Guidance on Implementing the Standard on Web Usability

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Preface

This document assists Government of Canada departments by providing tools, solutions and guidance to advance Web usability. It is a supporting document to be read in conjunction with the Standard on Web Usability.

The Guidance on Implementing the Standard on Web Usability provides direction to Senior Departmental Officials, Chief Information Officers, Heads of Communications, Web Managers, Web functional specialists and Centres of Expertise on their respective roles and responsibilities.

In particular, Senior Departmental Officials (SDOs) are responsible for overseeing and monitoring the implementation of the direction set forward in the Standard on Web Usability (Standard), including specific SDO deliverables contained therein, and ensuring the timelines in the Standard are met.

The Standard on Web Usability is one of three new Web standards that replace the Common Look and Feel (CLF) 2.0 Standards, the others being the Standard on Web Accessibility and the Standard on Web Interoperability.

Section 1: Introduction - Purpose

The Guidance on Implementing the Standard on Web Usability is a companion piece to the Standard on Web Usability (Standard) by providing details on implementing the Standard over a two year period; roles and responsibilities; approaches and mechanisms for use by Senior Departmental Officials (SDOs), Chief Information Officers (CIOs), Heads of Communications, Web Managers, functional specialists and Centres of Expertise. This document supports the Government of Canada's (GC) commitment to Web usability and a client-centred approach for developing websites (including Web applications). This document is intended to be read in its entirety.

Background

In May 2000, the Treasury Board approved the first set of GC Web standards, known as the Common Look and Feel 1.0 or "CLF 1.0". CLF 1.0 was intended to strengthen the identity, presence, visibility and accessibility of the GC online to support a client-centred approach.

In December 2006, CLF 1.0 was replaced by "CLF 2.0" to reflect best practices, and, based on consultations, to build collectively on what had been learned by implementing CLF 1.0 across GC websites (including Web applications). CLF 2.0 came into effect on January 1, 2007. It applied to new GC websites (including Web applications) introduced as of that date, but allowed for a two year implementation timeline for websites (including Web applications) already in existence; these websites (including Web applications) had to be compliant by December 31, 2008.

The Secretary of the Treasury Board announced in January 2010 that the existing CLF 2.0 Standards would be updated. The CLF Standards would be replaced by three new standards: the Standard on Web Accessibility, the Standard on Web Usability, and the Standard on Web Interoperability. This signalled, as it pertained to the Standard on Web Usability, the GC's intent to make it easier for individuals and businesses to find and utilize information and services on GC websites (including Web applications).

Section 2: The Standard on Web Usability - A New Approach

The Standard defines Web usability as:

the extent to which specified users can find, understand and utilize information and services online. Web usability can be measured through the effectiveness and efficiency with which users can complete defined tasks online.

The objective of the Standard is to ensure a high level of Web usability on GC websites (including Web applications). The Standard applies to all departments listed in Schedules I, I.1, and II of the Financial Administration Act (FAA).

User-Centred Design

Usability is contextual to the website's purpose and its intended audience. The use of best practices such as those defined in User-Centred Design (UCD) are recommended. Some of these best practices include the following:

  1. Focus on users and tasks
    • Determine the existing or expected users;
    • Identify their key requirements; and
    • Identify the context in which users will be using the website or Web application.
  2. Measure ease of use empirically
    • Identify how success will be measured; and
    • Measure throughout the Web development lifecycle
  3. Modify websites (including Web applications)
    • Based on empirical measurement; and
    • Make changes taking into consideration feedback, technical constraints, and operational and business considerations.

Mechanisms to help achieve the above can be obtained from the various means listed in the "Listening and Evaluating" section of the Communications Policy.

Domain Names

The Standard requires all Government of Canada websites to follow the requirements for domain names listed in Appendix B. In addition to using at least one of the domain name formats listed in requirements 1.2.1 and 1.2.2, departments may also implement bilingual hyphenated names or acronyms. For example, www.pco-bcp.gc.ca, www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca or www.jeunesse-youth.gc.ca/. These domain names are required to meet sections 1.4, 1.5, and 1.6 in Appendix B of the Standard.

