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Section II - Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Transport Canada has four strategic outcomes that reflect the long-term and enduring benefits to Canadians that stem from its mandate and vision. As the department strives towards these outcomes, progress can be reported in relation to expected results [4], performance indicators [5] and targets [6], as set out in its Program Activity Architecture for 2012-2013.

The department uses qualitative and quantitative indicators, also called “performance measures”, to determine the results achieved in terms of strategic outcomes and expected results. Using a systematic method to develop, communicate, monitor and report performance information provides a uniform foundation to achieve these outcomes. In an effort to better report on results of activities, and to demonstrate value to Canadians, Transport Canada will continue to strengthen performance indicators in its Performance Measurement Framework.

This section provides detailed analysis of how the department plans to meet its expected results, and presents the financial and non-financial resources that will be dedicated to each program activity in the coming year. It also highlights some of Transport Canada’s initiatives that are included in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.

2.1 Strategic Outcome: An Efficient Transportation System

An efficient transportation system requires a strong and modern marketplace policy framework and infrastructure to strengthen Canada’s long term economic competitiveness. Work is ongoing to ensure that policy and legislative frameworks remain relevant and allow industry to respond to challenges and take advantage of opportunities for the future.

The federal government makes strategic infrastructure investments to ensure that funds are spent where they are most needed, to support economic growth, improve the quality of life of Canadians and better position Canada in the rapidly changing global marketplace. Transportation infrastructure initiatives create jobs, support trade and tourism, connect Canadians and attract investments. Canada promotes innovative financing arrangements for transportation infrastructure through public-private partnerships to spur innovation, better manage risks and leverage public investments to the greatest extent possible, given tight fiscal constraints in most jurisdictions.

Canada is a trading nation, and the efficiency and reliability of trade impacts directly on the nation’s prosperity and well being. As a result, it is imperative that the federal government play a role in the development of an integrated transportation network linking importers and exporters to markets and suppliers in the increasingly complex global value chains. Guided by the National Policy Framework for Strategic Gateways and Corridors, the Gateways and Corridors initiatives aim to support international commerce by creating a more efficient, reliable and seamless trade-related transportation system in Canada.

The demands of global trade, population growth, an aging demographic, and the effects of climate change require new and innovative solutions to keep Canada’s transportation system efficient, accessible and competitive. Investing in the right technologies, research and skills development will enable the transportation sector to continue to support trade, global competitiveness and national prosperity. In addition, the sector’s ability to enhance its innovative capacity will determine future improvements in transportation efficiency, safety, security, accessibility and environmental performance.

The following four program activities [7] support this strategic outcome:

  • 2.1.1 Transportation Marketplace Frameworks;
  • 2.1.2 Gateways and Corridors;
  • 2.1.3 Transportation Infrastructure; and
  • 2.1.4 Transportation Innovation.

The plans, expected results, performance indicators and targets of these program activities are described below.

Strategic Outcome 1: An Efficient Transportation System
Performance Indicators Targets
Canada’s ranking based on the World Bank’s Logistics Performance Index. Canada in top 25 of ranked nations.
Planning Summary Table
($ millions)
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Transportation Marketplace Frameworks 10 9 9 9 A fair and secure marketplace
Gateways and Corridors 227 1,063 793 0 Strong economic growth
Transportation Infrastructure 347 309 293 260 Strong economic growth
Transportation Innovation 12 14 11 11 An innovative and knowledge-based economy
Total Planned Spending* 596 1,395 1,106 280  

*Due to rounding, column totals shown may not be exact. Amounts are net of respendable revenue.

2.1.1 Program Activity: Transportation Marketplace Frameworks

Description: The Transportation Marketplace Frameworks program activity encourages transportation efficiency by fostering a competitive and viable transportation sector. Program activities include setting the regimes governing the economic behaviour of carriers in all modes of transportation; setting the rules of governance for all the transportation infrastructure providers falling under federal authority; monitoring the transportation system; representing the interests of Canada at international transportation fora and on other international bodies, and enabling access to transportation for Canadians.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
9 9 9

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
67 67 67


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
A competitive transportation sector Percentage change in freight transportation intensity >0
A competitive transportation sector Percentage change in passenger transportation intensity >0

Planning Highlights

The department will continue to modernize marketplace frameworks so that the transportation sector can adapt, innovate and remain competitive. This work contributes to the government priority of creating the right conditions for economic and job growth. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • assess the current air and marine policy framework to ensure their responsiveness to trends affecting air and marine transportation, with a view to promoting a competitive and viable transportation system to support trade opportunities, bringing economic benefits to Canadians;
  • implement the government response to the recommendations of the comprehensive review of freight rail service aimed at improving the efficiency, effectiveness and reliability of the rail system. This will help the rail system support domestic and international trade; and
  • monitor and analyze the freight transportation system supporting international commerce with the objective of identifying bottleneck issues and improvements to ensure that the transportation system is optimized and responsive to the users’ needs. This will help inform current and future freight integration initiatives.

