82.8
Language Instruction for Newcomers
to Canada [d]
94.0
93.5
190.1
190.1
122.3
Total Contributions
225.7
229.7
436.3
399.5
325.9
Total Transfer Payments [f]
386.5
418.1
635.5
598.7
522.8

[a] The Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord and contributions to provinces recognize the importance of settlement services that respond to the growing need to help immigrants integrate.

[b] The Immigrant Settlement and Adaptation Program provides funds for services such as orientation, paraprofessional counselling, translation, job finding help, and Enhanced Language Training.

[c] Host funds are used to match newcomers with Canadian volunteers (individuals and groups), who help them settle in and integrate.

[d] The Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada program provides funds for basic language training in both of Canada’s official languages to help adult immigrants integrate socially, culturally, economically and politically.

[e] The Resettlement Assistance Program, formerly the Adjustment Assistance Program, helps pay for temporary accommodations, clothing, household effects and living expenses for up to one year for indigent Convention refugees.

[f] Overall, Planned Spending of $635.5 million decreased to $598.7 million due to planned settlement funding, which was deferred to future years. Actual expenditures of $522.8 million were lower than total authorities by $75.9 million primarily due to further approvals for the reprofile (moving forward) of settlement resources to future years.

Table 11: Financial Statements

Statement of Management Responsibility

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2007 and all information contained in these statements rests with departmental management. These financial statements have been prepared by management in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these financial statements. Some of the information in the financial statements is based on management’s best estimates and judgment and gives due consideration to materiality. To fulfil its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of the Department’s financial transactions. Financial information submitted to the Public Accounts of Canada and included in the Department’s Departmental Performance Report is consistent with these financial statements.

Management maintains a system of financial management and internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are in accordance with the Financial Administration Act, are executed in accordance with prescribed regulations, within Parliamentary authorities, and are properly recorded to maintain accountability of Government funds. Management also seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements by careful selection, training and development of qualified staff, by organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility, and by communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards and managerial authorities are understood throughout the Department.

The financial statements of the Department have not been audited.


____________________
Richard B. Fadden
Deputy Minister
Date
  ____________________
Wayne Ganim
Senior Financial Officer
Date

Citizenship & Immigration Canada
Statement of Operations (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)


  2007 2006
Expenses (Note 4)
Integration program
568,236
452,198
Immigration program
272,603
271,025
Temporary resident program
145,439
167,759
Citizenship program
118,299
80,610
Refugee program
94,241
94,306
Canada's role in international migration and protection
4,039
3,788
Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative
0
765
Total Expenses 1,202,857 1,070,451
Revenues (Note 5)
Immigration program
216,909
293,098
Temporary resident program
153,927
144,909
Citizenship program
46,306
69,014
Refugee program
14,581
13,163
Integration program
734
825
Total Revenues
432,457
521,009
Net Cost of Operations
770,400
549,442

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these statements.

Citizenship & Immigration Canada
Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
At March 31 (in thousands of dollars)


  2007 2006
ASSETS
Financial Assets
Accounts receivable and advances (Note 6)
22,617
13,506
Loans (Note 7)
34,407
35,984
Total financial assets
57,024
49,490
Non-financial assets
Tangible capital assets (Note 8)
224,294
184,816
Inventory
8,010
5,743
Prepayments
1,341
1,230
Total non-financial assets
233,645
191,789
TOTAL ASSETS
290,669
241,279
 
LIABILITIES
Deferred revenues (Note 9)
235,045
282,876
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
123,020
115,947
Other liabilities (Note 14)
24,000
28,020
Vacation pay and compensatory leave
14,487
13,305
Employee severance benefits (Note 10)
51,634
46,555
TOTAL LIABILITIES
448,186
486,703
 
EQUITY OF CANADA
(157,517)
(245,424)
TOTAL
290,669
241,279

Contingent Liabilities (Note 11)
Contractual Obligations (Note 12)
The accompanying notes form an integral part of these statements.