Web Page Layout and Design Elements

The Standard on Web Usability mandates a basic structure for Web page layout and design elements. The basic structure for the Web page also facilitates the application of GC visual elements and identifiers.

The Federal Identity Program (FIP) is responsible for prescribing the visual elements and identifiers across all GC websites (including Web applications). Visual elements and identifiers include such things as the Canada Wordmark, FIP signature, maple leaf symbols, the background and colours. The visual elements and identifiers are not included in the Standard on Web Usability, but are available on the FIP section of the TBS Website.

Figure 1 provides a high-level summary of the layout and design elements that are mandated in the Standard on Web Usability as well as identifying the GC visual elements and identifiers that are prescribed by FIP. Please note additional requirements for website and Web page notices, and Web addresses are not included in Figure 1 and can be referenced in the Standard on Web Usability.

Figure 1: Summary of Layout and Design Elements
Figure 1: Summary of Layout and Design Elements is a wireframe image depicting the mandatory elements as described in the preceding text.

Site Elements (Mandated by Standard on Web Usability)

  1. Site title (Link to home)
  2. Official language selection link
  3. Breadcrumbs
  4. Search
  5. Government priorities (on departmental site home page)
  6. Date modified
  7. About us
  8. News
  9. Contact us
  10. Stay connected
  11. Terms and conditions
  12. Transparency

GC Visual Elements and Identifiers (Prescribed by Federal Identity Program)

  1. Favicon
  2. Federal Identity Program signature
  3. Government of Canada navigation bar
  4. Banner
  5. Canada Wordmark
  6. Site navigation bar
  7. Page background
  8. Site footer
  9. Government of Canada footer

Visual elements and identifiers include such things as the Canada Wordmark, FIP signature, maple leaf symbols, the background and colours.

Web Page Areas

The GC visual elements and identifiers, are prescribed by FIP and are incorporated in the following areas: Government of Canada navigation bar, banner area, background, site footer and Government of Canada footer.

In addition, departments have a degree of flexibility within other mandatory areas of the Web page basic structure. These include: site navigation bar, breadcrumbs area, content area, date modified area and site footer. For example:

  • Departments can control the content area, with the exception of departmental site home pages where a section is reserved for government priorities;
  • Departments can determine factors such as the content of the site navigation bar; and
  • Departments can determine whether to add additional links to the site footer.

Figure 2 provides an illustration of these mandatory areas.

Figure 2: Summary of mandatory areas of the Web page basic structure
Figure 2: Summary of mandatory areas of the Web page basic structure identifies the following areas where departments have a degree of flexibility as described in the preceding text.

Use of Social Media Icons

Departments can use the social media icons for the following sites: Twitter and YouTube. To do so, an approval process must be followed. Details regarding the approval process are included in the social media procurement process page on GCPEDIA. The guidance in this section will be updated when further information becomes available.

Implementation

The Standard requires that all public-facing GC websites (including Web applications) be compliant by July 31, 2013.

While the visual elements and identifiers as prescribed by FIP may change in the future, the layout of Web pages is expected to remain the same.

Departments are encouraged, where appropriate, to comply simultaneously with both the Standard on Web Accessibility and Standard on Web Usability, for example, by pursuing a "one-touch" approach. This may help departments to reduce resources required to comply with both Standards.

The Web Standards Office supports departmental implementation of the new layout and design by providing the Web Experience Toolkit that complies with both the Standard on Web Usability and the Standard on Web Accessibility. The Web Experience Toolkit includes ready-made tools and solutions for building and maintaining innovative websites that are accessible, usable, and interoperable.

Monitoring of compliance to the Standard on Web Usability will take place through various mechanisms, such as the Management Accountability Framework (MAF). Additional information on compliance monitoring will be provided at a later date.

Section 3: Guidance for Senior Departmental Officials (SDOs)

The Senior Departmental Official (SDO) is responsible for supporting their deputy head in overseeing the implementation and monitoring of the Standard on Web Usability within their department. The following outlines SDO responsibilities and provides a series of recommendations.