Did you know?

The marine mode is one of the most energy-efficient modes of transportation. Studies have indicated that shortsea shipping offers advantages in terms of reduced fuel usage, surface congestion and noise levels. The marine mode presents an opportunity to optimize the efficient use of Canada’s multimodal transportation system.

2.1.2 Program Activity: Gateways and Corridors

Description: Canada is a trading nation, and the efficiency and reliability of this trade impacts directly on the nation’s prosperity and well being. As a result, it is imperative that the federal government play a role in the development of an integrated transportation network linking importers and exporters to markets and suppliers in the increasingly complex global value chains. Guided by the National Policy Framework for Strategic Gateways and Trade Corridors, Gateways and Corridors program activity aims at supporting Canada’s international commerce by creating more efficient, reliable and seamless trade-related transport systems. The program sets strategies and frameworks for improving and integrating transportation networks in key regions; fosters partnerships between all levels of government and the private sector; supports and oversees projects that contribute to the increased capacity and efficiency of gateway and corridor infrastructure; develops and puts in place measures that remove impediments to the effective development of gateways and corridors; and markets the use of gateways and corridors.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
1,063 793 0

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
63 49 0


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Gateways and corridors are efficient, reliable and support international commerce Efficiency and reliability as measured by total transit time of international containerized freight using Canada’s strategic gateways and trade corridors Total transit time for a given year ≤ total transit time for the previous year

Planning Highlights

The department implements gateways and corridors initiatives to contribute to an efficient, reliable, and secure trade-related transportation system to support international commerce. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • continue to develop and implement Canada’s three strategic gateways and corridors initiatives: the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative, the Continental Gateway and Trade Corridor and the Atlantic Gateway and Trade Corridor, and consider future directions and strategies to improve transportation system connectivity and efficiency;
  • implement gateway strategies in partnership with other federal departments and agencies, provinces and territories, municipalities, and private sector stakeholders to strengthen Canada’s competitiveness in global commerce, improve efficiencies, attract new investments and contribute to sustained long-term economic growth;
  • contribute to the efficient and safe operation of Canada’s critical trade infrastructure by moving forward on the Detroit River International Crossing to provide necessary border crossing capacity to handle anticipated trade and traffic growth, as well as transportation-system redundancy and state-of-the-art security of border operations at Windsor-Detroit - the busiest commercial land border crossing in North America; and advance the planning for a new bridge over the St. Lawrence River in the Greater Montreal area; and
  • continue to invest in Beyond the Border initiatives to make the transportation network safer, more efficient and more secure for international trade. These security and economic initiatives will enhance the flow of legitimate trade and travel across the Canada-U.S. border, which will deliver tangible benefits to the Canadian economy and regional economies, the traveling public and the business community engaged in cross-border commerce.

2.1.3 Program Activity: Transportation Infrastructure

Description: The Transportation Infrastructure program activity looks after transportation infrastructure under Transport Canada’s mandate to improve efficiency and provide service. It acts as the steward of certain commercial transportation assets operated by third parties on behalf of the federal government (e.g., airport authorities, port authorities, federal bridges, via Rail, Seaway Corporation, Marine Atlantic.); provides funding for Canada’s strategic transportation infrastructure, targeted to support federal objectives; develops transportation infrastructure policy in consultation with stakeholders; supports essential services in certain communities; manages legacy commitments; and divests assets and contracts out operations, where needed.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
309 293 260

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
241 239 226


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federally funded infrastructure is available, reliable and operational Percentage of federally funded transportation infrastructure that meets operational targets 100

Planning Highlights

The department will continue to enhance the sustainability of the national transportation infrastructure. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • develop long-term, cost-efficient asset stewardship strategies for ports, airports and lands still owned and operated by Transport Canada including the Pickering Lands, the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporations properties, and other departmental real property holdings, to rationalize Canada’s transportation assets, while providing high quality, safe and efficient services, as well as value-for-money to Canadians;
  • continue to oversee the implementation of via Rail’s capital program, which is supported by the Government of Canada’s 2007 commitment to improve the sustainability and reliability of passenger rail services in Canada and provide more frequent, faster, cleaner and safer services within the Quebec City-Windsor Corridor; and
  • work with our provincial, municipal, private sector and other partners to successfully deliver infrastructure projects and programs. Canadians will benefit from investments through programs such as the Outaouais Road Agreement and the Building Canada Fund, which will improve the safety and efficiency of national highways, roads, railways and other transportation infrastructure, as well as, contribute to a stronger economy and enhanced quality of life.

