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ARCHIVED - 2011-2012 RPPs - Transfer Payment Programs

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Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Program (AGGP)
AgriInsurance Program
AgriInvest Program
AgriStability Program
Canadian Cattlemen's Association Legacy Fund
Contributions for Rural and Co-operatives Development
Contributions to Accelerate the Pace of Innovation and Facilitate the Adoption of New Technologies
Contributions to Enable Competitive Enterprises and Sectors
Contributions to Enhance the Safety and Security of Canada's Food System
Contributions to Minimize the Occurrence and Extent of Risk Incidents
Contributions to Promote Environmentally Responsible Agriculture
Contributions to Strengthen the Competitiveness of Canada's Red Meat Packing and Processing Industry
Contributions to Support the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program
Contribution to Support the Specified Risk Material Innovation Program
Contributions to Transform Canada's Strengths into Domestic and Global Success
EcoAgriculture Biofuels Capital Initiative
Loan Guarantees under the Canadian Agricultural Loans Act
Payments in connection with the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act - Advance Payments Program
Programming related to the Agricultural Flexibility Fund


Strategic Outcome: An environmentally sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Program Activity: On-Farm Action

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Program (AGGP) (Voted)

Start date: September 1, 2010

End date: August 31, 2015

Description:
AGGP is a program to develop and transfer knowledge to help farmers mitigate Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. The focus is on both science and knowledge creation, and on knowledge and technology transfer activities. The objective of the AGGP is to enhance the understanding and accessibility of agricultural technologies, Beneficial Management Practices (BMPs) and processes that can be adopted by farmers to mitigate GHG emissions in Canada. The main priority issue areas include: livestock, crops, agroforestry and agricultural water-use efficiency. Eligible recipients must be legal entities and capable of entering into legally binding agreements and must demonstrate a capacity to achieve results consistent with the accountability framework as well as criteria specific to each program or initiative.

Expected results:

  1. Increased knowledge by farmers about GHG mitigation BMP's and technologies, and
  2. Increased adoption by farmers of GHG mitigation BMP's and technologies.

Performance Indicators:

  1. Number of farmers with an increased level of understanding of GHG mitigation BMPs and technologies;
  2. Number of farmers adopting GHG mitigation practices;
  3. Number of new BMPs demonstrated through field days and workshops;
  4. Number of technologies developed, verified and validated; and
  5. Number of methodologies and approaches developed.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: On-Farm Action        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 0.5 5.4 5.4 5.4
Total Transfer Payment Program 0.5 5.4 5.4 5.4

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Program Activity: Business Risk Management

Name of Transfer Payment Program: AgriInsurance Program (Statutory)

Start date: April 1, 2008

End date: March 31, 2012
AgriInsurance is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Description:
The AgriInsurance program is one of the core pillars of the business risk management suite available to producers under Growing Forward.

AgriInsurance (formerly the Production Insurance program), will aim to reduce the financial impact on producers of production losses caused by uncontrollable natural perils.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act (FIPA), as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal Provincial AgriInsurance Agreement.

Federal AgriInsurance website
British Columbia
Alberta
Saskatchewan
Manitoba
Ontario
Quebec
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
Prince Edward Island
Newfoundland

Expected results:
The financial impacts of production losses are mitigated by providing effective insurance protection.

Performance Indicators:

  1. Value of insured production compared to the total value of all agricultural products eligible for insurance reported as follows: Percentage of Crops - Target 60 percent.
  2. Value of crops eligible for insurance compared to the value of all agricultural products reported as follows: Percentage of Crops – Target 85 percent.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Business Risk Management        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 524.0 452.0 See End Date Note
Total Transfer Payment Program 524.0 452.0 - -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Program Activity: Business Risk Management

Name of Transfer Payment Program: AgriInvest Program (Statutory)

Start date: December 19, 2007
Agreements were signed with the provinces to implement the program starting in the 2007 program year.

End date: March 31, 2012
AgriInvest is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Description:
The AgriInvest program is one of the core pillars of the business risk management suite available to producers under Growing Forward.

AgriInvest allows producers to self-manage, through producer-government funded savings accounts, the first 15 percent of their margin losses for a production year and/or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues. Under the program, annual producer deposits of up to 1.5 percent of their allowable net sales are matched by government deposits. Government deposits are cost-shared 60:40 by federal and provincial/territorial governments. In combination with the AgriStability program, AgriInvest is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines, while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

AgriInvest provides producers with a secure, accessible, predictable and bankable source of income assistance to address small drops in farm income and manage on-farm risks.

Federal AgriInvest Website
AgriInvest in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)

Expected results:
Producers have the flexibility in managing small financial risks.
Producers use program account balances to address income declines or to make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues.

Performance Indicators:

  1. Percentage of AgriInvest producers receiving AgriStability payments and making withdrawals from their AgriInvest saving accounts. Target is at least 60 percent of AgriInvest producers.
  2. Percentage of producers indicating that they use their funds to address income declines or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues. Target is at least 75 percent of producers.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Business Risk Management        
Total grants 155.8  139.4 See End Date Note
Total contributions 19.0  20.1 See End Date Note
Total Transfer Payment Program 174.8 159.5 - -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
As required, the allocations to Grant versus Contribution may be adjusted and these would be reflected in the Supplementary Estimates, the Departmental Performance Report and Public Accounts.

Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Program Activity: Business Risk Management

Name of Transfer Payment Program: AgriStability Program (Statutory)

Start date: December 19, 2007
Agreements were signed with the provinces to implement the program starting in the 2007 program year.

End date: March 31, 2012
AgriStability is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Description:

The AgriStability program is one of the core pillars of the business risk management suite available to producers under Growing Forward.

AgriStability is a margin-based program that provides support when a producer experiences larger farm income losses, which are drops in their margin (eligible farm income, less eligible farm expenses) for the program year of more than 15 percent of the producer's average margin from previous years (i.e., their reference margin). Thus, a payment is triggered under the program when a producer’s program year margin drops below 85 percent of their reference margin. AgriStability also includes coverage for negative margins, as well as mechanisms to advance a participant a portion of their expected payment during the year when a significant decline in income is expected (interim payments and Targeted Advance Payments). In combination with the AgriInvest program, it is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines where AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

Federal AgriStability Website
AgriStability in Alberta (Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (AFSC))
AgriStability in Ontario (Agricorp)
AgriStability in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)
AgriStability on Prince Edward Island (PEI Agricultural Insurance Corporation)

Expected results:
The short-term impacts of larger income losses (losses of over 15 percent relative to their historical reference margin) are mitigated.

Performance Indicators:

  1. Participants' farm market revenues compared to total farm market revenues for the industry. Target - 75 percent of farm market revenues are covered by the program.
  2. Participants' production margin with payments compared to reference margin. Target - Program payments bring producer's margin up to 65 percent of reference margin on average (for producers receiving a payment).
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Business Risk Management        
Total grants 115.2 95.5 - -
Total contributions 795.4 501.0 See End Date Note
Total Transfer Payment Program 910.6 596.4 - -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
As required, the allocations to Grant versus Contribution may be adjusted and these would be reflected in the Supplementary Estimates, the Departmental Performance Report and Public Accounts.

Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Program Activity: Trade and Market Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Legacy Fund (Statutory)

Start date: June 27, 2005

End date: March 31, 2015

Description:
The purpose of the Canadian Cattlemen's Association Legacy Fund is to support the Canadian beef sector to develop markets for beef cattle, beef cattle genetics, beef and beef products in a post-BSE environment. A grant totalling $50 million over 10 years will be provided.

Expected results:
Growth in traditional, existing, new and emerging markets for Canadian beef and genetics products; and to maximize the total value realized by the Canadian beef and cattle genetics industry through optimization of genetics and beef product values.

Performance Indicators:

  • Change in consumer recognition and perceptions of Canadian beef and beef products (measured by consumer surveys and benchmark studies);
  • Increase in total beef export volumes to key markets; and
  • Change in international and target country market share.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Trade and Market Development        
Total grants 9.5  5.0 5.0 5.0
Total contributions - - - -
Total Transfer Payment Program 9.5 5.0 5.0 5.0

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.

After 2010-11, it is expected that approximately $11.5 million of the total $50 million authorized will be available for the remaining years of the program. Planned Spending will be adjusted in the future once annual forecasts become available.


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Strategic Outcome: An innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Program Activity: Rural and Co-operatives Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Rural and Co-operatives Development (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2013

Description:
The programming for Rural and Co-operatives Development covers the following two initiatives:

Rural development programming, whose objective is to support local, regional, and national stakeholders to develop collaborative activities that contribute to the engagement, knowledge development and knowledge transfer activities to address barriers to rural competitiveness, innovation and amenities development. This is part of Canada's Rural Partnership (CRP).

Co-operative Development Initiative (CDI) which provides support for the development, innovation and growth of co-operatives, by:

  • Providing advisory services and funding innovative co-op projects, delivered by the two national co-operative associations; and
  • Funding research to build knowledge contributing to co-op development.

Expected results:
Rural development
New economic activities are being developed in rural communities.
Measured by: The number of communities in 20 selected rural regions where new economic activities are implemented as a result of CRP collaborative activities.
Target: 30 communities by March 31, 2013

Co-operative Development
Canadians are better able to utilize the co-operative model to meet their economic and social needs.
Measured by: Number of co-operatives created, which have received CDI support.
Target: 150 co-operatives by March 31, 2013

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Rural and Co-operatives Development        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 7.5 7.5 7.5 -
Total Transfer Payment Program 7.5 7.5 7.5 -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: An innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Program Activity: Science, Innovation and Adoption

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to Accelerate the Pace of Innovation and Facilitate the Adoption of New Technologies (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2013

Description:
The program is designed to accelerate industry led innovation activities leading to the development and commercialization of new products, practices and processes by supporting the required academia, industry and government foresight and applied science, technology and development activities.

The program initiatives are designed to work systematically along the three phases of the innovation continuum; they are:
Discovery Phase: the creation of new knowledge and ideas;
Pre-commercialization Phase: the further development of ideas into new technologies to address challenges and opportunities; and
Commercialization, Adoption and Marketing Phase: the realization of economic and social benefits from the technologies that generate new practices, products and processes.

Expected results:
Accelerated pace of innovation and new technologies adopted.
Performance Indicator: Percentage increase in number of applied agri-science research and development projects.
Target: 400 percent increase in number of applied agri-science research and development projects by March 2013.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Science, Innovation and Adoption        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 59.9 37.4 73.8 0.7
Total Transfer Payment Program 59.9 37.4 73.8 0.7

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: An innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Program Activity: Agri-Business Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to Enable Competitive Enterprises and Sectors (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2013

Description:
Agri-Business Development provides support for provincial and territorial activities and to national organizations to increase the use of sound business management practices by producers and agri-businesses to enable businesses to be profitable.

Eligible programs and initiatives equip producers and agri-businesses with the skills, knowledge and expertise needed to understand their businesses’ financial situation, assess opportunities, respond to change, and realize business goals. It also enables agri-businesses to be profitable and invest where needed to manage the natural resource base sustainably, and produce and market safe food and other products.

Expected results:
Increased realization of business goals.
Performance Indicator: Percentage of participating businesses in Agri-Business Development activities meeting their career/business goals.
Target: 55 percent of participants will be meeting their business and career goals. This target will be met by March 2013.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Agri-Business Development        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 36.5 27.1 26.6 -
Total Transfer Payment Program 36.5 27.1 26.6 -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Program Activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to Enhance the Safety and Security of Canada's Food System (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2013

Description:
Programming for the Contributions to Enhance the Safety and Security of Canada's Food System is comprised of the following components:

Food Safety Systems Development
Food Safety Systems Development focuses on the development of voluntary science-based food safety systems by national organizations to effectively minimize food safety risks. It supports national (or equivalent) organizations in developing on-farm and/or post-farm Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) based food safety systems. Intended clients are national or regional non-profit organizations that are not represented by entities at the national level.

Food Safety Systems Implementation
Food Safety Systems Implementation facilitates the early adoption of government-recognized food safety systems by producers and non-federally registered food-processing enterprises through financial incentives. Eligible projects could include the implementation of good manufacturing practices towards HACCP or ISO 22000 standards in non-federally registered processing plants and the implementation of government reviewed HACCP-based food safety systems on farms. Implementation is administered by provinces and territories under Growing Forward.

Expected results:
Food Safety Systems Development
Increased number of national on-farm and post-farm organizations with food safety systems ready to submit to Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) for recognition. Government-recognized on-farm food safety programs are technically based on the internationally accepted food safety control system known as HACCP.
Performance Indicator: Number of organizations that submit to CFIA for recognition.
Targets: On-Farm target is six organizations and Post-Farm is seven organizations. The date to achieve target is March 31, 2013.

Food Safety Systems Implementation
Increased number of producers and non-federally registered food processing enterprises engaged in food safety activities.
Performance Indicator: Number of provinces and territories with food safety activities as Growing Forward cost-shared programs.
Target: Specific targets for designated programs covering food safety activities are set out in individual bilateral agreements.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 26.0  12.5 13.0 -
Total Transfer Payment Program 26.0 12.5 13.0 -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Program Activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to Minimize the Occurrence and Extent of Risk Incidents (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2013

Description:
Programming for the Contributions to Minimize the Occurrence and Extent of Risk Incidents is comprised of the following components:

Biosecurity Standards Implementation
The approved national Biosecurity Standards form the basis for implementation of the minimum biosecurity requirements for a particular sector at the farm level. Provinces and territories are responsible for farm-level implementation and are able to impose additional standards to respond to a particular, unique need of the local industry.

Traceability Industry Infrastructure
Investment in Traceability Industry Infrastructure will enhance the industry's ability to follow the movement of a food through specific stages of production, processing and distribution. It supports the development and implementation of industry infrastructure to participate in the National Agriculture and Food Traceability System. This program invests in the development of industry-led systems that collect and verify identification and movement data, and accelerates industry capacity.

Traceability Enterprise Infrastructure
The Traceability Enterprise Structure provides funding to individual businesses to assist in the purchase and installation of traceability infrastructure and the training of staff to implement traceability systems for plants, animals and products. This could include implementation of animal handling systems, equipment and data systems necessary to record and report data to industry databases. These actions will enable recipients to participate fully in the National Agriculture and Food Traceability System.

Expected results:
Biosecurity Standards Implementation
Increased review and approval of biosecurity systems being implemented.
Performance Indicator: Number of biosecurity systems implemented.
Target: Specific targets for designated programs covering food safety activities are set out in individual bilateral agreements.

Traceability Industry Infrastructure
Increase in the development of industry-led traceability systems.
Performance Indicator: Number of organizations and private entities implementing industry-led traceability systems.
Target: Ten organisations and/or private entities. The date to achieve target is March 31, 2013.

Traceability Enterprise Infrastructure
All provinces and territories implementing traceability activities as Growing Forward cost-shared programs.
Performance Indicator: Number of provinces and territories with traceability activities as Growing Forward cost-shared programs.
Target: Specific targets for designated programs covering food safety activities are set out in individual bilateral agreements.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 39.7 29.9 24.8 -
Total Transfer Payment Program 39.7 29.9 24.8 -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: An environmentally sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Program Activity: Environmental Knowledge, Technology, Information and Measurement; and On-Farm Action

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to Promote Environmentally Responsible Agriculture (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2013

Description:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) supports farmers through agri-environmental risk assessment and planning; providing expertise, information and incentives to increase the adoption of sustainable agriculture practices at the farm and landscape levels; investigating and developing new approaches that encourage and support the adoption of sustainable agriculture practices; and increasing the recognition of the value of sustainable agriculture practices. This program supports environmental stewardship and helps reduce the sector’s overall impact on the environment. It contributes to a cleaner environment and healthier living conditions for Canadian people, and a more profitable agriculture sector.

Expected results:
Improved agri-environmental risk assessment and planning by agricultural producers.

Performance Indicator:
Increase in adoption levels of Beneficial Management Practices (BMPs). Environmental Farm Plans set out out priorities for each farm once an environmental scan is performed. BMPs are based on priorities set out in that plan.

Target:
Ten percent increase from previous program baselines by 2013. Baselines are from the Environmental Indicators for the National Agri-Health Analysis and Reporting Program (NAHARP).

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Environmental Knowledge,
Technology, Information and Measurement
       
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 2.9 3.6 3.0 -
Total Environmental Knowledge,
Technology, Information and Measurement
2.9 3.6 3.0 -
Program Activity: On-Farm Action        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 76.6 58.3 49.7 -
Total On-Farm Action 76.6 58.3 49.7 -
Total Transfer Payment Program 79.5 61.9 52.7 -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: An innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Program Activity: Agri-Business Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to Strengthen the Competitiveness of Canada's Red Meat Packing and Processing Industry (Voted)

Start date: June 4, 2009

End date: March 31, 2012

Description:
The national, applications-based Slaughter Improvement Program (SIP) provides eligible red meat packers and processors with repayable federal contributions to implement sound business plans for projects aimed at improving the operations of federally inspected packing plants. The program aims to allow industry stakeholders to strengthen their competitiveness by supporting new investments that could support profitability for red meat packers. These new investments focus on reducing operating costs, increasing revenues, adopting innovation to meet future business conditions and consumer expectations and addressing slaughter capacity gaps in regions where it can be demonstrated that this factor is constraining sector growth.

Recipients must also be involved or present a business plan to be involved in the slaughter of red meat. They must be federally inspected red meat packing and processing plants; provincially inspected plants implementing projects to become federally inspected to market their products beyond provincial boundaries; or legal entities planning to establish a federally inspected plant in a region where a deficit in slaughter capacity is constraining sector growth. The program is applications-based, and functions under a request-for-applications approach.

Expected results:
The SIP will lead to the following outcomes: investment in operational performance among red meat packers and processors; and improved operational and financial performance among red meat packers and processors.

Performance indicators may include, but are not limited to, the following: percentage of recipients that increase their operational performance; amount of program funds invested by red meat packers and processors in operational improvements (as documented in their business plans); and percentage of recipients that increase their financial performance.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Agri-Business Development        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 29.6 28.7 - -
Total Transfer Payment Program 29.6 28.7 - -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: An innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Program Activity: Science, Innovation and Adoption

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to Support the Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program (Voted)

Start date: May 28, 2009

End date: On-going, subject to evaluation of relevance and effectiveness by March 31, 2014.

Description:
The Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program (CAAP)'s objective is to facilitate the agriculture, agri-food, and agri-based products sector's ability to seize opportunities, to respond to new and emerging issues, and to pathfind and pilot solutions to new and ongoing issues in order to help it adapt and remain competitive. Launched as a successor to the Advancing Canadian Agriculture and Agri-Food (ACAAF) program, CAAP will continue to support industry-led initiatives at the national, regional and multi-regional levels.

Expected results:

  • Industry implements strategies to respond to emerging issues and opportunities;
  • Conversion of applied research into commercial products;
  • Adoption of innovative, value-added products, processes and technologies by the sector; and
  • Improved competitiveness of the sector.

Performance Indicators:

  • Number of strategies to respond to emerging issues developed and implemented by industry;
  • Number of commercial products created;
  • Number of innovative, value-added products, processes and technologies adopted by the sector; and
  • Number of projects resulting in: reduction of producing and processing costs; improved product quality; improved market share or preservation of market share.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Science, Innovation and Adoption        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 33.4  28.4 28.4 31.4
Total Transfer Payment Program 33.4 28.4 28.4 31.4

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: An innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Program Activity: Agri-Business Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution to Support the Specified Risk Material Innovation Program (Voted)

Start date: June 17, 2010

End date: March 31, 2013

Description:
The three-year, up to $40 million Specified Risk Material Innovation Program (being delivered under the name of Slaughter Waste Innovation Program (SWIP)) provides industry with the ability to capitalize on the knowledge, experience and technology advancement gained in dealing with the first three years of the Enhanced Feed Ban (EFB) and to move towards implementing longer term solutions that have the potential to improve the competitiveness of the sector. The objective of SWIP is to support research, development and commercialization or adoption of innovative technologies or processes related to the removal, disposal or use of Specified Risk Material (SRM) to reduce handling costs and to create potential revenue sources from SRM.

Eligible recipients include provincially and federally inspected slaughterhouses, and standalone businesses handling SRMs, including rendering plants, and to support pre-commercial research and development work, research or engineering firms in partnership with livestock industry associations or slaughter facilities. Recipients must be Canadian legal entities, including Canadian subsidiaries of foreign companies, and capable of entering into legally binding contracts.

Expected results:

  • Revenue generation (energy production and co-products) or cost-reduction from SRM removal, disposal or destruction;
  • Increased competitiveness of the beef industry, as a whole, along the value chain due to reduced handling costs and/or new revenues;
  • New knowledge of technologies and processes related to SRM removal, disposal or destruction with wide application and broad benefits domestically and internationally;
  • New capacity and infrastructure for the destruction of prions (infectious agent in a variety of human and non-human neurodegenerative diseases, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)) thus contributing to the reduction of human and animal health risks associated with BSE; and
  • Increase in or preservation of regional capacity for SRM removal, disposal or destruction.

Performance Indicators:

  • Amount of funds invested by federally and provincially inspected slaughter plants and other businesses handling SRMs, including rendering plants;
  • Percentage of recipients that reduced their SRM handling, removal or disposal costs and increased revenues from such activities;
  • Share of Canadian beef processing capacity (slaughter plants) with reduced SRM handling, removal and destruction costs; and
  • Share of Canadian beef processing capacity (slaughter plants) with new access to prion deactivation facilities.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Agri-Business Development        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 9.0 18.9 13.9 -
Total Transfer Payment Program 9.0 18.9 13.9 -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Program Activity: Trade and Market Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to Transform Canada's Strengths into Domestic and Global Success (Voted) (related funding is found under Grant payments for the Organisation for the Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) (Voted))

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2013

Description:
The programming for Transforming Canada's strengths into Domestic and Global Success is composed of the following:

The AgriMarketing Program provides a platform to equip industry, including small and medium-sized enterprises, for success in global markets. AgriMarketing cost-shares with industry associations for international market development, export promotion activities and in-depth research to form long-term international strategies that contribute and build on the Canada Brand.

The Enabling Research for Competitive Agriculture (ERCA) Program supports research, complements AAFC policy analysis and development, and contributes to a more informed policy dialogue by engaging the external policy research community on priority issues that can be used by industry groups and producers to assist them in identifying new opportunities, markets and ways to enhance productivity and improve competitiveness to improve their success in global and domestic markets.

A small component of the ERCA initiative provides a grant to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to enhance research on priority issues for Canada in the global context through collaborative activities, thereby providing a unique, global perspective on Canada's competitiveness.

Expected results:
AgriMarketing Program:

  • Contribution agreements with industry associations, alliances and technical marketing institutions;
  • Increased capacity of industry associations to deliver market development and branding projects;
  • Increased effectiveness of market development and branding projects undertaken by industry associations; and
  • Enhanced market opportunities for Canadian agriculture and food producers in key international markets.

Performance measures and indicators are:

  • Number of agreements implemented annually;
  • Percentage of market development and branding projects undertaken by industry associations outside Canada with the program funding as compared to promotional activities undertaken without the program funding; and
  • Percentage increase in exports for AgriMarketing Program supported sectors with a long-term international strategy.

ERCA Contribution Program:

  • The establishment of communities of experts with broad representation from universities and other institutions;
  • Broadly disseminated research results that are used by industry and government to enhance competitiveness and prosperity;
  • Strengthened policy research capacity addressing priority issues for the sector;
  • Participation of industry and representatives from other departmental initiatives such as the Value Chain Roundtables (VCRT) and Agri-foresighting at ERCA events and workshops;
  • Publication of research reports, policy briefs, professional journal articles and newspaper articles by ERCA members; and
  • A large pool of graduate students knowledgeable in agricultural policy from which to recruit at AAFC.

Performance measures and indicators are:

  • The number of researchers involved in ERCA;
  • The number of meetings, workshops, seminars and Parliamentary Committees where ERCA policy research results are presented for use by government, industry and other stakeholders;
  • The number of graduate students recruited into agriculture programs at universities in Canada through ERCA;
  • The number of participants at ERCA events from industry, VCRT or Agriforesighting, government and other organizations;
  • The number of research reports/policy briefs/ professional journal articles and newspaper articles published by ERCA members; and
  • The number of graduate students who graduate from their programs.

ERCA - Grant to the OECD:

  • Broadly disseminated research results that are used by industry and government to enhance competitiveness and prosperity;
  • Enhanced economic and policy research capacity addressing priority issues for the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector in a global context;
  • Increased information for the use of provinces and territories on key issues impacting the sector; and
  • A further influence on the research agenda of the OECD in order to broaden policy research to include topics of importance for Canada.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Trade and Market Development        
Total grants 0.1 0.1 0.1 -
Total contributions 24.7 23.1 24.1 -
Total Transfer Payment Program 24.8 23.2 24.2 -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: An innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Program Activity: Science, Innovation and Adoption

Name of Transfer Payment Program: EcoAgriculture Biofuels Capital Initiative (Voted)

Start date: March 29, 2007

End date: March 31, 2013

Description:
The ecoAgriculture Biofuels Capital initiative (ecoABC) is a six-year, federal initiative that provides conditionally repayable contributions towards the construction or expansion of biofuel facilities that have equity investments from farmers and use agricultural feedstock. The initiative, which is part of the federal renewable fuels strategy, is providing an opportunity for farmers to benefit from the emerging renewable fuels industry while helping the government to achieve its targets for renewable fuel content in gasoline and diesel fuel through domestic production. Eligible recipients include corporations (including but not restricted to co-operatives), individuals, and partnerships, which are not subject to a controlling interest by a federal, provincial or municipal government, which can demonstrate that their equity investments from agricultural producers are equal to or exceed five percent of projected eligible project costs, and which intend to build plants or expand existing facilities to produce renewable transportation fuels in Canada from agricultural feedstock.

Expected results:
To provide agricultural producers with an opportunity for equity investment in biofuel production facilities, and to facilitate achieving the federal government’s target of renewable fuel content equal to 5 percent of the gasoline pool by 2010 and 2 percent in diesel and heating oil by 2012 through domestic production.

Specific results include:

  • New biofuels facilities are built;
  • Increased (domestic) ethanol production;
  • Broadened economic base of communities where facilities are built; and
  • Increased and diversified off-farm revenues for producers.

Performance Indicators:

  • Number of new facilites built or expanded for renewable fuels (8-12 facilities);
  • Change in annual production of ethanol and biodiesel by funded facilities (overall increase in production of 1 billion to 1.5 billion litres of renewable fuel);
  • Number of new jobs in funded facilties (200-360 overall);
  • Increased spending in communities with funded facilities (specific targets determined later); and
  • Change in primary producers' revenue from investment ($6 million to $12 million annually).
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Science, Innovation and Adoption        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 38.9 23.9 48.4 -
Total Transfer Payment Program 38.9 23.9 48.4 -

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Program Activity: Business Risk Management

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Loan Guarantees under the Canadian Agricultural Loans Act (CALA) (Statutory) (previously known as FIMCLA)

Start date: June 18, 2009

End date: On-going under the CALA legislation

Description:
The CALA program is a financial loan guarantee program that gives farmers easier access to credit. Under the CALA program, the Government of Canada guarantees loans issued through financial institutions to farmers and agricultural co-operatives. Farmers use these loans to establish, improve and develop farms, while agricultural co-operatives also access loans to process, distribute or market the products of farming.

Expected Results:

  • Provide producers with greater access to affordable credit to make investments in their farm properties: As of November 29, 2010, farmers and agricultural co-operatives have received 3,538 loans worth approximately $191 million since Royal Assent on June 18, 2009.
  • Administer program in a prudent manner (default rate under 2 percent): As of fiscal year 2009-10, CALA's default rate is 1 percent; with recoveries factored in, the net default rate is 0.65 percent.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Science, Innovation and Adoption        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 4.0 13.1 13.1 13.1
Total Transfer Payment Program 4.0 13.1 13.1 13.1

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Program Activity: Business Risk Management

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments in Connection with the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act (AMPA) - Advance Payments Program (Statutory)

Start date: 1997

End date: On-going under AMPA

Description:
The Advance Payments Program (APP) is a financial loan guarantee program that guarantees cash advances to producers, enabling them to produce and market their agricultural products when conditions are most ideal. Producers can receive cash advances of up to $400,000 per production period, the first $100,000 of which is interest-free. Advances can be on a variety of crops and/or livestock and producers have up to 18 months (usually from April until September of the following year) to use their cash advance for whatever purpose they feel necessary. The producer must repay their advance (as they are selling/delivering their product) in full before the end of the 18 month production period.

Expected Results:

  • Provide producers with greater access to credit (supplying advances to over 35,000 producers).
  • Improved cash flow for producers receiving APP advances (achieving advance amount of approximately $2.5 billion).
  • Administer the program in a prudent manner for eligible producers (achieving a default rate of under 2 percent of the total amount advanced).
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Business Risk Management        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 184.0 106.0 94.0 94.0
Total Transfer Payment Program 184.0 106.0 94.0 94.0

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Strategic Outcome:
An environmentally sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector;
A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk; and
An innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector

Program Activity:
Environmental Knowledge, Technology, Information and Measurement; On-Farm Action; Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems; Trade and Market Development; Science, Innovation and Adoption; and Agri-Business Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Programming related to the Agricultural Flexibility Fund (Voted)

Start date: June 18, 2009

End date: March 31, 2014

Description:
Agricultural Flexibility Fund (AgriFlexibility) initiatives will fall under three project categories or elements:

  1. Investments to help reduce the cost of production or improve environmental sustainability;
  2. Investments in value-chain innovation and sectoral adaptation; and
  3. Investments to address emerging opportunities and challenges.

Expected Results:

  • Producers, partners and industry implement actions to improve their environmental practices;
  • Producers, partners and industry implement actions to reduce costs of production;
  • Improved food safety, biosecurity, traceability and risk management measures;
  • Agri-processors upgrade their capacity (through the modernization of their facilities;
  • Increase in value-chain efforts focussed on innovation and/or adaptation; and
  • Agri-industry implements actions to respond to market threats and/or take advantage of emerging market opportunities.

Performance Indicators:

  • Number of actions implemented by producers to improve their environmental practices;
  • Number of actions implemented by producers to reduce their costs of production;
  • Number of improved food safety, biosecurity, traceability and risk management measures;
  • Number of agri-processors that upgrade their capacity;
  • Number and types of activities that increased value-chain efforts focused on innovation and/or adaptation; and
  • Number of actions implemented to respond to market threats and/or take advantage of emerging market opportunities.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Program Activity: Environmental Knowledge,
Technology, Information and Measurement
       
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 1.3 2.9 2.1 1.3
Total Environmental Knowledge, Technology,
Information and Measurement
1.3 2.9 2.1 1.3
Program Activity: On-Farm Action        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 11.7 25.5 19.1 11.2
Total On-Farm Action 11.7 25.5 19.1 11.2
Program Activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity
Risk Management Systems
       
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 11.2 19.7 14.8 8.7
Total Food Safety and Biosecurity
Risk Management Systems
11.2 19.7 14.8 8.7
Program Activity: Trade and Market Development        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 6.2 13.5 10.1 5.9
Total Trade and Market Development 6.2 13.5 10.1 5.9
Program Activity: Science, Innovation and Adoption        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 19.9 32.2 24.2 14.1
Total Science, Innovation and Adoption 19.9 32.2 24.2 14.1
Program Activity: Agri-Business Development        
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 6.1 2.4 1.8 1.0
Total Agri-Business Developments 6.1 2.4 1.8 1.0
Total Transfer Payment Program 56.4 96.2 72.2 42.2

Summary of the 3-Year Plan: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1174061891718&lang=eng

Note:
Forecast Spending 2010-11 reflects the authorized funding levels to the end of the fiscal year 2010-11 (not necessarily forecast expenditures). Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process (for the 2011-12 through to 2013-14 planning years) as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.


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Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Details of Transfer Payment Programs


Strategic Outcome:
A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy

Program Activity:
Enterprise Development; Community Development; and Policy, Advocacy and Coordination

Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Business Development Program – Voted

Start date:
July 25, 1995

End date:
Not applicable.  Based on evaluations of ACOA's program sub-activities, ministerial approval for continuation of this program will be sought prior to March 31, 2011.

Description:
Through its Business Development Program (BDP), ACOA works to create opportunities for economic growth in Atlantic Canada by helping small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) become more competitive, innovative and productive by working with communities to develop and diversify local economies and by championing the strengths of the region in partnership with Atlantic Canadians.

The objectives of the BDP are:

  • to improve the growth and competitiveness of Atlantic SMEs;
  • to provide for dynamic and sustainable communities in Atlantic Canada; and
  • to provide for policies and programs that strengthen the Atlantic economy.

Eligible commercial recipients include individuals, sole proprietorships, partnerships, co-operatives, a body corporate or a Crown corporation that carries on, or is about to carry on, for-profit activities in Atlantic Canada. This does not include a government or individual municipality.

Eligible non-commercial recipients include not-for-profit incorporated entities and may include a Crown corporation, a provincial government, a municipal government, a not-for-profit organization owned or controlled by a provincial or municipal government, local economic development associations or post-secondary educational institutions.

Expected results:
A performance measurement strategy (PMS) has been developed for the Agency, which includes performance indicators, expected results, methods for reporting on performance, evaluation criteria and evaluation plans to be used for determining the effectiveness of its program activities. The BDP focuses on improving SME growth and competitiveness through innovation, entrepreneurship, business skills development, trade, access to capital, business support and investments activities. The BDP also supports ACOA’s community mobilization sub-activity through some of its non-commercial projects.

Key results expected under the BDP include the following:

Enterprise Development
Objective: Improve growth and competitiveness of Atlantic SMEs

  • strengthened Atlantic Canadian innovation and commercialization capacity (measured by indicators such as the amount leveraged per dollar invested by ACOA in innovation projects).
  • more Atlantic Canadians with the motivation and skills required to successfully start, sustain or grow a business (measured by indicators such as the percentage of participants in entrepreneurship awareness and promotion activities, indicating that the activity increased their intent to start a business).
  • access for Atlantic Canadians to accurate, timely and relevant business information (measured by indicators such as the level of client satisfaction).
  • increased export capacity and sales for SMEs in Atlantic Canada (measured by indicators such as the export sales of ACOA-assisted firms).
  • increased flow of foreign direct investment into Atlantic Canada (measured by indicators such as the number of leads and number of deals).
  • SMEs have access to funding for expansion/modernization (measured by indicators such as the amount leveraged per dollar invested by ACOA in expansion/modernization projects for the domestic market).

Community Development
Objective: Provide for dynamic and sustainable communities for Atlantic Canada

  • improved community capacity to identify economic development needs and opportunities (measured by indicators such as the number of partners involved in planning).
  • Atlantic Canadian businesses have access to capital (measured by indicators such as the dollars leveraged on investments by other sources).
  • Atlantic Canadian businesses have access to information and counselling (measured by indicators such as the number of CBDC/Seed clients who have taken part in training or business counselling).
  • improved capacity to address economic and business development needs and opportunities (measured by indicators such as the dollars leveraged on investments).

Policy, Advocacy and Coordination
Objective: Provide for policies and programs that strengthen the Atlantic economy

  • well-informed policy decisions reflecting opportunities and challenges of the Atlantic region’s economy, while considering enterprise and community development potential (measured by indicators such as the extent to which policy analysis and research, economic analysis and engagement activities are useful and provide input into decision making with respect to Atlantic Canadian regional economic development).
($ millions)
   Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total contributions 130.4 105.2 111.6 110.2

Summary of the Three-Year Plan:
See ACOA’s website.


Strategic Outcome:
A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy

Program Activity:
Enterprise Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Atlantic Innovation Fund – Voted

Start date:
May 10, 2001

End date:
not applicable

Description:
The objectives of the program are:

  • to increase activity in and to build capacity for innovation and research and development (R&D), which leads to technologies, products, processes or services that contribute to economic growth in Atlantic Canada;
  • to increase the capacity for commercialization of R&D outputs;
  • to strengthen the region’s innovation capacity by supporting research, development and commercialization partnerships and alliances among private-sector firms, universities, research institutions and other organizations in the Atlantic system of innovation, and to increase their critical mass; and
  • to maximize benefits from the national R&D programs.