SDOs must:

  • Oversee the implementation and ongoing compliance with the Standard on Web Usability within their department. This may include:
    • Coordinating and overseeing the Web usability activities of the Chief Information Officer (CIO), the Heads of Communications, and content owners;
    • Putting in place a department-wide Web governance mechanism to monitor progress on the department's Web management, performance, and conformance to the Standard on Web Usability.
  • Bring to the deputy head's attention any significant difficulties in implementing the Standard on Web Usability;
  • Identify and address compliance and or performance issues in Web Usability.
  • Report to the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) on performance issues, including through compliance reporting.
  • Encourage personnel who report to him/her to collaborate in interdepartmental working groups to address implementation priorities related to the Standard through the development of guidelines and tools.

To facilitate implementation of the Standard on Web Usability, SDOs may wish to consider the following recommendations:

  • Integrate requirements from the Standard on Web Usability, including usability best practices, into departmental Web development processes.
  • Ensure that appropriate accountability mechanisms are in place to support the department's efforts in complying with the Standard on Usability.
  • Provide training and learning opportunities for Web managers and functional specialists on developing websites (including Web applications) that comply with the Standard on Web Usability.
  • Reduce the redundant, outdated and trivial content on the department's websites (including Web applications).

Checklist for Senior Departmental Officials (SDOs)

In implementing the Standard on Web Usability have you:

  • Overseen the implementation and ongoing compliance with the Standard on Web Usability within their department?
  • Brought to the deputy head's attention any significant difficulties in implementing the Standard on Web Usability?
  • Identified and addressed compliance and or performance issues in Web Usability?
  • Reported to the Treasury Board Secretariat on performance issues, including through compliance reporting?
  • Encouraging personnel who report to you to collaborate in interdepartmental working groups to address implementation priorities related to the Standard through the development of guidelines and tools?

Considered:

  • Integrating requirements from the Standard on Web Usability, including usability best practices, into departmental Web development processes?
  • Ensuring that appropriate accountability mechanisms are in place to support the department's efforts in complying with the Standard on Usability?
  • Providing training and learning opportunities for Web managers and functional specialists on developing websites (including Web applications) that comply with the Standard on Web Usability?
  • Reducing the redundant, outdated and trivial content on the department's websites (including Web applications)?

Section 4: Guidance to Chief Information Officers (CIOs)

This section outlines the roles and responsibilities of the department's Chief Information Officer (CIO) or equivalent related to implementing the Standard on Web Usability in the area of software and systems, and websites (including Web applications).

CIOs must:

  • Ensure that Web pages (of websites including Web applications) for which they are responsible comply with the Standard on Web Usability by July 31, 2013.
  • Ensure that software and systems acquired by the department enable websites (including Web applications) to meet the requirements of the Standard, or are modifiable to enable websites (including Web applications) to meet the requirements of the Standard. Examples of software and systems may include content management systems or authoring tools.
  • Encourage personnel who report to him/her to collaborate in interdepartmental working groups to address implementation priorities related to the Standard through the development of guidelines and tools.

CIOs should support the SDO by considering the following guidance for activities and deliverables for which they are responsible:

  • Integrate requirements from the Standard on Web Usability, including usability best practices, into departmental Web development processes.
  • Ensure Web development processes, software and systems are able to adapt to user feedback and changes in technology.
  • Ensure that staff under their responsibility have the knowledge and expertise necessary to comply with the Standard on Web Usability.
  • Reduce redundant, outdated and trivial Web applications.

For relevant legislation, policies, publications and other Web related references, consult Appendix B.

Checklist for Chief Information Officers (CIOs)

In implementing the Standard on Web Usability have you:

  • Ensured that Web pages (of websites including Web applications) for which they are responsible comply with the Standard on Web Usability by July 31, 2013?
  • Ensured that software and systems acquired by the department enable websites (including Web applications) to meet the requirements of the Standard, or are modifiable to enable websites (including Web applications) to meet the requirements of the Standard. Examples of software and systems may include content management systems or authoring tools?
  • Encouraged personnel who report to you to collaborate in interdepartmental working groups to address implementation priorities related to the Standard through the development of guidelines and tools?

