Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Symbol of the Government of Canada

ARCHIVED - Public Health Agency of Canada - Supplementary Tables

Warning This page has been archived.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived on the Web is for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It has not been altered or updated after the date of archiving. Web pages that are archived on the Web are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats on the "Contact Us" page.





2011-12
Report on Plans and Priorities



Public Health Agency of Canada






Supplementary Information (Tables)






Table of Contents




Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

The following is a summary of the Transfer Payment Programs for the Public Health Agency of Canada in excess of $5.0M per fiscal year. All the transfer payments shown below are voted programs.

($ M)
Transfer Payment Program Forecast Spending 2010-11 Planned Spending 2011-12 Planned Spending 2012-13 Planned Spending 2013-14
Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities 32.1 32.1 32.1 32.1
Community Action Program for Children 53.4 53.4 53.4 53.4
Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program 27.2 27.2 27.2 27.2
Innovation Strategy 10.3 10.9 10.9 10.9
Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada 21.9 22.7 24.2 24.2
National Collaborating Centres for Public Health   8.3   8.3   8.3   8.3
Canadian Diabetes Strategy (non-Aboriginal elements)   5.8   6.3   6.3   6.3

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding


Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities

Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and prevent and mitigate disease and injury

Program Activity: Health Promotion

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC)

Start Date: 1995-96

End Date: Ongoing

Description: This program supports locally designed and controlled early childhood development intervention strategies for off-reserve Aboriginal children and their families. The program focuses on health promotion, education and school readiness, aboriginal culture and language development, parental involvement, nutrition, and social support.

Expected Results: To provide opportunities for the healthy development of Aboriginal pre-school children in urban and northern settings, including the development of positive self-esteem and a desire for learning, and opportunities to develop successfully as young people. The program helps to reduce health disparities experienced by children and their families facing conditions of risk through increased community capacity, by helping participants make healthy choices and by promoting multi-sectoral partnerships.

($ M)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Contributions 32.1* 32.1 32.1 32.1
Total Transfer Payments 32.1* 32.1 32.1 32.1

*An April, 2010, Treasury Board submission which included $3.0M for Contributions for Transitions Fund returns planned spending to $32.1M from the $29.1M published in the 2010-11 RPP.

Link to link 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Community Action Program for Children

Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and prevent and mitigate disease and injury

Program Activity: Health Promotion

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Action Program for Children (CAPC)

Start Date: 1993-94

End Date: Ongoing

Description: CAPC provides funding to community-based groups and coalitions to develop and deliver comprehensive, culturally appropriate prevention and early intervention programs to promote the health and social development of children (0-6 years) and their families facing conditions of risk.

Expected Results: To enhance community capacity through a population health approach and to respond to the health and development needs of young children and their families who are facing conditions of risk. Contribute to improved health and social outcomes for young children and parents/caregivers facing conditions of risk, and continue partnering with multiple sectors in the community.

($ M)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Contributions 53.4 53.4 53.4 53.4
Total Transfer Payments 53.4 53.4 53.4 53.4

Link to link 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program

Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and prevent and mitigate disease and injury

Program Activity: Health Promotion

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (CPNP)

Start Date: 1994-95

End Date: Ongoing

Description: This program promotes the health of at-risk pregnant women, infants and their families through leadership and support to community groups. The program focuses on reducing the incidence of unhealthy birth weights, improving the health of both infant and mother, and encouraging breastfeeding.

Expected Results: To enhance community capacity through a population health approach to respond to the health and development needs of pregnant women and their infants who are facing conditions of risk. Contribute to improved health outcomes for pregnant women, infants and their families and continue partnering with multiple sectors in the community.

($ M)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Contributions 27.2 27.2 27.2 27.2
Total Transfer Payments 27.2 27.2 27.2 27.2

Link to link 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Innovation Strategy

Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and prevent and mitigate disease and injury

Program Activity: Health Promotion

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Innovation Strategy (IS)

Start Date: 2009-10

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The Innovation Strategy is a federal grants and contributions initiative designed to foster and support effective action on and across a broad range of factors that affect the health of Canadians. The IS focuses on innovation and learning in population health to address the determinants of health and to reduce health inequalities. The Strategy supports the development, adaptation, implementation and evaluation of innovative interventions and policy initiatives in various settings and populations in Canada as well as knowledge translation and dissemination based on the systematic collection of results and outcomes of interventions and the promotion of their use across Canada.

Expected Results: To increase effective action to reduce health inequalities and their underlying causes by implementing innovative and promising population health practices. Performance measures include the:

  • Extent of design and implementation across Canada of innovative and promising interventions and practices;
  • Extent of knowledge exchange regarding effective interventions to take action on priority heath issues; and
  • Increase in the number of intersectoral collaborations to address specific determinants of health and reduce health inequalities.
($ M)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Grants   6.5   7.2   7.2   7.2
Total Contributions   3.8   3.7   3.7   3.7
Total Transfer Payments 10.3 10.9 10.9 10.9

Link to link 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada

Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and prevent and mitigate disease and injury

Program Activity: Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada (FI)

Start Date: January 2005

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Contributions towards the Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada.

Expected Results: Projects funded at the national and regional levels will result in increased knowledge and awareness of the nature of HIV and AIDS and ways to address the disease; increased individual and organizational capacity to address HIV and AIDS; and enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS.

($ M)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Grants   5.2   6.0   7.4   7.4
Total Contributions 16.7 16.7 16.8 16.8
Total Transfer Payments 21.9 22.7 24.2 24.2

Link to link 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



National Collaborating Centres for Public Health

Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and prevent and mitigate disease and injury

Program Activity: Public Health Preparedness and Capacity

Name of Transfer Payment Program: National Collaborating Centres for Public Health (NCCPH)

Start Date: 2004-05

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Contributions to persons and agencies to support health promotion projects in community health resource development, training/skill development and research. The focus of the NCCPH program is to strengthen public health capacity, translate health knowledge and promote and support the use of knowledge and evidence by public health practitioners in Canada in collaboration with provincial/territorial and local governments, academia, public health practitioners and non-governmental organizations.

Expected Results: Improved public health decision-making stemming from:

  • Increased opportunities for collaboration and networking between health portfolio partners, NCCs and other external organizations;
  • Increased knowledge translation activities ( including knowledge synthesis, translation and exchange) and the application of environmental scan and research findings by researchers and knowledge users;
  • Knowledge gap identification, acting as catalysts for new research;
  • Increased availability of knowledge for evidence-based decision making in public health with consequent increased use of evidence to inform public health programs, policies and practices; and
  • Improved public health programs and policies.
($ M)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Contributions 8.3 8.3 8.3 8.3
Total Transfer Payments 8.3 8.3 8.3 8.3

Link to link 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Canadian Diabetes Strategy (non-Aboriginal elements)

Strategic Outcome: Canada is able to promote health, reduce health inequalities, and prevent and mitigate disease and injury

Program Activity: Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Diabetes Strategy (non-Aboriginal elements) (CDS)

Start Date: 2005-06

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The CDS engages provinces, territories and stakeholders at the national and regional levels in order to improve information and services available to Canadians living with or at higher risk of developing diabetes. This is achieved through community-based programming, support for diabetes surveillance systems, and collaboration on knowledge development and exchange related to risk factors and determinants for diabetes and its complications.

Expected Results: The provision of information to Canadians living with diabetes or who are at higher risk of developing diabetes has the direct effect of increasing awareness of diabetes risks and complications. Canadians who are at high risk for developing diabetes will have information to increase their awareness of their risks and will have skills to prevent the onset of diabetes. Canadians living with diabetes will have increased awareness of complications and will be provided with skills for self-management of their disease. Moreover, surveillance and knowledge development, along with community-based programming, enhances the capacity of researchers and practitioners to apply best practices to better detect, educate and counsel. Finally, the activities of the CDS assist policy makers at all levels to improve public policy regarding diabetes. Ultimately, these activities will lead to earlier detection and better management of diabetes.