Eligible recipients include commercial and non-commercial entities such as, but not limited to, universities, colleges, other post-secondary educational institutions, business associations, research institutions and private-sector firms.

Federal departments, including federal research laboratories and institutes, and provincial government departments, are not eligible recipients.

Expected results:
A performance measurement strategy has been developed for the Agency that includes performance indicators, expected results, methods for reporting on performance, evaluation criteria and evaluation plans to be used for determining the effectiveness of program activities.

The key result expected for the Innovation program sub-activity, which is largely supported by the AIF program, is strengthened Atlantic Canadian innovation and commercialization capacity (measured by indicators such as the number of meaningful partnerships and collaboration for technology development and commercialization, amount leveraged per dollar invested by ACOA in innovation projects, and revenues resulting from commercialization).

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total contributions 60.3 59.9 59.9 59.6

Summary of the Three-Year Plan:
See ACOA’s website.


Strategic Outcome:
A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy

Program Activity:
Community Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Innovative Communities Fund – Voted

Start date:
April 1, 2005

End date:
not applicable

Description:
Working with communities at various stages of economic development, this program supports non-commercial/non-profit strategic initiatives that target the economic needs of communities and stimulate economic development. Working in collaboration with Atlantic communities and stakeholders, the Innovative Communities Fund (ICF) builds on the strengths of communities and provides the tools needed to identify opportunities available for their sustainable economic growth.

Expected results:
The ICF targets both developmental and long-term program outcomes.
Short-term outcomes aimed at the economic development needs of rural communities are:

  • community access to funding and/or expertise they require to develop proposals;
  • the development of partnerships; and
  • increased citizen engagement and buy-in.

In the long term, expected results are:

  • improved community economic development planning capacity;
  • improved project management capacity; and
  • the engagement of project partners.
($ millions)
   Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total contributions 30.8 42.3 40.0 40.0

Summary of the Three-Year Plan:
See ACOA’s website.



Strategic Outcome:
A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy

Program Activity:
Community Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Community Futures Program – Voted

Start date:
May 18, 1995

End date:
not applicable

Description:
The purpose of this national program is to help communities develop and implement local solutions to local problems. The program provides financial support to Community Futures organizations (CFOs) that, in collaboration with other partners and stakeholders, can assess a community’s situation and develop strategies to meet its needs, provide support to SMEs and social enterprise, and undertake community economic development initiatives. The objective of the program is to further the ultimate objective of helping communities to successfully pursue
(a) economic stability, growth and job creation;
(b) diversified and competitive local rural economies; and
(c) sustainable communities. In Atlantic Canada, the program provides funding to 41 CFOs, known in the region as Community Business Development Corporations (CBDCs), that provide financial and technical assistance to SMEs in rural areas. More information on services provided through the CBDCs can be found on ACOA’s website.

Expected results:
Assisting selected communities in the development of their economies and supporting the growth of small businesses, the Community Futures Program’s short-term results are:

  • enhanced business development services (e.g. information, counselling, referrals, training);
  • improved access to capital and leveraged capital through loans, loan guarantees and equity investments to businesses;
  • strengthened community strategic plans and more effective implementation through projects, partnerships and other community economic development initiatives; and
  • enhanced marketing to increase awareness and use of Community Futures organizations.

In Atlantic Canada, the short-term expected results of the program, based on the role and responsibilities of the CBDCs, are to ensure that Atlantic Canadian businesses have access to capital, and business information and counselling.

($ millions)
   Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total contributions 12.6 12.6 12.6 12.6

Summary of the Three-Year Plan:
See ACOA’s website.


Strategic Outcome:
A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy

Program Activity:
Enterprise Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Saint John Shipyard Adjustment Initiative – Voted

Start date:
May 29, 2003

End date:
May 31, 2011 (as amended)

Description:
Aims to address the impact of the lack of manufacturing activities at the site of the former Saint John shipyard and its economic impact on the province of New Brunswick. Eligible recipients may include Irving Shipbuilding Inc. or affiliates.

The federal government's objective is to ensure the closure of the Saint John shipyard site and its evolution into long-term economic development use. Therefore, prior to disbursement of any funds under the Saint John Shipyard Adjustment Initiative (SJSAI), Irving Shipbuilding Inc. (ISI) had to agree not to use (nor allow the use of) the site to construct, refit or renovate ships for 20 years. ACOA will not disburse any funds for capital expenditures until it has received satisfactory proof that impediments to alternate industrial or commercial activities on the site have been removed to the Minister's satisfaction. ISI must demonstrate that projects included under the SJSAI provide a net economic benefit to Canada, with no adverse competitive impact on existing firms.

Expected results:
Mitigate the impact of major economic downturns.

($ millions)
   Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total contributions 4.0 6.0 0.0 0.0

Summary of the Three-Year Plan:
See ACOA’s website.

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Canada Revenue Agency

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Children's special allowance payments

  1. Strategic outcome: Eligible families and individuals receive timely and correct benefit payments.
  2. Program activity: Benefit programs
  3. Name of transfer payment program: Children's special allowance payments (CSA) (Statutory)
  4. Start date: August 28, 1995 Footnote 1
  5. End date: Ongoing
  6. Description: Tax-free monthly payments made to agencies and foster parents who are licensed by provincial or federal governments to provide for the care and education of children under the age of 18 who physically reside in Canada and who are not in the care of their parents. CSA payments are equivalent to Canada Child Tax Benefit payments. CSA payments are governed by the Children's Special Allowances Act which provides that this allowance be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
  7. Expected results: Monthly payments issued on schedule.
(thousands of dollars)
 
8. Forecast spending 2010‑2011
9. Planned spending 2011‑2012
10. Planned spending 2012‑2013
11. Planned spending
2013-2014
12. Total grants
 
 
 
 
12. Total contributions
 
 
 
 
12. Total other transfer payments Footnote 2
225,000
227,000
231,000
235,000
13. Total transfer payments
225,000
227,000
231,000
235,000
14. Planned evaluations: N/A
 
 
 
 
Footnote 1: Responsibility for Children's special allowance payment was transferred from Human Resources Development Canada, effective August 28, 1995 (P.C. Order 1995-342)
Footnote 2: Other Transfer payment is a transfer payment based on legislation or an arrangement that normally includes a formula or schedule as one element used to determine the expenditure amount. However, once a payment is made, the recipient may redistribute the funds among several categories of expenditure in the arrangement.

Disbursements to provinces under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006

  1. Strategic outcome: Taxpayers meet their obligations and Canada's revenue base is protected.
  2. Program activity: Taxpayer and business assistance
  3. Name of transfer payment program: Disbursements to provinces under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006 (Statutory)
  4. Start date: October 12, 2006
  5. End date: October 12, 2013 with an option for an additional 2 years
  6. Description: The export charge, to be levied by Canada on exports of softwood lumber products to the United States, will be collected and administered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) with support from the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade on behalf of the provinces. Under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006 (Act), the CRA is responsible for making disbursements to the provinces of a portion of the charge collected over the course of the application of the Softwood Lumber Agreement, 2006 (Agreement). These disbursements will be reduced by several factors: refunds paid to the industry, costs for the administration and implementation of the Agreement and the Act as well as the costs incurred for certain litigation resulting from the Agreement or Act. The Act applies to the following regions: BC Interior, BC Coastal, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. Exports from the remaining provinces and territories are excluded.
  7. Expected results: Disbursements will continue on a quarterly basis until the termination of the Agreement, unless lumber market prices increase to the point where no export charge is applicable for that period.
(thousands of dollars)
 
8. Forecast spending 2010‑2011
9. Planned spending 2011‑2012
10. Planned spending 2012‑2013
11. Planned spending 2013‑2014
12. Total grants
 
 
 
 
12. Total contributions
 
 
 
 
12. Total other transfer payments Footnote 1
200,000
140,000
TBD
TBD
13. Total transfer payments
200,000
140,000
TBD
TBD
14. Planned evaluations: N/A
 
 
 
 
1 Other transfer payment is a transfer payment based on legislation or an arrangement that normally includes a formula or schedule as one element used to determine the expenditure amount. However, once a payment is made, the recipient may redistribute the funds among several categories of expenditure in the arrangement.
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Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

The CFIA's Three-Year Plan for Transfer Payment Programs is available on the Agency's website at http://inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/ar/artoce.shtml. The 2011-12 Plan will be available effective April 1, 2011.

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Canadian Heritage

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)


Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Arts

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Canada Arts Presentation Fund

Start date: 2001-02

End date: 2014-15

Description: The Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF) aims to give Canadians access to a variety of professional artistic experiences in their communities. It provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit organizations that professionally present arts festivals or performing arts series, as well as their support organizations. The CAPF also supports the emergence of presenters and presenter support organizations for under-served communities or artistic practices. The expected result is that Canadians, from all regions, experience and value professional artistic experiences.

Expected results:

1) Presenters offer a variety of professional artistic experiences to Canadians.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of professional arts presenter recipients, by discipline.

2) Canadians, including those in underserved communities across Canada, engage and participate in a variety of professional artistic experiences.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of professional arts presenters whose activities reach out to underserved communities, by type of underserved community.

Output:

1) Grants and contributions approved under the CAPF.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grants and contributions approved and total amount of funds awarded.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $10,500,000 $10,500,000 $10,500,000 $10,500,000
Total contributions $17,001,855 $18,028,682 $18,472,742 $18,472,742
Total Transfer payments $27,501,855 $28,528,682 $28,972,742 $28,972,742

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expression and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Arts

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

Start date: 2001-02

End date: 2014-15

Description: The Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF) seeks to contribute to the improvement of physical conditions for arts and heritage related to creation, presentation, preservation and exhibition. The program also aims to increase and improve access for Canadians to performing arts, visual arts, media arts, and to museum collections and heritage displays and/or exhibitions. To achieve these objectives, the CCSF provides financial assistance in the form of grants and contributions to Canadian not-for-profit arts and heritage organizations, other levels of government or agencies as well as equivalent Aboriginal people's institutions or organizations for construction/renovation projects, specialized equipment purchases and/or feasibility studies for cultural infrastructure projects. The expected result is that Canadians in all regions, including underserved communities, have access to new or improved arts and heritage spaces in their communities for creation, presentation, preservation and/or exhibition.

Expected results:

1) Arts and heritage organizations have resources to build and improve facilities and    
infrastructure.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of new or improved arts and heritage facilities.

2) A variety of arts and heritage experiences are available in underserved communities.
Definition:
Underserved communities: Aboriginal, culturally diverse, official languages, young audiences.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of Canadian Heritage supported infrastructure and specialized equipment projects located in underserved communities.

Output:

1) Grants and contributions approved under the CCSF.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grants and contributions approved and total amount of funds awarded.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $3,000,000 $3,000,000
Total contributions $22,949,850 $22,508,613 $22,458,613 $22,358,613
Total Transfer payments $26,949,850 $25,508,613 $25,458,613 $25,358,613

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expression and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Arts

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Canada Arts Training Fund

Start date: 1997-98

End date: 2012-13

Description: The Canada Arts Training Fund aims to contribute to the development of Canadian creators and future cultural leaders of the Canadian arts sector by supporting the training of artists with high potential through institutions that offer training of the highest calibre. It provides financial assistance to independent professional Canadian not-for-profit institutions that specialize in providing focused, intensive and practice-based studies. These schools provide professional training at the highest level in disciplines such as ballet, contemporary dance, theatre, circus arts, and music (opera, orchestral), etc. It also supports some training that reflects Aboriginal and culturally diverse artistic practices. The expected result is that Canadians and the world benefit from high-quality artistic achievements by Canadian artists trained in Canada.

Expected result:

1) Graduates have professional careers in Canada and internationally.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of graduates employed professionally in their field in Canada or abroad.

Output:

1) Contributions approved under the Canada Arts Training Fund.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grants and contributions and total amount awarded.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions $22,742,440 $22,779,440 $22,779,440 $22,779,440
Total Transfer payments $22,742,440 $22,779,440 $22,779,440 $22,779,440

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expression and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Arts

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Canada Cultural Investment Fund

Start date: 2001-02

End date: 2014-15

Description: The Canada Cultural Investment Fund (CCIF) aims to help arts and heritage organizations build and diversify their revenue streams, strengthen their organizational capacity, business skills and competencies, and to assist them in being better rooted and recognized in their communities. This will be achieved through four components: Endowment Incentives, Cultural Capitals of Canada, Strategic Initiatives, and Limited Support to Endangered Arts Organizations. The CCIF provides financial assistance to Canadian not-for-profit organizations in the arts and heritage sectors, foundations, Canadian municipalities, as well as First Nations, Métis, and Inuit equivalent governments. The expected result is to contribute to the long-term organizational, administrative and financial health of Canadian arts and heritage organizations.

Expected result:

1) Arts and heritage organizations are supported within Canadian communities that value their existence.

Performance indicators:

  • Number of new or maintained partnerships and initiatives developed per applicant/recipient.
    Partnerships include: financial and non-financial investments in the delivery/execution of a project.
    Initiatives include: tools, strategies, activities, programs, approaches developed as a result of project funding.
  • Number of types of demonstrated community support (by community constituency), other than Canadian Heritage, per applicant/recipient.
    Types of community support include: private sector, foundations, schools, community associations, other levels of government, etc.
  • Amount of funds raised through private-sector donations by arts organizations applying to and eligible for Endowment Incentives component.

Output:

1) Grants and contributions approved under the CCIF.

Performance indicator:

  • Total amount of funds awarded.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $19,038,432 $19,038,432 $19,038,432 $19,038,432
Total contributions $6,144,273 $6,144,273 $5,997,023 $6,183,773
Total Transfer payments $25,182,705     $25,182,705     $25,035,455        $25,222,205

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expression and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Cultural Industries

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Canada Media Fund

Start date: 2010-11

End date: 2014-15

6. Description: The Canada Media Fund (CMF), a public/private partnership, provides funding for the creation of television convergent digital content in both official languages and leading-edge non-linear content and applications designed for distribution on multiple platforms (e.g. television broadcast, the Internet, and/or mobile phones). The CMF focuses investments on the creation of content Canadians want and harnesses the opportunities provided by new technologies to deliver the content to Canadians where and when they want it. Organizations supported by the CMF include, but are not limited to, Canadian television and interactive production companies, broadcasters, broadcast distribution undertakings, Internet service providers and mobile communications operators. Canadians as consumers of convergent programs and creators of leading-edge content and applications represent to ultimate target group. Aboriginal communities and Francophones in minority language communities are also targeted by specific production envelopes.

Expected results:

1) Leading-edge non-linear content and applications are created for commercial potential or public use.
Definitions:
Leading-edge, non-linear content and applications: innovative content or applications presented on or developed for a digital platform that allows for interaction, such as offering user choices to control progress or to direct a story or presentation.
Commercial potential: potential uptake of products by mainstream media companies.
Public use: taking the form of projects whose products are used freely and/or directly by the public.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of leading-edge non-linear content and applications projects supported by the CMF.

2) Canadians watch or interact with CMF supported television programs or digital convergent content.

Performance indicators:

  • Audience share for CMF-funded television productions as a percentage of total audiences, by genre and by language.
  • Number of users of digital convergent content from platforms other than television.

Output:

1) Contribution agreement with the CMF Corporation.

Performance indicator:

  • A contribution agreement between Canadian Heritage and the Canada Media Fund Corporation is signed.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions* $134,146,077 $34,596,077 $34,596,077 $34,596,077
Total Transfer payments $134,146,077 $34,596,077 $34,596,077 $34,596,077

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm

* Variance between fiscal year 2010-11 and 2011-12 is mainly due to the wind down of the Canada's Economic Action Plan, which included funding for the Canada Media Fund.


Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expression and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Cultural Industries

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Canada Interactive Fund

Start date: 2010-11

End date: 2014-15

Description: The Canada Interactive Fund (CIF) provides funding for the creation of online Canadian content developed by Official Language Minority Community (OLMC), Aboriginal, ethnocultural and other not-for-profit cultural organizations by focusing on the creation of interactive cultural products and applications. Examples of projects supported under the CIF could be where not-for-profit cultural organization partners with a targeted community to develop a living history of a community which combines a blog, an interactive timeline, community photos and stories of individual members. As Canadians increasingly adopt new technologies, the CIF is needed to ensure that OLMC, Aboriginal, ethnocultural and other not-for-profit cultural organizations contribute to leading-edge content online. This will complement action the Government has taken to update cultural programs, in particular the Canada Media Fund, which ensures the for-profit sector to create and distribute Canadian programming on multiple platforms.

Expected results:

1) Digital interactive content and applications are created by official language minority community, Aboriginal, ethnocultural and other not-for-profit cultural organizations.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of digital interactive products created with support from the CIF.

2) Canadians access digital interactive content produced by official language minority community, Aboriginal, ethnocultural and not-for-profit cultural organizations.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of annual visitors to projects supported through the CIF.

Output:

1) Contributions issued under the CIF.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of contribution agreements signed and total amount of funds awarded.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions $4,435,130 $10,770,684 $6,346,244 $6,724,894
Total Transfer payments $4,435,130 $10,770,684 $6,346,244 $6,724,894

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expression and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Cultural Industries

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Canada Music Fund

Start date: 2001-02

End date: 2014-15

Description: The Fund supports activities of music creators, artists and entrepreneurs to ensure Canadians' access to a diverse range of Canadian music choices. The Fund consists of the following components: 1) Music Entrepreneur, which provides financial assistance to established firms with a track record for the creation, production, distribution and marketing of Canadian music, including touring activities; 2) New Musical Works, which provides financial assistance to small and medium music entrepreneurs for the creation, production, distribution and marketing of Canadian music, including attendance to music showcases; 3) Collective initiatives, which provides financial assistance to a diverse range of collective activities aiming to enhance presence of Canadian music artists at home and abroad; 4) Creators' Assistance, which provides financial support to professional development and acquisition of business knowledge of music creators; 5) Canadian Music Memories, which provides financial support for the preservation of Canada's musical heritage for future generations.

Expected results:

1) A range of Canadian music is produced by Canada Music Fund recipients.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of Canadian music releases that were supported by the Canada Music Fund (by genre, language, province, etc.).

2) The portion of the Canadian-owned music industry targeted by the Canada Music Fund is sustainable.

Performance indicator:

  • Gross revenues, in Canadian dollars, of Canada Music Fund - Music Entrepreneur Component recipients.

3) Canadian music supported by the Canada Music Fund is accessed in Canada and abroad.

Performance indicator:

  • Total number of domestic and international unit sales of Canada Music Fund supported music.

Output:

1) Grants and contributions issued under the Canada Music Fund.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grants and contributions issued and total dollar amount awarded.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $2,000,000 $2,000,000 $2,000,000 $2,000,000
Total contributions $23,828,331 $23,828,331 $23,828,331 $22,829,231
Total Transfer payments $25,828,331 $25,828,331 $25,828,331 $24,829,231

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expression and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Cultural Industries

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Canada Book Fund

Start date: 2010-11

End date: 2014-15

Description: The Fund supports the activities of Canadian book publishers and other sectors of the book industry to ensure access to a broad range of Canadian-authored books. This support is delivered through the following streams of funding:

1) Support for Publishers, which provides funding distributed primarily through a formula that rewards success in delivering content that Canadians value. This funding contributes to the sustainable production and marketing of Canadian-authored books by offsetting the high costs of publishing in Canada and building the capacity and competitiveness of the sector;

2) Support for Organizations, which provides project funding to develop the Canadian book industry and the market for its products by assisting industry associations and related organizations to undertake collective projects offering a broad benefit to the industry and, ultimately, to readers everywhere.

Expected results:

1) A range of Canadian-authored books is produced by the Canada Book Fund (CBF) recipients.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of Canadian-authored titles published by CBF recipients (by genre, language, province, etc.).

2) The portion of the Canadian-owned book publishing industry targeted by the CBF is sustainable.

Performance indicator:

  • Aggregate profit margin (%) of CBF recipient publishers.

3) Canadian-authored books supported by the CBF are accessed in Canada and abroad.

Performance indicator:

  • Value, in Canadian dollars, of domestic and international sales of CBF recipient publishers.

Output:

1) Grants and contributions issued under the CBF.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grants and contribution agreements issued and total dollar amount awarded.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $8,300,000 $8,300,000 $8,300,000 $8,300,000
Total contributions $28,366,301 $28,366,301 $28,366,301 $28,366,301
Total Transfer payments $36,666,301 $36,666,301 $36,666,301 $36,666,301

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expression and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Cultural Industries

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Canada Periodical Fund

Start date: 2010-11

End date: N/A

Description: The Fund supports the activities of Canadian publishers and magazines and non-daily newspaper associations to ensure that Canadians have access to diverse Canadian magazines and non-daily newspapers. It is delivered through the following components: 1) Aid to Publishers, which provides formula funding to Canadian magazines and non-daily newspapers for publishing activities, such as distribution, content creation, online activities and business development; 2) Business Innovation, which provides project funding to print and online magazines for business development and innovation; 3) Collective Initiatives, which provides project funding to Canadian magazines and non-daily newspaper associations for industry-wide projects to increase the overall health of the Canadian magazine and non-daily newspaper industries.

Expected results:

1) A range of Canadian periodicals is produced by the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) recipients.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of Canadian periodicals (titles) published by the CPF recipients (by genre, language, region, etc.).

2) The portion of the Canadian-owned periodicals industry targeted by the CPF is sustainable.

Performance indicator:

  • Aggregate profit margin (%) of CPF recipient publishers.

3) Canadian periodicals supported by the CPF are accessed by Canadian readers.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of copies of CPF-supported periodicals distributed to Canadians per year.

Output:

1) Grants and contributions issued under the CPF.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grants and contributions issued and total dollar amount awarded.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants* $72,775,054 $58,015,054 $58,015,054 $58,015,054
Total contributions $1,999,544 $1,999,544 $1,999,544 $1,999,544
Total Transfer payments $74,774,598 $60,014,598 $60,014,598 $60,014,598

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm

* Variance between fiscal year 2010-11 and 2011-12 is mainly due to the wind down of the Canada's Economic Action Plan, which included funding for the Canada Periodical Fund.

Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expression and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Cultural Industries

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: TV5

Start date: 1990-91

End date: 2012-13

Description: The international French-language TV channel TV5 is a partnership between France, Belgium's Francophone community, Switzerland, Canada and Quebec. The Department of Canadian Heritage provides annual funding to channels (single-recipient program) through a contribution agreement to TV5 Québec Canada and a grant to TV5 MONDE. Funding from Canadian Heritage and the Government of Quebec enables Canadian productions to be presented both in Canada, through TV5 Québec Canada, and around the world, through TV5 MONDE, alongside a rich diversity of programming from the international Francophonie.

Expected results:

1) Canadian content is part of TV5 MONDE's international programming.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of Canadian content broadcast on TV5 MONDE.

2) Canadians have access to the wealth and diversity of the international Francophonie through TV5 Québec Canada (TV5 QC).

Performance indicator:

  • Number of Canadian households with access to TV5 QC.

Outputs:

1) Contribution agreement (TV5 Québec Canada).

Performance indicator:

  • Implementation of contribution agreement.

2) Grant to TV5 MONDE.

Performance indicator:

  • Implementation of grant agreement.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $8,000,000 $8,500,000 $8,500,000 $8,500,000
Total contributions $4,460,900 $4,460,900 $4,460,900 $4,460,900
Total Transfer payments $12,460,900 $12,960,900 $12,960,900 $12,960,900

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadian artistic expression and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

Program activity: Heritage

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Museums Assistance Program

Start date: 1972-73

End date: See note*

Description: The Museums Assistance Program (MAP) provides funding to Canadian museums and heritage institutions for projects that support federal objectives for museums to ensure that Canadians have access to and experience Canada's diverse cultural heritage. The primary objectives of MAP are to facilitate Canadians' access to their heritage; to ensure the preservation, management and presentation of Aboriginal cultural heritage; and to strengthen professional knowledge, skills and practices in the management of key museum functions. MAP also supports the Canadian Museums Association's activities to enhance the professional standards of Canada's museum community. Additionally, in support of the Youth Employment Strategy, MAP helps heritage organizations, especially small and medium-sized museums, to create summer employment and internship opportunities for Canadian youth through Young Canada Works in Heritage Organizations and Young Canada Works at Building Careers in Heritage.

Note:
*Given that the Terms and Conditions of the Museums Assistance Program have been approved and extended by the Minister (effective April 1st 2011) in agreement with the Treasury Board Secretariat and the Policy on Transfer Payments, the program description and expected results will be updated in the reporting of results for 2011-12.

Expected results:

1) Heritage institutions and heritage workers undertake projects to improve key museological knowledge, skills and practices.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of projects to improve key museological knowledge, skills and practices, and of youth employment opportunities created through Young Canada Works (YCW).

2) Aboriginal cultural heritage is preserved and presented.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of projects to improve preservation and presentation of Aboriginal heritage.

3) Heritage institutions create opportunities for Canadians to access their heritage.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of traveling exhibitions projects.

Output:

1) Grants and contributions agreements signed under MAP and YCW.

Performance indicators:

  • Number of applications assessed.
  • Number of applications approved.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $2,500,000 $4,663,680 $4,663,680 $4,663,680
Total contributions $12,076,284 $11,076,284 $11,076,284 $11,076,284
Total Transfer payments $14,576,284 $15,739,964 $15,739,964 $15,739,964

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm

Note:            

As of 2011-12, the Grants to institutions and public authorities in Canada in accordance with section 35 of the Cultural Property Export and Import Act are included in the Museum Assistance Program.


Strategic outcome: Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.

Program activity: Promotion of and Attachment to Canada

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Celebration and Commemoration Program

Start date: 2008

End date: 2013

Description: The Celebration and Commemoration Program aims to support or create opportunities for Canadians to celebrate/commemorate their history, diversity and achievements through a two-fold approach that includes the Celebrate Canada 11-day period culminating on July 1 with Canada Day celebrations and a five-year plan which is a theme-based dynamic approach to celebrating and commemorating significant people, places, symbols, anniversaries and events. These activities are delivered in collaboration with other federal departments, agencies, regions, partners and stakeholders. The Program provides opportunities to bring Canadians together in their communities to discover and appreciate the richness and diversity of Canadian society and to show their sense of belonging to Canada and pride in being Canadian.

Expected results:

1) Canadians participate in community celebrations and commemorations, and celebrations of national significance.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of participants at local and national activities.

2) Increased sense of pride and belonging to Canada.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of Canadians who agree that national celebrations and commemorations are a good way to share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.

3) Coordinated federal approach to celebrations and commemorations.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of members attending meetings of the Interdepartmental Commemorations Committee.

Outputs:

1) Grants and contribution agreements signed under the Celebration and Commemoration Program.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grants and contributions agreements signed.

2) Five-year Commemoration Plan.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of updates to the Five-year Commemoration Plan.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $5,500,000 $5,500,000 $5,500,000 $5,500,000
Total contributions $6,329,473 $4,994,367 $4,994,367 $4,994,367
Total Transfer payments $11,829,473 $10,494,367 $10,494,367 $10,494,367

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.

Program activity: Promotion of and Attachment to Canada

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Exchanges Canada Program

Start date: 2000-01

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Exchanges Canada Program provides grants and contributions in support of youth participation initiatives that allow young Canadians to learn about Canada, create linkages with each other and better appreciate the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian reality. The Program supports not-for-profit organizations to provide Canadian youth with a range of exchange and forum activities to strengthen their sense of belonging to Canada and therefore their sense of Canadian identity. The program has two components: Youth Exchanges Canada (YEC) and Youth Forums Canada (YFC). YEC funds reciprocal homestay exchanges for young Canadians, and also includes the Summer Work / Student Exchange sub-component, which provides summer job opportunities for 16 and 17 year-olds in their second official language. YFC enables young Canadians to connect with one another through forums, study sessions and workshops of interest to them. The Exchanges Canada website also provides a single window to information on a wide range of exchanges available in Canada.

Expected results:

1) Young participants enhance their knowledge and understanding of Canada.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of participants who report enhanced knowledge and understanding of Canada.

2) Young participants connect and create linkages with one another.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of participants who report having created new ties with other young Canadians as a result of the exchange.

3) Young participants enhance their appreciation of the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian experience.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of participants who report enhanced appreciation for diversity and commonalities.

Outputs:

1) Grants and contribution agreements in support of youth exchanges.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grants and contribution agreements.

2) Information available to Canadians about youth exchanges.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of people accessing information about youth exchanges.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000
Total contributions $17,736,359 $17,686,359 $17,686,359 $17,686,359
Total Transfer payments $17,836,359 $17,786,359 $17,786,359 $17,786,359

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.

Program activity: Promotion of and Attachment to Canada

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Katimavik Program

Start date: 1997-98

5. End date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Katimavik Program, delivered by an independent, not-for-profit organization, the Katimavik-OPCAN Corporation, is a national youth volunteer and training program that provides young Canadians with the opportunity to learn more about their country and create ties with communities and with other Canadians. The objectives of the Program are to contribute significantly to the personal, social and professional development of the participants; to promote community service; and to offer a diverse experience, fostering a better understanding of the Canadian reality. Groups of youth aged 17 to 21 participate in a six- or nine-month program and collaborate on projects that involve volunteer work, training and group interaction, in various regions of Canada, including French-speaking and English-speaking communities.

Expected results:

1) Participants value Canada and its diversity.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of participants indicating that they value Canada and its diversity more since participating in the Program.

2) Host-community partner organizations improve their capacity to serve their community.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of community partners indicating that they have seen their capacity to serve their community improve.

3) Participants improve their personal, social and professional skills.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of participants indicating that they have improved their personal, social and professional skills during their participation in the Program (in accordance with each of the skills covered by the Program).

Output:

1) Contribution agreement signed under the Katimavik Program.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of contribution agreements signed.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12*
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions** $15,000,000 $16,294,320 $16,294,320 $19,776,000
Total Transfer payments $15,000,000 $16,294,320 $16,294,320 $19,776,000

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm

* Of this amount, $1 M will be transferred to Action Canada pending approval by Parliament.  Refer to announcement by Minister Moore ‘Minister Moore Announces Renewed Youth Program Funding’, October 2009. http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/infoCntr/cdm-mc/index-eng.cfm?action=doc&DocIDCd=CJM091543

** In fiscal years 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13, funds from the Katimavik Program were allocated to fund the Youth Take Charge Program (YTC).

Strategic outcome: Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.

Program activity: Promotion of and Attachment to Canada

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Youth Take Charge

Start date: April 1, 2010

End date: March 31, 2013

Description: The objective of the Youth Take Charge Program is to strengthen youth attachment to Canada through engagement in the fields of history and heritage, civic engagement and youth service, arts and culture, and economic activities. The Program provides grants and contributions to eligible organizations in support of youth-led projects involving youth generally aged 7 to 30, which demonstrate the ability to strengthen attachment to Canada while addressing one or more of the above-mentioned thematic areas. It is expected that the Program will increase awareness among youth participants of the importance of being an active and engaged citizen; will increase relevance of youth-serving organizations for youth; and will increase youth engagement in communities. These outcomes will, in the long-term, lead to increased youth attachment to Canada and an increased sense of shared Canadian identity among youth.

Expected results:

1) Youth have a sense of attachment to Canada.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of youth participants who have a sense of attachment to Canada.

2) Youth have a sense of shared Canadian identity.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of youth participants who have a sense of shared Canadian identity.

Output:

1) Grants and contribution agreements.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of signed agreements.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14*
Total grants - $3,400,000 $1,700,000 -
Total contributions $1,440,680 $2,081,680 $1,781,680 -
Total Transfer payments $1,440,680 $5,481, 680 $3,481,680 -

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm

* Funding for the Youth Take Charge Program ends in 2013-14.


Strategic outcome: Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.

Program activity: Engagement and community participation

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Building Communities through Arts and Heritage

Start date: September 1, 2007

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage (BCAH) program provides grants and contributions in support of local festivals and capital projects. Funding is made available to eligible stakeholders presenting arts and heritage festivals, events and activities that place emphasis on local engagement. Its objective is to engage citizens in their communities through performing and visual arts as well as through the expression, celebration and preservation of local historical heritage. The program has three components: 1) Local Festivals supports festivals, events and activities that involve the whole community and give opportunities to local artists and artisans and/or celebrate local history and heritage; 2) Community Anniversaries supports one-time commemorations through festivals or other activities that celebrate a major anniversary of a significant local person or event; and 3) Legacy Fund supports tangible, lasting capital projects that commemorate or celebrate a major anniversary of a significant local person or event.

Expected result:

1) Canadians are engaged in the expression, celebration and preservation of local arts and heritage.

Performance indicators:

  • Number of volunteers at BCAH supported events.
  • Number of local artists, artisans, and performers of historical heritage activities at BCAH supported events.
  • Number of visitors/attendees at BCAH supported events.

Outputs:

1) Grants and contribution agreements signed under the BCAH Program.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grant letters and agreements signed.

2) Regional coordination and consultation

Performance indicator:

  • Number of annual coordination and consultation meetings.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $14,355,000 $14,355,000 $14,355,000 $14,355,000
Total contributions $4,800,000 $3,300,000 $3,300,000 $3,300,000
Total Transfer payments $19,155,000 $17,655,000 $17,655,000 $17,655,000

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.

Program activity: Engagement and community participation

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Peoples' Program

Start date: 1971-72

End date: 2010-11

Description: The Aboriginal Peoples' Program (APP) focuses primarily on strengthening cultural identity, encouraging the full participation of Aboriginal peoples in Canadian life, and on supporting the continuation of Aboriginal cultures and languages as living elements of Canadian society. APP programming incorporates Aboriginal values, cultures and traditional practices into community-driven activities designed to strengthen cultural identity and enable positive life choices. The APP is composed of two complementary components:

  • The Aboriginal Communities Component supports the efforts of Aboriginal communities to develop innovative and culturally appropriate solutions to the social, cultural, economic and other obstacles that impede community and personal prospects.

  • The Aboriginal Living Cultures Component supports the preservation and revitalization of Aboriginal languages and cultures.

Expected results:

1) Aboriginal languages are preserved and revitalized.

Performance indicator:

  • Degree to which Aboriginal language resources produced (printed materials, electronic materials, video productions) are utilized by Aboriginal people in the preservation and revitalization of their language.

2) Aboriginal peoples are engaged in their communities and have the opportunity to participate in social and cultural aspects of life in Canada.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of Aboriginal peoples engaged and participating in community activities.

3) Aboriginal youth are empowered with leadership skills and a sense of community.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of Aboriginal youth participating in projects that promote leadership in urban Aboriginal communities.

Output:

1) Grants and contribution agreements signed under the APP.

Performance indicator:

  • Number and type of agreements.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $1,340,000 $1,340,000 $1,340,000 $1,340,000
Total contributions $54,874,907 $55,375,899 $55,375,899 $55,375,899
Total Transfer payments $56,214,907 $56,715,899 $56,715,899 $56,715,899

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.

Program activity: Official Languages

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Development of Official-Languages Communities Program

Start date: 2009-10

End date: 2013-14

Description: The Development of Official-Languages Communities Program has three components: Community Life, Minority Language Education and Language Right Support. The Program fosters the vitality of Canada's English- and French-speaking minority communities and enables them to participate fully in all aspects of Canadian life. Through partnerships and agreements with community organizations, provinces, territories, municipalities and federal departments and agencies, the Program aims to enhance the capacity of minority official language communities to have greater access to quality education, different programs and services in their language in their communities, as well as linguistic rights support, as guaranteed by the Constitution.

Expected results:

1) Members of official language minority communities (OLMC) have access to programs and services in their language, in their communities.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of Sectors in which Federal-Provincial-Territorial provide programs and services to OLMC's.

2) Section 41 of the Official Languages Act (OLA) responsibilities and OLMC perspectives in federal institutions are better known and integrated in development of initiatives and programs.

Performance indicator:

  • Quality of measures taken by Federal Institutions to integrate section 41 OLA and OLMC perspectives (low, medium, high).

Outputs:

1) Agreements (ex.: cooperation agreements with communities, intergovernmental agreements, agreements with the Council of Education Ministers (Canada), etc.).