Citizenship & Immigration Canada
Statement of Equity of Canada (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)


  2007 2006
Equity of Canada, beginning of year
(245,424)
(284,651)
Net cost of operations
(770,400)
(549,442)
Current year appropriation used (Note 3)

1,056,436

880,780
Revenue not available for spending
(432,457)
(521,009)
Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund (Note 3c)
(2,832)
(2,698)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 13)
237,160
231,596
Equity of Canada, end of year
(157,517)
(245,424)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these statements.

Citizenship & Immigration Canada
Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)


  2007 2006
OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net cost of operations
770,400
549,442
Non-cash items:
Services provided without charge by other government departments

(237,160)

(231,596)
Amortization of tangible capital assets
(8,207)
(7,994)
Loss on disposal of tangible capital assets
(61)
(2,554)
Statement of financial position adjustments
Decrease in liabilities

38,517

25,130
Increase (decrease) in accounts receivable and advances
9,111
(11,526)
Decrease in loans
(1,577)
(2,004)
Increase in inventories and prepayments
2,378
1,300
Cash used by operating activities
573,401
320,198
CAPITAL INVESTMENT ACTIVITIES
Acquisitions of tangible capital assets
47,746
36,875
Cash used by capital investment activities
47,746
36,875
FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Net cash provided by Government of Canada
(621,147)
(357,073)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these statements.

Citizenship & Immigration Canada
Notes to the Financial Statements (unaudited)

1. Authority and Objectives

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) was established on June 23, 1994 by the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act. It is a Department named in Schedule I of the Financial Administration Act and currently reports to Parliament through the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

The Department’s key strategic outcomes are:

  • maximum contribution to Canada’s economic, social and cultural development from migration;
  • reflection of Canadian values and interests in the management of international migration, including refugee protection; and
  • successful integration of newcomers and promotion of Canadian citizenship.

These three strategic outcomes are reflected with the following key activities.

  • Immigration program: Design, develop and implement policies and programs to facilitate the entry of permanent residents in a way which maximizes their economic, social and cultural contributions to Canada while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians.
  • Temporary resident program: Design, develop and implement policies and programs to facilitate the entry of temporary workers, students and visitors in a way which maximizes their economic, social and cultural contribution to Canada while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians.
  • Canada’s role in international migration and protection: Assert Canada’s position in the context of international migration to influence the international agenda on migration and protection.
  • Refugee program: Maintain Canada’s humanitarian tradition by protecting refugees and persons in need of protection in Canada and abroad.
  • Integration program: Develop policies and programs to support the settlement, resettlement, adaptation and integration of newcomers into Canadian society by delivering orientation, adaptation and language programs for newcomers.
  • Citizenship program: Design, develop and implement policies and programs to administer the acquisition of Canadian citizenship and to enhance the values and promote the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

CIC administers the Citizenship Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA).

CIC is funded by a budgetary lapsing authority. Revenues, including fees and rights, are deposited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund and are not available for use by the Department. Fees and rights are collected through the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations as well as through the Citizenship Regulations. Employee benefits are authorized by a statutory authority. CIC issues immigration loans through a non-budgetary non-lapsing authority.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

(a) Parliamentary appropriations – the Department is financed by the Government of Canada through Parliamentary appropriations. Appropriations provided to the Department do not parallel financial reporting according to Canadian generally accepted accounting principles since appropriations are primarily based on cash-flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the statement of operations and the statement of financial position are not necessarily the same as those provided through appropriations from Parliament. Note 3 provides a high level reconciliation between the bases of reporting.

(b) Net Cash Provided by Government – The Department operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by the Department is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by the Department are paid from the CRF. The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements, including transactions between departments of the federal government.

(c) Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund is the difference between the net cash provided by Government and appropriations used in a year, excluding the amount of non-respendable revenue recorded by the Department. It results from timing differences between when a transaction affects appropriations and when it is processed through the CRF.

(d) Revenues

  • Revenues from regulatory fees are recognized in the accounts based on the services provided in the year.
  • Other revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event occurred that gave rise to the revenues.
  • Revenues that have been received but not yet earned are recorded as deferred revenues. The recognition of revenues from fees is considered deferred until the application is processed, while the recognition of revenues from rights (right of citizenship and right of permanent residence) is deferred until the right is granted.

(e) Expenses – Expenses are recorded on the accrual basis.