($ M)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Grants 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2
Total Contributions 4.6 5.1 5.1 5.1
Total Transfer Payments 5.8 6.3 6.3 6.3

Link to link 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan




Greening Government Operations (GGO)

The Greening Government Operations (GGO) table has been created for departments to report against progress on Goal 8 of the link Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (i.e., minimize the environmental footprint of government operations). In any given fiscal year departments are required only to complete the applicable portions of the table based on the provisions of the link Federal Sustainable Development Act.

Green Building Targets


8.1 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, new construction and build-to-lease projects, and major renovation projects, will achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance.*
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Number of completed new construction, build-to-lease and major renovation projects in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework
(Optional in FY 2011-12)
   
Number of completed new construction, build-to-lease and major renovation projects that have achieved an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework
(Optional in FY 2011-12)
   
Existence of strategic framework
(Optional in RPP 2011-12)
No; target completion date is March 31, 2012  

* This will be demonstrated by achieving Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) New Construction (NC) Silver, Green Globes Design 3 Globes, or equivalent.

Strategies / Comments

  1. The Agency has one major construction project underway, but it will not be ready for occupancy until February 2013. The JC Wilt Infectious Diseases Research Centre Project will be targeting LEED-NC Silver certification on an approximate floor area of 5,360m2.
  2. The Agency will establish a Departmental Strategic Framework to outline the conditions for buildings being assessed against this target as of April 1, 2012. The Agency will assess existing new construction and build-to-lease projects against the framework commencing in 2012-13.


8.2 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, existing Crown buildings over 1,000m2 will be assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool.*
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Number of buildings over 1,000m2, as per departmental strategic framework
(Optional in FY 2011-12)
   
Percentage of buildings over 1,000m2 that have been assessed using an industry-recognized assessment tool, as per departmental strategic framework
(Optional in FY 2011-12)
   
Existence of strategic framework
(Optional in RPP 2011-12)
No; target completion date is March 31, 2012  

* Assessment tools include: Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) BES (Building Environmental Standards), Green Globes or equivalent.

Strategies / Comments

  1. The Agency footprint includes two Crown laboratory buildings: the Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses and the Canadian Science Centre for Human and Animal Health.
  2. The Agency will establish a Departmental Strategic Framework to outline the conditions for buildings being assessed against this target as of April 1, 2012. Existing Crown buildings over 1,000m2 will be assessed upon completion of the Framework.


8.3 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, new lease or lease renewal projects over 1,000m2, where the Crown is the major lessee, will be assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool.*
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Number of completed lease and lease renewal projects over 1,000m2 in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework
(Optional in FY 2011-12)
NA  
Number of completed lease and lease renewal projects over 1,000m2 that were assessed using an industry-recognized assessment tool in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework
(Optional in FY 2011-12)
NA  
Existence of strategic framework
(Optional in RPP 2011-12)
NA  

* Assessment tools include: BOMA BES, an appropriately tailored BOMA International Green Lease Standard, or equivalent.

Strategies / Comments

  1. This target is not applicable as Public Works and Government Services Canada negotiates all leases on behalf of PHAC. As the client, the Agency can only request inclusion of this target in its lease requirements.


8.4 As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, fit-up and refit projects will achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance.*
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Number of completed fit-up and refit projects in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework
(Optional in FY 2011-12)
   
Number of completed fit-up and refit projects that have achieved an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in the given fiscal year, as per departmental strategic framework
(Optional in FY 2011-12)
   
Existence of strategic framework
(Optional in RPP 2011-12)
No; target completion date is March 31, 2012  

* This will be demonstrated by achieving LEED Commercial Interior Silver, Green Globes Fit-Up 3 Globes, or equivalent.

Strategies / Comments

  1. The Agency does not have any fit-up or refit projects scheduled this fiscal year.
  2. The Agency will establish a Departmental Strategic Framework to outline the conditions for buildings being assessed against this target as of April 1, 2012. The Agency will assess its fit-up and refit projects against the Strategic Framework commencing in 2012-13.

Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target


8.6 By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Existence of implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally-generated EEE
(Optional in RPP 2011-12)
No; target approval date is March 31, 2012  
Total number of departmental locations with EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year FY 2011-12 23%  
FY 2012-13 60%  
FY 2013-14 100%  

Strategies / Comments

  1. Definition of Location: Any building that is occupied by at least one PHAC employee and one EEE asset. It excludes facilities such as warehouses and mobile laboratories. The Agency has 39 locations.
  2. EEE Implementation Plan: The Agency will develop a National Implementation Plan for the disposal of the Agency’s surplus EEE. The plan will include an annual interim target of 23% for 2011-2012, with the target of having all PHAC facilities with an EEE implementation plan fully implemented by March 31, 2014. The EEE implementation plan will include all of the required elements, as per the mandatory implementation strategies listed in Theme IV of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. The Agency’s EEE Implementation Plan will be hosted on the PHAC internal website.
  3. Roles and Responsibilities: The Asset and Materiel Management Division is the Office of Primary Interest with collaboration from the Sustainable Development Division and the IM/IT Directorate.
  4. Key Activities of the EEE Disposal Process: PHAC, in collaboration with Health Canada, will enhance its system to track and report on EEE disposal based on key equipment types disposed of through all designated streams at all locations that have an EEE implementation plan fully implemented.
  5. Reporting Requirements: The financial system and Asset Centre databases will be used to establish, monitor and, report on metrics for measuring activity-level performance of this target.
  6. Mechanisms to Evaluate Progress: PHAC will prepare an annual, national EEE disposal report for senior management, which will be led by the Asset and Materiel Management Division, with input from the IM/IT Directorate.
  7. Relationship between Agency Asset Management System and EEE Implementation Plan: The Agency’s asset management systems will be modified to enable tracking and reporting on compliance with implementation plans.
  8. Security Concerns or Sub-Processes: PHAC will ensure all security considerations will be taken before disposal of electronic equipment occurs.

Printing Unit Reduction Target


8.7 By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply target where building occupancy levels, security considerations, and space configuration allow.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units in fiscal year 2010-11, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow (Optional) 1.8:1*  
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow FY 2011-12 4:1  
FY 2012-13 8:1  
FY 2013-14 8:1  

*Ratio determined through an audit of the PHAC Print Optimization studies, which include select PHAC locations. This ratio will be updated as additional figures from across Canada are determined.

Strategies / Comments

  1. Printing Unit Definition: A printing unit is defined as all desktop printers, networked printers, facsimile machines, photocopiers and multi-functional devices (MFDs).
  2. Scope: Target excludes:
    • Label makers, plotters, scanners, etc.;
    • Select employees as a result of Duty to Accommodate and ergonomic assessments;
    • Buildings with fewer than eight employees; and
    • Buildings where space configuration does not allow for an 8:1 ratio to be achieved.
    Security considerations will serve as an exemption under specific conditions.
  3. Method Used for Determining Number of Organizational Printing Units: IM/IT staff will conduct a manual inspection of all Agency workstations, using PHAC floor plans as a mapping tool.
  4. Method for Determining Number of Office Employees: TBS Population Affiliation Report1 (2777 Employees).

1 The TBS Population Affiliation Report can be found at: link http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pas-srp/report-rapport_e.asp?cat=e.


Paper Consumption Target


8.8 By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005-2006 and 2011-2012, and applicable scope.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Number of sheets of internal office paper purchased or consumed per office employee in the baseline year selected, as per departmental scope
(Optional in RPP 2011-12)
   
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption, expressed as a percentage, relative to baseline year selected
(Optional in RPP 2011-12)
FY 2011-12    
FY 2012-13    
FY 2013-14    

Strategies / Comments

  1. PHAC will determine data sources and develop implementation strategies for achieving and reporting against this target by March 31, 2012. Once the data sources and strategies have been identified, PHAC will establish a baseline.