Performance indicator:

  • Number of bilateral agreements with communities and PTs.

2) Grants and contributions.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grant and contribution agreements with communities and PTs.

3) Support and coordination mechanisms and summaries of action plans and section 41 records of achievement.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of action plans submitted by federal institutions.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $33,322,973 $33,322,973 $33,322,973 $33,322,973
Total contributions $192,134,987 $191,797,917 $191,797,917 $188,349,017
Total Transfer payments $225,457,960 $225,120,890 $225,120,890 $221,671,990

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity.

Program activity: Official Languages

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Enhancement of Official Languages Program

Start date: 2009-10

End date: 2013-14

Description: The Enhancement of Official Languages Program has three components: Promotion of Linguistic Duality, Second Language Learning and Language Right Support. The Program promotes a better understanding and appreciation of the benefits of linguistic duality while offering linguistic rights support as guaranteed by the Constitution. Through partnerships and agreements with the provinces and territories and non-governmental organizations in support of second-language learning and initiatives that foster understanding between Anglophone and Francophone Canadians, the Program encourage the public to recognize and support linguistic duality as a fundamental value of Canadian society.

Expected results:

1) Greater number of Canadians have a better understanding of and appreciation for the benefits of linguistic duality.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of Canadians that have a working knowledge of the second official language.

2) Knowledge and Integration of section 41 of the Official Languages Act (OLA) responsibilities toward linguistic duality perspectives in federal institutions' development of initiatives and programs.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of Federal Institutions that have taken measures in regards to their responsibilities toward section 41 OLA and linguistic duality perspectives.

Outputs:

1)  Grants and contributions.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of grant and contribution agreements with communities and provinces and territories.

2) Support and coordination mechanisms and summaries of action plans and section 41 records of achievement.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of action plans submitted by federal institutions.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $5,599,842 $5,599,842 $5,599,842 $5,599,842
Total contributions $105,923,289 $105,923,289 $105,923,289 $105,923,289
Total Transfer payments $111,523,131 $111,523,131 $111,523,131 $111,523,131

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadians participate and excel in sport.

Program activity: Sport

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Hosting Program

Start date: 1967

End date: June 2011. The continuation of the terms and conditions is underway.

Description: The Hosting Program is a key instrument in the Government of Canada’s overall approach to sport development in Canada and aims to enhance the development of sport excellence and the international profile of sport organizations by assisting sport organizations to host the Canada Games and international sport events in Canada. These events are expected to produce significant sport, economic, social and cultural benefits. The Program has four components:

1) International Major Multisport Games; 2) International Single Sport Events; 3) International Multisport Games for Aboriginal Peoples and for Persons with a Disability;
and 4) the Canada Games. The Hosting Program offers Canada-at-large a planned and coordinated approach to realizing direct and significant benefits, from bidding and hosting projects, in the areas of sport development, economic, social, cultural and community impacts, across a broad range of government priorities. The Program is characterized by active liaison with collaborators/stakeholders and by a diligent contribution system.

Expected result:

1)  Canadian athletes, coaches and officials have opportunities to participate at sport events in Canada funded by Sport Canada.

Performance indicators:

  • Number of competition opportunities for Canadian athletes, coaches and officials at funded events.
  • Number of athletes from under-represented groups participating at funded events.

Output:

1)  Contribution agreements.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of events funded.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions $16,043,739 $33,320,500 $122,866,900 $134,865,000
Total Transfer payments $16,043,739 $33,320,500 $122,866,900 $134,865,000

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadians participate and excel in sport.

Program activity: Sport

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Sport Support Program

Start date: 1961

End date: June 2011. The continuation of the terms and conditions is underway.

Description: The Sport Support Program is the primary funding vehicle for initiatives associated with the delivery of the Canadian Sport Policy. The Sport Support Program funding is aimed at developing athletes and coaches at the highest international levels; providing sound technically-based sport programming for all athletes; increasing the number of Canadians from all segments of society involved in sport; and advancing Canadian interests and values in Canada and abroad. This funding is provided to eligible organizations in support of programming that supports the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy.

Expected result:

1) Canadians have access to quality sport programs and services.

Performance indicators:

  • Percentage of funded National Sport Organizations that have their coaching programs aligned with Long-Term Athlete Development (LTAD) tenets.
  • Percentage of funded organizations that have adopted the current Canadian Anti-Doping Program.
  • Number of projects that are completed, as proposed in domestic and international bilateral agreements. Activity/project refers to a set of activities or functions that a recipient proposes to undertake as per the bilateral agreement.

Output:

1) Contribution/bilateral agreements.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of agreements in place during the fiscal year. Note: Agreements represent any domestic or international contribution or bilateral agreement.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions $146,883,812 $146,814,464 $143,815,064 $143,815,064
Total Transfer payments $146,883,812 $146,814,464 $143,815,064 $143,815,064

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


Strategic outcome: Canadians participate and excel in sport.

Program activity: Sport

Name of the Transfer Payment Program: Athlete Assistance Program

Start date: 1971

End date: June 2011. The continuation of terms and conditions is underway.

Description: The Athlete Assistance Program (AAP) contributes to the pursuit of excellence through its support for improved Canadian athlete performances at major international sporting events, enabling athletes to combine their sport and academic or working careers while training intensively in pursuit of world-class performances. To this end, the program identifies and supports athletes already at or having the potential to be in the top 16 in the world in their sport.

Expected results:

1) Canadian athletes have the financial resources to achieve higher levels of athletic performance.

Performance indicator:

  • Percentage of athletes agreeing that AAP has made it possible to achieve higher levels of athletic performance (scale is 1 [strongly disagree] to 7 [strongly agree]). Note: A score of 5-7 on the scale indicates agree.

2) Canadian athletes access academic opportunities.

Performance indicator:

  • Number of currently and formerly carded athletes using tuition grant (including deferred tuition).

Output:

1) Direct support for high-performance athletes.

Performance indicators:

  • Total dollar amount of AAP support allocated to high-performance athletes, per fiscal year.
  • Number of athletes supported (Living & Training, Tuition, Deferred Tuition, Special Needs).
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants $27,000,000 $27,000,000 $27,000,000 $27,000,000
Total contributions - - - -
Total Transfer payments $27,000,000 $27,000,000 $27,000,000 $27,000,000

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pc-ch/publctn/3yr-pln/index-eng.cfm


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Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)


Strategic Outcome: A world-class health-research enterprise that creates disseminates and applies new knowledge across all areas of health research.

Program Activity: 1.1 – Health Knowledge, 1.2 – Health Researchers, 1.3 – Health Research Commercialization, and 1.4 – Health and Health Services Advances

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grants for research projects and personnel support

Start date: October, 2000

End date: N/A

Description:

CIHR provides a wide array of funding programs under this transfer payment program. This includes grant programs which are programs that provide support for the direct costs of research projects, for the training of researchers, or for activities that support the translation of research findings. Other programs provide direct salary and stipend support to individual researchers/scientists and research trainees.

Expected results:

  • Health research advances knowledge
  • Health research is conducted and translated
  • A strong and talented health research community with the capacity to undertake health research
  • Commercial activity-products patents and intellectual property, companies and employment generated

Performance Indicators:

  • Outputs and impacts of CIHR funded research
  • Number of publications from CIHR supported research per million dollars funded
  • Number, types and share of PhD, graduates in Canada compared to international levels
  • Number and fields of investigators and trainees funded
(in millions of dollars)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 868.8 840.8 832.4 831.3
Total Transfer payments 868.8 840.8 832.4 831.3

Strategic Outcome: A world-class health-research enterprise that creates disseminates and applies new knowledge across all areas of health research.

Program Activity: 1.2 – Health Researchers

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Graduate Scholarships

Start date: 2003-04

End date: N/A

Description:

The Canada Graduate Scholarship program (CGS) is a federal class grants program jointly administered by CIHR, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). CIHR's portion of the tri-agency class grants CGS program provides financial support to develop future health researchers at both the Masters and Doctoral levels in all health related fields in Canada, providing them with an opportunity to gain research experience.

Expected results:

  • Increased capacity to meet demand for highly qualified personnel in the academic, public and private sectors.

Performance indicators:

  • Percentage of recipients completing degrees
  • Average completion rates versus general population
  • Average time to degree completion among recipients versus general population
(in millions of dollars)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 36.3 28.3 21.3 21.3
Total Transfer payments 36.3 28.3 21.3 21.3

Strategic Outcome: A world-class health-research enterprise that creates disseminates and applies new knowledge across all areas of health research.

Program Activity: 1.3 – Health Research Commercialization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Networks of Centres of Excellence

Start date: October, 2000

End date: N/A

Description:

The Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) program is a federal class grants program jointly administered by CIHR, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), in partnership with Industry Canada. Networks are not-for-profit corporations with an established Board of Directors and are unique partnerships among the academic, private, public and not-for-profit sectors. These nation-wide, multidisciplinary and multi-sectoral partnerships connect excellent research with industrial know-how and strategic investment. Networks put in place well-defined strategies to transfer knowledge to users-ensuring that discoveries and technological advances are turned into social and economic benefits for all Canadians.

Expected results:

  • World-class Networks and Centres connect leading-edge research with industrial know-how and strategic investment
  • Strong linkages and partnerships created between university, government and industry, and other users (NGOs), resulting in the transfer of knowledge and exploitation of leading-edge research results with economic or societal benefits to Canada.

Performance indicators:

  • Significant demonstration of impact (i.e. Number of patents, licenses, copyrights, number of new products or processes, policies influenced or created, health delivery influenced stemming from networks and centres).
(in millions of dollars)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 27.5 27.5 25.0 25.0
Total Transfer payments 27.5 27.5 25.0 25.0

Strategic Outcome: A world-class health-research enterprise that creates disseminates and applies new knowledge across all areas of health research.

Program Activity: 1.4 – Health and Health Services Advances

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Institute Support Grants

Start date: October, 2000

End date: N/A

Description:

The Institute Support Grant program provides funding to select Canadian academic institutions, including universities and teaching hospitals, to assist them in hosting the 13 Institutes of CIHR. The Institutes help CIHR maintain strong ties to Canada's research communities and to understand their needs. Each CIHR-appointed Institute Director is among the top scientists in his/her field. Institutes help CIHR define its strategic health research priorities and develop research partnerships with other interested parties concerned with health research. Institutes also organize conferences, seminars, and workshops, all with the goal of developing and disseminating health-related knowledge and best practices.

Expected results:

  • Effective domestic and international health research agendas as well as alliances and partnerships in areas related to the mandate of each Institute.

Performance indicators:

  • Evidence of Institute's emerging leadership within the Canadian research and research user community, including examples of Institute innovation in identifying and responding to national and international health threats and opportunities.
(in millions of dollars)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 13.0 13.0 13.0 13.0
Total Transfer payments 13.0 13.0 13.0 13.0

Strategic Outcome: A world-class health-research enterprise that creates disseminates and applies new knowledge across all areas of health research.

Program Activity: 1.2 – Health Researchers

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Excellence Research Chairs

Start date: 2010-11

End date: 2017-18

Description:

The Canada Excellence Research Chair program is a federal class grants program jointly administered by CIHR, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). This program aims to support the development of a world-class workforce crucial to the innovation process, positioning Canada as a magnet for the world's top researchers and graduate students, and promoting the development and application of leading-edge knowledge.

Expected results:

  • Centres with strong commercialization orientation are created that will become self-sufficient.
  • Centres with strong research orientation are created that will yield significant public benefits within the funding period.

Performance indicators:

  • Number of self-sufficient centres.
  • Percentage of Centres with significant public benefits or research outcomes (for Centres with a research focus).
(in millions of dollars)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 4.6 8.4 8.4 8.4
Total Transfer payments 4.6 8.4 8.4 8.4

Strategic Outcome: A world-class health-research enterprise that creates disseminates and applies new knowledge across all areas of health research.

Program Activity: 1.2 – Health Researchers

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships

Start date: 2008-09

End date: N/A

Description:

The Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship program is a federal class grants program jointly administered by CIHR, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). The Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships program is designed to attract and retain world-class doctoral students by offering them a significant financial award to assist them during their studies at Canadian universities. Vanier Scholars demonstrate leadership skills and a high standard of scholarly achievement in the social sciences and humanities, natural sciences and engineering, and health-related fields.

Expected results:

  • Contribute to making Canada a more attractive destination for international students and making Canada's scholarship initiatives more internationally competitive.

Performance indicators:

  • Percentage of foreign Vanier candidates put forward by universities
  • Recipients' perception of Canada as an attractive destination for research
(in millions of dollars)
  Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 5.5 8.4 8.4 8.4
Total Transfer payments 5.5 8.4 8.4 8.4


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Canadian International Development Agency


Details on transfer payments programs

CIDA grants, contributions and other transfer payments of $3,207 million account for 93% of CIDA's 2011-2012 total planned spending, excluding non-budgetary expenditures. Further information is given below.


  Forecast spending
2010-2011

($ thousands)
Planned spending
2011-2012

($ thousands)
Grants
Bilateral - Grants for cooperation with other donor countries for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition. 8,200 8,700
Multilateral - Grants in support of development assistance, humanitarian assistance or disaster preparedness, including peace building, for global operations, programs, projects, activities and appeals; as well as in support of programming against hunger, malnutrition and disease for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition. 2,036,433 1,743,427
Partnership - Grants for development assistance programs, projects and activities intended to support development and public engagement initiatives or to enhance the awareness, understanding, and engagement of Canadians with respect to development and grants for education and training programs, projects and activities for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition. 23,900 23,900
Sub-total grants 2,068,533 1,776,027
Contributions
Bilateral - Contributions in support of development assistance, including payments for loan agreements issued under the authority of previous Appropriation Acts, contributions for cooperation with countries in transition and contributions in support of regional or country specific development assistance projects, programs and activities for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition. 717,904 911,268
Multilateral - Contributions in support of development assistance, humanitarian assistance or disaster preparedness, including peace building, for global operations, programs, projects, activities and appeals; as well as in support of programming against hunger, malnutrition and disease for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition. 5,091 3,663
Partnership - Contributions for development assistance programs, projects and activities intended to support development and public engagement initiatives or to enhance the awareness, understanding, and engagement of Canadians with respect to development and contributions for education and training programs, projects and activities for the benefit of developing countries or territories or countries in transition. 257,931 267,192
Sub-total contributions 980,926 1,182,123
Other transfer payments
(S) Encashment of notes issued to the development assistance funds of the international financial institutions in accordance with the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act 249,141 248,113
(S) Payments to the World Bank for the Advance Market Commitment for Pneumococcal Vaccines in accordance with the Section 144 of the Budget and Economic Statement Implementation Act, 2007 20,468  
Total 3,319,068 3,206,263
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Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)


Strategic Outcome: Developed and diversified territorial economies that support prosperity for all Northerners

Program Activity: Business Development and Community Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Strategic Investments in Northern Economic Development (SINED) (voted)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: Strategic Investments in Northern Economic Development is a project-based suite of programs to strengthen the driver sectors of the territorial economies; diversify them; and encourage Northerners’ participation in the economy. Eligible recipients include social enterprises, individuals, other levels of government and other non-federal entities, public or private, that have an interest in economic development in the North.

Expected results:

  • Strengthened northern innovation and technology capacity
  • Increased access to funding for northern and Aboriginal entrepreneurs
  • Increased uptake of economic opportunities in existing, expanding and emerging sectors
  • Increased capacity through training and business skills development activities of northern individuals and communities to identify and respond to economic opportunities
  • Enhanced quality infrastructure for northern communities

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 18.157 18.157 18.157 18.157
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 18.157 18.157 18.157 18.157

Summary of the three-year plan: The first preliminary phase of a summative evaluation of SINED was conducted in 2010–2011. No specifically focused evaluations or audits are planned for this program in 2011–2012. (A fully finalized summative evaluation is planned for 2013–2014)


Strategic Outcome: Developed and diversified territorial economies that support prosperity for all Northerners

Program Activity: Community Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Economic Development (voted)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: Ongoing

Description: Aboriginal Economic Development funding is designed to increase Aboriginal participation in the Canadian economy. Through community investment, community infrastructure programming, and individual and community business development, CanNor provides funding and other supports to viable and sustainable proposals brought forward by First Nations, Métis and Inuit entrepreneurs in the North, as well as by northern communities, Aboriginal businesses and financial organizations.

Expected results:

Northern and Aboriginal communities ready to benefit from economic development opportunities

  • Viable Aboriginal economic businesses
  • A skilled Aboriginal workforce

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 11.8 11.8 11.8 11.8
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 11.8 11.8 11.8 11.8

Summary of the three-year plan: Program renewal for these programs is being led by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. No evaluations or audits are planned for 2011–2012.

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Canadian Space Agency

Annexe 1 - Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs) for the Canadian Space Agency

Contribution under the Canada/ESA Cooperation Agreement

Strategic Outcome:

Canada's exploration of space, provision of space services and development of its space capacity meet the nation's needs for scientific knowledge, innovation and information.

Program Activity:

Future Canadian Space Capacity: This Program Activity is necessary to secure the nation's strategic and ongoing presence in space in the future and to preserve Canada's capability to deliver internationally renowned space assets for future generations. It is targeted at Canadian academia, industry and youth, as well as users of Canadian space solutions (Other Government Departments (OGDs) and international partners).

Name of Transfer Payment Program:Contributions under the Canada/European Space Agency (ESA) Cooperation Agreement.

Start Date: January 1st, 2000

End Date: December 31, 2010*

* Please note that further to the summative evaluation of the Canada/European Space Agency Cooperation Agreement, the contribution program under the said Agreement was recommended for continuation. Therefore, the revised terms and conditions for the contributions under the 2010-2019 Cooperation Agreement will be aligned with CSA's 2011-2012 Program Activity Architecture (PAA) and submitted for Treasury Board's approval in time for fiscal year 2011-2012.

Description: Enhance Canadian industry's technological base and provide access to European markets for value added products and services in the fields of Earth Observation (EO), telecommunications and generic technological activities; foster the participation of Canadian academia and make possible the demonstration of Canadian space technologies in European science and exploration missions. This is achieved through a financial contribution by the CSA to ESA optional programs.

Expected Results (Program Activity Level):

Future Canadian Space Capacity: Canada has a space community (academia, industry and government) able to contribute to the sustained and strategic Canadian use of space.

Expected Results Specific to the Transfer Payment Program:

Successful development and demonstration of advanced technologies, systems, components, and studies provided for in the contracts awarded by ESA to Canadian firms under the following ESA EO programs: EOEP (Earth Observation Envelop Program), GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) Service Element and GMES Space Component.

Successful development and demonstration of advanced technologies, systems, components, or studies provided for in the contracts awarded by ESA to Canadian firms under the following ESA Telecommunications and Navigation programs: ARTES 1, 3-4, 5, 8 and GalileoSat.

Successful development and demonstration of advanced technologies, systems, components, or studies provided for in the contracts awarded by ESA to Canadian firms under Europe's space exploration program Aurora, under the European Transportation and Human Exploration Preparatory Activities program and under the European Physical and Life Science program (ELIPS).

Growing utilization of data obtained from ESA relating to European markets and Earth observation and telecommunications technologies as strategic information for government departments, agencies and industries in Canada.

Because of our participation in Europe's satellite communication, Earth observation and science and space exploration programs, increased demonstration opportunities for space-qualified technologies and products developed by Canadian firms for the space markets are available.

Development of new alliances and/or strengthening of established alliances between Canadian and European companies.

Summary of CSA 3-Year Plan:
http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/publications/default.asp#parliament

 
Program Activity
($ in millions)
Forecast Spending 2010-2011 Planned Spending 2011-2012 Planned Spending 2012-2013 Planned Spending 2013-2014
Future Canadian Space Capacity 27.1 47.3 29.0 28.3
Total Contributions 27.1 47.3 29.0 28.3
Total Transfer Payments 27.1 47.3 29.0 28.3
Notes:
1. This table details contribution programs with funding in excess of $5 million per annum.
2. Due to rounding, decimals may not add up to totals shown.



Class Grant and Contribution Program to support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology

Strategic Outcome:

Canada's exploration of space, provision of space services and development of its space capacity meet the nation's needs for scientific knowledge, innovation and information.

Program Activities:

Space Data, Information and Services: Space Data, Information and Services: This Program Activity is necessary because the space-based solutions assist Other Government Departments (OGDs) in delivering growing, diversified or cost-effective programs and services within their mandate, which is related to key national priorities, such as sovereignty, defence, safety and security, resource management, environmental monitoring and the North. It also provides academia with data required to perform its own research.

Space Exploration: This Program Activity provides valuable Canadian science, signature technologies and qualified astronauts to international space exploration endeavours. This Program Activity is necessary to contribute to the government of Canada's Science and Technology Strategy. It could also generate spin-offs that contribute to a higher quality of life for Canadians and could foster nation-building.

Future Canadian Space Capacity: This Program Activity is necessary to secure the nation's strategic and ongoing presence in space in the future and to preserve Canada's capability to deliver internationally renowned space assets for future generations. It is targeted at Canadian academia, industry and youth, as well as users of Canadian space solutions (Other Government Departments (OGDs) and international partners).

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Class Grant and Contribution Program to support Research, Awareness and Learning in Space Science and Technology.

Start Date: October 1st, 2009

End Date: N/A - Ongoing Program

Description: This program supports knowledge growth and innovation in the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) priority areas while increasing the awareness and participation of Canadians in space-related disciplines and activities. The program has two components: a) Research and b) Awareness and Learning.

The research component aims to support the development of science and technology; foster the continual development of a critical mass of researchers and highly qualified people in Canada; and, support information-gathering and, space-related studies and research pertaining to Canadian Space Agency priorities.

The awareness and learning component aims to increase awareness of Canadian space science and technology among Canadian youth and educators and their participation in related activities; provide learning opportunities to Canadian students and physicians in various space-related disciplines; and support the operations of organizations dedicated to space research and education.

Expected Results (Program Activity Level):

Space Data, Information and Services: User other government departments (OGDs) offer more diversified or cost-effective programs and services due to their utilization of space-based solutions.

Space Exploration: Expansion of advanced scientific knowledge acquired through space exploration endeavours.

Future Canadian Space Capacity: Canada has a space community (academia, industry and government) able to contribute to the sustained and strategic Canadian use of space.

Expected Results (Transfer Payment Program Level):

1. Research Component

  • Increased knowledge from research projects in priority space science and technology areas.

  • Maintained and/or increased space focus in universities, post-secondary institutions, and not-for-profit organizations.

  • Partnerships established and/or sustained.

  • Leveraged partner contributions.

  • Access to international collaboration for Canadian organizations.

2. Awareness and Learning Component

Awareness: Increased availability and use of the space theme in learning opportunities and materials related to science and technology.

Learning: Post-secondary level and physicians will have increased knowledge and skills in space-related disciplines.

Summary of CSA 3-Year Plan: The CSA will submit a three-year Plan of the Class Grant and Contribution Program to the Treasury Board Secretariat by April 1 each year as per section 6.6.1 of the Policy on Transfer Payments.

The CSA Class Grant and Contribution Program is well advanced in the first year of its implementation.

The summative evaluation of the previous CSA Class Grant and Contribution Program was completed in 2008.

To learn more about it, please go to:
http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/publications/default.asp#parliament

 
Program Activity
($ in millions)
Forecast Spending 2010-2011 Planned Spending 2011-2012 Planned Spending 2012-2013 Planned Spending 2013-2014
Space Data, Information and Services 0.9 0.5 1.0 0.0
Space Exploration 0.2 1.0 1.2 0.9
Future Canadian Space Capacity 7.2 6.6 6.1 8.3
Total Grants and Contributions 8.2 8.2 8.3 9.2
Total Transfer Payments 8.2 8.2 8.3 9.2
Notes:
1. This table details contribution programs with funding in excess of $5 million per annum.
2. Due to rounding, decimals may not add up to totals shown.

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Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)


Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society.

Program Activity: Settlement and Integration of Newcomers

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada–Quebec Accord Grant / Subvention versée en vertu de l’Accord Canada–Québec

Start date: Financial compensation to the province (in the form of a grant) is based on the Canada–Quebec Accord, which came into force on April 1, 1991.

End date: The Accord does not have an expiry date.

Description: The Canada–Quebec Accord relating to immigration gives Quebec the responsibility for providing settlement and integration services to all immigrants in Quebec, including all refugees. Quebec receives an annual grant from the federal government to support these settlement and integration services. For more information, please see the Canada–Quebec Accord.

Objective/anticipated outcomes: An objective of the Canada–Quebec Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec’s demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants to the province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec.

Activities: Quebec has responsibility for the selection, reception and integration of immigrants to Quebec. In accordance with section 26 of the Canada–Quebec Accord, Canada is required to pay compensation to Quebec, where it is established that:

  • the reception and integration services offered by Quebec correspond, when considered in their entirety, with those offered by Canada in the rest of the country; and
  • those services are offered without discrimination to all permanent residents in the province, whether or not they have been selected by Quebec.

Expected results: The Government of Quebec is responsible for developing and publishing its own expected results related to immigration.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 258.5 258.5 258.5 258.5
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments
Total transfer payments 258.5 258.5 258.5 258.5

Summary of the three-year plan: As per the Policy on Transfer Payments, CIC is required each year to provide a three-year plan for its Transfer Payment Programs.


 

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society.

Program Activity: Settlement and Integration of Newcomers

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP)

Start date: 1970s (under another name; RAP in its current form implemented 1998)

End date: September 30, 2011 (CIC) will seek continuation of program terms and conditions when they expire)

Description: The RAP provides immediate settlement assistance and orientation to government-assisted refugees who have been resettled in Canada. The program provides income support and immediate essential services to government-assisted refugees who lack the resources to provide for their own basic needs. In addition, it provides referrals to settlement programs for newcomers. The evaluation of the RAP is expected to be complete in the first quarter of 2011.

Expected results: Refugees are able to live safely and independently.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants
Total contributions 49.8 56.7 58.6 58.6
Total other types of transfer payments
Total transfer payments 49.8 56.7 58.6 58.6

Summary of the three-year plan: As per the Policy on Transfer Payments, CIC is required each year to provide a three-year plan for its Transfer Payment Programs.


 

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Program Activity: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Historical Recognition Program (CHRP)

Start date: 2006–2007

End date: 2011–2012

Description: CHRP provides funding for community-based projects that commemorate or recognize the historical experiences of selected ethnocultural communities affected by federally legislated wartime measures and immigration restrictions or prohibitions. The program also educates the Canadian public concerning the contributions made by these communities to shaping Canada. Eligible communities include: Chinese-Canadians, Jewish-Canadians, Indo-Canadians and Italian-Canadians.

Expected results: The expected results are:

  • historical experiences of affected communities are recognized in a way that is meaningful to the respective communities and serves to preserve their stories for future generations; and
  • educational information on the historical experiences of affected communities is available to the communities and the general public, acknowledging and commemorating the experiences and elaborating on the contributions of these communities to building Canada and promoting a pluralistic society.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 0.3 0.2
Total contributions 5.9 5.1
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 6.2 5.3 - -

Summary of the three-year plan: As per the Policy on Transfer Payments, CIC is required each year to provide a three-year plan for its Transfer Payment Programs.


 

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Program Activity: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Multiculturalism Program

Start date: 1982–1983

End date: 2011–2012

Description: The program objectives are to:

  • build an integrated socially cohesive society;
  • improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and
  • engage in discussions on multiculturalism and diversity at an international level.

The Multiculturalism Program works to build an integrated cohesive society by fostering intercultural understanding, citizenship, civic memory and pride, and respect for core democratic values grounded in our history, and by promoting equal opportunity for individuals of all origins.

Expected results: The expected results are:

  • program participants and beneficiaries take action toward increasing awareness of Canadian history and institutions; Canadian values; cultural diversity; and the cultural, racial, ethnic and religious barriers to full participation in society and economy;
  • federal and targeted institutions demonstrate an increased responsiveness to the needs of a diverse society; and
  • increased policy awareness in Canada about international approaches to diversity and increased implementation of international best practices in Canadian multiculturalism policy, programming or initiatives.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0
Total contributions 7.8 7.8 7.8 7.8
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8

Summary of the three-year Plan: As per the Policy on Transfer Payments, CIC is required each year to provide a three-year plan for its Transfer Payment Programs.


 

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Program Activity: Settlement and Integration of Newcomers

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Settlement Program

Start date: May 15, 2008

End date: March 31, 2013

Description: The Settlement Program provides services that make a difference in the lives of newcomers. These services include: language training; information and referrals; assistance matching employment with newcomers’ skills and education; and help with establishing networks and contacts in their communities.

The terms and conditions for the Settlement Program describe both eligible recipients of contribution funding and eligible clients. The eligible recipients (often referred to as service providers) for settlement services include the following:

  • provincial, territorial or municipal governments;
  • not-for-profit organizations including non-governmental organizations, non-profit corporations, community groups and umbrella organizations;
  • businesses;
  • educational institutions (including school boards, districts and divisions); and
  • individuals.

Eligible clients for settlement services are primarily permanent residents. However, they may also include some prospective immigrants and refugees who are highly likely to obtain permanent residency, but have not yet received their permanent resident visa. These include, for example, individuals who have been selected by CIC pending completion of medical, security and criminal verification requirements.

Expected results: The program’s ultimate outcomes are that:

  • newcomers are better able to find employment commensurate with their skills and experience;
  • newcomers enjoy their rights and act on their responsibilities in Canadian society;
  • Canadians provide a welcoming community to facilitate the full participation of newcomers into Canadian society; and
  • newcomers contribute to the economic, social and cultural development needs of Canada.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants        
Total contributions 648.8 611.8 605.8 605.8
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total transfer payments 648.8 611.8 605.8 605.8

Note: The Foreign Credentials Referral Office will undertake a summative evaluation in 2011–2012.

Summary of the three-year plan: As per the Policy on Transfer Payments, CIC is required each year to provide a three-year plan for its Transfer Payment Programs.

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Department of Finance Canada

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

Compensation to Canadian Agencies or Entities Established by an Act of Parliament for Reduction of Debts of Debtor Countries (Vote 5)

Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative (Vote 5)

Harbourfront Centre Funding Program (Vote 5)

Payments to the International Development Association

Fiscal Equalization (Part I—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Territorial Formula Financing (Part I.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Canada Health Transfer (Part V.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Canada Social Transfer (Part V.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Wait Times Reduction Transfer (Part V.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Statutory Subsidies (Constitution Acts, 1867 to 1982, and Other Statutory Authorities)

Youth Allowances Recovery (Federal-Provincial Fiscal Revision Act, 1964)

Alternative Payments for Standing Programs (Part VI—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Incentive for Provinces to Eliminate Taxes on Capital (Part IV—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Payment to Ontario Related to the Canada Health Transfer (Budget Implementation Act, 2009)

Establishment of a Canadian Securities Regulation Regime and a Canadian Regulatory Authority (Budget Implementation Act, 2009)

Debt Payments on Behalf of Poor Countries to International Organizations pursuant to section 18(1) of the Economic Recovery Act (stimulus)

Transitional Assistance to Provinces Entering into the Harmonized Value-Added Tax Framework (Part III.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Subsidy Resources to the International Monetary Fund's Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust (Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act, Section 8)

Small and Medium Enterprise Finance Challenge (SME) (Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act, Section 8)

Fast Start Climate Change Financing (Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act, Section 8)

Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Compensation to Canadian Agencies or Entities Established by an Act of Parliament for Reduction of Debts of Debtor Countries (Vote 5)

Start date: 1991–92

End date: Ongoing

Description: Compensation to Export Development Canada and the Canadian Wheat Board for reduction of debts of debtor countries

Expected results: Payments to Canadian creditors consistent with Government of Canada commitments

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 87.501 150.500 5.000 5.000

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative (Vote 5)

Start date: April 2001

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: The Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative is both an infrastructure and an urban renewal investment. The goals of the initiative include positioning Canada, Ontario and Toronto in the new economy, thereby ensuring Canada’s continued success in the global economy. This includes increasing economic growth and development opportunities; recognizing the intrinsic links between economic, social, and environmental health; enhancing the quality of life in Toronto; and encouraging sustainable urban development.

Expected results: Sustainable urban development and infrastructure renewal in Toronto’s waterfront area, including increased accessibility to and use of the waterfront area and a revitalized urban infrastructure.

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total contributions 53.559 30.916 0.0 0.0

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Harbourfront Centre Funding Program (Vote 5)

Start date: March 2006

End date: March 31, 2011

Description: The primary objective of the Harbourfront Centre Funding Program has been to provide operational funding to Harbourfront Centre until March 31, 2011. Such support has assisted the Harbourfront Centre in covering its fixed operational costs. The funding program has also facilitated Harbourfront Centre’s ability to leverage funding from other levels of government and to pursue other revenue-generating strategies that allow the organization to provide the general public with continued access to cultural, recreational, and educational programs and activities held in Toronto’s waterfront area.

Expected results: A self-reliant and financially viable organization that supports the economic, social, and cultural development of Toronto’s waterfront area

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total contributions 4.200 0.0 0.0 0.0

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Payments to the International Development Association

Start date: 1960

End date: Ongoing

Description: This program provides encashment of demand notes to allow the International Development Association to disburse concessional financing for development projects and programs in the world’s poorest countries.

Expected results: Payments to international organizations consistent with Government of Canada commitments

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 384.280 384.280 384.280 384.280

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Fiscal Equalization (Part I—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 1957

End date: Ongoing

Description: Formula-based Equalization payments are made to eligible provincial governments to enable them to provide reasonably comparable levels of public services at reasonably comparable levels of taxation. Equalization payments are unconditional.

Expected results: Timely and accurate administration of Equalization payments to provinces

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11*
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 14,881.503 14,658.570 15,565.903 16,349.732

* Forecast spending for 2010–11 includes a Total Transfer protection payment of $509,503,000.

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.

More information on major federal transfers to provinces and territories can be found on the Department’s website at http://www.fin.gc.ca/access/fedprov-eng.asp.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Territorial Formula Financing (Part I.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 1985

End date: Ongoing

Description: Territorial Formula Financing payments are made to territorial governments to provide the resources they need to deliver services comparable to those delivered by provincial governments, taking into account the high costs and unique challenges in the North. Territorial Formula Financing payments are unconditional.

Expected results: Timely and accurate administration of payments to territories

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 2,663.567 2,876.083 3,009.972 3,153.352

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.

More information on major federal transfers to provinces and territories can be found on the Department’s website at http://www.fin.gc.ca/access/fedprov-eng.asp.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Canada Health Transfer (Part V.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 2004

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Canada Health Transfer (CHT) provides equal per capita support for health care through cash and tax transfers to provincial and territorial governments. The CHT supports the government’s commitment to maintain the Canada Health Act’s national criteria (comprehensiveness, universality, portability, accessibility and public administration), conditions, and prohibitions against user fees and extra-billing.

Expected results: Timely and accurate administration of CHT payments to provinces and territories

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11*
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 25,441.998 26,951.863 28,568.975 30,283.114

* Forecast spending for 2010–11 includes a Total Transfer protection payment of $15,712,000.

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.

More information on major federal transfers to provinces and territories can be found on the Department’s website at http://www.fin.gc.ca/access/fedprov-eng.asp.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Canada Social Transfer (Part V.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 2004

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Canada Social Transfer (CST) provides equal per capita cash support to provincial and territorial governments to assist them in financing social assistance and social services, post-secondary education, and programs for children. The CST gives provinces and territories the flexibility to allocate payments to those areas according to their own priorities and supports the government’s commitment to prohibit minimum residency requirements for social assistance.

Expected results: Timely and accurate administration of CST payments to provinces and territories

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 11,178.703 11,514.064 11,859.486 12,215.271

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.

More information on major federal transfers to provinces and territories can be found on the Department’s website at http://www.fin.gc.ca/access/fedprov-eng.asp.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Wait Times Reduction Transfer (Part V.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 2004–05

End date: 2013–14

Description: As part of the 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care, the Government of Canada committed to support to provinces and territories to help reduce wait times in the health care system—primarily in support of human resources and tools to manage wait times. A total of $4.25 billion was provided through a third-party trust fund in 2004 and was notionally allocated over 5 years, from 2004–05 to 2008–09. This amount has been paid in full. From 2009–10 to 2013–14, annual funding of $250 million will be provided to provinces and territories through a transfer on an equal per capita basis.

