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Royal Canadian Mounted Police - Report


Minister’s Message

The Honourable Vic Toews, P.C., Q.C., M.P.

As Minister of Public Safety, I am pleased to present to Parliament the Royal Canadian Mounted Police 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities.

The RCMP is a unique organization as it tackles crime at the international, federal, provincial/territorial and municipal levels. The organization provides services to Canadians through its federal policing mandate as well as through its policing contracts with three territories, eight provinces, approximately 180 municipalities, and over 600 Aboriginal communities. The RCMP is a key organization in keeping Canadian families and communities safe and secure. To this end, the Government fully supports the RCMP in delivering on its mandate, strategic priorities and vision.

The RCMP continues its commitment to five strategic priorities for 2012-13: reducing the threat and impact of serious and organized crime; countering threats to Canada’s economic integrity; reducing youth crime; countering criminal threats to the security of Canada; and contributing to safer and healthier Aboriginal communities.

The RCMP has also established management priorities to strengthen professional integrity and redress, support employee wellness, and to provide strong talent management, all in support of delivering quality service to Canadians and ensuring operational effectiveness.

Moreover, the RCMP will be working on two strategic outcomes. One, reducing criminal activity affecting Canadians, will be addressed through various initiatives such as emphasizing community policing, taking a client-centred service approach to policing, and focusing on early intervention strategies to prevent crime and victimization. To achieve the second, ensuring Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance, the RCMP is enhancing the delivery of federal policing in Canada and with its partner agencies and is also delivering courses and programs to international law enforcement agencies to help reduce criminality around the world. Detailed information on these initiatives is provided within this Report.

I wish to extend my support and gratitude to the 30,000 dedicated men and women of the RCMP for their ongoing efforts to ensure a safe and secure Canada.

 

The Honourable Vic Toews, P.C., Q.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety Canada

Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d’être

As Canada’s national police force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is a critical element of the Government of Canada’s commitment to providing for the safety and security of Canadians. By tackling crime at the municipal, provincial/territorial, federal and international levels, the RCMP provides integrated approaches to safety and security and a consistent federal role and presence from coast to coast to coast.

Responsibilities

The RCMP’s mandate, as outlined in section 18 of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act, is multi-faceted. It includes preventing and investigating crime; maintaining peace and order; enforcing laws; contributing to national security; ensuring the safety of state officials, visiting dignitaries and foreign missions; and providing vital operational support services to other police and law enforcement agencies within Canada and abroad.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Activity Architecture (PAA)

RCMP Program Activity Architecture

RCMP Strategic Outcomes Program Activities Program
Sub-Activities
1. Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

1.1 Police Operations

1.1.1 Policing Services Under Contract

1.1.2 Federal Policing

1.1.3 Technical Services and Operational Support

1.2 Canadian Law Enforcement Services

1.2.1 Scientific, Technical and Investigative Support

1.2.2 Canadian Firearms Program

1.2.3 Advanced Police Training

2. Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally 2.1 International Policing Operations

2.1.1 International Stability and Development

2.1.2 International Cooperation

2.2 Canadian Police Culture and Heritage

2.2.1 Musical Ride

2.2.2 Partnerships and Heritage

3. Incomes are secure for RCMP members and their survivors affected by disability or death 3.1 Statutory Payments

3.1.1 Compensation to Members Injured on Duty

3.1.2 Survivor Income Plan

3.1.3 RCMP Pension Continuation Act Payments

  4.1 Internal Services

4.1.1 Governance and Management Support

4.1.2 Resource Management Services

4.1.3 Asset Management Services

Note: The RCMP’s contribution to a Safe and Secure Canada includes subordinate contributions to the following Government of Canada outcomes: a Fair and Secure Marketplace, Beneficial North American Partnership and a Prosperous Canada Through Global Commerce.

 

Organizational Priorities

The strategic priorities of the RCMP are selected based on a thorough scan and analysis of the external environment and crime trends.

Identifying these issues as priorities across the entire organization allows employees to focus operations in a more strategic manner in order to enhance public safety.

Each strategic priority has outcomes and objectives which are developed and evaluated by a working group led by a Deputy Commissioner.

