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ARCHIVED - 2011-2012 RPPs - Horizontal Initiatives

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Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan
AgriFlexibility
AgriInsurance
AgriInvest
AgriStability
Canada’s Rural Partnership
Co-operative Development Initiative
Growing Forward Program Initiatives Development


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan Element of Growing Forward

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $94.9 million over five years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

This initiative targets four specific regulatory issues that were identified by stakeholders, namely: 1) health claims, novel foods and ingredients; 2) food fortification; 3) minor use pesticides and pesticide risk reduction; and 4) veterinary drugs. The Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan supports the general principles of the Government of Canada's Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation. The Plan addresses the development of regulatory frameworks based on the accumulation of sound science, as well as advancing the transparency, timeliness, responsiveness, efficiency, public interest, and government collaboration to minimize regulatory burden for stakeholders.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

Shared outcome:

Addressing key regulatory obstacles to promoting a competitive and innovative sector, while protecting and advancing the public interest.

Governance structure:

Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between AAFC and Health Canada set out the roles and responsibilities for the management of this initiative. The Deputy Ministers of the two departments oversee the governance process that includes the following levels of management in accordance with the MOUs:

  • An Assistant Deputy Ministers’ (ADM) Committee oversees the management of the MOUs and reports back to the Deputy Ministers.
  • Joint Management Committees (JMCs), composed of directors general or equivalent level representatives, have been established to manage the implementation of the MOUs and report semi-annually to the ADM Committee.

Planning Highlights:

Work under the Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan aims to improve and modernize key aspects of the regulatory system in each of the four priority areas (see Section 7 above), while reducing the regulatory burden to promote innovation and improve competitiveness within the agriculture and agri-food sector.

AAFC is committed to helping industry best understand and follow regulatory processes and requirements, including responding to the scientific data requirements of submissions to Health Canada. Concerning minor-use pesticides and pesticide risk reduction, AAFC’s plans involve identifying and prioritizing pest management needs, conducting literature searches and generating data, undertaking regulatory and outreach activities, compiling data, drafting reports, and assembling regulatory submissions. With regard to health claims, novel foods and ingredients, AAFC’s plans include working with industry and research and regulatory communities to facilitate information collection, analysis and exchange, as well as undertaking and coordinating collaborative scientific research.

Health Canada’s activities are focussed on streamlining regulatory processes and improving submission review times, and developing policy and regulatory frameworks that better address priorities of the sector while maintaining health and safety standards. Health Canada will continue to review regulatory submissions for minor-use pesticides in a dedicated manner. In the veterinary drugs area, the Department's work will involve undertaking regulatory harmonization initiatives with international agencies, improving regulatory processes for generic and new drugs, and developing policy and a pilot program for Minor Uses and Minor Species to facilitate the regulatory process and increase the availability of veterinary drugs for food-producing animals, such as sheep and goats. With respect to health claims, novel foods, ingredients, and food fortification, Health Canada’s plans include developing and implementing targeted policies, regulations and pre-market processes.

AAFC and Health Canada have established interdepartmental working groups for the initiatives in which they are partnering. These groups develop business cases, work plans, performance objectives and targets, and budget and expenditure reports. They report to their respective JMCs.

Federal Partner: AAFC

($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending
for 2011–12
Due to rounding figures may not add up to the totals shown.
Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction 36.2 9.0
Health Claims, Novel Foods and Ingredients 16.1 3.6
Total 52.4 12.6

Expected Results by program:

Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction

  • A national list of grower-selected pest management priority projects
  • Data for regulatory submissions for new minor uses
  • Improved pesticide resistance management; and improved crop protection practices
  • Increased availability of newer, reduced-risk pesticides, tools, technologies, and practices
  • Prevention of trade barriers with countries where these products are already available
  • An improved Canadian competitive position in international markets

Health Claims, Novel Foods and Ingredients

  • Regulatory-issue/impact documents and literature reviews
  • Domestic and international science networks
  • Data and evidence to address priority knowledge gaps
  • Targeted sector guidance and communication
  • Complete and substantiated sector regulatory submissions
  • An enhanced sector ability to navigate the regulatory system through an improved understanding of regulatory processes/requirements
Federal Partner: Health Canada

($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending
for 2011–12
Due to rounding figures may not add up to the totals shown.
Pesticide Regulation Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction 16.0 4.0
Health Products Veterinary Drugs  5.0 1.2
Food and Nutrition Health Claims, Novel Foods and Ingredients 17.4 3.5
Food Fortification  4.3 1.1
Total 42.6 9.8

Expected Results by program:

Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction

  • New minor uses of pesticides available to growers through a dedicated minor use review process by Pest Management Review Agency

Veterinary Drugs

  • Information and guidance for industry
  • Enhanced policies, guidelines and regulatory frameworks, a strategy for streamlining generic drug approvals, and increased scientific capacity for reviewing veterinary drug submissions
  • Closer harmonization of technical requirements for veterinary drug approvals with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine
  • Increased availability of generic and Minor Use Minor Species veterinary drugs for food-producing animals in the Canadian marketplace

Health Claims, Novel Foods and Ingredients

  • Policies, regulations and pre-market processes, manuals, consultations, and work-sharing agreements
  • Enhanced policy/regulatory/process engagement with industry, consumers and international partners
  • Modernized and efficient policy and regulatory approaches and pre-market processes
  • Innovative, safe food products and claims, focussing on health benefits

Food Fortification

  • A system of pre-market approval of industry submissions for foods fortified with vitamin and mineral nutrients on a discretionary basis, consisting of dedicated staff to manage the review and assessment of the safety of fortified foods, implement the authorization (which may include the issuance of Temporary Marketing Authorization Letters), and enhance the knowledge base supporting the development of approaches to manage fortified foods

($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners
(from Start to End Date)
Total Planned Spending for All Federal
Partners for 2011–12
94.9 22.4

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners:

Not applicable

Contact information:

Lynn Stewart, Director
Food Regulatory Issues Division
Food Value Chain Bureau
Market and Industry Services Branch
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Floor 2, Room 242, Tower 5
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-0153

Note:

AAFC’s Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved TB Submissions and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2011-12. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Flexibility Fund

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity:

The Agricultural Flexibility Fund (AgriFlexibility) contributes to several program activities within AAFC: Environmental Knowledge, Technology, Information and Measurement; On-Farm Action; Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems; Trade and Market Development; Science, Innovation and Adoption; and Agri-Business Development.

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 21, 2009

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2014

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $410.7 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Agricultural Flexibility Fund is a five-year fund that helps implement new initiatives, both federally and in partnership with provinces, territories and industry. AgriFlexibility will improve the sector's competitiveness and assist the sector adapt to pressures through non-business risk-management measures to take advantage of existing and emerging opportunities to address market pressures. Initiatives are consistent with Canada's international trade interests and obligations, complement measures being implemented under the Growing Forward policy framework, and contribute to a competitive and sustainably profitable Canadian agricultural and agri-food sector.

Three federal-only initiatives under AgriFlexibility have been announced and are at various stages of design and implementation. They are: Livestock Auction Traceability Initiative; AgriProcessing Initiative (API); and Canada Brand Advocacy Initiative.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

Shared outcomes:

  • Producers/partners/industry implement actions to improve their environmental practices.
  • Producers/partners/industry implement actions to reduce their costs of production.
  • Food safety, biosecurity, traceability, and risk management measures are improved.
  • Agri-processors upgrade their capacity.

Governance structure:

Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) questions related to AgriFlexibility are discussed at the FPT Policy ADM Committee. The following is a description of the internal governance.

The Director General AgriFlexibility (DGAF) Committee comprises Directors General from across the Department and is chaired by the Director General of Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate, Farm Financial Programs Branch. This Committee reviews proposals and makes a recommendation to one of the Corporate Management Boards: the Policy, Programs and Results Board (PPRB) or Horizontal Management Board (HMB).

PPRB or HMB reviews all proposals, prioritizes funding and ensures a consistent policy approach. The Board agrees on a recommendation, including funding, provided to the Deputy Minister. It also reviews the financial status of the fund as well as status reports.

In the case of API, proposals are reviewed by DGAF which then makes funding recommendations. PPRB or HMB is advised of funding recommendations, and proposals being recommended for funding are then submitted by the Deputy Minister to the Minister for approval.

Final approval of proposals is granted by the Minister, based on a recommendation from the Deputy Minister.

Planning Highlights:

In 2011-12, AAFC plans to complete the implementation of AgriFlexibility. In particular, AAFC is planning to launch an interprovincial meat hygiene pilot project initiative. The objective of the initiative is to assess the challenges that prevent small- and medium-sized slaughter and meat processing establishments in Canada from meeting the federal requirements and participating in interprovincial trade. These pilots will also provide the necessary information to develop the tools to help these plants meet food safety requirements for interprovincial trade.

Federal Partner: AAFC

($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending
for 2011–12
Various program activities Agricultural Flexibility Fund 410.7 166.7
Total 410.7 166.7

For more information, visit: www.agr.gc.ca/agriflexibility

Expected Results by program:

  • Producers/partners/industry implement actions to improve their environmental practices.
  • Producers/partners/industry implement actions to reduce their costs of production.
  • Food safety, biosecurity, traceability, and risk management measures are improved.
  • Agri-processors upgrade their capacity. The indicator for this result is the number of agri-processors that upgrade their capacity, and the target for 2011-12 is 11.

($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners
(from Start to End Date)
Total Planned Spending for All Federal
Partners for 2011–12
410.7 166.7

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners:

Expected results are the same as those of federal partners.

Contact information:

Lynn McGuire, Director
Adaptation Division
Farm Financial Programs Branch
Floor 8, Room 242, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-1905

Note:

Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved TB Submissions and does not include any amounts that could be brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2011-12. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInsurance

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriInsurance is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, actual spending may vary. Total federal funding allocation is $1,749.7 million over four fiscal years (2008-09 to 2011-12).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriInsurance (formerly known as Production and Crop Insurance) aims to reduce the financial impact on producers of production losses caused by uncontrollable natural perils.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal/Provincial AgriInsurance Agreement.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriInsurance
AgriInsurance in British Columbia
AgriInsurance in Alberta
AgriInsurance in Saskatchewan
AgriInsurance in Manitoba
AgriInsurance in Ontario
AgriInsurance in Quebec
AgriInsurance in New Brunswick
AgriInsurance in Nova Scotia
AgriInsurance in Prince Edward Island
AgriInsurance in Newfoundland

Shared outcome:

To mitigate the financial impacts of production losses by providing effective insurance protection.

Governance structure:

AgriInsurance is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM Program Activity.

AgriInsurance is a provincial-territorial program to which the federal government contributes financially under the Federal/Provincial AgriInsurance Agreement. The program is administered provincially in all provinces. The federal and provincial governments cost-share a portion of the premium costs together with program participants. Governments also fully cost-share the administrative costs of the program (60:40 federal-provincial-territorial).

Governance structure includes various national standards outlined in Canada Production Insurance Regulations. Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Planning Highlights:

The federal government will continue to work to ensure producers have access to affordable and comprehensive insurance coverage. The federal government will also continue working with the provinces and delivery agencies to develop new insurance options for agricultural products, including livestock and horticultural crops.

In partnership with the provinces and territories, AAFC has put in place a set of performance indicators and targets for the suite of BRM programs. Officials will use these performance indicators and targets to closely monitor and report on the performance of the BRM programs and ensure they are meeting their objectives.

FPT governments are looking at the entire suite of BRM programs to assess how they are performing and determine program and policy implications as governments move towards the next generation of Growing Forward policies and programs.

Federal, provincial, territorial Ministers are meeting on a regular basis to evaluate and discuss the challenges that the agriculture sector is facing.

Federal Partner: AAFC

($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to
End Date)
Planned Spending
for 2011–12
Business Risk Management AgriInsurance 1,749.7
over four years
(2008-09 -
2011-12)
456.1
Total 1,749.7 456.1

Expected Results by program:

The financial impacts of production losses are mitigated by providing effective insurance protection.

Performance Indicators and Targets:

  • Value of insured production compared to the total value of all agricultural products eligible for insurance reported as follows: Percentage of Crops - Target 60%.
  • Value of crops eligible for insurance compared to the value of all agricultural products reported as follows: Percentage of Crops - Target 85%.

The Expected Results, Performance Indicators and Targets listed above are based on those provided for AAFC's 2011-12 Performance Measurement Framework.


($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners
(from Start to End Date)
Total Planned Spending for All
Federal Partners for 2011–12
1,749.7 456.1

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners:

Planning and development activities are done jointly with the provinces. Therefore, the expected results are the same, but the achieved results will vary by province.

Contact information:

Danny Foster, Director General
BRM Program Development
Floor 3, Room 241, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100

Note:

Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved TB Submissions and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2011-12. Planned spending amounts include the federal cost-share of each province’s direct administration costs of their respective programming. This program is statutory and demand-driven; therefore actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability and AgriInvest. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInvest

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriInvest is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, actual spending may vary. Total federal funding allocation is $866.6 million over five fiscal years (2007-08 to 2011-12).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriInvest allows producers to self-manage, through producer-government savings accounts, the first 15% of their margin losses for a production year and/or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues. Under the program, annual producer deposits of up to 1.5% of their allowable net sales are matched by government deposits. Government deposits are cost-shared 60:40 by federal and provincial/territorial governments. In combination with the AgriStability program, AgriInvest is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

AgriInvest provides producers with a secure, accessible, predictable, and bankable source of income assistance to address small drops in farm income and manage on-farm risks.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal/Provincial/Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada’s outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriInvest
AgriInvest in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)

Shared outcomes:

To provide producers with flexibility in how they choose to manage and mitigate small income losses through the availability of timely and predictable funds

Governance structure:

The AgriInvest program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM Program Activity. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are shared by the federal government, the provinces and the Yukon Territory on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

For the 2008 program year, the AgriInvest program was delivered by the federal government in all provinces except Quebec. Producer deposits and matching contributions were made to the accounts held by federal government. Starting with the 2009 program year, producers opened and made their deposits into AgriInvest accounts at an approved financial institution of their choice. Any balance in their AgriInvest account held by the federal government was transferred to the Financial Institution account. In Quebec, the AgriInvest program is, and will continue to be delivered provincially by La Financière agricole du Québec.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Planning Highlights:

The federal government, including program administrators, will continue to work to ensure AgriInvest provides producers with flexible assistance which may be used to address small income farm losses or for investments to either mitigate income losses or reduce farm risks. It will also ensure that all information needed by participants is available and easily understandable, and that matching government contributions are made in a timely fashion.

The Department will continue to work closely with financial institutions to ensure the smooth delivery of the program. The transfer of AgriInvest accounts to financial institutions increases participants’ access to their accounts through the services offered by the financial institutions. La Financière agricole administers the AgriInvest program in Quebec and will continue to hold AgriInvest accounts for producers in that province.

In partnership with the provinces and territories, AAFC has put in place a set of performance indicators and targets for the suite of BRM programs. Officials will use these performance indicators and targets to closely monitor and report on the performance of the BRM programs and ensure they are meeting their objectives.

FPT governments are looking at the entire suite of BRM programs to assess how they are performing and determine program and policy implications as governments move towards the next generation of Growing Forward policies and programs.

Federal, provincial, territorial Ministers are meeting on a regular basis to evaluate and discuss the challenges that the agriculture sector is facing.

Federal Partner: AAFC

($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to
End Date)
Planned Spending
for 2011–12
Business Risk Management AgriInvest 866.6 168.2
Total 866.6 168.2

Expected Results by program:

Producers have the flexibility in managing small financial risks.

Performance Indicators and Targets:

  • Percentage of AgriInvest producers receiving AgriStability payments and making withdrawals from their AgriInvest saving accounts. Target is at least 60% of AgriInvest producers.
  • Percentage of producers indicating that they use their funds to address income declines or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues. Target is at least 75%.

The Expected Results, Performance Indicators and Targets listed above are based on those provided for AAFC’s 2011-12 Performance Measurement Framework.


($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners
(from Start to End Date)
Total Planned Spending for All
Federal Partners for 2011–12
866.6 168.2

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners:

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

Contact information:

Danny Foster, Director General
BRM Program Development
Floor 3, Room 241, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100


Note:

Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved TB Submissions and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2011-12. This program is statutory and demand-driven; therefore actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability and AgriInsurance. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs. Total allocation does not include funding for the one-time federal-only 2007 AgriInvest Kickstart program.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriStability

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriStability is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, actual spending may vary. Total federal funding allocation is $3,224.0 million over five fiscal years (2007-08 to 2011-12).

For the period of 2007-08, funding in the amount of $649.0 million pertains to the Canadian Agriculture Income Stabilization (CAIS) program, which preceded AgriStability.

Included in this total allocation is $12.9 million ($2.5 million for 2009-10 and $10.4 million for 2010-11) for the transfer of delivery from the federal administration of the program to British Columbia and Saskatchewan.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriStability is a margin-based program that provides support when producers experience large farm income losses, which result in drops in their margins (eligible farm income less eligible farm expenses) for a program year of more than 15% relative to their average margins from previous years (i.e., their reference margins). Thus, a payment is triggered under the program when producers’ program year margins drop below 85% of their reference margins. AgriStability also includes coverage for negative margins, as well as mechanisms to advance to participants a portion of their expected payments during the year when significant declines in incomes are expected (interim payments and Targeted Advance Payments). In combination with the AgriInvest program, it is the successor to the CAIS program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal/Provincial/Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.

The program links to the strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriStability
AgriStability in British Columbia
AgriStability in Alberta (Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (AFSC))
AgriStability in Saskatchewan
AgriStability in Ontario (Agricorp)
AgriStability in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)
AgriStability in Prince Edward Island (PEI Agricultural Insurance Corporation)

Shared outcome:

To mitigate the short-term impacts of large income losses

Governance structure:

The AgriStability program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FPT) Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM Program Activity. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are shared by the federal government and the provinces/territory on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

In British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Quebec, and Prince Edward Island, the AgriStability program is delivered provincially. The AgriStability program is administered by the federal government for Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Yukon Territory.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Planning Highlights:

Federal and provincial governments, including program administrators, will continue to work to ensure the AgriStability program is effectively stabilizing the incomes of producers, that all information needed by participants is available and understandable, and that applications and payments are processed in a timely fashion.

In partnership with the provinces and territories, AAFC has put in place a set of performance indicators and targets for the suite of BRM programs. Officials will use these performance indicators and targets to closely monitor and report on the performance of the BRM programs and ensure they are meeting their objectives.

FPT governments are looking at the entire suite of BRM programs to assess how they are performing and determine program and policy implications as governments move towards the next generation of policies and programs following Growing Forward.

Federal, provincial, territorial Ministers are meeting on a regular basis to evaluate and discuss the challenges that the agricultural sector is facing.

Federal Partner: AAFC

($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to
End Date)
Planned Spending
for 2011–12
Business Risk Management AgriStability 3,224.0 for the fiscal
years 2007-08 to 2011-12
643.6
Total 3,224.0 643.6

Note:

Total Allocation: Of this amount, $649.0 million pertains to the period of 2007-08 for CAIS which preceded AgriStability and $12.9 million is for costs related to the transfer of delivery to British Columbia and Saskatchewan.

Expected Results by program:

Short-term impacts of large income losses are mitigated.

Indicators and Targets:

  • Participants' farm market revenues compared to total farm market revenues for the industry. Target is 75% of total farm market revenues that are covered by the program.
  • Participants' production margin with payments compared to reference margin. Target is that program payments bring producers' margins up to 65% of reference margin on average.

The Expected Result, Performance Indicators and Targets listed above are based on those provided for AAFC's 2011-12 Performance Measurement Framework.

($ million)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners
(from Start to End Date)
Total Planned Spending for All
Federal Partners for 2011–12
3,224.0 643.6

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners:

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

Contact information:

Danny Foster, Director General
BRM Program Development
Floor 3, Room 241, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100

Note:

Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved TB Submissions and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2011-12. This program is statutory and demand-driven; therefore actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriInvest and AgriInsurance. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada’s Rural Partnership

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Rural and Co-operatives Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Start date under the Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2008
(Original start date under Agricultural Policy Framework: April 1, 2003).

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$52.1 million over five years (including in-year transfers)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Canada’s Rural Partnership (CRP) leads an integrated, government-wide approach through which the government aims to co-ordinate its economic, social, environmental, and cultural policies towards the goal of economic and social development and renewal of rural Canada.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of an innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector and the Government of Canada’s outcome of An Innovative and Knowledge-Based Economy.

Shared outcomes:

  • Collaboration between rural communities and stakeholders to address barriers and challenges to local development
  • Information and tools used by rural communities and regions to develop local amenities and other assets
  • New economic activities in rural Canada

Governance structure:

The CRP is managed by the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat. It contributes to raising awareness and inclusion of rural Canada in federal policies and programs, as well as engaging government and non-government partners to stimulate economic development in rural Canada. The mechanisms for achieving this include:

  • the Rural Development Network, a policy-maker forum involving 30 federal departments and agencies;
  • the National Rural Research Network, which brings together research partners from both academia and government to focus on enhancing knowledge about rural issues to better inform policy making;
  • the Community Information Database, a free web-based resource that provides comprehensive and reliable information on economic, social and demographic factors at the community level, to support decision-making and action; and
  • the Community Development Program, which offers funding to assist rural and northern regions to obtain information and access or develop the expertise, tools and processes needed to respond to challenges and opportunities and to become more competitive and generate economic activities.

In each province and territory, these efforts are reinforced by Rural Teams, comprised of the federal government representatives and, in most cases, members from the provincial or territorial government and of sectoral stakeholders.

Planning Highlights:

Through its networks, teams and programming, CRP will stimulate collaborative approaches with all levels of government and non-government organizations to assist rural communities to: enhance the competitiveness of rural regions; foster the transformation of local ideas and untapped assets into sustainable economic activities; and help develop new economic opportunities from existing natural and cultural amenities.

Federal Partner: AAFC - Rural and Co-operatives Development

($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to
End Date)
Planned Spending
for 2011–12
AAFC – Rural and Co-operatives Development Canada’s Rural Partnership 52.1 10.3
Total 52.1 10.3

Expected Results by program:

Rural communities and regions are using information, tools and processes to develop local natural and cultural amenities and other assets.

Contributing activities by AAFC:

  • developing and transferring/mobilizing knowledge to support and facilitate innovative rural development; and
  • funding knowledge building proposals.

Indicator: Number of communities that are using new and updated or adapted information and tools to innovate and diversify their economies. Target for 2011-12: 160

($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners
(from Start to End Date)
Total Planned Spending for All
Federal Partners for 2011–12
52.1 10.3

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners:

Not applicable

Contact information:

Christine Burton, A/Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
Floor 2, Room 125, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2955

Note:

AAFC’s Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved TB Submissions and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2011-12. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Co-operative Development Initiative

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Rural and Co-operatives Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Start date under the Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2008
(Original start date under Agricultural Policy Framework: April 1, 2003)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$23.2 million over five years (including in-year transfers)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Co-operatives Secretariat provides advice on policies and programs affecting co-operatives and builds partnerships within the federal government and with industry, provinces and other key stakeholders to support the development of co-operatives. The Secretariat manages a grants and contributions program, the Co-operative Development Initiative, which includes:

  • providing advisory services and funding innovative co-operative projects, delivered by the co-operative sector; and
  • funding research to build knowledge contributing to co-operative development.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of an innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector and the Government of Canada’s outcome of An Innovative and Knowledge-Based Economy.

Shared outcomes:

  • Access to services across the country creates an enabling environment for co-operative development and growth
  • More and stronger co-operatives respond to public policy challenges
  • Canadians are better able to utilize the co-operative model to meet their economic and social needs

Governance structure:

The Co-operatives Secretariat, now an integral part of the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat, was created as a focal point between Canadian co-operatives and federal departments and agencies. It has instituted mechanisms to raise awareness and inclusion of co-operatives in federal policies and programs. These include dialogue and collaboration with key federal departments as well as with provincial counterparts and the sector.

Planning Highlights:

The Co-operatives Secretariat will continue to manage a partnership agreement with two national co-operative associations for the delivery of the Co-operative Development Initiative with the objective of enhancing the contribution of co-operatives to meeting the economic and social needs of Canadians.

Federal Partner: AAFC - Rural and Co-operatives Development

($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending
for 2011–12
AAFC - Rural and Co-operatives Development Co-operative Development Initiative 23.2 4.7
Total 23.2 4.7

Expected Results by program:

More and stronger co-operatives respond to public policy challenges.

Contributing activities by AAFC:

  • strengthening partnership with the co-operative sector associations; and
  • providing funding for the provision of advisory services and for projects that respond to public policy priorities; and
  • funding knowledge building proposals

Indicator: Number of co-operatives created or strengthened

Targets:
Number of new co-operatives: 40
Number of co-operatives strengthened: 8


($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners
(from Start to End Date)
Total Planned Spending for All
Federal Partners for 2011–12
23.2 4.7

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners:

AAFC partners with co-operative sector organizations that act as delivery agents. The above-noted expected results and measures are to be achieved by these organizations.

Contact information:

Christine Burton, A/Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
Floor 2, Room 125, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2955

Note:

AAFC’s Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved TB Submissions and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2011-12. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Growing Forward Program Initiatives Development

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2009

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$20.8 million over four years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between AAFC and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) sets out the general terms, roles and responsibilities for the management and funding of the various components of the Canadian Integrated Food Safety Initiative (CIFSI), funded under AAFC’s Growing Forward framework agreement, in respect of the Growing Forward Program Initiatives Development. The following initiatives are delivered by CFIA, in collaboration with AAFC:

  1. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support element under the National Food Safety Systems component of the Canadian Integrated Food Safety Initiative: The CFIA-led System Recognition element will provide government recognition of on-farm and post-farm food safety systems developed by national (or equivalent) industry organizations. CFIA will continue to develop and deliver food safety system recognition programs. Under the Scientific and Technical Support element, CFIA will continue to provide scientific and technical advice to support food safety system development based on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP).

  2. National Biosecurity Standards Development:
    The National Biosecurity Standards Development will allow CFIA to focus on developing nationally consistent plant and animal biosecurity standards. These standards will be developed with industry, commodity organizations and provinces. Once the biosecurity standards are approved by CFIA, they will become the national biosecurity standard for that particular commodity.

  3. Traceability Information Sharing Solution element under the Developing National Traceability Systems component of the CIFSI (This element has been completed but is described here since it is part of the total allocation of $20.8 million):
    The Traceability Information Sharing Solution explored potential solutions for accessing and querying traceability information between industry and government partners in a planned, measured and constructive way. The allocation of funding was used to develop materials necessary to define and document the high level requirements and initial project planning for the national Traceability Information Sharing Solution, which may lead to preliminary project approval (PPA). This initiative was managed through joint leadership between CFIA and AAFC and coordinated through the Traceability Management Office.

  4. Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure element under the Developing National Traceability Systems component of the CIFSI:
    The Traceability Management Office will be established to collaboratively undertake the work relating to the overall government legislative and regulatory infrastructure necessary to put traceability authorities, agreements and protocols in place. The allocation of funding to CFIA will be used to develop the legislative and regulatory infrastructure for the initiative.

    The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risks and the Government of Canada’s outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

Shared outcomes:

These initiatives contribute to the following strategic outcomes of AAFC:

  • a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

These initiatives contribute to the following strategic outcomes of CFIA:

  • a safe and sustainable plant and animal resource base; and
  • public health risks associated with the food supply and transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized and managed.

Governance structure:

The overall administration of the MOU is delegated to:

  1. For AAFC:
    • Director General – Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
    • Director General – Policy Development and Analysis Directorate
    • Director General – Food Value Chain Bureau
  2. For CFIA:
    • Executive Director – Food Safety and Consumer Protection Directorate
    • Executive Director – Animal Health Directorate, Programs
    • Executive Director – Plant Health and Biosecurity
    • Chief Information Officer – CFIA
    • Executive Director – Domestic Policy Directorate

Planning Highlights:

Government-recognized and science-based food safety, biosecurity and traceability standards, practices and systems developed and implemented at the farm and agri-business levels will help to prevent the spread of animal and plant diseases. This will reduce costs associated with responses to disease outbreaks, help continue and enhance market access, and allow the sector to better respond to increasing demands for assurances of food safety. In turn, this will strengthen domestic and international consumers' confidence in Canada as a source for safe products.

Key targets or expected results include:

  • Government program for the review of national on-farm food safety programs completely operational;
  • Government program for the review of national post-farm food safety programs developed and operational;
  • Development of National Biosecurity Standards for priority commodity groups; and
  • Development of the Traceability Management Office’s legislative and regulatory Infrastructure.
Federal Partner: AAFC

($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned
Spending
for 2011–12
Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support N/A - funds transferred
to CFIA
N/A - funds transferred
to CFIA
National Biosecurity Standards Development N/A - funds transferred
to CFIA
N/A - funds transferred
to CFIA
Traceability Information Sharing Solution N/A - funds transferred
to CFIA
N/A – funds transferred
to CFIA
(Completed)
Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure N/A - funds transferred
to CFIA
N/A - funds transferred
to CFIA
Total N/A - funds transferred
to CFIA
N/A - funds transferred
to CFIA

Note:

Since CFIA is delivering these programs with funds transferred from AAFC, total allocations, planned spending and expected results are reflected in the CFIA table below.

Expected Results by program:

Refer to Expected Results listed under the CFIA table below.

Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

($ millions)
Federal Partner
Program Activity
Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending
for 2011–12
Due to rounding figures may not add up to the totals shown.
Food Safety and Nutrition Risks CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support 7.3 1.9

Animal Health Risks and Production Systems

Plant Health Risks and Production Systems

National Biosecurity Standards Development 9.5 2.5
Animal Health Risk and Production Systems Traceability Information Sharing Solution 1.1 0.0
Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure 3.0 0.9
Total 20.8 5.3

Note: Funds transferred by AAFC to CFIA are reflected in the above table.

Expected Results by program:

CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support:

  • Continuous improvement of the On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program and the Post-Farm Food safety Recognition Program;
  • On-going technical review and assessment of on-farm and post-farm food safety programs for recognition; and
  • Scientific and technical support provided as needed to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders.

National Biosecurity Standards Development:

  • Environmental scan of current state of biosecurity within a commodity sector;
  • National agri-commodity biosecurity standards developed;
  • Production and dissemination of standards; and
  • Production and dissemination of education and training material.

Traceability Information Sharing Solution:

  • Completed.

Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure:

  • Establish a national legislative framework for traceability including parliamentary processes and final approval;
  • Establish implementation activities for new legislation;
  • Ongoing amendment and continuous improvement for a regulatory framework for traceability; and
  • Continue to initiate privacy impact assessments as required.

($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners
(from Start to End Date)
Total Planned Spending for All
Federal Partners for 2011–12
20.8 5.3

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners:

Not applicable

Contact information:

Linda Parsons, Director General
Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
Farm Financial Programs Branch
Floor 8, Room 220, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-1900


Note:

AAFC’s Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved TB Submissions and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2011-12. Total allocation and planned spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

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Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative:
International Business Development Agreement

Name of lead department:
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Lead department program activity:
Enterprise Development (program sub-activity: Trade)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:
April 1, 2011 (subject to approval)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:
March 31, 2016

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):
$7.0 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
In May 1994, ACOA entered into an agreement (Canada/Atlantic Provinces Agreement on International Business Development, also known as IBDA) with the four Atlantic Provinces, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and Industry Canada to “undertake specific measures to optimize regional coordination on a pan-Atlantic scale and combine limited resources to coordinate trade-related activities.” Since its launch, the agreement has been extended four times (in 1997, 2000, 2005 and 2010) for a total investment of $23 million; the latest extension sunsets March 31, 2011. Funding is cost-shared 70/30 by the federal (through ACOA) and provincial governments. The commitment to this agreement, with the increased funding allocation, attests to both the IBDA’s positive results and its significance for the future of the region’s international business development.

More information can be found on the IBDA home page on ACOA’s website.  

Shared outcome:
The primary shared outcomes for the IBDA partners since the agreement’s inception have been:

  1. increased number of new exporters;
  2. existing exporters reporting sales to new markets; and
  3. existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets. Since 1994, the Agency and its partners have administered over 240 projects involving some 4,800 Atlantic Canadian companies. The IBDA helped 196 companies to begin exporting, 455 exporters to increase their export sales, and 315 exporters to expand into new markets.

In addition to the above outcomes, the new extension will seek to

  1. support universities and research establishments to expand their revenues from international commercialization;
  2. support clients sourcing new technologies or processes;
  3. support foreign direct investment; and
  4. support Canadian direct investment abroad.

Governance structure:
ACOA is the lead organization for this initiative and houses the Secretariat responsible for administering the agreement. A management committee, comprising a representative from each of the partners, is responsible for planning and managing the agreement’s programs and the evaluation of projects.

Partners
Federal departments and agencies (70% funding)

  • ACOA (lead department)
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (non-funding partner)
  • Industry Canada (non-funding partner)

Provincial governments (30% funding)

  • Business New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia Business Inc.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development
  • Prince Edward Island Business Development Inc.

Planning Highlights:
The IBDA will continue to build on its accomplishments to date, its extensive experience and lessons learned to further contribute to sustained growth in international business for the Atlantic region.

Through its four key elements, the IBDA will

  1. expose sectors and companies to export market opportunities and ensure that they are well prepared with the capability, knowledge and information required to develop international business;
  2. develop longer-term strategies and implementation plans for international business development and undertake research on companies’ needs and best practices;
  3. assist sectors and companies by obtaining market intelligence and contacts, identifying international market opportunities and applying this knowledge to trade development activities; and
  4. undertake business activities that support sector export development strategies and contribute to contacts, alliances and ultimately sales for both existing and new exporters.
Federal Partner: ACOA (lead department)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Enterprise Development Business Development Program $7,000,000 $1,400,000

Expected Results, by program:

As of April 2011, the IBDA will adopt a new list of results indicators:

  • number of projects undertaken
  • value of contributions or funding extended

Outputs

  • number of clients who participated in promotional activities sessions
  • number of research and/or market intelligence reports completed
  • number of clients who participated in learning and skills development activities
  • number of matchmaking meetings
  • level of satisfaction among clients who used matchmaking services (%)
  • number of clients who participated in ACOA-assisted international events
  • level of satisfaction among clients who participated in international events (%)
  • volume of sales reported (average range)
  • number of foreign direct investment opportunities identified (FDI leads)

Outcomes

  • number of SMEs starting to export
  • number of SMEs exporting to new markets
  • number of SMEs increasing export sales to existing markets
  • number of occasions when clients sourced a more competitive product or service
  • number of SMEs, universities and research establishments expanding their revenues from international commercialization
  • number of clients who identified/adopted new technologies or processes
  • number of foreign direct investment transactions completed (deals closed), where ACOA’s support contributed to the project’s fruition
  • number of Canadian Direct Investment Abroad (CDIA) identified
  • assisted firm export sales differential (%)

Federal partner: Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
International Commerce N/A $0 $0

Expected Results by program:  same as ACOA

Federal Partner: Industry Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Internal Services N/A $0 $0

Expected Results by program:  same as ACOA

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
$7,000,000 $1,400,000

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners:  Same as federal partners.