Expected results: Timely and accurate administration of payments to provinces and territories for targeted support

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 250.000 250.000 250.000 250.000

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.

More information on major federal transfers to provinces and territories can be found on the Department’s website at http://www.fin.gc.ca/access/fedprov-eng.asp.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Statutory Subsidies (Constitution Acts, 1867 to 1982, and Other Statutory Authorities)

Start date: 1867

End date: Ongoing

Description: The statutory subsidies provide a source of funding to provinces in accordance with terms of entry into Confederation.

Expected results: Timely and accurate administration of payments to provinces and territories for targeted support

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 32.000 32.149 32.200 32.200

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Youth Allowances Recovery (Federal-Provincial Fiscal Revision Act, 1964)

Start date: 1964

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Youth Allowances Recovery is a recovery from the Province of Quebec for an additional tax point transfer (three points) above and beyond the Canada Health Transfer and Canada Social Transfer tax point transfers. In the 1960s, Quebec chose to use the federal government’s contracting-out arrangements for certain federal-provincial programs. Taken together, the Alternative Payments for Standing Programs and the Youth Allowances Recovery are known as the "Quebec Abatement." These arrangements ensure that all provinces and territories are treated the same through cash and tax transfers in support of health and social programs.

Expected results: Timely and accurate administration of payments to provinces and territories for targeted support

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments (649.810) (685.644) (726.617) (770.715)

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Alternative Payments for Standing Programs (Part VI—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 1977

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Alternative Payments for Standing Programs is a recovery from the Province of Quebec for an additional tax point transfer (13.5 points) above and beyond the Canada Health Transfer and Canada Social Transfer tax point transfers. In the 1960s, Quebec chose to use the federal government’s contracting-out arrangements for certain federal-provincial programs. Taken together, the Alternative Payments for Standing Programs and the Youth Allowances Recovery are known as the "Quebec Abatement." These arrangements ensure that all provinces and territories are treated the same through cash and tax transfers in support of health and social programs.

Expected results: Timely and accurate administration of payments to provinces and territories for targeted support

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments (2,949.851) (3,112.956) (3,301.012) (3,498.486)

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Incentive for Provinces to Eliminate Taxes on Capital (Part IV—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 2007–08

End date: 2010–11

Description: Financial incentive to encourage provinces to eliminate provincial capital taxes or restructure an existing capital tax on financial institutions into a minimum tax.

Expected results: Increased competitiveness of Canadian businesses by strengthening Canada’s business tax advantage

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 228.100 0.0 0.0 0.0

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Payment to Ontario Related to the Canada Health Transfer (Budget Implementation Act, 2009)

Start date: 2009–10

End date: 2010–11

Description: Direct payments are made to the Government of Ontario to ensure its per capita cash entitlements in relation to the Canada Health Transfer are the same as for other Equalization-receiving provinces.

Expected results: Timely and accurate administration of payments to provinces and territories for targeted support

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 195.300 0.0 0.0 0.0

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework

Name of transfer payment program: Establishment of a Canadian Securities Regulation Regime and a Canadian Regulatory Authority (Budget Implementation Act, 2009)

Start date: 2009–10

End date: 2010–11

Description: In Budget 2009, the Government of Canada committed to move forward quickly with willing provinces and territories to establish a Canadian securities regulator that respects regional interest and expertise as well as constitutional jurisdiction. These funds will be used to compensate participating provinces and territories for matters relating to the transition toward a Canadian securities regulator.

Expected results: A more efficient and streamlined regulatory system that reinforces financial stability, strengthens enforcement, protects investors, and is more accountable

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 0.0 150.000 0.0 0.0

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Debt Payments on Behalf of Poor Countries to International Organizations pursuant to section 18(1) of the Economic Recovery Act (stimulus)

Start date: 2010

End date: 2054

Description: Payments for Canada’s commitment to the G8-led Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative

Expected results: Payments to international organizations and Canadian creditors consistent with Government of Canada commitments

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 76.200 51.200 51.200 51.200

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Transitional Assistance to Provinces Entering into the Harmonized Value-Added Tax Framework (Part III.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 2010

End date: 2011

Description: The Provinces of Ontario and British Columbia decided to enter into the harmonized value-added tax framework and signed Comprehensive Integrated Tax Coordination Agreements. The Government of Canada entered into these Agreements under the authority of Part III.1 of the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act. As part of the Agreements, the Government of Canada has committed to providing Ontario with $4.3 billion and British Columbia with $1.599 billion in transitional assistance, to help offset transition costs and to facilitate economic growth and job creation. In 2009–10, British Columbia received $250 million. In 2010–11, Ontario received $3 billion and British Columbia received $769 million. Planned spending for 2011–12 is $1.88 billion: $1.3 billion for Ontario and $580 million for British Columbia.

Expected results: Implementation of the harmonized value-added tax in Ontario and British Columbia

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 3,769.000 1,880.000 0.0 0.0

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Subsidy Resources to the International Monetary Fund's Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust (Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act, Section 8)

Start date: 2010–11

End date: 2010–11

Description: A grant contribution of $40 million is made to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust to support concessional lending to poor countries.

Expected results: To be used, along with other donor and IMF resources, to provide $6 billion in additional concessional lending by the IMF to the world’s poorest countries in order to support their development goals and help them cope with the recent financial and economic crisis.

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 40.000 0.0 0.0 0.0

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Small and Medium Enterprise Finance Challenge (SME) (Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act, Section 8)

Start date: 2010–11

End date: 2010–11

Description: Canada’s contribution toward fulfillment of the commitment made by G20 Leaders to finance the implementation of the best solutions received through the Small and Medium Enterprise Finance Challenge for scaling up private sector financing for growth-oriented small and medium-sized enterprises in developing countries.

Expected results: Increased private sector financing for growth-oriented small and medium-sized enterprises, which will result in economic growth and job creation benefits in developing countries.

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 20.000 0.0 0.0 0.0

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.


Strategic outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Program activity: Transfer and Taxation Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Fast Start Climate Change Financing (Bretton Woods and Related Agreements Act, Section 8)

Start date: 2010–11

End date: 2010–11

Description: Two separate payments are made to the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the private sector arm of the World Bank. The first payment is a grant of $5.83 million for technical assistance grants that developing countries can use to build in-country capacity for evaluating and funding clean energy investments. The second payment is a loan of $285.72 million that will be disbursed as concessional financing to support private sector financing of clean energy projects in developing countries. These payments contribute to meeting commitments made by the Government of Canada during climate change negotiations in Copenhagen in 2009, and in the 2010 Speech from the Throne.

Expected results: To be used to assist developing countries in their efforts to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt to the impact of climate change

($ millions)
Program Activity
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Other types of transfer payments 5.830 0.0 0.0 0.0

Link to three-year transfer payment program plan: A summary of the Department of Finance Canada’s three-year plan for transfer payment programs can be found on the Department’s website.



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Department of Justice Canada

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund (Voted)

4. Start date: April 1, 2003

5. End date: Ongoing

6. Description:The purpose of the Initiative in Support of Access to Justice in Both Official Languages is to improve the capacity of the justice system to serve Canadians in both official languages. The Initiative is part of the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future,announced by the federal government in June 2008. It includes a consulting mechanism, a justice training component, and a grants and contributions funding program titled "Access to Justice in both Official Languages Support Fund." Its objectives are to increase the capacity of the justice system and its stakeholders to offer justice services in both official languages and to increase awareness in the legal community and official language minority and majority communities concerning their rights and issues related to access to justice in both official languages.

Recipients:

  • Canadian not-for-profit organizations
  • Provincial and territorial governments, regional and municipal governments, provincial and territorial Crown corporations
  • institutions/boards of education, including centers for jurilinguistics

7. Expected results: Continued and improved access to justice services for the official languages minority communities.

($ millions) 8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0.04 $0.05 $0.05 $0.05
Total contributions $6.48 $7.18 $6.84 $2.84
13. Total transfer payments $6.52 $7.23 $6.89 $2.89
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Aboriginal Justice Strategy Fund

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program:Aboriginal Justice Strategy Fund (Voted)

4. Start date:1991-1992 as Aboriginal Justice Initiative

5. End date: March 31, 2012

6. Description:The Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS) enables Aboriginal communities to have increased involvement in the local administration of justice and provides timely and effective alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. AJS programs are also aimed at reducing the rates of victimization; crime and incarceration among Aboriginal people in communities operating AJS programs; and, helping the mainstream justice system become more responsive and sensitive to the needs and culture of Aboriginal communities.

Recipients: (a) bands, First Nations, Tribal Councils, local, regional and national Aboriginal organizations; (b) agencies and institutions of regional/municipal governments; (c) non-profit community organizations, societies, and associations which have voluntarily associated themselves for a non-profit purpose; (d) provincial and territorial governments; (e) individuals; and (f) for-profit corporations, so long as these corporations will not make a profit on the work performed.

7. Expected results: Aboriginal communities continue to have increased involvement in the local administration of justice by providing timely and effective alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. Over time, the AJS Fund will contribute to reducing rates of victimization, crime and incarceration among Aboriginal people in communities operating AJS programs and help the mainstream justice system become more responsive and sensitive to the needs and culture of Aboriginal communities.

($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0.26 $0.26 $0 $0
Total contributions $11.74 $12.24 $2.90 $2.90
13. Total transfer payments $12.00 $12.50 $2.90 $2.90
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Aboriginal Courtwork Program

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program:Aboriginal Courtwork Program (Voted)

4. Start date: 1978-1979

5. End date: Ongoing

6. Description:The objective of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program is to improve access to justice by helping Aboriginal people involved in the criminal justice system obtain fair, just, equitable and culturally sensitive treatment. It is the only ongoing justice related program available to all Aboriginal people (adult and youth), regardless of status and residency. The Program provides Aboriginal persons charged with an offence with timely and accurate information on their rights, obligations, roles and responsibilities at the earliest possible stage of the criminal justice process. Services also include referring clients to appropriate legal and social resources in their community. Aboriginal Courtworkers serve as a "bridge" between criminal justice officials and Aboriginal people and communities by providing information, cultural context, and liaison, and promoting communications and understanding.

Recipients: Federal contributions will be made to provincial governments to provide Aboriginal Courtwork services to Aboriginal persons (adults and youths) charged with an offence under any federal or provincial statute or municipal by-law. A province may authorize one or more agencies to deliver Aboriginal Courtwork services on its behalf.  All designated delivery agencies will be accountable to the funders. In addition, the Projects in Support of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program component provides modest support for projects that further the mandate of the Program.

7. Expected results: Contribution agreements with the provinces will support delivery of Aboriginal Courtwork services to ensure access to justice for Aboriginal people within the mainstream Canadian justice system, which will promote fair, equitable and culturally relevant treatment before the courts.

($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $5.41 $4.91 $4.91 $4.91
13. Total transfer payments $5.41 $4.91 $4.91 $4.91
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Legal Aid Systems

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Legal Aid Systems (Voted)

4. Start date: August 17, 1971

5. End date: March 31, 2012

6. Description:The objective of the federal Legal Aid Program is to contribute to sustaining a national system of justice that helps to ensure that economically disadvantaged persons have access to the justice system, through contribution funding in support of criminal, youth criminal justice and immigration and refugee legal aid services provided by the provinces (funding for criminal and civil legal aid in the territories is provided through the Access to Justice Services Agreements).

Recipients: Provinces

7. Expected results: Provinces are enabled to provide legal aid services to eligible persons involved in serious criminal, youth criminal justice, and immigration and refugee matters.

($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $124.57 $119.83 $108.33 $108.33
13. Total transfer payments $124.57 $119.83 $108.33 $108.33
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Youth Justice Services

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program:Youth Justice Services Funding Program (Voted)

4. Start date:April 2, 1984

5. End date: Ongoing

6. Description:The overall objective of this Program is to support the policy directions of the Youth Justice Initiative. The specific objectives of the individual agreements are to support and promote an appropriate range of programs and services that encourage accountability measures for unlawful behavior that are proportionate and timely; encourage the effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons into their communities; target the formal court process to the most serious offences; and target detention and custody to the most serious offences.

Recipients: Provinces and territories

7. Expected results: The contribution agreements will support a sustainable youth justice system that is capable of innovation and supports federal youth justice priorities

($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $177.30 $177.30 $177.30 $177.30
13. Total transfer payments $177.30 $177.30 $177.30 $177.30
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Fund (Supporting Families Fund)

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program:Supporting Families Fund (Voted)

4. Start date: April 1, 2009

5. End date: March 31, 2014

6. Description: The SF Fund is a key component of the Supporting Families Experiencing Separation and Divorce Initiative (SFI), which was announced by the Minister of Justice in September 2008. The fund is aimed at facilitating access to the family justice system for families experiencing separation and divorce through various services, programs, and information resources, particularly those that promote compliance with financial support and custody/access obligations. The Fund also supports projects that promote public awareness about parental obligations, compliance, and the family justice system.

Recipients: Provincial and territorial departments, agencies, or other organizations designated by provincial and territorial governments as responsible for child support, the enforcement of support orders and agreements and parenting arrangement programs and services, are eligible to apply for contribution funding under the Family Justice Initiatives and the Pilot Projects components of the Fund.

Any of the following may apply for contribution or class grant funding under the Fund's Public Legal Education and Information and Professional Training component:

  • individuals
  • non-profit professional organizations, societies or associations
  • other non-profit organizations, societies or associations
  • educational institutions
  • private sector organizations sponsoring non-profit projects in partnership with federal, provincial, or territorial governments

7. Expected results:

Expanded accessibility of custody/access, support and enforcement services;

Enhanced awareness and understanding of parental obligations, compliance, and the family justice system.

($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0.05 $0.05 $0.05 $0.05
Total contributions $15.95 $15.95 $15.95 $15.95
13. Total transfer payments $16.00 $16.00 $16.00 $16.00
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Victims of Crime Initiative

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program:Victims of Crime Initiative

4. Start date:Victims of Crime Initiative (VCI) April 1, 2005, and Federal Victims Strategy (FVS) April 1, 2007

5. End date: VCI ongoing, and FVS March 31, 2011

6. Description:The Victims Fund is a grants and contributions fund with broad terms and conditions designed to raise awareness and enhance services and assistance to victims of crime. The Victims Fund is administered by the Policy Centre for Victim Issues and provides support to victims of crime as well as to governmental and non-governmental organizations to implement a wide range of victim-focused projects and activities. Planned spending for 2011-12 and onwards does not reflect the Funding for the Federal Victim Strategy which sunsets on March 31, 2011 however, its renewal is being sought by the Department.

Recipients: (a) individuals; (b) national, provincial, territorial, municipal, Aboriginal, community or professional organizations, societies or associations; (c) Canadian educational institutions/boards of education; (d) International governmental and non-governmental organizations, including bodies associated or affiliated with organizations of which Canada is a member, which have as their purpose victim advocacy, services, assistance or raising awareness about the impact of victimization; (e) private sector organizations sponsoring non-profit projects; (f) bands, tribal councils and self-governing First Nations who are working to provide services and assistance to victims of crime in Aboriginal communities; (g) provincial, territorial, municipal and regional governments and agencies.

7. Expected results:

  • Give victims a more effective voice in the criminal justice system
  • Increased access to services for victims
  • Increased awareness and understanding among criminal justice system personnel, service providers and victims about victim issues, legislation and services available
  • Reduced financial hardship for victims
($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0.85 $0.35 $0.35 $0.35
Total contributions $6.30 $4.74 $4.74 $4.74
13. Total transfer payments $7.15 $5.09 $5.09 $5.09
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Youth Justice Services - Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Justice Services - Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program (voted)

4. Start date:April 1, 2002

5. End date: Ongoing

6. Description:The overall objective of this Program is to financially assist the provinces and territories in providing the specialized services required for the implementation of the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision sentence pursuant to paragraph 42(2)(r) and subsection 42(7) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other sentencing options applicable under the Act to serious violent youth offenders with mental health problems. It is expected that these services might reduce the likelihood of further violence in those convicted of the most serious violent offences.

Recipients: Provinces and territories

7. Expected results: Through the contributions signed under this Program, provinces and territories will have the financial capacity to implement sentencing options that involve specialized treatment programs to address the mental health issues of serious violent youth offenders.

($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $11.05 $11.05 $11.05 $11.05
13. Total transfer payments $11.05 $11.05 $11.05 $11.05
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Implementation of Official Languages Requirements under the Contraventions Act

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program:Implementation of Official Languages Requirements under the Contraventions Act (Voted)

4. Start date:April 1, 2008

5. End date: Ongoing

6. Description: The Contraventions Act provides an alternative to the summary conviction procedure of the Criminal Code for the prosecution of certain offences under federal statutes and regulations. It allows certain federal offences to be prosecuted, using provincial court processes, by means of a ticketing scheme. Following a 2001 Federal Court decision concerning the implementation of the Act, the Department of Justice initiated the process of modifying existing Contraventions Act implementation agreements to ensure that the language rights requirements identified by the Court are respected.  To support this process, the Department of Justice received funding to establish the Contraventions Act Fund. The overall program has three main areas of activities:

  • Implementing the Contraventions Act with the consent and cooperation of each province and territory by permitting, through a regulatory incorporation, federal contraventions to be prosecuted in accordance with the provinces' and territories' respective offence schemes, together with their processes and procedures, and giving enforcement authorities a new tool to better enforce federal regulatory offences that have been designated as contraventions 
  • Allowing for the effective implementation of the Act through the negotiation with each province and territory of implementation agreements dealing with the administrative and procedural aspects of such implementation and, which are consistent with the Federal Court decision, by identifying the means and mechanisms to address the language-rights requirements identified in that decision 
  • Administering the Contraventions Act Fund to support provinces and territories in respect of judicial activities and extra-judicial services in both official languages to conform with the Federal Court decision in respect of proceedings instituted under the Contraventions Act

Recipients:
Provincial and territorial departments and agencies and municipalities designated by provincial and territorial governments as being responsible for judicial activities and for providing extra-judicial services in both official languages.

7. Expected results:

  • Increased capacity to offer in both official languages judicial activities and extra-judicial services in relation to the prosecution of federal contraventions
  • Implementation of theContraventions Act in all jurisdictions of Canada in a manner that is respectful of the quasi-constitutional language rights of Canadians
($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $5.12 $9.09 $9.09 $9.09
13. Total transfer payments $5.12 $9.09 $9.09 $9.09
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Youth Justice Fund

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program:Youth Justice Fund (Voted)

4. Start date:1999-2000

5. End date: Ongoing

6. Description:The overall objective of funding under the Youth Justice Fund is to encourage a fairer and more effective youth justice system. Funding is available for community and Aboriginal organizations, provinces/territories and their agencies, and other youth justice stakeholders for innovative pilot projects and related activities, such as training and evaluation. Priorities are set annually based on identified needs and emerging federal youth justice priorities.

A variety of activities are eligible for funding support under the Youth Justice Fund. These include, among others:

  • The development, implementation, testing and evaluation of pilot projects dealing with youth involved in the criminal justice system. These projects often address youth with specific issues, such as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, mental health issues, substance abuse or gang involvement;
  • Training and educational activities for youth justice professionals and community service providers; and
  • Research activities which contribute to policy development

Recipients: Community and Aboriginal organizations, provinces/territories and their agencies and other youth justice stakeholders.

7. Expected results: The overall expected result is a fairer, more effective youth justice system.

Short-Term and Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Increased responsiveness to emerging issues
  • Increased community involvement
  • Increased collaboration and knowledge development
  • More effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons
  • A more integrated coordinated approach
($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0.73 $0.33 $0.33 $0.33
Total contributions $4.28 $2.18 $2.18 $2.18
13. Total transfer payments $5.01 $2.51 $2.51 $2.51
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Access to Justice Services Agreements in the Territories (in the areas of Legal Aid, Aboriginal Courtwork, and Public Legal Education and Information Services)

1. Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

2. Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Access to Justice Services Agreements in the Territories (in the areas of Legal Aid, Aboriginal Courtwork and Public Legal education and Information Services) (Voted)

4. Start date:1996

5. End date: Ongoing

6. Description:The goal of the Access to Justice Services Agreements is to integrate federal government funding support to Canada's three territories for access to justice services (including criminal and civil legal aid, Aboriginal Courtwork, and Public Legal Education and Information) through ongoing contribution agreements that allow the territories the flexibility needed to provide these services in a challenging environment (vast distances, harsh climate, cultural/linguistic differences). The overarching goal of federal support for Aboriginal Courtwork services is to facilitate and enhance access to justice by assisting Aboriginal people involved in the criminal justice system to obtain fair, just, equitable and culturally sensitive treatment. With regard to legal aid services in the territories, the federal goal is to enable the territories to provide legal aid services to economically disadvantaged persons involved in serious criminal, youth criminal justice and civil matters. And, with respect to public legal education and information, the goal is to assist the territories in providing members of the public with the legal information they need to make informed decisions and participate effectively in the justice system.

Recipients:Territorial governments that undertake to provide services to eligible persons and eligible young persons in matters relating to the overall objectives of the Access to Justice Services Agreements. The territories may authorize entities ("territorial access to justice services delivery entities") to provide services in these matters.

7. Expected results: Contribution agreements signed with the territories will allow greater flexibility to allocate resources which will enable the territories to deliver access to justice services in the areas of Legal Aid (criminal and civil), Aboriginal Courtwork and Public Legal Education and Information.

($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010-11
9. Planned Spending
2011-12
10. Planned Spending
2012-13
11. Planned Spending
2013-14
12. Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $4.86 $4.86 $4.86 $4.86
13. Total Transfer payments $4.86 $4.86 $4.86 $4.86
14. Link to three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan
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Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

Community Diversification Program

Strategic outcome: A competitive and diversified economy for the regions of Quebec

Program activity: Community Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Diversification program. This program represents a voted item, except for 2009-10, for which the funding dedicated to Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP) corresponds to a statutory appropriation, and 2010-11, for which the funding portion dedicated to CEAP also corresponds to a statutory appropriation.

Start date: April 1, 2007

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Community Diversification program helps Quebec regions maintain and develop their economic activity base. A community’s vitality depends on its ability to develop by building on its own assets. The program has the following three objectives: to foster communities’ development and increase their mobilization by drawing up visions and projects of local and regional scope; assist communities through support for entrepreneurship and through creation or maintenance of viable enterprises; and increase communities’ capability to attract tourists and skilled individuals.

This program was also used for implementation of the Community Adjustment Fund (CAF), a temporary initiative under CEAP (2009-10 and 2010-11).

Eligible beneficiaries: Includes in particular small and medium-sized enterprises and non-profit organizations.

Expected results:

  • Communities are pursuing a development vision and implementing resulting initiatives.
  • Enterprises are contributing to community economic growth and maintenance.
  • Communities are recognized for their distinctiveness, brand image or outreach.
(in thousands of dollars)
  Forecast spending
2010–11
Planned spending
2011–12
Planned spending
2012–13
Planned spending
2013–14
Grants 35 100 100 100
Contributions 168,077 110,469 94,481 73,537
Other types of transfer payments        
Total transfer payments 168,112 110,569 94,581 73,637

Summary of Three-Year Plan: Hyperlink to the Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs : http://www.dec-ced.gc.ca/eng/agency/about/plan.html

 

Business and Regional Growth Program

Strategic outcome: A competitive and diversified economy for the regions of Quebec

Program activity:
Enterprise competitiveness
Competitive positioning of sectors and regions

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Business and Regional Growth program. This program represents a voted item, except for 2009-10, for which the funding dedicated to Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP) corresponds to a statutory appropriation, and 2010-11, for which the funding portion dedicated to CEAP also corresponds to a statutory appropriation.

Start date: April 1, 2007

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Business and Regional Growth program reinforces conditions conducive to the sustainable growth of regions and SMEs. It aims to help enterprises improve their performance, become more competitive and engage in more innovation to facilitate their sustainable development; support the transfer of technology and research outputs to enterprises; and create the right conditions for attracting foreign investment and international organizations.

This program was also used for implementation of the Community Adjustment Fund (CAF), a temporary initiative under CEAP in 2009-10 and 2010-11.

Eligible beneficiaries: Includes in particular small and medium-sized enterprises and non-profit organizations.

Expected results:

  • Assisted enterprises are using their strategic capabilities.
  • Products and services derived from R&D are being commercialized.
  • New enterprises and investment are consolidating the regions’ economic base.
  • Competitiveness poles are being developed and consolidated.
  • Clusters and networks of enterprises in the same sector or region are better structured.
  • The innovation commercialization process is generating medium- and long-range economic and social spinoffs.
  • Competitive regions are attracting foreign direct investment and international organizations
(in thousands of dollars)
  Forecast spending
2010–11
Planned spending
2011–12
Planned spending
2012–13
Planned spending
2013–14
Grants        
Contributions 127,692 103,668 101,449 84,704
Other types of transfer payments        
Total transfer payments 127,692 103,668 101,449 84,704

Summary of Three-Year Plan: Hyperlink to the Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs : http://www.dec-ced.gc.ca/eng/agency/about/plan.html

 

Community Futures Program

Strategic outcome: A competitive and diversified economy for the regions of Qubec

Program activity: Community Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Futures Program (CFP) (voted item)

Start date: May 18, 1995

End date: Indeterminate, in line with the Treasury Board of Canada’s Policy on Transfer Payments, in effect since October 1, 2008.

Description: This Canada-wide program provides support for communities in all parts of the country to help them take charge of their own local economic development.

Beneficiaries: In Quebec, the CFP financially supports local and regional development agencies, including Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs), Community Economic Development Corporations (CEDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs).

Expected results:

  • Communities are pursuing a development vision and implementing resulting initiatives.
  • Enterprises are contributing to community economic growth and maintenance.
(in thousands of dollars)
  Forecast spending
2010–11
Planned spending
2011–12
Planned spending
2012–13
Planned spending
2013–14
Grants        
Contributions1 35,0002 32,300 32,300 32,300
Other types of transfer payments        
Total transfer payments 35,000 32,300 32,300 32,300

Summary of Three-Year Plan: Hyperlink to the Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs : http://www.dec-ced.gc.ca/eng/agency/about/plan.html

 

Contribution program to fund construction of a gas pipeline between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines

Strategic outcome: A competitive and diversified economy for the regions of Qubec

Program activity: Infrastructure

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution program to fund construction of a gas pipeline between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines (voted item).

Start date: April 1, 2012

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: The goal of the program is to fund the project for construction of section of gas pipeline between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines in order to provide the Thetford area with access to natural gas. The program targets an increase in enterprises’ competitiveness as well as economic diversification through infrastructure conducive to economic development and benefiting the community.

Eligible beneficiary: Gaz Métro Limited Partnership and/or related company.

Expected results:

  • The gas pipeline reaches Thetford Mines, and gas is distributed to end users.
  • Enterprises can adopt natural gas as the energy source for their activities.
  • Enterprises are established in the region and use natural gas.
(in thousands of dollars)
  Forecast spending
2010–11
Planned spending
2011–12
Planned spending
2012–13
Planned spending
2013–14
Grants        
Contributions 0 0 14,500 3,648
Other types of transfer payments        
Total transfer payments 0 0 14,500 3,648

Summary of Three-Year Plan: Hyperlink to the Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs : http://www.dec-ced.gc.ca/eng/agency/about/plan.html


Notes:

  • 1 - Annual planned spending under the CFP includes $21.0 million from the CFP permanent fund.
  • 2 - Forecast spending for the CFP in 2010-11 includes operating expenditures allocated to CFP organizations and contributions to the CFDC Common Fund for the Business Startup and Succession Fund.
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Environment Canada

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)



1. Strategic Outcome: Canada’s natural capital is conserved and restored for present and future generations

2. Program Activity: 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Habitat Stewardship Program for Species at Risk (HSP)

4. Start date: August 20, 2000

5. End date: Program is ongoing. March 2012 is the end date for a portion of HSP funding ($4 M)

6. Description: The purpose of the HSP is to contribute to the recovery of endangered, threatened, and other species of concern, and to prevent other species from becoming a conservation concern, by engaging Canadians in conservation actions to benefit wildlife. HSP fosters partnerships among organizations interested in the recovery of species at risk and provides funding for implementing activities that protect or conserve habitats for species at risk. It enables non-government organizations, landowners, the private sector, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, community groups, and other levels of government to plan, manage and complete projects that will achieve the Program goal.

7. Expected results:

  • Support habitat projects that benefit species at risk.
  • Enable Canadians to become actively and concretely involved in stewardship projects for species at risk that will result in tangible, measurable environmental benefits.
  • Improve understanding of the role stewardship has as a conservation tool.
  • Securing or protecting important habitat to protect species at risk and support their recovery.
  • Increased awareness and understanding among Canadians of the environmental impacts of their transportation choices.
  • Mitigating threats to species at risk caused by human activities.
($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010–2011
9. Planned Spending
2011–2012
10. Planned Spending
2012–2013
11. Planned Spending
2013–2014
12. Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $12.4 $11.8 $7.8 $7.8
Total other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0
13. Total transfer payments $12.4 $11.8 $7.8 $7.8

14. Summary of the 3 Year Plan:

Refer to the following link for reference to the summary of 3 Year Plans as per Section 6.6.1 of the Policy on Transfer Payments: http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=AA625E07-1



1. Strategic Outcome: Canada's natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

2. Program Activity: 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions in support of Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

4. Start date: June 10, 2010

5. End date: Ongoing – Evaluation to be completed by March 31, 2015

6. Description: Contributions in support of Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat are proposed in order to encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in activities to maintain or restore wildlife populations, in particular migratory birds and species at risk, to target levels.

7. Expected results: Projects funded under these terms and conditions will contribute, together with other departmental activities and the actions of others, to the following key expected results*:

Applicable to all Sub-Activities:
Expected result Performance indicator
a) Individuals and organizations are increasingly engaged in priority activities related to the conservation of wildlife, in particular migratory birds and species at risk. Total time invested by individuals in funded projects (person-years).
b) Increased Aboriginal participation in wildlife and habitat conservation. Number of Aboriginal organizations participating in funded projects related to migratory birds, species at risk or their habitats.
c) New knowledge and data produced by collaborating organizations contribute to the conservation of migratory birds, species at risk and their habitat. Proportion of species for which primary data to establish population status and trends are provided through funded projects.
d) Priority habitats for migratory birds and species at risk are conserved by partners through stewardship and protection. Land area conserved through funded projects.
e) Factors limiting priority species at risk and migratory bird populations are reduced by partners. Proportion of threats addressed through funded projects.
f) Increased collaboration within Canadian and international research and policy communities related to Environment Canada’s biodiversity priorities. Number of formal collaborations regarding transnational conservation issues undertaken or maintained as a direct result of funded projects.
g) Compliance with the requirements of the Agreement on International Humane Trapping Standards. Canada and Competent Authorities (Provinces and Territories) remain compliant to the requirements of the Agreement.

*The expected results listed above reflect current areas of focus where the numbers and scale of agreements are expected to be sufficient to enable measurement of the impact of the contributions. Should the areas of focus for projects under these terms and conditions change, additional expected results and indicators will be defined where warranted.

Projects having different expected results but which support the objectives of these terms and conditions may be undertaken. Evaluation and performance measurement of such projects, which tend to be unique and non-recurring, will focus on the specific expected results identified in individual funding agreements.

The results of the Program link to the Environment Canada Program Activity: Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat, which includes Program Sub-Activities: Biodiversity Policy and Priorities, Species at Risk, Migratory Birds and Wildlife Habitat Conservation, under the strategic outcome “Canada’s natural capital is conserved and restored for present and future generations” of the Program Activity Architecture.

($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010–2011
9. Planned Spending
2011–2012
10. Planned Spending
2012–2013
11. Planned Spending
2013–2014
12. Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $11.756 $13.639 $15.289 $14.039
Total other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0
13. Total transfer payments $11.756 $13.639 $15.289 $14.039

a) Forecasted 2010–2011 expenditures are expected to change once the final list of deferred projects is finalized and approved by senior management (lists are expected to be approved in mid/late December).

b) The amounts shown in 2011–2012 and future years are subject to change pending decisions related to the allocation of the Strategic Review Reduction.

c) Amounts listed above do not include Assessed Contributions for the following Transfer Payment Programs:

  • $160K - Convention on Wetlands of Int'l Importance (Ramsar)
  • $175K - Convention on Int'l Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)

14. Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=AA625E07-1



1. Strategic Outcome: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

2. Program Activity: 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution to EcoAction 2000 Community Funding Initiative (voted)

4. Start date: 1998

5. End date: In December 2009, the Minister of Environment approved the renewal of the Program’s terms and conditions with minor modifications, as per authorities granted under the new Transfer Payment Policy (2008).

6. Description: Provide financial support to non-profit organizations to undertake environmental projects that yield positive, measurable results and increase capacity to take action and environmental awareness at the community level.

7. Expected results:

Expected result Performance indicator
  • Support for and promotion of environmental improvements through funding to community groups undertaking action, outreach and capacity building activities that address the Government of Canada and Environment Canada priorities of climate change, nature, clean water and clean air.
Number of projects funded.
  • Leveraging of monetary and voluntary in-kind support for environmental activities that have measurable environmental benefits.
Ratio of federal government to total partner contributions.
  • Provide the tools Canadians need as individuals and members of communities to act on their knowledge and values in support of sustainable development.
Total annual number of individuals engaged in EcoAction-funded projects.
  • The successful completion of community-based projects that support action, capacity building and outreach on priority environmental issues at the local and regional levels.
Percentage of projects successfully completed.


($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010–2011
9. Planned Spending
2011–2012
10. Planned Spending
2012–2013
11. Planned Spending
2013–2014
12. Total grants        
Total contributions $4.5 $5.0 $5.0 $5.0
Total other types of transfer payments $0.0 $0.0 $0.0 $0.0
13. Total transfer payments $4.5 $5.0 $5.0 $5.0

14. Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=AA625E07-1



1. Strategic Outcome: Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

2. Program Activity: 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Freshwater Program

4. Start date: April 1, 2008

5. End date: March 31, 2017

6. Description: The objective of this class contribution is to enable the clean-up of contaminated sediment in targeted areas of concern in the Great Lakes, and advance clean-up efforts to restore Lake Winnipeg and Lake Simcoe.

Transfer payments made under the program will be in the form of contributions to a broad range of entities to support the remediation of contaminated sediment in Great Lakes Areas of Concern or rehabilitation measures that reduce nutrient loads to lakes Winnipeg and Simcoe and their tributaries. The entities include domestic or international non-profit organizations, provincial and municipal governments, regional conservation authorities, individual Canadians, businesses, post-secondary institutions, Indian bands, and Aboriginal organizations and associations.

7. Expected results: Contribution funding under the program will target the following results:

  • Implement contaminated sediment management plans in Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes (Detroit River, St. Marys River, Thunder Bay, St. Clair River, Niagara River, and the Bay of Quinte) to reduce the release and impact of contaminated sediments on the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem;
  • Support stewardship projects that will reduce pollutants, particularly nutrients loads, in priority areas in the Lake Winnipeg Basin; and
  • Clean up Lake Simcoe by supporting projects to reduce excessive quantities of phosphorus and other nutrients in priority areas in the Lake Simcoe Basin and to make progress on the rehabilitation of priority habitat to restore the health of the aquatic ecosystem and coldwater fishery in Lake Simcoe.

Planned evaluations: A third-party program evaluation is being conducted for Lake Winnipeg and Lake Simcoe, and for the Great Lakes initiative, and will conclude in 2011.

($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010–2011
9. Planned Spending
2011–2012
10. Planned Spending
2012–2013
11. Planned Spending
2013–2014
12. Total grants $0.0 $0.0 $0.0 $0.0
Total contributions $8.1 $7.5 $1.8 $3.6
Total other types of transfer payments $0.0 $0.0 $0.0 $0.0
13. Total transfer payments $8.1 $7.5 $1.8 $3.6

14. Summary of the 3 Year Plan:

http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=390AF41B-1 (from 2010–2011 RPP input, update if required)



1. Strategic Outcome: Canada's natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations

2. Program Activity: 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions in support of Sustainable Ecosystems

4. Start date: June 10, 2010

5. End date: Ongoing – Evaluation to be completed by March 31, 2015

6. Description: Contributions under the Sustainable Ecosystems Program Activity are proposed in order to encourage and support individuals and organizations engaged in activities to manage ecosystem resources in a manner consistent with ecosystem sustainability.