  • Grants are recognized in the year in which the conditions for payment are met.
  • Contributions are recognized in the year in which the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or fulfilled the terms of a contractual transfer agreement.
  • Vacation pay and compensatory leave are expensed as the benefits accrue to employees under their respective terms of employment.
  • Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, workers’ compensation costs, legal services and international immigration services are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.

(f) Employee future benefits

i. Pension benefits: Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multiemployer plan administered by the Government of Canada. The Department’s contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan. Current legislation does not require the Department to make contributions for any actuarial deficiencies of the Plan.

ii. Severance benefits: Employees are entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment. These benefits are accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.

(g) Accounts and loans receivables are stated at amounts expected to be ultimately realized; a provision is made for receivables where recovery is considered uncertain. Loans that cannot be recovered are written off after receiving Parliamentary approval in accordance with the Debt Write-off Regulations.

(h) Contingent liabilities – Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities that may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

(i) Inventories – Inventories consist of forms and equipment held for future program delivery and not intended for resale. They are valued at cost.

(j) Foreign currency transactions – Transactions involving foreign currencies are translated into Canadian dollar equivalents using rates of exchange in effect at the time of those transactions. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in a foreign currency are translated into Canadian dollars using the rate of exchange in effect on March 31. Gains and losses resulting from foreign currency transactions are included in other revenues and other expenses in notes 4 and 5.

(k) Tangible capital assets – All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost.

Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:


Asset Class   Amortization Period
Machinery and equipment   15 years
Informatics hardware 5 years
Purchased software 7 years
Furniture and other 10 years
Motor vehicles 8 years
Leasehold
improvements
Lesser of remaining term of the lease or
useful life of the improvement
Asset under construction Once in service, in accordance with asset type

(l) Measurement uncertainty – The preparation of these financial statements in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the financial statements. At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. The most significant items where estimates are used are contingent liabilities, the liability for employee severance benefits, the useful life of tangible capital assets and deferred revenues. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management’s estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the financial statements in the year they become known.

3. Parliamentary appropriations

CIC receives all of its funding through annual Parliamentary appropriations. Items recognized in the statement of operations and the statement of financial position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary appropriations in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, the Department has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables.

(a) Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year appropriations used.


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Net cost of operations
770,400
549,442
Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations
but not affecting appropriations

 

 
Add (Less) :    
Revenue not available for spending
432,457
521,009
Services provided without charge by
other government departments
(237,160)
(231,596)
Refunds of previous year’s revenues
53,895
12,306
Amortization of tangible capital assets
(8,207)
(7,994)
Employee severance benefits
(5,079)
(5,101)
Inventory consumed in operations
(1,678)
(3,956)
Vacation pay and compensatory leave
(1,182)
1,663
Other
3,217
4,232
 
Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations
but affecting appropriations
   
Add (Less):    
Acquisition of tangible capital assets
47,746
36,875
Inventory purchased and prepayments
4,283
5,601
Non-budgetary loans
(2,191)
(1,672)
Other
(65)
(29)
Current year appropriations used
1,056,436
880,780

(b) Appropriations provided and used


  Appropriations provided
  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Vote 1 – Operating expenditures
489,636
428,908
Vote 2a – Write-off of loans

987

0
Vote 5 – Grants and Contributions
598,704
429,405
Statutory amounts
94,607
53,856
Less:
Lapsed Vote 1: Operating expenditures
(49,377)
(18,430)
Lapsed Vote 2a: Write-off of loans
(9)
0
Lapsed Vote 5: Grants and Contributions
(75,898)
(11,279)
Lapsed: Proceeds from disposal of Crown assets
(8)
0
Non-budgetary item
(2,191)
(1,672)
Appropriations available for future years
(15)
(8)
Current year appropriations used
1,056,436
880,780

c) Reconciliation of net cash provided by Government to current year appropriations used


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Net cash provided by Government
621,147
357,073
Revenue not available for spending

432,457

521,009
 
Change in net position in the Consolidated Revenue Fund
Refunds of previous years’ revenues
53,895
0
Variation in accounts receivable and advances
(9,111)
11,526
Variation in accounts payable and accrued liabilities
3,053
7,233
Variation in deferred revenue
(47,831)
(38,220)
Other
2,826
22,159
Subtotal
2,832
2,698
Current year appropriations used
1,056,436
880,780