Contact information:
Michel Têtu
Director General, Trade and Investment
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 6051
Moncton, New Brunswick
E1C 9J8
Tel: 506-851-6496
E-mail: Michel.Tetu@acoa-apeca.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative:
Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership

Name of lead department:
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Lead department program activity:
Community Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:
April 1, 2009

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:
March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):
$9,975,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership (ACTP) is a nine-member, pan-Atlantic marketing consortium comprised of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, the four provincial tourism industry associations, and the provincial departments responsible for tourism in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. ACTP is dedicated to promoting Atlantic Canada as a leading vacation destination in key American and European markets.

The 2009-2012 ACTP is a $19.95-million agreement that supports:

  • fully-integrated marketing strategies (consumer, trade and media relations) based on sound market research, economies of scale and commonality;
  • funding that is incremental to provincial marketing budgets;
  • the preservation of provincial brand equity;
  • marketing activities being dictated by the marketplace;
  • clear and responsive measurement systems of benefit to all four Atlantic Provinces; and
  • end-of-agreement project evaluations.

Additional information on the Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership can be found on the ACTP website.

A memorandum of understanding for the renewal of the Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership was signed on April 1, 2009. This initiative directly supports the Agency’s long-term strategic outcome.

Shared outcome:
The 2009-2012 ACTP is expected to generate $10 in incremental economic activity for every $1 invested in marketing. The three-year revenue target is $190 million in incremental revenues for small and medium-sized tourism enterprises in Atlantic Canada.

Governance structure:
The activities of the ACTP are managed by a ten-person management committee, consisting of the ACOA vice-president responsible for tourism and the director general of Tourism Atlantic, the four provincial deputy ministers responsible for tourism, and the four tourism industry association presidents (or their permanent designates). Decisions of this management committee are by consensus. Six members constitute a quorum, provided all four provinces are represented, with both government and industry present, as well as ACOA. A Canadian Tourism Commission representative sits as an ex-officio member of the management committee.

The management committee is responsible for the administration and management of the agreement, the allocation of annual budgets on a per-market basis, the approval of annual program work plans and budgets, and the evaluation of program activities. It oversees the work of a marketing committee, develops and oversees a communications policy, and provides program interpretation and dispute resolution.

Planning Highlights:
Each year (including 2011-2012) the marketing committee researches and prepares fully integrated consumer advertising, as well as travel trade and media relations marketing strategies, all for the management committee’s approval. These strategies will be implemented by program managers who report directly to the marketing committee.

Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Community Development Atlantic Investment Partnership II Tourism $9,975,000 $3,325,000

Expected Results, by program:
$63.33 million in export revenues in each year of the partnership
$190 million in export revenues over the life of the partnership


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
$9,975,000 $3,325,000

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners:
$10 in tourism revenue for every $1 invested in marketing.

Contact information:
Rob McCloskey
Director General, Tourism Atlantic
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 40
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
C1A 7K2
Telephone: 902-626-2479
E-mail: Rob.McCloskey@acoa-apeca.gc.ca

Top of Page

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Table A: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

2. Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) (2003-04 to 2007-08)

3. Lead department program activity: CFIA: Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-04 (enhanced programming)

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The BSE program protects human and animal health by conducting surveillance, research and risk assessments regarding BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and minimizing the risk of exposure to infected materials; maintains consumer confidence through assessing the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks; and supports market access for cattle, beef and related products through promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments regarding human exposure to BSE and other TSEs, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) carries out surveillance and targeted supporting research in this area as well. The CFIA verifies that specified risk material (SRM) is being removed from the animal feed chain and the human food chain, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program. AAFC has been involved in supporting, stabilizing and repositioning Canada's beef and cattle industry, including through the provision of compensation payments to stakeholders impacted by BSE in Canada.

Year Departments Funding Period Intent of Funds
2003-04 CFIA, AAFC, HC 2003-04 to 2007-08 -measures to secure the future of the Canadian beef industry
2003-04 CFIA 2003-04 to 2007-08 -the removal of SRM from the food chain and re-entering export markets (refered to as the enhanced BSE initiative)
2004-05 CFIA 2004-05 to 2008-09 -reposition the Canadian beef and cattle industry to operate on a profitable and sustainable basis
2004-05 CFIA 2004-05 to 2005-06 -strengthen animal feed restrictions
2005-06 CFIA 2005-06 to 2008-09 -additional measures to address critical pressures facing the ruminant industry
2006-07 CFIA 2006-07 -continue the work the Agency was undertaking for the enhanced feed ban
2007-08 CFIA On-going -implement the enhanced feed ban restrictions
2008-09 CFIA 2008-09 -extend sunsetting elements of the enhanced BSE initiative
2009-10 CFIA, PHAC, HC 2009-10 to 2013-14 -continue work on the core BSE activities

8. Shared outcome(s): Contributing to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

9. Governance structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for the delivery of the BSE Program. In 2008, a summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program was conducted, which noted that the governance of the program should be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding BSE-related activities, both internally and with other partner organizations. The CFIA accepted this recommendation and agreed to develop options for an improved governance model to facilitate horizontal dialogue that is consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives. In 2010, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's overall approach to governance more in line with evolving business needs. The new governance structure focuses on the importance of sharing information internally and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision-making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure business line perspectives are integrated into decision-making, the three senior executive-level committees are supported by four committees: Animal Health, Plant, Food and Horizontal Management.

10. Planning Highlights: For 2011-12, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the BSE Program to current standards as well as improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Internal Services

SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain $91.5M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $9.5M
Import Controls $2.8M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $0.3M
BSE Surveillance $159.9M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $15.4M
Cattle Identification $29.2M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $2.8M
Export Certification $53.2M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $5.7M
Technical Market Access Support $44.1M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $5.0M
Enhanced Feed Ban $241.0M (2004-05 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing $26.6M
Establishment Review $2.3M (2004-05 to 2006-07) $0.0M
Oversupply of Aged Cattle $0.3M (2004-05) $0.0M
Meat Inspection Reform $9.2M (2005-06 to 2007-08) $0.0M
Total $633.5M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing $65.3M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain:

Outcome: Safe food.

Output/Activities: Compliance with current regulations/Continue the enforcement and verification of SRM removal by CFIA inspection staff.
Indicator3: Compliance rate of industry for removal of SRM.
Targets and Tracking3: Currently being revised

Import Controls:

Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

Output/Activities: Up-to-date import controls/Review and update current import policies and conditions for BSE as required in order to reflect changes to international standards and evolving science.
Indicator3: Currently being revised
Targets and Tracking3: Currently being revised

BSE Surveillance:

Outcome: Safe animals and food.

Output/Activities: Measure of BSE level and distribution in cattle population/Analyze options to redesign the BSE surveillance program and consult with stakeholders to explore further targeting of surveillance.
Indicator3: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population.
Targets and Tracking3: Currently being revised

Cattle Identification:

Outcome: Safe animals and food.

Output/Activities: Enhanced traceability in cattle herd /Continue work on cattle identification enforcement activities, including verification at auctions and federally and provincially inspected abattoirs that cattle are identified with an approved ear tag.
Indicator3: Currently being revised
Targets and Tracking3: Currently being revised

Export Certification:

Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Output/Activities: Export Certificate/Continue the provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries.
Indicator3: Independent assessment reviews.
Targets and Tracking3: Currently being revised

Technical Market Access Support:

Outcome: Maintain and improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Output/Activities: Increased market demand and confidence/Continue the establishment and maintenance of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence regarding international policies and standards development.
Indicator3: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.
Targets and Tracking3: Currently being revised

Enhanced Feed Ban:

Outcome: Safe feed, fertilizer, animals and food.

Output/Activities: Compliance with EFB regulations/Continue the enforcement of enhanced feed ban restrictions.
Indicator3: Trends in compliance with regulations associated with the enhanced feed ban; trends in proportion of feed mills and renderers using prohibited materials/SRM and producing ruminant feeds.
Targets and Tracking3: Currently being revised

 

11. Federal Partner: Health Canada (HC)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Food Safety and Nutrition

Risk Assessment and Targeted Research $62.1M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $6.2M
Compliance and Enforcement4 $1.0M (2003-04 to 2007-08) $0.0M
Product Assessment4 $6.2M (2003-04 to 2007-08) $0.0M
Tracking and Tracing4 $3.1M (2003-04 to 2007-08) $0.0M
Total $72.4M (2003-04 to 2013-14) 6.2M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

Risk Assessment and Targeted Research:

Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance

Output/Activities: Conduct consultations with stakeholders, external collaborations/research and training and conferences attendance.
Indicators and Targets: *
Number of direct consultations/visits with stakeholders as a result of Canadian expertise
Number and type of training, conferences, symposiums, etc. attended by HC staff on BSE/TSE topics
Number of research citations related to BSE/TSE peer reviewed publications produced by HC
Number and description of policies/standards on BSE/TSE contributed by HC to the international community
Number and dollar amount of external collaborations

*Note: A review of Health Canada's performance measurement framework for BSE is currently being undertaken, which has included the development of draft key indicators for certain program elements (as indicated above). Targets have yet to be determined. An interdepartmental Performance Measurement Strategy will be finalized.

11. Federal Partner: Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Science and Technology for Public Health

Surveillance and Population Health Assessment

Surveillance and Research for Human TSEs $7.9M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $0.8M
Total $7.9M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $0.8M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

Surveillance and Research for Human TSEs:

Outcome: Risks of human TSEs in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.

Output/Activities: Continued, detailed, case-by-case, laboratory-based investigation of all human TSEs across Canada; improved methods and strategies for efficient case investigation; surveillance data; research publications.
Indicator: Alignment of PHAC data from human TSE surveillance with international benchmarks.
Targets and Tracking: TBD

11. Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Food Safety and Biosecurity Systems (FSBRMS)

Facilitating the Disposal of Specified Risk Material (SRM) $79.9M (2006-07 to 2009-10) $0.0M
Establishment $276.0M (2003-04) $0.0M
Implementation $36.0M (2003-04) $0.0M
Tracking and Tracing Systems $7.8M (2003-04 to 2004-05) $0.0M
Transitional Industry Support Program $934.6M (2003-04) $0.0M
Accelerating Implementation of Traceability in Livestock and Meat Sources $16.1M (2004-05 to 2006-07) $0.0M
Farm Income Payment Program $999.9M (2004-05 to 2005-06) $0.0M
Cull Animal Program $202.4M (2003-04 to 2005-06) $0.0M
Loan Loss $38.4M (2004-05 to 2008-09) $0.0M
Feeder/Fed Cattle Set-Aside Program $296.3M (2004-05 to 2005-06) $0.0M
Total $2,887.3M (2003-04 to 2013-14)5 $0.0M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13): A summary outlining expected results for AAFC is not included in the RPP as their resources sunsetted in 2008–09.

 
Total Allocation for all Federal Partners (from Start Date to End Date) Total Planned Spending for all Federal Partners for 2011-12

$3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing

$72.3M

17. Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

18. Contact Information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Colleen Barnes
Executive Director
Domestic Policy Directorate
(613) 773-5901

Public Health Agency of Canada
Dr. Michael B. Coulthart
Director
Prion Diseases Program
(204) 789-6026

Health Canada
Geoff Middleton
Manager Accountability
Policy, Planning, International Affairs Directorate (PPIAD)
(613) 954-2039

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
John Ross
Director
Animal Industry Division
(613) 773-0220

3 A trial period of the CFIA's performance measurement framework for BSE is currently being performed, which includes the effectiveness of the draft key indicators for certain program elements (as indicated above). Targets and tracking methods have not yet been finalized.

The purpose of the Enterprise Operational Reporting/Performance Management Reporting Solution (EOR/PMRS) complementary projects are to develop more robust program level reporting solutions against performance indicators and targets, in order to enable the Agency to report reliably on specific program objectives and improve program decision-making. This 5-year initiative will be completed in 2013, at which time 15 programs will have developed Performance Measurement Frameworks, key performance indicators, performance targets and improved reporting capabilities. Animal Health and Meat Hygiene are being inducted into EOR/PMRS this fiscal year. Feed and Fertilizer programs have been inducted into EOR/PMRS, and are doing on-going testing and refinement of their indicators and targets. Much progress has been made in reporting capacity for the inducted programs, but at this time the indicators and targets for all the programs in the BSE initiative have not been identified.

4 Funding sunsetted in 2007-08

5 Due to rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.


Table B: National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)

2. Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

3. Lead department program activity: CFIA: Aquatic Animal Health Division – Animal Health Directorate

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $59.0M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $10.4M ongoing

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The NAAHP goal is to protect Canada's aquatic animals resources and productivity by preventing the introduction and spread of aquatic animal diseases and by maintaining the seafood industry's competitiveness in international markets. This is in line with the Government of Canada's priority to protect the natural resources of Canada and economic stability. The Agency's priority in this area is a safe and sustainable animal aquatic resource base.

8. Shared outcome(s): Sustainable Aquatic Resource Productivity and Internationally Competitive Aquatic Animal Resource Base Industry, which will allow trade to continue and expand.

9. Governance structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for delivery of the NAAHP in collaboration with DFO. Respective federal roles and responsibilities are outlined in a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The Animal Health Business Line and the Horizontal Steering Committee for Aquatic Animal Health are responsible for monitoring the financial governance within the CFIA budget. An Executive Steering Committee at the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) level from both organizations, is responsible for the strategic direction, monitoring and analysis of the NAAHP implementation. At the Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FPT) level, the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers (CCFAM) has oversight over the program through a working group with the CFIA. There is also an industry / Federal/Provincial/Territorial advisory committee, the Aquatic Animal Health Committee, that meets annually to guide the development of the program.

10. Planning Highlights: Specific regulations related to reportable diseases and import controls were published in December 2010. Import requirements will come into force December 10, 2011. Diseases are reportable, mandatory notification of these diseases are in effect since January 5, 2011. A surveillance system will be in place and serious disease incursions will be investigated. These regulations are under the Health of Animals Act. Other initiatives include development of disease response plans and Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) with the provinces on disease response.

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Animal Health and Zoonotics Program

Internal Services

National Aquatic Animal Health Programs $32.1M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $6.4M ongoing $6.4M
Total $32.1M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $6.4M ongoing $6.4M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

Regulatory amendments based on full consultation (Federal/Provincial/Territorial groups, Aboriginal Groups, & World Trade Organizations (WTO));
Discussions with FPT on MOU, Mandatory Reporting, Surveillance Delivery, Emergency Response & Delineation of Domestic Disease Control zones;
Priority P&Ps required to enforce revised regulations;
NAAHP integration into priority Information Management Information Technology (IM/IT) systems & linkage to Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Laboratory Information Management System interface;
Development of Survey plans to support trade and domestic control;
Development of training material for key NAAHP implementation activities (5 National Training Initiatives).

Development of standards and P&Ps for compartmentalization to replace Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Fish Health Protection Regulations

Outcome 1: Certification of aquatic animal commodities exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.
Output/Activities: Negotiate export certificates based on importing country requirements, development of training modules to support delivery for inspection and certification of aquatic animals, training of Animal Health operational staff to deliver the program, analysis and publication of domestic disease status at the regional and compartment level, carry out sampling plans, and negotiate for continued and new market access.
Indicator: Time taken to issue aquatic animal certificate.
Target: An adequate number of staff are trained to carry out inspections and issue certificate.*

Outcome 2:Protection of the National Aquatic Animal Health System
Output/Activities: A database system that captures Mandatory Reporting information reported by the industry, provinces and laboratories. Initially the determination of whether the report requires further inspection will be made in the program division. Training will be required for aquatic animal inspection and sample submission.
Indicator: Implementation of the Disease Reporting and Response infrastructure.
Target: 100% are triaged for disease reporting.

Outcome 3: Develop and establish an import system for products meeting Canadian standards
Output/Activities: Adapt the Automated Import Requirement System (AIRS) to accommodate live aquatic species. AIRS is a public internet interface for importers and will require a restructuring with creation of new international import codes. Training of Canada Border Services Agency, importers and CFIA delivery staff will be required in order to perform live animal and premises inspections and to develop import health conditions based on country of origin risk assessments.
Indicator: CFIA Automated Import Requirement System is ready and sufficient staff are trained.
Target: System is 100% ready for implementation and an adequate number of staff are trained to use it.

* Note: The target will be determined once the program is ready for implementation, and will therefore be established for the 2011-12 Performance Report.

11. Federal Partner: Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Aquatic Animal Health

National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System (NAAHLS) $26.9M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $4.0M ongoing $4.0M
Total $26.9M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $4.0M ongoing $4.0M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

Laboratory standards and tracking system that meets international requirements for audit/challenge of export certificates and/or import controls, and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 17025 Laboratory Accreditation

Outcome 1: Diagnostic tests validated to World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) requirements
Output/Activities: Ongoing development and validation of diagnostic tests required to support NAAHP program activities. Laboratory standards and tracking systems meet international requirements for audit/challenge of export certificates and/or import controls International Standards Organization 17025, the main standard used by testing and calibration laboratories. Priority disease list established collaboratively with the CFIA.

Indicator:Validated test methods incorporated into National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System diagnostic repertoire for the priority disease.
Target: End of Fiscal Year 2011-12

Outcome 2: Operational Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
Output/Activities: Continued development of the LIMS.
Indicator: LIMS is operational.
Target: April 2011

Outcome 3: Fish Health Protection Regulations (FHPR) amended and then ultimately rescinded
Output/Activities: Work collaboratively with the CFIA on a transition framework for moving from the FHPR to the authorities under amended Health of Animals Regulations (HAR) when they come into force.
Indicator: FHPR is rescinded.
Target: End of Fiscal Year 2011-12

Outcome 4: Ensure adequate capacity for diagnostic testing
Output/Activities: In collaboration with the CFIA, establish a network of third party testing laboratories in support of NAAHP program activities.
Indicator: Network of approved provincial, territorial and private laboratories providing specific diagnostic services.
Target: End of Fiscal Year 2011-12

 
Total Allocation for all Federal Partners (from Start Date to End Date) Total Planned Spending for all Federal Partners for 2011-12

$59.0M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $10.4M ongoing

$10.4M

17. Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable): Controlling aquatic animal diseases

18. Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Annie Champagne
Director
Aquatic Animal Health Division
(613) 221-3779

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Stephen Stephen
Director
Biotechnology and Aquatic Animal Health Science
(613) 990-0292


Table C: Listeria

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak.

2. Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Health Canada (HC); and, Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

3. Lead department program activity: CFIA: Food Safety Program; HC: Food Safety and Nutrition; and, PHAC: Surveillance and Population Health Assessment

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2009-10

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $75.0M (2009-10 to 2011-12)

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The objective of this horizontal initiative is to address some of the 57 recommendations made in the report by the government-appointed Independent Investigator, Sheila Weatherill, who reviewed the circumstances leading to the 2008 Listeriosis outbreak in Canada. The Government developed an action plan based on three thematic areas: address immediate food safety risks, enhance surveillance and early detection, and improve Government response to food-borne illness outbreaks in Canada.

To implement the action plan, the three federal organizations – CFIA, HC, PHAC – received a total spending authority of $75.0 million over three years (CFIA: $46.8 million, PHAC: $17.7 million, and HC: $10.5 million). Each federal organization has identified the resource requirements, strategic outcomes, objectives and implementation plan for each thematic area. Implementation of this horizontal initiative will further enhance Canada's food safety system.

8. Shared outcome(s): Address Immediate Food Safety Risks by increasing the number of Ready to Eat (RTE) meat inspection staff, updating food safety programs and directions to industry, building 24/7 capacity for health risk assessments, and improving electronic access for inspection staff.

Enhance Surveillance and Early Detection by upgrading (web-based) national public heath surveillance system, improving detection methods for Listeria, enhancing laboratory testing capacity, and improving laboratory diagnostic tools.

Improve Government Response to Food-borne Illness Outbreaks in Canada by strengthening federal leadership capacity for outbreak response, revising the national Foodborne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol (FIORP), improving risk communication during food-borne emergencies, targeting communications to vulnerable populations, and improving public access to integrated Government of Canada food safety information.

9. Governance structure(s): Responsibility for the implementation of the recommendations made by the Independent Investigator is based on the mandates of the CFIA, HC, PHAC. In addition, the Deputy Minister of AAFC chairs a special committee of deputy heads from CFIA, HC and PHAC which provides recommendations to improve the ways the organizations work together to deliver their food safety mandates. The CFIA, PHAC, HC, and AAFC work horizontally through a governance structure to implement and monitor the implementation of the recommendations.

The governance framework includes an ADM-level Committee on Food Safety (ADM-CFS) that is supported by a DG-level committee. The ADM-CFS receives support and direction from the AAFC, CFIA, PHAC, and HC deputy heads. Furthermore, each department monitors the implementation of the recommendations through a department specific governance structure that includes inter-branch director-level, executive director or DG-level, vice-president or ADM-level, and senior management-level committees.

10. Planning Highlights: In 2011-12, the federal government will continue to enhance Canada's ability to prevent, detect and respond to outbreaks of food-borne illness.

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Food Safety Program

Internal Services

Hiring of Inspection staff in Ready to Eat Meat Facilities $21.3M $9.1M
Scientific and technical training programs $11.6M $4.3M
Enhanced connectivity of Inspectors $3.0M $1.0M
Enhanced Food Safety Program Risk Management $4.6M $1.8M
Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other food-borne hazards $1.2M $0.5M
Additional Listeria testing $4.1M $1.4M
Government of Canada food safety portal $1.0M $0.4M
Total $46.8M $18.5M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

Hiring of Inspection staff in Ready to Eat Meat Facilities:

Outcome: The CFIA will continue to increase inspection capacity and deliver new inspection activities for federally registered RTE meat establishments.

Output/Activities: Staff will be hired to deliver new inspection tasks (CVS).
Targets and tracking: Number of new hires verses planned hires.

Scientific and technical training programs:

Outcome: The CFIA will continue to enhance the scientific and technical knowledge among RTE meat inspection staff in all federally registered meat establishments.

Output/Activities: Training specialists will deliver food processing science and technology sessions and food emergency training, laboratory staff will be trained on novel and emerging lab techniques.
Targets and tracking: Number of inspectors trained, number of person days for this training, number of courses offered on food technology, number of staff trained on updated policies, number of e-learning products developed.

Enhanced connectivity of Inspectors:

Outcome: The CFIA will continue to improve the management of food safety risks by providing frontline inspection staff secure access to the Agency's network and applications to better utilize inspection resources through improved and timely documentation and communication of inspection results.

Output/Activities: Solutions to improve access will be deployed across the Agency.
Targets and tracking: Number of inspectors with high speed access verses total number of inspectors.

Enhanced Food Safety Program Risk Management:

Outcome: CFIA will continue to review food safety programs to apply lessons learned.

Output/Activities: Hiring of remaining food safety specialists who will continue to review, analyse, design and deliver required program enhancements.
Targets and tracking: Number of reviews/ updates/ directives/projects completed verses the number planned.

Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other food-borne hazards:

Outcome: CFIA will continue to improve management of food safety risks and the early detection and faster response to potential foodborne illness outbreaks.

Output/Activities: Continued testing and validation work against established criteria; determination if test detection methods meet regulatory requirements.
Targets and tracking: Number of new analysts hired verses number planned, completion of validation protocol and project, decisions made on use of new methods.

Additional Listeria testing:

Outcome: Improved management of food safety risks through improved decision making.

Output/Activities: Continued testing and monitoring and trend analysis.
Targets and tracking: Increase in number of product samples submitted, reports produced on data trends at defined frequency, number of food program specialists dedicated to trend analysis.

Government of Canada food safety portal:

Outcome: A streamlined portal for all Government of Canada food safety information. Canadians are aware of and contribute to management of food safety risks.

Output/Activities: Additional enhancements to the portal based on qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the previous 2 years.
Targets and tracking:

  • Number of advertisements to portal.
  • Percentage increase in page views as a result of advertisement campaigns.
11. Federal Partner: Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Surveillance and Population Health Assessment

Surveillance of Infectious Diseases $2.9M $1.3M
Public Health Preparedness and Capacity Public Health Tools $4.5M $1.5M
Emergency Preparedness $4.2M $2.2M
Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation Foodborne, Environmental and Zoonotic Diseases $2.8M $1.5M
Regulatory Enforcement and Emergency Response Health Emergency Response Team $3.3M $1.5M
Total $17.7M $8.0M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

The activities can be characterized under two themes: Detection and Response

Surveillance and early detection are key activities to prevent food-borne illnesses and measure the effectiveness of food safety programs. PHAC activities in these areas include assessing and tracking food-borne risks and outbreaks through surveillance tools and platforms, and analyzing food-borne illnesses to develop genome sequences that aid in response, recovery and risk management.

The ability to respond to food-borne illness is supported through PHAC's network of response partnerships in the provinces/territories and local health authorities.

Surveillance of Infectious Diseases:

Outcome Strengthen laboratory diagnostic tools and networking tools by completing genomic sequences and fingerprint uploading to PulseNet; develop training material on new prototypes and methodologies.

Targets and Tracking: Percentage of completed genomic sequences of Listeria monocytogenes against plan (20 over a two-year period 2010-2012); Percentage increase of direct PFGE fingerprinting uploads to PulseNet annually.

Public Health Tools & Emergency Preparedness:

Outcome: National public health tools and platforms are implemented in the outbreak module.

Targets and Tracking: Percentage of active provincial/territorial participants in Panorama outbreak module; Percentage of provinces/territories deploying Panorama outbreak module.

Outcome: Public health professionals identified in the National Food-borne Illness Surge Capacity are trained and ready to respond to a food-borne illness outbreak activities in Canada.

Targets and Tracking: Percentage of public health professionals in National Food-borne Illness Surge Capacity roster that is trained and ready to respond to food-borne illness outbreak activities identified within Canada.

Outcome: A multi-faceted risk communications plan is developed and implemented to increase the number of Canadians with knowledge of how to protect themselves against the risk of food-borne illness during an outbreak; develop a model for public health resources.

Targets and Tracking: Percentage of Canadians with knowledge of how to protect themselves against the risk of food-borne illness during an outbreak, measured against baseline awareness levels that HC has established.

Foodborne, Environmental and Zoonotic Diseases:

Outcome: Exercise the FIORP with federal/provincial/territorial partners.

Targets and Tracking: Percentage of planned FIORP exercises completed with federal/provincial/territorial partners; Percentage of positive post-outbreak reviews by federal/provincial/ territorial partners.

Health Emergency Response Team:

Outcome: Develop an operational framework that provides procedures and guidance to the Health Portfolio for the coordination and management of foodborne illness emergencies.

Targets and Tracking: Percentage of public health professionals trained in a national food-borne illness outbreak management.

11. Federal Partner: Health Canada (HC)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12
Food Safety and Nutrition Build Health Risk Assessment Capacity $4.9M $2.1M
Improve Test Detection Methods for Listeria and Other Foodborne Hazards $3.6M $1.5M
Internal Services Social Marketing Strategy $2.0M $0.4M
Total $10.5M $4.0M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

Build Health Risk Assessment Capacity:

Outcome: HC will continue to enhance its ability to provide risk assessments, based on the best available science and risk modelling methods to strengthen prevention and response to food safety incidents.

Output/Activities: Validation of risk modelling methods, implementation of appropriate systems to facilitate the sharing of analysis and data across jurisdictions and validation of risk assessment approaches.

Targets and tracking: Number of staffing actions, number HRAs completed within service standard, number quality management practices (including SOPs, templates, inter-departmental HC-CFIA protocols) implemented.

Improve Test Detection Methods for Listeria and Other Foodborne Hazards:

Outcome: HC will continue to have a suite of rapid, validated tools available to industry and government partners, to allow action to be taken at the earliest opportunity, reducing the exposure of Canadians in a food safety emergency.

Output/Activities: Piloting and validation of methodologies & prototypes for the detection of Listeria & other hazards in foods in real time, and the identification of methods for priority validation by the Microbiological Methods Committee (MMC) and the Chemicals methods Committee (RCMC).

Targets and tracking: Number of FTEs hired/allocated to developing/improving microbiological and chemical methods, number of validated methods, and #of methods prioritized for fast tracking and validation by MMC and RCMC, number of completed pilots and validated methodologies/prototypes for the detection of Listeria and other hazards in foods.

Social Marketing Strategy:

Outcome: Increased awareness of safe food handling behaviours.

Output/Activities: Web advertising campaign; stakeholders' web links kit; insert in <acronym title="Office of the Auditor General">OAS</acronym>, strategic alliances.
Targets and Tracking: Number of collateral materials distributed; web statistics and advertising statistics.

 
Total Allocation for all Federal Partners (from Start Date to End Date) Total Planned Spending for all Federal Partners for 2011-12

$75.0M (2009-10 to 2011-12)

$30.5M

17. Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

18. Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Theresa Iuliano
Senior Director
Policy and Strategies Directorate
(613) 773-5867

Public Health Agency of Canada
Mark Raizenne
Director General
Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
(613) 948-6883

Health Canada
Samuel Godefroy
Director General
Food Directorate
(613) 957-1821


Table D: Invasive Alien Species (IAS)

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Invasive Alien Species (IAS)

2. Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

3. Lead department program activity: Plant Resources Program

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-11

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $95.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $19.0M ongoing

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Invasive alien species (IAS) are those species introduced by human action outside their natural distribution (past or present), that threaten the environment, economy, or society, including human health. Annually, IAS causes billions of dollars in direct losses, control costs, increased production costs and lost market access. The annual impact of IAS is estimated to be as much as $20 billion to the forest sector, $7 billion for aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes, and $2.2 billion for invasive plants alone in the agricultural sector. IAS have gained international attention as globalization, climate change, and increases in international trade have elevated the risks of IAS introductions.

In recognition that responding to IAS is a shared responsibility, "An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada" was adopted in 2004 by federal, provincial and territorial resource ministers as a national coordinated approach toward prevention and management of IAS. The objective of the Strategy is to initiate implementation of the priority objectives (i.e. prevention, early detection and rapid response to new invaders and management of established and spreading invaders) and will be met through contributions to work in five thematic areas: Risk Analysis, Science and Technology, Legislation, Regulation and Policy, Engaging Canadians and International Cooperation. Environment Canada is the lead for invasive animal species; Fisheries and Oceans Canada leads the aquatic invasive species issues; the Canadian Food Inspection Agency leads for invasive plants and other plant pests; and, Natural Resources Canada leads for forest pests.

Budget 2010 allocated $19 million per year to Environment Canada, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, National Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to continue implementation of the Government of Canada's IAS Strategy as well as maintain and enhance the advances made in the previous five years in invasive alien species activities. Ongoing implementation of the IAS Strategy is critical to continue the protection of Canada's ecosystems and resource-based economy.

8. Shared outcome(s): Continuing the implementation of the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada is essential to protect Canada's aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and their native biological diversity and domestic plants and animals from the risks of invasive alien species. The key outcome of the Strategy is to make Canada a leader in the prevention and management of IAS in a manner that ensures environmental sustainability, economic competitiveness and societal well being.

9. Governance structure(s): The government-wide IAS Strategy involves Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. The departments and agencies are committed to ongoing collaboration on IAS issues. Federally, coordination continues to be discussed through the Directors' General Interdepartmental Committee on Invasive Alien Species. Currently, the governance model for the National IAS Strategy is under revision. Inter-jurisdictionally, federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) cooperation on IAS issues continue under the auspices of the annual joint meeting of Resource Ministers' Councils for wildlife, forests, fisheries and aquaculture, and endangered species, as well as associated meetings of Deputy Ministers and Assistant Deputy Ministers. The Minister of Agriculture is the lead federal Minister responsible for responding to invasive alien plants and plant pests. Efforts will continue to seek the full engagement of federal, provincial, and territorial Ministers of agriculture and facilitate their annual participation in addressing invasive alien species.

10. Planning Highlights: For 2011-12, the key horizontal plans and are to: continue to develop, advance and implement concrete and practical prevention, detection, response and management activities of the IAS strategy; improve coordination mechanism across species, jurisdictions and issues.

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Plant Resources Program

Internal Services

Risk Analysis $15.5M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $3.1M ongoing $3.1M
Science and Technology $33.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $6.6M ongoing $6.6M
Legislation, Regulation and Policy $6.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $1.2M ongoing $1.2M
Engaging Canadians $3.5M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.7M ongoing $0.7M
International Cooperation $2.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.4M ongoing $0.4M
Total $60.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $12.0M ongoing) $12.0M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

Risk Analysis:

Entry of invasive plants and plant pests is managed in a risk based manner and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is controlled.

Outcome 1: Entry of invasive plants and plant pests is managed in a risk based manner and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is controlled.

Outputs/Activities: The CFIA will continue to identify highest risk potential IAS, their pathways, and appropriate means by which to mitigate identified risks through continuing to conduct pest and weed risk analyses, import controls and initial response to early detections. Additionally, the Agency will continue to facilitate information sharing among federal departments to ensure information flows to and from both parties, thereby ensuring CFIA's mandate is met.
Indicator: To Be Developed (TBD)*.
Target: To Be Developed (TBD).

Science and Technology:

Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Outcomes: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Outputs/Activities: The Agency will support IAS prevention, detection and response through continued efforts to develop scientific tools and expertise. The CFIA will also minimize the impact of IAS introductions by continued foresight projects and efforts in early detection such as import monitoring and inspection, continuing to develop diagnostic methods and tools for the identification of high risk IAS and that provide rapid and accurate identification of invasive alien species.
Indicator: TBD
Target: TBD

Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Outcomes: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed and response to invasive plants and plant pests is planned and implemented.