7. Expected results: The purpose and overall objective of contributions made under these terms and conditions is to enhance or maintain the sustainability of ecosystems in Canada, through collaboration with other levels of government (provinces, territories as well as regional, municipal and local government), Aboriginal peoples and other stakeholders (such as non-governmental organizations, academic institutions, industry, businesses). Sustainable Ecosystems Program contributions will support the following key results*:

Applicable to the Ecosystems Initiatives Sub-Activity:
Expected result Performance indicator
  • Engagement of governments, citizens and stakeholders in the development and implementation of ecosystem-based management plans as well as in ecosystem governance processes.
  • Percentage of planning units that have a functioning multi-stakeholder governance structure
  • Percentage of planning units with a functioning multi-stakeholder governance structure where the governance structure includes all interests relevant to the identified environmental issues
  • Percentage of planning units that have an ecosystem-based management plan that has been approved by the relevant multi-stakeholder governance structure
  • Percentage of total costs of Ecosystem Initiative multi-stakeholder governance structures that is contributed by Environment Canada.
  • Implementation of environmental remediation, protection and conservation projects required to meet the goals and objectives identified in ecosystem-based management plans or to achieve ecosystem objectives.
  • Percentage of environmental issues identified in approved ecosystem-based management plans or by ecosystem governance processes that are addressed by funded projects
  • Percentage of total estimated costs of all management actions identified in approved ecosystem-based management plans represented by funded projects
  • Percentage of actions identified in approved ecosystem-based management plans or ecosystem governance processes that have been completed
  • Percentage of the total value of funded projects contributed by Environment Canada.
  • Participation of individuals and organizations in activities contributing to the achievement of goals and objectives identified in ecosystem-based management plans or to achieve ecosystem objectives.
  • Number of individual participants in projects or activities undertaken in support of approved ecosystem-based management plans or under the auspices of an ecosystem-based multi-stakeholder governance structure
  • Number of organizational participants in projects or activities undertaken in support of approved ecosystem-based management plans or under the auspices of an ecosystem-based multi-stakeholder governance structure.

Applicable to all Sub-Activities:
Expected result Performance indicator
  • New knowledge and data produced by collaborating organizations contribute to the management and sustainability of Canadian ecosystems.
  • Percentage of research priorities (by program) implemented in whole or in part by funded projects.

*For each of the results set out, the following are the key performance measurements and indicators that will be used to monitor and report on the efficacy of the activities and the progress of the various projects undertaken. Further details, including data sources, frequency of measurement and linkages to Program logic models are described in its Performance Measurement Strategy. Data for each of the indicators will be tracked at the level of individual planning units and may be aggregated to enable reporting at Sub-Activity or Program levels.

The Program Activity “Sustainable Ecosystems” supports the Strategic Outcome “Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.”

($ millions)
  8. Forecast Spending
2010–2011
9. Planned Spending
2011–2012
10. Planned Spending
2012–2013
11. Planned Spending
2013–2014
12. Total grants $0 $0 $0 $0
Total contributions $7.1** $8.106*** $8.076 $8.076
Total other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0
13. Total transfer payments $7.1 $8.106 $8.076 $8.076

1 All amounts in this table represent the amounts transferred to SDTC’s NGBF by Environment Canada. An equivalent amount is transferred by Natural Resources Canada.
2 Please also see the Up-Front Multi-Year Funding for SDTC table.
3 $37.5 million was reprofiled from 2010–2011 to 2012–2013.

14. Link to 3-year Transfer Payment Program Plan: http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?Lang=En&n=AA625E07-1



1. Strategic Outcome: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

2. Program Activity: Climate Change and Clean Air

3. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) for the NextGen Biofuels Fund (NGBF). Payments are both statutory and voted.

4. Start date: April 2007

5. End date: September 30, 2027 (the last appropriation by Parliament will be in fiscal year 2014–2015, with the last disbursement by SDTC by March 31, 2017)

6. Description: The $500 million NextGen Biofuels Fund supports the establishment of
first-of-kind large demonstration-scale facilities for the production of next-generation renewable fuels. It is one of two funds operated by SDTC. As sponsoring departments for the federal government, Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada provide oversight for the operations of SDTC to ensure it complies with the two funding agreements and the founding legislation. Under the NGBF, the SDTC provides grants with conditional repayment terms to eligible recipients for the establishment of first-of-kind large demonstration-scale facilities producing next-generation renewable fuels. These facilities must involve both non-conventional technologies and non-traditional feedstocks and be built in Canada, using representative Canadian feedstock. Selection is based on the technology's (rather than the plant's) potential for environmental and other socio-economic benefits.

While the spending listed below captures the funds transferred from Environment Canada to the foundation, the actual planned disbursements to NGBF projects in 2011–2012 are $28.5 million. Between 2012 and 2015, SDTC plans to disburse $200 million to NGBF projects, according to the 2011 Corporate Plan.

7. Expected results: This grant will demonstrate the technological and economic feasibility of large-scale biofuels production. Such production will provide improved environmental benefits, such as reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and will encourage the retention and growth of Canadian technology expertise and innovations capacity.

($ millions) by Environment Canada1
  8. Forecast Spending
2010–2011
9. Planned Spending
2011–2012
10. Planned Spending
2012–2013
11. Planned Spending
2013–2014
12. Total grants (NGBF)2 $03 $25.0 $62.53 $25.0
13. Total transfer payments $0 $25.0 $62.5 $25.0

1 All amounts in this table represent the amounts transferred to SDTC’s NGBF by Environment Canada. An equivalent amount is transferred by Natural Resources Canada.
2 Please also see the Up-Front Multi-Year Funding for SDTC table.
3 $37.5 million was reprofiled from 2010–2011 to 2012–2013.

14. Summary of the 3 Year Plan:

Refer to the following link for reference to the summary of 3 Year Plans as per Section 6.6.1 of the Policy on Transfer Payments: http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=AA625E07-1


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Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)


Strategic Outcome: The economy of southern Ontario is competitive and diversified

Program Activity: Business and Innovation Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Southern Ontario Development Program (SODP)

Start date: October 2, 2009 – Business Innovation and Community Development

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: The SODP was established on October 2, 2009 as a core program of . It builds upon the assets and strengths of communities to create an environment where businesses can thrive and maximize southern Ontario's potential to succeed in the knowledge-based economy. This program has evolved into the Southern Ontario Advantage (SOA) which has targeted the objectives of accelerating innovation and improving productivity and competitiveness of local businesses and communities. The SOA consists of seven new initiatives with the following ones contributing to business and innovation development: Investing in Business Innovation, Scientist and Engineers in Business, Applied Research and Commercialization, Technology Development Programand theProsperity Initiative (Productivity Enhancing and Building a Competitive Advantage.

Expected results: Contributes to the expected outcome of 2% annual growth rate of GDP in Ontario and 0.5% reduction of the March 2011 unemployment rate.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants        
Total contributions 132.3 127.2 128.7 128.5
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 132.3 127.2 128.7 128.5

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: The deadline to provide the official 2011-12 Three-Year Plan for Transfer Payment Programs is April 1st, 2011.


Strategic Outcome: The economy of southern Ontario is competitive and diversified

Program Activity: Economic Regional Development and Infrastructure Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Southern Ontario Development Program (SODP)

Start date: October 2, 2009 – Business Innovation and Community Development

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: The SODP was established on October 2, 2009 as a core program of . It builds upon the assets and strengths of communities to create an environment where businesses can thrive and maximize southern Ontario's potential to succeed in the knowledge-based economy. This program has evolved into the Southern Ontario Advantage (SOA) which has targeted the objectives of accelerating innovation and improving productivity and competitiveness of local businesses and communities. The SOA consists of seven new initiatives with the following ones contributing to business and innovation development: Investing in Business Innovation, Scientist and Engineers in Business, Applied Research and Commercialization, Technology Development Programand theProsperity Initiative (Productivity Enhancing and Building a Competitive Advantage.

Expected results: Contributes to the expected outcome of 2% annual growth rate of GDP in Ontario and 0.5% reduction of the March 2011 unemployment rate.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants        
Total contributions 29.0 48.9 47.5 47.7
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 29.0 48.9 47.5 47.7

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: The deadline to provide the official 2011-12 Three-Year Plan for Transfer Payment Programs is April 1st, 2011.


Strategic Outcome: The economy of southern Ontario is competitive and diversified

Program Activity: Economic Regional Development and Infrastructure Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Brantford Greenwich-Mohawk Remediation Project.

Start date: October 12, 2007

End date: N/A

Description: In 2007, the Government of Canada made a commitment to assist the clean-up and redevelopment of brown fields in Brantford, Ontario, totalling more than 50 acres. In 2011-2012, will continue to provide funding for the redevelopment of this site with the aim of improving environmental quality, health and safety, helping create and retain employment opportunities, and revitalizing land and leading to infrastructure development in the city.

Expected results: Contributes to the expected outcome of 2% annual growth rate of GDP in Ontario and 0.5% reduction of the March 2011 unemployment rate.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 10.4  1.2    
Total contributions        
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 10.4 1.2    

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: The deadline to provide the official 2011-12 Three-Year Plan for Transfer Payment Programs is April 1st, 2011.


Strategic Outcome: The economy of southern Ontario is competitive and diversified

Program Activity: Economic Regional Development and Infrastructure Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: The Economic Development Initiative (EDI)

Start date: April 1, 2008

End date: March 31, 2013

Description: This Initiative supports the development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of economic activities, partnerships and increased support of small businesses in the region's Francophone communities. The Economic Development Initiative is part of the "Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future," the Government of Canada's strategy for official languages.

Expected results: Contributes to the expected outcome of 2% annual growth rate of GDP in Ontario and 0.5% reduction of the March 2011 unemployment rate.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants        
Total contributions 2.9 1.8 0.3  
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 2.9 1.8 0.3  

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: The deadline to provide the official 2011-12 Three-Year Plan for Transfer Payment Programs is April 1st, 2011.


Strategic Outcome: The economy of southern Ontario is competitive and diversified

Program Activity: Economic Regional Development and Infrastructure Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: The Community Futures Program

Start date: N/A

End date: N/A

Description: The Community Futures Program supports 37 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) in southern Ontario to help rural communities develop and implement local solutions to local problems with a focus on community economic development and small business growth.

Expected results: Contributes to the expected outcome of 2% annual growth rate of GDP in Ontario and 0.5% reduction of the March 2011 unemployment rate.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants        
Total contributions 12.5 12.5 12.5 12.5
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 12.5 12.5 12.5 12.5

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: The deadline to provide the official 2011-12 Three-Year Plan for Transfer Payment Programs is April 1st, 2011.


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Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)


Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative

Strategic Outcome Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries
Program Activity Aboriginal Strategies and Governance
Start date July 2007
End date March 31, 2012
Description On July 16, 2007, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans announced the Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (PICFI), which is designed to support increased First Nations participation in integrated commercial fisheries, where all commercial harvesters fish under common and transparent rules, a higher standard of accountability for all resource users, and strengthened collaboration and cooperation amongst all fishery interests.

PICFI is a $175 million, 5-year initiative, developed to support the implementation of much needed reforms which includes the following four distinct yet integrated elements:
  • Increased First Nation Participation in Integrated Commercial Fisheries, BC-wide, in advance of treaties, through the Voluntary relinquishment of Commercial Licenses and quota to support First Nations self-sufficiency through economic development, build a foundation for future treaties and bring First Nations more fully into integrated management processes;
  • First Nation Capacity Building to support the development of First Nations commercial fisheries enterprises so that the commercial fishery access provided is effectively utilized and managed;
  • Fisheries Accountability Measures to support enhanced fisheries monitoring, catch reporting, greater enforcement and enable the development of a traceability system all fishery participants are confident that integrated management plans are being respected and that the fisheries resource is being managed in a sustainable manner; and
  • New Pacific Co-Management Models to establish new mechanisms for increasing the collaboration of resource users in commercial fisheries decision-making to facilitate joint problem-solving among interested groups and better achieve sustainable resource management approaches that meet conservation goals.
Expected results
  • Increased integration of Aboriginal peoples in the commercial fishing industry.
  • Increased participation and benefits for First Nations in integrated commercial fisheries and related areas in advance of treaty;
  • Establishment of First Nation owned and operated Commercial Fisheries Enterprises (CFE) operating with sound governance practices and structures;
    New models of co-management supporting strengthened cooperation and collaboration amongst users, particularly around salmon; and
  • Higher standard of reporting and monitoring, and strengthened enforcement levels.
Link to 3-year Transfer Payment Program Plan http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/reports-rapports/tpp-ppt/tpp-ppt2011-eng.htm

($ millions) Forecast
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2011–12
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Total grants
Total contributions 35.5 33.0
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 35.5 33.0

Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy

Strategic Outcome Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries
Program Activity Aboriginal Strategies and Governance
Start date 1992
End date Ongoing
Description Launched in 1992, the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) provides for negotiated arrangements with Aboriginal groups around the harvesting, use and management of Aboriginal food, social and ceremonial (FSC) fisheries and, where applicable, communal commercial fisheries.
In 1994, DFO introduced a commercial access component to the AFS, the Allocation Transfer Program (ATP). The DFO introduced a commercial access component to the ATP facilitates the voluntary retirement of commercial fishing licences and the issuance of communal licences to eligible Aboriginal groups in a manner that does not add to the existing effort on the resource.
Provisions of negotiated fisheries agreements under the AFS may include:
  • a harvest allocation to the Aboriginal group for FSC purposes;
  • terms and conditions pertaining to communal fishing licences;
  • enforcement provisions, including the training and engagement of Aboriginal Fisheries Guardians;
  • arrangements for the co-management and stewardship of fisheries resources and their supporting habitats, including the restoration and protection of species at risk;
  • co-management projects for the improvement of the management of fisheries generally, such as scientific research,  stock assessment, fish enhancement and habitat management; and
  • communal commercial fishing arrangements including the transfer of vessels and gear as well as support for fisheries-related economic opportunities (e.g., demonstration fishery projects,  aquaculture development, business planning support, etc.).
Where Agreements pertaining to the FSC Fisheries cannot be concluded between DFO and an Aboriginal group, DFO will issue to the group a communal fishing licence that establishes the terms and conditions of its FSC fishery. The AFS is applicable where DFO manages the fishery and where a fisheries management regime has not already been established under a land claims settlement.
Expected results
  • Increased integration of Aboriginal peoples in the commercial fishing industry.
  • Increased participation of Aboriginal groups in fisheries co-management activities.
  • Increased and more effective participation of Aboriginal groups in DFO/multi-stakeholder aquatic resource and oceans management structures and processes.
  • More collaborative relations among DFO, Aboriginal groups and non-Aboriginal resource users.
Link to 3-year Transfer Payment Program Plan http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/reports-rapports/tpp-ppt/tpp-ppt2011-eng.htm

($ millions) Forecast
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2011–12
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Total grants
Total contributions 35.7 31.7 31.7 31.7
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 35.7 31.7 31.7 31.7

Atlantic Lobster Sustainability Measures

Strategic Outcome Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries
Program Activity Integrated Fisheries Resource Management
Start date September 2009
End date March 31, 2014
Description This is one of two programs to support restructuring of Canada’s Atlantic Lobster Fishery. The Atlantic Lobster Sustainability Measures (ALSM) will provide support for the development and implementation of lobster sustainability plans which will help the fishery to make changes that will enhance its economic prosperity (through self-rationalization) and long-term sustainability (through mandatory and possible, additional conservation measures).
ALSM is a five-year, $50M initiative with an overall goal to support the implementation of sustainability plans within Lobster Fishing Areas by providing funding to supplement and help leverage other sources of funds obtained by harvesters, such as provincial programs, financial institutions, etc. The outcomes of sustainability plans will help achieve the conservation measures necessary for a sustainable future and enable and provide incentive for the long-term structural change needed within the lobster fishery. This structural change, through rationalization, is necessary to improve the economic viability across the sector and help ensure long term sustainability. An economically viable sector will, in turn, be more willing to invest in strengthened conservation measures.  In addition, when self-rationalization is on a significant scale, it may provide conservation benefits as well as economic benefits.
Expected results
  • elements of sustainability plans pertaining to the enhancement of Lobster Fishing Area organization governance structures are in place;
  • elements of sustainability plans pertaining to lobster conservation and stewardship are in place;
  • elements of sustainability plans pertaining to productivity enhancement are in place; and
  • elements of sustainability plans pertaining to restructuring and rationalization are in place
Link to 3-year Transfer Payment Program Plan http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/reports-rapports/tpp-ppt/tpp-ppt2011-eng.htm

($ millions) Forecast
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2011–12
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Total grants
Total contributions 14.3 20.7 7.8 4.8
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 14.3 20.7 7.8 4.8

Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management

Strategic Outcome Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries
Program Activity Aboriginal Strategies and Governance
Start date 2005-06
End date Ongoing
Description Launched in October 2004, the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management (AAROM) Program provides for Capacity Building and Collaborative Management initiatives that supports the involvement of Aboriginal groups, working together, to obtain access to technical, scientific and administrative expertise in order to facilitate their participation in multi-stakeholder and other decision-making processes used to manage aquatic resources and ocean spaces.

Aboriginal groups transition from Capacity Building into Collaborative Management.
Provisions of Contribution Agreements under AAROM may include:
  • establishing AAROM collaborative management structures or AAROM bodies;
  • accessing skilled professional, administrative and technical expertise from within the Aboriginal community or other external sources but excluding public office holders;
  • participating in aquatic resource and oceans management planning – through development of resource and oceans management plans and coordination of community input into the development of plans;
  • developing or providing input into the development of models, structures and processes to guide the interactions of external bodies and agencies with the respective Aboriginal group;
  • planning and holding consultation sessions with member communities on AAROM-related issues;
  • participating in various government technical committees and other multi-stakeholder fora;
  • developing, implementing and monitoring AAROM capacity building strategies;
  • developing enforcement capacity including Aboriginal Fishery Officers and upgrading the skills of Aboriginal Guardians;
  • collaborating in scientific research efforts related to aquatic resource and oceans management;
  • participating in and providing input to various aquatic and oceans resource policy and management processes;
  • undertaking scientific research activities to support appropriate watershed / ecosystem-based management efforts, including the collection and gathering of Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge (ATK);
  • conducting community outreach, stewardship and awareness activities;
  • conducting liaison activities with other relevant/interested parties;
  • developing protocols on ATK – dealing with new and innovative approaches to collect, analyze and integrate this information into environmental and habitat assessments and management practices;
  • ongoing program planning, administration and reporting activities of the AAROM Collaborative Management body; and
  • negotiations and implementation of related AAROM agreements (and associated protocols) for which DFO is a signatory.
AAROM is applicable in areas where DFO manages the fishery, and where land claim agreements addressing those matters covered under AAROM are not in place. Where the Aboriginal group has signed a comprehensive land claims agreement, and one or more of the matters covered by the AAROM Program are not dealt with in the agreement, the group would be eligible to apply for support in those matters not covered.
Expected results

34 AAROM Agreements (23 Collaborative Management and 11 Capacity Building) with Aboriginal organizations involving approximately 330 member communities. These agreements allow Aboriginal groups to:

  • work together in relation to a watershed or ecosystem;
  • build capacity in aquatic resource and oceans co-management areas including aqua-culture; 
  • establish aquatic resource and oceans management bodies – or “aggregate bodies”;
  • obtain access to skilled personnel and related support which allows them to participate more effectively in decision-making and advisory processes; and
  • obtain access to commercial fishery opportunities (including vessels and gear); and
  • build fisheries catch monitoring and enforcement capacity.
Link to 3-year Transfer Payment Program Plan http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/reports-rapports/tpp-ppt/tpp-ppt2011-eng.htm

($ millions) Forecast
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2011–12
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Total grants
Total contributions 14.3 16.6 14.9 14.9
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 14.3 16.6 14.9 14.9


Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative

Strategic Outcome Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries
Program Activity Aboriginal Strategies and Governance
Start date 2007-08
End date 2011-12
Description The long-term goal of the Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (AICFI) is to continue to create positive conditions towards concluding longer-term INAC -led arrangements for Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations (MMFN). The immediate goals are to assist MMFNs to:
  • Enhance capacity in governance and management of MMFN commercial fishing enterprises;
  • Develop effective participation in sustainable, integrated commercial fisheries with a greater role in fisheries management; and
  • Help diversify existing fishing enterprises to support the full realization of economic potential of existing fishing licences.

AICFI has been developed to proceed along two separate paths of deployment. The first is through individual MMFNs where the individual First Nations can apply for funding for components of the initiative provided they have completed the prerequisite planning as per component requirements. This will allow First Nations the ability to personalize their development to their own needs and development schedule.

The second path of deployment is through associated aggregate bodies which may apply for funding to proceed with the development of the Commercial Fishing Enterprise (CFE) Business Development Unit as well as co-management and various training and mentoring projects. Aggregate bodies will develop expertise that can be shared with individual First Nations which will provide smaller First Nations a larger voice within the commercial fishery as well as provide a higher value for dollar on mentoring and training sessions.
Expected results AICFI has developed an RMAF/RBAF which sets the performance measurement and risk management strategy to assist DFO management in the delivery of the program. The following results are expected for the participating MMFNs:
  • Sound (transparent and accountable) CFE governance structures;
  • Sound business management processes for CFE management and operation;
  • A Fisheries Coordinator mentored in areas of expertise required to meet the commercial fisheries business management needs of the community;
  • Fishing skills acquired through at sea mentoring or in-class training;
  • Fisheries Management System in place for interested, eligible MMFNs;
  • Greater involvement by MMFNs in fisheries co-management; and
  • Increased ability by MMFNs to optimize existing access and achieve CFE profitability and sustainability.
Link to 3-year Transfer Payment Program Plan http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/reports-rapports/tpp-ppt/tpp-ppt2011-eng.htm

($ millions) Forecast
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2011–12
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Total grants
Total contributions 11.6 11.3
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 11.6 11.3

Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary

Strategic Outcome Safe and Secure Waters
Program Activity Search and Rescue Services
Start date April 1, 2008
End date March 31, 2013
Description To permit the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) Associations to carry out authorized activities related to maritime Search and Rescue Operations, Search and Rescue Prevention and other safety related activities.
Expected results As per the integrated Results-Based Management and Accountability Framework and the Risk-Based Audit Framework for CCGA, the continuation of the Auxiliary program will directly result in reduced loss of life, reduced loss and/or damage to property, reduced number and severity of Maritime Search and Rescue incidents. The ultimate outcome is safe and secure Canadian waterways.
Link to 3-year Transfer Payment Program Plan http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/reports-rapports/tpp-ppt/tpp-ppt2011-eng.htm

($ millions) Forecast
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2011–12
Planned
Spending
2012–13
Planned
Spending
2013–14
Total grants
Total contributions 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9

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Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Table 1: Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Table 1.1: Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program

Start date: December 9, 2009

End date: Ongoing

Description: Provision of assistance to enhance the capacity of key beneficiary states, government entities and international organizations to prevent and respond to threats posed by international criminal activity, primarily in the Americas.

Expected results:

  • Increased capacity of beneficiary states and government entities to prevent and respond to criminal activity
  • Increased capacity of international organizations responsible for supporting state-based anti-crime efforts
  • Advancement of Canadian security interests by addressing regional and transnational threats
  • Increased Canadian engagement and cooperation in the hemisphere on security issues
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 7.00 7.00  7.00 7.00
Total contributions 21.40 9.55  9.75 9.40
Total Transfer payments 28.40 16.55  16.75 16.40

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.2: Commonwealth Secretariat

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Commonwealth Secretariat

Start date: September 28, 1965

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's assessed contribution to the regular budget of the Commonwealth is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of Canada's membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to international peace, security and development and, to this end, to enhance relationships among the 54 Commonwealth member countries. For further information, see www.thecommonwealth.org.

Expected results:

Much of the regular budget of the Commonwealth Secretariat is directed to supporting and implementing the decisions of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meetings and those of a large web of regular meetings of Commonwealth sectoral ministers including, for example, the Commonwealth Ministerial Action Group and Ministers of Foreign Affairs, Finance, Health and Education.

Results include diplomatic interventions in the form of good offices and public pressure by the Secretariat and/or coordinated action by Commonwealth ministers to support democratic institutions and procedures; programs to build capacity in democratic and human rights procedures; and enhanced cooperation among Commonwealth countries related to economic, social and political development.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 5.93 5.11  5.11 5.11

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.3: Contributions under the Global Partnership Program for the Destruction, Disposal and Securing of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction and Related Expertise

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions under the Global Partnership Program for the Destruction, Disposal and Securing of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction and Related Expertise

Start date: August 12, 2003

End date: March 31, 2013

Description: To implement Canada's commitment to the G 8 Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, launched at the 2002 Kananaskis Summit, through projects for the dismantlement of nuclear submarines, destruction of chemical weapons, enhancement of nuclear and radiological security, redirection of former weapons scientists, and non-proliferation of dangerous biological materials. Canada committed up to $1 billion over 10 years to implement the goals of the Global Partnership, initially in the former Soviet Union, where the threat was most acute. The justification for the Partnership was based on an assessment of threats to Canadian and international security following the terrorist attacks of September 2001. Evaluations at the G 8 level have identified the continuing seriousness of the terrorist and weapons of mass destruction (WMD) threats worldwide and the ongoing value of the Partnership's international cooperative threat-reduction approach. As a result, G 8 leaders agreed at the 2008 Toyako Summit to expand Partnership programming beyond the former Soviet Union. Twenty-two countries and the European Union are engaged in projects, and more than US$20 billion has been pledged.

Expected results:

Short and medium term:

  • WMD will be destroyed.
  • WMD materials and facilities will be secured.
  • Dangerous pathogens will be secured.
  • Environmental and health risks will be reduced
  • Sustainable employment for former weapons scientists will be increased.

Long term:

  • The threat to Canadians from WMD is reduced.
  • The international non-proliferation, arms control and disarmament regime is strengthened and the international environment made more secure.
  • International relationships are developed that significantly enhance Canada's image internationally and bring prestige to Canada
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 98.99 87.48  87.58 0

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.4: Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Start date: September 2005

End date: Ongoing

Description: Provision of training, equipment, infrastructure and technical assistance to enhance the capacity of key beneficiary states, government entities and international organizations to prevent and respond to threats posed by terrorist activity, in a manner consistent with international counter terrorism and human rights obligations, norms and standards.

Expected results:

  • Increased capacity of beneficiary states and government entities to prevent and respond to terrorist activity
  • Increased capacity of international organizations responsible for supporting state-based counter terrorism-related efforts
  • Increased safety of Canadians and protection of Canadian interests at home and abroad
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 7.47 5.57  5.47 5.47
Total contributions 9.40 4.90  4.90 4.90
Total Transfer payments 16.87 10.37  10.37 10.37

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.5: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

Start date: July 1982

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the FAO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to agricultural development and provide it with a voice in the international community. For further information, see www.fao.org.

Expected results: Achieving food security for all is at the heart of FAO efforts: to make sure people have regular access to enough high-quality food to lead active, healthy lives. FAO's mandate is to raise levels of nutrition, improve agricultural productivity, better the lives of rural populations and contribute to the growth of the world economy. FAO's objectives, as set out in its constitution, are:

  • to promote the common welfare by furthering action for the purpose of: raising levels of nutrition and standards of living of the peoples within member nations;
  • to secure improvements in the efficiency of the production and distribution of all food and agricultural products, including fisheries, marine products and forestry products; and
  • to better the condition of rural populations,

thus contributing toward an expanding world economy and ensuring humanity's freedom from hunger.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 16.22 16.65  16.65 16.65

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.6: Global Commerce Support Program (GCSP)

Strategic Outcome: International Services for Canadians

Program Activity: International Commerce

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Commerce Support Program (GCSP)

Start date: December 11, 2008

End date: Ongoing

Description: Approved under the new Transfer Payment Policy, the GCSP is a contribution program that harmonizes three previously existing programs under one umbrella mechanism:

  • Invest Canada-Community Initiatives (ICCI) (formerly CISP)
  • Going Global Innovation (GGI) (formerly Going Global Science and Technology Fund)
  • Global Opportunities for Associations (GOA) (formerly PEMD-A)

The objective of the program is to build a stronger and more competitive Canadian capacity to compete in the global economy.

Expected results:

  • Enhance the capability and effectiveness of Canadian communities to attract, retain and expand foreign direct investment
  • Increase Canadian science and technological innovation and commercialization opportunities
  • Stimulate the engagement of Canadian industry associations and their interested members in international markets in order to expand commercial linkages and facilitate future successes abroad.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 6.04 6.04  6.04 6.04

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.7: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Start date: December 9, 2009

End date: March 31, 2013

Description: The GPSF is a critical component of the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) portfolio. Funded from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, the GPSF fills a funding gap by providing dedicated resources for activities that are necessary for a timely response with respect to countries in or at risk of crisis, but that are not properly the responsibility of the Department of National Defence (DND) and are outside Canada's traditional official development assistance program. Examples of these activities are supporting peace operations and peace processes, supporting justice and security system reform, enhancing transitional justice and reconciliation, and improving the peace enforcement and peace operations capacities of military and police forces in Africa and the Americas. Major recipients of funding are Afghanistan, Sudan and Haiti.

The GPSF is both a responsive and a directive program, established to provide timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges. DFAIT works closely with a range of government departments including the Canadian International Development Agency, Public Safety Canada, the RCMP, DND, the Correctional Service of Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency and Justice Canada. Among other assistance, these partnerships provide critical expertise in the area of justice and security system reform to the civilian components of UN peace operations.

Expected results: The GPSF supports initiatives in affected states. These are states experiencing fragility, conflict, governance crises, natural disasters and complex emergencies implicating Canadian interests and consistent with Canada's foreign policy priorities. The long-term expected results are:

  • Strengthened institutions and civil society in affected states
  • Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations
  • Strengthened international frameworks for addressing crisis situations

The ultimate result of GPSF-funded interventions is effective stabilization and reconstruction in affected states, contributing to peace and security and the safety and well-being of beneficiaries living in those targeted areas.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 12.42 30.00  30.00 0
Total contributions 110.72 78.40  65.30 0
Total Transfer payments 123.14 108.40  95.30 0

* NB: $9.4 million has been added to the GPSF in 2011-2012 and 2012-2013. This fund will be held in a frozen reserve and will be released in case of crisis.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.8: Grants and Contributions in Aid of Academic Relations

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grants and Contributions in Aid of Academic Relations

Start date: April 1, 2007

End date: March 31, 2011

Description: These grants and contributions expand international education programs to more effectively and efficiently advance departmental priorities, including by contributing to Canada’s competitiveness and by promoting democracy, the rule of law and human rights.

Expected results: Raised awareness of Canada among leaders, decision makers and the general public in foreign countries; Canada’s knowledge advantage is recognized worldwide and serves to strengthen Canadian interests and economic prosperity.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 6.91 9.91  9.91 9.91
Total contributions 10.68 8.01  8.01 8.01
Total Transfer payments 17.59 17.92  17.92 17.92

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.9: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Atomic Energy (IAEA)

Start date: December 19, 1989

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the IAEA is a legally binding obligation of membership. Payment is made to ensure that membership is in good standing and to maintain influence and credibility in a key international body, the aims of which Canada supports. The IAEA is the world's centre for nuclear cooperation and it works to further the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technology, in particular by verifying that states adhere to their commitments to use nuclear energy only for peaceful purposes. Canada has significant interests at the IAEA, based on the importance of the Agency's role in advancing the goals of nuclear non-proliferation, safety and security, our advanced and extensive nuclear energy and radioisotope production industries, and our important uranium sector.

This assessed contribution does not include the assessed voluntary contribution to the IAEA Technical Cooperation Program, which remains a CIDA responsibility.

Expected results: The projection of Canadian values abroad, the preservation of Canadian national security, the strengthening of international stability and security, the promotion of world economic growth and prosperity, and support for multilateral institutions and mechanisms:

  • effective and efficient implementation of the IAEA's major programs as reflected in the Agency's biennial program and budget;
  • effective participation for Canada in the Agency's activities
  • direct and indirect technical and commercial dividends to the Canadian nuclear industry; and
  • IAEA actions and decisions consistent with Canadian foreign policy priorities
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 15.67 14.04  14.04 14.04

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.10: International Criminal Court (ICC)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Criminal Court (ICC)

Start date: April 1, 2005

End date: Ongoing

Description: This is an assessed-contribution transfer payment.

Expected results: Through its support to the ICC, Canada has provided leadership in promoting accountability for the most serious criminal acts known to humankind, thus contributing to international peace and stability. Canada was a key player in the creation of the ICC and has been successful in strengthening the Court’s role as an instrument in the global fight against impunity. There are currently 115 States Parties to the Rome Statute. This is a relatively new international organization; therefore, some small budget increases are anticipated. ICC-assessed annual contributions enable the Court to carry out investigations and prosecutions; to engage in outreach to counter the culture of impunity and advance the interests of justice; and to carry on all other activities required and expected of a judicial body functioning in accordance with international standards.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 5.10 6.46  6.46 6.46

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.11: International Labour Organization (ILO)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Labour Organization (ILO)

Start date: January 1, 1989

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the ILO, a UN specialized agency, is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to international labour and social policy issues and provide it with a voice in the international community.

Expected results:

  • Development and effective supervision of international labour standards and realization of fundamental principles and rights at work
  • Targeted action against child labour, giving priority to the urgent elimination of its worst forms
  • Contributions to poverty reduction through promotion of coherent economic and social policies that support employment creation
  • Assistance to constituents in the development of skills and employability policies and programs for decent work
  • Better instruments and tools for policy analysis and formulation that support good governance and the extension of social protections to vulnerable workers
  • Strengthened social dialogue on labour and social policy issues at the national and international levels
  • 5Improved organizational effectiveness, transparency and accountability
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 12.54 13.73  13.73 13.73

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.12: International Organization of the Francophonie (OIF)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Organization of the Francophonie (OIF)

Start date: 1972

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada’s statutory contribution to the OIF and two related ministerial conferences.

Expected results:

  • Continuation of cooperation programs and activities undertaken by the organization
  • Continued promotion of Canadian interests
  • Consistency with the political and economic objectives that Canada has set for itself for the Francophonie
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 14.37 13.39  13.39 13.39

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.13: Investment Cooperation Program

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Investment Cooperation Program

Start date: January 4, 2010

End date: Ongoing

Description: This program assists private sector firms registered in Canada with the cost of exploring investment opportunities in developing countries in order to reduce poverty and create sustainable employment and economic growth. The program does not finance the actual investment; rather, it provides support for activities surrounding an investment. Specifically, the program contributes up to 75% of the cost of studying the viability of an investment, demonstrating and adapting appropriate technologies, and undertaking activities aimed at making investments, including public investments, more sustainable. The program is part of Canada's official development assistance for developing countries.

Expected results:

  • Sustainable local businesses created, expanded or modernized in the developing country
  • Creation or maintenance of new and/or higher-skilled jobs with the local businesses
  • Increased sales of the products or services of the recipient firm and, if applicable, its local partner
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 6.70 20.00  20.00 20.00

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.14: North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Civil Administration

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Civil Administration

Start date: January 1, 1989

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to NATO is a legally binding obligation of membership based on the 1949 North Atlantic Treaty. Canada’s contribution furthers its foreign policy goals by funding the administrative budget of NATO, an international organization vital to Canadian defence and security interests. NATO was designed to promote the stability of the North Atlantic area and to safeguard the freedom and security of its people by political and military means, based on the principles of democracy, individual liberty and international law. The NATO civil budget, structured along "output based" lines in response to objectives set annually by the North Atlantic Council, covers the activities of the NATO Secretary General, the NATO headquarters and the NATO international staff. The NATO civil administration supports the process of consensus building and decision making among alliance members and manages NATO’s relations with its partners. The NATO civil budget also supports the work of various NATO agencies with specialized responsibilities. An effective and efficient NATO civil administration assists alliance members in promoting security and stability in the North Atlantic area and in responding effectively to current security challenges, particularly in Afghanistan. The NATO accounts are subject to annual audit by the International Board of Auditors for NATO.