4. Expenses
The following table presents details of expenses by category.


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Transfer payments
Other level of governments within Canada

276,722

234,215
Non-profit organizations
211,483
152,591
Individuals
33,164
30,063
Other countries and international organizations
1,436
1,256
Refund of previous year transfer payments
(2,474)
(3,138)
Total transfer payments
520,331
414,987
 
Operating expenses
Salaries and employee benefits
459,195
431,445
Professional and special services
124,938
129,327
Accommodation
29,998
28,894
Transportation and communications
25,372
21,739
Repairs and maintenance
6,421
12,990
Utilities, materials and supplies
16,037
12,125
Amortization of tangible capital assets
8,207
7,994
Information services
3,832
3,239
Rentals of equipment
6,779
2,362
Other
1,747
5,349
Total operating expenses
682,526
655,464
Total expenses
1,202,857
1,070,451
 
Detail of transfer payments
Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration
193,893
188,353
Language instruction for newcomers to Canada
122,288
93,561
Contributions to provinces
82,829
48,975
Immigrant settlement and adaptation
70,208
42,900
Resettlement assistance
44,128
39,754
Host program
5,023
3,326
Grant for the Institute for Canadian Citizenship
3,000
0
International Organization for Migration
1,075
1,012
Migration policy development
361
244
Refund of previous year transfer payments
(2,474)
(3,138)
Total
520,331
414,987

5. Revenues
The following table presents details of revenues by category.


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Immigration service fees
315,066
292,366
Right of permanent residence
70,266
158,774
Citizenship service fees
27,249
37,359
Right of citizenship
19,011
31,561
Interest on loans
734
799
Other
131
150
Total
432,457
521,009

6. Accounts receivable and Advances
The following table presents details of accounts receivable and advances.


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Receivables from other federal government departments and agencies
17,887
10,131
Receivables from external parties
4,746
3,352
Advances to employees
161
240
Less: allowance for doubtful accounts on external receivables
(177)
(217)
Total
22,617
13,506

7. Loans
In accordance with the IRPA, CIC can issue immigration loans up to a maximum of $110,000 000. Since February 28, 1995, all immigration loans bear interest at a rate determined by the Minister of Finance at the beginning of each calendar year. Regulations provide for a period of up to 7 years for the repayment of the loans. The interest rate on oustanding interest-bearing loans varies between 3.56% and 10.842% Allowance for doubtful accounts is made for loans when recovery is considered uncertain.


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Immigration loans
38,080
40,271
Less: Allowance for doubtful collection
(3,673)
(4,287)
Total
34,407
35,984

 


  (in thousands of dollars)
Aging Number of loans Capital Interest Total
0 to 1 year
4,278
11,146
0
11,146
1 to 2 years
3,398
7,932
3
7,935
2 to 3 years
2,603
5,015
9
5,024
3 to 4 years
2,155
3,688
39
3,727
4 to 5 years
1,159
1,727
45
1,772
5 to 6 years
813
1,467
86
1,553
6 to 7 years
599
1,328
140
1,468
7 years and over
2,079
4,584
871
5,455
TOTAL
17,084
36,887
1,193
38,080

 


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Opening balance
40,271
41,943
New loans (including accrued interest)
13,049
13,574
Repayments
(14,270)
(15,246)
Write-off
(970)
0
Closing balance
38,080
40,271

There were no write-offs in 2005-2006 as no Supplementary Estimates were approved by Parliament

8. Tangible Capital Assets


(in thousands of dollars) COST   ACCUMULATED AMORTIZATION
Capital asset class Opening Acquisitions Disposals
and write-offs
Closing   Opening
balance
Amortization Disposals
and write-offs
Closing
balance
2007
Net book
value
2006
Net book
value
Machinery and equipment
1,810
124
0
1,934
 