Outputs/Activities: The Agency will continue modernizing the legislative framework by updating regulations or creating new ones and harmonizing approaches, where possible, in consultation with stakeholders. To ensure consistency with international standards and legislated mandate, the CFIA will continue to develop new science-based program policies and update existing ones with a focus on higher risk pathways of introduction. The CFIA will continue to design new programs and modernize existing ones to support the implementation of policies and to deliver associated import control to protect Canada's resource base from potential IAS. The CFIA will continue to collaborate with federal and provincial partners to co-ordinate implementation of An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada, to maintain strong lines of communication, engage stakeholders, and contribute to good interdepartmental governance as well as strengthening internal governance across branches.
Indicator: TBD
Target: TBD

Engaging Canadians:

Increased cooperation and awareness from stakeholders on plants and plant pests and compliance with policies and regulations.

Outcomes: Increased cooperation and awareness from stakeholders on plants and plant pests and compliance with policies and regulations.

Output/Activities: The Agency will continue to work collaboratively with stakeholders and other government departments to raise awareness about IAS, their potential pathways and associated policies and programs, thereby promoting early reporting of IAS, best management practices and compliance with regulations for reducing the risk to Canada's plant resources.
Indicator: TBD
Target: TBD

International Cooperation:

Increased international engagement, cooperation and awareness of invasive species and compliance with policies and regulations.

Outcomes: Increased international engagement, cooperation and awareness of invasive species and compliance with policies and regulations.

Output/Activities: One of the main goals of international cooperation is to ensure that international standards and processes reflect Canadian interests. The CFIA will continue its active participation in international standard setting, harmonization of approaches, negotiations and bilateral meetings with key trading partners to mitigate the risk of IAS introduction through trade pathways and maintain access to foreign markets.
Indicator: TBD
Target: TBD

*Note: Indicators, targets and tracking methods have not yet been determined. A joint logic model and individual Results-Based Management and Accountability Frameworks were prepared pursuant to the previous Treasury Board Submission for the IAS Strategy by participating departments and agencies. The CFIA, EC, DFO and NRCan will jointly review and update the logic model and Performance Measurement Strategies to reflect minor changes to their respective programs.

11. Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Adapting to a Changing Climate and Hazard Risk Management

Risk Analysis $3.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.6M ongoing $0.6M
Science and Technology $5.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $1.0M ongoing $1.0M
Legislation, Regulation and Policy $1.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.2M ongoing $0.2M
Engaging Canadians $0.5M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.1M ongoing $0.1M
International Cooperation $0.5M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.1M ongoing $0.1M
Total $10.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $2.0M ongoing) $2.0M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

Risk Analysis:

The capacity to identify and address forest invasive alien species risks and prevent their introduction is increased.

Outcome: The capacity to identify and address forest invasive alien species risks and prevent their introduction is increased.

Outputs/Activities: National risk analysis models and risk maps for selected forest invasive alien species are developed to improve understanding of the pathways of forest invasive alien species movement and help to better assess human-assisted introductions and spread of new invasive alien forest pests and their impacts.
Indicator and Target: TBD*

Science and Technology:

Knowledge of forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology, and ecology is improved.

Likelihood of establishment or spread of forest alien forest species is minimized and their impacts are mitigated.

Outcome 1: Knowledge of forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology, and ecology is improved.

Outputs/Activities: Scientific research is undertaken to address knowledge gaps in taxonomy, biology, ecology, distribution, and pest-host and forest-pathogen relationships.
Indicator and Target: TBD*

Outcome 2: Likelihood of establishment or spread of forest alien forest species is minimized and their impacts are mitigated.

Outputs/Activities: Detection, diagnostic and surveillance tools and strategies are developed for forest invasive alien species. Response tools and methods are developed and provided to responsible agencies to deal with control and eradication of forest invasive alien species.
Indicator and Target: TBD*

Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Decision-making related to forest invasive alien species management by regulatory agencies and other organizations is informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Canadian positions in national and international discussions on phytosanitary matters are informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Outcome 1: Decision-making related to forest invasive alien species management by regulatory agencies and other organizations is informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Outputs/Activities: Science and policy expertise on forest invasive alien species prevention, detection and response are provided to regulatory agencies and other federal Departments, Provinces and Territories, Municipalities Industry and First Nations.
Indicator and Target: TBD*

Outcome 2: Canadian positions in national and international discussions on phytosanitary trade issues are informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Outputs/Activities: Scientific and policy advice is provided in support to phytosanitary trade negotiations and the development of national and international forest phytosanitary standards.
Indicator and Target: TBD*

Engaging Canadians:

Scientific information on forest invasive alien species is made available to agencies, researchers and the public.

Outcome: Scientific information on FIAS is made available to agencies, researchers and the public.

Outputs/Activities: Application functionality and content of the CanFIAS Database and the Forest Invasive Alien Species Web Portal are enhanced and expanded.
Indicator and Target: TBD*

International Cooperation:

International cooperation with phytosanitary organizations and trading partners is facilitated.

Outcome: International cooperation with phytosanitary organizations and trading partners is facilitated.

Outputs/Activities: Collaboration is fostered through active participation in scientific activities and knowledge transfer in support to international phytosanitary organizations such as the North American Plant Protection Organization and the International Forestry Quarantine Research Group that provides internationally coordinated research analyses to the International Plant Protection Convention's Technical Panel on Forest Quarantine and Commission of Phytosanitary Measures.
Indicator and Target: TBD*

*Note: A review of Natural Resources Canada's performance measurement framework for Forest Invasive Alien Species will be undertaken. Targets and tracking methods have not yet been determined.

11. Federal Partner: Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12

Science for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Internal Services

Risk Analysis $2.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.4M ongoing $0.4M
Science and Technology $5.1M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $1.02M ongoing $1.02M
Legislation, Regulation and Policy $1.05M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.21M ongoing $0.21M
Engaging Canadians $0.45M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $0.09M ongoing $0.09M
International Cooperation $11.4M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $2.28M ongoing $2.28M
Total $20.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $4.0M ongoing $4.0M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

Risk Analysis:

Risk analysis for priority species and pathways.

Science and Technology:

Decision makers are provided with information in order to manage species and pathways in a risk based manner.

Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Development of components of aquatic invasive species regulations.

Engaging Canadians:

Stakeholder and partner are aware of activities that can mitigate the risk of aquatic invasive species.

International Cooperation:

The impact of Sea Lamprey is effectively managed in the Great Lakes.

Canada is engaged with international discussion to address the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species.

11. Federal Partner: Environment Canada (EC)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2011-12
Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat Engaging Canadians $5.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $1.0M ongoing $1.0M
Total $5.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $1.0M ongoing $1.0M

16. Expected Results by program as per (13):

Increased number and quality of proposals
Increased contribution of individuals and organizations in activities related to IAS

Outcome 1: Increased targeted awareness of key stakeholders in priority pathways of introduction.

Outcome 2: Improved ability to detect and respond early to IAS introduction and spread in Canada.

Outcome 3: Maintained jurisdictional partnership for coordination and communication of on the ground activities.

Outputs/Activities: Communication and promotional products and services; information and advice regarding development and submission of project proposals; funding agreements; project verification and monitoring.

Indicators and Targets: Multiple indicators have been identified for each result and are available as part of the draft Program's Performance Measurement Strategy (to be finalized in 2011-12).

 
Total Allocation for all Federal Partners (from Start Date to End Date) Total Planned Spending for all Federal Partners for 2011-12

$95.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $19.0M ongoing

$19.0M

17. Results achieved by non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

18. Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Wendy Asbil
National Manager
Plant Health and Biosecurity Division
(613) 773-7236

National Research Council of Canada
Jacques Gagnon
Director
Science Policy Division
(613) 990-5827

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Patrice Simon
Director
Environment and Biodiversity Science
(613) 990-0289

Environment Canada
Tracy Schneider
A/Manager
Conservation, Partnerships and Programs
(819) 934-5277

Top of Page

Canadian Heritage

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008-13: Acting for the Future

Name of lead department: Canadian Heritage

Lead department program activity: Official Languages

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1,110.10 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):  

The Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008-13: Acting for the Future (Roadmap) is a Government of Canada policy statement that includes a number of initiatives to strengthen and promote linguistic duality. Fifteen federal institutions have received funds for sectoral programs and activities related to official languages. The Roadmap contributes to the attainment of a strategic outcome for Canadian Heritage (Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity) and to the Government of Canada’s outcome (A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion).

Two of key components of the Roadmap are the implementation of an accountability framework and a coordinated government-wide approach to official languages. The Roadmap is a component of the Official Languages Program (OLP), as defined and approved by the Committee of Deputy Ministers on Official Languages in December 2004.

Web site: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/slo-ols/strat-eng.cfm

Shared outcomes:  

Three levels of outcomes have been established.

Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in the official language of choice.

Three intermediate outcomes:

  • Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English-speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in the official language of choice.
  • Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
  • Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.

Eight immediate outcomes:

  • Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
  • Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
  • Improved social and economic development of official-language minority communities (OLMC).
  • Strengthened capacity of language industries.
  • Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
  • Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
  • Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
  • Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.

Governance structure:

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for the implementation of the Roadmap. The Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) (Canadian Heritage) supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. With respect to roles and responsibilities, the OLS is responsible for developing and coordinating the results of the Roadmap. The OLS ensures that all information (financial and non-financial) needed is gathered and that the content of all logic models of the Roadmap’s structure is taken into consideration. The OLS is also responsible for the complete implementation and the accountability framework for the Roadmap. This role was given to the OLS by the partners through the development of a the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework for the Roadmap, which outlines the activities and results structure, the governance structure, as well as the roles and responsibilities of departments and different interdepartmental committees, while also identifying the relevant operational issues concerning its horizontal implementation. The OLS also support the governance of the OLP through various mechanisms and committees.

A governance structure has been established to support the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and to ensure that the Roadmap provides results for Canadians, the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages (CADMOL) was created. This committee acts on behalf of all federal departments, agencies and organizations, partners in the Roadmap in a variety of ways: it supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and all ministers who have responsibilities under the Official Languages Act (OLA); it ensures leadership for managing the OLP, including the Roadmap, by making decisions and overseeing the coordination of partners’ actions; it guides the implementation of the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (HRMAF) and oversees the evaluation of the Roadmap. During CADMOL meetings, departments having specific responsibilities under the OLA (for instance, Canadian Heritage, Justice Canada, and the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer) report on achievements that are specific to their mandate and describe the challenges and issues related to these responsibilities.

Three interdepartmental committees support CADMOL by providing recommendations. Firstly, the Interdepartmental Policy Committee (IPC) provides an information-sharing forum between partners in order to present a joint approach to strategic issues regarding the OLP. The Interdepartmental Management Committee for the Official Languages Program (IMCOLP) seeks to ensure that interdepartmental coordination of the OLP is formalized and structured, most notably by assessing the implementation of the OLP and strengthening the accountability process. The Coordinating Committee on Official Languages Research (CCOLR) ensures that official-languages research is coordinated. The committees may create working groups as needed to complete specific projects. For example, the Working Group on the HRMAF Revision (Working Group) was created in the summer of 2008.

Planning Highlights: 

For the year 2011-12, the implementation of the Roadmap continues in respect of the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework released in September 2009. The coordination of the implementation is facilitated by the formal governance structure in place. The Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages and its support committees, as well as various interdepartmental groups ensure that the different strategies allow for monitoring, measuring and evaluation of the results expected for 2011-12.

A horizontal evaluation of the Roadmap is scheduled for 2011-12 and 2012-13. This evaluation will be lead by the Office of the Chief Audit and Evaluation Executive of the Department of Canadian Heritage. All the partners of the Roadmap will participate and contribute on a pro rata basis depending on their allocated funding within the Roadmap to an estimated amount of $300,000 to make the evaluation.

Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in the language of choice.

Intermediate outcome 1: Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English-speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in the language of choice.

Immediate outcome 1.1: Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.

Federal Partner: Justice Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs Contraventions Act Fund

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved capacity to carry on judicial activities and to deliver extrajudicial services related to federal contraventions in both official languages.
$47.46 M $9.49 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Continued and increased access to justice services in both official languages through the implementation of the Contraventions Act, including linguistic clauses, in Newfoundland and Labrador, the amendment of the existing agreement in Prince Edward Island to include linguistic clauses and the commencement of negotiations with Saskatchewan.

Federal Partner: Justice Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Internal Services Contraventions Act Fund $1.92 M $0.38 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: N/A

Federal Partner: Justice Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training)

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Increased capacity of partners and the Department to implement solutions relating to access to justice in both official languages.
$38.02 M $9.19 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Implementation of the pan-Canadian study on justice training needs in both official languages.

Continued judicial awareness and information activities in order to promote increased access to justice services in both official languages.

Federal Partner: Justice Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Internal Services Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training) $1.89 M $0.44 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: N/A

Immediate Outcome 1.2: Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.

Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Canadian Health System

Official language minority community development
Training, Networks and Access to Health Services

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) Increased number of health professionals to meet health service needs of OLMCs in both official languages.
2) Increased coordination and integration of health services for OLMCs within institutions and communities.
3) Increased partnerships, interaction of networks in provincial, territorial health systems.
4) Increased awareness among stakeholders that networks are a focal point for addressing health concerns of OLMCs.
5) Increased dissemination and uptake of knowledge best practices to address health concerns of OLMCs.
$174.3 M $38.9 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: In 2011-12, Health Canada will enter into new funding agreements for Cultural and French-language training ($1.5 M) and for new Official Languages Health Projects ($1.6 M) within French linguistic minority communities.

In addition, 22 multi-year funding agreements were initiated with community-based stakeholders in 2009-10 and 2010-11. These agreements, amounting to $34.9 M in 2011-12, will all conclude in March 2013 and are for the following activities:

  • Health Networking: $5.0 M;
  • Training and Retention of Health Professionals: $22.8M;
  • Official Languages Health Projects for English and French linguistic minority communities: $7.1 M.

During 2011-12, Health Canada will complete a mid-term review of its Official Languages Health Contribution Program.

In addition to funding agreements totaling $38.0 M in 2011-12, a further $900,000 has been identified for operations and accommodation relating to the Official Languages Health Contribution Program.

Immediate Outcome 1.3: Improved social and economic development of official-language minority communities (OLMC).

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Minority-Language Education – Component: Support to Second-Language and Minority-Language Education

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Increased access of OLMCs to quality education in their language in their milieu.
$280.0 M $56.0 M 

Expected Result for 2011-12: Maintain the investment levels from Provinces and Territories for educational programs and activities that promote access to a minority language education.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Minority-Language Education – Component: Official-language Monitors

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved access of OLMCs to a quality education in their language and milieu.
$5.2 M $1.04 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Maintain the number of participants in the Odyssée program which allows students to work as language assistants in minority language classrooms.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Minority-Language Education – Component: Summer Language Bursaries

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved access of OLMCs to a first-rate education in their language in their environment.
$1.7 M $0.34 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Support the Destination Clic program to maintain its yearly enrolment. This program helps young francophone’s outside Quebec enrich their first language while discovering new communities in Canada.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Community vitality – Component: Youth Initiatives

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language.
2) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially for youth).
$10.5 M N/A

Expected Result for 2011-12: Nothing in 2011-12. The initiative was for 2009-10 only.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Community vitality – Component: Support to Official-language Minority Communities

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and improved access to a range of programs and services offered in their language.
$22.5 M $4.5 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Continued investment in the creation, improvement and delivery of activities, and services intended for OLMC that promote a sense of belonging.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Community vitality – Component: Intergovernmental Cooperation

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Increased access of OLMCs to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.
$22.5 M $4.5 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Improvement of signed Federal-Provincial/Territorial agreements services and on approved special projects.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Community vitality – Component: Cultural Development Funds

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) Increased access to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.
2) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially in culture).
$14.0 M $3.5 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Continue to support cultural projects that promote a sense of belonging for the OLMC.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Social Development Strengthening non-gouvernmental organizations' means for Early Childhood Development

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

The capacity of NGOs working in the area of early childhood in minority environments will be increased.
$4.0 M $0.8 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: The implementation of the National Framework for Collaboration on Early Childhood Development in Minority Francophone Communities in Canada will continue.

The following initiatives will be realised:

  • a summative evaluation;
  • two Web-based video clips on models of Early Childhood and Family Centres;
  • a transformative analysis in Early Childhood Development; and,
  • tools to help national, provincial and territorial partners, as well as parents living in French minority communities.
Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Skills and Employment Family Literacy Initiative

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Community stakeholders can act in the area of family literacy, and tools and support are available and used by those members of OLMCs that need them.
$7.5 M $1.8 M

Expected Results for 2011-12 : Results of 11 research projects will be available. These projects will identify literacy needs and specific tools required for new targeted groups such as: Francophone immigrant women living in remote communities, parents from Francophone military families, exogamous families, new parents, grand-parents, seasonal workers, fathers, integrated immigrants, and parents with precarious situations living in rural and urban environments.

Eight new family literacy models will be developed, including five designed for new targeted groups, which will be tested and adapted.

Seven new partnerships with various provincial and territorial stakeholders will be created to increase networking and knowledge sharing.

Evaluation tools will be developed to report on results.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Social Development Child Care Pilot Project

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:


New knowledge on child care services for minority Francophone communities.
$13.5 M $2.7 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Child Care Pilot Project:

  • The results in the research report on the short-term impact of the French-language preschool program on children’s development and readiness to learn will be updated to include data from the second cohort of participants. This will add to the collective knowledge of what works with respect to early childhood development services.

  • The project will assess children and survey parents to continue to measure the impact of the French-language preschool program on the development of the children, one year and two years after the end of the preschool program.
Two action-research projects are led by the Enabling Fund (see Enabling Fund section below for details).

Oversampling of OLMCs within the Program for the International Assessment for Adult Competencies (PIAAC):

  • This project will include an oversampling of OLMCs to have a better comprehension of how individuals of OLMCs are ready to face the challenges of the knowledge economy.

Research project using Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2009 data:

  • This project is a comprehensive analysis of skill levels in reading, mathematics and science of 15-year old Canadian students attending minority language schools across Canada.
Federal Partner: Citizenship and Immigration Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Integration of French-speaking immigrants
Maintain, develop and improve promotional events abroad and the resettlement of Francophone immigrants

Consolidate existing support networks and enhance settlement services

Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC)
Recruitment and integration of immigrants

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

French-speaking immigrants obtain reinforced services of establishment in OLMCs.
$20.0 M $4.5 M (please note that CIC will invest an additional $2.5M that is not part of the total allocated funding)

Expected Results for 2011-12: Develop and implement a communication strategy for the Francophone Immigration Initiative in order to ensure consistency of the message and better engage stakeholders.

Consolidate strategies of promotion and recruitment of French-speaking immigrants by coordinating the participation of provinces and territories, community representatives and employers and facilitating the holding of promotion and recruitment events at several Canadian missions abroad.

Consolidate and harmonize Francophone immigration networks, and develop an accountability framework for networks.

Accelerate the economic integration of immigrants to Francophone minority communities by increasing employers' engagement and facilitating matching processes between employers and newcomers.

Conduct the evaluation of the “Recruitment and Integration of French-Speaking Immigrants to Francophone Minority Communities” initiative and use the evaluation’s recommendations to further support Francophone immigration to Francophone Minority Communities.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages

Broadcasting Policy and Programs

Canadian Radio- television and Telecommunications Comission (CRTC)

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) CRTC report is issued on the availability and quality of broadcasting services to English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada.
2) The findings of the report will inform policy and decision-making on the availability and quality of broadcasting services in English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada.

Non-monetary N/A

Expected Result for 2011-12: The report has been published.

Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Community Development Support to francophone immigration in New-Brunswick

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Enhanced capacity to support francophone immigration in New Brunswick.
$10.0 M $4.2 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: To maintain the support for Francophone Immigration in New Brunswick.

Federal Partner: Industry Canada – FedNor
Industry Canada – Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Community, Economic and Regional Development (of Ontario) Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.
2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.
$10.5 M $1.14 M
$0.4 M
$1.8 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Development of 10 new projects and completion of 23 projects currently under way. The new projects will target business development in support of improved economic development of OLMC.

Funding of and participation in research and analysis projects on OLMC economic development; participation in the organization of OL Symposium on research.

Support the development of 40 projects which will support community strategic planning, as well as business and economic development of Francophone Communities in Southern Ontario.

Federal Partner: Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Northern Economy Economic Development Initiative

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:


Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.
$0.4 M $0.1 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Funding is expected to be allocated via a proposal-driven process in 2011-12.

This funding is expected to support the social and economic development of official-language minority communities in the territories.

Federal Partner: Canada Economic Development (CED) for Quebec regions
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Community Development Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.
2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.
$10.2 M $4.2 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Result 1 :

1) Innovation
1 project - $210K (5%)

2) PME support
12 projects - $2,52M (60%)

3) Partnership
2 projects - $420k (10%)

4) Diversification
5 projects - 1,049M$ (25%)

Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Research and Analysis

Community Economic Planning, Development and Adjustment Business Development and Entrepreneurship Innovation
Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.
2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.
$3.2 M $0.75 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Pursue the implementation of the Economic Development Initiative (EDI) through contribution agreements with organizations supporting the economic development of the Official Languages Minority Communities (OLMC);

-Enhanced capacity of OLMCs as reflected by: number of partnerships created or maintained; and project funding leveraged.

-Development of francophone enterprises as reflected by: number of enterprises created, maintained or expanded; and project funding leveraged.

- Development of francophone communities as reflected by: number of projects, initiatives, or studies that contribute to the diversification or expansion of the economic base of the OLMCs; and project funding leveraged.

Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Community Development Economic Development  Initiative

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.
2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.
$6.2 M $1.5 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Maintain the financing of already approved Economic Development Initiative (EDI) projects and that of new projects in the OLMC.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Skills and Employment Enabling Fund for Official-Language Minority Communities

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) Contribute to synergies among Government of Canada programming relevant to OLMCs; Contribution recipients are informed and contribute to knowledge building and program/policy issues; Knowledge shared among federal partners, contribution recipients and OLMCs.
2) Program results are available to inform management and program policy issues.
3) OLMCs’ access to Government of Canada programs and services.
4) Collaborative arrangements.
$69.0 M $13.8 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: The governance structure of the National Committees for Economic Development and Employability will be reinforced to strengthen the commitment of communities and federal partners.

Two action-research projects will be developed and implemented in communities, one on economic integration of immigrants in OLMCs and another on the development of entrepreneurial skills among OLMC youth. Two interdepartmental /community driven working groups will guide the development and implementation of these projects.

The program will implement an improved set of reporting tools with recipient organizations to focus on the achievement of tangible outcomes for communities. Work on the development of a Community Maturity Model will continue.

The program will develop contribution agreements with 14 OLMC organizations responsible for enhancing community economic and human resource development. These agreements will take effect on April 1, 2011.

Intermediate Result 2: Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.

Immediate Result 2.1: Strengthened capacity of language industries.

Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Linguistic Management and Services      University Scholarships Program in Translation

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Scholarships help encourage students to pursue post-secondary studies in translation, interpretation and terminology.
$8.0 M $2.8 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Increase in the number of students registered in a translation program in Canada.

Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Linguistic Management and Services          Language Industry Initiative

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Funded projects help enhance the capacity, diversity and effectiveness of the language sector.
$10.0 M $2.9 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Increase in the participation rate of private and non-profit enterprise in the activities organized by project sponsors for the Canadian Language Sector.

Federal Partner: National Research Council of Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Interactive Languages Technologies Languages Technologies Research Centre (LTRC)

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) Collaboration with key partners in the implementation of an R&D strategy responsive to industry needs.
2) Research competency in the target domains recognized globally.
3) Transfer of knowledge and technology.
$10.0 M $2.0 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Result 1: Collaboration with key partners in the implementation of a R&D strategy responsive to industry needs.

Number of collaborative agreements and memoranda of understanding: 4

Number of innovative translation aid tools and content management tools for multilingual and multicultural content developed or in the process of development: 2 + 2 = 4

Number of Institute for Information Technology (IIT) / Language Technologies Research Centre (LTRC) / Association de l'insdutrie de la langue (AILIA) seminars and presentations at the national level: 3 + 10 = 13

Result 2: Research competency in the target domains recognized globally.

Number of citations by peers from the scientific community: 60

Number of awards of excellence, internal and external awards received: 1

Number of invitation of Canadian and foreign researchers: 1

Number of students at post-doctoral, doctoral and master and bachelor's degree received / formed: 1

Number of tasks on the editorial scientific boards of journals, number of leadership roles in program committees of international conferences, number of reviews of articles for journals and scientific conferences:

  • 2 scientific journal articles written.
  • 1 management of a program committee or subcommittee of international conferences.
  • 20 reviews of papers submitted to journals and scientific conferences.

Number of scientific articles, patents, and licensing of research:

  • 10 scientific papers.
  • 1 Patent Application.
  • 2 Research licences.

Result 3: Transfer of knowledge and technology.

Number and value of R&D collaborative agreements:

  • Number of agreements: 3
  • Cumulative value: $600,000

Number and value of commercial and technology evaluation licences:

  • Number: 2
  • Cumulative revenues: $30,000

Number of participants to exchange activities with partners and enterprises (for example: LTRC, AILIA, trade shows, etc.): 1

Number of pilot projects with industrial and institutional partners: 3

Immediate Result 2.2: Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.

Federal Partner: Public Works and Governmental Services Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Linguistic Management and Services             Canada Language Portal

Result for 2008-13 Roadmap:

Canadians have better access to quality language resources in both official languages.
$16.0 M $3.4 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Develop new articles for the Portal.

Add writing tools to the Portal.

Conclude agreements with partners to develop the Portal.

Obtain authorizations given by our partners to establish links to online language resources.

Federal Partner: Canada School of Public Service
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Foundational learning

Official Languages Learning

Language retention services
Expanding Universities’ Access to Language Learning

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Increased access to language training products to Canadians through new partnerships with Canadian universities.
$2.5 M $0.88 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Learners have a better understanding of the benefits of linguistic duality.

Students and universities are satisfied with the tools.

Tools help students maintain or improve their proficiency level in their second language.

New approach facilitating access to Canada School of Public Service’s language learning tools.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Learning of a Second Language – Component: Support to Second-Language and Minority-Language Education

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Increased access of OLMCs to quality education in their language in their milieu.
$190.0 M $38.0 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Maintain the investment levels in Provinces and Territories for programs and activities that promote the learning of French and English as a second official language.

Maintain or increase the proportion of Canadians who learns French and English as a second language.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Learning of a Second Language – Component: Summer Language Bursaries

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved access of OLMCs to a first-rate education in their language in their environment.
$38.3 M $7.66 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Ensure the number of scholarship holders take advantage of the Explore program. This program offers a cultural exchange that helps students perfect their comprehension and competencies of their second official language.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Learning of a Second Language – Component: Official-language Monitors

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.
$14.8 M $2.96 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: Ensure the number of participants in the Odyssée program is maintained. This program allows students to work as language monitors in second language classrooms across the country.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Youth Initiatives – Promotion of the linguistic duality

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language.
$2.0 M N/A

Expected Result for 2011-12: Nothing in 2011-12. The initiative was for 2009-10 only.

Immediate Result 2.3: Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Cultural Industries National Translation Program for Book Publishing

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
$5,0 M $1.5 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Funding is allocated to book publishers for eligible translations.

Official language translations of books by Canadian authors are undertaken with support from the National Translation Program for Book Publishing.

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Cultural Industries Musical Showcase Program for Artists from Official-language Communities

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
$4.5 M $1.0 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Funding agreements are in place with partners who organize showcases and finance the artists.

Music showcases are organized and presented.

Artists from OLMCs perform at these showcases.

Intermediate Result 3: Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.

Immediate Result 3.1: Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).

Federal Partner: Justice Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Legal Services to Government Accountability and Coordination Framework

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Support to ministers with statutory or sectoral responsibilities for official languages and to work with them.
$2.18 M $0.44 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Continue training and awareness activities in order to increase awareness of language rights.

Continue providing high quality and useful legal advice to partners.

Continue monitoring official language issues that could affect the federal government.

Federal Partner: Justice Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Internal Services Accountability and Coordination Framework $0.15 M $0.03 M

Expected Result for 2011-12: N/A

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage (Official Languages Secretariat)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Official Languages Accountability and Coordination Framework

Results for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

1) The Government of Canada has official languages strategies.
2) The partners are supported in the implementation of their official languages initiatives.
3) The quality of information on results (financial and non-financial) provided by the partners is improved.
4) The results of the research on official languages are communicated to the partners.
5) The Minister of Official Languages is advised on official languages files.
$13.5 M $1.85 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Support to Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and senior officials in elaborating timely documentation and in insisting on quality assurance of given information and strategic advice.

To facilitate the implementation of the Roadmap by organizing regular meetings of interdepartmental committees of various levels, by consulting with the partners, by coordinating the collection of information for ministerial reports, by sharing timely financial and non-financial information and by preparing the organization of a symposium on research on official languages.

Immediate Result 3.2: Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.

Federal Partner: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer 1
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
Policy Direction. Partnerships and Integration Program Integrity and Sustainability Program Centre of excellence

Result for the 2008-13 Roadmap:

Linguistic duality is reinforced in the federal public service.
$17.0 M $3.4 M

Expected Results for 2011-12: Follow-up on coordination of the review of official languages policy instruments to harmonize them with the human resources management regime currently in place.

Support for the development and review of policy instruments from other policy centres for everything related to official languages.

Policy interpretations on horizontal issues.

Follow-up on the state of official languages in institutions subject to the Official Languages Act as part of the official languages risk-based annual review exercise.

An assessment of the status of official languages in institutions subject to the Management Accountability Framework (MAF).

An Annual Report on Official Languages to Parliament that provides a strategic portrait of the Official Languages Program and is incorporated into the Report on Human Resources Management in the Public Service of Canada.

Follow-up on the preparation of the compliance review of the Regulations, based on the next 10-year census data (the data will be known around December 2012).

Federal Partner: Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity(PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for 2011-12
  Strategic Services Program    

Expected Result for 2011-12: Horizontal support for institutions through the Official Languages Advisory Committees, the Network of Official Languages Champions, the Annual Conference of Official Languages Champions and the Annual Best Practices Forum, as well as tools facilitating the management of official languages in the institutions.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
$ 1,110.1 M $ 234.79 M

Contact information: Geneviève Postolec (819) 934-9196

Notes:

  • 1. In February 2009, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer has been created. It aggregates the Canada Public Service Agency and some parts of Treasury Board Secretariat related to compensation and human resources.


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Department of Finance Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime, formerly the National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering

Name of lead department(s): Department of Finance Canada

Lead department program activity: Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 2000

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation
(start to end date):
$622,961 ($ thousands)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering (NICML) was formally established in 2000 as part of the government's ongoing effort to combat money laundering in Canada. Legislation adopted that year, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act, created a mandatory reporting system for suspicious financial transactions, large cross-border currency transfers, and certain prescribed transactions. The legislation also established the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) to collect and analyze these financial transaction reports and to disclose pertinent information to law enforcement and intelligence agencies. In December 2001, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act was amended to include measures to fight terrorist financing activities, and renamed the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act.

The NICML was expanded and is now known as Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime. In December 2006, Bill C-25 amended the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act to ensure that Canada's legislation remains consistent with international anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing standards as set out by the Financial Action Task Force, and is responsive to areas of domestic risk. The amendments include enhanced client identification requirements, the creation of a registration regime for money services businesses, and the establishment of an administrative and monetary penalties regime to deal with lesser infractions of the Act.

Shared outcome(s): To detect and deter money laundering and the financing of terrorist activities and to facilitate the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences.

Governance structure(s): Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime is a horizontal initiative composed of both funded and non-funded partners. The funded partners are the Department of Finance Canada, the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, FINTRAC, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canada Revenue Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; the non-funded partners are Public Safety Canada, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada, and Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. An interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister-level group and working group, consisting of all partners and led by the Department of Finance Canada, has been established to direct and coordinate the government's efforts to combat money laundering and terrorist financing activities. In addition, the Department also chairs a Public/Private Sector Advisory Committee. This broad-based advisory committee is composed of both public and private sector representatives who provide general guidance for Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime.

Planning Highlights: The priorities for Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime partners will continue to focus on the following key objectives: detecting, deterring and preventing money laundering and terrorist financing and facilitating the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences. Each partner plays a key role in the Regime, and a coordinated effort is a priority.

Federal Partner: Department of Finance Canada
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Financial Sector Policy Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $3,600 $300
Total $3,600 $300

Expected results by program:

The Department of Finance Canada will continue its effective oversight of Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime. The Department will also focus on the following areas:

  • Monitoring the financial sector for money laundering and terrorist financing risks and other emerging illicit financing risks
  • Participating in strategic domestic and international policy development activities that support the government’s commitments to the Regime
  • Working to address the recommendations from the ten-year Treasury Board-mandated evaluation of the Regime
  • Heading the Canadian delegation to participate as an active member in the Financial Action Task Force and the Asia/Pacific Group on Money Laundering, as a Cooperative and Supporting Nation to the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force, and as an observer on the Financial Action Task Force of South America Against Money Laundering
  • Completing the implementation of the Budget 2009 measure related to counter-measures to tackle illicit financing
  • Initiating the 5-year Parliamentary Review of the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act
  • Continued participation in horizontal initiatives related to national security
Federal Partner: Department of Justice Canada
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $7,200 $100
Total $7,200 $100

Expected results by program:

The International Assistance Group and the Criminal Law Policy Section of the Department of Justice Canada play a significant role in the Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime. For 2011-12, it is anticipated that the Criminal Division will use the resources it receives to carry out work related to the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), including attending FATF-related international meetings. These may include meetings of the subgroups of the FATF, for example, the Working Group on Evaluation and Implementation, and FATF-Style Regional Bodies, including the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force and the Financial Action Task Force of South America Against Money Laundering. Resources will also be allocated to ensure the Criminal Law Policy Section’s continued involvement in policy development relating to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, the Human Rights Law Section will receive money to deal with any ancillary constitutional issue raised during the prosecutions.