Considered:

  • Integrating requirements from the Standard on Web Usability, including usability best practices, into departmental Web development processes?
  • Ensuring Web development processes and project management lifecycles are able to adapt to user feedback and changes in technology?
  • Ensuring that staff under their responsibility have the knowledge and expertise necessary to comply with the Standard on Web Usability?
  • Reducing redundant, outdated and trivial Web applications?

Section 5: Guidance for Heads of Communications

This section outlines the roles and responsibilities of the department's Head of Communications or equivalent related to implementing the Standard on Web Usability in the area of Web content.

Heads of Communications must:

  • Ensure that Web pages (of websites including Web applications) for which they are responsible comply with the Standard on Web Usability by July 31, 2013.
  • Encourage personnel who report to him/her to collaborate in interdepartmental working groups to address implementation priorities related to the Standard through the development of guidelines and tools.
  • Ensure all domain names are approved for use in consultation with Privy Council Office.
  • Ensure that links to Government priorities are approved for placement on departmental site home pages in consultation with Privy Council Office.
  • Ensure that goals, content owners and target audiences are identified for each of the department's websites.
  • Ensure that GC visual elements and identifiers are applied on websites as prescribed by FIP.

Heads of Communications should support their SDO by considering the following guidance for activities and deliverables for which they are responsible:

  • The Head of Communications should consider putting in place a department-wide process to oversee the creation and decommissioning of website domain names. Where possible, Heads of Communications should decrease the number of domain names managed by the department.
  • Oversee the development and implementation of the recommended secondary navigation structures and information architecture for the department's website.
  • Ensure that staff under their responsibility have the required knowledge and expertise needed to comply with the Standard on Web Usability.
  • Ensure that all Web content published on the department's website is written in plain language and is tailored to the target audience (e.g. scientific community).
  • Ensure that documents are formatted for the Web to make them easy to find and use.
  • Incorporate the requirements of the Standard on Web Usability into the business requirements when selecting or procuring new communications technology or contracted services.
  • Ensure ongoing content review and management of redundant, outdated and trivial (ROT) content.

For relevant legislation, policies, publications and other Web related references, consult Appendix B.

Checklist for Heads of Communications

In implementing the Standard on Web Usability have you:

  • Ensured that Web pages (of websites including Web applications) for which they are responsible comply with the Standard on Web Usability by July 31, 2013?
  • Encouraged personnel who report to him/her to collaborate in interdepartmental working groups to address implementation priorities related to the Standard through the development of guidelines and tools?
  • Ensured all domain names are approved for use in consultation with PCO?
  • Ensured that links to Government priorities are approved for placement on departmental site home pages in consultation with PCO?
  • Ensured that goals, content owners and target audiences are identified for each of the department's websites?
  • Ensured that visual elements are applied on websites as prescribed by FIP?

Considered:

  • Putting in place a department-wide process to oversee the creation and decommissioning of website domain names?
  • Overseeing the development and implementation of one of the recommended secondary navigation structures and information architecture for the department's website?
  • Ensuring that staff under their responsibility have the required knowledge and expertise needed to comply with the Standard on Web Usability?
  • Ensuring that all Web content published on the department's website is written in plain language and is tailored to the target audience?
  • Ensuring that documents are formatted for the Web to make them easy to find and use online?
  • Incorporating the requirements of the Standard on Web Usability into the business requirements when selecting or procuring new communications technology or contracted services?
  • Ensuring ongoing content review and management of redundant, outdated and trivial (ROT) content?

Section 6: Guidance for Web managers, functional specialists, and Web content owners

This section outlines the roles and responsibilities of the Web managers, functional specialists, content owners or equivalents related to implementing the Standard on Web Usability. This section is also of interest to Centres of Expertise.

Web managers, functional specialists and Web content owners must:

  • Ensure websites (including Web applications) comply with mandatory requirements described in all appendices of the Standard on Web Usability.
  • Ensure that archived Web pages include an archived content notice.
  • Incorporate usability principles and approaches into the Web development process.