Green Meetings Target


8.9 By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Presence of a green meeting guide
(Optional in RPP 2011-12)
No; target approval date is March 31, 2012  


Green Procurement Targets


8.10 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least 3 SMART* green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.
8.10.1 As of April 1, 2011, office computers will have a minimum average of a four-year life in the Department.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Average life of office computers in the Department in fiscal year 2010-11 4 years  
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year 4 years  

*SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound.

Strategies / Comments

  1. This target complies with Environment Canada’s SMART criteria. Considering the expenditures on and purchase volume of office computers, these reductions are a best practice in green procurement and should be considered before any other targets.
  2. It requires either asset management data on office computers or data on the average expenditure per office employee and the average cost of office computer for a proxy calculation.
  3. Successful integration of this target in Agency operations requires the collaboration of multiple stakeholders, such as information technology authorities, procurement authorities and asset managers. It also requires the support of program managers throughout the organization.


8.10 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least 3 SMART* green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.
8.10.2 As of April 1, 2011, at least 90% of new purchases and leases of printers and multi-functional devices will have environmental features.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Percentage of newly purchased and leased printers and multi-functional devices with environmental features in the 2010-2011 fiscal year 100%  
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year 90%  

*SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound.

Strategies / Comments

  1. This target complies with Environment Canada’s SMART criteria.
  2. This target complements the Printing Unit Reduction Target (8.7).
  3. For this target, progress against measure in the given fiscal year may be lower than the established baseline to allow for security and emergency management considerations under specific conditions.


8.10 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least 3 SMART* green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.
8.10.3 By March 31, 2012, the Agency will procure and operationalize smart bars for all workstations across the Agency to enhance energy efficiency.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Baseline in 2010-2011:

Number of purchased and operationalized smart bars relative to the number of workstations across the Agency

0%
 
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year 100%  

*SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound.

Strategies / Comments

  1. This target complies with Environment Canada’s SMART criteria.
  2. This target will realize cost-savings and reduced energy consumption during off-peak hours. Considering the high level of electricity used in office buildings, these reductions are a best practice in green procurement.
  3. Operationalizing smart bars for all workstations will reduce greenhouse gas emissions attributable to the Agency and support the Agency's 4th Energy Reduction Initiative in its link Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy.
  4. This target requires the collaboration of multiple stakeholders, such as information technology, sustainable development, procurement authorities and asset managers. It also requires the support of program managers throughout the organization.


8.11 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART* targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision-making.
Training for Select Employees

8.11.1 By March 31, 2012, a minimum of 80% of materiel managers, procurement personnel and acquisition cardholders will have taken an Agency recognized training course on green procurement.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Baselines established in 2009-10:  
% of Asset and Materiel Management employees with Canadian School of Public Service (CSPS) C215 certification 73%

% of Asset and Materiel Management contracting specialists with CSPS C215 certification

83%
% of Acquisition Card Holders with PHAC Mandatory Procurement Training 83%

Progress against measure in the given fiscal year:

 
% of Asset and Materiel Management employees with Canadian School of Public Service (CSPS) C215 certification 80%**

% of Asset and Materiel Management contracting specialists with CSPS C215 certification

80%**
% of Acquisition Card Holders with PHAC Mandatory Procurement Training 100%***

*SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound.
**For these targets, progress against measure in the given fiscal year may be lower than the established baseline to allow for security and emergency management considerations under specific conditions.
***Mandatory

Strategies / Comments

  1. This target complies with Environment Canada’s SMART criteria.
  2. An Agency recognized training course on green procurement includes: The Canada School of Public Service C215 certification and the mandatory procurement training for PHAC acquisition cardholders.
  3. For the purpose of this target, identified materiel managers and procurement personnel include all PHAC employees designated with a Procurement Group (PG) classification.


8.11 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART* targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision-making.
Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management

8.11.2 As of April 1, 2011, 100% of all identified managers and functional heads of procurement will have environmental considerations clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
Baselines established in 2009-10:

% of all managers and function heads (three employees) of procurement and materials with environmental consideration clauses incorporated into their performance evaluations

100%
 
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year 100%  

*SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound.

Strategies / Comments

  1. This target complies with Environment Canada’s SMART criteria.
  2. The three identified employees have responsibility for 100% of departmental purchases over $10,000.


8.11 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART* targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision-making.
Management processes and controls

8.11.3 By March 31, 2014, decrease the quantity of “unknown attributes” associated with the financial system’s Green Procurement field in contracts by at least 10% below 2009-10 baseline levels.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Target Status  
% of contracts and services with ‘unknown attributes’ 3,171 of 4,853 contracts = 65%  
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year 63% “unknown attributes”  

*SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound.

Strategies / Comments

  1. In the 2009-10 Departmental Performance Report, PHAC reported that it established a green procurement baseline indicator for purchased goods and services.
    • 3171 Unknown Attributes or $125.7M.
    • 72 Environmental Attributes of Supplier or $20.1M.
    • 41 Uncertified Environmental Attribute or $0.6M.
    • 67 Certified Environmental Attribute or $1.4M.
    • 22 Recycled Content or $0.1M.
    • 1480 No Environmental Attribute or $364.6M.
  2. Of the 4,853 contracts implemented in 2009-10 for goods and services, four percent or 202 included a green component. PHAC’s objective for 2011-12 is to reduce the quantity of unknown attributes by 2%. Goods and services include, but are not limited to:
    • IT hardware procurement;
    • Vehicles procurement;
    • Furniture procurement;
    • IT services procurement;
    • Professional services procurement; and
    • Acquisition card procurement.

Reporting on the Purchases of Offset Credits


Mandatory reporting on the purchase of greenhouse gas emissions offset credits, as per the Policy Framework for Offsetting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Major International Events, should be reported here.
Performance Measure RPP DPR
Quantity of emissions offset in the given fiscal year
(Optional for all RPPs)
Not Applicable  

Strategies / Comments

  1. The Agency is not seeking to purchase greenhouse gas emissions offset credits in 2011-12.



Horizontal Initiatives


Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada

Name of Horizontal Initiative: link Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada (FI)

Name of Lead Department(s): Public Health Agency of Canada (the Agency)

Lead Department Program Activity: Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: January 13, 2005

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement): The FI strengthens domestic action on HIV and AIDS, builds a coordinated Government of Canada approach, and supports global health responses to HIV and AIDS. It focuses on prevention and access to diagnosis, care, treatment and support for those populations most affected by HIV and AIDS in Canada — people living with HIV and AIDS, gay men, Aboriginal people, people who use injection drugs, federal inmates, youth, women, and people from countries where HIV is endemic. The FI also supports and strengthens multi-sector partnerships to address the determinants of health. It supports collaborative efforts to address factors which can increase the transmission and acquisition of HIV including sexually transmitted infections (STI) and also addresses co-infection issues with other infectious diseases (e.g., Hepatitis C and tuberculosis) from the perspective of disease progression and morbidity in people living with HIV and AIDS. People living with and vulnerable to HIV and AIDS are active partners in shaping policies and practices affecting their lives.

*Shared Outcome(s):

First level outcomes

  • Increased knowledge and awareness of the nature of HIV and AIDS and ways to address the disease;
  • Increased individual and organizational capacity;
  • Increased Canadian engagement and leadership in the global context; and
  • Enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS.

Second level outcomes

  • Reduced stigma, discrimination, and other barriers;
  • Improved access to more effective prevention, care, treatment and support;
  • Internationally informed federal response; and
  • Increased coherence of the federal response.

Ultimate outcomes

  • Prevent the acquisition and transmission of new infections;
  •  
  • Improved quality of life for those at risk and living with HIV and AIDS;
  • Contribute to the global effort to reduce the spread of HIV and AIDS and mitigate its impact; and
  • Contribute to the strategic outcomes of partner departments.

*Shared Outcomes have been refined in response to an April 2009 link Federal Initiative (FI) to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada Implementation Evaluation Report, which recommended strengthening of the FI’s performance measurement framework.