620
121
0
741
1,193
1,190
Informatics hardware
29,553
1,239
2,187
28,605
19,870
4,766
2,184
22,452
6,153
9,683
Purchased software
20,053
234
110
20,177
4,787
1,982
109
6,660
13,517
15,266
Furniture & other
835
305
20
1,120
238
93
20
311
809
597
Motor vehicles
985
163
160
988
515
111
103
523
465
470
Leasehold improvements
7,428
5,939
0
13,367
2,216
1,134
0
3,350
10,017
5,212
Assets under construction
152,398
39,742
0
192,140
0
0
0
0
192,140
152,398
Total
213,062
47,746
2,477
258,331
28,246
8,207
2,416
34,037
224,294
184,816

Amortization expenses for the year ended March 31, 2007 is $8,207 (2006, $7,994)

9. Deferred revenue
The deferred revenue account was established to record fees and rights derived from the Citizenship Act and Regulations and the IRPA and Regulations where the service has yet to be provided or the right granted.


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Opening balance
282,876
337,958
Payments received
180,345
210,347
Revenue recognized
(184,507)
(265,429)
Remissions – reduction of the right of permament residence
(43,669)
0
Closing balance
235,045
282,876

10. Employee Benefits
(a) Pension benefits: The Department’s employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Qubec Pension Plans benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the employees and the Department contribute to the cost of the Plan. The 2006-2007 expense amounts to $29,867,771 ($30,569,614 in 2005-2006), which represents approximately 2.2 times the contributions by employees (2.6 in 2005-2006).

The Department’s responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan’s sponsor.

(b) Severance benefits: The Department provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre funded. Benefits will be paid from future appropriations. Information about the severance benefits, measured as at March 31, is as follows:


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year
46,555
41,454
Expense for the year
9,461
8,746
Benefits paid during the year
(4,382)
(3,645)
Accrued benefit obligation, end of year
51,634
46,555

11. Contingent liabilities

Claims and litigation
Claims have been made against the Department in the normal course of operations. As at March 31, 2007, no significant liability is expected to result from these claims. However, some potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded in
the financial statements.

12. Contractual obligations
The nature of the Department’s activities can result in some large multi year contracts and obligations whereby the Department will be obligated to make future payments when the services/goods are received. Significant contractual obligations that can be reasonably estimated are summarized as follows:


(in thousands of dollars) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
and after
Total
Transfer payments

325,000

338,000
338,000
338,000
338,000
1,677,000
Operating expenditures
2,200
2,300
2,300
2,200
2,000
11,000
Total
327,200
340,300
340,300
340,200
340,000
1,688,000

13. Related party transactions
The Department is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies, and Crown corporations. The Department enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms. Also, during the year, the Department received services that were obtained without charge from other government departments as presented in part (a).

(a) Services provided without charge by other government departments

During the year, the Department received, without charge from other departments, accommodation, legal fees and the employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans. Additionally, the Department received international immigration services from Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), staff and facilities at missions abroad. These services without charge have been recognized in the Department’s Statement of Operations as follows.


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Accommodation
29,998
28,894
Employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans
20,316
18,565
Workers’ compensation costs
143
140
Legal services
38,703
38,797
International immigration services
148,000
145,200
Total
237,160
231,596

The Government has structured some of its administrative activities for efficiency and cost-effectiveness purposes so that one Department performs these on behalf of all without charge. The costs of these services, which include payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada are not included as an expense in the Department’s Statement of Operations.

(b) Payables and receivables outstanding at year-end with related parties


  2007 2006
  (in thousands of dollars)
Accounts receivable – other government departments and agencies

11,361

8,386
Accounts payable – other government departments and agencies
5,960
8,960

14. Other liabilities
The Immigrant Investor Program allows qualified immigrants to gain permanent residence in Canada by making an investment of $400,000 in the Canadian economy. The investment is returned to the investor, without interest, five years and two months after payment.

After meeting other immigration requirements, applicants are then required to pay their $400,000 investment to the Receiver General for Canada. CIC acts as an agent for the approved provincial funds by collecting the investments and distributing them to the approved funds according to a prescribed allocation formula (50 percent divided equally and 50 percent distributed according to provincial gross domestic product). The investment is distributed to the participating provinces and territories (Ontario, British Columbia, Prince Edward Island, Northwest Territories, Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador) on the first day of the second month following receipt from the investor.