Expected results: The NATO civil budget enables the operations of the NATO Secretariat and agencies. The expected results include effective decision making by the alliance in pursuit of the NATO objectives of stability and security in Afghanistan, the North Atlantic region and beyond; support to NATO operations; timely implementation of decisions taken by the North Atlantic Council; appropriate response to current and emerging defence and security challenges; and enhanced relations with NATO partners and cooperation with other international organizations; and proper management of the alliance's resources.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 22.31 26.89  26.89 26.89

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.15: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA— The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

Start date: March 20, 1975

End date: N/A

Description: To pay the assessed contribution required of Canada for its participation as a member of the OECD. The contribution pays for the Secretariat (professionals and support staff who provide high-quality research and analysis) and maintenance of the headquarters, located in Paris.

Expected results:

  • Implement OECD work programs and policy positions that reflect input from across government and support domestic priorities
  • Find solutions to common economic problems by working cooperatively with members (soft law, guidelines, agreements)
  • Influence the policy development of other members and of non-members to improve the functioning of the international econ
  • Analyze new and emerging issues, both domestic and global, that affect our economy and standard of livingomic environment
  • Analyze new and emerging issues, both domestic and global, that affect our economy and standard of living
  • Contribute to continued sound management of the OECD
  • Work toward institutional reforms to improve the OECD's ability to cope with new issues and power dynamics
  • Improve engagement with non-members, reflecting Canadian priorities to increase the long-term effectiveness of the organization
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 14.40 11.54  11.54 11.54

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.16: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)

Start date: January 1, 1993

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the OSCE is an obligation arising out of Canada's commitments as one of the 56 participating states of the organization. Canada's contribution furthers its foreign policy goals by funding programs implemented by the OSCE's institutions and field operations in priority foreign policy areas for Canada related to regional and international security.

The OSCE is a focused regional forum with a comprehensive and cooperative approach to security. Canada's contribution to the organization's unified budget covers the costs associated with the implementation of work programs and activities in three dimensions: political and military aspects of security; economic and environmental cooperation; and cooperation in humanitarian and other fields. This integrated approach allows the OSCE to make a significant contribution to furthering European security and transatlantic cooperation through non-coercive measures. Canada's contribution also supports stronger partnership with Canadians in developing and implementing Canada's international security policy, through the involvement of members of Parliament in the work of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly, the deployment of Canadians to OSCE field operations, and the contribution of Canadian experts to the organization.

The OSCE unified budget, based on a programmatic approach, is approved by the OSCE Permanent Council on a yearly basis. The OSCE accounts are subject to an annual report by external auditors as well as an internal oversight annual report, which are made available to participating states.

The OSCE budget supports the programs of the OSCE Secretariat in Vienna, as well as the OSCE institutions (Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights, Representative on Freedom of the Media, and High Commissioner on National Minorities) and the organization's 18 field missions.

Expected results:

The results expected include effective and timely implementation of the decisions of the OSCE Permanent Council; continuous monitoring of the security and stability situation in Europe; concerted programming to actively contribute to conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict institution building; and proper management of the organization's resources.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 14.08 11.40 11.40 11.40

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.17: Organization of American States (OAS)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organization of American States (OAS)

Start date: May 31, 1990

End date: Ongoing

Description: To pay Canada's annual assessed contribution to the OAS, a Charter obligation of membership.

Expected results:

  • Strengthening of the OAS as the key political forum through which Canada promotes its hemispheric interests
  • Promotion and consolidation of democracy, and strengthening of human rights, governance and the rule of law
  • Enhanced regional multilateral cooperation on security issues in the Americas
  • Increased effectiveness and efficiency of the OAS through increased accountability and transparency
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 12.05 11.89  11.89 11.89

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.18: Payments in Lieu of Taxes on Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations' Property in Canada

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments in Lieu of Taxes on Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations' Property in Canada

Start date: January 18, 1979

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations’ Property Grants Order (P.C.1979-59, January 18, 1979), the Municipal Grants Act, and successor Orders and Acts form the statutory basis relating to this program. The related memorandum of understanding between Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada and Public Works and Government Services Canada, National Capital Area, establishes responsibilities and procedures governing the provision of services related to the payment of grants in lieu of real property and frontage or area taxes with respect to diplomatic and consular property. These procedures are designed to ensure fiscal and operational accountability, while promoting efficient program delivery.

Expected results:

  • Compliance with Canada’s international legal obligations toward foreign diplomatic missions and consular posts
  • Timely and accurate administration of payments to municipal and provincial taxing authorities
  • Most favourable reciprocal conditions for Canadian missions abroad
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 13.52 13.52  13.52 13.52

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.19: Projects and Development Activities Resulting from Francophonie Summits

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Projects and Development Activities Resulting from Francophonie Summits

Start date: March 9, 1979

End date: Ongoing

Description: This fund provides funding to cooperation programs and activities undertaken by the International Organization of the Francophonie (OIF). It also provides financial support to the Government of New Brunswick to foster its participation in international Francophonie activities. This fund promotes Canadian interests and is consistent with the political and economic objectives that Canada has set for itself for the Francophonie. It also promotes active participation by the Government of New Brunswick in summits, ministerial conferences and other related Francophonie activities.

Expected results:

  • The OIF is active in all the areas identified in the contribution agreement, in accordance with the overall guidance provided by member states of the organization.
  • Active participation by the Government of New Brunswick in all significant activities of the OIF.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 8.50 8.00 8.00 8.00

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.20: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

Start date: January 1, 1988

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to UNESCO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to culture, science and education, and provide it with a voice in the international community.

Expected results:

  • Universal primary education in all countries by 2015
  • Gender disparities in primary and secondary education eliminated or greatly reduced in most member states
  • Preparation, launch and implementation of a 10-year UN Literacy Decade and Plan of Action in order to reach the target of achieving a 50% improvement in levels of adult literacy by 2015
  • Comprehensive and broad-based HIV/AIDS education and prevention campaigns conducted, particularly among the 15-24 age group in Africa and South Asia
  • Impact of HIV/AIDS pandemic on educational capacities assessed
  • Implementation of the Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions
  • Implementation of the International Convention Against Doping in Sport
  • Protection of world cultural and natural heritage through the implementation of the World Heritage Convention
  • Increased scientific cooperation to improve management of the planet’s water resources
  • Development of free, independent and pluralistic media
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 12.25 11.85 11.85 11.85

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.21: United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

Start date: October 5, 2000

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's assessed contribution to UN peacekeeping operations is a legally binding obligation of membership. For further information, see www.un.org.

Expected results:

  • Enhance peace and security for the countries and regions concerned
  • Increased levels of security, basic services and governance provided in affected areas, promoting advanced prospects for peace as well as enabling reconstruction and development activities
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 291.97 271.51 271.51 271.51

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.22: United Nations Organization (UN)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Organization (UN)

Start date: March 27, 1980

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's assessed contribution to the regular budget of the United Nations is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to international peace, security and development and provide it with a voice in the international community. Assessed contributions are used to finance the organization's programs toward attainment of the UN's objectives, as set out in its Charter. For further information, see www.un.org.

Expected results: Efforts to maintain international peace and security and promote sustained economic growth and sustainable development in accordance with the Millennium Development Goals. In particular:

  • Progress in the development of Africa
  • Promotion of human rights
  • Effective coordination of humanitarian assistance efforts
  • Promotion of justice and international law
  • Progress toward disarmament
  • International cooperation for drug control and crime prevention
  • Combatting of international terrorism in all its forms and manifestations
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 124.31 118.07 118.07 118.07

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.23: World Health Organization (WHO)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: World Health Organization (WHO)

Start date: January 1, 1990

End date: Ongoing

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the WHO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to health and provide it with a voice in the international community

Expected results:

  • Enhanced global health security (maintaining a comprehensive outbreak alert and response mechanism supported by new international health regulations; responding rapidly and effectively in crisis situations)
  • Accelerated progress toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals (reducing maternal mortality, improving child survival, addressing the global pandemics of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, promoting healthy environments, increasing access to essential medicines)
  • Promotion of equity in health (strengthening health systems to reach the poor and disadvantaged)
  • Ensured accountability, by improving organizational effectiveness, transparency and accountability
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total Transfer payments 15.29 15.78 15.78 15.78

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Table 1.24: World Trade Organization (WTO)

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: World Trade Organization (WTO)

Start date: January 1, 1995

End date: Ongoing

Description: The purpose of this program is to pay the assessed contribution for Canada’s membership in the WTO.

Expected results:

The WTO provides the only multilateral forum for negotiating market access and other trade rules. It also provides the best forum for monitoring the implementation of obligations and commitments under various trade agreements, reviewing members' trade policies and practices, and discussing trade-related issues that inhibit the free, fair and predictable flow of trade.

The WTO is the only organization offering a state-to-state dispute settlement system whereby trade disputes are settled based on commonly agreed-on rules, rather than political or economic power. Through these agreements, 153 WTO members operate a non-discriminatory trading system that spells out their rights and obligations. Each country receives guarantees that its exports will be treated fairly and consistently in other countries' markets. Each promises to do the same for imports into its own market.

As a trade-dependent country, Canada has been actively involved in all areas of the current round of WTO negotiations, known as the Doha Development Agenda, and continues to work with other WTO members to advance these negotiations. We are seeking an ambitious outcome to the negotiations to provide a more level playing field for Canadian exporters competing in global markets, while increasing Canadian and global economic growth, prosperity and development. Canada is also seeking an outcome to the round that strikes a balance between development objectives, developing countries' concerns and Canadian commercial interests and that would lead to better integration of developing countries into the world trading system.

Beyond the Doha negotiations, Canada participates in the accession negotiations for all countries seeking to join the WTO, as well as in the reviews of WTO members, and is itself reviewed every four years. Canada's next Trade Policy Review will take place between May 25 and 27, 2011, at the WTO in Geneva, Switzerland. Canada is also one of the most active participants in the WTO dispute settlement system.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total contributions 6.76 7.08 7.08 7.08

Summary of the 3 Year Plan:
Three-year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Top of Page

Health Canada

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)


Contributions for Bigstone Non-Insured Health Benefits Pilot Project (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Bigstone Non-Insured Health Benefits Pilot Project (Voted)

Start Date: April, 2005

End Date: March 2011

Description: Administration and delivery of benefits with Bigstone Health Commission to registered Indians and recognized Inuit.  Effective April 1, 2011, this Transfer Payment Program is one of ten First Nations and Inuit programs that have been streamlined into three:  Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support; Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care; and Contribution for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits Nations and Inuit Health Branch, which have now been consolidated from ten classes into three.

Expected Results: Improved access to quality well-coordinated culturally appropriate primary health care programs and services for First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities.

Contributions for Bigstone Non-Insured Health Benefits Pilot Project (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions 9.1 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 9.1 - - -

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Community Programs (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Community Programs (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2005

End Date: March 2011

Description: Community programs support child and maternal-child health; mental health promotion; addictions prevention and treatment; chronic disease prevention and health promotion services.  Effective April 1, 2011, this Transfer Payment Program is one of ten First Nations and Inuit programs that have been streamlined into three:  Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support; Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care; and Contribution for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits Nations and Inuit Health Branch, which have now been consolidated from ten classes into three.

Expected Results: Increased participation of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities in programs and supports and improved continuum of programs and services in First Nation and Inuit communities

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Community Programs (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions 244.7 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 244.7 - - -

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Benefits (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Benefits (Voted)

Start Date: April, 2005

End Date: March 2011

Description: A limited range of medically necessary health-related goods and services which supplement those provided through other private or provincial/territorial health insurance plans is provided to registered Indians and recognized Inuit. Benefits include drugs, dental care, vision care, medical supplies and equipment, short-term crisis intervention mental health services, and transportation to access medical services not available on reserve or in the community of residence.  Effective April 1, 2011, this Transfer Payment Program is one of ten First Nations and Inuit programs that have been streamlined into three:  Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support; Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care; and Contribution for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits Nations and Inuit Health Branch, which have now been consolidated from ten classes into three.

Expected Results: Access by eligible clients to Non-Insured Health benefits

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Benefits (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions 168.7 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 168.7 - - -

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Facilities and Capital Program (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Facilities and Capital Program (Voted)

Start Date: April 2005

End Date: March 2011

Description: Provides funding to eligible recipients for the construction acquisition, leasing, operation and maintenance of nursing stations, health centres, health stations, health offices, treatment centres, staff residences, and operational support buildings.  Effective April 1, 2011, this Transfer Payment Program is one of ten First Nations and Inuit programs that have been streamlined into three:  Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support; Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care; and Contribution for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits Nations and Inuit Health Branch, which have now been consolidated from ten classes into three.

Expected Results: Increase availability of health facilities, equipment and other moveable assets in First Nations and Inuit communities that support the provision of health services

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Facilities and Capital Program (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions 112.9 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 112.9 - - -

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Governance and Infrastructure Support (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Governance and Infrastructure Support (Voted)

Start Date: April 2005

End Date: March 2011

Description: Health Governance and infrastructure support aims to increase First nations and Inuit control over health programs and services.  Activities include health planning and management; health research, knowledge and information management; health consultation and liaison; health delivery and infrastructure; integration and adaptation of health services; and health human resources.  Effective April 1, 2011, this Transfer Payment Program is one of ten First Nations and Inuit programs that have been streamlined into three:  Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support; Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care; and Contribution for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits Nations and Inuit Health Branch, which have now been consolidated from ten classes into three.

Expected Results: Improved health status of First Nations and Inuit through strengthened governance and infrastructure

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Governance and Infrastructure Support (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions 183.7 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 183.7 - - -

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Protection (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Protection (Voted)

Start Date: April 2005

End Date: March 2011

Description: Communicable Disease and Environmental Health and Research programs facilitate preparedness to implement measures in the control, management and containment of outbreaks of preventable diseases and improve management and control of environmental hazards.  Effective April 1, 2011, this Transfer Payment Program is one of ten First Nations and Inuit programs that have been streamlined into three:  Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support; Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care; and Contribution for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits Nations and Inuit Health Branch, which have now been consolidated from ten classes into three.

Expected Results: Environmental health risk management contributes to improve the health status of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities, as well as, improve access to quality, well-coordinated communicable disease prevention and control programs for First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Protection (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions 18.0 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 18.0 - - -

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)

Start Date: April 2005

End Date: March 2011

Description: Primary Health Care services include emergency and acute care health services, and community primary health care services which include illness and injury prevention and health promotion activities. These programs also include: the First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care; and the Oral Health Strategy.  Effective April 1, 2011, this Transfer Payment Program is one of ten First Nations and Inuit programs that have been streamlined into three:  Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support; Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care; and Contribution for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits Nations and Inuit Health Branch, which have now been consolidated from ten classes into three.

Expected Results: Improved access to quality well-coordinated culturally appropriate primary health care programs and services for First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities.

Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions 136.2 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 136.2 - - -

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contribution to the Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People's Health (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution to the Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People's Health (Voted)

Start Date: April 2005

End Date: March 2011

Description: To support the Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People's Health.  Effective April 1, 2011, this Transfer Payment Program is one of ten First Nations and Inuit programs that have been streamlined into three:  Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support; Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care; and Contribution for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits Nations and Inuit Health Branch, which have now been consolidated from ten classes into three.

Expected Results: Continued empowerment of Aboriginal peoples through advancements in knowledge and sharing of knowledge on Aboriginal health.

Contribution to the Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People's Health (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions 5.0 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 5.0 - - -

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



First Nations and Inuit Health Services Transfer (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: First Nations and Inuit Health Services Transfer (Voted)

Start Date: April 2007

End Date: March 2012

Description: To increase responsibility and control by First Nation and Inuit of their own health programs and services and to effect improvement in the health conditions of First Nations and Inuit.  Effective April 1, 2011, this Transfer Payment Program is one of ten First Nations and Inuit programs that have been streamlined into three:  Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support; Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care; and Contribution for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits Nations and Inuit Health Branch, which have now been consolidated from ten classes into three.

Expected Results: Increased control or accountability by First Nations and Inuit communities of health care services.

First Nations and Inuit Health Services Transfer (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions 256.1 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 256.1 - - -

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contributions for the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Program

Start Date: November 2006

End Date: March 2013

Description: to support the mental wellness of former IRS students, their families and communities, by providing: resolution health support services, delivered by Resolution Health Support Workers; Elder support; support during truth and reconciliation and commemoration events; research and communication activities in support of the mental wellness of former IRS students, and an overall increased awareness of and demand for mental health services available to former IRS students and their families during the resolution process.  Effective April 1, 2011, this Transfer Payment Program is one of ten First Nations and Inuit programs that have been streamlined into three:  Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support; Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care; and Contribution for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits Nations and Inuit Health Branch, which have now been consolidated from ten classes into three.

Expected Results: providing services which are sensitive to cultural and traditional Aboriginal practices, ultimately improving emotional and mental wellness of former IRS students as well as reducing the risk of crises and preventable death.

Contributions for the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions 32.3 - - -
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 32.3 - - -

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted).

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Health Infrastructure Support Authority underpins the long-term vision of an integrated health system with greater First Nations and Inuit control by enhancing their capacity to design, manage, deliver and evaluate quality health programs and services.  It provides the foundation to support the delivery of programs and services in First Nations communities and for individuals, and to promote innovation and partnerships in health care delivery to better meet the unique health needs of First Nations and Inuit. 

Expected results:

Health Planning and Quality Management (11 expected results)

  1. Health Consultation and Liaison  Activities/Collaborative processes
  2. Documents (policies, standards, frameworks, papers, reports) and   Collaborative processes
  3. Health research coordination, data collection, analyses, reports
  4. Health Planning and Management
  5. Recipient Reporting
  6. Sustained liaison and collaboration with partners and stakeholders
  7. Enhanced First Nations and Inuit opportunity to participate in and influence design and development of programs and policies
  8. Evidence-based information to support program and policy decisions
  9. Supporting sustained harmonized and collaborative policy approaches
  10. Improved quality and delivery of programs and services
  11. Improved First Nations and Inuit capacity to influence and /or control (design, deliver and manage) health systems

Health Human Resources (7 expected results)

  1. Increased awareness of health career opportunities
  2. Decreased financial barriers for students and Community Based Workers (CBW)
  3. Increased number of qualified Aboriginal health professionals and allied health workers
  4. Increased Post Secondary Education (PSE) support to Aboriginal health career students
  5. Cultural competent PSE curriculum
  6. Increased collaboration with internal and external partners
  7. Greater awareness of policies, standards, guidelines and best practices in health human resources planning and activities

Health Facilities (13 expected results)

  1. Skills development in Integrated Real Property Management and Planning
  2. Provision of expert matter advice related to Health Infrastructure construction and /or renovation and /or operations and maintenance
  3. Integrated Facility Audit (Assurance Framework)
  4. Roll-up of the National Long Term Capital Plan
  5. Development and maintenance of a First Nations Health Facilities Management Information System
  6. Update of guidelines for First Nations related to Health infrastructure Design and Maintenance
  7. Strengthen First Nations control of their health infrastructure system by empowering them in the field of Health Infrastructure investment and management
  8. Improved risk management
  9. Improved efficiency, productivity and functionality of  facilities
  10. Improved planning and financial analysis
  11. Increased availability of evidence-based data to support efficient facility life-cycle planning
  12. Safe health facilities that support health program delivery
  13. Improved FN/I capacity to influence and /or control (design, deliver and manage) quality health programs and services

System Integration (11 expected results)

  1. Lessons learned under AHTF are communicated to stakeholders
  2. Capacity of Aboriginal organization partners to engage in health services/systems integration policy development is supported
  3. Key stakeholders in Aboriginal health are engaged in the integration of health services
  4. Partners have capacity for integrated health services planning
  5. Lessons learned under AHTF are reflected in the health services/systems integration plans submitted by RACs
  6. Implementation of broad scope health services/systems integration projects
  7. Movement towards broader and more advanced level of integration of health programs and services
  8. Increased collaborative planning for and integration of aboriginal health services
  9. Increase in sustained integrated health services arrangements
  10. Improved access to quality health programs and services by Aboriginal peoples
  11. Improved health programs and services for Aboriginal peoples

E-health Infostructure (7 expected results)

  1. Improved ongoing integrated planning and implementation of complex e-Health systems
  2. Increased First Nation management of e-Health Infostructure
  3. Improved access to e-Health Infostructure services
  4. A workforce that is increasingly comfortable with using ICTs as part of service delivery
  5. Increased First Nations awareness of e-Health Infostructure
  6. Greater use of policies, standards and guidelines for ICT implementation and use
  7. Increased use of evidence-based information to inform e-Health Planning and implementation; increasingly integrated information for continuous improvement in e-Health Infostructure

Nursing Innovation (5 expected results)

  1. Increased stakeholder/provider engagement & collaboration
  2. Increased capacity to monitor and report on primary care education
  3. Increased access to primary care nursing education for remote and isolated practice
  4. Increased #  of collaborative primary care teams providing services
  5. Improved First Nations access to quality primary care services

 

Contribution for the First Nations and Inuit Health Infrastructure Support (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions   227.8 244.2 228.5
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments   227.8 244.2 228.5

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted).

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions forFirst Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted).

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Primary Health Care Authority funds a suite of programs, services and strategies provided primarily to First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities living on-reserve or in Inuit communities.  It encompasses health promotion and disease prevention programs to improve health outcomes and reduce health risks; public health protection, including surveillance, to prevent and /or mitigate human health risks associated with communicable diseases and exposure to environmental hazards; and primary care where individuals are provided diagnostic, curative, rehabilitative, supportive, palliative/end-of-life care, and referral services. 

Expected results: 

Healthy Child Development (8 expected results)

  1. Sustained access to healthy child development programs/services
  2. Increased workforce skills, knowledge and /or expertise in healthy child development
  3. a. Supportive environments for healthy behaviours, including increased public awareness and knowledge
    b. Community and stakeholder engagement and collaboration in policy/program development and service delivery
  4. Increased ability to collect and provide information for policy or program development that is relevant to First Nations and Inuit community contexts
  5. Increased availability and use of evidence-based information, including community and traditional knowledge, for program improvement
  6. Improved coordination and integration of healthy child development programs and services
  7. Improved quality of healthy child development programs and services
  8. Increased practice of healthy behaviours related to healthy child development by First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities

Mental Wellness (9 expected results)

  1. Sustained access to mental wellness programs/services
  2. Increased workforce skills, knowledge and /or expertise in mental wellness
  3. Supportive environments for healthy behaviours, including increased public awareness and knowledge
  4. Community and stakeholder engagement and collaboration in policy/program development and service delivery
  5. Increased ability to collect and provide information for policy or program development that is relevant to First Nations and Inuit community contexts
  6. Increased availability and use of evidence-based information, including community and traditional knowledge, for program improvement
  7. Improved coordination and integration of mental wellness programs and services
  8. Improved quality of mental wellness programs and services
  9. Increased practice of healthy behaviours related to mental wellness by First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities

Healthy Living (9 expected results)

  1. Sustained access to healthy living programs/services
  2. Increased workforce skills, knowledge and /or expertise in healthy living
  3. Supportive environments for healthy behaviours, including increased public awareness and knowledge
  4. Community and stakeholder engagement and collaboration in policy/program development and service delivery
  5. Increased ability to collect and provide information for policy or program development that is relevant to First Nations and Inuit community contexts
  6. Increased availability and use of evidence-based information, including community and traditional knowledge, for program improvement
  7. Improved coordination and integration of healthy living programs and services
  8. Improved quality of healthy living programs and services
  9. Increased practice of healthy behaviours related to healthy living by First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities

Communicable Disease Control and Management (11 expected results)

  1. Improved access to communicable disease control and management programs/activities.
  2. Improved risk identification and mitigation
  3. Improved workforce skills, knowledge and /or expertise in communicable disease control and management
  4. Improved public awareness and knowledge of communicable disease risks 
  5. Improved community and stakeholder engagement and collaboration in policy/program development and service delivery
  6. Improved base of evidence of communicable disease risks, impacts and needs in First Nations communities
  7. Service delivery increasingly informed by relevant policies, standards, guidelines/frameworks
  8. Improved prevention of, response to, and mitigation of, communicable disease risks.
  9. A more evidence-based, coordinated and culturally appropriate approach to communicable disease control policy development and programming
  10. Increased community capacity to manage and administer communicable disease control and management programs
  11. Knowledge transfer products

Environmental Health (12 expected results)

  1. Improved access to environmental public health programs
  2. Improved environmental public health risk identification and mitigation
  3. Improved workforce and community skills, knowledge and /or expertise in environmental health 
  4. Improved public awareness and knowledge of environmental health risks
  5. Improved community skills, knowledge and /or expertise in environmental health research
  6. Improved community and stakeholder engagement and collaboration in policy/program development and service delivery
  7. Improved evidence base on environmental health risks, impacts and needs in First Nations and Inuit communities
  8. Increased body of culturally relevant, community and participatory research on environmental health in First Nations and Inuit communities
  9. Improved knowledge transfer of research findings and program guidance tools by and with communities and stakeholders
  10. Increased program and community capacity to address and mitigate environmental public health risks
  11. A more evidence-based, coordinated and culturally appropriate approach to environmental public health programming and policy development
  12. Improved community capacity to manage and administer environmental public health  programs and environmental health research activities

Clinical and Client Care (7 expected results)

  1. Improved access to clinical and client care (CCC)  services
  2. Increasingly appropriate CCC services based on need
  3. Increasing capacity of clinical and client care workforce
  4. Increased First Nations and Inuit management of clinical and client services
  5. Timely collaboration with internal and external primary care providers 
  6. Greater use of policies, standards, guidelines and best practices in service delivery
  7. Increased use of evidence-based information to inform quality program delivery

Home and Community Care (6 expected results)

  1. Improved access to home and community care (HCC) services
  2. Increasingly appropriate HCC services based on assessed need
  3. Increasing capacity of HCC workforce
  4. Increased collaboration with internal and external primary care providers 
  5. Greater use of policies, standards, guidelines and best practices in service delivery
  6. Increased use of evidence-based information to inform quality program delivery
Contribution for the First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions   684.5 665.1 673.3
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments   684.5 665.1 673.3

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted).

Strategic Outcome: First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

Program Activity: First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted).

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Supplementary Health Benefits Program is a national program that provides, to registered First Nations and recognized Inuit in Canada regardless of residency, a limited range of medically necessary health-related goods and services not provided through other private or provincial/ territorial programs. 

Expected results:

  1. Non-Insured Health Benefits provided in a manner that contribute to improved health status of First Nations and Inuit.
  2. NIHB Program managed in a cost-effective and sustainable manner
  3. Access by eligible clients to nationally consistently, portable NIHB
  4. Evidence-based benefit policy and program development (consistent with best practices of health service delivery)
  5. Claims for NIHB processed efficiently (regional and centralized)
  6. a. Client and Provider Compliance with Program requirements
    b. Collaborative relations with stakeholders and service providers to facilitate service delivery.
Contribution for theFirst Nations and Inuit Supplementary Health Benefits (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants        
Total contributions   159.5 165.6 170.4
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments   159.5 165.6 170.4

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Grant for Territorial Health System Sustainability Initiative (THSSI).

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the needs of Canadians

Program Activity: Canadian Health System

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant for Territorial Health System Sustainability Initiative (THSSI)

Start date: April 1, 2010

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The THSSI is divided into the following three funds:

  • The Territorial Health Access Fund intended to: reduce reliance over time on the health care system; strengthen community level services; and build self-reliant capacity to provide services in-territory.  Territorial governments each receive $8.6 million, over two years, to support the implementation of these activities.
  • The Operational Secretariat Fund which: supports the functioning of the Federal / Territorial Assistant Deputy Minister's Working Group (F/T ADM Working Group) which oversees the implementation of the THSSI; provides capacity support to territorial governments to administer THSSI; and , supports pan-territorial initiatives that address common territorial health priorities. Territorial governments share $4 million, over two years, to support these activities.
  • The Medical Travel Fund which offset the costs of medical transportation in each territory.  Nunavut is allotted $20.4 million, NWT $6.4 million and Yukon $3.2 million over the two years of the initiative.

Expected results:

The overriding goal of the two-year extended THSSI is to assist the three territories to consolidate progress made under the THSSI in reducing the reliance on outside health care systems and medical travel. For territories, consolidating projects that have achieved their goals and integrating projects with an ongoing mandate into territorial core business

Grant for the Territorial Health System Sustainability Initiative (THSSI)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 30.0 30.0 0.0 0.0
Total contributions        
Total other types of transfer payments        
Total Transfer payments 30.0 30.0 0.0 0.0

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Contribution in Support of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: Canadians are informed of and protected from health risks associated with food products, substances and environments, and are informed of the benefits of healthy eating.

Program Activity: Substance Use and Abuse

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution in Support of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2001

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: A transfer payment program in support of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy designed to develop and test tobacco cessation and prevention techniques and approaches and to transfer this knowledge to stakeholders with the intention of changing behaviour. Contributions are provided to support the provinces and territories as well as key national and regional non-governmental organizations and others in order to help build a strong knowledge base and ongoing capacity for developing effective tobacco prevention and cessation interventions. The grant portion of the program is designed to support international tobacco control efforts.

Expected Results: Supporting the attainment of a smoking prevalence rate in Canada of 12% by 2011 by: contributing to a reduction in smoking uptake among Canadian youth; contributing to the number of Canadians who quit smoking; contributing to the reduction in the number of Canadians exposed to second-hand smoke; increasing capacity in research and regulations; and contributing to the global implementation of the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

Contribution in Support of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants
Total contributions 15.8 15.8 15.8 15.8
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 15.8 15.8 15.8 15.8

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Drug Treatment Funding Program (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: Canadians are informed of and protected from health risks associated with food products, substances and environments, and are informed of the benefits of healthy eating.

Program Activity: Substance use and abuse

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Drug Treatment Funding Program (Voted)

Start Date: October 2007 - Services component; April 2008 - Systems component

End Date: 2011-2012 (services component); 2012-2013 (systems component)

Description: The aim of the Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP) will be to provide the incentive (seed funding) for provinces, territories and key stakeholders to initiate projects that will lay the foundation for systemic change leading to sustainable improvement in the quality and organization of substance abuse treatment systems. At the same time that provincial and territorial governments are working to achieve these system-level efficiencies, five-year time limited funding (new funds) will be available for the delivery of treatment services to meet the critical illicit drug treatment needs of at-risk youth in high needs areas.

Expected Results: DTFP plans to increase availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for at-risk youth in areas of need. The Program's success and progress will be measured by the type/nature of treatment services and supports that have been made available by end of FY and will be measured by the program/service utilization trends associated with their populations and areas of need.

DTFP will also seek to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency of affected Canadians. The Program's success and progress in this plan will be measured by the extent to which treatment system improvements have been made; perceptions of stakeholders; and, the extent to which uptake/integration of evidence-informed practices has occurred.

Drug Treatment Funding Program (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants
Total contributions 28.0 29.9 25.7 11.3
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 28.0 29.9 25.7 11.3

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: Canadians are informed of and protected from health risks associated with food products, substances and environments, and are informed of the benefits of healthy eating.

Program Activity: Substance use and abuse

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Voted)

Start Date: April, 2004

End Date: ongoing

Description: The Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund will contribute to reducing drug use among Canadians, particularly among vulnerable populations such as youth, by focusing on health promotion and prevention approaches to address drug abuse before it happens. The objectives of the Fund are to facilitate the development of local, provincial, territorial, national and community-based solutions to drug use among youth and to promote public awareness of illicit drug use among youth. The Program is delivered through Health Canada's regional and national offices and the Northern region.

Expected Results: DSCIF plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit drug use. The program's success and progress will be measured by the level/nature of acquired or improved knowledge/skills to avoid illicit drug use within the targeted population, and will be measured by evidence that capacity changes are influencing decision-making and behaviours around illicit drug use and associated consequences in targeted populations.
DSCIF also plans to strengthen community responses to illicit drug issues in targeted areas, and will measure their progress based on the type/nature of ways that community responses have been strengthened in targeted areas. For example, the adoption/integration evidence-informed/best practices within the targeted areas will indicate the program's contribution to this outcome.

Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants
Total contributions 14.5 11.5 11.5 11.5
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 14.5 11.5 11.5 11.5

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians

Program Activity: Official Language Minority Community Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)

Start Date: April 2009

End Date: March 2013

Description: Builds on initiatives established under the previous Contribution Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities (2003-2004 to 2008-2009). The Program is managed by the Official Language Community Development Bureau.

The Program was approved for a five year period (2008-2009 to 2012-2013) with a total budget of $174.3 million, to support three mutually reinforcing components: 1) Health Networking ($22M); 2) Training and Retention of Health Professionals ($114.5M); and 3) Official Language Minority Community Health Projects ($33.5M); and to strengthen Health Canada's capacity to administer the Program ($4.3M).

The Health Networking component aims to: (i) maintain and enhance official language minority community health networks in line with provincial/territorial priorities; (ii) develop strategies to increase and improve OLMC health services; and (iii) provide leadership and coordination of activities that span all three components of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program.

The Training and Retention component is designed to: (i) provide post-secondary training of francophone health professionals in official language minority communities located outside Quebec to respond to the health care provider needs of those communities; (ii) promote the recruitment of qualified students into francophone post-secondary health training programs and their re-integration into official language minority communities upon graduation; (iii) provide training and retention initiatives in Quebec to ensure that health professionals have opportunities to improve their ability to work in both official languages, and to practice where they can meet the needs of official language minority communities; (iv) in communities outside Quebec, provide cultural and French-language training to bilingual health professionals to improve their ability to provide health services to Francophone minority language communities; and (v) promote research and information-sharing on approaches to reducing barriers to health care access for official language minority communities.

The Official Language Minority Community Health Projects component of the Program provides short and medium term support for projects in six activity areas in response to community and provincial, territorial, or regional health priorities: (i) strategies to develop, retain and mobilize health human resources within French official language minority communities; (ii) development of sustained health information products and tools to facilitate access to health services within networks; (iii) provision of improved front-line health service expertise in the minority official language; (iv) support to regional and local health and social service agencies and community organizations in implementing new programs and best practices for access to health services in the minority official language; (v) development of volunteer health and social support services for official language minority communities within local networks, institutions and health

7. Expected results: The two main objectives of the Program are to improve access to health services in the minority official language and to increase the use of both official languages in the provision of health services. To achieve these objectives the Program has identified five expected outcomes:

  1. increased number of health professionals to provide health services in official language minority communities;
  2. increased coordination and integration of health services for official language minority communities within institutions and communities;
  3. increased partnership/interaction of networks in provincial and territorial health systems;
  4. increased awareness among stakeholders that networks are a focal point for addressing the health concerns of official language minority communities; and
  5. increased dissemination and adoption of knowledge, strategies or best practices to address the health concerns of official language minority communities.
Official Languages Health Contribution Program (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants
Total contributions 36.8 38.0 38.3 23.0
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 36.8 38.0 38.3 23.0

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Assessed Contribution to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)

Strategic Outcome: A health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians

Program Activity: Canadian Health System

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Assessed Contribution to the Pan American Health Organization

Start Date: July 2008

End Date: March 2013

Description: Payment of Canada's annual membership fees to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).

Expected Results: Canada's participation in PAHO promotes results aimed at improving and protecting the health of Canadians, enhancing global health security, and supporting global health efforts through the exchange of best practices, lessons learned and the provision of technical expertise in strengthening health systems and in building capacity. PAHO has an effective disease surveillance system at the country level which is used extensively to provide an early warning system for Canadian tourists and businesses in Latin America and the Caribbean. This infrastructure is essential to Canada's interests in being better prepared to respond to emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

Canada's influence and interests in the Americas region with respect to good governance, transparency and accountability are also advanced through our membership in PAHO, which provides a forum for the wider dissemination of Canadian-based values related to health and the provision of health-care, amongst others. Canada's membership in this multilateral organization also aligns with the Government of Canada's foreign policy objectives for the Americas which seek to strengthen our bilateral and multilateral relations in the region.