Governance Structure(s): The Responsibility Centre Committee (RCC) is the governance body for the FI. It is comprised of directors from the nine Responsibility Centres which receive funding through the FI. Led by the Agency, the RCC promotes policy and program coherence among the participating departments and agencies, and ensures that evaluation and reporting requirements are met.

The link Agency is the federal lead for issues related to HIV and AIDS in Canada responsible for overall coordination, communications, social marketing, reporting, evaluation, national and regional programs, policy development, surveillance and laboratory science.

link Health Canada (HC) supports community-based HIV and AIDS education, capacity-building, and prevention for First Nations on-reserve and Inuit communities south of the 60th degree parallel and provides leadership on international health policy and program issues.

As the Government of Canada’s agency for health research, the link Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) sets priorities for and administers the extramural research program.

link Correctional Service Canada (CSC), an agency of the link Public Safety Portfolio, provides health services (including services related to the prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of HIV and AIDS) to offenders sentenced to two years or more.

Planning Highlights: Provide inter-sectoral leadership on common approaches to monitoring systems and to program interventions in order to prevent and control HIV and AIDS and related infectious diseases in Canada.

Federal Partner: The Agency
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Science and Technology for Public Health HIV/AIDS Reference Testing and Quality Assurance Ongoing   2.9 link ER 1.1
link ER 1.2
Surveillance and Population Health Assessment Surveillance of Infectious Disease Ongoing   4.5 link ER 2.1
Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation Infectious Disease Prevention and Control and Community Associated Infections Ongoing 34.9 link ER 3.1
link ER 3.2
link ER 3.3
Total Agency   42.3  

Expected Results:

ER 1.1: Public health decisions and interventions by public health officials are supported by timely, reliable and accredited reference service testing that accurately captures all the circulating HIV strains in Canada and directs attention to new outbreaks and increases in HIV transmission.

  1. Identify best treatments for reduced mother to child transmission.
  2. Develop standards and methods for testing.
  3. Improve understanding of HIV variation.
  4. Provide drug resistance information that will guide treatment selection for treatment-na´ve patients.
  5. Monitor quality of HIV testing in Canada.

ER 1.2: Use of laboratory-generated knowledge is increased.

  1. Develop linkages with epidemiologists and other social scientists to examine magnitude of HIV test results and social determinants that have an influence in HIV infected persons.
  2. Identify, confirm, and provide recommendations to address performance of HIV diagnostic test kits in Canada.
  3. Collaborate with the Canadian Association of HIV Clinical Laboratory Specialists on standards development for increased quality of HIV diagnostic, prognostic, and drug resistance testing.
  4. Collaborate with the Standards Council of Canada and the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute on the creation and implementation of quality standard guidelines/practices in medical laboratories in Canada and worldwide.
  5. Disseminate technical information to partners on HIV testing to enhance quality, reliability, and comparability.
  6. Collaborate with CIHR and the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control on funded projects including HIV transmission patterns in at-risk communities in Vancouver in order to determine whether new infections are over-represented.

ER 2.1: Trends are monitored and assessed in reported HIV infections, and patterns of prevalence and risk and health behaviours related to HIV and associated infections among populations most affected by HIV and AIDS in Canada are assessed. This will be achieved by designing and implementing targeted survey data collection, analysis, and interpretation, as well as knowledge transfer and exchange. These efforts will particularly be focussed in areas and in populations that have noted recent increases in HIV infection rates, such as Aboriginal persons in Saskatchewan who inject drugs.

ER 3.1: Increased knowledge and awareness of the nature of HIV and AIDS and ways to address the disease, as indicated by:

  1. The number and type of evidence-based information products developed and disseminated, including the national report on HIV/AIDS Surveillance; the National Report on HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance; comparative international studies of HIV incidence and prevalence; three population-specific reports; an HIV prevention and related co-infection framework; HIV counselling and testing guidelines and a chapter on disclosure; the Canadian Guidelines on Sexually Transmitted Infections; Canadian Sexual Health Education Guidelines information products; interdepartmental pilot projects to address HIV and the determinants of health; augmented HIV case reporting; targeted epidemiological studies among most at risk populations; improved knowledge and characterization of HIV strains in Canada; and implementation of recommendations from the PHAC study of HIV and AIDS funding programs’ structure;
  2. Ongoing support and guidance provided to partners, including the number and type of knowledge and awareness activities and products, and processes to develop funding proposals aligned with public health priorities;
  3. Project data on number of presentations and workshops and their reach;
  4. Project data on increases in knowledge of HIV transmission and risk factors among target populations;
  5. Identification of novel transmission mechanisms of HIV infection; and
  6. The efficacy of policies aimed at addressing HIV transmission.

ER 3.2: Enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS, as indicated by:

  1. Intersectoral leadership;
  2. Coordinated approaches to data collection and dissemination, enhanced collaboration with key stakeholders in the response to HIV and AIDS, and STI’s, including committees, partnerships and collaborative documents;
  3. Focussed advisory and coordination agendas that link to FI expected results;
  4. Engagement of community organisations in the response to HIV and AIDS and the factors that impact those affected and at risk for infection;
  5. The number of invitations to submit applications and the number of funded project proposals;
  6. Project data on number and type of partnerships; and,
  7. On-going guidance provided to NGO partners.

ER 3.3: Increased individual and organizational capacity to address HIV and AIDS, as indicated by:

  1. The accessibility, quality and reliability of HIV molecular diagnostic and monitoring assays;
  2. The development and implementation of effective interventions for the prevention and control of infectious diseases in community settings;
  3. Sustained support to community-based organizations, including the number of projects funded and funds provided to community-based funding;
  4. The number of projects in which target populations contribute to management and delivery of projects;
  5. The number and type of capacity building activities for non-governmental and community-based organizations;
  6. Project data on actions to improve access to health and social services;
  7. Project data on number of volunteers and volunteer hours;
  8. Improved methods for determining the immune health of people with HIV; and
  9. Identifying key prevention strategies for vulnerable groups.

Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Internal Services Governance and Management Support Services Ongoing 0.9 link ER 4.1
link ER 4.2
First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care Bloodborne Diseases and Sexually Transmitted Infections — HIV/AIDS Ongoing 4.5 link ER 5.1
link ER 5.2
Total HC   5.4  

Expected Results:

ER 4.1: Increased Canadian engagement and leadership in the global context through exchanging best practices with global partners to inform global and domestic policies on HIV and AIDS. This will be achieved by supporting the development and dissemination of information, and through increased dialogue and engagement with stakeholders and other Government of Canada departments in three global fora to share expertise and influence policies.

ER 4.2: Enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS through supporting the development of advice documents to inform global collaboration on HIV and AIDS and policy coherence across federal government’s global activities on HIV and AIDS.

ER 5.1: Areas for improved programming regarding HIV-blood borne sexually transmitted infections (HIV-BBSTI) and tuberculosis (TB) co-infections are identified via enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address underlying factors related to HIV and AIDS through partnerships with the link National Native Alcohol and Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program (NNADAP) and the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch’s TB Program.

ER 5.2: Increased individual and organizational capacity to address HIV and AIDS, as indicated by the:

  1. Development of a training module to be used by NNADAP workers and community nurses in HIV-BBSTI risk factors;
  2. Number of community nurses receiving training on HIV-BBSTI and related health issues; and
  3. Number of NNADAP workers receiving training on HIV-BBSTI risk factors and the need for HIV testing.

Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Health and Health Services Advances HIV and AIDS Research Initiative Ongoing 21.0 link ER 6.1
link ER 6.2
link ER 6.3
link ER 6.4
Total CIHR   21.0  

Expected Results:

ER 6.1: Increased knowledge and awareness of the nature of HIV and AIDS and ways to address the disease through the funding of high-quality research and knowledge translation grants in HIV and AIDS. This will be achieved through the ongoing development and administration of strategic research funding programs.