Did you know?

The Port of Sept-╬les, which exceeded its shipping records of the past thirty years, will officially become Canada’s second largest port, and will soon be North America’s largest mining port due to its wealth in minerals and its mining industry.

2.1.4 Program Activity: Transportation Innovation

Description: The Transportation Innovation program activity supports the Advantage Canada framework to promote skills development, and create health, environmental, societal and economic benefits for Canadians. It achieves this by building better linkages between science and policy, supporting technology development aligned with policy issues of significance to the department, and serving as a focal point in the delivery of a coordinated and integrated transportation innovation agenda. The program sets policy and strategic direction for research and development; develops designs, negotiates, and manages research programs for breakthrough technologies, including intelligent transportation systems; advances the development and dissemination of scientific knowledge, and the application of technology; partners and collaborates with other federal departments, provinces and territories; and supports skills development for a highly qualified transportation workforce.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
14 11 11

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
31 31 32


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Research and development investments are optimized to improve the transportation system for Canadians. Ratio of Research and Development funding leveraged from external sources 1:1
Research and development funding provided to support efficient, clean, safe and secure transportation. Percentage of approved funding delivered 100%

Planning Highlights

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

The department will continue to stimulate innovation in the transportation sector as an element of the Advantage Canada Framework, a strategic, long-term economic plan designed to improve Canada’s economic prosperity. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • in support of Transport Canada’s renewed policy framework, finalize the departmental innovation strategy; and
  • in support of Advantage Canada and science and technology priorities, develop partnerships between governments, and the academic and private sectors to address priority transportation innovation issues and opportunities. This will include support for advanced transportation technologies, such as intelligent transportation systems, and will address issues such as adapting infrastructure to cold and changing climates in support of economic development in Canada’s northern regions.

2.2 Strategic Outcome: A Clean Transportation System

With the transportation sector producing approximately twenty-four percent [8] of Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions, it is important that Transport Canada continue to take a leadership role in ensuring an environmentally responsible transportation system while balancing safety, security and economic efficiency. This means playing a key role in furthering the transportation sector components of the Government of Canada’s environmental agenda by helping reduce pollution and emissions from transportation sources; protecting the marine and freshwater environment; and fulfilling the important stewardship role of ensuring that Transport Canada’s lands, facilities and activities comply with environmental legislation and that an environmental management system is in place. In 2012-2013 Transport Canada will continue to implement its suite of transportation regulatory and program initiatives under the renewed Clean Air Agenda.

Transport Canada plays a strong leadership role as it engages with national and international partners to limit the environmental impacts of transportation. It also contributes to the Government of Canada’s initiatives to improve the federal regulatory system for environmental assessments for major resource projects while ensuring improvements to its own regulatory, consultation and review processes for transportation-related projects.

The following three program activities support this strategic outcome:

  • 2.2.1 Clean Air from transportation;
  • 2.2.2 Clean Water from transportation; and
  • 2.2.3 Environmental Stewardship of transportation.

The plans, expected results, performance indicators and targets of these program activities are described below.

Strategic Outcome 2: A Clean Transportation System
Performance Indicators Targets
Percentage change in air emissions from transportation as measured in tonnes of greenhouse gas and air pollutants Support government commitments
Percentage of contaminated sites managed 100
Number of new alien invasive species detected 0
Planning Summary Table
($ millions)
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Clean Air from Transportation 16 25 35 33 A clean and healthy environment
Clean Water from Transportation 8 2 2 2 A clean and healthy environment
Environmental Stewardship of Transportation 24 33 27 23 A clean and healthy environment
Total Planned Spending* 48 60 64 58  

*Due to rounding, column totals shown may not be exact. Amounts are net of respendable revenue.