The detailed plans and performance indicators for each priority are articulated to employees and external partners on the RCMP’s performance management tool, the Balanced Scorecard.

In June 2011, the RCMP Senior Executive Committee reviewed and confirmed that the following would continue to be the strategic priorities for the period from 2012 to 2017:

  • reducing the threat and impact of serious and organized crime,
  • countering criminal threats to Canada’s economic integrity,
  • reducing youth crime,
  • countering criminal threats to the security of Canada, and
  • contributing to safer and healthier Aboriginal communities.

The RCMP has also established management priorities to strengthen professional integrity and redress, support employee wellness, and to provide strong talent management. Key performance indicators for the priorities are available on the RCMP website 1.

Priority Type 2 Strategic Outcomes and/or Program Activities
Serious and organized crime Ongoing

SO1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

SO2: Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Status

Why is this a priority?

Under the Criminal Code, organized crime is defined as being composed of three or more persons, having as one of its main purposes a serious offence likely to result in a financial benefit. Organized and serious crime affects the daily lives of Canadians. The violence and corruptive effect of organized crime groups has a significant impact on the social and economic well-being of Canadians and the communities in which they live.

Plans for meeting the priority

RCMP enforcement efforts will be focused towards ensuring successful prosecutions of those who are involved in serious and organized crime. The RCMP will reduce the impact of organized crime through awareness and education, and the expanded collection and sharing of criminal intelligence and information. The Force will also work with international partners to ensure a global approach to combating organized crime.

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes and/or Program Activities
National Security Ongoing

SO1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

SO2: Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Status

Why is this a priority?

National security remains a top priority for Canadians because the safety of the public and protection of government infrastructure has a significant effect on the well-being of citizens as well as the Canadian economy. The absence of a specific threat to the integrity of Canada’s basic national security should not be interpreted as immunity from such a threat, nor should our security be viewed with complacency. The RCMP will focus its efforts on espionage or sabotage against Canada; foreign-influenced activities detrimental to the interests of Canada; activities directed toward or in support of the threat or use of acts of serious violence against Canadians for political, religious or ideological objectives; and activities designed to lead to the destruction or overthrow by violence of the Government of Canada.

Plans for meeting the priority

The RCMP will effectively respond to threats to Canada’s security by preventing, detecting, denying, investigating and responding to national security criminality 3. Through effective enforcement, the RCMP will contribute to successful prosecutions and/or prevention.

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes and/or Program Activities
Economic Integrity Ongoing

SO1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

SO2: Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Status

Why is this a priority?

A safe and secure Canadian economy provides confidence to consumers and investors in conducting business and investing in Canada. Canadians need to be assured that their savings, credit, identities and intellectual property are safe from criminals.

Plans for meeting the priority

The RCMP will focus on enforcement and successful prosecutions, as well as preventing, detecting and deterring criminal activity that affects the Canadian economy; building awareness around crimes that affect the economy; and educating Canadians on how to protect themselves from becoming victims of economic crime.

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes and/or Program Activities
Aboriginal Communities Ongoing SO1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Status

Why is this a priority?

Delivering culturally competent police services provides the foundation necessary to build relationships and partnerships for the 67 percent of RCMP detachments that serve more than 600 Aboriginal communities across Canada. Moreover, the RCMP has a long and productive history of service to First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities since the earliest days of the North-West Mounted Police in the 1870s.

Plans for meeting the priority

The RCMP will deliver a professional and culturally competent police service by ensuring that employees have the skills and knowledge to recognize and pay tribute to Aboriginal values and traditions. The RCMP will be accountable to Aboriginal peoples for public safety by honouring commitments through processes that effectively address the quality of service delivery. The RCMP will also respond to community needs through a balanced approach of prevention and enforcement activities determined through research, intelligence and risk assessment, aimed at lowering criminal involvement and victimization.

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes and/or Program Activities
Youth Ongoing SO1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Status

Why is this a priority?

The RCMP believes that long-term prevention of youth crime and victimization can only be accomplished in partnership with the community, and it considers young people key players in the prevention of crime in communities. The RCMP works closely with local organizations and social services so that young people who come into contact with the police, as either offenders or victims, receive the help they need to overcome challenges in their lives.