The participating provinces and territories are responsible for investing their allocations to strengthen their economies and to create or continue employment. They report to CIC quarterly, and after the five-year holding period, remit the $400,000 investment back to CIC. CIC, within 30 days of receipt of the $400,000 from the participating funds, returns the $400,000 investment to the investor (without interest).

The value of financial transactions processed during the year is as follows.


(in thousands of dollars) April 1, 2006 Receipts and
other credits
Payments
and other
charges
March 31, 2007
Immigrant Investor program
28,000
579,116
583,116
24,000

Table 12: Response to Parliamentary Committees, Audits and Evaluations

Response to Parliamentary Committees

Report 4: Immediate Moratorium on Deportations of All Undocumented Workers

The Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration recommended that the government place an immediate moratorium on deportations of all undocumented workers and their families who pass security and criminality checks while a new immigration policy is put in place.

The Government of Canada’s response can be found at the following link:
http://cmte.parl.gc.ca/cmte/CommitteePublication.aspx?SourceId=210586

Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)
OAG – Large Information Technology Projects

The OAG carried out an examination of large information technology projects across the federal government. Seven projects, including the GCMS, were examined. The OAG noted that GCMS was reasonably well managed but improvements were needed in the areas of governance and organizational capacity.

Additional information can be found at the following OAG link:
www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/domino/reports.nsf/html/20061103ce.html/$file/20061103ce.pdf

External Audits (Other external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.)

N/A

Internal Audits and Evaluations

INTERNAL AUDITS

Annex 13 of the 2006-2007 Reports on Plans and Priorities indicated that the Internal Audit and Accountability Branch was in the process of developing a risk based audit plan for 2006-2009 as indicated in TBS’s new Internal Audit Policy. The risk-based audit plan was developed and approved by the Audit Committee in November 2006.

Audits completed in 2006-2007

Audit of the Bucharest Immigration Program
www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/audit/bucharest.asp

Audit of the Designated Medical Practitioner Management Control Framework
www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/audit/dmp.asp

Audit of the Immigrant Settlement and Adaptation Program and the HOST Contribution Program
www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/audit/isap-host.asp

Audit of the Seoul Immigration Program
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/audit/seoul.asp

Audit of Immigration – Contribution Accountability Measurement System (iCAMS)
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/audit/icams.asp

Audits that were started in 2006-2007 and completed in 2007-2008
These audits will be presented at the next Audit Committee meeting (Summer 2007):

  • Audit of the Buenos Aires Immigration Program
  • Audit of the Caracas Immigration Program

EVALUATIONS

Results-Based Management and Accountability Frameworks (RMAF) and Evaluation Frameworks completed in 2006-2007

Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA)
Enhanced Language Training (ELT)
Foreign Students – Off-Campus Employment Program
Foreign Students – Post-Graduate Employment Program

Participated in the following horizontal RMAFs

Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Program
2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games
Canada’s Action Plan Against Racism

Evaluations and reviews completed in 2006-2007

Metropolis Review
Formative Evaluation of Official Languages in Minority Communities Initiative
Summative Evaluation of the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program

Several major studies are also currently underway. Due to insufficient data, the planned Skilled Workers formative evaluation was not undertaken, but is tentatively scheduled to begin in 2007-2008.

Table 13: Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS)


Points to Address Departmental Input
1. What are the key goals, objectives, and/or long-term targets of the SDS?

Goal I – Minimize the negative environmental impacts of departmental operations.

Goal II – Promote awareness of sustainable development principles and objectives among departmental staff, clients and stakeholders.

Goal III – Support sociocultural sustainability.

Goal IV – Promote accountability and ensure compliance.

2. How do your key goals, objectives, and/or long-term targets help achieve your Department’s strategic outcomes?

Sustainable development consists of finding a balance between the economic and social needs of Canadians and the need to protect the environment. This principle is based on elements founded on values such as fairness and quality of life, as well as on integrated decision making.

Since CIC’s strategic outcomes are focused on the economic, social and cultural development of Canada; on sharing Canadian values with the international community; and on the integration of newcomers into Canadian society, CIC’s sustainable development goals are designed to support all of these aspects.