2.2.1 Program Activity: Clean Air from Transportation

Description: The Clean Air from transportation program activity advances the federal government’s environmental agenda in the transportation sector and complements other federal programs designed to reduce air emissions for the health of Canadians and the environment for generations to come. The program regulates air emissions from the transportation sector, and oversees Transport Canada’s clean air program obligations and commitments.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
25 35 33

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
92 91 90


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Decrease in intensity of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants in the transportation sector Percentage change in transportation emission intensity An intensity improvement that is consistent with the plan established under the government's horizontal approach to clean air

Planning Highlights

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

The department will contribute to the federal government’s environmental agenda through regulatory and non-regulatory initiatives designed to reduce air emissions from transportation. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • lead the Government of Canada’s participation at the International Maritime Organization and the International Civil Aviation Organization to develop programs of action to limit or reduce air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping and international aviation resulting in the alignment of Canada’s clean air regulatory framework and policies with international standards;
  • put in place domestic regulations to address emissions from the marine and rail sectors, thereby reducing the risk to the health of Canadians and the environment from exposure to air pollution; and
  • implement the new next generation clean transportation initiatives under the Clean Air Agenda announced in Budget 2011 to improve the quality of life and health of Canadians by reducing air emissions by using clean technologies in the transportation sector. (For more information, please consult Environment Canada’s Report on Plans and Priorities 2012-2013 Clean Air Agenda expected results.)

Did you know?

The Government of Canada recently announced a $30M new Shore Power Technology for Ports Program that will help ship operators adopt technology that reduces fuel consumption, emissions and fuel costs, and improves the competitiveness of Canadian ports.

2.2.2 Program Activity: Clean Water from Transportation

Description: The Clean Water from Transportation Program Activity protects the marine environment by reducing the pollution of water from transportation sources. This Program regulates and monitors the release and impact of discharges from marine vessels into the marine environment, regulates ballast [9] water, and contributes to setting domestic and international rules that govern limits to liability of marine pollution incidents. This Program advances the federal government's clean water agenda in the transportation sector and complements other federal programs designed to protect the marine environment for the health of Canadians and the environment for generations to come. This Program also represents Canada in discussions to set international standards to prevent pollution from vessels operating in Canada's waters.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
2 2 2

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
13 13 13


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Prevention of pollution in the marine environment from vessels operating in waters under Canadian jurisdiction. Percentage change in number of releases by vessels of substances that could have a negative impact on the marine environment (i.e. pollution, ballast water) 5 percent reduction

Planning Highlights

Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

The department will continue to protect the marine environment by contributing to the reduction of water pollution from transportation sources. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • provide surveillance over all waters under Canadian jurisdiction, including the Arctic in order to monitor the pollution of water from shipping sources and implement penalties that would contribute to reduced pollution incidents and minimize the introduction of invasive species into Canadian waters;
  • update regulations such as New Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations, and enhance oversight functions to minimize the number of pollution incidents in Canadian waters; and
  • enhance consultation approaches with the marine shipping industry to improve regulation development and the delivery of associated national marine programs and services.

2.2.3 Program Activity: Environmental Stewardship of Transportation

Description: The Environmental Stewardship program activity fulfills Transport Canada's responsibilities in working towards an environmentally responsible national transportation system for Canadians by ensuring compliance with the department's environmental obligations in relation to acts, regulations, policies and guidelines. The program fulfils Transport Canada's responsibility to implement its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy under the Federal Sustainable Development Act; ensures that Transport Canada's lands and facilities are managed in an environmentally responsible manner in compliance with federal legislation and policies; provides functional support for environmental assessments, including assessments of major resource projects; and manages contaminated sites.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
33 27 23

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
89 89 89


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Compliance with Transport Canada's environmental obligations in relation to acts, regulations, policies and guidelines Percentage of departmental commitments achieved under the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy 100
Compliance with Transport Canada's environmental obligations in relation to acts, regulations, policies and guidelines Number of instances where Transport Canada was not in compliance with applicable environmental legislation 0
Oversight of compliance with applicable laws and policies Number of planned National Environmental Management System reviews undertaken >= ( at least) 1

Planning Highlights

Theme IV - Shrinking Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government

The department will continue to deliver environmental stewardship of Canada’s transportation system, including Transport Canada’s operations. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • contribute to Government of Canada initiatives to improve the regulatory framework for environmental assessment of major resource projects throughout Canada;
  • exercise environmental stewardship of Transport Canada lands and activities, to ensure that Transport Canada’s airports, ports and other operations comply with environmental legislation such as the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, Fisheries Act, and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act; and
  • contribute to all of the Greening Government Operations targets under the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (for more information, please see Section III).

2.3 Strategic Outcome: A Safe Transportation System

Transport Canada supports a safe transportation system that aims to facilitate the movement of people and goods across Canada, without loss of life, injury, or damage to property. The activities under this strategic outcome direct much of their collective effort at influencing the behaviour of the public and industry through laws and regulations. Transportation safety is enhanced by harmonized and streamlined regulatory regimes that are informed by the expertise of multiple countries and stakeholders. Sharing best practices and cooperating in research during the regulatory development stage results in effective and efficient regulatory frameworks that enhance transportation safety. In addition, Transport Canada ensures that Canadians and the transportation industry are in compliance with the regulatory framework through their safety oversight programs. These rules are complemented by policies, standards, directives, and guidelines that further influence the use of safe transportation practices and enable a safety culture which seeks to make safety a part of a company’s every action.