Web managers, functional specialists and Web content owners should consider the best practices described below for activities and deliverables for which they are responsible. Additional guidance will be provided to support functional specialists achieve a high level of usability on GC websites under a separate cover.

Use User-Centred Design process in the Web development process

See User-Centred Design best practices in Section 2 for guidance.

Identify key tasks

Determine how the website supports program objectives by identifying the most popular tasks that users need to complete on the site - such as finding the answer to a question, applying for a grant online or accessing a service. A website's content, how it is organized, and the supporting navigation structure should be designed to enable the completion of these key tasks.

The following tasks are common to all GC website and are related to the mandatory elements in the Standard on Web Usability:

  1. Find contact information of site owner.
  2. Navigate the site in the official language of choice.
  3. Search the website.
  4. Access media products such as press releases.
  5. Find out more information about the department and its mandate.
  6. Stay informed through online newsletters, Web feeds and social media.
  7. Understand the rights and obligations associated with using the site.
  8. Get back to the home page.

Identify the most important tasks on your website and consider removing anything that is no longer relevant or necessary.

Review the site's information architecture

Information architecture is how the information is organized, labelled and navigated. After identifying the key tasks that are most important and removing the redundant, outdated and trivial (ROT) content, site owners may need to re-write and or re-organize the remaining content. Although the Information architecture is not visible on the website, it impacts the overall site experience. Done well, Information architecture makes a site logical and intuitive. Done poorly, Information architecture makes a site seem unnecessarily complicated or devoid of information relevant to the user's goals.

A technique called card sorting can inform site owners as to how users' will expect that information to be organized on the website. Card sorting involves observing users as they sort information into categories. Asking the users to assign a label to this grouping of information can inform what words should be used on in the navigation and content to help site visitors find what they are looking for. There are a number of inexpensive, automated card sorting tools available online.

Information architecture is where information is stored and navigation is how the user finds it. Because users frequently arrive at a website from an external search engine, navigation allows multiple audiences to take different paths to the same information. A good navigation approach focuses on tasks; it does not represent an organizational chart. A horizontal navigation bar is mandatory for the primary navigation structure of all GC websites, according to the Standard on Web Usability. The labels of the navigation bar are within the purview of the site owner. Site owners can also implement one of the recommended secondary navigation structures (mega menu, tabbed menu or combo navigation) to help users find content.

Recommended secondary navigation structures are provided on the Web Standards section of the TBS website.

Use standardized terms for Web pages

The words used for site elements also help or hinder a user's journey to the content they seek. Using consistent terminology also supports the ability to learn how to use government sites. For these reasons, Appendix C includes a list of commonly used terms to support the mandatory elements in the site footer. These labels should not be used elsewhere on a Web page except for the page title and breadcrumb, unless they refer to the same information.

An additional list of terms, prescribed by FIP, is available on the FIP Section of the TBS website.

Update website and Web Page notices if required

Updated requirements are included in the Standard for the terms and conditions. Sample notices will be provided on the Web Standards section of the TBS website.

Prioritize sections or pages of the website for improvement

Web analytics software can be used to identify high traffic pages, which can help departments to prioritize areas on which to focus for the highest impact with site visitors.

Check to see if a solution exists to help improve the site's usability

Check to see if a solution exists already in the Web Experience Toolkit to ensure work is not duplicated. The Web Standards Office will publish a pattern library that has been developed in collaboration with the Web community. These pre-tested designs for common tasks will be made available online and will be supported through the Web Experience Toolkit, which is described in more detail below.

The Web Experience Toolkit (WET)

Build Web pages (of websites including Web applications) using the most recent version of the Web Experience Toolkit (WET). WET is a collection of ready-made tools and solutions for building and maintaining innovative websites (including Web applications) that are accessible, usable, and interoperable.

WET releases were made available to departments in August 2010 and February 2011 and most recently in August 2011. Subsequent releases are planned to be rolled out on a bi-annual basis.

These tools and solutions are open source software and free for use by departments. Examples include:

  • enhanced features for website forms (e.g. contact us forms);
  • display enhancements (e.g. navigation features, toolbars); and
  • personalisation features (e.g. customizable website features, geo-targeting - providing information targeted to the user's location).