Plans for meeting the priority

Through awareness, education, intervention, diversion and enforcement, the RCMP will work to mitigate youth victimization and involvement in crime by focusing on youth where the organization will have the greatest impact, and by expanding and leveraging new and existing relationships with internal and external partners to maximize collective youth intervention and diversion efforts. The RCMP will make sound, culturally competent, informed decisions and take appropriate actions in accordance with relevant legislation when interacting with youth.

 

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes and/or Program Activities
Management Priority Ongoing

SO1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced

SO2: Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally

Status

Why is this a priority?

The RCMP recognizes that a healthy police organization has the necessary policies, programs and services in place to deal with unique police workplace stressors and to ensure that the organization has a pool of highly developed, productive individuals with the skills necessary to the successful achievement of organizational priorities.

Plans for meeting the priority

The 2012 to 2017 organizational strategy identified three Human Resource “objectives” as being important to the continued success and evolution of the RCMP as an effective policing organization. As such, the RCMP will:

  1. Strengthen professional integrity and redress: the RCMP will demonstrate active leadership to ensure effective, timely and fair discipline and grievance processes;
  2. Support employee wellness: the RCMP will promote the health, safety and well-being of its employees by providing a safe and productive work environment, promoting employee wellness and encouraging employees to maintain a healthy balance between work and personal life; and
  3. Provide strong talent management: the RCMP will provide strong talent management through an integrated process of ensuring that the organization has a pool of highly developed productive individuals with the right skills, in the right job and at the right time, by applying a unified approach to the management of its people.

 

Risk Analysis

The RCMP Corporate Risk Profile acts as an instrument for management oversight with a clear link to the RCMP strategic planning tools and the achievement of objectives and priorities. There is a significant interrelationship between developing a Corporate Risk Profile and the strategic planning process. Risk management underlies all aspects of the organization’s priority setting, planning and resource allocation. In addition, the corporate risk profile, with two-way linkages from and into each of these areas, provides a vehicle to integrate the consideration of risk at the corporate level. When developing the RCMP corporate risk profile, risk information from both the corporate and operational levels is analyzed to understand the key characteristics and broad range of internal and external risks facing the organization.

Risk is captured both horizontally and vertically throughout the RCMP. Risk information is fed upwards through the divisions where it is captured by the Integrated Risk Management Unit. These risks are analyzed and grouped into risk trends. Annually, senior management members are interviewed from across the organization and the total risk information inter alia, is considered as a whole and articulated as overarching corporate risks. At the senior executive level, the risk information is validated and communicated back down to the divisions through the Senior Management Team.

The most significant corporate risks are addressed by the business lines and horizontal management of risks is realized through the collective efforts of RCMP senior management. In this fashion, risks are tied directly to the achievement of the RCMP’s mandate, objectives and strategic outcomes. Thus, the actual practice of integrated risk management is well implemented and supported at all levels within the RCMP.

Assessment and ranking of key risk information from the divisions through the business planning process and interviews with senior management were based on the Force’s corporate objectives and its capacity to manage risk and its risk tolerance. In May 2011, the risk assessment exercise identified 94 risks which were grouped into 15 risk trends:

  • economic/demographic disparity
  • supporting major events
  • information sharing
  • legislated and regulatory
  • sustainable funding
  • unique community issues
  • conflicting priorities
  • loss of corporate knowledge and experience
  • governance and leadership
  • alignment of planning activities
  • learning and development
  • managing partnerships
  • recruiting, retention and succession planning
  • technology and systems
  • building infrastructure

The corporate risk profile is dynamic as it is based on our evolving operating environment. Key corporate risks are validated by senior executives and the corporate risk profile is linked in a meaningful way to corporate priority setting and resource allocation exercises.