Assessed Contribution to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants
Total contributions 12.5 12.5 12.5 12.5
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 12.5 12.5 12.5 12.5

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Grant to the Canadian Blood Services: Blood Safety and Effectiveness and Research Development (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: Canadians are informed of and protected from health risks associated with food products, substances and environments, and are informed of the benefits of healthy eating.

Program Activity: Health Products

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Blood Services: Blood Safety and Effectiveness and Research Development (Voted)

Start Date: April 2000

End Date: Ongoing

Description: To support basic, applied and clinical research on blood safety and effectiveness issues through the auspices of Canadian Blood Services

Expected Results: Improved blood safety and blood system governance

Grant to the Canadian Blood Services: Blood Safety and Effectiveness and Research Development (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Grant to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program Activity: Canadian Health System

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: The Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial advice and evidence-based information about the effectiveness of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision makers.

Expected Results: The purpose of the Named Grant is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review (CDR), Health Technology Assessment (HTA), and the Canadian Optimal Medication Prescribing and Utilization Service (COMPUS). Expected results are: creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost.

Grant to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 17.9 18.9 16.9 16.9
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 17.9 18.9 16.9 16.9

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Health Care Policy Contribution (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program Activity: Canadian Health System

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Health Care Policy Contribution (Voted)

Start Date: September 2002

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: The Health Care Policy Contribution Program fosters strategic and evidence based decision-making for quality health care, and promotes innovation through pilot projects, evaluation, policy research and analysis, and policy development on current and emerging priorities. Currently, the Program funds projects in priority health care policy areas such as access to health care; chronic and continuing care (including home and community care); health human resources, including assessment and integration of internationally educated health professionals; patient safety; and palliative/end-of-life care.

Expected Results: Program outputs include: research and evaluation reports; educational models, tools and resources for health providers, health system managers and decision makers; innovative models, case studies and best practices; and development and promotion of collaborative relationships. Program outcomes include: increased awareness and understanding of knowledge tools/products, approaches, models, innovations and health system reform issues; broader adoption of knowledge or innovations resulting in changes to policy, practice and/or organizational structure; and expansion or enhancement of existing practices or models.

Health Care Policy Contribution (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants
Total contributions 32.7 33.5 33.5 33.6
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 32.7 33.5 33.5 33.6

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Grant to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program Activity: Canadian Health System

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC) is a five-year plan with the following objectives: (1) to reduce the expected number of new cases of cancer among Canadians; (2) to enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer; and (3) to lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer. Health Canada is the federal liaison with the Canadian Partnership against Cancer, the not-for-profit organization responsible for the implementation of the CSCC, and is responsible for managing the five-year $250 million grant agreement with the corporation.

Expected Results: the Partnership will become a leader in cancer control through knowledge management and the coordination of efforts among the provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups, and Aboriginal organizations to champion change, improve health outcomes related to cancer, and leverage existing investments. A coordinated, knowledge-centered approach to cancer control is expected to significantly reduce the economic burden of cancer, alleviate current pressures on the health care system, and bring together information for all Canadians, no matter where they live.

Grant to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 55.0 50.0 50.0 50.0
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 55.0 50.0 50.0 50.0

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program Activity: Canadian Health System

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)

Start Date: September 2002

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: The Named Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) supports the federal government's interest (in an F/P/T partnership context) in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to improve the quality of health care services by providing a leadership role in building a culture of patient safety and quality improvement in the Canadian health care system through coordination across sectors, promotion of best practices, and advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety. The first five-year Funding Agreement with CPSI ended on March 31, 2008, and was renewed for an additional five years, starting April 1, 2008 and ending March 31, 2013. Health Canada has ongoing funding authority of up to $8 million per year for the CPSI Named Grant

Expected Results: CPSI will provide leadership and coordination of efforts to prevent and reduce harm to patients, with an emphasis on four key areas: education, with a focus on developing curriculum and training programs; interventions and programs, with a focus on coordinating and supporting evidence-informed clinical interventions and programs; research, to increase the scope and scale of patient safety research; and tools and resources, with a focus on creating tools and resources that can be applied by healthcare organizations.

Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Grant to the Health Council of Canada (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program Activity: Canadian Health System

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Health Council of Canada (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2004

End Date: ongoing

Description: The Health Council of Canada (the Council) was established out of the 2003 First Ministers' Accord on Health Care Renewal to monitor and report on progress against commitments in the 2003 Accord. In the 2004 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care, First Ministers expanded the mandate of the Council to include reporting on the health status of Canadians and health outcomes. The Health Council is governed by its Corporate Members, who are participating F/P/T Ministers of Health (excluding Québec and Alberta).

Expected Results: Through monitoring and annual public reporting on the progress achieved in implementing commitments in the 2003 First Ministers' Accord and the 2004 Health Accord, the Council contributes to enhancing accountability and transparency in health care system reform.

Grant to the Health Council of Canada (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Grant to Support the Mental Health Commission of Canada (Voted)

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program Activity: Canadian Health System

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to support the Mental Health Commission of Canada (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2017

Description: In Budget 2007, the federal government committed $130M over 10 years to establish the national Mental Health Commission of Canada, an arm's length, not-for profit organization designed to improve health and social outcomes for people and their families living with mental illness.

Expected Results: Over the course of this grant, the Commission is expected to develop a national mental health strategy, a knowledge exchange centre, and undertake anti-stigma public awareness and educational initiatives.

Grant to Support the Mental Health Commission of Canada (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan



Grant to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI)

Strategic Outcome: A Health System Responsive to the Needs of Canadians

Program Activity: Canadian Health System

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2007

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: CIHI is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial (F/P/T) governments that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1991 by the F/P/T Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information. CIHI's data and its reports inform health policies, support the effective delivery of health services and raise awareness among Canadians about the factors that contribute to good health.

From 1999 to 2007, the federal government provided approximately $313 million to CIHI through a series of grants, known as the Roadmap Initiative. This allowed CIHI to provide quality, timely health information. More recently CIHI's funding has been consolidated through the Health Information Initiative.

Beginning in 2007-08, the Health Information Initiative provides conditional grant funding to CIHI. This funding allows CIHI to continue important work initiated under the Roadmap Initiative and to further enhance the coverage of health data systems to improve the information available to Canadians on their health care system, including information on wait times, and comparable health indicators. The funding also enables CIHI to respond effectively to emerging priorities. Under this initiative, up to $406.49 million will be delivered to CIHI over five years (2007-08 to 2011-12).

Expected results: As per CIHI's funding agreement with Health Canada, CIHI's draft 2011-12 Operational Plan and Budget is to be provided to Health Canada by the end of January 2011. At the March 2011 CIHI Board Meeting, the document will be brought forward for review and approval and then subsequently submitted to the Minister of Health. In CIHI's 2009-2010 Annual Report they indicated that they will remain focused on their strategic priorities as follows:

More and Better Data

  • Increase jurisdictional uptake of select reporting systems, with a continued focus on home and continuing care, pharmaceuticals, medication incidents and ambulatory care/emergency visits;
  • Continue to develop and implement our Primary Health Care Information program;
  • Work to address data gaps in the areas of Aboriginal health and community mental health;
  • Increase the quality and comprehensiveness of our patient-specific cost data;
  • Improve the timeliness of data collection and reporting across all data holdings; and
  • Collaborate with jurisdictions and Canada Health Infoway to advance health system use of data and the pan-Canadian agenda related to the electronic health and medical records.

More Relevant and Actionable Analysis

  • Produce our first-ever pan-Canadian hospital reports;
  • Release a series of analytical products on cross-cutting themes focused on cancer, seniors, Aboriginal health, mental health and patient safety/quality of care;
  • Develop and implement a rolling multi-year analytical plan and release reports and special studies focused on access to care/wait times, patient outcomes, H1N1, continuity of care, cost/productivity and primary health care;
  • Implement methodologies and infrastructures to link data in a privacy-sensitive manner; and
  • Continue to implement the Canadian Population Health Initiative Action Plan, with a particular focus on the themes of place and health and reducing gaps.

Understanding and Use of Our Data

  • Expand the depth and breadth of our eReporting applications, including CIHI Portal;
  • Launch our new and improved website;
  • Share expertise and enhance overall responsiveness by implementing a more strategic approach to marketing products and developing a customer strategy and educational offerings;
  • Develop new data sharing agreements, as appropriate;
  • Enhance our data security and privacy programs by conducting privacy audits on select internal data holdings and external data recipients;
  • Host national conferences and workshops to promote increased understanding and use of our data and information products; and
  • Develop and deliver education products to support improvement and use of our products and services (such as data quality, national reporting system, indicators and data standards).

2010-2011 is the third year of CIHI's four year strategic plan.

Grant to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) (Voted)
Program Activity
(millions of dollars)
Forecast Spending
2010-11
Planned Spending
2011-12
Planned Spending
2012-13
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total grants 81.7 81.7 81.7 81.7
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments
Total Transfer payments 81.7 81.7 81.7 81.7

Link to 3 year Transfer Payment Program Plan

Top of Page

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS)

Start date: April 1, 2010

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS) builds on three strategic priorities: supporting demand-driven skills development; fostering partnerships with the private sector and the provinces and territories; and, placing emphasis on accountability and results. Under the Strategy, ASETS Agreement Holders design and deliver programs to help Aboriginal people to prepare for, obtain and maintain meaningful and sustainable employment, assist Aboriginal youth to make successful transitions from school to work or to support their return to school, and support Aboriginal child care programs.

The objective of the ASETS is to increase Aboriginal participation in the Canadian labour market, ensuring that First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people have opportunities to be engaged in sustainable, meaningful employment.

Expected results: ASETS will generate between 14,000 and 16,500 jobs and up to 8,500 childcare spaces per year over the next five years.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 246.1 245.6 245.6 245.6
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total Transfer payments 246.1 245.6 245.6 245.6

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Skills and Partnerships Fund


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Skills and Partnerships Fund (SPF)

Start date: April, 2010

End date: March 31, 2015

Description: The Skills and Partnership Fund (SPF) is a partnership-based, opportunity-driven fund that will support projects aiming to encourage innovation and partnerships, test new approaches to the delivery of employment services and address systemic gaps in service delivery.

The SPF will fund innovative Aboriginal labour market development projects under the following three priority areas:

  • Skills Development: Pilot innovations that provide skills training to clients with multiple barriers to employment;
  • Training-to-Employment: Respond to small to mid-sized economic partnership opportunities with targeted labour force development initiatives; and,
  • Service Delivery Improvement: Pilot innovations in organizational systems through partnership to address labour market program delivery weaknesses/gaps.

Expected results: Through its training to employment stream, SPF is expected to generate 8,000 to 10,000 job opportunities for Aboriginal people between 2010-11 and 2014-15. It will also generate skills development opportunities such as essential skills training for multi-barriered clients, training for youth, entrepreneurship training and work experience opportunities. It is also expected to result in innovations and improvements in delivering labour market services to Aboriginal clients.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions 2.5 57.5  50.0 50.0
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 2.5 57.5*  50.0 50.0

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml

* From the approved funding of $10M in 2010-2011, $7.5M is being reprofiled into 2011-2012.


Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership (ASEP)

Start date: June 7, 2007

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership (ASEP) is a nationally-managed, opportunity-based program promoting maximum employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments through a collaborative Aboriginal, private sector and provincial/territorial partnership approach. ASEP focuses on sustainable Aboriginal employment by providing the skills training needed to secure long term-skilled jobs on major economic developments. Formalized partnerships develop, contribute to, and manage multi-year training strategies directly leading to long-term, skilled jobs. Partners contribute at least 50% of the total cost of the project and must guarantee at least 50 long-term jobs as a result.

Expected results: The 36 current ASEP projects are expected to train more than 14,000 individuals, and result in more than 8,000 Aboriginal people securing long term jobs by the end of the projects on March 31, 2012.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions 75.4 67.1  - -
Total other types of transfer payments -  - - -
Total Transfer payments 75.4 67.1  - -

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Youth Employment Strategy


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Employment Strategy (YES)

Start date: April 1, 2003

End date: Ongoing

Description: Through the Youth Employment Strategy (YES), the Government of Canada is working to provide young Canadians with both valuable work experience and earnings to help transition to the labour market and to support them in furthering their education. Transfer payments made under the YES are predominantly in the form of contributions from participating departments for wage subsidies for participating youth, or for the development and delivery of youth support services. Such support services include client assessment, case management services and the provision of employability tools, to help participants acquire needed skills. Transfer payments contribute directly to the program objectives by encouraging organizations to create meaningful, skill-enhancing opportunities for youth.

Expected results: Programs respond to the needs of young workers, employers and other stakeholders.

The common key results commitments for all initiatives receiving funding under the Youth Employment Strategy are:

  • Enhanced youth employability skills gained from work experience or tailored interventions; and,
  • A portion of youth participants will return to school to further their education/skills development and/or become employed or self-employed.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions 291.1 239.6  239.6 239.6
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 291.1 239.6*  239.6 239.6

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml

* Variance from 2010-2011 to 2011-2012 is due to funding ending in 2010-2011 for Canada Summer Jobs, and from one-year funding announced in Budget 2010 to assist young people in gaining skills and work experience.


Targeted Initiative for Older Workers


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Targeted Initiative for Older Workers (TIOW)

Start date: October 17, 2006

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers (TIOW) is a federal-provincial/territorial cost-shared initiative providing support to unemployed older workers in communities affected by significant downsizing or closures and/or ongoing high unemployment, through programming aimed at reintegrating them into employment. In situations where there is little likelihood of immediate employment, programming may be aimed at increasing the employability of older workers and ensuring they remain active and productive labour market participants while their communities undergo adjustment.

Provinces and territories are responsible for identifying affected communities to target for activities, design and delivery of projects, and monitoring and reporting on projects.

To be eligible to participate in the Initiative, older workers must be unemployed, legally entitled to work in Canada, lack skills needed for successful integration into new employment, live in an eligible community, and normally be aged 55 - 64. Projects must include employment assistance activities, such as résumé writing, interview techniques, counselling and job finding clubs, and at least two other employability improvement activities such as prior learning assessment, skills training, work experience, or assistance to start a small business.

See: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/employment/employment_measures/older_workers/index.shtml for further details.

Expected results: Programs respond to the needs of older workers, employers and other stakeholders.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions 56.1 79.8  - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total Transfer payments 56.1 79.8  - -

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities

Start date: April 1, 2005

End date: March 31, 2013

Description: The objective of the Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities is to enhance the development and vitality of the official language minority communities by strengthening capacity in the areas of community economic development and human resource development and by promoting partnerships at all levels. The Enabling Fund provides funding to Official Language Minority Communities designated organizations, the Réseaux de développement économique et d’employabilité and Community Economic Development and Employability Committees through contribution agreements, so that these organizations can plan, develop and manage community projects and access funding for these projects.

Contributions can be made under the Enabling Fund to support activities such as:

  • Organizing meetings of the National Committees to develop strategic joint plans and manage implementation;
  • Holding meetings to share information and coordinate activities;
  • Coordinating research on socio-economics in Official Language Minority Communities;
  • Marketing/Promoting the Enabling Fund Program;
  • Planning economic and human resources, implementing community development plans, conducting research;
  • Creating, implementing and consolidating collaborative projects to enhance the vitality and economic growth of Official Language Minority Communities;
  • Mobilizing community stakeholders; and,
  • Strengthening local and national structures to improve their capabilities to manage and implement community projects.

Expected results: Programs respond to the needs of Official Language Minority Community workers, employers and other stakeholders as follows:

  • Contribution recipients are informed and contribute to knowledge building and program/policy issues;
  • Knowledge is shared among federal partners, contribution recipients and Official Language Minority Communities;
  • Official Language Minority Community economic and human resources issues continue to be integrated into the government’s policy/program development;
  • Contribution recipients continue to develop and implement effective community plans and projects with concrete results; and,
  • There is sustained collaboration across federal institutions working with Official Language Minority Community stakeholders.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions 12.0 12.0  12.0 -
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 12.0 12.0  12.0 -

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities (LMAPDs)

Start date: April 1, 2004

End date: Ongoing

Description: Through the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities (LMAPDs), the Government of Canada transfers funding annually to the provinces for programs and services to improve the employment situation for persons with disabilities.

The Government of Canada contributes 50 percent of the costs incurred by provinces for funded programs and services up to the amount of the federal allocation identified in each bilateral federal-provincial agreement. (Territories have not entered into any LMAPDs given the Territorial financing formula). Transfers to provinces are made as ‘other transfer payments’.

Expected results: The goal of the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities is to improve the employment situation of Canadians with disabilities, by enhancing their employability, increasing the employment opportunities available to them, and building on their existing knowledge base. Reporting under the Agreements includes selected societal indicators (employment income, educational attainment and employment rate of working age people with disabilities) and the following program indicators:

  • number of participants in programs and services;
  • number of participants completing a program or service where there is a specific start and end point to the intervention; and,
  • number of participants who were assisted in obtaining and maintaining employment by programs or services funded through Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities.

Provinces report annually to their citizens on outcomes and program results and also share these reports with HRSDC.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions - - -
Total other types of transfer payments 222.0 222.0  222.0 222.0
Total Transfer payments 222.0 222.0  222.0 222.0

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities

Start date: April 1, 2007

End date: Ongoing

Description: Transfer payments made under the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities are in the form of contribution agreements with individuals, businesses, and organizations.

Transfer payments contribute directly to the program objectives by assisting unemployed persons with disabilities having little or no labour market attachment to prepare for, find and maintain employment or self-employment. Examples of activities supported under this program include:

  • encouraging employers to provide individuals with work opportunities and experience;
  • working in partnership with organizations for people with disabilities to address barriers to clients’ labour market participation;
  • helping individuals increase their employment skill level; and,
  • helping individuals to start their own businesses.

For more information about this program, please visit: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/disability_issues/funding_programs/opportunities_fund/index.shtml

Expected results:

  • Persons with disabilities have enhanced their employability by completing an Opportunities Fund intervention;
  • Persons with disabilities have obtained employment or self-employment or sought further skills upgrading following participation in Opportunities Fund activities; and,
  • Persons with disabilities have increased earned income levels and reduced their dependence on passive income support.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions 26.8 26.8  26.8 26.8
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 26.8 26.8  26.8 26.8

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Labour Market Agreements


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Labour Market Agreements (LMAs)

Start date: April 1, 2008

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: In Advantage Canada, the Government of Canada set out the goal to create "the best educated, most skilled and most flexible workforce in the world." In Budget 2007, the Government of Canada delivered on this commitment through a New Labour Market Architecture, which included new, six-year bilateral Labour Market Agreements (LMAs) with the provinces and territories supported by $500M / year of new federal investments. Through these agreements, the Government of Canada provides funds for provincial and territorial skills and employment programming and training to non-EI eligible unemployed Canadians, as well as employed individuals who are low skilled, in particular, employed individuals who do not have a high school diploma or a recognized certification or who have low levels of literacy and essential skills.

Labour Market Agreements, which have been signed with all 10 provinces and 3 territories, are intended to increase labour force participation of under-represented groups, ensure that Canadians have the right skills to compete, and encourage employers to provide more training to their workers.

Expected results: Labour Market Agreements were designed to allow provinces/territories (P/Ts) to develop and deliver labour market programming based on their specific priorities and objectives. Nevertheless, LMAs have broad objectives:

  • Quantity - To increase the participation of Canadians and newcomers in the workforce to meet current and future labour requirements;
  • Quality - To enhance the quality of skills development and training; and,
  • Efficiency - To facilitate workforce mobility and provide the information necessary to make informed labour market choices.

The Labour Market Agreements include a robust accountability framework to allow the Government of Canada to measure results against policy objectives and demonstrate value for money to Canadians. Reporting under the Agreements includes the following indicators:

Eligible Client indicators:

  • Total number of eligible clients served/in training by employment status (employed, unemployed, self-employed);
  • Education level of eligible clients prior to intervention; and,
  • Number of eligible clients served in an intervention by designated client group (Aboriginal peoples, immigrants, older workers, persons with disabilities, women, and youth).

Service Delivery Indicators:

  • Number of eligible clients participating in interventions by intervention type; and,
  • Proportion of eligible clients "satisfied" with service received upon completion of the intervention.

Eligible Client Outcome and Impact Indicators:

  • Proportion of eligible clients who have completed their intervention, by intervention type;
  • Proportion of eligible clients employed 3 months and 12 months after leaving the intervention;
  • Number of eligible clients who have earned credentials or certification through participation in the intervention;
  • Average hourly earnings of Eligible Clients following the intervention; and,
  • Proportion of Eligible Clients who, 3 months and 12 months after leaving the intervention, indicate their training helped prepare them for future employment.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - - -
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments 474.6 543.4  508.1 505.6
Total Transfer payments 474.6 543.4*  508.1 505.6

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml

* Variance between fiscal years can be explained by funding reprofiles.


Sector Council Program


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Sector Council Program

Start date: April 1, 2002

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Sector Council Program supports a network of 34 industry-based, national groups that operate in key sectors to address priority human resources and skills challenges. This program enables demand-driven partnerships that address critical skills and human resources challenges from the perspective of industrial sectors. Contribution payments under the Sector Council Program support infrastructure, as well as research and project based activities proposed by Sector Councils and other national organizations working on skills, training and learning issues.

The Sector Council Program supports Sector Council activities that include:

  • Labour market information products that allow businesses to plan human resources and project investments;
  • National occupational standards that facilitate labour mobility, influence college curricula, and promote essential skills and health and safety in the workplace;
  • Targeted recruitment and skills development initiatives that increase labour force participation and integration of vulnerable groups such as youth, Aboriginal people and newcomers;
  • Curriculum tailored to industry needs;
  • Skills development tools, including e-learning; and,
  • Tools and approaches to integrate internationally trained workers.

Expected results: The capacity exists for employers to deliver employment, training and assessment services to Canadians.

  • Develop solutions to human resources and skills issues by:
    • increasing understanding of skills, occupational needs and labour market issues;
    • increasing availability and use of products and services to help industry address their human resource issues;
    • facilitating labour market transitions (including both entry and career progression); and,
    • increasing industry investments in skills development to promote a quality workforce.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions 28.7 27.4  26.5 26.5
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 28.7 27.4  26.5 26.5

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Apprenticeship Incentive Grant & Apprenticeship Completion Grant


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Apprenticeship Incentive Grant (AIG) and Apprenticeship Completion Grant (ACG)

Start date: January 1, 2007

End date: Ongoing

Description: Apprenticeship Incentive Grant (AIG)
The Apprenticeship Incentive Grant promotes access to apprenticeships and improves labour mobility by providing a $1,000 grant to registered apprentices in the designated Red Seal trades during the first two years/levels of their apprenticeship program, up to a maximum of $2,000 per apprentice. This taxable cash grant is designed to reward advancement in the first two years of an apprenticeship program in one of the Red Seal trades, building momentum for apprentices to complete their apprenticeship programs and receive journeyperson certification. Registered apprentices who completed their first or second year of their apprenticeship program in a Red Seal trade designated in the province/territory where they are registered as an apprentice, on or after January 1, 2007, are eligible to apply.

The Apprenticeship Incentive Grant provides an incentive for more Canadians to pursue apprenticeships and, taken together with the Apprenticeship Completion Grant, Apprenticeship Job Creation Tax Credit for employers and the Tradesperson’s Tool Deduction, is intended to meet the future need for skilled trades people that is crucial to the sustained growth of the economy. By focusing on the Red Seal trades, for which there are national occupational standards, the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant also supports inter-provincial mobility.

Apprenticeship Completion Grant (ACG)
Introduced in Budget 2009 as part of Canada's Economic Action Plan, the Apprenticeship Completion Grant provides a taxable grant of $2,000 to those registered apprentices who successfully complete their apprenticeship program and obtain journeyperson certification in one of the designated Red Seal trades on or after January 1, 2009. The Apprenticeship Completion Grant builds on and enhances the existing Apprenticeship Incentive Grant by providing an additional incentive for Canadians to finish their apprenticeship training and launch rewarding careers in the skilled trades.

Expected results: Apprenticeship Incentive Grant (AIG)
Registered apprentices in designated Red Seal trades are encouraged to progress in the early years of their apprenticeship program, and ultimately to obtain journeyperson certification in the Red Seal trades. The Grant has been designed to meet the following objectives:

  • To increase access to apprenticeships in the Red Seal Program trades by helping apprentices to cover expenses such as the purchase of tools and other materials required for learning on-the-job and travel expenses associated with classroom training;
  • To encourage the apprentice's progression through the technical and on-the-job training requirements in the early years of their apprenticeship program, thus building the momentum towards certification; and,
  • To promote inter-provincial mobility by increasing the number of apprentices working in the Red Seal trades and obtaining their Red Seal certification.

Apprenticeship Completion Grant (AIG)
The Apprenticeship Completion Grant is intended to increase the number of apprentices completing an apprenticeship program and obtaining journeyperson certification in a designated Red Seal trade. The Grant has been designed to build on the objectives of the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant, specifically progression through apprenticeship training and interprovincial mobility, by increasing the number of apprentices who complete their apprenticeship program and obtain journeyperson certification in a designated Red Seal trade.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 145.3 152.6  152.6 152.6
Total contributions - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 145.3 152.6  152.6 152.6

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Literacy and Essential Skills


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program (ALLESP)

Start date: April 1, 2006

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program (ALLESP) works with partners to facilitate the creation of opportunities for Canadians to acquire the learning, literacy and essential skills they need to participate in a knowledge-based economy and society.

Expected results: Through Literacy and Essential Skills programming, the capacity exists to deliver employment, training and assessment services to Canadians.

The expected ultimate outcomes are that adult Canadians have the literacy and essential skills they need to :

  • get a job;
  • adapt and succeed in the labour market; and,
  • contribute to their communities and families.

The expected intermediate outcomes are:

  • Literacy and essential skills are integrated into federal programs and policies;
  • Literacy and essential skills are integrated into training; and,
  • Partners’ policies and programs address literacy and essential skills needs.

The expected direct outcomes are:

  • The benefits of literacy and essential skills upgrading are understood;
  • Information is available on what works in the field of literacy and essential skills;
  • Literacy and essential skills tools and supports are available and used by those who need them; and,
  • Partners have the capacity to address literacy and essential skills issues.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 21.8 18.3 18.3 18.3
Total contributions 3.2 3.2  3.2 3.2
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 25.0 21.5*  21.5 21.5

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml

* The decrease of $3.5M from 2010-2011 is explained by a reprofile of funds from a previous year.


Foreign Credential Recognition Program


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Skills and Employment

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Foreign Credential Recognition Program (FCRP)

Start date: May 26, 2010

End date: Ongoing

Description: The objective of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program (FCRP) is to ensure that the qualification assessment and recognition processes available to skilled immigrants and other internationally trained workers in Canada are fair, transparent, consistent, and timely. Through the FCRP, the government works with its partners and key stakeholders to break down the barriers to the recognition of foreign qualifications and enhance labour market outcomes of internationally-trained workers.

The Foreign Credential Recognition Program provides strategic financial support to provincial and territorial partners and stakeholders, to develop systems and processes for assessing and recognizing foreign qualifications in targeted occupations and sectors.

The Foreign Credential Recognition Program supports the research and project-based activities of partners and stakeholders to develop structural changes in the tools and processes institutions and/or organizations use to evaluate and recognize foreign qualifications. The Program’s work to date forms the cornerstone of the federal government’s contribution towards the development and implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications, announced in November 2009.

Reducing internal barriers to labour mobility continues to be seen as a key to addressing FCR issues. The Government of Canada supports an array of measures aimed at facilitating the movement of skilled workers within Canada. Under Chapter 7 of the Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT), which was amended effective August 11, 2009, all governments (except Nunavut) are committed to ensuring that workers in regulated occupations can apply to be certified in another province or territory without having to undergo significant additional training, examination or assessment. By strengthening institutional capacity, and applying tools and processes, the FCRP helps to facilitate newcomers’ entry into, and mobility within, the Canadian labour market.

The FCR Program contributes to the competitiveness of Canada’s economy by improving immigrants’ labour market integration.

Expected results: The Foreign Credential Recognition Program works with partners and stakeholders to achieve the following immediate, medium and long-term outcomes:

Immediate Outcome:

  • Understanding, consensus, collaboration and commitment among stakeholders and partners on issues and potential solutions related to FCR;
  • Promotion, information sharing and transfer of best practices in developing Pan-Canadian FCR processes; and,
  • Partnership among key stakeholders, provinces and territories to advance the FCR agenda.

Medium-term Outcome:

  • Availability of tools and processes to assess and recognize foreign credentials across organizations.

Long-term Outcome:

  • Standardization of Pan-Canadian FCR processes and tools in targeted occupations and other sectors; and,
  • Use of tools and processes by organizations to assess and recognize the credentials of internationally-trained workers in targeted occupations and sectors.

Ultimate Outcome:

  • Enhanced labour market outcomes of internationally-trained workers in targeted occupations and sectors.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions 26.4 21.4  21.4 21.4
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 26.4 21.4*  21.4 21.4

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml

* Variance from 2010-2011 to 2011-2012 is mainly attributable to a reprofile of funds from 2009-2010 to 2010-2011.


Canada Student Loans Program - Liabilities


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Learning

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Student Loans Program – Liabilities

Start date: September, 1964

End date: Ongoing

Description: From September 1964 to August 1, 1995, the Canada Student Loan Program operated a Guaranteed Loan regime with Canadian financial institutions, whereby financial assistance was provided to students through financial institutions in the form of 100 percent guaranteed government loans.

This transfer payment tracks claims submitted by financial institutions related to the remaining Guaranteed Loan Portfolio.

Expected results: Track claim payments to financial institutions for the remaining balance of the portfolio.

Canada meets its obligations as set out under the Canada Student Loans Act in agreements with financial institutions.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions (8.8)  (14.0) (10.4) (9.8)
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments (8.8)  (14.0) (10.4) (9.8)

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml

Canada Student Loans Program – Interest Payments and Liabilities


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Learning

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Student Loans Program – Interest Payments and Liabilities

Start date: August 1, 1995

End date: Ongoing

Description: From August 1, 1995 to July 31, 2000, the Canada Student Loans Program operated a risk-shared loans regime with Canadian financial institutions. This transfer payment represents consolidated costs related to that regime, including interest subsidy, repayment assistance benefits, the amount of loans forgiven, risk premium put-backs and administrative costs.

Expected results:

  • As a result of this transfer payment, students who borrowed under the risk-shared regime continue to receive in-study student financial assistance and debt management assistance in repayment; and,
  • Canada meets its obligations as set out under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act in agreements with financial institutions.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions 7.1 5.2  5.5 3.3
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 7.1 5.2  5.5 3.3

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Canada Student Loans Program – Direct Financing Arrangement


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Learning

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Student Loans Program – Direct Financing Arrangement

Start date: August 1, 2000

End date: Ongoing

Description: This transfer payment provides alternative payments to non-participating jurisdictions given that provinces and territories may choose not to participate in the Canada Student Loans Program. Provinces and territories who make this choice receive an alternative payment to assist in the cost of delivering a similar student financial assistance program.

The transfer payment also provides repayment assistance benefits to borrowers, and the value of loans forgiven according to prescribed criteria. As of August 2009, individual debt measures, including interest relief and debt reduction in repayment, have been replaced by the Repayment Assistance Plan. The Repayment Assistance Plan is an optional program for students facing difficulty in making their student loan payments.

Finally, this transfer payment is used to ensure that full-time student military reservists who interrupt their studies for a deployment on designated operations will not be charged interest or have to start paying back their student loan while they are away from their studies and on duty.

Expected results: Post-secondary education students in the province of Québec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut continue to access financial assistance similar to the assistance provided to students in those jurisdictions that participate in the Canada Student Loans Program.

Students in participating jurisdictions with financial difficulty are able to receive repayment benefits.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants - - -
Total contributions 323.7 348.6  348.0 352.5
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 323.7 348.6  348.0 352.5

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/typtpp_table.shtml


Canada Student Grants Program


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Learning

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Student Grants Program (CSGP)

Start date: August 1, 2009

End date: Ongoing

Description: As of August 1, 2009, the Canada Student Grants Program (CSGP) replaced Canada Study Grants and Canada Access Grants. The Canada Student Grants Program (CSGP) provides up-front grants to students from low- and middle-income families, students with dependants, part-time students and those with permanent disabilities. The new Canada Student Grants Program is simple, transparent, predictable and broad-based, providing certainty and predictability for students who qualify.

Students who received the former Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation (CMSF) general bursaries in past years receive transitional grants until they complete or withdraw from their program of study. Former CMSF recipients who are eligible for the new low and middle-income grants will have the difference between the amount of the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation general bursary and the amount of the new grant made up with a transition grant.

Expected results: The CSGP is designed to:

  • Provide non-repayable assistance in an integrated, consistent, and predictable manner across the country;
  • Enable disadvantaged students to better understand and benefit from Federal programs for student financial assistance;
  • Encourage post-secondary education completion, and thereby support the full participation of individuals from disadvantaged groups in the labour market; and,
  • Promote increased participation and equity in post-secondary education by providing higher levels of assistance and targeting assistance to lower- and middle-income groups.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 578.4 554.3  539.6 534.9
Total contributions - - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total Transfer payments 578.4 554.3  539.6 534.9

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Canada Education Savings Program


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Learning

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Education Savings Program (CESP)

Start date: January 1, 1998 (Canada Education Savings Grant)
January 1, 2005 (Canada Learning Bond)

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Canada Education Savings Program (CESP) encourages saving for a child’s post-secondary education savings, from early childhood, in Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs). It is intended to make post-secondary education more affordable for families by providing the Canadian Education Savings Grant (CESG), a matching savings grant on RESP savings for children aged 0 – 17. Eligible low-income families can also benefit from the Canada Learning Bond. The Program’s main clients include families with children. The Program also administers the Education Savings Community Outreach Contribution Program that assists organizations to develop outreach projects to encourage low-income Canadians to save for their children’s post-secondary education, access available education savings incentives and increase their financial literacy.

The program’s infrastructure is also used to administer the Alberta Centennial Education Savings Grant on behalf of the Province of Alberta, on a cost-recovery basis.

Further information regarding the Canada Education Savings Grant can be found at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/learning/education_savings/public/cesg.shtml

Further information regarding the Canada Learning Bond can be found at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/learning/education_savings/public/clb.shtml

Expected results: Expected Result 1: Canadians with children under 18 years have savings with the Registered Education Savings Plan.

Performance Indicators:

  1. Percentage of children under 18 years in the current calendar year who have ever received a Canada Education Savings Grant.
  2. Percentage of eligible children in the current calendar year who have ever received a Canada Learning Bond.

Expected Result 2: Canadians are able to finance their post-secondary education using their savings from a Registered Education Savings Plan.

Performance Indicator:

  1. Total amount ($) withdrawn from Registered Education Savings Plan accounts in a calendar year to pay for post-secondary education.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 714.0 736.0  768.0 809.0
Total contributions 3.9 2.4  2.4 2.4
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 717.9 738.4  770.4 811.4

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Pathways to Education Canada


Strategic Outcome: A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

Program Activity: Learning

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Pathways to Education Canada

Start date: December 31, 2010

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: Pathways to Education Canada, a charitable organization founded in 2001, is the largest community-based early intervention program in Canada. The program was created to reduce poverty and its effects by lowering the high school dropout rate and increasing access to post-secondary education (PSE) among disadvantaged youth, generally from low-income families who are newcomers to Canada and who have no previous history of PSE. To help ensure that disadvantaged youth complete high school and continue on to PSE, Pathways to Education Canada provides:

  • Non-financial supports such as tutoring, mentoring, and counselling; and,
  • Financial supports such as bursaries for PSE, and funding for certain immediate costs related to attending high school (e.g. bus tickets).

The program has proven successful in helping disadvantaged youth overcome barriers to high school completion and post-secondary education.

Expected results: Federal funding is expected to allow Pathways to Education Canada to strengthen its existing programs and to work with community partners to expand its activities into new communities across the country. Expansion efforts have begun, with community-based partners opening new programs in Kingston, Winnipeg and Halifax in 2010.