The following five program activities support this Strategic outcome:

  • 2.3.1 Aviation Safety;
  • 2.3.2 Marine Safety;
  • 2.3.3 Rail Safety;
  • 2.3.4 Road Safety; and
  • 2.3.5 Transportation of Dangerous Goods.

Strategic Outcome 3: A Safe Transportation System
Performance Indicators Targets
Fatality rates by transportation mode/sector By mode or sector
Accident rates by transportation mode/sector By mode or sector
Planning Summary Table
($ millions)
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Aviation Safety 227 231 223 222 A safe and secure Canada
Marine Safety 78 62 62 61 A safe and secure Canada
Rail Safety 38 37 36 36 A safe and secure Canada
Road Safety 26 23 24 21 A safe and secure Canada
Transportation of Dangerous Goods 15 13 12 13 A safe and secure Canada
Total Planned Spending* 384 366 357 353  

*Due to rounding, column totals shown may not be exact. Amounts are net of respendable revenue.

The plans, expected results, performance indicators and targets of these program activities are described below.

2.3.1 Program Activity: Aviation Safety

Description: The Aviation Safety program activity develops, administers, and oversees the policies, regulations and standards necessary for the safe conduct of civil aviation within Canada's borders in a manner harmonized with the international aviation community. It also manages programs to support safety-related investments at regional/small airports and provides air transport services to support Transport Canada’s and other government department’s operations.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
231 223 222

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
1,803 1,803 1,803


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
A safe civil aviation system Number of accidents per 100,000 hours of flight (five year average) 6.5

Planning Highlights

The department will continue to strive for the highest level of aviation safety for Canadians. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • enhance the Civil Aviation Safety management framework by implementing the Civil Aviation Safety program action plan, the assessment of the management control framework, the Internal Audit management control framework action plan, and by addressing the Office of Auditor General 2012 audit recommendations;
  • accelerate finalization of the new Civil Aviation organizational structure through completion of work descriptions and implementation of classification decisions and staffing strategies as per the Civil Aviation action plan; and adopt people management strategies to support our workforce and workplace; and
  • implement a national risk-based approach to oversight planning that considers surveillance and service activities (safety management systems and non-safety management systems).

2.3.2 Program Activity: Marine Safety

Description: The Marine Safety program activity protects the life and health of Canadians by contributing to a safe and efficient marine transportation system. This program derives its authority from a number of Acts including the Canada Shipping Act 2001, the Navigable Waters Protection Act, the Safe Containers Act, the Pilotage Act, the Coasting Trade Act and the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act, to develop and enforce a marine safety regulatory framework for domestic and foreign vessels (non-pleasure craft and pleasure craft); enforce international conventions signed by Canada; and protect the public right to navigation on Canada’s waterways.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
62 62 61

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
603 603 603


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
A safe marine transportation system Number of Canadian commercial Vessel (non-pleasure craft) occurrences per 1,000 vessels in the Canadian registry (five-year moving average) 9.5
Baseline is 13.6 occurrences per 1,000 vessels.
Rate change from 13.6 to 9.5 represents a 30 percent decrease
A safe marine transportation system Number of pleasure craft fatalities for recreational boating activities (five-year average) 111

Planning Highlights

The department will contribute to an efficient and sustainable marine transportation system in which the public can have continued confidence. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • advance the modernization of Marine Safety’s oversight frameworks and improve national program standardization by enhancing compliance and oversight activities, and by strengthening national modal consistency in program delivery;
  • develop and integrate performance measurement and risk-based decision-making into the overall management and delivery of the program. This includes moving towards a risk-based inspection regime for domestic vessels, for which risk ratings of these vessels will form the basis for targeted compliance inspections; and
  • advance work to ensure a vibrant Marine Safety program that meets its statutory obligations and provides adequate level of service to the marine industry through the establishment of an appropriate and up-to-date fee structure.