Federal Partner: Public Prosecution Service of Canada
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Addressing criminal issues to contribute to a safer world Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $13,800 $2,300
Total $13,800 $2,300

Expected results by program:

For 2011–12, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) will continue to provide legal advice and support to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and other enforcement agencies over the course of proceeds of crime, money laundering, terrorist financing and investigations relating to the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act, and to undertake prosecutions that arise out of those investigations. In addition, the PPSC will continue to provide Regime-related training to law enforcement personnel and prosecutors, and to support policy development and coordination. Finally, the PPSC will support the work of the Financial Action Task Force, as required.

Federal Partner: The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Collection, analysis, and dissemination of financial information Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $355,585 $45,496
Total $355,585 $45,496

Expected results by program:

Financial Intelligence

The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) produces and disseminates financial intelligence on suspected money laundering, terrorist financing and other threats to the security of Canada; making case disclosures to appropriate law enforcement agencies, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service or other agencies designated by legislation to support investigations and prosecutions. FINTRAC also conducts strategic analysis of financial intelligence from a variety of information sources, which informs various stakeholders about trends and patterns relating to money laundering and terrorist financing.

In 2011–12, FINTRAC will continue to provide law enforcement, intelligence bodies and international partners with timely financial intelligence and case disclosures to support investigations and other actions. FINTRAC will also seek to ensure that its partners, policy makers and other interested parties have the knowledge and support they need to make informed decisions on existing and emerging issues related to money laundering and terrorist financing.

Compliance

FINTRAC seeks to counter money laundering and terrorist financing by improving the compliance of its Reporting Entities with their obligations under Part 1 of the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act and related regulations, including obligations concerning reporting, record keeping, identity verification and other requirements.

For 2011–12, FINTRAC will continue to use a risk-based approach to compliance that seeks to ensure that reporting entities understand and are engaged in meeting their legislative obligations regarding anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing.

Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Money Laundering Units Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $80,210 $6,989
Anti-Terrorist Financing Units Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $32,563 $5,041
Public Works and Government Services Canada Accommodations $3,303 $551
Total $116,076 $12,581

Expected results by program:

Money Laundering Units

Enhance national and international opportunities for the detection and investigation of money laundering activities, including leading money laundering investigations targeting major organized crime.

Explore strategic realignment of Money Laundering Units (AML) resources to maximize their effectiveness. Consideration will be given to critical mass, recognition of RCMP national priority targets and large-scale money laundering targets, and location of international airports within Canada.

Develop proactive Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada disclosures, as well as other intelligence, to a point where AML and Integrated Proceeds of Crime resources can be maximized in order to disrupt organized criminals and crime groups.

Anti-Terrorist Financing Units

Through the gathering and analysis of financial intelligence, the Anti-Terrorist Financing Team will focus on converting that intelligence into proactive investigations for the Anti-Terrorist Financial Investigative Units, thus enhancing its ability to detect and deter terrorist financing activities. The Anti-Terrorist Financing Team will continue to work closely with domestic partners to further criminal investigations of terrorist financing and will participate and contribute to international forums such as the Financial Action Task Force and international law-enforcement working groups on terrorist financing.

Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Special Enforcement Program (SEP) Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $25,968   $2,200
Charities Directorate Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $16,129* $4,351
Total $42,097   $6,551
* The total allocation was adjusted to accurately reflect the funding that Canada Revenue Agency Charities received in Budget 2008.

Expected results by program:

Special Enforcement Program

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) is focusing on the following three key areas: participating in committees and initiatives that aim to manage and strengthen Canada’s Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime; continuing to enhance operational relationships with the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) and other Regime partners; and conducting research and analysis as it relates to money laundering and tax avoidance and evasion, which would include conducting compliance action focused on individuals and entities that are participating in money laundering and terrorist financing activities.

In 2011–12, the Special Enforcement Program (SEP) will continue to treat all disclosures from FINTRAC on a priority basis. That is, SEP will thoroughly review all disclosures received from FINTRAC and select for audit those with identifiable tax potential. The projected number of audits will remain at approximately 90 cases, with a projected federal tax recovery of $9,000,000. However, given the complexity of the files received from FINTRAC, the lengthy amount of time required to complete these cases and the fact that the number of referrals continue to increase, the number of audits SEP can complete in 2011–12 may be impacted. These factors will also potentially impact the federal tax recovery for these cases.

The results of these audits will be gathered for intelligence purposes to determine whether trends or additional participants in these activities can be identified. 

Charities Directorate 

Under the Income Tax Act, CRA is responsible for administering the registration system for charities. This responsibility recognizes that the existence of a strong regulatory deterrence against terrorist abuse of charities contributes to suppressing the financing of terrorism in Canada and to protecting and preserving the social cohesion and the well-being of Canadians. The CRA's regulatory oversight of charities has been strengthened by the enactment of complementary measures under the Charities Registration (Security Information) Act and the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act and by changes to the Income Tax Act that authorize broader information sharing between partners of Canada’s Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime. Under these authorities, intelligence provided to CRA assists in its mandate to protect the integrity of the registration system for charities, and information disclosed by CRA can be used for investigative purposes. In 2011–12, CRA will continue to consolidate its capacity to identify and respond to cases involving possible links to terrorism by deploying new decision support systems, refining risk management tools, developing a privacy management framework and bringing regulatory actions to the attention of Canadians.

Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Assessment Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime   $807
Enforcement Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime   $4,693
Border Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime   $338
Recourse Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime   $1,688
Total $82,126 $7,526

Expected results by program:

Risk Assessment

  • Continue to be involved in tactical and strategic analysis and assessments of intelligence related to money laundering and terrorist financing activities.
  • Participate in the exchange of currency seizure information to assist in the investigation or prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing activity offences with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
  • Participate in joint forces operations with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and other government departments. Several specific operations exemplify the high level of cooperation between the Regime partners and related international agencies.

Admissibility Determinations

  • Border services officers (BSOs) maintain the responsibility to enforce the physical cross-border reporting obligation, including the examination of baggage and conveyances, and to question and search individuals for unreported or falsely reported currency and monetary instruments.
  • BSOs continue to seize currency and monetary instruments if they are not reported and are greater than the reporting threshold. Seized non-reported currency and monetary instruments are forfeited with no terms of release when BSOs suspect that the seized currency or monetary instruments are proceeds of crime or funds for use in terrorist financing activities. In all other instances, the seized amount will be returned upon payment of a penalty. BSOs are trained to recognize various monetary instruments and potential instances of non-compliance.
  • Dedicated Cross-Border Currency Reporting Teams will continue to be an integral part of the Canada Border Services Agency’s (CSBA) outbound enforcement effort.
  • The Currency Detector Dogs Service will continue to play an important role in the detection of unreported currency that may be related to money laundering or terrorist financing.

Recourse

  • Allow for the legislative or administrative mechanism that provides Canadians with a timely, objective, consistent and transparent internal review process intended to determine the correctness of CBSA decisions and actions taken under the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act.

Internal Services

  • Provide functional direction to the regions regarding the administration and enforcement of Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act.
  • Provide critical strategic planning, priority setting and coordination for the Cross-Border Currency Reporting Program;
  • Continue to work closely with other key government departments on matters related to money laundering and terrorist financing.
  • Continue to be involved in international conferences and workshops that require the presence of cross-border law enforcement expertise.
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
$622,961 $74,854

† Certain organizations that are partners in Canada’s Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime are exempt from reporting; therefore the figures presented in the table may not add up to the total amount allocated.

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):

Contact information:

Rachel Grasham
Chief, Financial Crimes Section
Phone: 613-943-2883



Top of Page

Department of Justice Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Anti-Drug Strategy

2. Name of lead department(s): Department of Justice

3. Lead department program activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-08

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12 and ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $527.9 millions

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS) was launched by the Government of Canada in 2007, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Its goal is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The prevention action plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use, and to develop and implement community-based interventions and initiatives to prevent illicit drug use. The treatment action plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The enforcement action plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

8. Shared outcome(s):

  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced impacts of illicit drug use through prevention and treatment efforts; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.

9. Governance structure(s):

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Youth Justice, and Strategic Initiatives and Law Reform Section of the Department of Justice Canada.

The Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC), which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources. The ADMSC prepares questions for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by the Department of Public Safety Canada, oversees the implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy and the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The Communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy including, making decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative and ensuring coordination of communication.

10. Planning Highlights:

For 2011-12, the 12 federal partner departments and agencies involved in the NADS (the Strategy) will continue to implement the Strategy as planned, with its focus on contributing to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency, and reduce the production and distribution of illicit drugs. As this is the last year for the current Strategy, planning has commenced for Strategy renewal and this process will likely culminate sometime in the latter half of the fiscal year with proposals to set the course for the next phase of the Strategy. In addition, as is required by the accountability structure for the Strategy, an impact evaluation has been initiated and that evaluation will be completed within the 2011-12 fiscal year.

The overall operating environment for the Strategy may change if the Bill (S-10) proposing mandatory minimum penalties (MMPs) for serious drug offences is passed by Parliament, although the affected Strategy partners have plans in place to meet this challenge.

The following tables present the expected results for each federal partner's program activities.

11. Federal Partner: Department of Justice
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
A1 - Justice policies, laws and programs a. Drug Treatment Courts $16.2M $3.6M
b. Youth Justice Fund
(Treatment Action Plan)
$6.8M $1.5M
c. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.4M $0.3M
C1 - Internal Services d. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.5M $0.3M
e. National Anti-Drug Strategy $0.3M $0.1M
Total $26.2M $5.8M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Drug Treatment Courts: Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court clients.

Youth Justice Fund:

Overall Results:

  • To work collaboratively with interested provinces and territories as well as other stakeholders in order to identify gaps in drug treatment programs for youth in the justice system.
  • To introduce, pilot and evaluate a number of drug treatment options for youth involved in the youth justice system in communities.
  • To share knowledge of the piloted drug treatment programs and promising practices with provinces and territories as well as other interested stakeholders.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Projects on treatment services and program enhancements.
  • Enhanced capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Increased availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for targeted populations in areas of need.
  • Improved treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency in targeted populations in areas of need.

Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy (Justice policies, laws and programs):Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

  • exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • maintaining the NADS Governance Structure;
  • leading and coordinating all NADS communications activities;
  • taking lead responsibility for accountability, evaluation and performance reporting; and
  • leading the process for Strategy renewal for 2011-12.

Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy (Internal Services): Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

  • exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • maintaining the NADS Governance Structure;
  • leading and coordinating all NADS communications activities;
  • taking lead responsibility for accountability, evaluation and performance reporting; and
  • leading the process for Strategy renewal for 2011-12.
11. Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
3.4.3 Controlled Substances a. Mass Media Campaign

(Prevention Action Plan)
$29.5M $6.9M
b. Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund

(Prevention Action Plan)
$55.2M $11.0M
3.4 Substance Use and Abuse c. Drug Treatment Funding Program

(Treatment Action Plan)
$122.0M $32.9M
4.1.1.2 First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions d. National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP)

(Treatment Action Plan)
$35.5M $10.1M
3.4.3 Controlled Substances e. Office of Controlled Substances

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$12.7M $4.2M
f. Drug Analysis Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$11.7M $4.3M
$3.4M [1] $0.9M [1]
Total $270.0M $70.3M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Mass Media Campaign:The mass media campaign plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit drug use. The mass media campaign will be measured by the change in the level of awareness, attitude, knowledge and capacity among targeted populations pertaining to their decisions regarding illicit drug use, related risk-taking behaviour and associated consequences. This will be conducted through post campaign public opinion research with both youth 13-15 years of age and their parents, and measured against the baseline surveys that were conducted with parents in 2008 and with youth in 2009. Other evaluation metrics will include: website statistics, Facebook fans, engagement, booklet downloads, calls to 1-800-O-Canada and the number of booklets ordered/shipped.

Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF): DSCIF plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit drug use. The program's success and progress will be measured by the level/nature of acquired or improved knowledge/skills to avoid illicit drug use within the targeted population, and will be measured by evidence that capacity changes are influencing decision-making and behaviours around illicit drug use and associated consequences in targeted populations.

DSCIF also plans to strengthen community responses to illicit drug issues in targeted areas, and will measure their progress based on the type/nature of ways that community responses have been strengthened in targeted areas. For example, the adoption/integration of evidence-informed/best practices within the targeted areas will indicate the program's contribution to this outcome.

Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP): DTFP plans to increase the availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for at-risk youth in areas of need. The program's success and progress will be measured by the type/nature of treatment services and supports that have been made available, and by the program/service utilization trends associated with their populations and areas of need. DTFP also seeks to enhance capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations. This will be measured by the extent to which P/T jurisdictions show evidence of building capacity (e.g., training activities, increased number of counsellors, wider range of services, etc.), and the type/nature of capacity enhancements, treatment services and supports for people residing in Downtown Eastside Vancouver by populations targeted (e.g., youth, Aboriginal populations, sex trade workers and ex-offenders). DTFP is also expecting to improve collaboration on responses and knowledge of treatment issues, which will be measured by the nature, scope and depth of collaborative activities within and among jurisdictions and stakeholders; and stakeholder perceptions on the extent to which responses to DTFP treatment issues are collaborative (e.g., lessons learned). Ultimately the DTFP is working towards improving treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency of affected Canadians.

National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program: First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) plans to increase the availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need (as determined by regional needs assessments). The progress of this plan will be measured by the nature of new or enhanced services that have been made available through funding in targeted areas and are based on research or best practices. FNIHB also plans to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency in First Nations and Inuit populations in areas of need. The progress of this plan will be measured by:

  • the proportion of treatment facilities accredited;
  • the proportion of addictions counsellors in treatment centres who are certified;
  • the changes in stakeholder perceptions regarding the extent to which treatment services have been improved in Strategy-supported investment areas; and
  • the types of collaborative/partnerships with Aboriginal organizations to strengthen systems, programs and services.

Office of Controlled Substances: The Office of Controlled Substances (OCS) plans to reduce the risk of diversion of precursor chemicals by using Strategy funding to improve processes for the issuance of precursor licences and permits. This will include reviewing and streamlining guidance provided to regulated parties involved in carrying out activities with precursor chemicals, and to law enforcement regarding the application for authorization to dispose of seized controlled substances. It will also include improving the tools used to record losses and thefts reported to the OCS by regulated parties.

Drug Analysis Services: Drug Analysis Services (DAS) plans to improve drug enforcement intelligence and evidence, and to increase safety in dismantling illicit drug operations. The success and progress of this plan will be measured by: the perceptions of stakeholders regarding the benefit and timeliness of DAS contributions to court/police responses; the number and nature of injuries to law enforcement officers/other first responders; and the level of additional risk to the environment during the investigation and dismantling of illegal drug operations.

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
1.4 Health and Health Services Advances Research on Drug Treatment Model

(Treatment Action Plan)
$4.0M $1.0M
Total $4.0M $1.0M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Research on Drug Treatment Model: Continue to improve the state of knowledge and its translation with respect to treatment and understanding of the consequences of illicit drug use.

To address this, in 2011-12, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) will be evaluating mid-term reports of five year team grants on substance abuse to determine progress on the objectives, which are to:

  • Generate high-quality research that addresses an important health and disease, health care or health system problem or issue which is best approached through a collaborative team;
  • Provide superior research training and mentorship environments; and
  • Produce new knowledge and the translation of research findings into improvements in the health of Canadians and the Canadian health care system.

CIHR will also review end of grant reports for one year grants funded in 2010-11 to determine if the objectives have been achieved, which were to:

  • Generate preliminary observations, data or knowledge, or to facilitate team formation, as a first step towards the pursuit of more comprehensive funding opportunities by researchers or teams of researchers;
  • Generate high impact results and/or innovative research proposals, research tools, techniques, devices, inventions, or methodologies;
  • Produce scoping reviews and syntheses that respond to the information needs of knowledge users in the areas of prevention and treatment of illicit drug use;
  • Support the use of synthesis evidence in decision making by building integrated and end-of-grant knowledge translation practices into the production of scoping reviews and syntheses; and
  • Extend the benefits of knowledge synthesis to new kinds of questions relevant to knowledge users and areas of research that have not traditionally been synthesized.

CIHR has also launched new competitions for the same one year grants with similar objectives, which will be funded in 2011-12.

A workshop will be held in Fall 2011 to reunite the researchers funded under the Substance Abuse Initiative to:

  • Share current knowledge and research results;
  • Establish networks of researchers and partners (federal departments, provincial agencies, NGOs); and
  • Identify knowledge translation opportunities and provide feedback to CIHR for a knowledge translation.
11. Federal Partner: Public Safety
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
1.3 Countering Crime a. National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.0M $0.8M
b. Crime Prevention Funding and Programming: Crime Prevention Action Fund

(Prevention Action Plan)
$20.0M $15.8M
Total $24.0M $16.6M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation:

  • Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies.

Crime Prevention Funding and Programming:

  • Effective evidence-based responses to substance use and abuse and crime related issues in communities.
  • Positive changes in risk and protective factors among targeted populations.
11. Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
1.1.2.7 a. Drug and Organized Crime Awareness Services

(Prevention Action Plan)
$12.9M $3.0M
3.5.2 Community and Youth Programs b. National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program

(Treatment Action Plan)
$3.6 M $0.8 M
1.1.2.9 c. Marijuana and Clandestine Lab Teams/Proceeds of Crime

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$85.2M $26.2M
PWGSC Accommodations $2.3M $0.5M
Total $104.0M $30.5M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Drug and Organized Crime AwarenessServices: Reduction of the demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations (e.g., youth and Aboriginal youth), as well as within the general public, through community partnership and education in view of creating awareness of the health consequences related to substance use.

The Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Service (DOCAS) remains committed to providing Canadians with the tools needed to deal with substance use/abuse and expects a reduction of negative impacts on health and society along with a decrease of criminal activities linked to illicit drug use.

National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program:

  • Increased police awareness of risk and protective factors of youth offenders and victims.
  • Increased community satisfaction with RCMP youth-related services.
  • Increased police awareness of community-based youth-serving resources and referral procedures.
  • Increased referrals to youth addictions treatment and intervention programs by police.

Marijuana and Clandestine Lab Teams/Proceeds of Crime:

  • Development of transnational partnerships to address issues regarding the globalization of the precursor chemical industry and its impact on communities.
  • Enhanced ability to identify, disrupt and dismantle organized crime groups profiting from the production and trafficking of controlled drugs and substances.
  • Enhanced ability through partnerships, both internal and external, to develop tactical targeting parameters that address the procurement of chemicals by organized crime groups.
  • Enhanced ability to monitor, analyze and predict regional and national trends on marihuana production and trafficking.
  • Enhanced ability to adjust tactical and strategic objectives based on the analysis of regional and national marihuana grow operation trends.
  • Enhanced ability through partnerships at the municipal, provincial and federal levels to promote, coordinate and implement various initiatives and legislations targeting marihuana producers and traffickers.
11. Federal Partner: Correctional Service Canada
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
2.0 Correctional Interventions Case Preparation and Supervision

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$23.3M [1] $6.4M [1]
Total $23.3M $6.4M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Case Preparation and Supervision: Timely case preparation; rate of offenders successfully reintegrated into the community (if legislation regarding mandatory minimum penalties (MMPs) for serious drug offences is passed).

11. Federal Partner: Parole Board of Canada
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.4 M $1.3 M
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$1.8 M $0.5M
Internal Services Internal Services $1.3 M $0.4M
Total $7.5M [1] $2.2M [1]

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Conditional Release Decisions: Should the proposed legislation receive Royal Assent, this funding will provide Parole Board of Canada (PBC) the capacity for effective management of its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. PBC will collect information and report on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated as a result of new legislative provisions (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole).

Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability: Should the proposed legislation receive Royal Assent, this funding will provide the PBC the capacity for provision of information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings and individuals who seek access to decision registry in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. In a similar manner, PBC will report on the extent of involvement of victims and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by PBC.

Effective management of both these responsibilities will contribute to public safety and reinforce public confidence in the justice system.

11. Federal Partner: Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
1.1 Drug, Criminal Code, and terrorism prosecution program a. Prosecution and prosecution related services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$8.6M $1.7M
b. Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA

(Mandatory Minimum Penalties)
$33.5M [1] TBD [1]
2.1 Internal Services Enforcement Action Plan $1.3M $0.2M
Total $43.4M $1.9M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Prosecution and prosecution related services:Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA), in response to the workload generated by the enhanced RCMP dedicated anti-drug teams and criminal intelligence and technical operations support staff.

Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA:Provision of prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations and prosecution of drug charges under the CDSA resulting from the MMPs, subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

11. Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
Risk Assessment Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$7.2M $2.1M
Internal Services Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$5.5M $1.6M
Total $12.7M $3.7M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services (Risk Assessment):

  • Increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illicit drug issues relative to the border.
  • Increase intelligence support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the Strategy.
  • Improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the Strategy to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting and information sharing related to illicit drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the Strategy as they relate to the border.

Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services (Internal Services):Laboratory and Scientific Services - Continuation of the original Strategy plan with respect to additional sampling, analysis and increased use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry. Safe sampling tools are still in development.

11. Federal Partner: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
1.2 Diplomacy and Advocacy Annual Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Control Commission (CICAD)

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.5M $0.9M
Total $4.5M $0.9M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Annual Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Control Commission (CICAD):

  • Improved capacity of UNODC to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs and international crime at the global level.
  • Improved capacity of CICAD to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs in the Americas.
11. Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
4. Reporting Compliance Special Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.2M $1.0M
Total $4.2M $1.0M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Special Enforcement Program:

  • 32 audits of targets involved in marijuana grow operations or illicit drugs.
  • $1,750,000 in federal tax assessed will be generated from these audits:
  • Provincial tax (except for Quebec files), penalties and interest will also be assessed, and
  • Delinquent action will be taken on any taxpayers who have not filed their applicable personal income tax returns.
  • The expected dollars assessed resulting from the Strategy audits has decreased from $2.5M in 2010-11 to $1.75M in 2011-12 due to the CRA placing a greater emphasis on the collectability of assessments in order to have an impact on the criminal activities.
11. Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
1.7 Specialized Programs and Services Forensic Accounting Management Group

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$1.6M [2] $0.6M [2]
Total $1.6M [2] $0.6M [2]

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Forensic Accounting Management Group: Increased operational capacity to provide forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives for engaging in criminal activities.

11. Federal Partner: Financial Transactions and Analysis Centre of Canada
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
2004113 Detection and deterrence of money laundering and terrorist financing Financial Transactions and Report Analysis Centre of Canada

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$2.5M $0.7M
Total $2.5M $0.7M

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Financial Transactions and Report Analysis Centre of Canada:

  • Law enforcement and intelligence agencies receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.
  • Enhanced compliance in high risk reporting entity sectors.
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
$527.9M $141.6

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

18. Contact information:

Catherine Latimer
General Counsel and Director General
Youth Justice, and Strategic Initiatives and Law Reform Section
(613) 957-9623
clatimer@justice.gc.ca

Footnotes:

[1] The funding to implement mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to Bill S-10 (Penalties for Organized Drug Crime Act) receiving Royal Assent.

[2] Includes Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation charges.

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Environment Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Canadian Group on Earth Observations is a collection of federal departments participating in the international Group on Earth Observations (GEO).

2. Name of lead department: Environment Canada (EC) (by virtue of the identification of the ADM of the Meteorological Service of Canada as the GEO Principal.)

3. Lead department program activity: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 2003 (though there are no dedicated funds, this initiative is funded from the existing A-Base)

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): provided through existing A-Base and in-kind contributions from federal departments.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The GEO is seeking to implement the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to allow free and open access to Earth observations for decision makers and policy makers in all countries. In doing so, users such as Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada will be better able to better predict the future state of planet Earth and better warn citizens of the onset of hazardous conditions. See the GEO website for more details: http://www.earthobservations.org/

8. Shared outcomes:

  • Enhancing access to global Earth observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements;
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international; and
  • Improving evidence-based decision making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations.

9. Governance structures: Coordination is achieved through the DG-level Interdepartmental Co-ordinating Committee (ICC) and ad hoc working level committees.

10. Planning Highlights: The binational group for the Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) has been formed and registered as a GEO participating organization to improve monitoring and data sharing in the Great Lakes basin. Work continues to establish similar groups in the Prairies and the Rocky Mountains for better understanding of the water cycle and better predictions of drought, flood and water quality conditions. This is connected to Global Drought Monitoring Initiative efforts. The GEO Plenary and Ministerial Summit in Beijing from November 3 to 5, 2010, reaffirmed member countries’ commitment to the GEOSS. Furthermore, Canada reaffirmed that, in the coming years, it will actively contribute to global efforts in forest carbon tracking and in the Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM), and that the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) will assume the chairmanship of the Committee on Earth Observations Satellites (CEOS) in 2012.

Canada also plays a key role in the GEO Monitoring and Evaluation Working Group with EC providing a co-chair and DND providing expertise to the group performing the second evaluation of GEO results, which will focus on the progress made in global data sharing. An interdepartmental working group co-chaired by EC and NRCan has been activated to explore the larger issue of data standard and sharing policies and principles.

11. Federal Partner:
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011–2012
1. Environment Canada Meteorological Service of Canada N/A In-kind contributions of $100K salary and $50K O&M from A‑Base
$38K G&C
2. Natural Resources Canada a. Earth Sciences Sector N/A In kind – to be determined
b. Canadian Forest Service N/A In kind – to be determined
c. Canadian Sensor for Remote Sensing N/A $30K G&C
3. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada a. Science and Technology N/A In kind – to be determined
b. Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration and Environment N/A In kind – to be determined
4. Canadian Space Agency a. Earth Observations N/A In kind – to be determined
5. Department of Fisheries and Oceans a. Science and Technology N/A In kind – to be determined
6. Health Canada a. Radiation N/A In kind – to be determined
7. Statistics Canada a. Agriculture N/A In kind – to be determined
8. Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade a. Environment N/A In kind – to be determined

16. Expected results by program: Participation in the GEO by Canadian departments is expected to have benefits in nine areas related to ecosystems, biodiversity, agriculture and forestry, energy production, human health, weather forecasting, climate forecasting, disaster risk reduction and water management. Coordinating open and full access to all available space-based and in-situ Earth observations related to these areas will increase the amount and quality of information available to decision makers and policy makers at all levels of government and in industry, resulting in better predictions, identification of issues and adaptation and mitigation strategies and overall better management of these areas.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–2012
N/A $ to be determined

18. Contact information:
Danielle Lacasse
DG Business Policy Directorate
Meteorological Services Canada
Environment Canada



1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative

2. Name of lead department: Environment Canada

3. Lead department program activity: 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2010 (GLAPV resources)

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 25, 2012

  • The 2007–2010 Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA) respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem was extended for one year to March 31, 2011. A further extension of the COA to June 2012 is anticipated.
  • The Great Lakes Action Plan was renewed for a further five years, to March 31, 2015, after which funding will be ongoing (GLAPV). $8M per year is allocated for Areas of Concern to implement remedial actions to complete the clean-up and restoration in three key areas: fish and wildlife habitat rehabilitation and stewardship, contaminated sediment assessment and remediation, and innovative approaches to improve municipal wastewater effluent quality.

* Note: The Government of Canada is continuing negotiations with the Government of the United States to amend the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The implications of these negotiations for a new federal program are currently unknown.

Contact information:
Jennifer McKay
Manager, Great Lakes Environment Office
Environment Canada
416-739-5712


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Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


FINTRAC is involved in the following horizontal initiatives as a partner:

  • Anti-Money Laundering / Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime (AML/ATF)
  • Public Security and Anti-Terrorism Initiative (PSAT)
  • National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS)
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Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Health of the Oceans

Lead department Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Strategic Outcome Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems
Program Activity Integrated Oceans Management
Start date April 1, 2007
End date March 31, 2012
Description Building on the achievements of the Oceans Action Plan, the Health of the Oceans initiative is a five-year, $61.5 million commitment by five departments — Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), Transport Canada, Environment Canada, Parks Canada and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada — to improve the health of the ocean environment. For its part, DFO will receive $23.2 million to support its protection and conservation work. Key DFO initiatives include establishing six new Marine Protected Areas (MPA) under the Oceans Act, advancing a national MPA network, conducting scientific research to support designation of the new MPAs, creating four new national Oceans Centres of Expertise, and enhancing spill-response capacity and emergency planning in the Arctic Ocean. For a complete list, see the table below. DFO co-ordinates the entire Health of the Oceans Initiative, including bi-annual performance monitoring, the preparation of summary annual reports and preparation for a final summative evaluation. A program evaluation is projected to be completed in 2011-12.
Shared outcomes
  • Four new Oceans Centres of Expertise
  • Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy: finalization of planning guidelines for federal MPA network
  • Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy: preparation of a status report of federal MPA
  • Federal-Provincial-Territorial Marine Protected Areas network (2012)
  • Marine Protected Areas establishment
  • Collaboration with the World Wildlife Fund-Canada
  • Delivery of a suite of indicators to assess and monitor Arctic ecosystems
  • Integrated Oceans Management and Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) assessment tools linkage
Governance structure This initiative is subject to interdepartmental governance through the Assistant Deputy Ministers Interdepartmental Committee on Oceans, supported by a shadow Directors General Committee. This governance structure reviews the initiatives on a regular basis including review and approval of annual reports to Ministers on the progress of this initiative.
Planning Highlights The Oceans Directorate at DFO monitors the HOTO initiative biannually and develops tools and processes to capture and report performance information. The monitoring and reporting process assesses progress against work plans and thus provides an opportunity for adaptive functions during the projects life cycle. The collaborative governance structure contributes to facilitated information access and exchange and leads to better informed decisions relating to program planning and management. An annual performance summary is prepared for submission to TBS.

Federal Partner / Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending 2011–12 Expected Results for 2011-12
Fisheries and Oceans
Integrated Oceans Management Federal Marine Protected Areas Strategy Implementation in DFO 1250.0 250.0 Advance the creation of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada’s oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management framework.
Development of a Federal-Provincial-Territorial MPA Network 2,500.0 400.0 Significant progress in planning and advancement of a National (federal-provincial-territorial) Marine Protected Area Network in Canada’s three oceans.
Arctic Council – Ecosystem Projects 1,000.0 200.0 The Arctic Council Ecosystem Projects will result in:
  • a State of the Arctic Basin Report and use of common ecosystem monitoring strategies in shared and boundary waters;
  • Canada’s participation in expert workshops and major conferences on ecosystem approach for advancing EBM concepts and approaches, promoting Canada’s leadership in EBM applied to the Arctic, and sharing information and practices with other circumpolar countries, including US;
  • articles on EBM in Canada’s Arctic published in expert journals or workshop proceedings;
  • a suite of indicators for monitoring and assessing ecosystem status and trends, socio-economic aspects and governance structures in place in the Arctic; and,
  • the Arctic Council’s Report on Best Practices in Ecosystem-based Oceans Management in the Arctic (key product of the 2009 Ministerial Meeting).
Oceans Centres of Expertise (Coastal, Corals, Data Integration, TEK) 3,000.0 600.0 Establishment of four centres of expertise. Development and implementation of common tools and approaches in the five LOMAs to protect deep sea corals and sponge reefs, incorporate traditional knowledge, develop information management and exchange standards and accelerate progress in addressing coastal management issues
Collaboration with World Wildlife Fund (WWF) 213.0 42.6 Greater contribution by environmental non-governmental organizations to the Health of the Oceans.
Gulf of Maine (at DFO) 750.0 120.0 This initiative builds on the existing successful trans-boundary collaboration and management of Groundfish stocks through the Canada-United States Steering Committee, and the excellent cooperation between states and provinces through the Gulf of Maine Council. Based on DFO’s national standard, a literature review and project work plan for a joint Canada-United States Bay of Fundy/Gulf of Maine Ecosystem Overview and Assessment Report was developed as part of the 2005 Oceans Action Plan.
Marine Protected Areas Establishment 5,250.0 787.5 Six new MPAs will be designated within the existing Large Ocean Management Areas and a national monitoring and reporting system will be implemented for all Oceans Act MPAs.
Ecosystem Science Support and Advice on Health of the Oceans 5,500.0 1,100.0 Science advice on Marine Protected Areas and on priority sector-specific impacts and mitigation.
Habitat Management Integrated Management and Canadian Environmental Assessment Act Assessment Tools Linkages 1,450.0 225.0 Processes and tools developed to support integrated oceans management and promote Health of the Oceans bridged with Canadian Environmental Assessment Act project-specific environmental assessment and strategic environmental assessment to address ecosystem-level cumulative impacts.
Environmental Response Services Spill Capacity and Emergency Response Strategy 2,260.0 0 Canada’s spill response capacity in the Arctic assessed, and equipment and systems to respond to the unique risks prepared.
Environment Canada
Biodiversity and Corporate services Federal Marine Protected Areas Strategy – Implementation in EC 1,250.0 250.0 Advance the creation of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada’s oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management framework.
Marine Wildlife Areas Establishment 2,000.0 179.0 Both the National Wildlife Area at Sable Island and Marine Wildlife Area at Scott Islands will be ready for designation, and a contribution will have been made to the Federal Marine Protected Area Network building process.
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision making and corporate services Sable Island Weather Station 4,000.0 800.0

1)  The risk of loss of life or property due to weather events is reduced for mariners, Canadian citizens and the international community, by producing more accurate weather forecasts and warnings using data from the Sable Island Weather Station.
2)  The understanding of upper atmospheric conditions and the flow of airborne pollutants and greenhouse gases is improved, by enabling scientific research through the continued existence of the Sable Island Weather Station infrastructure.
3)  The unique and fragile ecosystem of Sable Island is conserved by protecting it from human degradation.

Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes and corporate services Gulf of Maine (at EC) 751.0 120.0 Increased support for the Gulf of Maine Council and implementation of the joint Canada-US five-year action plan that includes implementation of regional strategies for adaptation to climate change, indicators development, education and engagement and joint monitoring for toxic contaminants in the trans-boundary ecosystem.
Parks Canada Agency
Heritage Places Establishment Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy Implementation in Parks Canada 1,250.0 167.0 Advance the creation of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada’s oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management framework.
National Marine Conservation Area in Lancaster Sound 5,000.0 1,000.0 Achieve a full understanding of the feasibility of establishing a National Marine Conservation Area in Lancaster Sound with the support of Inuit, Nunavut and key sectoral stakeholders, leading to the conservation of a significant representative component of Canada’s marine environment and a clear demonstration of Arctic sovereignty in the Northwest Passage.
Transport Canada
Transportation Safety and Security and Internal Services Enforcement of Ballast Water Regulations 4,500.0 966.5 Enforcement of regulations that minimize the risk of harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens from being introduced through ship ballast water to waters under Canadian jurisdiction.
Pollution Prevention - Surveillance 13,000.0 3,181.6 Enforcement of Canada’s pollution prevention regulations in the Pacific, Arctic, East Coast Waters, the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the St. Lawrence Estuary.
Pollution Prevention – Dash 7 Outfitting 5,000.0 0 Enforcement of Canada’s pollution prevention regulations in the Pacific, Arctic, East Coast Waters, the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the St. Lawrence Estuary.   Modernization of the current Dash 7 surveillance aircraft to a standard equal to the Dash 8 surveillance aircraft dedicated for use on the East and West Coast.
Arctic International Marine Shipping Assessment 550.0 0 An assessment of projected shipping activities and the associated environmental, social and economic impacts and risks as reduced sea ice may lead to increased marine transport in the Arctic.
Pollution Prevention – Ship Waste Reduction Strategy 800.0 200.0 Adequate reception facilities for wastes; appropriate legislation and standards
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Northern land Resources Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment/ Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment from land-based sources of pollution 175.0 0 The series of reports will lead to:  an expanded arctic regional programme of action on land-based sources of pollution; a greater understanding of Aboriginal Arctic marine resource use; and a greater understanding of the social, economic and environmental impacts from changing shipping patterns on northern and aboriginal communities.
TOTAL   61,449.0 10,590.0  

Contact information
Harvey Brodkin
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
200 Kent Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0E6
Telephone: (613) 990-6692
Email: Harvey.Brodkin@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

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Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Table 4: Horizontal Initiative—Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of lead department(s): Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Lead department program activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 2, 2005; operationalized September 18, 2006

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1,134.9 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Funded from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, the GPSF fills a funding gap by providing dedicated resources for activities that are necessary for a timely response with respect to countries in or at risk of crisis, but that are not properly the responsibility of the Department of National Defence (DND) and are outside Canada's traditional official development assistance program. Examples of these activities are supporting peace operations and peace processes, supporting justice and security system reform, enhancing transitional justice and reconciliation, and improving the peace enforcement and peace operations capacities of military and police forces in Africa and the Americas. Major recipients of funding are Afghanistan, Sudan and Haiti.

The GPSF is both a responsive and a directive program, established to provide timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges. DFAIT works closely with a range of other government departments including the Canadian International Development Agency, Public Safety Canada, the RCMP, DND, the Correctional Service of Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency and Justice Canada. Along with other assistance, these partnerships provide critical expertise in the area of justice and security system reform to the civilian components of UN peace operations.

Shared outcome(s): The ultimate shared outcome is peace, security, and the safety and well-being of those living in priority fragile or conflict-affected states, through effective stabilization and reconstruction programming. Specific expected results are:

  • Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations
  • Strengthened institutions and civil society in affected states
  • Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations
  • Strengthened international frameworks for addressing crisis situations

Governance structure(s): The GPSF is managed by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) in the context of a whole-of-government approach coordinated through the START Advisory Board. Led by the Director General of START and comprising senior officials from across government, the START Advisory Board is responsible for establishing, within the framework of individual departmental authorities, whole-of-government strategic policy as well as priority setting and direction with respect to fragile states and complex emergencies. It is also responsible for providing a platform for information exchange to ensure that program-related activities are complementary and avoid duplication. The START Secretariat is located in the Programs and Departmental Security Branch of DFAIT and is accountable to DFAIT, which is responsible for the financial, human and physical resource services for START.

Planning Highlights: There are four key developments central to plans for GPSF programming in 2011-2012. They are: (1) transitioning GPSF programming in Afghanistan from a Kandahar to a national-level focus in the thematic areas of rule of law, justice, border security and stabilization operations and with a new focus on regional diplomacy; (2) continuing Canadian engagement in Sudan in the context of the end of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement period and supporting the negotiation of peaceable post-referendum arrangements; the GPSF will seek to provide expert support from relevant government departments within the framework of a renewed Canadian commitment to Sudan programming through to 2012-2013; (3) continuing Canadian engagement in Haiti in the context of justice and security sector reform as a component of reconstruction; the GPSF will provide expert support to justice and security institutions in Haiti through the deployment of members of other government departments (OGD) and Canadian non-governmental organizations; and (4) working with OGD partners to develop a comprehensive framework for funding and managing civilian deployments in recognition of the growing demand for Canadian government civilian expertise to respond to complex emergencies internationally.

Federal Partner: Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) (Lead)
Note: Planned funding for federal partners’ programming in Afghanistan is unavailable due to ongoing efforts to finalize plans for the transformation of Canada’s engagement in Afghanistan post July 2011. 
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
PA 2: Diplomacy and Advocacy Global Peace and Security Program   $78.98 million
Global Peace and Operations Program   $10.00 million
Glyn Berry Program for Peace and Security   $5.00 million
Total   $93.98 million 

Expected Results by program activity: The GPSF supports initiatives in affected states. These are states experiencing fragility, conflict, governance crises, natural disasters and complex emergencies implicating Canadian interests and consistent with Canada’s foreign policy priorities. The long-term expected results are:

  • Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations
  • Strengthened institutions and civil society in affected states
  • Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations
  • Strengthened international frameworks for addressing crisis situations

The ultimate result of the GPSF-funded interventions is effective stabilization and reconstruction in affected states, contributing to peace and security and the safety and well-being of beneficiaries living in those targeted areas.

Federal Partner: Department of National Defence (DND)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
PA 1: N/A      
Total    

* Total funding to this federal partner comes from the GPSF Afghanistan programming envelope and is unavailable.

Expected Results by program activity: N/A

Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
PA 1: Federal and International Operations International Police Peacekeeping Program   $12.51 million*
Canadian Police Arrangement   $12.60 million
Total   $25.11 million

* Subject to program renewal

Expected Results by program activity: Deployment of up to 200 Canadian police officers to support peace operations in fragile states and added deployments to Guatemala to support the Police Reform Commission.

Federal Partner: Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
PA: N/A Delivery of International Assistance under the CCC/DFAIT Memorandum of Understanding   $8.50 million
Total   $8.50 million

Expected Results by program activity: To reach 60% completion of the Haitian National Police headquarters ($4.5 million) and 50% completion of the Fleet Management and Maintenance Centre ($4 million).

Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
PA: N/A      
Total    

Expected Results by program activity: N/A

Federal Partner: Correctional Service of Canada (CSC)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
PA 1: Correctional Interventions Operations in Afghanistan    
Stabilization and Reconstruction in Haiti   $1.22 million
Total   $1.22 million

Expected Results by program activity: Deployment of up to 25 officers to the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti until October 2011.

Federal Partner: Department of Justice/Public Prosecutions
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
N/A      
Total    

Expected Results by program activity: N/A

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–2012
$1,134.9 million $128.81 million

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Elissa Golberg
Director General, START Secretariat
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
Tel.: 613-665-6689
Fax: 613-944-5911
Email: elissa.golberg@international.gc.ca

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Health Canada

Horizontal Initiatives 1


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Federal Tobacco Control Initiative (FTCS)

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Substance Use and Abuse

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: *

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: *

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

8. Shared outcome(s):

9. Governance structure(s):

10. Planning Highlights:

11. Federal Partner: * Funding for the initiative is ongoing but the current policy approval ends March 31, 2011. Further information is not available at this time.
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
       
     
     
Total    

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

11. Federal Partner: (Denomination)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
       
     
     
Total    

16. Expected results by program as per (13):


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
   

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

18. Contact information:

Cathy A. Sabiston
Director General, Controlled Substances and Tobacco Directorate
(613) 941-1977
cathy.a.sabiston@hc-sc.gc.ca

Horizontal Initiatives 2


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Defence of Canada Against Third-Party Claims in Tobacco Litigation

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Substance Use and Abuse

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-2011

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-2013

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $45,738,000

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The purpose of this horizontal initiative is to defend Canada against third party claims in tobacco litigation. The source of funding for this initiative is:

  • $34,878,000 over three fiscal years from the fiscal framework in Budget 2010;
  • Up to $9,000,000 from Health Canada's existing reference levels ($3,000,000 in 2010-11, $3,000,000 in 2012-12, and $3,000,000 in 2012-13); and
  • Up to $1,860,000 from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's existing reference levels ($1,100,000 in 2010-11, $380,000 in 2011-12, and $380,000 in 2012-13).

8. Shared outcome(s):

Canada is defended against third-party claims in tobacco litigation.

9. Governance structure(s):

The Interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee on Tobacco Litigation co-ordinates the defence efforts. The committee is co-chaired by Health Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Justice Canada. The responsibilities of the Steering Committee include:

  • Ensuring a clear and consistent understanding of the collective and individual obligations of departments and agencies in all aspects of the defence;
  • Providing high-level strategic instruction and policy advice as to significant aspects of the litigation or its financial administration;
  • Monitoring expenditures;
  • Monitoring the evolution of the defence and related resource allocations and needs; and
  • Identifying and sharing lessons learned for any future large-scale document production or litigation actions.

10. Planning Highlights:

In 2011-12, with guidance and support from Justice Canada, Health Canada and Agriculture Canada will continue to prepare for and defend Canada against third-party claims in tobacco litigation as required.

11. Federal Partner: Health Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA 2.5 Substance Use and Abuse Defence of Canada Against Third-Party Claims in Tobacco Litigation $29,742,000 new funding

$9,000,000 existing reference levels
$10,787,000 new funding

$3,000,000 existing reference levels
Total $38,742,000 $13,787,000

Expected results by program:

  • Canada is defended against third-party claims in tobacco litigation.
Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Internal Services Defence of Canada Against Third-Party Claims in Tobacco Litigation $5,136,000 new funding

$1,860,000 existing reference levels
$1,922,000 new funding

$380,000 existing reference levels
Total $6,996,000 $2,302,000

Expected results by program:

  • Canada is defended against third-party claims in tobacco litigation.

12. Contact information:

Louis Proulx
A/Director, Health Canada Litigation Support Office
123 Slater Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9
613-954-5851
louis.proulx@hc-sc.gc.ca

Horizontal Initiatives 3


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Action plan to Protect Human Health from Environmental Contaminants

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Sustainable Environmental Health

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2008-2009

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-2013

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $84.6M

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Recent surveys show that Canadians are concerned about environmental contaminants. There is a clear need to ensure that Canadians have credible information on the impact of chemicals in the environment and the steps that they should take as a result.

The Government has already taken steps to address environmental contaminants through the Chemicals Management Plan and the Clean Air Agenda, focusing on substances which have known potential for harming human health and the environment. Both industry and stakeholders have been supportive of these initiatives but continue to insist that decisions be made based on scientific evidence. This requires mechanisms such as monitoring, surveillance and research to ensure that the effectiveness of interventions to address known potential risks can be assessed and that emerging risks can be detected.

The Action Plan to Protect Human Health from Environmental Contaminants is designed to further protect the health of Canadians from environmental contaminants while increasing the knowledge-base on contaminant levels and potential impacts on health, in particular:

  • to foster awareness and provide information for Canadians to take action;
  • to identify and monitor trends in exposures to contaminants and potentials association with health problems such as asthma, congenital anomalies and developmental disorders; and
  • to better understand the association between contaminants and illness.

$13.1M has been allocated to Health Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 to develop an Environmental Health Guide for Canadians, as well as tailored guides for First Nations and Inuit communities. The objective of the guide is to help make Canadians aware of the risks that harmful environmental contaminants may pose to their health along with direct actions that they can take to reduce these risks and improve their health. The Guide, Hazardcheck, was published March 1, 2010.

$54.5M has been allocated to Statistics Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 towards conducting the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) and $5.6M from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 for Health Canada to conduct the First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative (FNBI). The CHMS is used to collect information from Canadians about their general health and lifestyles and includes collection of blood and urine specimens to be tested for environmental contaminants among other things. The CHMS will not provide data on First Nations on-reserve or Inuit communities. Data for First Nations' peoples on reserve will be captured under the First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative.

$5.9M has been allocation to the Public Health Agency of Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 to enhance surveillance of congenital anomalies.

$5.5M has been allocation to the Public Health Agency of Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 to conduct surveillance of developmental disorders.

8. Shared outcome(s): Reduce health risks to Canadians (particularly vulnerable populations) from environmental contaminants

9. Governance structure(s):

All action plan initiatives take advantage of governance and management structures already established for ongoing government programs such as: the Canadian Population Health Statistics Program, the Chemicals Management Plan, the Healthy Living and Chronic Disease initiative of the Public Health Agency of Canada, as well as components of existing national surveillance systems developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada in partnership with stakeholders.

Each program within Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada will be fully responsible for the management of initiatives they are leading within the action plan. Consultations and stakeholder involvement will be governed through consultative structures and interdepartmental committees already established.

A tripartite governance structure between Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada will be used to oversee the implementation of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). The CHMS will use the existing Canadian Population Health Statistics Program as a governance structure, which includes senior officials from all three federal organizations.

10. Planning Highlights:

Environmental Health Guide for Canadians

The Environmental Health Guide for Canadians has been developed with partners across the Health Portfolio and with the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation to raise awareness of environmental hazards among Canadians and to inform them of what they can do to reduce their exposure to these risks such as carbon monoxide, household chemicals, second-hand smoke, and lead). Background research is also underway for a Guide focusing on senior's health.

A marketing campaign was launched in March 2010 to promote the new Environmental Health guide and to raise awareness of the link between health and the environment. A marketing campaign for 2010-11 will focus primarily on social media including: outreach to Mommy blogger communities and a viral quiz. To compliment the on-line tactics, public engagement events will be hosted at 150 retail locations over 3 consecutive weekends in March 2011 thereby educating Canadians on the environmental issues that could impact their health through face-to-face discussions. A First Nations and Inuit campaign is also underway to support tailored Guides. This includes a general Home Guide, Outdoor Guides with a seasonal focus (fall/winter and spring/summer) and another for First nations and Inuit Youth Guide.

Background research is underway for fact sheets designed for health care providers and teachers/students which will be developed in 2011-12.

2011-12 activities are currently being planned to build on the momentum generated from the launch of the campaign. Partnerships with various non-Governmental and private sector collaborators are being discussed. As well, public relations and outreach activities will continue throughout the year.

First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative

The First Nations Environmental Health Guide-Your Health at Home, What you can do is now complete and is available on the Health Canada Website and has been mailed out to First Nations communities across Canada. The text for the First Nations youth Guide and Spring/ Summer outdoor guides have been developed and are being reviewed by Aboriginal stakeholders. Activity booklets for First Nations youth are also in development. The text for the Inuit Home Guide has been developed and review is underway by Aboriginal stakeholders. For 2011-12, all First Nations Guides should be completed and distributed to First Nations communities across Canada. The Inuit Youth Guide and outdoor Guides should be developed and reviewed by Aboriginal partners during 2011-2012.

Over the next two years, the First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative will be in the implementation phase. This fiscal year, a pilot project in two First Nations' communities is being carried out to assess the logistical and operational requirements of conducting a health survey in a remote versus non-remote First Nation community. In 2011/12, a full-scale health survey will be conducted in First Nations' communities across Canada.

First Nation priorities will be determined and suitable biomonitoring parameters, sampling protocol, and parameters for an ethics review are to be developed including mechanisms to ensure appropriate comparability of data with the CHMS are in place. Sampling of selected communities is expected to commence.

Enhanced Congenital Anomalies Surveillance

In 2011-2012 the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will continue to work with the provinces and territories on implementation of congenital anomalies surveillance systems in the various jurisdictions. It will also continue its participation in the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Reporting, and PHAC will organize the 9th Annual Scientific Meeting for the Network.

Surveillance of Developmental Disorders

In 2011-2012 the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will build on previous developmental work for the surveillance of autism, as the target developmental disorder for the initiative. The focus will be on establishing the surveillance methodology, including indicators, data sources, and sampling approach if indicated. This work will be done collaboratively with experts in the field, other levels of government and other stakeholders.

Canadian Health Measures Survey

In 2011-12 the CHMS team will be working simultaneously on three cycles of the survey:

CHMS Cycle 1: Data dissemination and data release will continue in FY 2011-12 with the release of all Cycle 1 data to the public domain. The CHMS biobank will be available for access by researchers according to published protocols.

CHMS Cycle 2 data collection, which began in August 2009, will continue during FY 2011-12. The CHMS cycle 2 data collection will continue through fall 2011 and data collection response rates will be monitored regularly to ensure adequate representation of the Canadian population by age group and sex.

CHMS Cycle 3 content planning has started in FY 2009-10. During FY 2011-12 specifications for data collection and processing applications, operations manuals, and lab and clinic manuals will be developed. Pilot testing and feasibility studies will be conducted to determine appropriate operational processes and to ensure high response rates and quality data.

11. Federal Partner: Health Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA 3.1 Sustainable Environmental Health Environmental Health Guide for Canadians $13.1M HECS: $0.385M
FNIHB: $0.490M

PACCB: $0. 925M
PA 4.1 First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative $5.6M FNIHB: $1.7M
Total 18.7M 3.5M

Expected results by program:

  • Distribution of The Environmental Health Guides
  • Increased online discussion of the link between health and home environments
  • Fact sheets designed for health care providers and teachers/students will be developed.
  • Tailored Guide for Inuit Youth and Outdoor activities are developed and distributed for review with Aboriginal partners.
  • Tailored Guides for First Nations Fall/Winter Outdoor activities are developed and distributed to aboriginal communities.
  • Continuation of the Environmental Health marketing campaign (mainstream and First Nations components).
Statistics Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA 2 Social Statistics Canadian Health Measures Survey $54.5M $14M

Expected results by program:

  • CHMS Cycle 1: All data from Cycle 1 will be in the public domain and the CHMS biobank will be available for access by researchers according to published protocols. Access to the data by users and researchers, use of the data files in the Research Data Centres, publications in journals, media and other channels will be tracked and monitored.
  • CHMS Cycle 2: Data collection response rates are monitored regularly to ensure adequate representation of the Canadian population by age group and sex. Ongoing data quality control and data quality assurance activities, including observation of the data collection procedures by health experts, are performed to ensure a high data quality level.
  • CHMS Cycle 3: Specifications for data collection and processing applications, operations manuals and lab and clinic manuals will be developed in collaboration with health experts, through working groups and advisory committees, and federal partners through the tripartite governance structure between Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada. Pilot testing and feasibility studies will determine appropriate operational processes to ensure high response rates and quality data while ensuring adherence to planned resources.
Public Health Agency of Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA 1.2 Surveillance and Population Health Assessment Enhanced Congenital Anomalies Surveillance 5.9M $1.6M
Surveillance of Developmental Disorders $5.5M $1.5M
Total $11.4M $3.1M

Expected results by program:

  1. Enhanced Congenital Anomalies Surveillance:
    • increased capacity in the provinces and territories for surveillance of congenital anomalies in their jurisdictions and
    • strengthened networks across Canada for surveillance and research into prevention of congenital anomalies.
  2. Surveillance of Developmental Disorders:
    • a network for surveillance of autism in Canada and
    • increased public health scientific capacity on autism within the federal government.

12. Contact information:

Suzanne Leppinen
Director, Horizontal and International Programs
Safe Environments Directorate, Healthy Environments and Consumer Product Safety Branch, Health Canada
613-941-8071
Suzanne.Leppinen@hc-sc.gc.ca

Horizontal Initiatives 4


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children.

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada (HC)

3. Lead department program activity: First Nations and Inuit Health Primary Health Care

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

  • ECD component- October 2002.
  • Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) component- December 2004

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

  • ECD component - ongoing.
  • ELCC component - ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

  • ECD: $320 million 2002-03 to 2006-07 ($60 million in 2002-03 and $65 million thereafter). Ongoing: $65 million per year.
  • ELCC: $45 million 2005-06 to 2007-08 ($14.5 million in 2005-06; $15.3 million in 2006-07; $15.2 million in 2007-08). Ongoing: $14 million per year.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The ECD Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children was announced on October 31, 2002. The Strategy provides $320 million over five years to: improve and expand existing ECD programs and services for Aboriginal children; expand ECD capacity and networks; introduce new research initiatives to improve understanding of how Aboriginal children are doing; and work towards the development of a "single window" approach to ensure better integration and coordination of federal Aboriginal ECD programming.

In December 2004, as first phase of a "single window", Cabinet approved an additional $45 million over three years (beginning fiscal year 2005-06) and $14 million ongoing to improve integration and coordination of two ECD programs-- Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve (AHSOR) and the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative (FNICCI).

The objectives of these funds are to increase access to and improve the quality of ELCC programming for First Nations children on reserve, and improve integration and coordination between the two programs through joint planning, joint training and co-location.

The Strategy also includes Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)-funded child/day care programs in Alberta and Ontario.

8. Shared outcome(s):

The ECD component complements the September 2000 First Ministers F/P/T ECD Agreement. It seeks to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children by improving the developmental opportunities to which Aboriginal children (and their families) are exposed at an early age (0-6 years).

The ELCC component complements funding released to provinces and territories under the March 2003 Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Childcare (ELCC) to improve access to ELCC programs and services.

9. Governance structure(s):

  • Interdepartmental ECD ADM Steering Committee;
  • Interdepartmental ECD Working Group.

10. Planning Highlights:

In collaboration with partners and stakeholders, federal departments will continue to build on evidence to inform programming and capacity building efforts, and to enhance linkages and integrate services to better support Aboriginal children and their families. These activities will be measured through performance reports and evaluations of program relevance and effectiveness. Coordination of training efforts across programs will be a key area of focus for 2011-12.

The First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative (FNICCI) will continue to provide access to quality child care services for First Nations and Inuit children whose parents are starting a new job or participating in a training program under the new Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS). ASETS is the successor program to the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy (AHRDS), which expired on March 31, 2010. Better collaboration/synergies among FNICCI and Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR) centers will be a priority over the coming years. Risks: infrastructure limitations, size and remoteness of communities running these initiatives.

11. Federal Partners #1: Health Canada (HC):
Electronic Link: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/famil/develop/ahsor-papa_intro-eng.php
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
First Nations and Inuit Health Primary Health Care a. Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR) $107.595 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$21.519/year).
$21.519/year ongoing.
Committed in 2002.

ELCC
$24.000 (2005-06 through to 2007-08,
$7.500 in 2005-06, $8.300 in 2006-07;
$8.200 in 2007-08).
$7.500 in 2008-09 and ongoing

Committed in 2005.
$21.519




$7.500
  b. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (FASD-FNIC) $70.000 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$10.000 in 2002-03 and $15.000 thereafter). $15.000/ year ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$15.000
  c. Capacity Building $5.075
(2002-03 through to 2006-07; $1.015/year). $1.015/ year ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$1.015
Total From start to 2009-10

ECD: $295.272

ELCC: $39.000
ECD: $37.534

ELCC: $7.500

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR):

  • Ongoing program support and enhancement
  • Increase integration, coordination, access, and quality of programming (i.e., identify core competencies of workers/staff)

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (FASD-FNIC):

  • Program enhancement (e.g., develop strategies to implement an FASD Community Coordinators evidence-based project framework stemming from the pilot project evaluation, and to enhance linkages and integrate services to support First Nations and Inuit women with addictions)

Capacity Building:

  • Increase capacity of National Aboriginal Organizations
  • Enhance capacity of community Early Childhood Education practitioners
11. Federal Partners #2: Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC):
Electronic Link: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/dca-dea/index-eng.php
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
Health Promotion a. Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) $62.880 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$12.576/ year and ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$12.576
  b. Capacity Building $2.500 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$0.500/year) and ongoing

Committed in 2002
$0.500
Total $104.608 $13.076

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) :

  • Continue to support program expansion by serving 1000 children on an ongoing basis. The program is enhanced also on an ongoing basis through an increased number of special needs and parental outreach workers and special needs training

Capacity Building:

  • Horizontal coordination, engagement and development of tools and resources.
11. Federal Partners #3: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC):
Electronic Links:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/employment/aboriginal_employment/childcare/index.shtml
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
Skills and Employment (*) a. First Nations and Inuit child Care Initiative (FNICCI) $45.700 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$9.140/year) and ongoing.

Committed in 2002

ELCC
$21.000 (2005-06 through to 2007-08; $7.000/year). $6.500/ year ongoing.

Committed in 2005
$9.14 M





$6.5 M
Social Development (*) b. Research and Knowledge $21.200
(2002-03 through to 2006-07); $4.240/year and ongoing.

Committed in 2002
$2.3 M
Total ECD: $107.040

ELCC: $34.000
$11.44M

$6.5M
(*) Based on current HRSDC Program Activity Architecture

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

First Nations and Inuit child Care Initiative (FNICCI):

  • Program support and enhancement
  • Increase program integration, coordination, access and quality.

Research and Knowledge:

  • Information on the well-being of Aboriginal children.
  • Align collection of Aboriginal children information with Federal strategy on Aboriginal data.
11. Federal Partners #4: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC):
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
The people- social development a. Capacity Building $5.050 (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07;
1.010/year) 2007-2008 and ongoing.

Committed in 2002.
$1.010
Total $8,080 $1.010

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Capacity Building:

  • Partnerships with other government departments and First Nations to support increased coordination/integration of ECD programs and services.
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
ECD (2002-03 to 2006-07): $320.000

($60.000 in 2002-03 and $65.000/year hereafter); $65.000/year ongoing.

Total from start to 2009-10: $515.000

ELCC (2005-06 to 2007-08): $45.000

($14.500 in 2005-06; $15.300 in 2006-07; $15.200 in 2007-08); and $14.000/year ongoing.

Total from start to 2009-10: $73.000


ECD: $63.060



ELCC: $14.000





Total: $77.060

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

N/A

18. Contact information:

Cathy Winters, Senior Policy Coordinator,
Children and Youth Division, Community Programs Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
Postal Locator 1919A Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa
Telephone: (613) 952-5064
Email: cathy.winters@hc-sc.gc.ca

Horizontal Initiatives 5


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (Action Plan)

2. Name of lead department(s): The lead is shared between Health Canada (HC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

3. Lead department program activity:

  • HC: Health Products, Consumer Products Safety, Pesticide Safety and Food Safety and Nutrition;
  • CFIA: Food Safety Program;
  • PHAC: Health Promotion, Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, and Infectious Disease Prevention and Control;
  • CIHR: Health and Health Services Advances.

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: Fiscal Year 2008-2009.

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Fiscal Year 2012-2013 (and ongoing).

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$489.4 million over five years ending in Fiscal Year 2012-2013 (and $126.7 million ongoing).

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The federal government is responsible for promoting the health and safety of Canadians. A key part of this role is ensuring that the food, health and consumer products used by Canadians are safe. Adverse consequences associated with unsafe products impact not only the Canadian public, but also the Canadian economy. The Action Plan is a horizontal initiative aimed at modernizing and strengthening Canada's safety system for food, health and consumer products. A number of high-profile incidents, such as lead and ingestible magnets in children's toys, foodborne illness outbreaks, and the global withdrawal of some prescription medicines, have underscored the need for government action.

The Action Plan modernizes Canada's regulatory system to enable it to better protect Canadians from unsafe consumer products in the face of current realities and future pressures. The Action Plan bolsters Canada's regulatory system by committing to amending or replacing outdated health and safety legislation with new legislative regimes that respond to modern realities, and by enhancing safety programs in areas where modern legislative tools already exist. The Action Plan helps to ensure that Canadians have the information they need to assess the risks and benefits associated with the consumer and health products they choose to use, and to minimize risks associated with food safety.

The Action Plan is an integrated, risk-based plan and includes a series of initiatives that are premised on three key areas of action: active prevention, targeted oversight and rapid response. We focus on active prevention to avoid as many incidents as possible and work closely with industry to promote awareness, provide regulatory guidance, and help identify safety concerns at an early stage. Targeted oversight provides for early detection of safety problems and further safety verification at the appropriate stage in a product's life cycle. To improve rapid response capabilities and ensure the government has the ability to act quickly and effectively when needed, we work to enhance health and safety risk assessments, strengthen recall capacity, and increase the efficiency in responding and communicating clearly with consumers and stakeholders.

8. Shared outcome(s):

  • Increased knowledge of food risks and product safety (scientific and surveillance/monitoring);
  • Increased industry awareness and understanding of regulatory requirements;
  • Increased industry compliance with safety standards;
  • Increased consumer awareness and understanding of safety risks associated with health and consumer products and food;
  • Strengthened oversight and response to safety incidents;
  • Increased consumer confidence in health and consumer products and food;
  • Increased trade-partner confidence in Canadian controls, which meet international standards;
  • Increased availability of safe and effective products; and
  • Level playing field where imports can be demonstrated to meet Canadian requirements.

9. Governance structure(s):

The Minister of Health and the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada have joint responsibility and accountability for results, and for providing information on progress achieved by the Action Plan.

A Governance Framework has been established and endorsed by all of the partner departments/agencies. To facilitate horizontal coordination, the following Director General (DG)/Executive Director (ED) level Task Forces have been established:

  • Legislative and Regulatory Task Force;
  • Health Products Task Force;
  • Consumer Products Task Force;
  • Food Task Force; and the
  • Communications Task Force.

These Task Forces report to a DG/ED level Coordinating Committee. An Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)/Vice President (VP) level Steering Committee provides direction to the Coordinating Committee. An Oversight Committee of Deputy Heads facilitates the provision of high level guidance to the Steering Committee.

Health Canada's Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) provides the Secretariat function for the Action Plan and plays an integral role in supporting the ongoing operation and decision-making of the governance committees, the oversight and integration of performance against commitments, and providing advice to senior management. SPB is also the lead for coordinating the implementation of the legislative and regulatory initiatives.

Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) has primary responsibility for implementing Action Plan activities related to health products with support from Health Canada's Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) on one initiative (increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness).

Health Canada's Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch (HECSB) and the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), along with the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), work together to implement Action Plan activities related to consumer products. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) work together to implement Action Plan activities related to food safety.

The Public Affairs, Consultation and Communications Branch (PACCB) provide communications support for all of the above activities and will coordinate or lead many of the horizontal Departmental activities under the Consumer Information Strategy.

10. Planning Highlights:

The Action Plan reflects the need to modernize and sharpen the focus of Government action to protect Canadians and responds to the new technological and economic realities of the 21st century, such as globalization and the introduction of more complex products. The Action Plan is an integrated, risk-based plan with the streams of initiatives (premised on the three key areas of action) aligned to meet these needs.

11. Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
Health Products Active Prevention 57.6 11.5
Targeted Oversight 34.6 10.22
Rapid Response Existing resources Existing resources
Consumer Products Safety Active Prevention 41.0 12.5
Targeted Oversight 15.7 4.3
Rapid Response 17.9 4.6
Pesticide Safety Active Prevention 6.9 1.6
Rapid Response 8.0 2.1
Food Safety and Nutrition Active Prevention 29.6 7.1
Rapid Response 1.3 0.3
Total 212.6 54.2

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Active Prevention

The Health Products program will initiate regulatory change to include regulatory oversight of the manufacturing of active pharmaceutical ingredients to improve the safety, quality and efficacy of health products. To increase awareness and compliance with regulatory requirements, Health Canada continues to engage in pre-submission meetings with industry, including the ability to better document, track, and monitor and evaluate the exchange of information. These meetings provide an opportunity for the drug submission sponsor to obtain feedback regarding areas of concern prior to filing a submission. In addition, as part of the lifecycle approach, and in the absence of enabling legislation, Health Canada continues to implement an interim strategy for development and review of Pharmacovigilance Plans (PvP) and Risk Management Plans (RMP) with the aim of generating better and new information concerning health products during the pre or post-market phases. A PvP, which can be requested by Health Canada or submitted voluntarily by the manufacturer, identifies and characterizes known or potential safety concerns. RMP, which include a PvP component plus additional risk minimization activities, provide proposals on how to mitigate any identified or potential safety risk by providing additional assurance that the manufacturer has measures in place to react and act quickly if new information concerning the product emerges once on the market. The Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) Inspection Program is dependant on the new API legislation; therefore, API inspections are not possible at this time and targets cannot be set. Preparatory work on inspection training, compliance and promotion work continue while these regulations are pending.

Expected Results: Enhance knowledge of post-market health products safety risks and oversight of risk management and mitigation strategies to inform decisions and to increase ability to monitor and identify safety concerns before or as they arise.

Performance Indicator: Year over year increase in PvP/RMP submitted by industry. Number of pre-submission meetings per year.

The Consumer Products Safety program will provide information to consumers and work closely with industry to promote awareness, provide regulatory guidance, help identify and systematically assess safety risks at early and ongoing stages of product development, develop standards and share best practices.
Expected results: Increased consumer/industry awareness of health risks and regulatory requirements related to consumer products.

Performance indicators: % by target population aware of information related to consumer product safety and related to exposure to consumer products by: level of consumer awareness; type of target group and # reached; planned industry outreach activities completed by level of establishment; and product category.

Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) encourages and facilitates industry development and adoption of quality assurance and stewardship programs for the safe manufacture and subsequent selection and use of pesticides and other consumer products containing pesticides. Retailers of pest control products often rely on their distributors for validation of access to products with lapsed registrations, or which have never been registered. Work under this strategy fosters an increased knowledge of the requirements of the Pest Controls Products Act (PCPA) and an awareness of the tools available to validate the status of the pest control products and their label information. These initiatives are critical in promoting the safe and proper use of pesticides and ensuring risk reduction practices are established along the entire supply chain. In addition, stakeholders are engaged in order to test assumptions about the ability and will to comply with product recall or phase-out requirements. This includes such considerations as whether users can follow through with specific requirements when the financial implications are significant.

Expected results: Increased awareness and understanding of product safety obligations, standards and regulatory requirements by industry.

Performance indicators: % of the target population aware/engaged/confident regarding risks and regulatory activities; # of complaints and/or incidents; # of industry situations noted and self corrected; # violations where absence of knowledge of requirements is the cause; and # of stakeholder partnerships formed.

The Food Safety and Nutrition program activity will continue to support the Government as it develops and seeks Parliamentary approval for amendments to the Food and Drugs Act (FDA) to strengthen and modernize food safety provisions. The program will continue to conduct risk mapping exercises, engage industry to address food safety risks, develop strategic partnerships for work sharing opportunities in standard setting with international food regulators, consult with consumers and industry on updated food standards and will update its health risk assessment standard operating procedures to respond to new service standards.