Planning Summary

Financial Resources ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
2,946.6 2,938.6 2,981.4

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalent – FTEs)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
29,202 29,181 29,159

 

Strategic Outcome 1: Criminal activity affecting Canadians is reduced
Performance Indicators Targets
Percentage of Canadians who agree that they are satisfied with the RCMP’s contribution to a safe and secure Canada 80%
Severity level of crime in Canada Annual reduction of 4 points on the Crime Severity Index 4 in RCMP jurisdictions
Per capita rate of crime 5 in Canada Target reduction of per capita crime rate 6 (in RCMP jurisdictions) by 3% annually; for 2012-13, this means a target of 9,266 per 100,000 population
Public perception of change in crime in Canada 7 Reduction of 5% over 5 years

 

Strategic Outcome 2: Canada’s police provide international collaboration and assistance while maintaining a rich police heritage nationally
Performance Indicators Targets
Percentage of respondents who agree that the RCMP provides effective support of international operations

Police partners: 80%

Stakeholders: 80%

Percentage of respondents worldwide who can correctly identify a uniformed member in Red Serge and a horse and rider from the Musical Ride as originating from Canada

Red Serge: 63%

Musical Ride: 55%

 

Planning Summary Table
($ millions)
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12 8
Planned Spending 9 Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Police Operations 1,818.9 1,756.5 1,787.5 1,834.0 A safe and secure Canada
Canadian Law Enforcement Services 271.3 264.7 264.9 265.9 A safe and secure Canada
Total Planned Spending 2,021.2 2,052.4 2,099.9  

 

Planning Summary Table
($ millions)
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
International Policing Operations 78.9 60.7 59.0 59.2 A secure world through international cooperation
Canadian Police Culture and Heritage 12.1 11.6 11.6 11.7 A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage
Total Planned Spending 72.3 70.6 70.9  

 

Planning Summary Table
($ millions)
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Statutory Payments 127.1 130.4 139.8 149.8  
Total Planned Spending 130.4 139.8 149.8  

 

Planning Summary Table
($ millions)
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Internal Services 868.4 722.7 675.8 660.8
Total Planned Spending 722.7 675.8 660.8

Expenditure Profile

The department’s 2012-13 planned spending is $2.9 billion. Approximately $1.8 billion or over 60% of the RCMP’s spending is directed to its front-line policing operations in support of its strategic outcome to reduce criminal activity affecting Canadians. This includes resources devoted to federal policing duties, resources providing services to provinces, territories, municipalities and First Nation communities under policing services agreements, and the technical and operational support functions that are critical to effective, intelligence-led policing. An additional $337 million of the RCMP’s policing resources provide policing support services to the Canadian law enforcement community at large and fund international policing commitments. The balance of RCMP funding is allocated to Internal Services to provide support programs and infrastructure for policing operations, and for various grants, contributions and statutory payments.

2012-13 Main Estimates and Planned Spending

The 2012-13 Main Estimates for the RCMP is $2.6 billion, which represents a decrease in spending of $329 million from the 2011-12 Main Estimates. There are two very notable circumstances contributing to this material decrease.

First, approximately $206 million relates to the expiry of the RCMP’s 20-year policing services agreements with provinces, territories and municipalities on March 31, 2012. This amount is the total of incremental funding that had been requested since 2008-09. It was only approved to the end of the 2011-12 fiscal year, pending renewal of the agreements. Renewal of this funding, as well as any incremental resources required to meet contract policing obligations in 2012-13 under the renewed contracts, will be sought in-year and have been taken into consideration in the 2012-13 planned spending of this RPP.

Second, the RCMP’s Main Estimates reflect a transfer of $143 million to fund information technology services that will now be provided by Shared Services Canada.

Planned spending also reflects the Main Estimates funding plus additional funds that are projected to be received in-year through supplementary estimates, and transfers from central agency votes. More information will be provided in the 2012-13 Supplementary Estimates.

2012-13 Main Estimates and Planned Spending Table
  ($ millions)
2012-13 Main Estimates 2,554
Adjustments (Planned spending not in Main Estimates) 392
Total Planned Spending 2,946

As depicted in the following diagram, RCMP expenditures during 2009-10 and 2010-11 were significantly impacted by the 2010 Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Games, as well as the G8 and G20 Summits. These two events combined account for approximately 15% of 2009-10 expenditures and 8% of 2010-11 expenditures.

Figure 1 : Actual and Planned Spending ($ millions)

[text version]

 

Estimates by Vote

For information on our organizational appropriations, please see the 2012-13 Main Estimates publication.