2.3.3 Program Activity: Rail Safety

Description: Under the authority of the Railway Safety Act, the Rail Safety program activity develops, implements and promotes safety policy, regulations, standards and research. The program provides oversight of the rail industry and promotes public safety at crossings and identifies the risks of trespassing. It also provides funds to improve safety at grade crossings.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
37 36 36

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
208 208 208


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
A safe rail transportation system Rate of rail accidents (per million train miles) that occur on railways under federal jurisdiction (includes main-track collisions, and derailments, non-main track derailments and collisions, fires/explosions and others) (five-year average) 14.1
A safe rail transportation system Rate of rail incidents (per million train miles) that occur on railways under federal jurisdiction (includes abnormal position of main-track switch, movement exceeding limit of authority, leaks of dangerous goods, incapacitation of crew member, runaway rolling stock, signal that is less restrictive than required and unprotected overlap of authorities) (five year average) 2.45

Planning Highlights

The department will continue to further improve rail safety in Canada. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • in conjunction with the expected passage in Parliament of the amendments to the Railway Safety Act, begin development of key regulations, including Railway Operating Certificates and Administrative Monetary Penalties. Rail Safety is also developing regulations on grade crossings, and the collection of industry data;
  • continue to strengthen its oversight regime by:
    • enhancing the national inspector training program, through the development and improvement of courses on auditing, Safety Management Systems and orientation of new Rail Safety Inspectors;
    • building on progress made in the Rail Safety Quality Management System to help ensure that business practices are carried out consistently on a national level; and
    • continuing the implementation of the Rail Safety Integrated Gateway, to capture and report on safety performance data.
  • build and expand on the Rail Safety program’s risk-based business planning process to effectively allocate and monitor resources in support of audits, inspection and outreach activities.

2.3.4 Program Activity: Road Safety

Description: Guided by the Motor Vehicle Safety Act and the Motor Vehicle Transport Act, the Road Safety program activity develops standards and regulations, provides oversight of the regulated industry, engages in public outreach in order to reduce the deaths, injuries and social costs caused by motor vehicle use, and improves public confidence in the safety of Canada’s road transportation system.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
23 24 21

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
113 113 113


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Safer vehicles Collisions per 10,000 motor vehicle registered To be determined
Safer vehicles Fatalities (vehicle occupants) per 10,000 police-reported collisions occurring on public roads To be determined
Safer vehicles Serious injuries (vehicle occupants) per 10,000 police-reported collisions occurring on public roads To be determined

Planning Highlights

The department will continue to promote road safety. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • pursue modernization of the temporary vehicle importation regime by amending Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations and by implementing an on-line system to authorize and track temporary importations;
  • further develop the pre-clearance vehicle importation program to facilitate a risk-based approach to auditing importers. Transport Canada will also educate designated importers about their responsibilities under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act in order to improve the compliance rates; and
  • streamline the exemptions process under the Motor Vehicle Transport Act to accommodate industry sectors that use motor carriers which are subject to the Hours of Service Regulations.

Did you know?

2011-2020 is the United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety. Canada’s Road Safety Strategy 2015, organized by the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators, contains the long-term vision that Canada’s roads will be the safest in the world. Transport Canada is participating in both initiatives.

2.3.5 Program Activity: Transportation of Dangerous Goods

Description: As required by the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992, the Transportation of Dangerous Goods program activity, based on risk, develops safety standards and regulations, provides oversight and gives expert advice (e.g. Canadian Transport Emergency Centre) on incidents involving dangerous goods to promote public safety in the transportation of dangerous goods by all modes of transport in Canada; identify threats to public safety, and enforce the Act and its regulations; guide emergency response and limit the impact of incidents involving the transportation of dangerous goods; and develop policy and conduct research to enhance safety.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
13 12 13

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
124 124 124


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Public safety during the transportation of dangerous goods Number of reportable releases of dangerous goods per trillion dollars of Canadian gross domestic product (five year average) 221.1
Public safety during the transportation of dangerous goods Number of reportable releases of dangerous goods, that caused injuries or deaths per trillion dollars of Canadian gross domestic product (five- year average) 3.8

Planning Highlights

The department will work to enhance public safety in the transportation of dangerous goods. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • establish and implement an action plan that addresses the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development Audit of Transportation of Dangerous Products to:
    • strengthen compliance monitoring guidance, develop tools and processes, document follow-up procedures for inspectors, support the review of transport dangerous goods inspection activities and introduce a quality assurance program;
    • review the Emergency Response Assistance plan program’s policies and procedures for approvals of plans and develop enhanced guidance material for remedial measure specialists; and
    • implement a national risk assessment tool that will serve as the basis for risk-based inspection planning for inspectors.