Expected Results: Increased industry and public understanding/engagement in food safety risks and mitigation processes, improved international collaboration in establishing global standards and establishment of the appropriate instrument or mix of instruments, including regulatory and non-regulatory measures (policies, standards, etc), to address immediate areas of concern.

Performance Indicators: # of engagement opportunities with industry, international collaborations; # of guidance/educational tools developed; # of standards, frameworks and policies developed or modified; and # of consultations/engagement activities with Canadians and target populations.

Targeted Oversight

The Health Products program's ability to make and support admissibility decisions at the border as they relate to health products will be strengthened through the establishment of a national border integrity program, which will include among other initiatives: a national standardized process for the handling of health products at the border; establishment of service standards between Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and Health Canada; and, undertaking public education activities to inform Canadians of risk associated with the importation of non-compliant health products. In addition, Health Canada will continue to enhance the post-market surveillance elements of the program through increased efforts focused on review of Periodic Safety Update Reports (PSURs) - documents that summarize the worldwide safety experience of a health product at pre-established post-authorization times. The Department will continue to work with its partners to increase reporting of adverse drug reactions through the Hospital-Based Mandatory Reporting project for Adverse Drug Reactions. Implementation of mandatory reporting is however dependent upon passing of relevant enabling legislation. If new legislation is not passed, Health Canada will continue requesting the reports from the hospitals on a voluntary basis, and will continue to coordinate efforts with provincial and territorial agencies to promote voluntary reporting.

In partnership with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Health Canada has established the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN) (a pan-Canadian network of centres of excellence in post-market pharmaceutical research) in order to fund studies that will inform pharmaceutical decision-making across the health care system. Please refer to Federal Partner #4 CIHR for DSEN's Expected Results and Performance Indicators.

To improve and augment patient and consumer participation in Health Product and Food Branch (HPFB) consultations, a Patient and Consumer Pool will be launched. Efforts in 2011-12 will focus on the establishment of a governance body, the implementation of a recruitment strategy, and the development and delivery of training material.

Expected Results: The TB submission anticipated annual doubling of PSUR volumes (baseline was 125/year in 2007-08), presuming that relevant legislation would be passed in 2010-11. Given that Adverse Reactions are not predictable, it is not possible to set targets related to the volume of reports expected in any given year. Since the Border Integrity Program is reactive, there are no set targets; however, admissibility decisions are tracked and reported quarterly.

Performance Indicators: Year over year increase in PSUR submitted by industry and year over year increase in AR Reports submitted by Institutions. Also tracked are # of patients/consumers recruited; # of patients/consumers trained, # of patients/consumers who have taken part in consultations, patient/consumer satisfaction; and client (HPFB) satisfaction.

Through targeted oversight actions, the Consumer Product Safety program activity works to detect safety problems as early as possible and at all stages in a product's life cycle. Under the Canada new Consumer Product Safety Act, Consumer Products Safety program will have improved authorities to ensure investigative actions are being taken to determine the safety profile of products and to verify that preventative measures are being implemented.

Expected Results: Improved Information and reporting of consumer product safety related incidents (by industry and consumers).

Performance Indicators: # of health-related consumer product incidents reported including type of injury/illness and product category examined (i.e., Consumer Products, Cosmetics) that cause illness/risk; # complaints received; # advisories and warnings issued; and # product recalls issued/recall monitoring/recall effectiveness.

The Food Safety & Nutrition program activity has no targeted oversight funding under this initiative.

Rapid Response

The Government is equipped to respond rapidly to remove unsafe consumer products from shelves, preventing them from reaching consumers. While the Department continues to operate with a step-wise approach to compliance and enforcement by working with industry to voluntarily take corrective actions the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) offers new measures to protect Canadians from unsafe consumer products. This includes a general prohibition against products that pose an unreasonable danger, the authority to order industry to recall* and/or take other corrective measures and in the case of industry's failure to act in a timely manner, Health Canada's ability to initiate a recall and/or corrective measures to ensure the health and safety of Canadians.

*Recall is a process by which the responsible establishment in Canada notifies consumers of the danger associated with a product and this notice should be accompanied by all of the following steps:

  • Stopping distribution of product by upper levels of trade;
  • Stopping sale of product by lower levels of trade;
  • Determining accounts/producing distribution lists and gathering necessary information pertaining to the recall;
  • Notifying accounts of the recall, with instructions to take specified measures (correct, return product/accept returns of products, disposal);
  • Removing product throughout supply chain; and,
  • Completing recall effectiveness form(s) and reporting on any reconciled product from accounts.

(The recall may also include other corrective measures in a separate order.)

Expected results: Improved industry compliance with product safety obligations.

Performance Indicators: % and # of inspected registrants/firms/users that are compliant** ('C') / non-compliant ('NC') with standards/acts/regulations /guidelines including Consumer Product Safety Regulations and cyclical enforcement (Product Category).

**Compliance is measured by a monitoring approach. Compliance results are determined by monitoring activities following initial inspection. Due to the non-license (post-market) nature of the consumer products industry, compliance verification is limited to primary level establishments and targeted to the highest levels of trade.

PMRA enhances compliance targeting and enforcement capacity in support of expanded regulatory authority under the PCPA, and maintains public confidence in pesticide product safety. In conjunction with other federal and provincial regulators, Health Canada continues the development and implementation of an evidence and risk-based approach to identify and act on situations of higher risk associated with non-compliance. Activities continue to include the enhancement of current information/intelligence networks, analysis and an updated targeting strategy to verify the presence of compliance and the reasons that non-compliance was found to exist. Activities also include an updated strategy to address the importation of unregistered consumer pesticides where the safety would be unknown.

Expected results: Improved risk-based monitoring of products.

Performance Indicators: # monitoring reports; #, % of targeted inspections on products/industries/sector of high risk to health; # follow-up inspections; and # and/or % pest management products monitored.

Under the rapid response pillar the Food Safety and Nutrition program activity will continue its participation in the Partnership for Consumer Food Safety Education with the goal of promoting the "Be Food Safe" campaign and will continue to develop new education materials for consumers to promote food safety in an effort to reduce foodborne disease outbreaks in Canada. In addition, it will develop a strategy for addressing the findings of a Public Opinion Research in February 2010 that measured the percentage of population aware of and engaged in food safety risks, alert systems and safety systems.

Expected Results: Increased public understanding of food safety risks, alerts systems and safety systems.

Performance Indicators: % of targeted population aware, engaged in food safety risks, alert systems and safety systems; and # of web hits of consumer oriented web pages.

11. Federal Partner #2: Canadian Food Inspection Agency
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
Food Safety Program

Internal Service
Active Prevention 114.2 26.6
Targeted Oversight 77.0 18.6
Rapid Response 32.2 7.2
Total 223.4 52.4

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Active Prevention

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) food safety initiatives aimed at ensuring active prevention include measures to enable government to better understand and identify food safety risks and to work with industry to implement effective food safety risk mitigation strategies. The CFIA, along with its federal partners, will strive to strengthen food safety standards and regulations and will engage Canadians in making decisions with respect to food safety.

In 2011-12, the CFIA will continue to work with Health Canada on data collection and risk mapping towards identification and characterization of areas of concern, including imported food ingredients, produce, mycotoxins in cereals and undeclared allergens. Risk maps will identify gaps in standard-setting and policy development and will assist in focusing operational efforts on areas of greatest risk.

A proposed regulatory scheme intended to minimize the risk of unsafe products entering the Canadian marketplace will be introduced. The proposed scheme would enable identification of importers bringing food products and ingredients into Canada and verification of industry's compliance with minimum food safety requirements.

The CFIA will publish guidance for industry on preventative food safety systems and will promote the implementation of these systems in high-risk areas.
Compliance activities and marketplace monitoring for the correct application of the revised "Product of Canada/Made in Canada" policy will continue.
Discussions with key trading partners on approaches to managing high-risk source countries will be ongoing, as well as collaboration with specific high-risk countries on managing food safety risks.

Expected results: Better understanding of high-risk sectors and better identification of potential food safety hazards for the development of effective preventative risk mitigation strategies; reduction in food safety hazards/risks; improved industry compliance; industry implementation of preventative food safety systems; establishment of standards, regulations, and policies that contribute to the prevention of food safety issues through the product lifecycle.

Performance indicators: Performance indicators for the food portion of the Action Plan are presently under review and will be reported on in the following performance report.

Targeted Oversight

Targeted oversight initiatives include enhanced inspection of identified high-risk food sectors and targeted import control measures such as border blitzes to intercept non-compliant food products before they are distributed, thus preventing contaminated products from reaching consumers. The CFIA will continue to adapt its food safety inspection practices for high-risk sectors. The bulk of inspection capacity will be dedicated to evaluation and verification of industry's control systems in both the domestic and imported food sectors. Method development and testing in targeted areas will continue, and front-line capacity will continue to increase. Border blitz plans will be reviewed and revised in light of the experience gained from the first three years of the Action Plan, and IM/IT business solutions for supporting enhanced tracking of imported food products will be further developed.

Expected results: Improved industry compliance with food safety standards; modern tools and new risk-based approaches contribute to improved safety of imported foods.

Performance indicators: Performance indicators for CFIA's activities under the food portion of the Action Plan are presently under review and will be reported on in the following performance report.

Rapid Response

Towards ensuring rapid response to food safety issues and emergencies, enhanced recall capacity will enable the Government of Canada to effectively respond to and conduct investigations for an anticipated increased number of food recalls resulting from targeted oversight activities. Targeted consumer risk communication activities and products will also improve Canadian's awareness of food safety issues and recalls and will help consumers better protect their health.

In 2011-12, the CFIA will continue to increase human resource capacity to address identified food safety issues. Enhancements to food safety recall and investigation methodology will continue.

Expected results: Timely and efficient recall capacity in the face of increased identification of potential risks through targeted testing and other information; better public understanding of food safety risks; increased consumer use of various food safety alert systems; and increased public trust and confidence in the food safety system.

Performance indicators: Performance indicators for CFIA activities under the food portion of the Action Plan are presently under review and will be reported on in the following performance report.

11. Federal Partner #3: Public Health Agency of Canada
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
Health Promotion Targeted Oversight 4.5 1.3
Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Targeted Oversight 3.5 1
Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation Active Prevention 18.3 4.1
Total 26.3 6.4

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Active Prevention

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will modernize and strengthen Canada's food safety systems by use of molecular typing, by expanding the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) integrated surveillance systems and C-EnterNet surveillance infrastructure, and use of decision making models in priority areas.

Expected results: Increased understanding of food safety risks by HC, PHAC and CFIA.

Performance Indicators: % of reports tracked, # of peer-reviewed publications, # of issue papers provided to departmental colleagues and stakeholders.

Targeted Oversight

Through ongoing and expanded data collection, analysis and reporting on the rates, patterns and circumstances of unintentional injury of Canadians, focusing on children and seniors, PHAC will contribute to the evidence base for policies, practices and programs for injury prevention and control.

Expected results: More and better data on accidents, injuries, illnesses and deaths due to consumer products. Engagement of risk assessment stakeholders

Performance Indicators: # and type of databases created/improved against plan; # of cases of product- related injuries; risk assessments of consumer-related injuries; and # and type of data/reports from key stakeholders.

11. Federal Partner #4: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
($ millions)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011-12
Health and Health Services Advances Targeted Oversight 27.1 8.9
Total 27.1 8.9

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Targeted Oversight

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research will make investments and focus efforts in advancing the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network to increase the available evidence on drug safety and effectiveness to regulators, policy-makers, health care providers and patients and to increase capacity within Canada to undertake high-quality post-market research in this area.

Work will continue on engaging interested parties during the development of the Network, delivering on peer reviewed funding opportunities for the initiative and responding to strategic direction received from the DSEN Steering Committee.

Expected results: Increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions and increased capacity in Canada to address priority research on post-market drug safety and effectiveness.

Performance Indicators: Evidence of the dissemination of research knowledge to the target audience.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date):
($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
Health Canada 54.2
Canadian Food and Inspection Agency 52.4
Public Health Agency of Canada 6.4
Canadian Institutes of Heath Research 8.9
Total 121.9

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Not applicable.

18. Contact information:

Hélène Quesnel, Director General, Legislative and Regulatory Policy Directorate, Strategic Policy Branch, Health Canada
Telephone: (613) 952-3484, fax: (613) 946-1430
e-mail: helene.quesnel@hc-sc.gc.ca.


Top of Page

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Youth Employment Strategy


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Youth Employment Strategy (YES)

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Skills and Employment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Through the Youth Employment Strategy, the Government of Canada is working to provide young Canadians with both valuable work experience and earnings to help transition to the labour market and support their further education. The Youth Employment Strategy supports Canadian youth as they move into the world of work. The Strategy plays a role in developing Canada's workforce by providing young Canadians with access to programs and services to help them gain the skills, knowledge, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment and make a successful transition into the labour force.

The Youth Employment Strategy is designed to respond to labour market challenges facing youth, aged 15 to 30. The Strategy has three program streams: Skills Link, Career Focus and Summer Work Experience, which includes the Canada Summer Jobs initiative. Skills Link provides youth-at-risk with opportunities to develop employability skills they need to find work or return to school. Career Focus helps post-secondary graduates find work in their area of specialization. Summer Work Experience helps secondary and post-secondary graduates acquire career-related skills and financing for their education through summer jobs.

The Government of Canada's support to young Canadians is a shared responsibility and a partnership effort among many departments and organizations. Human Resources and Skills Development, along with 10 other federal government departments, work cooperatively with other levels of government, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, and private sector, not-for-profit and voluntary sector organizations to deliver Youth Employment Strategy initiatives.

Canada's Economic Action Plan increased funding by $10 million in 2009 and provided an additional $10 million in 2010 for Canada Summer Jobs. This is part of the overall Government of Canada strategy to create the best educated, most skilled and most flexible workforce in the world.

Shared outcome(s): The shared outcomes of partners for the common key results are:

Number of youth served
Number of youth employed / self-employed
Number of youth returning to school

Governance structure(s): The Youth Employment Strategy has in place a horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework that represents a commitment among the eleven participating federal departments to undertake ongoing collection of common performance management data to ensure effective overall performance management of the program.

Oversight of the Youth Employment Strategy horizontal initiative is provided through a collaborative committee structure. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for facilitating coordination among the departments and agencies funding Youth Employment Strategy activities. As lead of this horizontal initiative, HRSDC chairs and is responsible for the coordination and management of the Youth Employment Strategy Interdepartmental Operations Committee and the Youth Employment Strategy Evaluation Sub-Committee. HRSDC is ultimately accountable for attaining the expected results for the Youth Employment Strategy and has the ultimate decision making authority for issues related to the overall policy, design and implementation of the Youth Employment Strategy.

Youth Employment Strategy initiatives are delivered nationally, regionally and locally using a variety of funding instruments, such as contribution agreements and some direct delivery methods. Transfer payments are provided primarily by participating departments through contribution agreements and service delivery agreements in support of participants' remuneration and overhead costs.

Planning Highlights: As lead, HRSDC will continue to support implementation of the YES across the 11 participating federal departments with a focus on program results and performance monitoring, and preparing the YES summative evaluation scheduled to begin 2012.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
Skills and Employment Career Focus Ongoing $13.0M Projected Range of Results

For POB-Service Canada:

Clients Served: 370

Employed or Self-Employed: 220

Return to School: 37

Contribution Agreements: 150

Funds Leveraged: $4.0M-$6.0M

For Sector Council:

Clients Served: 350

Employed or Self-Employed: 309

Return to School: 35

Contribution Agreements: 163

Funds Leveraged: TBD
Skills Link Ongoing $139.4M Service Canada
Projected Range of Results

Clients Served: 15,500

Employed or Self-Employed: 1,860

Return to School: 5,890

Contribution Agreements: 955

Funds Leveraged: $50.0M-$65.0M
Summer Work Experience (Canada Summer Jobs) Ongoing $111.4M Clients Served: not available

Employed or Self-Employed: not available

Return to School: not available

Contribution Agreements: not available

Funds Leveraged: CFO
Total   $263.8M  

Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Career Focus   $1.1M HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Total   $1.1M  

Federal Partner: Canadian International Development Agency
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Career Focus   $7.3M HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Total   $7.3M  

Federal Partner: Canadian Heritage
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Career Focus   $0.9M HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Summer Work Experience   $8.0M
Total   $8.9M  

Federal Partner: Environment Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Career Focus   $3.3M HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Total   $3.3M  

Federal Partner: Industry Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Career Focus   $9.5M HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Summer Work Experience   $7.4M
Total   $16.9M  

Federal Partner: National Research Council
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Career Focus   $5.3M HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Total    $5.3M  

Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Career Focus   $0.6M HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Total   $0.6M  

Federal Partner: Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Skills Link   $1.0M HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Total   $1.0M  

Federal Partner: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Skills Link   $16.0M HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Summer Work Experience   $8.0M
Total   $24.0M  

Federal Partner: Parks Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Summer Work Experience   $2.0M HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Total   $2.0M


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–2012
Ongoing $334.2M

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:

John Atherton, Director General
Active Employment Measures
Skills and Employment Branch
Telephone: (819) 994-6916
john.atherton@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Québec


Temporary Foreign Worker Program


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP)

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Skills and Employment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 13, 2007

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) enables Canadian employers to hire foreign workers on a temporary basis to meet immediate skills and labour needs when Canadians are not available, subject to employers and workers meeting specified criteria. The Program is jointly managed by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The TFWP includes program streams such as: Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program, Live-in-Caregiver Program, Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training, and several Labour Market Opinion (LMO) exempt streams.

In the province of Quebec, the TFWP is administered through a partnership with the Government of Quebec, as referenced in the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration.

The Temporary Foreign Worker Program is funded from the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/workplaceskills/foreign_workers/index.shtml

Shared outcome(s):

  • Employers’ temporary human resource needs are addressed;
  • Temporary Foreign Workers’ rights and protections are respected;
  • Entry of eligible temporary foreign workers into Canada in a timely manner;
  • Temporary migration that is consistent with federal, provincial and territorial regulations, standards and international obligations; and,
  • Migration that significantly benefits Canada’s economic, social, and cultural development.

Governance structure(s):

  • HRSDC is responsible for providing a LMO to CIC and employers indicating whether the employment of the temporary foreign worker is likely to have a positive, negative or neutral impact on the labour market in Canada, and processes LMO applications to support the work permit application process.
  • CIC is responsible for assessing work permit applications and issuing work permits to workers.
  • Each Department is responsible for the design and management of those elements of the program under its Minister's responsibility.

Planning Highlights: HRSDC in partnership with CIC will implement TFWP regulatory changes, which will include enhancements to the Program that will strengthen worker protection and improve program integrity. A key part of the process will be to monitor the implementation of the Quality Assurance Framework training and materials in order to ensure consistency and compliance in the application of all program directives and guidelines. These directives include the evaluation of the genuineness of job offers made to foreign nationals, and restricting program access to employers failing to meet commitments to workers with respect to wages, working conditions and/or the occupation.

In addition, HRSDC will continue to work with other government departments and the provinces and territories to develop information sharing agreements. These agreements will assist with the administration and enforcement of the Program as well as provincial/territorial employments standards and occupational health and safety legislation.

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
Skills and Employment Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing $39.2M Program enhancements, including those to strengthen worker protection, enhance program integrity and respond to the recommendations of the Auditor General of Canada. The work activities include :

  • implement a Quality Assurance Framework to ensure national consistency and compliance with legislation in the LMO assessment process;
  • partner with CIC to monitor implementation of TFWP regulatory changes, that come into force on April 1, 2011 to ensure changes are made in an efficient manner and employers, TFW’s and stakeholders are fully aware of TFWP requirements;
  • support completion of a joint HRSDC-CIC evaluation of the LMO streams of the TFWP with results expected in 2011-12;
  • design and implement a new HRSDC/Service Canada LMO process framework, including a new TFWP manual and associated training for officers;
  • work with Service Canada to implement jointly-managed employer monitoring processes;
  • develop new approaches to employer monitoring to enhance our ability to accurately identify and mitigate program integrity risks;
  • enhance mechanisms to report publicly on TFWP outcomes, including program statistics, results of compliance work to date and tools and information for employers;
  • develop and implement information sharing agreements with provinces/territories to assist in the administration and enforcement of provincial/territorial employment standards and occupational health and safety legislation;
  • develop and implement information sharing agreements with other government departments;
  • partner and participate with CIC in joint F-P/T Temporary Foreign Workers Working groups; and,
  • negotiate and implement, with CIC, Federal-Provincial Temporary Foreign Worker Annexes.
Total   $39.2M  

Federal Partner: Citizenship and Immigration Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
Temporary Resident Program Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing $24.2M Program enhancements, resulting from regulatory amendment to CIC’s Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations. These changes strengthen worker protection, enhance program integrity, and respond to the recommendations of the Auditor General of Canada. The work activities include:

  • partner with HRSDC to monitor implementation of TFWP regulatory changes that come into force on April 1, 2011, to ensure changes are made in an efficient manner and employers, TFWs and stakeholders are fully aware of TFWP requirements;
  • support completion of a joint HRSDC-CIC evaluation of the LMO streams of the TFWP with results expected in 2011-12;
  • partner and participate with HRSDC in joint F-P/T Temporary Foreign Workers working groups; and,
  • negotiate and implement, with HRSDC, Federal-Provincial Temporary Foreign Worker Annexes.
Total   $24.2M  


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–2012
Ongoing $63.4M

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:

Andrew Kenyon, Director General
Temporary Foreign Worker and Labour Market Information Directorate
Skills and Employment Branch
Telephone: (819) 994-1021
andrew.kenyon@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec

NOTE: The June 2007 start date represents the latest authorities for the Temporary Foreign Worker program. The planned spending figures are for Citizenship and Immigration Canada and HRSDC only. Figures exclude planned spending for other government departments such as DFAIT and PWSGC and therefore do not represent the full Government of Canada costs for the Temporary Foreign Worker Program.


Canada Student Loans Program and Canada Student Grants Program


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada Student Loans Program and Canada Student Grants Program

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Learning

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: September, 1964

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Canada Student Loans Program and Canada Student Grants Program lower financial barriers to post-secondary education by providing loans and grants to students with a demonstrated financial need. This helps increase their opportunities to develop the knowledge and skills they need to fully participate in the job market, the economy and society.

Information for Canadians about planning, saving and paying for post-secondary studies, including school selection, as well as applying for and managing student loans and grants, can be accessed at: http://www.canlearn.ca

Shared outcome(s): Maintain the Government's commitment to accessible post-secondary education by:

  • lowering financial barriers to post-secondary education through the provision of financial assistance to eligible Canadians.

Governance structure(s): The Government of Canada has entered into Integration Agreements with four provinces (Ontario, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador) in order to create a "one-student-one-loan" service approach. These four integrated provinces account for over 60% of Canada Student Loans Program borrowers. British Columbia will adopt this integrated model when it finalizes its Integration Agreement with the Government of Canada for 2011-2012.

Canada Student Loans and Canada Student Grants are jointly delivered and administered by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, participating provinces and Yukon1. An external Service Provider, financial institutions, Canada Revenue Agency and Public Works and Government Services Canada are responsible for conducting one or more activities during the loan lifecycle.

Effective management of the Program and relations with third-party agents is the primary responsibility of the Canada Student Loans Directorate. Program activities include defining the operational and financial processes for the delivery of the program by the service providers, investigation of escalated cases by the Client Relations office, and control and monitoring by the Comptroller's Office.

The application and needs assessment for the Program is delivered by provincial student assistance offices, which also administer provincial aid. The participating provinces and Yukon:

  • determine individual eligibility for loans and grants based on federal criteria;
  • issue loan certificates; and,
  • designate educational institutions that students may attend.

While the Canada Student Loans Program provides guidance and direction regarding delivery of the program, the Service Provider assumes responsibility for the administration of the loans while students are studying and in repayment. Responsibilities of the Service Provider include:

  • verifying loan agreements;
  • managing the in-study interest-free period;
  • handling loan repayment; and,
  • advising and counselling borrowers on their debt management options.

Public Works and Government Services Canada is responsible for disbursing loans and grants to the borrowers and to Educational Institutions, in cases where funds are directed to schools to cover tuition.

Accounts Receivable Directorate within the Canada Revenue Agency is the agent responsible for the collection of defaulted loans. Defaulted guaranteed and risk-shared loans become debts to the Crown when the Government of Canada buys back the debt from financial institutions. Defaulted direct financed loans are returned to government after the Service Provider has attempted collection for a set period of time and the borrower has either not made payments on their loan or is unwilling to repay.

Planning Highlights: Planning highlights for the Canada Student Loans Program in 2011-2012 include:

  • Ensuring the sustained delivery of core services to help Canadians access post-secondary education;
  • Implementing mandated program initiatives to improve post-secondary related services and programs, including modernizing and streamlining student financial assistance through the new Service Delivery Vision;
  • Reviewing and enhancing client service delivery in support of post-secondary education;
  • Developing and advancing policy options in support of post-secondary education awareness and participation; and,
  • Implementing administrative integration of student financial assistance with the Province of British Columbia.
Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
Learning Canada Student Loan Program $806.2M

Loans disbursed
under the
Canada Student
Financial Assistance
Act
:

$2,282.4M
$774.6M

Loans disbursed
under the
Canada Student
Financial Assistance
Act
:

$2,114.2M
Estimated number of Canadians to benefit from loans and non repayable in- study interest subsidies received (in the 2010-11 Loan Year beginning August 1, 2010) through the Canada Student Loans Program: 505,000
Canada Student Grant Program $578.4M $554.3M Estimated number of Canadians to benefit from the Canada Student Grant Program (in the 2010-11 Loan Year beginning August 1, 2010): 306,000
Total $1,384.6M $1,328.9M  

Expected Results: Continued promotion of access (both participation and completion) to post-secondary education by removing financial and information barriers


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–2012
$1,384.6M $1,328.9M

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:

Marc LeBrun, Director General
Canada Student Loans Directorate
Learning Branch
Telephone: (819) 997-6684
marc.l.lebrunr@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca


1 Quebec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut do not participate in the Canada Student Loans Program. These jurisdictions receive an alternative payment to assist in the cost of delivering a similar student financial assistance program.


National Child Benefit


Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Child Benefit Program Initiative

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Income Security

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 1998

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Through the Federal-Provincial/Territorial (F-P/T) National Child Benefit (NCB) initiative, the Government of Canada is working with provincial and territorial governments1 to provide income support, as well as benefits and services, for low-income families with children. The initiative also includes a First Nations component.

Shared outcome(s):

The National Child Benefit initiative has three goals:

  • Help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty;
  • Promote attachment to the labour market by ensuring that families will always be better off as a result of working; and,
  • Reduce overlap and duplication by harmonizing program objectives and benefits and simplifying administration.

Annual National Child Benefit Progress Reports include information on the level of spending by all jurisdictions. There is a data collection process to which all participating jurisdictions contribute in order to present comparable information on National Child Benefit initiatives. The data submitted by each jurisdiction is reviewed jointly to ensure consistency in reporting. To obtain the most recent Progress Report or for further information, please visit the F-P/T National Child Benefit website: http://www.nationalchildbenefit.ca.

Federal Spending:

The Government of Canada contributes to the National Child Benefit initiative through a supplement to its Canada Child Tax Benefit. In addition to the base benefit of the Canada Child Tax Benefit, which is targeted to both low- and middle-income families, the National Child Benefit Supplement provides extra income support to low-income families with children. Federal spending on the Canada Child Tax Benefit is tracked by the Canada Revenue Agency, which is responsible for the delivery of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

The federal government provided $3.68B through the NCB Supplement in the 2009-2010 benefit year (July to June). By 2010-2011, total annual federal support delivered through the Canada Child Tax Benefit, including the NCB Supplement, is projected to reach $10.12B, including a projected $3.74B through the NCB Supplement.

Provincial and Territorial and First Nations Spending:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. In the latest F-P/T NCB Progress Report, the National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2007, reports that in 2006-2007, total reinvestments and investments for provinces, territories, and First Nations were estimated at $833.6M in programs and services. These programs and services include child/day care initiatives, child benefits and earned income supplements, early childhood services and children-at-risk services, supplementary health benefits, and youth initiatives. First Nations investments and reinvestments in programs and services were estimated at $52.7M in 2006-2007.

Indicators and Impacts:

The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2007 includes an analysis of both societal level indicators, which measure areas such as low income and labour force attachment, and direct outcome indicators, which measure only those changes that are directly attributed to the National Child Benefit initiative.

With respect to societal level indicators, the report shows that the proportion of families with children living in low income has declined significantly since the mid-1990s, decreasing from 17.6 percent in 1996 to 10.5 percent in 2005, based on Statistics Canada's post-tax low-income cut-offs. During this period, the number of children living in low income decreased from 1,304,000 in 1996 to 787,894 in 2005, a decrease of approximately 516,106 children.

Further, using the Market Basket Measure (MBM), the report estimates that in 2005, as a direct result of the National Child Benefit initiative:

  • 171,100 children in 78,800 families were prevented from living in low income in 2005, a reduction of 13.7 percent. This means that in 2005, there were 13.7 percent fewer families with children living in low income than there would have been without the National Child Benefit. These families saw their average disposable income increase by an estimated $2,400, or 9.5 percent.
  • For those families with children who remained in low income, the National Child Benefit improved their disposable income by an average of $1,900 (10.7 percent). This means that the low-income gap (the additional amount of income needed by low-income families to reach the low-income line) was reduced by 20.4 percent in 2005.

In addition, in June 2005, federal, provincial and territorial governments released a synthesis report of a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the National Child Benefit initiative (1998-1999, 1999-2000, and 2000-2001). The evaluation compiled evidence from a number of studies and showed that the National Child Benefit initiative is meeting its goals. In addition, a second evaluation is underway.

For a complete discussion of indicators, please see Chapters 5 and 6 of the National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2007. For a discussion of evaluation results, please see the Evaluation of the National Child Benefit Initiative: Synthesis Report. These reports are available free of charge on the National Child Benefit website, at: www.nationalchildbenefit.ca.

Governance structure(s): The National Child Benefit initiative Governance and Accountability Framework outlines the key characteristics of the federal, provincial and territorial partnership: cooperation, openness, flexibility, evolution and accountability. As a co-operative effort among governments, the National Child Benefit initiative combines the strengths of a national program with the flexibility of provincial and territorial initiatives designed to meet the specific needs and conditions within each jurisdiction.

With respect to accountability, under the Governance and Accountability Framework, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services have committed to sharing data on reinvestment initiatives and reviewing results and outcomes achieved in order to identify best practices. Federal, provincial and territorial governments have also agreed to report annually to the public with a primary focus on the performance of the initiative. To date, nine annual progress reports have been published, as well as a synthesis report on a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the initiative.

The Federal Role:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, the Government of Canada provides additional income support to low-income families with children via the National Child Benefit Supplement component of the Canada Child Tax Benefit. Canada Revenue Agency delivers these benefits to families.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, and the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development represents the Government of Canada in this F-P/T initiative.

The Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.

The Provincial and Territorial Role:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The initiative is designed so that provinces, territories and First Nations have the flexibility to develop and deliver programs and services that best meet the needs and priorities of their communities. As part of this flexibility, provinces and territories may adjust social assistance or child benefit payments by the full or partial amount of the National Child Benefit Supplement. This approach has resulted in families on social assistance being no worse off in terms of their level of benefits, while providing additional funds for new or enhanced provincial and territorial programs benefitting low-income families with children.

As the National Child Benefit initiative has matured, the majority of provinces and territories no longer recover increases to the National Child Benefit Supplement. This means that the vast majority of children living in low-income families, including those on social assistance, are currently receiving some or all of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

Under the National Reinvestment Framework, provincial and territorial governments, along with First Nations, have committed to re-allocating available social assistance funds into benefits and services for children in low-income families that further the goals of the initiative. Jurisdictions have focused reinvestments primarily in key areas:

  • Child Benefits and Earned Income Supplements;
  • Child Care;
  • Early Childhood Services and Children-at-Risk Services;
  • Supplementary Health Benefits; and,
  • Youth Initiatives.

First Nations Role:

The federal government is responsible for ensuring programs for First Nations children on reserve are comparable to those available to other Canadian children. Under the National Child Benefit, First Nations have the flexibility to reinvest savings from adjustments to social assistance into programs and services tailored to meet the needs and priorities of individual communities. Some 500 First Nations participate in the National Child Benefit initiative and implement their own programs.

Planning Highlights: In 2011-2012, HRSDC will work with its federal partners and the provinces and territories to finalize and release the 2008 NCB Progress Report, and to prepare the 2009 NCB Progress Report.

Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency2
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
Administers the National Child Benefit Supplement and delivers income benefits directly to low income families. National Child Benefit Supplement Ongoing $3,800.0M (projected) Continued progress on the goals of the National Child Benefit initiative, as described in the "Shared Outcomes", above.
Total Ongoing $3,800.0M  

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–2012
Ongoing $3,800.0M

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:

François Weldon, Acting Director General
Social Policy Directorate
Strategic Policy and Research Branch
Telephone: (613) 994-3184
francois.weldon@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca


1The Government of Québec has stated that it agrees with the basic principles of the National Child Benefit. Québec chose not to participate in the initiative because it wanted to assume control over income support for children in Québec; however, it has adopted a similar approach to the National Child Benefit. Throughout this text, references to joint federal, provincial and territorial positions do not include Québec.
2 While Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, the Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency. In addition, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.


Homelessness Partnering Strategy


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS)

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Social Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2011

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2014

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $404.4M over three years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) promotes strategic partnerships and structures, including housing solutions and supports, to assist homeless persons and those at risk of homelessness to move toward self sufficiency. The HPS recognizes that a stable living arrangement is a basic requirement for improving health, parenting, education, and employment. As a result, communities are encouraged to develop longer-term solutions to address their homelessness-related needs.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy:

  • Serves as a catalyst for partnerships at the community level, between governments and across the federal government;
  • Provides communities with resources and information to target homelessness supports and services to the areas of greatest need based on local circumstances;
  • Invests funds in a manner that targets the greatest needs and affected client groups while ensuring that those investments complement those of other stakeholders and partners; and,
  • Enhances understanding of homelessness among communities, partners and stakeholders, as well as all orders of government, through knowledge development and dissemination as well as results reporting and analysis.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy has seven funding streams:

The first three funding streams focus on the needs of homeless and at-risk individuals at the local level, and provide funding to help them gain and maintain a stable living arrangement. These streams are delivered regionally through the Program Operations Branch:

  • Designated Communities;
  • Rural and Remote Homelessness; and,
  • Aboriginal Homelessness.