ER 6.2: Increased individual and organizational capacity for HIV and AIDS research through the funding of high-quality capacity-building grants and awards in HIV and AIDS. This outcome is achieved through the ongoing development and administration of strategic research capacity-building funding programs.

ER 6.3: Enable Canadian participation and leadership in HIV/AIDS research in the global context through the funding of internationally focused research projects and partnerships and contributing to relevant FI activities.

ER 6.4: Enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV/AIDS through on-going participation in FI committees and activities and the development of collaborative activities to address common priorities.


Federal Partner: Correctional Services Canada
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Custody Institutional Health Services Public Health Services Ongoing 4.2 link ER 7.1
link ER 7.2
Total CSC   4.2  

Expected Results:

ER 7.1: Increased knowledge and awareness of the nature of HIV and AIDS and ways to address the disease, as indicated by the percentage of federal offenders who indicate improved general knowledge of HIV and AIDS after attending CSC’s Peer Education Course.

ER 7.2: Enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS through the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Heads of Corrections Working Group on Health. The emphasis will be on developing and strengthening partnerships with: provincial and territorial governments involved in addressing HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted and blood borne infections; federal departments at national and regional levels (e.g., PHAC, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch of Health Canada); and the Council of Chief Medical Officers of Health.

($ M)
Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
Ongoing 72.9

Results to be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if Applicable): N/A

Contact Information:
Stephanie Mehta
100 Eglantine Drive
Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9
613-954-4502
stephanie.mehta@phac-aspc.gc.ca

Preparedness for Avian and Pandemic Influenza

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Preparedness for Avian and Pandemic Influenza Initiative

Name of Lead Department(s): Public Health Agency of Canada (the Agency)

Lead Department Program Activities:

  • Public Health Preparedness and Capacity
  • Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation
  • Surveillance and Population Health Assessment
  • Science and Technology for Public Health
  • Regulatory Enforcement and Emergency Response

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 21, 2006

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement): This initiative is directed at mitigating Canada’s risk from two major, inter-related animal and public health threats: the potential spread of avian influenza (AI) virus (i.e., H5N1) to wild birds and domestic fowl in Canada; and, the potential for a human-adapted strain to arise resulting in human-to-human transmission potentially triggering a human influenza pandemic. A coordinated and comprehensive plan to address both avian and pandemic influenza is maintained.

The bulk of the initiative is ongoing. Activities have been launched in the areas of vaccines and antivirals, surge capacity, prevention and early warning, emergency preparedness, critical science and regulation, risk communication, and inter-jurisdictional collaboration. To enhance the federal capacity to address an on-reserve pandemic, efforts have been made to increase surveillance and risk assessment capacity to fill gaps in planning and preparedness.

Shared Outcome(s):

Immediate Outcomes

  • Strengthened Canadian capacity to prevent and respond to pandemics; and
  • Increased internal and external awareness, knowledge and engagement with stakeholders.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Increased prevention, preparedness and control of challenges and emergencies related to AI/PI; and
  • Strengthened public health capacity.

Long-Term and Strategic Outcomes

  • Increased/reinforced public confidence in Canada’s public health system; and
  • Minimization of serious illness, overall deaths, and societal disruption as a result of an influenza pandemic

Governance Structure(s): In January 2008, the link Agency, the link Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the link Canadian Food Inspection Agency and link Health Canada  finalized the Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Interdepartmental/Agency Governance Agreement. The primary scope of the Agreement is the management of specific horizontal issues and/or initiatives relating to avian and pandemic influenza preparedness.

The Agreement is supported by a structure that falls within the auspices of the Deputy Minister’s Committee on Avian and Pandemic Influenza Planning. Implementation of the Agreement is led by the Avian and Pandemic Influenza Assistant Deputy Ministers (API ADM) Governance Committee focusing on implementation of the initiatives. The API ADM Governance Committee provides strategic direction and oversight monitoring.

An Avian and Pandemic Influenza Operations Directors General Committee supports the API ADM Governance Committee, makes recommendations to it and oversees the coordination of deliverables.

Planning Highlights: In 2011-12 the Agency, working collaboratively with Health Canada, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, intends to expand upon previous activities in avian and pandemic influenza preparedness, through the continuation of the vaccine readiness strategies, antivirals, surge capacity, prevention and early warning, emergency preparedness, critical science and regulation, risk communication, and inter-jurisdictional collaboration. Planned activities and expected results reflect lessons learned from the H1N1 pandemic, notably the Management Response and Action Plan (MRAP) following the Senate study.

Federal Partner: The Agency
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Science and Technology for Public Health Rapid vaccine development and testing Ongoing   1.0 link ER 1.1
Winnipeg lab and space optimization Ongoing 18.8 link ER 2.1
Surveillance and Population Health Assessment Surveillance Ongoing   8.7 link ER 3.1
Public Health Preparedness and Capacity Vaccine readiness and clinical trials Ongoing   3.6 link ER 4.1
Capacity for pandemic preparedness Ongoing   5.2 link ER 5.1
Emergency preparedness Ongoing   6.0 link ER 6.1
link ER 6.2
link ER 6.3
link ER 6.4
link ER 6.5
link ER 6.6
Emergency human resources Ongoing   0.4 link ER 7.1
Strengthening the public health laboratory network Ongoing   1.2 link ER 8.1
link ER 8.2
link ER 8.3
Influenza research network Ongoing   1.8 link ER 9.1
Pandemic influenza risk assessment and modelling Ongoing   0.8 link ER 10.1
link ER 10.2
Evaluation Ongoing   0.6 link ER 11.1
link ER 11.2
link ER 11.3
Pandemic influenza risk communications strategy Ongoing   1.8 link ER 12.1
link ER 12.2
Skilled national public health workforce Ongoing   5.9 link ER 13.1
link ER 13.2
link ER 13.3
link ER 13.4
Regulatory Enforcement and Emergency Response Contribution to National Antiviral Stockpile Ongoing   0.1 link ER 14.1
link ER 14.2
link ER 14.3
Total Agency   55.9  

Expected Results:

ER 1.1: Progress made on the development of different clinical-grade commercial H5N1 influenza vaccines.

ER 2.1: Construction of the new lab is 60% completed, therefore increased research capacity underway.

ER 3.1: Capacity to rapidly identify and report human cases of avian and pandemic influenza and public health events of international concern is improved though the revamping of the current severe respiratory illness early detection system which includes a pilot study on the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) reporting system.

ER 4.1: Capacity for vaccine-adverse event surveillance and effectiveness monitoring during a pandemic is improved through upgrades to the current Canadian Adverse Events Following Immunization Surveillance System (CAEFISS) database to ensure maximum functionality.

ER 5.1: Capacity for increased use of the regional communication systems is improved through the regional Public Health Capacity program.

ER 6.1: Response mechanisms are established to respond to an avian or pandemic influenza outbreak in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Canadian Pandemic Influenza Plan (CPIP).

ER 6.2: The National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) is capable of working with certified influenza strains as the lead influenza reference centre for Canada.

ER 6.3: Quarantine entry and exit screening options are developed and assessed for use during all phases of a pandemic.

ER 6.4: The Health Portfolio Emergency Operations Centre is maintained in a state of readiness.

ER 6.5: Incident response plans are maintained with provincial and territorial departments and non-governmental organizations through testing exercises where the testing criteria are established on lessons learned and through the after action reports and plans which are revised, updated and maintained regularly.

ER 6.6: Increased efficiency and effectiveness of regional resources placed to facilitate the flow of information between federal, provincial and territorial levels through the regional public health capacity program.

ER 7.1: An updated Human Resources Emergency Response Plan is implemented by end of fiscal year 2011-12.

ER 8.1: The current number of equipped and trained federal laboratory liaison technicians in place in provinces and territories will be maintained.

ER 8.2: Communications between provincial and territorial labs and the NML is improved thereby strengthening the national lab’s capacity through a series of meetings throughout the year.