2.4 Strategic Outcome: A Secure Transportation System

Transport Canada develops policies and programs that respond to emerging security risks while keeping Canada competitive and develops and enforces transportation security regulations. The department also works with domestic and international partners towards a shared and effective transportation security agenda. A secure transportation system supports a strong Canadian economy and the country’s competitiveness in global markets. As a trading nation, Canada must move people and goods across vast distances to domestic and international destinations, and the number of people traveling by air, sea and land increases every year. International and public confidence in the security of Canada’s transportation infrastructure is critical.

Transport Canada promotes a holistic approach to security. It develops policies, programs and regulations; and enforces these regulations in response to emerging security risks. The department’s role is diverse and complex, as reflected in the many activities that include enhancing the security of the surface transportation system, ports and airports across Canada.

The following three program activities support this strategic outcome:

  • 2.4.1 Aviation Security;
  • 2.4.2 Marine Security; and
  • 2.4.3 Surface and Intermodal Security.

Strategic Outcome 4: A Secure Transportation System
Performance Indicators Targets
Percentage of adjustments to the Canadian Regulatory Framework that meet international standards 100
Planning Summary Table
($ millions)
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
Aviation Security 44 46 44 44 A safe and secure Canada
Marine Security 20 21 21 21 A safe and secure Canada
Surface and Intermodal Security 6 6 6 6 A safe and secure Canada
Total Planned Spending* 70 73 71 70  

*Due to rounding, column totals shown may not be exact. Amounts are net of respendable revenue.

The plans, expected results, performance indicators and targets of these program activities are described below.

2.4.1 Program Activity: Aviation Security

Description: The Aviation Security program activity develops, administers and oversees policies, programs, regulations and standards necessary for a secure Canadian aviation system in a manner harmonized with the international aviation community.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
46 44 44

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
385 371 368


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Canada is aligned with international aviation security standards Percentage of aviation security regulations aligned with the International Civil Aviation Organizations standards 100

Planning Highlights

The department will continue to uphold the security of its aviation system. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • refine and strengthen the aviation security oversight function;
  • finalize the National Civil Aviation Security program to codify and clarify for all stakeholders Canada’s approach to aviation security; and
  • implement a new risk and results-based inspection program that includes more clearly defined inspection activities, and a baseline inspection schedule, which will improve reporting and national consistency.

Did you know?

Air travellers can now bring in their carry-on baggage small scissors and tools that are no longer than six centimetres (excluding the handle). These changes to the prohibited items list harmonize Canada with its international partners.

2.4.2 Program Activity: Marine Security

Description: The Marine Security program activity, with partners, enforces the Marine Transportation Security Act to protect Canada and Canadians in a way that respects Canadian values. It safeguards integrity and security, and preserves the efficiency of Canada’s marine transportation system against unlawful interference, terrorist attacks, or use as a means to attack our Canadian allies.

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
21 21 21

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
170 170 170


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Increased industry confidence in marine transportation security Percentage of industry indicating confidence in the Canadian marine security system 80
Canada is aligned with international marine security standards Percentage of marine security regulations aligned with the International Maritime Organization standards 100

Planning Highlights

The department will continue to promote a secure marine system. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • implement, in partnership with other co-leads, three initiatives of the Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness Action Plan, including: developing a harmonized approach, with the United States, for the screening of inbound maritime cargo; developing a plan to mitigate the impacts of disruptions to maritime commerce in the event of an emergency; and improving maritime domain awareness through the development a common approach to assessing threats and identifying risks;
  • implement the action plan for the Canada-US Regulatory Cooperation Council including aligning marine security requirements where possible and establishing a framework to jointly address issues related to the safety and security of vessels operating on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway. Priority areas include: expansion of the Joint Vessel Inspection Program in the St. Lawrence Seaway; exploring the feasibility of mutual recognition of regulatory oversight regimes for vessels operating exclusively on the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway; as well as establishing a framework to ensure greater regulatory alignment with the United States; and
  • review and update the Marine Transportation Security Regulations, including advancing Marine Security’s commitments under the Red Tape Reduction initiative.

2.4.3 Program Activity: Surface and Intermodal Security

Description: Guided by the Railway Safety Act, the International Bridges and Tunnels Act, the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act and the federal government's transportation security mandate, the Surface and Intermodal Security program activity enhances the security of surface and intermodal transportation such as rail and urban transit as well as international bridges and tunnels. Working with partners to protect Canada and Canadians in a way that respects Canadian values and preserves the efficiency of the transportation system, the program provides federal leadership, and develops and enforces regulatory and voluntary frameworks (regulations, codes of practice, and memoranda of understanding).