 
($ millions) Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 2.0 6.0 6.0 6.0
Total contributions -  - - -
Total other types of transfer payments -  - - -
Total Transfer payments 2.0 6.0 6.0 6.0

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Wage Earner Protection Program


Strategic Outcome: Safe, fair, and productive workplaces and cooperative workplace relations

Program Activity: Labour

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Wage Earner Protection Program (WEPP)

Start date: July 2008

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Wage Earner Protection Program Act was part of Bill C-55, which set out a comprehensive reform of Canada’s insolvency laws, including the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act. Passage of Bill C-55 was expedited with unanimous, all party consent in both Houses of Parliament. The Bill received Royal Assent on November 25, 2005, and became Chapter 47 of the Statutes of Canada, 2005. The Act was subject to technical amendments, which were contained in Bill C-12 and received Royal Assent on December 13, 2007. The Act and its Regulations came into force on July 7, 2008. Further amendments to the Program to include coverage for termination and severance pay were included in Budget Implementation Act, 2009.

The Wage Earner Protection Program (WEPP) is a targeted federal Program providing financial support to workers who lose their job and are owed money when their employer goes bankrupt or becomes subject to receivership under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act. Specifically, the Program reimburses eligible workers for unpaid wages, vacation, severance, and termination pay up to a current maximum of $3,400 (the equivalent of four weeks’ maximum insurable earnings under the Employment Insurance Act). The Wage Earner Protection Program is administered by the Labour Program and is delivered by Service Canada.

Expected results: The expected result for this Program is a reduction in economic insecurity of Canadian workers with unpaid wages in insolvent workplaces.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 56.2 56.2  54.2 54.2
Total contributions - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 56.2 56.2  54.2 54.2

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Old Age Security


Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Program Activity: Income Security

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Old Age Security Pension (statutory payment)

Start date: 1952

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Old Age Security (OAS) pension is a monthly benefit available to most Canadians 65 years of age or over who meet residence requirements. An applicant's employment history is not a factor in determining eligibility, nor does the applicant need to be retired. Old Age Security payments to pensioners are taxable income at the federal and provincial levels.

Expected results: Eligible seniors receive a benefit that assists them in maintaining a minimum standard of living.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 27,692.0 29,162.2  30,722.8 32,458.1
Total contributions - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 27,692.0 29,162.2  30,722.8 32,458.1

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Guaranteed Income Supplement


Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Program Activity: Income Security

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Guaranteed Income Supplement (statutory payment)

Start date: 1967

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) provides additional money, on top of the Old Age Security (OAS) pension, to low-income seniors living in Canada. The GIS is a monthly benefit paid to residents of Canada who receive a full or partial OAS pension and who meet the income requirements for the program.

(See: http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/isp/oas/oasrates.shtml - for the latest income requirements)

Benefits received from the Old Age Security program, including the Guaranteed Income Supplement and the Allowance, are not included as income in determining eligibility for this program.

Expected results: Eligible low-income seniors receive a Guaranteed Income Supplement that assists them in maintaining a minimum standard of living.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 8,046.0 8,429.8  8,869.9 9,338.8
Total contributions - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 8,046.0 8,429.8  8,869.9 9,338.8

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Allowance Payments


Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Program Activity: Income Security

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Allowance Payments (statutory payments)

Start date: 1975 – Allowance
1985 – Allowance for the Survivor

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Allowance may be paid to the spouse or common-law partner of a Guaranteed Income Supplement recipient, or to a survivor.

Expected results: Eligible low income seniors, such as spouses or common-law partners of Old Age Security pensioners or survivors between the ages of 60 and 64, receive an Allowance that assists them in maintaining a minimum standard of living.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 524.0 534.3  527.7 524.0
Total contributions - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 524.0 534.3  527.7 524.0

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Canada Disability Savings Program – Grants and Bond


Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Program Activity: Income Security

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Disability Savings Program (CDSP) – Grants and Bonds (statutory payment)

Start date: November 2008

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Canada Disability Savings Program (CDSP) is designed to support Registered Disability Savings Plans, which are savings vehicles to help parents and others save for the long-term financial security of a person with a severe disability. The Government of Canada will pay matching grants of 300, 200, or 100 percent depending on the beneficiary’s family income and the amount contributed. The Government will also pay income-tested bonds to the Registered Disability Savings Plans of low-income Canadians with disabilities, regardless of the amount contributed.

Expected results: The expected long-term result of the program is:

  • to contribute to the financial security of people with severe and prolonged disabilities.

The expected intermediate results for the program are:

  • authorized people or organizations contribute to beneficiary’s Registered Disability Savings Plan; and,
  • beneficiaries receive the Grants and Bonds through the Registered Disability Savings Plans.

The expected immediate results for the program are:

  • eligible individuals (and their families/guardians) are aware of the program and its requirements;
  • financial institutions offer the Registered Disability Savings Program in a manner that meets the needs of the target population; and,
  • eligible individuals (and their families/guardians) open Registered Disability Savings Plans.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 116.1 83.0  89.3 96.0
Total contributions - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 116.1* 83.0  89.3 96.0

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml

* Forecast Spending for 2010-2011 has been updated in 2010-2011 Supplementary Estimates (c) due to higher than expected take-up of the program.


Homelessness Partnering Strategy


Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Program Activity: Social Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS)

Start date: April 1, 2011

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: The Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) provides grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, individuals, municipal governments, Band and tribal councils and other Aboriginal organizations, public health and educational institutions, Agences de la santé et des services sociaux, research organizations and research institutes to help communities better understand and more effectively prevent and reduce homelessness.

Expected results: By March 31, 2014 the Homelessness Partnering Strategy aims to contribute, with partners, to a more sustainable and comprehensive continuum of supports to help homeless Canadians move towards self-sufficiency and to prevent those at risk from becoming homeless, through seven funding streams:

  • The first three funding streams of Designated Communities, Rural and Remote Homelessness, and Aboriginal Homelessness focus on the needs of homeless and at-risk individuals at the local level, and provide funding to help them gain and maintain a stable living arrangement.
  • The remaining four streams are delivered nationally and include the Federal Horizontal Pilot Projects (HPP), Homelessness Knowledge Development (HKD), National Homeless Information System (NHIS) and Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative (SFRPHI). These streams provide the means to develop and explore innovative methods, as well as horizontal approaches to addressing issues related to homelessness, including: effective reporting, accountability, data development and collection, evidence-based knowledge development, the sharing of best practices, and making surplus federal real properties available to communities:

For more information, please visit the Homelessness Partnering Strategy Web site: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/homelessness/index.shtml

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 2.7 0.8 0.8 0.8
Total contributions 145.8 110.1  107.9 110.8
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 148.3 110.9*  108.7 111.6

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml

* The decrease from 2010-2011 is due to reprofiles between fiscal years.


Social Development Partnerships Program


Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Program Activity: Social Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Social Development Partnerships Program (SDPP) (voted payments)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Social Development Partnerships Program (SDPP) provides grant and contribution funding to not-for-profit organizations working to meet the social development needs of persons with disabilities, children and their families, and other vulnerable or excluded populations in Canada.

The SDPP has two funding components: Children and Families, and Disability.

The SDPP-Children and Families supports not-for-profit organizations working in communities across Canada to tackle local challenges that individuals and families experience in accessing participation opportunities for learning, labour market attachment, and social inclusion. In addition, the SDPP provides funding for early childhood development in Official Language Minority Communities as part of the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality, 2008-2013.

http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/community_partnerships/sdpp/index.shtml

The Disability component of the Social Development Partnerships Program (SDPP-D) supports projects that are designed to improve the participation and integration of people with disabilities in all aspects of Canadian society. More specifically, the fund supports a wide range of community-based projects that respond to issues faced by people with disabilities and their families, including improved access to programs and services.

http://www.rhdcc-hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/community_partnerships/sdpp/call/disability_component/page00.shtml.

Expected results: The desired outcome for SDPP is:
Not-for-profit sector and partners have capacity to respond to existing and emerging social issues for target populations.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 21.3 14.3  14.3 14.3
Total contributions 6.4 6.1  6.1 6.1
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 27.7 20.4  20.4 20.4

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


New Horizons for Seniors Program


Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Program Activity: Social Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: New Horizons for Seniors Program (NHSP) (voted payments)

Start date: Original program: October 1, 2004;
Expanded Program: September 27, 2007

End date: Ongoing
Please note: Budget 2010 provided a $5 million annual increase to program funding for this program.

Description: Through the New Horizons for Seniors Program (NHSP), the Department helps seniors benefit from and contribute to the quality of life in their communities. The NHSP supports both community-based and Pan-Canadian (national or regional) projects. Community-based projects address social challenges ‘on the ground’ and recognize communities as the focal point for program and service delivery. Funded projects are inspired or led by seniors, are volunteer-based, and are supported by their communities. Pan-Canadian projects address elder abuse (including financial abuse) through raising awareness, developing and sharing information, and networking.

Expected results: The direct outcomes for NHSP are:

  • Recipient organizations equip community members to recognize abuse of seniors;
  • Participating seniors share their knowledge and experience with peers and different generations;
  • Recipient organizations adopt approaches to engage volunteers; and,
  • Recipient organizations have capacity to support seniors’ initiatives in their communities.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 31.3 31.3  31.3 31.3
Total contributions 1.8 1.8  1.8 1.8
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 33.1 33.1  33.1 33.1

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Universal Child Care Benefit


Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Program Activity: Social Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB)

Start date: July 1, 2006

End date: Ongoing

Description: Effective July 2006 families receive $100 per month (up to $1,200 per year) for each child under six. Payments are made directly to families so that they can choose the child care that best meets the family’s needs. The Universal Child Care Benefit is provided in addition to existing federal programs such as the Canada Child Tax Benefit, which includes the National Child Benefit Supplement, the new Child Tax Credit and the Child Care Expense Deduction. The Universal Child Care Benefit does not affect the benefits families receive under these programs. Further information can be found at http://www.universalchildcare.ca.

Expected results: Canada’s families with children under six years of age receive financial support through the Universal Child Care Benefit for their child care choices.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 2,594.0 2,660.0  2,698.0 2,730.0
Total contributions - - -
Total other types of transfer payments - - -
Total Transfer payments 2,594.0 2,660.0  2,698.0 2,730.0

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml


Enabling Accessibility Fund


Strategic Outcome: Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Program Activity: Social Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF)

Start date: September 2009 (Major Projects) and
June 2010 (Small and Mid-sized Projects)

End date: March 31, 2013

Description: The Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) supports community-based projects across Canada that improve accessibility, remove barriers, and enable Canadians with disabilities to participate in and contribute to their communities.

Through the Small Project Component of the EAF, funding is provided to projects that improve the built environment through renovation, construction and retrofitting of buildings, modification of vehicles for community use and provision of accessible information/communication technologies.

Through the Mid-sized Project Component of the EAF, contribution funding is provided for retrofits, renovations or new construction of facilities within Canada that house services and programs emphasizing a holistic approach to the social and labour market integration needs of people with disabilities.

Through the Major Project Component of the EAF, contribution funding is provided for the construction of abilities centres that assist people with varying abilities to have increased access to opportunities for social and economic participation in the community.

Expected results: The expected outcomes of the program are:

  • Direct outcome: People with disabilities can access community facilities;
  • Shared outcome: People with disabilities have opportunities to participate in community life; and,
  • Ultimate outcome: Communities benefit from the participation of people with disabilities.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–2011
Planned Spending
2011–2012
Planned Spending
2012–2013
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Total grants 9.4 10.0  10.7 -
Total contributions 22.5 3.0*  7.0 -
Total other types of transfer payments - - - -
Total Transfer payments 31.9 13.0  17.7 -

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/dpr/rpp/detailed_information/2011_2012/
typtpp_table.shtml

* Variance from 2010-2011 to 2011-2012 can be explained by reprofile of funds from 2009-2010 to 2010-2011.


Top of Page

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Canadian Polar Commission

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)


Strategic Outcome: Good governance and co-operative relationships for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners (The Government)

Program Activity: Governance and Institutions of Government

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Governance and Institutions of Government

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: The efforts related to this program activity assist in achieving social and economic vibrancy in First Nation and Inuit communities. It supports individual community and aggregate-based governments and governance systems by assisting them to establish effective governance and associated capacities, processes and mechanisms (such as by-law making authority and election processes). Particularly, support is provided to First Nation and Inuit governments as well as their respective institutions of government. These institutions include but are not limited to those that provide services in the areas of governance, land claim organizations and professional associations. This program activity also provides support to representative organizations with respect to policy legislation development.

Expected results: Capable and accountable First Nation governments and institutions.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 159.3 242.0 242.2 242.4
Total contributions 281.6 180.3 180.3 180.3
Total Transfer payments 440.9 422.3 422.5 422.7

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Good governance and co-operative relationships for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners (The Government)

Program Activity: Co-operative Relationships

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Co-operative Relationships

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: This program activity addresses constitutional and historic obligations, reduces conflict through negotiation and enables all parties to work together toward reconciliation. Co-operative Relationships are about mutual respect. They establish an atmosphere of trust, accountability and respectful partnerships among governments, First Nations and Inuit. This atmosphere, in turn, supports social, economic and cultural growth in First Nation and Inuit communities and increases their self-reliance. Co-operative Relationships are the basis for mutually reached resolution of claims and other rights issues. Through Co-operative Relationships, funds are provided to First Nations and Inuit in support of the activities within the program activity including negotiation of claims and self-government agreements, certainty is obtained over the ownership, use, and the management of land and resources. First Nations and Inuit are effectively represented in federal policy decisions and the Crown duty to consult is supported. Funds are transferred to Aboriginal recipients through contributions and loans agreements. Funding levels are determined based on proposals submitted by the Aboriginal people and are based on program guidelines and terms and conditions.

Expected results: Relationships between parties based on trust, respect, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability, rights and dialogue.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 618.4 251.8 250.0 250.0
Total contributions 69.3 70.7 68.0 66.0
Total Transfer payments 687.7 322.5 318.0 316.0

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Good governance and co-operative relationships for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners (The Government)

Program Activity: Treaty Management

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Treaty Management

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: By working in partnership, federal, provincial/territorial governments, and Aboriginal parties are able to create and maintain the necessary structures (such as education, child care etc.) to support ongoing and evolving relationships within a historical and modern context. Key activities include: the implementation of land claim, self-government agreements; special claims; comprehensive land claim transfers; Tables and Treaty Commissions. The Treaty Commission provides funds in the way of contributions to recipients. Although all Canadians are expected to benefit from the settlement and implementation of Comprehensive Land Claim Agreements, the primary beneficiaries are expected to be First Nations and Inuit communities, who will be better able to articulate their interests, participate in land and resource development and management (where applicable) as well as demonstrate the importance of treaties and the treaty relationship between the Crown and Aboriginal people. Funds are provided to the beneficiaries in the form of grants as per agreement.

Expected results: Creation and maintenance of ongoing partnerships to support historic and modern treaty structures.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 445.5 486.8 467.7 467.0
Total contributions 194.4 201.1 204.7 209.6
Total Transfer payments 639.9 687.9 672.4 676.6

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit (The People)

Program Activity: Education

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Education

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: This program activity provides First Nations and Inuit communities with tools to achieve educational outcomes comparable to those of other Canadians. INAC has primary responsibility under the Indian Act for the elementary and secondary education of status-Indians living on reserve. As a matter of social policy, INAC also supports on-reserve status-Indians and Inuit students in the pursuit of post-secondary education. Support provided through the Education programs includes provisions for instructional services, special education services as well as targeted initiatives which aim to enhance First Nation education management, improve teacher recruitment and retention, and encourage parental and community engagement. New targeted funds have been recently included to improve the provision of elementary and secondary education services through both a partnership and a student success program.

Expected results: First Nations and Inuit achieve levels of education comparable to other Canadians.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 0.8 1.7 1.7 1.7
Total contributions 1,607.8 1,620.6 1,652.4 1,678.1
Total Transfer payments 1,608.6 1,622.3 1,654.1 1,679.8

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit (The People)

Program Activity: Social Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Social Development

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: Supports the provision of: income assistance to meet basic needs for food, clothing and shelter to ensure the safety and well-being of individuals and families consistent with provincial programs and standards; First Nations child and family services to improve their well-being and security; assisted living for social support services of a non-medical nature such as in-home care, short-term respite care, foster care and institutional care to improve their well-being and security; Family Violence Program to improve safety and security, particularly of women and children at-risk; National Child Benefit Re-investment to support low-income families with children to help prevent or reduce the depth of child poverty; and other social services to build self-reliant, sustainable, healthy and stable First Nation communities.

Expected results: First Nation individuals and families are self-sufficient, secure and safe within supportive sustainable communities.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 9.2 10.0 10.0 10.0
Total contributions 1,610.6 1,548.3 1,586.4 1,631.5
Total Transfer payments 1,619.8 1,558.3 1,596.4 1,641.5

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit (The People)

Program Activity: Managing Individual Affairs

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Managing Individual Affairs

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: The Managing Individual Affairs program activity ensures responsible Federal stewardship of the provisions of the Indian Act that pertain to Estates, Band moneys, registration and Band membership through direct client-services as well as partnerships with First Nations to deliver select services including the administration of Estates and the Indian Registration Program. The Program Activity is also responsible for administering the portions of the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act that pertain to Indian Moneys.

Expected results: Federal stewardships of the legislative, administrative and treaty obligations for which INAC is responsible.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4
Total contributions 9.7 8.8 8.8 8.7
Total Transfer payments 11.1 10.2 10.2 10.1

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit (The People)

Program Activity: Residential Schools Resolution

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Residential Schools Resolution

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: Indian Residential schools were mostly operated by four religious denominations and funded by the federal government, from before Confederation to 1996. The courts in each jurisdiction approved the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, which was implemented on September 19, 2007, with final deliverables up to 2017. The administration of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) seeks to further reconciliation with former student residents of Indian Residential Schools, their families and communities by providing: financial compensation (through validation of their residency and an independent assessment of more serious harms they may have suffered); a disclosure forum; and the provision of healing and commemorative services.

Expected results: Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement is well-managed in order to contribute to a fair resolution of Indian residential Schools.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants        
Total contributions 1.3 10.8 10.3  
Total Transfer payments 1.3 10.8 10.3  

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Full participation of First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities in the economy (The Land and Economy)

Program Activity: Aboriginal Economic Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Aboriginal Economic Development

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: This program activity recognizes the synergies between economic development, lands activities, and business development. It recognizes that the federal government has a role to play in creating the conditions that will foster Aboriginal economic development. As INAC does not hold all the economic levers, it must forge strategic partnerships with other levels of government, the private sector, Aboriginal organizations and other stakeholders to succeed in increasing the participation of Aboriginal Canadians in the economy. The sub-activities (SAs) and sub-sub-activities (SSAs) under this program activity contribute to the expected results: viable Aboriginal businesses and opportunity-ready communities. Strengthening business development capacity tools will encourage Aboriginal Canadians to start and/or expand their own businesses, thereby contributing to viable Aboriginal businesses. Increasing access to and control of Aboriginal lands and natural resources, and building community/institutional capacity, will enable Aboriginal communities to fully utilize their assets for economic development, contributing to opportunity-ready communities. The growing Aboriginal land and resource base will also increase economic opportunities for Aboriginal communities, contributing to an increased number of Aboriginal start-up businesses.

Expected results:

  • Viable Aboriginal businesses.
  • Opportunity ready communities
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 10.0      
Total contributions 180.2 189.5 189.9 189.8
Total Transfer payments 190.2 189.5 189.9 189.8

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Full participation of First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities in the economy (The Land and Economy)

Program Activity: Federal Administration of Reserve Land

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Federal Administration of Reserve Land

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: This program activity encompasses the Crown's statutory and fiduciary obligations as the administrator of reserve lands held in trust for the use and benefit of Indians. Those obligations are fulfilled through the timely response to requests for land transactions and activation of land and resource assets, additions to reserve and, environmental protection performed with due diligence, which preserves the principles of communal use and benefit while meeting the aspirations of First Nations in building safe, healthy and successful communities.

Expected results:

  • Land designated for economic development purposes.
  • Timely administration of reserve land, and resources activities.
  • Contaminated Sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 3.0 4.8 2.0 2.0
Total contributions 108.4 16.0 14.9 14.9
Total Transfer payments 111.4 20.8 16.9 16.9

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Full participation of First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities in the economy (The Land and Economy)

Program Activity: Community Infrastructure

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Community Infrastructure

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: This program activity supports the provision of funding for the acquisition, construction, operation and maintenance of: community facilities such as roads, bridges, water and sewer, and administration offices; education facilities, such as schools and teacherages and on-reserve housing.

Expected results: First Nation communities have a base of infrastructure that protects the health and safety and enables engagement in the economy.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Total contributions 1,230.1 1,173.2 1,001.0 965.6
Total Transfer payments 1,230.3 1,173.3 1,001.2 965.7

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North (The North)

Program Activity: Northern Governance and People

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Northern Governance and People

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: This program activity strengthens the North's communities and people by: devolving to the people of the North province-like responsibilities for land and natural resources; reducing the costs of transporting nutritious perishable foods and other essential items to isolated Northern communities; providing grants to Territorial Governments for hospital and physician services; working with Northern communities to identify the risks and challenges posed by climate change; and advancing interests of Canadians and Northerners through circumpolar forums.

Expected results:  

  • The people of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are responsible for the governance of Northern land and resources.
  • Consumption of nutritious food in eligible communities.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 48.3 49.2 50.2 51.2
Total contributions 12.2 58.3 56.6 56.6
Total Transfer payments 60.5 107.6 106.8 107.8

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North (The North)

Program Activity: Northern Science and Technology

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Northern Science and Technology

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: This program activity supports scientific research and technology in the North. Research and monitoring of long-range contaminants and their impacts on the ecosystem and the traditional/country food chain is carried out through the Northern Contaminants Program. It also supports the work carried out under the International Polar Year initiative including the efforts to facilitate scientific research licensing and approvals as well as the establishment and management of scientific data. The establishment of the Canadian Arctic Research Station will position Canada as an international leader in Arctic science and technology.

Expected results: A simplified framework for research licensing through the development of tools that will facilitate scientific research by, and for, northern regulatory bodies, Aboriginal organizations, northern communities, and future northern science programs and activities.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1
Total contributions 48.2 5.6 4.8 4.8
Total Transfer payments 49.3 6.7 5.9 5.9

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North (The North)

Program Activity: Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: This program activity supports the management, sustainable development and regulatory oversight of the land, water, environment and natural resources of the North. Mineral and petroleum resource development, including offshore projects, are managed and coordinated; environmental management and stewardship is promoted through initiatives like the Protected Areas Strategy, Cumulative Impacts Monitoring Program and the continued development and improvement of the northern regulatory regime; resource management is effected through development of legislation, regulations and related policies as well as collaboration with and support of Northern Boards; contaminated sites are identified and cleaned-up; and northern land and resources are managed for the current and future benefit and prosperity of all Northerners.

Expected results:

  • A more predictable and timely regulatory regime in the North.
  • Environmental assessment processes are effective in identifying potential impacts and mitigation measures.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants        
Total contributions 35.4 23.0 20.6 19.4
Total Transfer payments 35.4 23.0 20.6 19.4

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Socio-economic well-being of Métis, non-status Indians and urban Aboriginal people (Office of the Federal Interlocutor)

Program Activity: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: The Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) responds to the needs of Aboriginal people living in urban centres. This program activity promotes the self-reliance and economic participation of urban Aboriginal people and expands their life choices. Through the UAS, the federal government partners with other governments, community organizations and Aboriginal people to support (financially and through other means) projects that respond to local priorities. The Strategy enhances the federal government's ability to align expenditures, directed toward urban Aboriginal people in key centres, with provincial and municipal programming in a way that both advances federal objectives and responds effectively to local challenges and opportunities.

Expected results:

  • Self-reliant urban Aboriginal people who participate in the economy.
  • Broader and enhanced engagement of Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) partners leading to federal and provincial efforts more effectively responding to urban Aboriginal needs.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants        
Total contributions 9.9 9.9    
Total Transfer payments 9.9 9.9    

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Socio-economic well-being of Métis, non-status Indians and urban Aboriginal people (Office of the Federal Interlocutor)

Program Activity: Métis and Non-status Indian Organizational Capacity Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Métis and Non-status Indian Organizational Capacity Development

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: This program activity is carried out by the Office of the Federal Interlocutor, the Government of Canada's principal point of contact for Métis and non-status Indian (MNSI) organizations, and an advocate within government on their key issues. The main mandate of the Office is to support (financially and through other means) the work of these organizations, and help find practical ways to reduce dependency and improve the self-reliance and social and economic conditions of Métis, non-status Indians and off-reserve Aboriginal people. The Office fulfills this mandate by helping Métis and non-status Indian organizations develop their organizational and professional capacity, so that they can build effective partnerships with federal and provincial governments, and the private sector.

Expected results:

  • MNSI organizations have the organizational capacity to deliver agreed upon projects.
  • MNSI organizations that have the financial capacity to be accountable for public funds.
  • Stable and democratically accountable MNSI organizations that represent their members' interests.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants        
Total contributions 12.1 12.1 12.1 12.1
Total Transfer payments 12.1 12.1 12.1 12.1

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


Strategic Outcome: Socio-economic well-being of Métis, non-status Indians and urban Aboriginal people (The Office of the Federal Interlocutor)

Program Activity: Métis Right Management

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer payments for Métis Right Management

Start date: N/A

End date: ongoing

Description: This program activity is the federal response to the 2003 Supreme Court of Canada's Powley decision. This decision affirmed that Métis people hold section 35 Aboriginal rights under the Canadian Constitution. The program works with non-profit, representative Aboriginal organizations that have substantial Métis memberships to develop objectively verifiable membership systems for Métis members and harvesters in accordance with the Supreme Court's direction.

Expected results: Reconciliation of section 35 Métis Aboriginal rights with the sovereignty of the Crown.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants        
Total contributions 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0
Total Transfer payments 8.0 8.0 8.0 8.0

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.


TOTAL OF TRANSFER PAYMENTS

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total grants   1,297.2 1,049.0 1,026.5
Total contributions   5,419.0 5,136.1 5,018.6
Total Transfer payments   6,716.2 6,185.1 6,045.0

Summary of the 3 Year Plan: INAC's Departmental Plan for Transfer Payment Programs.

 


Top of Page

Industry Canada

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

A summary of Industry Canada’s Three-Year Plan for Transfer Payment Programs is available on the departmental website.


Strategic Outcome:
The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive


Program Activity: Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Online Economy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Telecommunication Union, Switzerland

Start Date: April 1, 2011

End Date: March 31, 2015

Description: Canada is a signatory to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) treaty agreement, which is negotiated every four years at a plenipotentiary conference in accordance with the treaty obligations of the ITU Constitution and Convention. Canada’s membership, contribution and standing in the ITU, and its involvement in related events, allow Industry Canada to achieve results internationally across a broad range of issues affecting radiocommunication, standardization and telecommunications development. Canada’s contribution to the ITU is commensurate with its international standing and commitment to the United Nations and UN specialized agencies.

Expected Results:

  • Secure Canada’s interests in the international regulation of the radio frequency spectrum and of telecommunications to protect Canadian access to spectrum and satellite orbit resources; to facilitate communications across Canada; to monitor and protect Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic and other remote areas through modern digital technologies; and to deal with scientific, environmental, weather-related, transportation, public safety, national and defence matters.
  • Provide leadership and focus in promoting the competitiveness of the Canadian telecommunications industry by working closely with Canadian stakeholders to obtain, among other things, spectrum allocations at global ITU conferences and to develop global standards that advance their product lines, technologies, services, and research and development activities.
  • Work with other countries to harmonize policy and regulatory frameworks, to promote interconnection and interoperability of global telecommunications networks and services, and to facilitate access to key markets for Canadian manufacturers and service providers.
  • Develop effective consultation and information dissemination processes in conjunction with Canada’s key trading partners.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Grants 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.8
Total Transfer Payments 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.8

Strategic Outcome:
Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy


Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Transfer Payment Program: CANARIE

Start Date: April 1, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: CANARIE (Canada’s Advanced Research and Innovation Network), now in the fifth year of its five-year mandate, operates and develops the backbone of Canada’s advanced, high-speed research network; and facilitates and supports publicly funded research and innovation. In partnership with provincial advanced research networks, the CANARIE network connects Canadian research facilities, universities, educational institutions, hospitals and other science facilities as well as links them to their international peers. It is an essential tool for researchers, innovators and educators.

Expected Results:

  • Continue to evolve applications and platforms supporting a 21st-century cyber infrastructure for Canada, which involves connecting data, computers and people to support advanced, internationally competitive and groundbreaking research.
  • Continue to operate and upgrade the network as well as expand its menu of network services, including IPv6, peering and shared access to research data across Canada.
  • Implement, in support of the federal government’s Digital Economy Strategy, an innovation test-bed pilot addressing a segment of Canada’s information and communication technologies (ICT) industry.
  • If the pilot is successful, propose to extend the network across Canada’s ICT system as part of the renewal of CANARIE’s mandate in 2012.
  • Continue to upgrade the network through the Infrastructure Extension Program (IEP) and to promote the innovative research platforms developed through the Network-Enabled Platform (NEP) Program, both of which support the development of middleware tools and related platform technologies that will enable virtual organizations and other research communities to easily access and benefit from the CANARIE network.

Results are reported back to Industry Canada on an annual basis.

($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Statutory Payments 25.0
Total Transfer Payments 25.0

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Institute for Quantum Computing

Start Date: April 2, 2009

End Date: March 31, 2014

Description: The Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) is a research institute based at the University of Waterloo and located at the main campus in Waterloo, Ontario. IQC’s mission is to be the world leader in the development of quantum technologies, and its objective is to create an environment for physicists, mathematicians, engineers and computer scientists to advance the fields of quantum information and quantum computation.

Expected Results:

  • Increase knowledge in quantum computing.
  • Create new opportunities for students to learn and to apply new knowledge.
  • Brand Canada as a place to conduct research in quantum technologies.
  • Position Canada to take advantage of the economic and social benefits of research.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12*
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Grants 17.0 5.0 5.5 6.0
Total Transfer Payments 17.0 5.0 5.5 6.0

* The decrease in federal funding in 2011–12 is due to the completion of construction of the new IQC building in 2010–11.


Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Start Date: April 1, 2002

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) is a not-for-profit corporation that supports networks of Canadian and international researchers who conduct long-term research on scientific, social and economic issues. Working in association with Canadian and international institutions, CIFAR provides opportunities for eminent scholars to add to Canada’s research base. At present, CIFAR supports 12 research programs and 350 researchers in a range of areas, including cosmology and gravity, experience-based brain and biological development, and nanoelectronics.

Expected Results:

  • Attract and retain highly qualified researchers.
  • Encourage greater private sector and provincial government investment in basic research and development activities in Canada.
  • Build interdisciplinary research strengths in areas benefiting Canada’s long-term scientific, economic and social development.
  • Encourage closer links between the research activities of Canadian researchers and international researchers.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Grants 5.0 5.0
Total Transfer Payments 5.0 5.0

Program Activity: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

Start Date: March 30, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Perimeter Institute (PI) for Theoretical Physics is an independent, non-profit, resident-based research institute devoted to foundational issues in theoretical physics at the highest levels of international excellence. PI pursues scientific research and engages in educational outreach activities, bringing together international scientists to push the limits of understanding of physical laws and develop new ideas about the very essence of space, time, matter and information. PI provides a multi-disciplinary environment to foster research in cosmology, particle physics, quantum foundations, quantum gravity, quantum information, superstring theory and related areas.

Expected Results:

  • Broaden PI’s research to combine insights from the full spectrum of physics.
  • Become the primary research home of a critical mass of the world’s leading theoretical physicists and secondary research home for many of the world’s outstanding theorists.
  • Generate through-flow of the most promising talent.
  • Increase PI’s position as Canada’s focal point for foundational physics research.
  • Host timely, focused conferences, workshops and seminars.
  • Engage in high-impact outreach.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14

Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
(Statutory Payments)

10.0 1.0
Total Transfer Payments 10.0 1.0

Program Activity: Research and Development Financing

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Automotive Innovation Fund

Start Date: May 9, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: The Automotive Innovation Fund supports strategic, large-scale research and development (R&D) projects to develop innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles.

Expected Result:

  • Enhanced capacity for automotive R&D, positioning Canada’s automotive industry to meet the demands for cars of the future.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 15.3 92.5 110.3
Total Transfer Payments 15.3 92.5 110.3

Program Activity: Research and Development Financing

Name of Transfer Payment Program: CSeries Program

Start Date: September 2008

End Date: October 2015

Description: In July 2008, the Government of Canada announced its intention to contribute $350 million to Bombardier Aerospace for research and development (R&D) of aircraft technologies related to its CSeries, a new family of 110- to 130-seat commercial aircraft. The R&D projects will support the Canadian aerospace industry’s goal of developing new technologies for the next generation of more fuel-efficient and safer commercial aircraft. The contribution is being provided by Industry Canada and is conditionally repayable.

Expected Result:

  • Enhanced capacity for R&D and the commercialization of new technologies in the Canadian aerospace industry.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 89.4 70.4 66.6 47.1
Total Transfer Payments 89.4 70.4 66.6 47.1

Program Activity: Research and Development Financing

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Industrial Technologies Office — Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative

Start Date: April 2, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012*

Description: The Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) encourages the development of innovative products and services; enhances the competitiveness of Canadian aerospace and defence (A&D) firms; and fosters collaboration among research institutes, universities, colleges and the private sector. SADI is a component of the government’s science and technology strategy, which aims to leverage greater private sector research and development (R&D) investment in Canada. SADI acts as a catalyst for new A&D investments by providing repayable contributions to Canadian A&D companies for strategic industrial research and pre-competitive development. SADI accepts applications on an ongoing basis, and projects are selected following a rigorous review of financial, technical and market criteria. The initiative is financed through funds previously allocated to Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) and repayments received from TPC and SADI projects.

Expected Results:

  • Increased R&D investment in innovative and competitive aerospace, defence, space and security firms.
  • New and ongoing collaborative R&D partnerships among aerospace, defence, space and security industries and research institutes, universities, colleges, and the private sector.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 177.0 220.0 243.8 240.7
Total Transfer Payments 177.0 220.0 243.8 240.7

*SADI is an ongoing program; its terms and conditions must be renewed on or before March 31, 2012.


Program Activity: Research and Development Financing

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Industrial Technologies Office — Technology Partnerships Canada

Start Date: March 11, 1996

End Date: December 31, 2006

Description: The Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) program provided repayable contributions to Canadian businesses to support industrial research and pre-competitive development in the aerospace and defence, environmental and life sciences, information and communication technologies, and advanced manufacturing sectors. The program helped leverage private sector investment in research and development (R&D) and produced a wide range of economic, social and environmental benefits for Canadians. TPC ended on December 31, 2006. Although it no longer takes applications, TPC continues to manage a $3.5-billion portfolio of existing contracted projects. Repayments on these projects are expected until 2035.

Expected Results:

  • Government investment in R&D activities in the aerospace, defence, environmental and enabling technology industries generates other incremental investment from Canadian businesses.
  • New and innovative products, services and processes are commercialized by Canadian businesses.
($ millions)
  Forecast Spending
2010–11
Planned Spending
2011–12
Planned Spending
2012–13
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Contributions 49.9 30.8 23.7 18.5
Total Transfer Payments 49.9 30.8 23.7 18.5

Strategic Outcome:
Canadian businesses and communities are competitive


Program Activity: Small Business Research, Advocacy and Services

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Small Business Financing Program

Start Date: 1961

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) helps Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) access financing that would not otherwise be available or would be available only under less favourable terms. It is a loan loss-sharing program involving partnerships with financial institutions. To be eligible, SMEs must be for-profit businesses with revenues under $5 million per year. Under the program, financial institutions can make term loans on real property, leasehold improvements and equipment. In the event that a registered loan defaults, the government pays 85 percent of net eligible losses. CSBFP is a national program that operates in all provinces and territories.

Expected Results:

  • Facilitate access to approximately $1 billion in debt financing.
  • Increase awareness of CSBFP among lenders, SMEs and intermediaries.
  • Continue communicating with financial institutions to improve program delivery.
($ millions)