Goal I aims to take into account an important Canadian value, protecting the environment, in the management of the immigration process. Goal II focuses on providing all those involved in the immigration process (employees, stakeholders and clients) with the opportunity to obtain the knowledge that will help them to participate in Canada’s progress toward sustainable development. Goals I and II both contribute to the economic, social and cultural development of the country.

Goal III involves the Department’s paying special attention to the sociocultural aspect of sustainable development. In the long term, this will help CIC achieve its third strategic outcome.

Goal IV focuses on the smooth progress of the Department’s sustainable development program, which will support the other three goals.

3. What were your targets for the reporting period?

Only four targets in the SDS that CIC tabled in Parliament in February 2004 have to be reached in 2006-2007. Most of the other activities in the strategy were to be implemented in 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 and continued in subsequent years.

2006-2007 targets:

1.1.1. Develop an overarching resource reduction strategy that will cover the following management areas: Fleet, Facilities Procurement and related issues.

1.1.2 As a part of the overarching resource reduction strategy, prepare a section that will cover information technology (IT) equipment and related issues.

1.2.10 Use 10 percent ethanol (minimum) fuel for CIC vehicles.

2.1.9 Grow support for resource reduction strategy above (Objective 1.1). Highlight the role of physical and other measures in contributing both tangible and intangible benefits (i.e., attitudes toward change).

4. What is your progress to date?

Activities 1.1.1, 1.1.2 and 2.1.9
These three activities are related. CIC does not have a detailed document outlining a resource reduction strategy for the Department. However, the following practices have been adopted.

1. Since April 1, 2005, CIC has been implementing The Way Forward, a wide-ranging strategy led by Public Works and Government Services Canada that aims to improve how the Government of Canada does business, particularly by greening its operations.

2. In 2006-2007, CIC staffed a position in Procurement and Contracting Services to implement green procurement at the national level.

3. To ensure maximum use of IT resources, CIC does not replace any equipment because of age alone. All IT equipment is used as long as possible before it is replaced. In Canada, CIC sends all surplus IT equipment to the Computers for Schools Program for reuse. Overseas missions sell their surplus equipment locally at auction. Servers are kept much longer than five years, and when they are upgraded, older servers are redeployed to smaller sites or are used for development and testing. Spare parts are kept on hand so that malfunctioning equipment can be repaired rather than replaced.

4. CIC recycles empty plastic printer ink cartridges, which vendors now take back for reuse.

Activity 1.2.10
CIC’s National Headquarters issued a directive to all CIC drivers stipulating that vehicles be fueled up only in service stations that offer ethanol fuel, if possible.

5. What adjustments have you made, if any? (To better set the context for this information, discuss how lessons learned have influenced your adjustments.)

The changes that CIC has made to its sustainable development strategy are outlined in the fourth edition of the strategy, which was tabled in Parliament on December 13, 2006.

In SDS IV, CIC’s approach to sustainable development will be focused on areas where it is felt that the Department can make a tangible difference. In the coming years, CIC will concentrate on building capacity in the Department through training and communications, and through preparing Strategic Environmental Assessments of its policy, plan and program proposals to ensure that all three pillars of sustainable development are factored into them.

CIC will also tighten its guidelines and procedures for documenting its management system and will work with senior management to integrate sustainable development considerations into decision making.

Lastly, instead of adopting a departmental resource reduction policy, each branch will be encouraged to create its own green plan. Best practices will be circulated throughout the Department. In this way, CIC hopes to establish a true culture of change among its employees.


Table 14: Client-Centred Service

CIC’s Service Improvement Office is a member of the interdepartmental working group on service standards chaired by TBS. The working group has developed a policy and directives on services and standards which should be approved in the fall of 2007. In anticipation of the adoption of the policy and directives, CIC has developed a plan of action, that includes developing an inventory of CIC services, defining service standards and evaluation procedures, and communicating information to the public and staff — all with the intent of respecting the policy’s time frames once adopted.

Table 15: Travel Policies

CIC adheres to the TBS Special Travel Authorities and the TBS Travel Directive, including rates and allowances.