ER 8.3: Components of the Canadian Pandemic Influenza Plan’s Annex C (Pandemic Influenza Laboratory Guidelines) are updated as a result of the H1N1 pandemic.

ER 9.1: Research resources are optimally allocated through proactive research protocols and international collaboration to respond to the needs of avian and pandemic influenza preparedness.

ER 10.1: Predictive and assessment models used for pandemic preparedness are developed and established.

ER 10.2: More potential learners in university and college settings are being trained as mathematical modelers to augment public health capacity in mathematical modeling.

ER 11.1: Evaluation improvements proposed in the Evaluation Plan for avian and pandemic influenza preparedness are implemented.

ER 11.2: Components of the performance measurement framework are in place at the responsibility-centre level.

ER 11.3: Performance data and evidence are collected using a Web-based system and are used for management and reporting.

ER 12.1: Social marketing plans and activities are reviewed and appropriate modifications have been made in light of the H1N1 experience.

ER 12.2: H1N1 lessons learned in communicating with stakeholders during a pandemic influenza are addressed.

ER 13.1: Letters of Agreement with selected placement sites for public health officers across the country are completed.

ER 13.2: Public health officers and Canadian Public Health Service regional coordinators are in place across Canada.

ER 13.3: Training modules continue to be developed, and new and existing modules are made available to public health officers in the field.

ER 13.4: Competency profiles for public health officers are developed.

ER 14.1: Lead time on an outbreak of a pandemic is improved through information sharing, international collaborations and increased surveillance systems.

ER 14.2: Pandemic vaccine availability is improved by optimizing the approval processes.

ER 14.3: The National Antiviral Stockpile is maintained and plans are established for the replacement of antiviral stocks as they reach the end of their shelf-life.


Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Health Products Regulatory activities related to pandemic influenza vaccine Ongoing 1.1 link ER 15.1
link ER 15.2
link ER 15.3
link ER 15.4
link ER 15.5
link ER 15.6
Resources for review and approval of antiviral drug submissions for treatment of pandemic influenza Ongoing 0.2 link ER 16.1
link ER 16.2
link ER 16.3
Establishment of a crisis risk management unit for monitoring and post-market assessment of therapeutic products Ongoing 0.3 link ER 17.1
link ER 17.2
Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit Strengthen federal public health capacity through Governance and Infrastructure Support to FN/I Health System Ongoing 0.7 link ER 18.1
link ER 18.2
link ER 18.3
link ER 18.4
link ER 18.5
FN/I emergency preparedness, planning, training and integration Ongoing 0.3 link ER 19.1
Specialized Health Services Public health emergency preparedness and response (EPR) on conveyances Ongoing 0.3 link ER 20.1
Total HC   2.9  

Expected Results:

ER 15.1: World Health Organization (WHO) Guidance on Regulatory Preparedness for Human Pandemic Influenza Vaccines is revised and updated as required.

ER 15.2: Finalize Extraordinary Use New Drugs (EUND) regulations and develop accompanying guidance document.

ER 15.3: Maintain links established with international regulatory bodies (WHO, Chinese State Food and Drug Administration, United States, Europe, Australia) by continuing to participate in regulatory and technical initiatives which increase the timeliness and availability of information in the event of a pandemic (i.e., pandemic influenza strain).

ER 15.4: Review response to the H1N1 events and produce and implement lessons learned.

ER 15.5: Continue coordinating blood system preparedness through regular teleconferences and regulatory advice/decisions to Canadian Blood Services and Headquarters. Share lessons learned and better practices with WHO Blood Regulators Network.

ER 15.6: Work with the WHO to develop recommendations for new pneumococcal conjugate vaccine through the WHO Expert Committee on Biologic Standardization.

ER 16.1: Complete review of any anti-viral submissions that may be received.

ER 16.2: Finalize Expedited Pandemic Influenza Drug Review (EPIDR) Protocol, incorporating H1N1 pandemic experiences.

ER 16.3: Ongoing on-the-job reviewer training for the accelerated review. Review procedures for antivirals submissions, before and during pandemic occurrences are established.

ER 17.1: Maintenance of the crisis risk management unit.

ER 17.2: Ongoing post-market assessment of therapeutic products.

ER 18.1: Educational initiatives regarding passenger conveyance of infection control are integrated into program activities, training and outreach to conveyance operators.

ER 18.2: Collaborate with PHAC, the Public Service Commission, and Indian and Northern Affairs Commission for planning and response.

ER 18.3: Work on surveillance needs with PHAC.

ER 18.4: Enhanced federal capacity to support First Nations communities in planning and responding to a pandemic.

ER 18.5: Increase links with national and regional Emergency Preparedness and Response program staff and with provinces and territories.

ER 19.1: Continue to support the testing and revision of community pandemic plans.

ER 20.1: Risks to public health on passenger conveyances are mitigated through the development and implementation of emergency preparedness and response policies, programs and training.


Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Health and Health Services Advances Pandemic Preparedness Research Strategic Initiative $40.9 M
The end date of the PPSRI is March 31, 2011, however, additional partner funds are committed in 2011-12
3.8 link ER 21.1
link ER 21.2
Total CIHR   3.8  

Expected Results:

ER 21.1: Progress on funded projects and outcomes of research are reviewed.

ER 21.2: Uptake of research results is facilitated, and consultations on future research needs are completed through reports and meetings of researchers, stakeholders and decision makers.


Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program / Internal Services Enhanced enforcement measures Ongoing   1.5 link ER 22.1
Avian biosecurity on farms Ongoing   2.7 link ER 23.1
Real property requirements $4.0M (2006-07 to 2007-08)   0.0 link ER 24.1
Domestic and wildlife surveillance Ongoing   3.1 link ER 25.1
Strengthened economic and regulatory framework Ongoing   0.9 link ER 26.1
Performance and evaluation Ongoing   1.2 link ER 27.1
Risk communications Ongoing   1.6 link ER 28.1
Field training Ongoing   1.1 link ER 29.1
link ER 29.2
AI enhanced management capability Ongoing   1.0 link ER 30.1
Updated emergency response plans Ongoing   2.0 link ER 31.1
Risk assessment and modelling Ongoing   2.0 link ER 32.1
AI Research Ongoing   1.5 link ER 33.1
International collaboration Ongoing   1.6 link ER 34.1
Animal vaccine bank $0.9M (2006-07 to 2008-09)   0.0 link ER 35.1
Access to antivirals Ongoing   0.1 link ER 36.1
Specialized equipment $20.7M (2006-07 to 2008-09)   0.0 link ER 37.1
Laboratory surge capacity and capability Ongoing   3.7 link ER 38.1
Field surge capacity Ongoing   1.0 link ER 39.1
National veterinary reserve Ongoing   0.8 link ER 40.1
Total CFIA   25.8  

Note: Total CFIA planned spending reflects adjustments made to federal funding allocation due to Strategic Review.

Expected Results:

ER 22.1: Increased capacity to support enhanced screening procedures for live birds or poultry products at Canada’s ports of entry with a view to mitigating the risk of future avian influenza outbreaks in Canada.

ER 23.1: Continuation of stakeholder and general public education, communications and outreach programs in support of the implementation of the National Avian On Farm Biosecurity Standard. Provide stakeholder consultations and develop communication tools to expand education and awareness to the poultry industry service sector.

ER 24.1: No planned expenditures as investments were realized in previous fiscal years.

ER 25.1: Enhanced/integrated Canadian surveillance system, supported by a robust systems platform and the analysis and interpretation of the data collected to allow more timely identification of potential outbreaks, and more timely response to avian influenza situations. Targeted wild bird surveillance plan for 2011 is currently being reviewed. The Canadian Notifiable Avian Influenza Surveillance System is entering its fourth year of operations, providing a real time relay of sampling and reporting of flock status through the National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease.

ER 26.1: Initiatives to strengthen regulatory capacity during outbreaks, including a review and analysis of current legislative/regulatory framework continues.