Planned Spending ($ millions)

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
6 6 6

Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents [FTEs])

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
40 40 40


Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Rail transportation operators (passenger and freight) implement the requirements of the voluntary framework Percentage of rail transportation operators adopting the voluntary security framework. 60

Planning Highlights

The department will continue to enhance the security of surface and intermodal transportation. In support of this objective, the program activity will focus on the following priorities:

  • refine and strengthen the Surface and Intermodal Security oversight function and work with industry stakeholders to improve the effectiveness of the security posture of the rail and urban transit systems;
  • use risk-based analysis to enhance the security of the international bridges and tunnels through voluntary or regulatory approaches and develop guidance documents and potential approaches to enhancing the security of the transportation of dangerous goods; and
  • continue to work with industry stakeholders on the promotion of Surface and Intermodal Security and industry developed security Codes of Practices, and the sharing of security guidance material and best practices.

2.5 Program Activity: Internal Services

Description: The Internal Services Program Activity include activities and related resources that are managed to support all strategic outcomes and program needs, as well as other departmental obligations. Only activities and resources that apply to the entire organization, and not those allocated to a single program, are included. Governance and Management Support Services include Management and Oversight Services [10], Communications Services and Legal Services. Resource Management Services include human resources management, financial management; information management and information technology services. Asset Management Services include real property, material and acquisition services.

Planning Summary Table
($ millions)
Internal Services Forecast
Spending
2011-12
Human Resources (Full-Time-Equivalents (FTEs )) and Planned Spending Contribution to Transport Canada Strategic Outcomes
2012-13 FTEs 2013-14 FTEs 2014-15 FTEs
Internal Services 284 191 1,445 196 1,438 200 1,425

An efficient transportation system

A clean transportation system

A safe transportation system

A secure transportation system


Planning Highlights

Transport Canada will continue to effectively manage activities and related resources to meet its program and departmental needs; and to meet central agency oversight requirements. Internal Services’ planning highlights that support these objectives and departmental priorities include:

Governance and Management Support:
Internal Audit and Evaluation:
  • introduce an enhanced evidence-based management action plan follow-up process for all outstanding audit and evaluation recommendations;
  • proactively monitor, risk assess, and report on outstanding external and internal audit and evaluation recommendations; and
  • implement approved risk-based audit and evaluation plans, and report audit findings to an external Audit Committee and evaluation findings to an Evaluation Committee.
Planning and Reporting:
  • strengthen the integration of financial and nonfinancial planning, monitoring and reporting to improve our capacity to make decisions and set priorities;
  • continue to enhance performance management and reporting through a review and refinement of the department's Program Activity Architecture and Performance Measurement Framework. This will improve decision making throughout the department, which will improve program delivery and resource allocation, and enhance accountability; and
  • develop and adopt more systematic risk management practices and ensure that the department has the policies, procedures and tools it needs to mitigate risks and achieve expected results. Integrated risk management will help strengthen our capacity to make decisions and set priorities.
Program Excellence:
  • continue to identify, develop and encourage the department to adopt tools and best practices to support excellence in designing and managing grants and contributions and to ensure they comply with federal policies, directives and guidelines related to grants and contributions, including performance and risk management practices.
Economic Analysis:
  • produce a comprehensive five-year review of the state of transportation in Canada and report to Parliament.
Communications:
  • implement the Web 2.0 Infrastructure Project that will allow Transport Canada to adopt new communication practices that promote the sharing of information with colleagues, other public servants, stakeholders and the public. This can include:
    • social media, which allow participants with distinct social/user profiles to create, share and interact with user-generated content, including text, images, video and audio (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Linked-In, blogs); as well as
    • collaborative technologies that allow many users to collaboratively create content (e.g. Wikis, Google Docs).
Resource Management Services:
Human Resource Management:
  • establish a National Workforce Management Board to address key human resources’ gaps and needs to meet departmental priorities and our core business activities, while minimizing the impact of transformational changes;
  • continue to provide guidance and advice to organizations on the people management portion of their Integrated Business Plan and help them identify people management initiatives to address the gaps/needs related to their priorities and core activities.
Financial Management:
  • improve departmental internal controls to ensure that the risks related to its stewardship of public resources are managed through effective internal controls as stated in the Policy on Internal Control;
  • adopt financial system enhancements, such as the Receiver General Buy Button project that will improve the secure storage of related payments information of Canadians; and
  • strengthen functional authority of project management, which improves project management practices within the department.
Information Technology:
  • work with Shared Services Canada to streamline and reduce duplication within government-wide information technology services and to maintain client service levels during the transition of services from Transport Canada to Shared Services Canada.
  • launch the technology and security components of the Web 2.0 Infrastructure Project