WET features are supported by GC interdepartmental working groups.

Benefits of using WET include:

  • Reduce costs using ready-made Web tools and solutions for building and maintaining innovative websites (including Web applications).
  • Decrease website (including Web applications) development times by using a wide range of supported website (including Web applications) layouts and designs.
  • Use existing website (including Web applications) features that respect accessibility (WCAG 2.0 AA and WAI-ARIA), usability, and interoperability.
  • Apply advanced and innovative technologies to push the envelope for website (including Web applications) functionality:
    • HTML5, CSS3, jQuery (JavaScript framework);
    • Ever-growing list of open source plugins and widgets.
  • Use open source software that is free for use by institutions and external Web communities.

Useful Links:

Checklists for managers, functional specialists, and equivalents responsible for websites (including Web Applications)

In implementing the Standard on Web Usability have you:

  • Ensured websites (including Web applications) comply with Appendices of the Standard on Web Usability?
  • Ensured that archived Web pages include an archived content notice?
  • Incorporated usability principles and approaches into the Web development lifecycle?

Considered:

  • Using a User-Centred Design process in their Web development process?
  • Identifying the most important tasks on websites?
  • Reviewing the site's information architecture?
  • Choosing one of the recommended secondary navigation structures to support users' tasks?
  • Using standardized terms for site footer links?
  • Updating website and Web page notices, where required?
  • Prioritizing sections or pages of the website for improvement?
  • Searching the Web Experience Toolkit to see if a solution exists?

Section 7: Conclusion

The Government of Canada (GC) has supported requirements intended to strengthen the identity, presence, visibility and accessibility of the GC online for over a decade with the Common Look and Feel Standards (CLF 1.0) and (CLF 2.0).

As it pertains to the Standard on Web Usability, a new approach is being undertaken to achieve a high level of Web usability on GC websites (including Web applications). A department's execution of the guidance, tools and solutions contained within this document assists with the implementation of the Standard on Web Usability. This is one of the three standards that replace CLF 2.0, including the Standard on Web Accessibility and the forthcoming Standard on Web Interoperability.

Enquiries

Please direct enquiries regarding the Standard on Web Usability and this guidance document to your department's Centres of Expertise (COE). For further interpretation, Centres of Expertise should contact:

Web Standards Office
Chief Information Officer Branch
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Ottawa ON K1A 0R5
E-mail: Webstandards@tbs-sct.gc.ca

Appendix A: Definitions

Archived Web page (page Web archivée)

A Web page that is:

  • maintained for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes;
  • not altered or updated after the date of archiving; and
  • stored in a digital repository.

An archived Web page may be provided on the Web, but must be clearly identified as being archived.

Area immediately below the Government of Canada navigation bar which includes site-specific content such as the site title and the site-specific search.
Behaviour (comportement)
The action, reaction, or functioning of a system, under normal or specified circumstances.
Body (corps)
The body of a Web page is the area between the header and footer which contains page-specific content and may include secondary navigation.
A navigation tool that provides links to the pages above the current page in the website's hierarchy.
A data file sent by a Web server to the Web browser on a user's computer that the Web server uses to remember information about the user. Typically, a cookie will only remember information that a user provides. The data stored within a cookie can only be read by the Web server that originally sent it.
Date modified (Date de modification)
The most recent date on which the Web page content was formally issued, substantially changed or reviewed.
Dimensions (dimensions)
A measure of spatial extent, especially width, height, or length.
Favicon (favoricône)
An icon associated with a website or Web page that may be displayed in the address bar of the browser, next to the page's name in a list of bookmarks, and next to the page's title on a browser tab.
The footer of a Web page is the area at the bottom of the page that contains information that is persistent across a website, such as links to contact information and terms and conditions for the website.
Government of Canada websites (sites Web du gouvernement du Canada)

websites for which the Government of Canada is accountable. The types of websites include departmental sites, initiative sites, sub sites and Web applications. Further definitions about the types of sites are provided below:

Departmental site (site de ministère):
A collection of Web pages that collectively represents the department (e.g., Environment Canada's website).
Initiative site (site d'initiative):
A group of Web pages that collectively represent an initiative of the Government of Canada. Initiative sites frequently have a different domain than the departmental domain (e.g., www.youth.gc.ca is an initiative site).
Sub site (site secondaire):
A group of Web pages within a larger departmental or initiative site, where the collection of Web pages are intended for a particular audience and whose specific purpose is to feature a prominent program or service. Sub sites may have a different sub-domain or domain than their departmental domain (e.g. www.army.forces.gc.ca is a sub site).
Web application (application Web):
A Web application is one or more Web pages that allow users to interact and perform specific transactions.
The header of a Web page is the area at the top of the page that contains information that is persistent across a website, such as the site title, visual identifiers, search, navigation bars, and breadcrumbs.
Home page (page d'accueil)
An entry page to the website. On a bilingual website, it is displayed by selecting a language on the splash page.
Interstitial page (page interstitielle)
Web page displayed before a requested content page that provides information that should be known before proceeding.
Location (position)
A place where something is or could be located.
Presentation (présentation)
The visual representation of something.
Primary domain name (nom de domaine principal)
Domain name that represents the website's primary purpose and is commonly used for website access and identification.
Secondary navigation (navigation secondaire)
Local navigation that helps users to move within a section of a site. Where local navigation is used, access to other sections should also be provided.
Server message page (page de messages du serveur)
A Web page that notifies a user of a problem on the Web server.
Global navigation that helps users to move from section to section across an entire website typically via navigational elements such as links.
Splash page (page d'entrée)
A Web page at the root of a website that offers users the option to select the language of the website.
User-Centred Design (UCD) (conception axée sur l'utilisateur)
User-centred design (UCD) is an iterative process for creating websites that involves the user to ensure the final product is usable by the intended audience.
Web usability (facilité d'emploi des sites Web)
Web usability is the extent to which specified users can find, understand and utilize information and services online. Web usability can be measured through the effectiveness and efficiency with which users can complete defined tasks online.
Web content (contenu Web)

Information and sensory experience to be communicated to the user by means of a user agent, including code or markup that defines the content's structure, presentation, and interactions

(Source: Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, Appendix A: Glossary)

Web page (page Web)

A non-embedded resource obtained from a single Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) using HTTP plus any other resources that are used in the rendering or intended to be rendered together with it by a user agent

Note 1: Although any "other resources" would be rendered together with the primary resource, they would not necessarily be rendered simultaneously with each other.

Note 2: For the purposes of conformance with these guidelines, a resource must be "non-embedded" within the scope of conformance to be considered a Web page.

For further information and examples please consult: Web page, Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, Appendix A: Glossary

Appendix B: Web Related References

Relevant Legislation

Related Policy Instruments and Publications

Appendix C: Standardized terms

Area Element English term French term
Site footer (content page)Hyperlinked text on every Web pageTerms and conditionsAvis
TransparencyTransparence
Hyperlinked titles that may or may not have additional text under them.About usÀ propos de nous
NewsNouvelles
Contact usContactez-nous
Stay connectedRestez branchés
Hyperlinked titles that can be used under the title "About us"Our mandateNotre mandat
The MinisterLe ministre
Organizational structureStructure de l'organisation
PublicationsPublications
Site mapPlan du site
Hyperlinked titles that can be used under the title "News"News releasesCommuniqués
SpeechesDiscours
Media advisoriesAvis aux médias
BackgroundersNotes d'information
StatementsDéclarations
Photo galleriesGalerie de photos
MultimediaMultimédia
Hyperlinked titles that can be used under the title "Contact us"AddressesAdresses
TelephoneTéléphone
FaxTélécopieur
TeletypewriterTéléimprimeur
EmailCourriel
Find an employeeTrouver un fonctionnaire
Hyperlinked titles that can be used under the title "Stay Connected"FeedsFils de nouvelle
SubscribeAbonnez-vous
Header (content page)Official language selection linkEnglishFrançais
Search buttonSearchRecherche
First breadcrumbHomeAccueil
Body (content page)Date modifiedDate modifiedDate de modification