ER 27.1: Management and evaluation of CFIA’s AI activities, including ongoing performance measurement to monitor results.

ER 28.1: Continued implementation of the “Be Aware and Declare” international border biosecurity outreach campaign. Ongoing media monitoring and training and risk communications related to AI prevention, preparedness and response activities.

ER 29.1: Continued training that will contribute to a skilled and experienced workforce ready to respond to an AI outbreak. A national training initiative for avian influenza response in three core areas is scheduled for the winter of 2011.

ER 29.2: Continued development of training materials (instructor-led and e-learning) in support of emergency response procedures and plans and of trainers in support of end-user training.

ER 30.1: A multi-disease version for the Canadian Emergency Management Response System (CEMRS) application for national surveillance/outbreak use will be available. Translation of CEMRS is currently underway. CEMRS is now used routinely for outbreak document management.

ER 31.1: Continued development and updating of emergency response procedures and plans.

ER 32.1: Continued development of models to better understand the influence and interaction of various factors on the spread of AI and the effectiveness of the various methods used to control and eradicate the disease. A retrospective analysis of the data arising from the 2004 AI outbreak in Abbottsford, BC, is coming to completion after five years' work.  There will be several publications in 2011 describing the key risk factors affecting disease transmission of AI.

ER 33.1: Investment through research in an improved federal capacity for control, risk assessment, diagnostics and vaccines on avian influenza issues will allow a better understanding of the spread of influenza and the effectiveness of disease control measures. These investments will allow more timely and evidence-based decision making on avian influenza responses, thus helping to reducing the risk of transmission to humans and mitigating economic and production losses.

ER 34.1: CFIA staff continue to provide assistance to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Central Bureau in the Communications Department in an effort to promote the development and implementation of science based standards. Furthermore, the CFIA continues to support the OIE's mandate and efforts to assist member countries in the control and eradication of animal diseases, including zoonotics, through its annual contribution to the OIE. In addition, the CFIA continues to support the development of capacity to address emergence of risk at the animal level through the Canadian chapter of Veterinarians Without Borders.

ER 35.1: Future AI vaccines will be purchased on an “as need” basis.

ER 36.1: Maintenance of access protocols and bank of antivirals to provide appropriate protection to federal employees, ensuring a more timely and effective response to an avian influenza situation and better protection of Canadians.

ER 37.1: No planned expenditures as investments realized in previous fiscal years.

ER 38.1: Maintaining, coordinating and managing the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network, an integrated network of federal, provincial and university labs. This network allows for rapid testing, detection and reporting of AI.

ER 39.1: Continued development of a viable response plan, including HR capacity and data management tools.

ER 40.1: Continued training of a reserve of professional veterinarians to enhance surge capacity, expertise and rapid response capability for animal disease control efforts.

Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
Ongoing 87.4

Results to be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if Applicable): N/A

Contact Information:
Dr. John Spika
130 Colonnade Road
Ottawa ON K1A 0K9
613-948-7929
john.spika@phac-aspc.gc.ca

Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative

Name of Horizontal Initiative: link Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative

Name of Lead Department(s): Public Health Agency of Canada (the Agency)

Lead Department Program Activity: Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: February 20, 2007

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2017

Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $111 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement): link The Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative (CHVI) is a collaborative undertaking between the Government of Canada (GoC) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) to contribute to the global effort to develop a safe, effective, affordable and globally accessible HIV vaccine. This collaboration, formalized by a Memorandum of Understanding signed by both parties in August 2006 and renewed in July 2010, builds on the Government of Canada’s commitment to a comprehensive, long-term approach to address HIV/AIDS. Participating federal departments and agencies are the Agency, Health Canada, Industry Canada, the Canadian International Development Agency, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

The CHVI’s overall goals are to: advance the basic science of HIV vaccine discovery and social research in Canada and low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs); support the translation of basic science discoveries into clinical research, with a focus on accelerating clinical trials in humans; address the enabling conditions to facilitate regulatory approval and community preparedness; improve the efficacy and effectiveness of HIV Prevention of Mother-to-Child (PMTCT) services in LMICs by determining innovative strategies and programmatic solutions related to enhancing the accessibility, quality, and uptake; and ensure horizontal collaboration within the CHVI and with domestic and international stakeholders.

Shared Outcome(s):  

Immediate (1-3 years) Outcomes

  • Increased and improved collaboration and networking among researchers working in HIV vaccine discovery and social research in Canada and in LMICs;
  • Greater capacity for vaccines research in Canada;
  • Enhanced knowledge base;
  • Increased readiness and capacity in Canada and LMICs; and
  • An Alliance Coordinating Office established.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Strengthened contribution to global efforts to accelerate the development of safe effective, affordable, and globally accessible HIV vaccines;
  • An increase in the number of women receiving a complete course of anti-retroviral prophylaxis to reduce the risk of mother to child transmission of HIV; and
  • A CHVI Research and Development Alliance established.

Long-Term Outcomes

  • The CHVI contributes to the global efforts to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS particularly in LMICs.

Governance Structure(s): The Minister of Health, in consultation with the Minister of Industry and the Minister of International Cooperation, is the lead Minister for the CHVI. An Advisory Board will be established and be responsible for making recommendations to responsible Ministers regarding projects to be funded and will oversee the implementation of the Memorandum of Understanding between the GoC and the BMGF. The CHVI Secretariat, housed in PHAC will continue to provide a coordinating role to the GoC and the BMGF.

Planning Highlights: In 2011-12, CHVI participating departments and agencies will continue to implement activities initiated in 2010-11. For example, the selection process for the Alliance Coordinating Office; the establishment of a HIV vaccine translational support fund to assist researchers in moving HIV vaccine candidates from preclinical research into clinical trials; the completion and awarding of CIDA-CIHR large team grants; the establishment of a new transfer payment fund to encourage private sector participation; and CHVI regulatory capacity-building activities.

In addition, community-based initiatives, research projects approved in 2009-10/2010-11 and support to the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise will continue in 2011-12. New activities planned for 2011-2012 include the establishment of the Alliance Coordinating Office; provision of training and mentoring programs for capacity building to address identified needs of developing national regulatory authorities; and enhancement of the access, quality and uptake of PMTCT services.

Federal Partner: The Agency
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation Infectious Disease Prevention and Control   5.5 1.5 link ER 1.1
  5.0 0.5 link ER 2.1
link ER 2.2
  7.5 0.8 link ER 3.1
link ER 3.2
link ER 3.3
Total PHAC 18.0 2.8  

Expected Results:

ER 1.1: New vaccine policy approaches and increased community involvement.

ER 2.1: Efficient and more timely transition from preclinical research into clinical trials.

ER 2.2: Increased number of clinical trial lots manufactured for promising HIV vaccine candidates.

ER 3.1: Establishment of a strong and vibrant network of HIV vaccine researchers and other vaccine researchers both in Canada and internationally.

ER 3.2: Development of innovative solutions to the challenges facing HIV vaccine research and development (such as strengthening career development opportunities for young and early-career investigators).

ER 3.3: Effective communications, strategic planning, coordination, reporting and evaluation within the Government of Canada.


Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Internal Services Governance and Management Support Services 1.0 0.1 link ER 4.1
Health Products Regulatory Capacity Building Program for HIV Vaccines 4.0 0.8 link ER 5.1
link ER 5.2
Total HC 5.0 0.9  

NOTE: Health Canada/IAD is awaiting TBS approval of supps. B

Expected Results:

ER 4.1: Promote the harmonization and exchange of domestic and international best practices, policies and protocols related to the regulation of vaccines and clinical trials.

ER 5.1: Ensure that trials with HIV vaccines are performed in accordance with the internationally accepted principles of Good Clinical Practices.

ER 5.2: Strengthen the regulatory capacity of developing national regulatory authorities targeted for vaccine and clinical trial submissions, including those related to HIV/AIDS.


Federal Partner: Industry Canada
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Commercialization and Research and Development Capacity in Targeted Canadian Industries Industrial Research Assistance Program’s Canadian HIV Technology Development Component 13.0 2.5 link ER 6.1
Total IC 13.0 2.5  

Expected Results:

ER 6.1: Further advancement of new and innovative technologies in pre-commercial development at small and medium- sized enterprises that operate in Canada for the prevention, treatment and diagnosis of HIV.


Federal Partner: Canadian International Development Agency
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Global Engagement and Strategic Policy International Development Assistance Program 16.0   4.1 link ER 7.1
12.0   0.8 link ER 8.1
30.0   6.0 link ER 9.1
  2.0   0.5 link ER 10.1
Total CIDA 60.0 11.4  

Expected Results:

ER 7.1: Increased capacity to conduct high-quality clinical trials of HIV vaccine and other related prevention technologies in LMICs through new teams of Canadian and LMICs researchers and research institutions.

ER 8.1: In collaboration with CIHR, increased capacity and greater involvement and collaboration amongst researchers working in HIV vaccine discovery and social research in Canada and in LMICs through the successful completion of the development stage of the Team Grant program to support collaborative teams of Canadian and LMIC researchers.

ER 9.1: Increased number of women receiving a complete course of anti-retroviral prophylaxis to reduce the risk of mother to child transmission of HIV.

ER 10.1: Increased capacity of regulatory authorities in LMICs especially those where clinical trials are planned or ongoing, through training and networking initiatives.


Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Health and Health Services Advances Institute Strategic Advances – HIV/AIDS 15.0 1.5 link ER 11.1
Total CIHR 15.0 1.5  

Expected Results:

ER 11.1: Increased capacity and greater involvement and collaboration amongst researchers working in HIV vaccine discovery and social research in Canada and in LMICs through:

  • Ongoing support for operating and catalyst grants undertaken by Canadian researchers;
  • Ongoing support for two emerging teams of Canadian researchers; and
  • Collaboration with CIDA in award and support of the Large Team Grant program for collaborative teams of Canadian and LMIC researchers.
($ M)
Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
111.0 19.0

Results to be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if Applicable): Non-governmental stakeholders (including research institutions and not-for-profit community organizations) are integral to the success of the CHVI. Their role is to engage and collaborate with participating departments and agencies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and other funders to contribute to the CHVI goals and to Canada’s contribution towards the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise.

Contact Information:
Steven Sternthal
200 Eglantine Driveway
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9
613-952-5120
steven.sternthal@phac-aspc.gc.ca



Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations for the Next Three Fiscal Years

A. Upcoming Internal Audits Over the Next Three Fiscal Years

The following audits were included in the Risk Based Audit Plan 2010-2015 approved in March 2010. The plan is reviewed annually. The annual review and update on planned audits may result in modification to audits conducted.

Internal Audit Type Status Expected Completion Date
Audit of International Activities Program In progress June 2011*
Audit of Immunization Programs Program Planned September 2011
Audit of Laboratory Health and Safety Program Planned September 2011
Audit of Financial Resource Allocation Process Internal Services Planned December 2011**
Audit of Risk Management Framework Internal Services Planned December 2011
Audit of the Management and Control of IM/IT Systems Development Internal Services Planned March 2012
Audit of Human Resources Management Internal Services Planned March 2012
Audit of Pandemic Preparedness Program Planned June 2012
Audit of HR System Information Internal Services Planned September 2012
Audit of the Observatory of Best Practices Program Planned December 2012
Audit of Regional Operations Program Planned December 2012
Audit of Values and Ethics and Conflict of Interest Internal Services Planned March 2013
Audit of Injury Prevention Program Planned March 2013
Audit of Business Continuity Planning Internal Services Planned June 2013
Audit of Science and Scientific Research Program Planned September 2013
Audit of Training and Learning Internal Services Planned December 2013
Audit of Knowledge Information and Data Systems Activities Internal Services Planned March 2014
Audit of Public Health Workforce Program Planned March 2014
Audit of Mental Health Program Planned March 2014

* The expected completion date of the Audit of International Activities has been revised from March 2011 to June 2011.

** The expected completion date of the Audit of Financial Resource Allocation Process has been revised from June 2011 to December 2011.

Electronic Link to Internal Audit Plan: N/A

B. All Upcoming Evaluations Over the Next Three Fiscal Years

Additional evaluations may be conducted within the three-year horizon pending approval of the update to the rolling PHAC Evaluation Plan. Similarly, timelines may be revised.

Evaluation Type Status Expected Completion Date
Evaluation of the Avian and Pandemic  Influenza Preparedness Program Grants and Contributions PAA – SSA 1.3.2.1
Horizontal – PHAC-led
In Progress March 2012
Evaluation of the National Emergency Stockpile System PAA – SA 1.6.3 In Progress March 2012
Evaluation of Aging and Seniors Program PAA – SA 1.4.4 Planned March 2012
Evaluation of the Food-Borne Disease Prevention and Control Program (including Listeriosis) Cross cutting Planned March 2012
Evaluation of Avian Influenza and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Program PAA – SSA 1.3.2.1
Horizontal – PHAC-led
Planned March 2012
Evaluation of the Field Services Program PAA – SSA 1.2.1.3, SA 1.3.1, SSA 1.3.2.2, SSA 1.5.3.1, SSA 1.6.1.1, SSA 1.6.2.3 Planned March 2012
Evaluation of Public Health Surveillance PAA – SA 1.2.1 Planned March 2012
Evaluation of the Family Violence Initiative PAA – SSA 1.4.1.2
Horizontal – PHAC-led
Planned March 2012
Evaluation of the Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities Program PAA – SSA 1.4.3.3 Planned March 2013
Evaluation of the Community Associated Infections (including Hepatitis C Prevention, Support and Research Programs Gs & Cs and Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative Gs & Cs; excluding the Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada) PAA – SSA 1.5.3.3 Planned March 2013
Evaluation of the Immunization and Respiratory Infections Programs (including the National Immunization Strategy) PAA – SSA 1.5.3.1, SSA 1.5.3.2 Planned March 2014
Evaluation of Public Health Tools (including National Collaborating Centres for Public Health and the Public Health Scholarships Capacity Building Gs & Cs programs) PAA – SSA 1.3.1.2 Planned March 2014
Evaluation of the Federal Initiative to address HIV/AIDS PAA – SSA 1.5.3.3 Planned March 2014
Evaluation of the Healthy Living Program (including the Integrated Strategy on Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Gs & Cs) PAA – SSA 1.4.1.1 Planned March 2014
Evaluation of the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Initiative PAA – SSA 1.4.3.4 Planned March 2014
Evaluation of the Gs & Cs component of Chronic Disease Prevention and Mitigation (including the Integrated Strategy on Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Gs & Cs, the Targeted and Immediate Action for Lung and Neurological Diseases Gs & Cs and the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute for the Canadian Breast Cancer Research Alliance Gs & Cs) PAA – SA 1.5.1 Planned March 2014
Evaluation of the Pathogens and Toxins Program PAA – SSA 1.6.1.3 Planned March 2014

Electronic Link to Evaluation Plan: N/A



Sources of Respendable Revenue


($ M)
Program Activity Forecast
Revenue
2010-11
Planned
Revenue
2011-12
Planned
Revenue
2012-13
Planned
Revenue
2013-14
 1.6 Regulatory Enforcement and Emergency Response
Sale to federal and provincial territorial departments and agencies, airports and other federally regulated organizations of first aid kits to be used in disaster and emergency situations ($50,000) 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Subtotal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Total Respendable Revenue 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1



Summary of Capital Spending by Program Activity


($ millions)
Program Activity Forecast
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2011-12
Planned
Spending
2012-13
Planned
Spending
2013-14
1.1 Science and Technology for Public Health 33.9 20.7 14.9 5.0
1.6 Regulatory Enforcement and Emergency Response   2.9   2.2   2.2 2.2
Total 36.8 22.9 17.1 7.2

Note: All figures are rounded.