The remaining four streams, delivered nationally through the Homelessness Partnering Secretariat, provide the means to develop and explore innovative methods, as well as horizontal approaches, to addressing issues related to homelessness, including: effective reporting, accountability, data development and collection, evidence-based knowledge development, the sharing of best practices, and making surplus federal real properties available to communities:

  • Federal Horizontal Pilot Projects (FHPP);
  • Homelessness Knowledge Development (HKD);
  • National Homelessness Information System; and
  • Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative (SFRPHI).

For more information, please visit the Homelessness Partnering Strategy website: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/homelessness/index.shtml

Shared outcome(s): Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Governance structure(s): The Homelessness Partnering Strategy community-based program is delivered via two models:

  • Community Entity model: Under this model, the federal government entrusts a community body, often the community’s municipal government, through a single contribution agreement with the ability to select and manage HPS projects in their area. This includes: publishing Calls for Proposals based on the priorities identified in the Community Plan; approving projects recommended by a Community Advisory Board (CAB); contracting and monitoring all agreements it holds with third-party service providers; reporting on CAB activities and disbursements; and, reporting on the results and outcomes for these agreements.
  • Shared Delivery model: Under this model, HRSDC works in partnership with the community, through a CAB, to support funding priorities resulting in a joint selection of projects and decision-making process. Where appropriate, partners also include the province/territory. HRSDC is responsible for project approvals, negotiation of contribution agreements, and monitoring.

A formal Canada-Quebec Agreement defines how the program is delivered in Quebec.

Under the renewed HPS, emphasis will be placed on coordinating federal, provincial and territorial priorities, programs, and investments to address the needs of individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Provinces and territories will be offered an opportunity to enter into bilateral arrangements with the Government of Canada to ensure a greater alignment of priorities and investments, which will bolster community efforts to tackle the challenges of homelessness, including related mental health issues. Efforts towards coordination could or will include: creating processes for provincial and territorial review of Community Plans and associated priorities; engaging communities to include provinces and territories on Community Advisory Boards; and, obtaining buy-in to support an increased emphasis on labour market integration.

The Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative (SFRPHI) makes surplus federal real properties available to community organizations, the not-for-profit sector, and other levels of government for projects to help prevent and reduce homelessness. The SFRPHI is a horizontal initiative under HPS, which HRSDC manages in partnership and in collaboration with Public Works and Government Services Canada and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.

Planning Highlights: Planning highlights for 2011–2012 focus on continuing the HPS initiatives to prevent and reduce homelessness across Canada while introducing several enhancements for the 2011–2014 period.

Specific 2011–2012 planning highlights include:

  • Ensuring a seamless transition to the renewed HPS to avoid a break in services;
  • Engaging in a dialogue with provinces and territories to ensure a greater alignment of priorities and investments;
  • Providing greater support for rural and remote communities;
  • Improving data sharing and collection;
  • Developing linkages with the five pilot projects of the Mental Health Commission of Canada to share knowledge around mental health and homelessness; and,
  • Increasing the relevance and dissemination of research.
Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
Social Development Homelessness Partnering Strategy - regionally Delivered Projects $385.8M $128.6M
  • Continued availability of essential supports and facilities within communities for individuals who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.
  • New projects funded based on identified priorities from 2011–2014 Community Plans.
  • Projects that receive funding through the Designated Communities funding stream demonstrate cost-matching by other partners.
Federal Horizontal Pilot Projects

(Examples of federal partners for this initiative include Health Canada, Justice Canada, Veteran Affairs, and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada)
$3.7M $1.2M
  • Pilot projects are developed and implemented to facilitate broader involvement of federal departments and agencies in developing solutions to homelessness.
Homelessness Knowledge Development $3.7M $1.2M
  • Understanding of homelessness issues and improved dissemination of research findings at the community level is increased.
National Homelessness Information System $2.2M $0.8M
  • Increased number of shelters will export data to NHIS.
Total $395.4M $131.8M  

Federal Partner: PWSGC
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–2012
Expected Results for
2011–2012
  Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative $9.0M $3.0M
  • Communities have enhanced capacity to provide facilities for use by individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.
Total $9.0M $3.0M  


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–2012
$404.4M $134.8M

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:

Barbara Lawless, Director General
Homelessness Partnering Secretariat
Income Security and Social Development Branch
Telephone: (819) 997-5464
barbara.lawless@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca


Communiqué on Early Childhood Development


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Early Childhood Development Agreement

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: September 2000 with funding beginning April 2001

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing until 2013-2014

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Not available

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): In September 2000, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for Social Services reached agreement to improve and expand early childhood development supports for young children (prenatal to age 6) and for their parents.

The Government of Canada is transferring $1.2 billion in 2011-2012 to provinces and territories in support of families with young children through the Canada Social Transfer (CST), which will grow to almost $1.3 billion by 2013–2014. This is a lump sum transfer to provincial and territorial governments in support of the Communiqué on Early Childhood Development, the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, and the Child Care Spaces Initiative1.

Information about the Agreement, including the text of the First Ministers' communiqué on Early Childhood Development, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at: http://www.ecd-elcc.ca.

Shared outcome(s):

The objectives of the initiative, as outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement, are:

  • to promote early childhood development so that, to their fullest potential, children will be physically and emotionally healthy, safe and secure, ready to learn, and socially engaged and responsible; and,
  • to help children reach their potential and to help families support their children within strong communities.

Governance structure(s): In the Early Childhood Development Agreement, First Ministers recognized that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early childhood development programs and services.

Federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for Social Services and Ministers of Health are responsible for implementation of the commitments in the Agreement. Implementation has been tasked to a Working Group comprised of officials from all jurisdictions (including Québec, which participates as an observer). The Working Group reports to Deputy Ministers responsible for Social Services. Previously, the Working Group was jointly chaired by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and the Province of Saskatchewan. Currently, the Social Services Forum governance structure is under review.

Planning Highlights: As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer (CST), provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):

Provincial and territorial governments are investing the funds transferred to them by the Government of Canada in any or all of the following four areas of action outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement:

  • promoting healthy pregnancy, birth and infancy;
  • improving parenting and family supports;
  • strengthening early childhood development, learning and care; and,
  • strengthening community supports.

All participating federal, provincial and territorial governments have committed to three reporting requirements:

  • Each government released a first report on Early Childhood Development programs and expenditures for the 2000-2001 fiscal year, providing a baseline against which new investments can be tracked;
  • In fall 2002, governments began annual reporting, using a shared framework with comparable program indicators, to track progress in improving and expanding early childhood development programs and services within the four areas for action; and,
  • In fall 2002, governments began regular reporting on children's well-being, using a common set of outcome indicators. Government of Canada reports are available at: http://www.socialunion.gc.ca.

The Government of Québec supports the general principles expressed in the Early Childhood Development Initiative but did not participate in developing the initiative because it wishes to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Contact information:

François Weldon, Acting Director General
Social Policy
Strategic Policy & Research Branch
Telephone: (819) 994-3184
francois.weldon@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

1 The notional allocation is $500 million for the Communiqué on Early Childhood Development; $350 million for the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care; and, $250 million for the Child Care Spaces Initiative. These do not reflect the 3% escalator.


Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Childcare


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing until 2013-2014

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Not available

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): In March 2003, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for Social Services, reached agreement on a framework for improving access to affordable, quality, provincially and territorially regulated early learning and child care programs and services. The objective of this initiative, which complements the September 2000 Early Childhood Development Agreement, is to further promote early childhood development and support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

The Government of Canada is transferring $1.2 billion in 2011-2012 to provinces and territories in support of families with young children through the Canada Social Transfer (CST), which will grow to almost $1.3 billion by 2013–2014. This is a lump sum transfer to provincial and territorial governments in support of the Communiqué on Early Childhood Development, the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, and the Child Care Spaces Initiative1.

Governments also committed to transparent public reporting that will give Canadians a clear idea of the progress being made in improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services, beginning with a baseline report in November 2003. Government of Canada reports are available at: www.socialunion.gc.ca.

Information about the initiative, including the text of the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial Web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at: http://www.ecd-elcc.ca.

Shared outcome(s): The objectives of the initiative, as outlined in the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care are:

  • to promote early childhood development; and,
  • to support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

Governance structure(s): The Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Child Care recognizes that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early learning and child care programs and services.

Implementation of the commitments outlined in the Multilateral Framework has been tasked to a Working Group comprised of officials from all jurisdictions (including Québec, which participates as an observer). This Working Group reports to Deputy Ministers responsible for Social Services, and is jointly chaired by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and the Province of Saskatchewan.

Planning Highlights: As funds are transferred to the provinces and territories via the Canada Social Transfer (CST), provinces and territories are responsible for planning and prioritizing how the funds are invested.

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):

Provincial and territorial governments have agreed to invest the funding provided in regulated early learning and child care programs for children under the age of six. Early learning and child care programs and services funded through this initiative will primarily provide direct care and early learning for children in settings such as child care centres, family child care homes, preschools, and nursery schools. Investments can include capital and operating funding, fee subsidies, wage enhancements, training, professional development and support, quality assurance, and parent information and referral. Programs and services that are part of the formal school system are not included in this initiative.

Governments also committed to transparent public reporting that will give Canadians a clear idea of the progress being made in improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services, beginning with a baseline report in November 2003 and annual reporting in November 2004.

The Government of Québec supports the general principles expressed in the Early Learning and Child Care Initiative but did not participate in developing the initiative because it wishes to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Contact information:

François Weldon, Acting Director General
Social Policy
Strategic Policy & Research Branch
Telephone: (819) 994-3184
francois.weldon@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca

1 The notional allocation is $500 million for the Communiqué on Early Childhood Development; $350 million for the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care; and, $250 million for the Child Care Spaces Initiative. These do not reflect the 3% escalator


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Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Canadian Polar Commission

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: International Polar Year

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) — Northern Affairs Program

Lead department program activity: Northern Science and Technology

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2006

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $150 million over six years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): To support Canada's participation in International Polar Year (IPY), the Government of Canada has invested $150 million over six years. This funding is being used to carry out an innovative and multidisciplinary Arctic science program. The Government of Canada IPY program is led by INAC and involving 12 federal departments and agencies, including the lead departments of Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (on behalf of Industry Canada), Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Canada's significant involvement and investment in IPY contributes to the government's stewardship of Canada's Northern Region. The Government of Canada IPY program is working with Canadian scientists and northern communities in developing and conducting activities such as research, training and capacity building.

Key areas of the Government of Canada IPY program include:

  • undertaking new science and research in and for the North, which includes the involvement of northern communities;
  • ensuring the health and safety of scientists and communities conducting research in the North;
  • communicating information about the program and the science undertaken;
  • building capacity, through training opportunities for youth and Northerners aimed at enhancing participation in northern scientific research;
  • ensuring that the resultant scientific knowledge and data are properly managed, archived and made accessible; and
  • supporting the appropriate procedural, regulatory and infrastructure framework for conducting scientific research.

The funds are distributed among federal departments and agencies according to their involvement in the various aspects of the program. The Northern IPY Co-coordinators maintain a regional network to support all aspects of Canada's IPY program in four Inuit regions across the North. The federal departments and agencies participating in IPY are undertaking research projects, delivering support for logistics and emergency preparedness, and contributing to projects for training, communications and outreach.

Shared outcome(s): The IPY program works toward the achievement of two outcomes:

  • Increased understanding of impacts of a changing climate and of health and well-being of northern communities, informs policy and decision making, and contributes to recognition of Canada as an expert on the Canadian North.
  • Northern research capacity is enhanced through newly trained scientists, knowledge and skills transfer to Northerners, and greater participation in planning and delivery of research by Northerners.

Governance structure(s):

  • Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) Committee on Arctic Science and Technology (chaired by the ADM of Northern Affairs, INAC);
  • IPY Federal Program Office (housed at INAC);
  • Director Generals communications committees on IPY; and
  • IPY advisory subcommittees.

The Government of Canada IPY program links with the International Joint Committee and other international scientific organizations to assist in the program development of the IPY “From Knowledge to Action” Conference that Canada will host in April 2012.

Planning Highlights: IPY will focus its efforts on synthesizing the results of IPY scientific research, managing data and information, communicating these results to northern communities, and articulating this new knowledge to facilitate and generate discussions about policy and program development that address short- and long-term issues.

 

Federal Partner: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Lands and Resources Government of Canada IPY program $59.7 $3.71
Total $59.7 $3.71

Expected results by program:

  • Preparing a final report on the findings / results of the IPY science projects; supporting the science synthesis process
  • Dissemination to northern communities of the results and knowledge acquired through IPY science projects
  • Increased participation of Northerners and Aboriginal people in Arctic science activities
  • Managing the data collected through the IPY science programs for long term preservation and future access
  • Improve access to information, training and communication amongst northern research licensing stakeholders

 

Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Sustainable Environmental Health Environmental Health Surveillance

(Dietary Choice and Health)
$0.16 $0
Total $0.16 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 

Federal Partner: Environment Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Water Resources

Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians
Government of Canada IPY program $11.17 $0
Total $11.17 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 

Federal Partner: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Oceanography and Climate Aquatic Ecosystem Science Government of Canada IPY program $31.54 $0
Total $31.54 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 

Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Adapting to a Changing Climate and Hazard Risk Management

Ecosystem Risk Management
Climate Change Geoscience, Public Safety Geoscience

Environmental Geoscience Program
$3.06 $0
Total $3.06 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 

Federal Partner: Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Science for Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation

Health and Well-being of Northern Communities
Government of Canada IPY program $31.29 $0
Total $31.29 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 

Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Strategic Priority Research Government of Canada IPY program $9.75 $0
Total $9.75 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 

Federal Partner: Canada Food Inspection Agency
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Food Safety and Nutrition Risks Parasitology $0.41 $0
Total $0.41 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 

Federal Partner: Parks Canada Agency
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Conserve Heritage Resources IPY Climate Change Impacts on the Canadian Arctic Tundra $0.82 $0
IPY Freshwater Systems $0.53 $0
Total $1.35 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 

Federal Partner: Public Health Agency of Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Public Health Agency of Canada Government of Canada IPY program $0.62 $0
Total $0.62 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 

Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Agriculture and Agri-food Government of Canada IPY program $0.16 $0
Total $0.16 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 

Federal Partner: Canadian Museum of Civilization
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Canadian Museum of Civilization Government of Canada IPY program $0.80 $0
Total $0.80 $0

Expected results by program:

  • Not applicable, as International Polar Year funding has not been allocated in FY 2011-2012

 


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
$150 $3.71

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):

  • Not applicable

Contact information:
Robert Fortin
Director
International Polar Year Federal Program Office
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
360 Albert Street, Suite 1011
Ottawa, ON K1A 0H4
Tel: (613) 995-6587
Fax: (613) 995-7029
robert.fortin@ainc-inac.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) — Northern Affairs Program

Lead department program activity: Community Infrastructure

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $735,639,806 for the first two years. Of this amount $202,500,000 in each of 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 are funded from existing reference levels. New funds of $165,318,143 in 2008-2009 and $165,321,663 in 2009-2010, including employee benefit plans and Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation requirements, are sourced from the Fiscal Framework, as confirmed in Budget 2008.

The program was extended for an additional two years, with funding confirmed as part of Budget 2010. This will provide an additional $845,547,800 in investments into water and wastewater infrastructure over the two additional years.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The prime objective of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan (FNWWAP) is to support First Nations communities on reserve in bringing their drinking water and wastewater services to a level and quality of service comparable to those enjoyed by other Canadians living in communities of similar size and location. There are five key activity areas in the FNWWAP: infrastructure investments; operations and maintenance; training; monitoring and awareness; and standards.

To meet the objectives of the FNWWAP, several program enhancements have been introduced, including a national assessment of existing water and wastewater facilities, engagement on a new federal legislative framework for safe drinking water, increased training through Circuit Rider training program, modifying existing policies related to small water and septic systems and agreements for water/wastewater services, investment in a National Wastewater Program and waterborne illness procedures.

The FNWWAP was implemented as part of government commitments in the 2007 Speech from the Throne, Budget 2008, and Budget 2010 to support First Nations’ access to safe drinking water.

The FNWWAP supports INAC’s strategic outcome for “The Land and Economy”: Full participation of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis individuals and communities in the economy. The FNWWAP also supports Health Canada’s First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services strategic outcome of better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians.

More information is available at these Web sites:

Shared outcome(s): The FNWWAP works toward the achievement of four outcomes:

  • First Nation communities have an increased capacity to address potential water quality problems.
  • Health risks associated with water quality and supply are reduced.
  • All First Nation community water and wastewater facilities meet federal standards.
  • First Nation communities have increased confidence in their drinking water.

Governance structure(s): The First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan (FNWWAP) is a successor to the joint First Nations Water Management Strategy (2003-2008) and the INAC Plan of Action for Drinking Water (2006-2008). An MOU has been in place between INAC and HC since 2005 regarding data sharing related to drinking water. INAC shares information on the proposed water and wastewater infrastructure investments, the annual inspections of water and wastewater treatment plants, and information on action related to Drinking Water Advisories. Conversely, HC shares information such as drinking water sample results that do not meet the Canadian Drinking Water Quality Guidelines and reasons for having recommended Drinking Water Advisories. At the working level, the Strategic Water Management on Reserve Committee which includes representatives from HC, INAC, Environment Canada (EC) and the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), provides a forum for discussion to share information and coordinate joint action, and to provide leadership in an integrated and coordinated manner to ensure safe drinking water for First Nations communities and implementing FNWWAP. Although this is not a formal decision-making body, it does provide a good venue to promote dialogue and the sharing of information. INAC, HC and EC have developed a National Framework for the Review of Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Project Proposals in First Nations Communities to ensure that reviews of water and wastewater infrastructure projects in First nations communities are coordinated and that all applicable standards and requirements are met.

Directors General and ADMs from HC and INAC meet regularly to exchange and coordinate action on all relevant issues related to the FNWWAP.

Planning Highlights:

Federal Partner: Health Canada, Environment Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program $1,342.2 $335.3
Total $1,342.2 $335.3

Expected results by program:

Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program: Increase in % of First Nations drinking water systems with low risk ratings and increase in % of First Nations wastewater systems with low risk ratings.

 

Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Health Canada – First Nations and Inuit Health Drinking Water Safety Program – FNNWAP funding $109.6 $27.3
Drinking Water Safety Program – A based funding $20.0 $5.0
Total $129.6 $32.3

Expected results by program:

Health Canada Drinking Water Safety Program: Increase in the number of First Nations communities south of 60° with increased or maintained capacity to monitor their drinking water quality as per the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality and reduce health risks associated with drinking water quality and supply.

 


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
$1,471.8M $367.6M

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:
Sébastien Labelle
Director, Policy, Programs and Procedures
Indian and Northern Affairs
Policy Directorate, Community Infrastructure Branch
10 Wellington Street
Gatineau, Quebec Canada
K1A 0H4
Telephone: (819) 994-6466
Fax: (819) 953-3321



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement — Health Supports component

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) — Northern Affairs Program

Lead department program activity: Residential Schools Resolution

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: September 2003 (RHSP), July 2004 (Crisis Line)

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013 (RHSP) October 31, 2013 (Crisis Line)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $226,786,069

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Health Supports component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) ensures that former students of Indian residential schools can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse through all phases of the IRSSA. The Health Supports component of the IRSSA is composed of the Indian residential schools Resolution Health Support Program (formerly, Mental Health Support Program) and a 24-hour crisis line. Both of these are continuations of programs that were in place under the National Resolution Framework prior to the implementation of the IRSSA in September 2007. The Mental Health Support Program began in 2003 and the Crisis Line started in 2004.

Health Canada delivers the Resolution Health Support Program, which ensures that eligible former Indian Residential School Students and their families, have access to an appropriate level of health support services, through all phases of the IRSSA, so that they may safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuses. Program components include: emotional support services provided by Resolution Health Support Workers (RHSWs); cultural support services provided by Elders; professional counseling; and assistance with the cost of transportation to access counseling, Elder, and/or Traditional Healer services.

INAC’s Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector supports former students in crisis by funding the National Indian Residential School Crisis Line, a national, 24-hour toll-free support service operated by trained Aboriginal crisis counselors. INAC is also responsible for coordinating the verification of program eligibility, and ensuring that Health Canada is aware of dates for Independent Assessment Process and Truth and Reconciliation and Commemoration events as they arise, so that health supports can be provided to former students in a seamless fashion.

Shared outcome(s):

The IRSSA Health Supports component works toward the achievement of two outcomes:

  • Eligible former students of Indian residential schools and their families have access to mental health and emotional support services.
  • Eligible former students of Indian residential schools can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse.

Governance structure(s): INAC is responsible for the overall implementation of the IRSSA and is working in partnership with Health Canada to coordinate and provide services for former Indian residential school students throughout all phases of the IRSSA.

Planning Highlights: The Health Supports component will:

  • continue to deliver professional, paraprofessional and cultural supports to former Indian residential school students and their families through the Resolution Health Support Program;
  • provide former Indian residential school students and their families with access to a 24-hour national crisis line;
  • undertake communications activities to ensure that the health supports program is well-known; and
  • strengthen research, knowledge and training initiatives to ensure that health supports are well-suited to meet the needs of Indian residential school claimants, their families and communities.

 

Federal Partner: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Residential Schools Resolution Indian Residential Schools Crisis Line 23.9 4.0
Total 23.9 4.0

Expected results by program: Demand-driven health supports are provided to former Indian residential school students and their families through all phases of the IRSSA.

 

Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program 202.8 202.8
Total 202.8 46.8

Expected results by program: Demand-driven health supports are provided to former Indian residential school students and their families through all phases of the IRSSA.

 

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
226.8 50.8

Contact information:

Health Canada:
Andrea Challis
Manager, Indian Residential School Resolution Health Support Program
Mental Health and Addictions Division
Community Programs Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
Phone: (613) 952-1377
andrea.challis@hc-sc.gc.ca

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada:
Alia Butt
A/Director
Policy and Reconciliation Directorate
Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Tel: 613-996-2603
alia.butt@inac-ainc.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (OFI)

Lead department program activity: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2007

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $68.5 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) was developed in 1997 to help respond to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres. Through the UAS, the Government of Canada seeks to partner with other governments, community organizations, Aboriginal people and the private sector to support projects that address local priorities.

In 2007, Canada decided to set national priorities that focus on greater economic participation and made a long-term commitment by investing $68.5 million over five years to help respond effectively to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres.

Shared outcome(s): The primary goal of the UAS is to better address issues facing Aboriginal people living in cities across Canada, working toward the achievement of the following outcomes:

  • Urban Aboriginal socio-economic needs are targeted within new and renewed federal initiatives, where appropriate.
  • Access to and co-ordination of programs and services is improved.
  • Partners co-ordinate development and communication of research, policies and knowledge.
  • Horizontal linkages and policy integration within the federal government are improved for seeking opportunities for partnership (i.e., the federal government, provincial and municipal governments, Aboriginal groups, and private sector).

To accomplish these outcomes, UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Governance structure(s):

Steering committees are the catalysts for planning, making funding decisions, and co-ordinating work through the UAS — along with other community activities — to respond to urban Aboriginal issues. Each UAS steering committee is composed of a cross-section of the Aboriginal community, to ensure the steering committee's decisions reflect broad community concerns and priorities. While the steering committee structure is meant to be reflective of local circumstances, each steering committee includes representation from the local Aboriginal community, the federal government, other levels of government and the private sector. The inclusive nature of the steering committees is indicative of the principle of partnership that underlies the UAS, particularly in keeping with the objective to establish strong and active partnerships between government and community.

In some of the designated cities under the UAS, federal funding is administered through an incorporated community organization that has been delegated authority for delivering UAS projects on behalf of the various partners. Regardless of whether funding is delivered by a community organization, by federal officials or by a combination of the two, funding through the UAS is designed to promote co-operation with other key partners (including other federal departments) and stakeholders in support of community interests.

Planning Highlights:

The UAS works in partnership with other federal departments, provincial and municipal governments, Aboriginal communities and the private sector to make strategic investments designed to enhance the economic participation of Aboriginal people in Canada's urban centres. Community projects funded through the UAS focus on three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families. The UAS also invests in building capacity within the urban Aboriginal community through investments that support the formation of effective partnerships and the development and implementation of strategic plans that address the unique needs of each community.

The UAS will continue to work toward achieving greater horizontality across federal departments to maximize investments. It will explore and implement new and innovative approaches to increase horizontality. INAC has undertaken an analysis of horizontal projects (funded under the UAS Horizontal Terms and Conditions) to better understand the mechanics of horizontality and to identify and overcome barriers to increased federal collaboration. Findings from the analysis on federal collaboration are being implemented and monitored for results.

The UAS will also work toward making progress on its core objectives, including closing the unacceptable socio-economic gaps between urban Aboriginal people and other residents of cities, by leveraging funding from other levels of government and the private sector and by better aligning federal initiatives with provincial-municipal initiatives and other activities.

The UAS is an opportunity driven strategy designed to leverage other federal, provincial, municipal, and private funding for community based projects rather than funding pre-planned projects. For these reasons variances will exist between the planned spending and partnering, and actual spending and partnering when the UAS reports on its results at the end of 2011-2012.

 

Federal Partner: Office of the Federal Interlocutor
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Urban Aboriginal Strategy Urban Aboriginal Strategy $68.5 $23.1
Total $68.5 $23.1

Expected results by program: UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

 

Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada/
Service Canada; Canadian Heritage, Health Canada; Public Health Agency
Canada; Industry Canada; Justice Canada; and Public Safety Canada

($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Various program activities Various programs Unknown at this time Unknown at this time
(Funding is dependent on availability
of funds at the departmental level
and the types of priorities identified
at the local level.)

 


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
$68.5 To be determined
(Funding is dependent on availability
of funds at the departmental level
and the types of priorities
identified at the local level.)

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):

The UAS improves program co-ordination within the Government of Canada to maximize its investments and aims for equal cost sharing with provincial and municipal governments.

Through sustainable partnership policy development, program co-ordination at the federal level and with provincial and municipal governments, Aboriginal, and private sector partners, the UAS addresses local priorities and engages partners in the process of reducing the disparities that urban Aboriginal people face.

The UAS strives to make significant progress along the road of horizontal management as well as shared accountability with all its partners. It represents a practical step that illustrates how Canada's government is moving in the right direction to ensure that Aboriginal people living in cities across Canada have greater access to the skills and experiences they need to gain access to and succeed in urban centres.

Contact information:
Allan MacDonald
Director General
Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
66 Slater Street Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Telephone: 613-992-8186
allan.macdonald@ainc-inac.gc.ca


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Infrastructure Canada

Horizontal Initiatives1


Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

Lead department program activity: Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-04

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-13

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $4.9 billion

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund, which received funding in the 2001 and 2003 federal budgets, is a cost-shared contribution program for strategic infrastructure projects.  To date, funding has been approved to support 76 projects.

Investments are directed to projects of major national and regional significance and are to be made in areas that are vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life for Canadians.  The CSIF is delivered through negotiated agreements with provincial, territorial or local governments, private partners or non-governmental organizations.  Contribution agreements are tailored based on the project requirements.

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Act outlines the prime categories of investments in projects that involve fixed capital assets that are used or operated for the benefit of the public.  The categories eligible under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund are:

  • Highway and Rail Infrastructure;
  • Local Transportation Infrastructure;
  • Tourism or Urban Development Infrastructure;
  • Water or Sewage Infrastructure; and
  • Other categories approved by regulation, e.g. Advanced Telecommunications and High-Speed Broadband, Northern Infrastructure.

More information on CSIF can be found at:  http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/csif-fcis/csif-fcis-eng.html.

Shared outcome(s):
The overall planned results Infrastructure Canada expects to achieve through CSIF are to invest in projects which:

  • facilitate the movement of goods and people on Canada’s National Highway System for the purposes of increasing the productivity, economic efficiency, and safety of Canada’s surface transportation system;
  • facilitate the safe and efficient movement of goods and people, ease congestion, or reduce greenhouse gases and airborne pollutants;
  • ensure that tourism continues to contribute to the economic well-being of Canadians and to serve as a bridge between Canada and the world;
  • ensure that drinking water is safe, clean and reliable at drinking water facilities, and ensure sustainable treatment of wastewater; and
  • expand broadband networks in Canada.

Governance structure(s):
All CSIF projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.  Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area.  After project selection, Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution.  At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by the implementing departments/agencies are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The fund is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada:  As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review, selection, approval, public announcements, environmental assessment in some cases, and program evaluation.  It leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients.  It also develops, in coordination with the implementing department/agency, the submission to Treasury Board for the approval of funds.  To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative will sit on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee usually as the federal co-chair, except for transportation projects where Transport Canada is the lead.
  2. An implementing department/agency: Infrastructure Canada’s relationship with each implementing department or agency varies with the capacity and the complexity of the project.  Responsibilities are also negotiated specifically for each project.  The implementing department/agency may provide technical assistance in the analysis of the business case, determining the costs and benefits to be realized, and providing advice on the development of the contribution agreement and Treasury Board submission.  The implementing department/agency will support implementation of CSIF projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as overseeing the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assessing the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, providing information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approving claims, making payments, and conducting audits and evaluation of projects.  The implementing department/agency is normally represented on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee.  The implementing department/agency also ensures adherence to information management requirements, including the use of the Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, which captures, monitors and reports on project information. The implementing department/agency also provides communication support.
  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, Infrastructure Canada leads the negotiations to develop a contribution agreement. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

Planning Highlights:

  • Apply consistent project monitoring to closing-out projects;
  • Oversee project completion and close-out adhering to consistent monitoring and review procedures; and
  • Assemble and analyze project information for reporting purposes.
Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $157.3 $11.6
     
     
Total:  $157.3  $11.6

Expected Results: Infrastructure Canada and ACOA will continue to co-manage 3 projects currently underway nearing completion in Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia.

Federal Partner: Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CEDQR)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $142.5 $23.3
     
     
Total: $142.5 $23.3

Expected Results: Infrastructure Canada and CEDQR will continue to co-manage 3 projects currently underway nearing completion in Quebec.

Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification (WED)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $652.0 $24.6
     
     
Total: $652.0 $24.6

Expected Results: Infrastructure Canada and WED will continue to co-manage 5 projects currently underway nearing completion in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia.

Federal Partner: Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $285.9 $39.1
     
     
Total: $285.9 $39.1

Expected Results: Infrastructure Canada and FedDev Ontario will continue to co-manage 4 projects currently underway nearing completion in Ontario.

Federal Partner: Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $40.0 $0.0
     
     
Total: $40.0 $0.0

Expected Results: Infrastructure Canada and CanNor will continue to co-manage 5 projects currently underway nearing completion in Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. 

Federal Partner: Transport Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $3,268.0 $226.7
     
     
Total: $3,268.0 $226.7

Expected Results: Transport Canada will continue to serve as the lead partner in the management of programs throughout the country that deal with highways and other major transportation infrastructure. 

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
$4,545.7 millions $325.3 millions

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail:  claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.


Border Infrastructure Fund (BIF)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Border Infrastructure Fund

Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

Lead department program activity: Border Infrastructure Fund

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-04

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2013-14

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $675 Million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The Border Infrastructure Fund, which was announced in Budget 2001, is a $675 million cost-shared contribution program. It complements some of the Government of Canada’s other infrastructure programs such as the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund and the Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program, a Transport Canada program.

As part of  “Canada’s commitment to address land border pressures, such as traffic congestion, and to continue to facilitate the large volume of trade across the Canada – United States border”, the Border Infrastructure Fund contributions are directed at or on routes leading to Canada’s border crossings, with a particular focus on the six largest:

  • Windsor, Ontario;
  • Sarnia, Ontario;
  • Fort Erie, Ontario;
  • Niagara Falls, Ontario;
  • Douglas, British Columbia; and
  • Lacolle, Quebec.

The fund also directs some funding toward smaller and regionally important border crossings throughout Canada. Once completed, projects supported under BIF will help alleviate traffic congestion, increase system capacity and further the Smart Border Declaration (a Canada – US Declaration; see http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/anti-terrorism/declaration-en.asp).

More information on this fund can be found at: http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/bif-fsif/bif-fsif-eng.html.

Shared outcome(s):
The overall planned results expected to achieve through BIF are to invest in projects that contribute to safe and efficient border crossings. Expected outcomes are to alleviate border congestion and increase border crossing capacity and to increase security and safety at border crossings, leading to cross border trade efficiencies.

Governance structure(s):
All BIF projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.  Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults with other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area.  After project selection, public announcements are made by the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.  Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution.  At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by Transport Canada are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The fund is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada:  As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review and selection.  It leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients and is responsible for the evaluation of the program.  To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative sits on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee.
  2. Transport Canada:  This department has the project-specific technical knowledge with regard to each project.  Transport Canada provides analysis and advice for the review and approval of projects.  It is responsible for implementing the Border Infrastructure Fund projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: environmental assessment, the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, the provision of information pertaining to cash flow and budget, the approval of invoices, making payments, the conducting of audits and evaluation of the projects.  Transport Canada reviews the business case for the project, and determines the costs and benefits.  It works with Infrastructure Canada to jointly negotiate the project agreement and prepares the Treasury Board submission; the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities signs both documents. Transport Canada is the federal co-chair of the project’s Agreement Steering Committee.  It also ensures adherence to information management requirements to capture, monitor and report on project information.
  3. The funding recipient:  The recipient may be a provincial, territorial or local government, private partner or a combination thereof.  Once the project has been selected, the funding recipient enters into negotiations with Infrastructure Canada to develop a contribution agreement.  The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

Planning Highlights:

  • Monitor the implementation of project-specific agreements in partnership with Transport Canada;
  • Oversee the scheduled completion of projects subject to terms of agreement ensuring claims are processed efficiently and timely; and
  • Assemble and analyze project information for reporting purposes.
Federal Partner: Transport Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $611.8 $44.3
     
     
Total: $611.8 $44.3

Expected Results: Transport Canada will continue to serve as the lead partner in the management of programs throughout the country that deal with highways and other major transportation infrastructure.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
$611.8 millions $44.3 millions

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail:  claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.


Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

Lead department program activity: Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2004-05

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2013-14

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1.2 Billion

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The $1.2 billion Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund has been structured to provide a balanced response to local infrastructure needs in urban and rural Canada and will ensure that all Canadians, whether they live in large, small or remote communities, will share in the benefits of infrastructure investments.

The fund improves and increases the stock of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, culture, recreation, and those very things that make our communities vibrant and productive places to live, work and raise families.  It targets communities of less than 250,000 residents as well as First Nation communities.  Like other infrastructure programs, MRIF seeks to ensure that the projects it funds support the goals of the Government of Canada, encourages new and innovative approaches and favours partnerships, including an emphasis on ‘green’ projects which are sustainable and reduce greenhouse gases.

Through MRIF, the Government of Canada continues to work in productive partnerships with provinces, territories, and municipalities, as well as First Nations and the private sector, to invest in local infrastructure projects.  These projects will be vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life in Canadian communities.

The fund is cost-shared with the Government of Canada contributing, on average, one-third of total project eligible costs.  Provinces and municipalities contribute the remainder of these costs.  In recognition of the unique circumstances of the First Nations and the Territories, where many communities have no tax base, the Government of Canada may contribute a higher percentage of total project eligible costs.

More information on the fund can be found at:  http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/mrif-fimr/mrif-fimr-eng.html.

Shared outcome(s):
The overall expected outcomes are:

  • Improved and increased core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, culture and recreation; and
  • Improved quality of life and economic opportunities for smaller communities and First Nations.

Governance structure(s):
The MRIF is based on a federal partnership arrangement between Infrastructure Canada and five federal partners:  Western Economic Diversification, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario, and the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency.  It involves 14 sub-programs, one joint sub-program for each province and territory and a sub-program for First Nations communities.  Each of the 14 sub-programs follows the same general conditions, priorities and approaches.  Also, recognizing the individual nature of each sub-program, the various agreements reflect the nature of the partnership as it relates to the order of government. 

To affect expected outcomes, MRIF eligible projects must conform to a policy leveraging framework, based on a common baseline, but adapted for each jurisdiction.  To ensure broad support and effective, innovative project delivery, partnerships of various types, including public-private partnerships are encouraged in the formulation and delivery of the fund projects.  The program relies on strong input from local and rural municipalities, including the support of the locally elected councils.  In addition, municipal representatives are involved in the processes and management of the program in the respective province or territory.

Planning Highlights:

  • Continue to manage projects subject to federal-provincial-territorial contribution agreements;
  • Continue to work with Federal Delivery Partners on the project close-out adhering to consistent monitoring and review procedures; and
  • Assemble and analyze project information for reporting purposes.
Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $139.2 $5.6
     
     
Total: $139.2 $5.6

Expected Results: Infrastructure Canada and ACOA will continue to co-manage 13 projects currently underway nearing completion in Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.  Over 70% of the federal contribution is committed to green projects.

Federal Partner: Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CEDQR)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $234.8 $0.0
     
     
Total: $234.8 $0.0

Expected Results: Infrastructure Canada and CEDQR will continue to co-manage 111 projects currently underway nearing completion in Quebec.  Over 60% of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.

Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification (WED)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $276.5 $29.7
     
     
Total: $276.5 $29.7

Expected Results: Infrastructure Canada and WED will continue to co-manage 46 projects currently underway nearing completion in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  Over 55% of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.

Federal Partner: Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $362.0 $11.5
     
     
Total: $362.0 $11.5

Expected Results: Infrastructure Canada and FedDev Ontario will continue to co-manage 128 projects currently underway nearing completion in Ontario. Over 70% of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.

Federal Partner: Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. $57.5 $0.0
     
     
Total: $57.5 $0.0

Expected Results: Infrastructure Canada and CanNor will continue to co-manage 34 projects currently underway nearing completion in Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut.  Almost 40% of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
$1,070.0 millions $46.8 millions


Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail:  claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.


Building Canada Fund (BCF)2

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Building Canada Fund

Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

Lead department program activity: Building Canada Fund

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-08

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2016-17

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $8.5 billion

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The Building Canada Fund focuses on projects that deliver economic, environmental, and social benefits to Canadians.

The national priorities for funding are the core national highway system, drinking water, wastewater, public transit and green energy.  Other eligible categories include projects that support economic growth and development (short-line rail and short-sea shipping, connectivity and broadband, tourism and regional and local airports), environmental projects (solid waste management), as well as projects that contribute to the ongoing development of safe and strong communities (disaster mitigation, culture, sport, recreation, local roads and bridges, and brownfield re-development).  Funding is used to support public infrastructure owned by provincial, territorial and municipal governments and entities, as well as the non-profit sector and private industry, in certain cases.

Funding is allocated for projects in the various provinces and territories based on their population (as of the 2006 Census).  In the provinces, the program operates through two components: the Major Infrastructure Component and the Communities Component.  In the territories, in recognition of their very low per capita allocations, the Building Canada funding has been rolled into the Provincial-Territorial Base Funding Program and is managed under the terms of this latter program in each territory.

The Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC) targets larger, strategic projects of national and regional significance.  Under this component, two-thirds of national funding is directed to the above-mentioned national priorities.  Projects under the Major Infrastructure Component are selected jointly through a federal-provincial/territorial negotiation process with all projects required to meet minimum federal eligibility criteria. 

The Communities Component (BCF-CC) is focused on projects in communities with populations of less than 100,000.  Projects are selected through an application-based process and, like projects under the Major Infrastructure Component, are evaluated on the extent to which they meet minimum federal eligibility criteria. This will significantly help smaller communities address their infrastructure pressures and serve as a complementary instrument to the Gas Tax Fund.

More information on the Building Canada Fund can be found at: http://www.buildingcanada-chantierscanada.gc.ca/funprog-progfin/target-viser/bcf-fcc/bcf-fcc-eng.html.

Shared outcome(s):
The expected outcomes are to deliver results that matter to Canadians - including cleaner air and water, safer roads, shorter commutes -  while supporting broad federal priorities of a stronger economy, cleaner environment, and better communities.

Governance structure(s):

  1. Major Infrastructure Component of the Building Canada FundAll BCF-MIC projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.  Priorities are identified through discussions with provinces.  Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area.  Following due diligence, Treasury Board approval is required for contributions to any projects above the delegated threshold (i.e. $100 million federal contribution) or that require exemptions to program terms and conditions.  At the same time, should they be required for transportation projects, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by Transport Canada are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.BCF-MICis delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:
    1. Infrastructure Canada:  As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for identifying priorities, recommending approval of all BCF-MIC projects to the Minister, public announcements, environmental assessment in some cases, and program evaluation. Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project selection and review/due diligence for all projects.  For non-transportation projects, Infrastructure Canada is also responsible for the preparation of Treasury Board submissions (where required), the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients, and the oversight of these agreements.  To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative sits on the project’s Agreement Steering Committee.  Infrastructure Canada oversees the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assesses the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, monitors information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approves claims, make payments, and conducts audits and evaluations of the projects.  Infrastructure Canada will use Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure to capture, monitor and report project information.
    2. Transport Canada:  For transportation projects, Transport Canada drafts a project review/due diligence for Infrastructure Canada’s review, prepares any required Treasury Board submissions, and leads the negotiations of contribution agreements.  Transport Canada monitors activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, and nominates federal representatives to sit on projects’ Agreement Steering Committees.  Transport Canada oversees the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assesses the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, monitors information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approves claims, makes payments, and conducts audits and evaluations of the projects.  Transport Canada will also ensure adherence to Infrastructure Canada’s information management requirements, including the use of Infrastructure Canada’s Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, which captures, monitors and reports project information. Transport Canada also provides communication support to Infrastructure Canada.
    3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization or a combination thereof. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the Terms and Conditions of the Contribution Agreement, and is also responsible for the ongoing operation and maintenance of the asset. 
  2. Communities Component of the Building Canada FundBCF-CC is governed by separate federal-provincial contribution agreements, each of which is managed by an Oversight Committee established by the Infrastructure Framework Committee that includes both federal and provincial senior officials. To support the operation of the Communities Component and Oversight Committees, each jurisdiction has a federal-provincial Joint Secretariat staffed by Federal Delivery Partners and provincial officials.All project applications under BCF-CC are subject to a competitive application-based process. This process is administered by the Joint Secretariat, but a material role for the respective provincial municipal association (for those provinces that have municipal associations) may also have been established as part of the application review process. Allowing some implementation flexibility to the Joint Secretariats and Oversight Committees, all competitive processes issue calls for applications (either one open window for applications or multiple shorter windows with set closing dates). Some provinces may limit the number of applications per community within and/or across all intakes.Joint Secretariats provide the first level of due diligence, including engineering, environmental, and legal review of the applications, and prepare briefing material for the Oversight Committees. The Oversight Committees review and rank the application against the mandatory and additional leveraging criteria established in the Policy Leveraging Framework of the Building Canada Fund. The Oversight Committee presents the recommended list of projects to the Minister or the Federal Delivery Partner Minister for consideration, in accordance with the delegations of authority. After consulting with other Ministers who have a mandate in the substantive project area, the Minister or the Federal Delivery Partner Minister provide feedback on the list of projects to the Oversight Committee. The Oversight Committee then performs a final review of the list and makes a recommendation to the appropriate Minister, in accordance with the delegations of authority. Federal funding for projects is announced once final approval has been granted in writing.
    The Framework Agreements stipulate that individual federal-provincial Contribution Agreements govern the Communities Component in each province, and that these agreements are managed by an Oversight Committee, established under the Infrastructure Framework Committee. Each Oversight Committee includes both federal and provincial senior officials and may also include representatives from provincial municipal associations (where applicable). The federal co-chair of the Oversight Committee is a senior official from Infrastructure Canada appointed by the Minister.

    In the federal-provincial contribution agreement, the parties agreed to establish a Joint Secretariat to support the Oversight Committee and administer BCF-CC. This secretariat is staffed by officials from the provincial government and the Federal Delivery Partner.

Planning Highlights:

Under BCF-MIC, it is expected that Infrastructure Canada will continue to work with provincial partners to identify project priorities for remaining uncommitted funding.  At the same time, the implementation of each project-specific agreement will be conducted in a streamlined manner to ensure that the terms of agreements are respected while claims for payment are processed efficiently.

Under BCF-CC, Infrastructure Canada will continue to collaborate with Federal Delivery Partners ensuring accountability regimes are clearly established and executed; conduct consistent project monitoring ensuring compliance to program Terms and Conditions; and oversee the scheduled completion of hundreds of projects.

Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component $20.5 $0.0
b. Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund $26.6 $7.0
c. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component $148.3 $37.5
d. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up $34.6 $0.0
e. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund $23.2 $0.8
Total: $253.2 $45.3

Expected Results:
a.  Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component:  Projects previously co-managed with ACOA have been repatriated to Infrastructure Canada.

c.  Building Canada Fund-Communities Component:  Infrastructure Canada and ACOA will continue to co-manage 220 projects currently underway in Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. It is forecasted that 39 of these projects will be completed during the 2011-2012 fiscal year. In addition, all 78 projects funded under the Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up stimulus are scheduled to be substantially completed by March 31, 2010. Following the December 2, 2010 announcement, construction deadline for infrastructure projects has been extended to October 31, 2011.

Federal Partner: Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CEDQR)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component $269.2 $79.7
b. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component $410.0 $80.0
c. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up $116.0 $0.0
d. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund $39.8 $0.0
Total: $835.0 $159.7

Expected Results:
a.  Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component:  Projects previously co-managed with CEDQR have been repatriated to Infrastructure Canada.

c.  Building Canada Fund-Communities Component:  Infrastructure Canada and CEDQR will continue to co-manage 230 approved projects in Quebec. It is forecasted that 34 of these projects will be completed during the 2011-2012 fiscal year. In addition, all 107 projects funded under the Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up stimulus are scheduled to be substantially completed by March 31, 2010. Following the December 2, 2010 announcement, construction deadline for infrastructure projects has been extended to October 31, 2011.

Federal Partner: Transport Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component $3,514.3 $872.6
b. Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund $440.5 $111.6
     
Total: $3,954.8 $984.2

Expected Results:
a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component:  As per the Memorandum of Understanding between Infrastructure Canada and Transport Canada, Transport Canada will continue to serve as the lead federal department in the management of contribution agreements for transportation projects under BCF-MIC.  In its role, Transport Canada will continue to work with recipients to implement Contribution Agreements and to deliver program funding to recipients under the Terms and Conditions of the BCF-MIC.  Transport Canada and Infrastructure Canada will continue to work together to review new transportation project priorities that are identified for funds remaining under the BCF-MIC.  In addition, Infrastructure Canada and Transport Canada will ensure that all selected projects meet the eligibility criteria of the BCF-MIC as set out in the program Terms and Conditions. It is currently expected based on information available from project proponents, up to 20 projectswill be completed during fiscal year 2011-2012.

Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification (WED)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component $185.0 $42.1
b. Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund $170.5 $0.0
c. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component $363.6 $117.3
d. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up $149.9 $0.0
e. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund $58.5 $8.1
Total: $927.5 $167.5

Expected Results:
a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component:  Infrastructure Canada and WED will continue to co-manage three BCF-MIC projects across the western provinces.  The expansion of Northlands Agricom Exhibition Facility in Edmonton, AB and construction of Evraz Place Revitalization in Regina, SK, are scheduled for completion in the fiscal year 2010-2011, with projects close-out in the fiscal year 2011-2012.  In addition, construction of the Kinnear Centre for Creativity and Innovation in Banff, AB is forecasted to be substantially completed during the fiscal year 2011-2012.

c.  Building Canada Fund-Communities Component:  Infrastructure Canada and WED will continue to co-manage 360 projects currently underway in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia. It is forecasted that 75 of these projects will be completed during the 2011-2012 fiscal year. In addition, all 166 projects funded under the Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up stimulus are scheduled to be substantially completed by March 31, 2010. Following the December 2, 2010 announcement, construction deadline for infrastructure projects has been extended to October 31, 2011.

Federal Partner: Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component $187.7 $34.9
b. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component $362.0 $85.0
c. Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up $196.0 $0.0
d.  Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund $64.0 $3.5
e. Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund 37.0 $0.0
Total: $846.7 $123.4

Expected Results:
a.  Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component:  Projects previously co-managed with FedDev Ontario have been repatriated to Infrastructure Canada.

b.  Building Canada Fund-Communities Component:  Infrastructure Canada and FedDev Ontario will continue to co-manage 360 projects currently underway in Ontario. It is forecasted that 79 of these projects will be completed during the 2011-2012 fiscal year. In addition, all 187 projects funded under the Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up stimulus are scheduled to be substantially completed by March 31, 2010. Following the December 2, 2010 announcement, construction deadline for infrastructure projects has been extended to October 31, 2011.

Federal Partner: Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
PA1 a. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund $9.5 $0.0
     
     
Total: $9.5 $0.0

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
$6,826.7 millions $1,480.1 millions

Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Claude Blanchette, Director General, Program Integration, Tel: (613) 948-9392, E-Mail:  claude.blanchette@infc.gc.ca.

1 Allocations for Horizontal Initiatives include Operating and Maintenance (O&M).
2 When it was announced, the Building Canada Fund was $8.8 billion, but since then portions of the fund are managed under the mechanisms of different funds.

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National Research Council Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Genomics R&D Initiative (GRDI)

Name of lead department: National Research Council (NRC)

Lead department program activity: Health and Life Science Technologies

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 1999-2000

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-2011 (renewal sought for 2011-2014)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $ 293,800,000 (assuming renewal until 2014)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Genomics R&D Initiative (GRDI) was established for the purpose of building and maintaining capacity inside government departments to do genomics research. As an enabling technology, genomics provides powerful tools and precise information to support operational mandates and upon which policy and regulatory decisions can be based. Federal science-based departments and agencies interact with partners, stakeholders and clients and link these enabling tools and technologies to value-added applications that enable Canada to respond to national priorities, deliver on government mandates and support the development of wealth for Canadians.

These applications range from international requirements for genomics-enabled testing to support access of exported products, the ability to interpret and assess genomics information submitted with product information for regulatory oversight, the development of assays and products using genomics approaches for enhancing Canadians' lives (e.g. public health, food safety), the environment and sustainability of human activities, socio-economic and ethical considerations related to the use and integration of genomics in health care, environmental sustainability activities, and consumer and industrial products and applications, as well as facilitating Canadians' access to accurate and understandable information concerning genome sciences. Focusing specifically on issues that involve living organisms, the GRDI's overarching goal is thus to contribute solutions to issues that are important to Canadians, with particular attention to the role that federal government research plays in finding these solutions. Additional information may be found at the GRDI website.

Shared outcomes: A revised Results-Based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) was prepared for the Initiative in 2006-2007 based on an ultimate outcome of enhanced quality of life in terms of health, safety, and environment, social and economic development. Long-term outcomes include: improved health care (e.g. diagnostics and treatment, reduced heath and environmental risks, reduced heath costs); reduced environmental impacts (e.g. water quality, healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems, sustainable fisheries, agriculture, forestry and aquaculture); and improved competitiveness of Canadian companies (e.g. diversification, improved productivity, cost reductions, sustainable development). A new Performance Measurement Strategy will be developed by March 31, 2011.

Governance structure: An interdepartmental ADM Coordinating Committee has been established to oversee collective management and coordination of GRDI. The Committee ensures that effective priority setting mechanisms are established within departments, and that government objectives and priorities are addressed.

The Committee also ensures that common GRDI management principles are implemented and horizontal collaborations between organizations are pursued wherever relevant and possible. The Committee includes members from each of the organizations receiving funding and a representative from Industry Canada.

An Interdepartmental Working Group (WG) supports the work of the Committee. The mandate of the WG is to provide recommendations and advice to the ADM Coordinating Committee regarding strategic priority setting and overall management of the GRDI. The WG also supports evaluation and reporting requirements related to the Initiative. NRC is the lead agency for the Initiative and chairs the Coordinating Committee and the Working Group.

Planning Highlights: Fiscal year 2010-11 is the last year of GRDI Phase IV. Funding for Phase V (2011-14) is currently being sought. Phase V seeks to: 1) address shared priorities through horizontal integration and effective collaborations around one or two interdepartmental pilot projects; and 2) support the priorities, policies and mandates of government through concerted high calibre genomics research in areas where federal laboratories have distinct roles and competencies. The ADM Coordinating Committee strongly supports the renewal of the GRDI into Phase V. The development of interdepartmental pilot projects, while continuing to invest in mandated research, is seen to represent an important transition for the Initiative that will ensure continued relevance and impact of the R&D for Canadians. The overall risk related to the funding and delivery of the GRDI program was evaluated during the planning stages of the 2010 GRDI evaluation, and was found to be medium-low.

Federal Partners: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), Environment Canada (EC), Health Canada (HC), National Research Council (NRC), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC).

Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start (FY1999-2000) to End Date*) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Science, Innovation and Adoption Canadian Crop Genomics Initiative (CCGI) 86.3 5.7
Total 86.3 5.7

Expected Results: Investment in genomics research will be focused in three broad categories: 1) biodiversity, gene mining and functional analysis; 2) delivery of genomics discoveries through bioinformatics and physical tools; and 3) enhancing the efficiency of plant breeding. Biodiversity, gene mining and functional analysis focus on the identification and extraction of genes for desirable traits. Bioinformatics and physical tools are required to enhance the efficiency of this process. Improved access to both biological materials and data sets will assist and accelerate the adoption of new technologies and the pace of commercialization. The new knowledge generated by these program areas will lay the scientific foundation for major advances in the genetic improvement of crops which will be critical in the next decade. To take full advantage of these new opportunities, Canada must have a responsive regulatory system that has the most effective and efficient testing and inspection tools at its disposal. In Phase V, AAFC will increase its commitment to work more closely with its portfolio partner, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, on genomics research projects that support mutual needs.

Federal Partner: Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start (FY1999-2000) to End Date*) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Science for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture National Aquatic Biotechnology and Genomics R&D Strategy 12.895 0.855
Total 12.895 0.855

Expected Results: Genomics-enabled research within DFO will continue to be aligned within the following themes: (1) Genetic Profiling of Aquatic Resources: DFO has responsibility for providing scientific advice and research for over 650 fish, invertebrate, and mammal species. There is enormous potential for the development of genomic tools relevant to those species under management, and particularly those that are of management concern. (2) Research and Development of Genomic Approaches for Aquatic Animal Health Diagnostic Tools to Protect Aquatic Ecosystems: Aquatic animal health research under this theme includes the genomics research concerning the health of aquatic animals that fall under DFO legislative authority. Further research incorporating genomics approaches to aquatic animal health will better position Canada to respond and manage aquatic animal resources, particularly under changing environmental conditions. (3) Aquatic Ecosystem Health: Genomics approaches offer opportunities for increasing our understanding of the aquatic ecosystem, and are anticipated to be an important tool for applying an ecosystem approach to managing aquatic resources and healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems.

Federal Partner: Environment Canada (EC)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start (FY1999-2000) to End Date*) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Climate Change and Clean Air Strategic Technology Applications of Genomics in the Environment (STAGE) 14.55 0.95
Total 14.55 0.95

Expected Results: The Strategic Technology Applications of Genomics in the Environment program aims at enhancing EC's applications of genomics-based tools and technologies for responsible decision-making. EC will continue to show leadership in environmental genomics and foster collaboration in other departments and external institutions. Genomics research supports EC's Science Plan in crucial areas such as understanding cumulative risks and managing risks, optimizing opportunities, and building resilience. This will assist the delivery of EC's obligations as a signatory of, and regulator for, major environmental legislation and agreements such as the Fisheries Act, the Toxic Substance Management Policy, the Chemical Management Plan, the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, and the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network.

Federal Partner: Health Canada (HC)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start (FY1999-2000) to End Date*) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Emergent Health Issues GRDI 51.1 1.9
Total 51.1 1.9

Expected Results: Genomics research will continue to focus on four priority areas of investment for strengthening the department's regulatory role: 1) Regulatory knowledge on therapeutics and biologics: Studies will be conducted for the identification of biomarkers associated with the safety evaluation of health products. 2) Regulatory knowledge on food safety and nutrition: Genomics research will be undertaken to detect food-borne contaminants, to characterize the health effects of food contaminants, nutrients, novel foods/food ingredients, and pre- and pro-biotics for enhanced regulatory decisions, and to develop biomarkers to monitor cellular and physiological responses in the context of nutrition and disease susceptibility of defined populations. 3) Regulatory knowledge to protect human health from potential adverse effects of environmental contaminants, consumer products, and pesticides: Research will focus on effectively and efficiently assessing the hazards of environmental contaminants, occupational health hazards, pesticides, and consumer products. 4) Research on socio-ethical impacts of genomics technologies and products: Bioethics and benefit-sharing best practices will be developed for genetic research, with studies pertaining to ethical, legal, and social issues of genomics to address the use of DNA samples for research purposes.

Federal Partner: Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start (FY1999-2000) to End Date*) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Science and Technology for Public Health GRDI 5.1 1.9
Total 5.1 1.9

Expected Results: Two themes guide research activities of the GRDI for PHAC: 1) Public Health Pathogenomics: generating, synthesizing, and moving new knowledge on pathogen genomics and related sciences into enhanced infectious disease surveillance, prevention and control programs. New applications to be targeted will take the form of novel diagnostics, molecular risk assessment tools, vaccines, intervention strategies, and methods for mitigating antimicrobial resistance. 2) Public Health Genomics: generating, synthesizing, and translating new knowledge in human genomics and related sciences with the aim of enhancing diagnostic, health promotion and preventative efforts, such as modulation of risk factors for chronic and infectious diseases and/or predictive genetic screening.

Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start (FY1999-2000) to End Date*) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Natural Resource and Landmass Knowledge for Canadians GRDI 28.1 1.9
Total 28.1 1.9

Expected Results: Genomics research will address the challenges faced by Canada's forest sector by using that knowledge for commercial innovation. Canada's capacity and expertise in forest genomics will address the needs of the forest sector by: (a) identifying genes of commercially important traits such as wood quality, growth and resistance, giving tree breeders the ability to select superior trees in seedlings as young as a year; (b) the production of innovative molecular technologies that will allow the identification or diagnosis of potentially invasive pests; (c) furthering our understanding of the interactions between hosts and pests or hosts and beneficial microorganisms for the development of environmentally-friendly forest management approaches, including biological control methods; and (d) investigating bioenergy solutions via improved feedstock and/or novel enzymatic processes and associated value-added bioproducts.

Federal Partner: National Research Council (NRC)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start (FY1999-2000) to End Date*) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Health and Life Science Technologies The Genomics and Health Initiative (GHI) 86.3 5.7
Shared Priorities 8.955 0.995
Total 95.255 6.695

Expected Results: The NRC Genomics and Health Initiative is focused on genomics and health-related technologies – key enabling technologies that support NRC and federal priorities in health, energy and environment. NRC-GHI provides a mechanism to bring to bear multi-disciplinary competencies and converging technologies in NRC research institutes, while ensuring that research projects are linked to market needs and opportunities for Canadian companies. The GHI-5 program funding decisions will support the NRC Strategy in critical research areas related to environmental degradation and climate change (e.g. adapting Canadian crops), as well as in response to growing health care pressures (e.g. developing and advancing technologies for diagnosing, treating and preventing human disease that help reduce health care costs). Shared priorities research will focus on two areas: 1) Improved ability to detect, diagnose and monitor organisms to ensure a sustainable supply of safe and healthy food and water for human consumption; and 2) Improved ability to detect, identify and understand Canadian biological diversity to prepare Canadian natural and managed resources and markets for global change. Because of the usefulness of genomic-based tools for detection and diagnosis in regulatory programs, the CFIA will also have the opportunity to participate in interdepartmental projects addressing the shared priority areas. NRC will administer the shared priorities funds and redistribute them to departments and agencies based on their contribution to the selected shared priority projects, based on a collaborative approach.

Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR)
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start (FY1999-2000) to End Date*) Planned Spending for
2011-12
N/A – one time allocation in 1999-2000 to assist in creation of Genome Canada Secretariat N/A 0.5 0.0
Total 0.5 0.0

($ millions)
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start (FY1999-2000) to End Date*) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
293.8 19.9

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:
Gary Fudge, P. Eng.
Director, Life Sciences Horizontal Initiatives
National Research Council Canada
613-949-0542
Gary.Fudge@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

* assuming end date March 31, 2014


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Natural Resources Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Improving the Performance of the Regulatory System for Major Natural Resource Projects

NOTE: Departments are instructed to review the detailed instructions for this table carefully, as they have changed from the template used last year. Note that plans and spending information for each federal partner involved in the horizontal initiative is to be presented in a separate table.


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Improving the Performance of the Regulatory System for Major Natural Resource Projects

2. Name of lead department(s): Natural Resources Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Safety, Security and Stewardship – Natural Resource and Landmass Knowledge and Systems

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 1, 2007

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $150 million over 5 years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

To respond to the growth in the number of major resource projects and to move forward on commitments to create a more accountable, predictable and timely regulatory review process, the Major Projects Management Office was established to provide a single point of entry into the federal regulatory system for all stakeholders and to provide overarching management of the federal regulatory process for major natural resource projects in both operational and policy areas.

The Government has allocated $150 million over five years to establish the MPMO within Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and to increase the scientific and technical capacity of key regulatory departments and agencies. Resources provided through this initiative ensure that key regulatory departments and agencies are positioned to deliver high quality assessments of major resource projects and to meet their legal responsibilities for Aboriginal Crown consultation associated with their regulatory decisions for major resource projects.

This initiative provides the oversight and capacity needed to address the issues affecting the performance of the federal regulatory system. In short, it lays the foundation for a more predictable and accountable regulatory system that will improve the competitiveness of Canada’s resource industries while ensuring careful consideration of environmental standards and technical requirements.

8. Shared outcome(s):

Among the more tangible results from this initiative will be improved efficiency and predictability of federal project reviews.  The environmental assessment and regulatory review and permitting process for major resource projects is targeted to be reduced from more than four years to an average of about two years.

Other important outcomes from this initiative include:

  • a more accountable, predictable and timely regulatory review process that will facilitate investment and planning decisions and improve the competitiveness of Canada’s resources industries;
  • high quality assessments of the environmental and social effects of resource development so that federal decisions in relation to projects safeguard the environment and promote sustainability; and
  • Aboriginal consultation responsibilities will be fulfilled in a more consistent, adequate and meaningful manner.

9. Governance structure(s):

The Cabinet Directive on Improving the Performance of the Regulatory System for Major Resource Projects established a new governance framework for federal government departments and agencies to facilitate the effective, coordinated, and concurrent discharge of their statutory duties, functions and obligations related to the regulation of major resource projects. It encourages federal government departments to work together to identify areas where the consistency, efficiency and effectiveness of the federal regulatory system can be improved and to develop and implement system improvements.  These activities are intended to improve the accountability, transparency, timeliness and predictability of the federal regulatory system for major natural resource projects.

The Minister of Natural Resources is the lead Minister for the Initiative.  In collaboration with his counterparts in other regulatory departments, the Minister of Natural Resources reports biannually to Cabinet on progress made towards achieving the objectives of the initiative, and reports annually to Parliament and the public through NRCan’s annual reporting requirements.

A Major Projects Deputy Ministers' Committee has been created to serve as the governance body for the implementation of the initiative.  This Committee provides direction for the resolution of project-specific issues and oversees the application of the Cabinet Directive.  Membership on this committee includes the Deputy Minister of NRCan (Chair), the Deputy Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the Deputy Minister of the Environment, the Deputy Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, the Deputy Minister of Transport, the Associate Deputy Minister of Industry, the Deputy Minister of Justice, the Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Operations) - Privy Council Office, the President of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, the President of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and the Chair of the National Energy Board.

The MPMO provides overarching management of the federal regulatory system for major resource projects. In this role, the MPMO works with federal regulatory departments / agencies to identify areas where the consistency, efficiency and effectiveness of the federal regulatory process can be improved and to implement change. The MPMO also provides support to the Major Projects Deputy Ministers' Committee, through the provision of strategic advice and analysis.

To ensure effective communication with federal regulatory departments on key issues and to facilitate collaboration and cooperation, interdepartmental working groups have been established at the ADM, DG and Director levels.

10. Planning Highlights:

To achieve the expected results, NRCan and its federal partners will develop and implement a whole-of-government strategy to modernize the federal regulatory review process for natural resource projects by:

  • Enhancing coordination and collaboration to ensure high-quality, timely and predictable environmental assessment and regulatory review processes;
  • Improving the process and capacity of Aboriginal engagement and consultations with respect to major resource projects;
  • Identifying and implementing process improvements to continue to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the federal regulatory system for major resource projects; and,
  • Working with partners to strengthen northern regulatory regimes.

Federal departments and agencies will also work collaboratively to improve the transparency and accountability of the federal regulatory review process through increased oversight and regular monitoring, tracking and reporting on progress against commitments in project agreements.

In addition, NRCan will work to identify opportunities to improve integration of federal and provincial regulatory review processes.

11. Federal Partner:

Natural Resources Canada

12. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011–12
Natural Resource and Landmass Knowledge and Systems Major Projects Management Office $13,000,000 $4,000,000
Total $13,000,000  $4,000,000 

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

  • A suite of legislative, regulatory and policy changes is developed and implemented to deliver predictable and timely project reviews, reduce regulatory burden, improve environmental protection and provide for more meaningful aboriginal consultations in support of the Government's economic and environmental agendas;

  • Project management and Deputy Minister-level oversight is provided for over 60 major resource projects, including working with partners to identify and resolve issues that arise to ensure an efficient and effective review process;

  • Project Agreements that include target timelines, service standards and work plans are developed to ensure timely, integrated and well coordinated environmental assessment, regulatory decision-making and Aboriginal consultation for major resource projects;

  • Robust tracking, monitoring and reporting on major resource projects is undertaken to increase the level of transparency and accountability of the federal regulatory review process and to ensure adherence to target timelines and service standards;

  • Ongoing implementation of a consistent, whole of government approach to Aboriginal consultations;

  • Work with partners to strengthen northern regulatory regimes and to improve integration of federal and provincial review processes; and,

  • An evaluation of the early successes towards meeting the objectives of the MPMO Initiative is carried out and recommendations/proposals are developed to improve program design.

  • Link: http://www.mpmo.gc.ca/


11. Federal Partner:

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

12. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011–12
Environmental Assessment Support   40,177,900

7,955,750

Environmental Assessment Development   3,991,000 878,000
Internal Services   10,831,000 2,166,250
Total 55,000,000  11,000,000 

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Environmental Assessment Support

  • A whole-of-government approach to addressing strategic and project-specific environmental assessment issues, including supporting implementation of the major resource projects initiative is supported; and,

  • The federal environmental assessment process and related Aboriginal consultation activities for major resource projects are managed in an effective and efficient manner.

Environmental Assessment Development

  • The implementation of this horizontal initiative is supported.  Improvements in the process, capacity, and associated Aboriginal consultations with respect to major resource projects is achieved;

  • Policies, procedures and guidance materials are developed for enhancing coordination and collaboration on high-quality, timely and predictable environmental assessment within the regulatory approval process; and,

  • Policies and procedures are developed to support of the integration of Aboriginal Crown consultations in the environmental assessment and regulatory approval process.

Internal Services

  • Core support services are provided to support program delivery.

11. Federal Partner:

Environment Canada

12. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011–12
Biodiversity is conserved and protected Wildlife program $2,352,116 $466,159
Water is clean, safe and secure Aquatic ecosystems are conserved and protected $614,683 $123,841
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes Environmental assessment and ecological monitoring $4,533,659 $868,975
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced Risk management/ Risk mitigation and implementation $2,723,837 $562,122
Relations with other governments and partners are effectively managed in support of environmental priorities Inter-governmental and stakeholder relations $596,818 $122,302
Strategic management support enables the department to meet its objectives Legal services $650,739 $141,844
Internal Services Core Support Services $1,028,148 $214,757
Total $12,500,000   $2,500,000

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Wildlife Program

  • The efficiency and effectiveness of the Canadian Wildlife Service's regulatory role in major resource projects is improved;

  • Guidance is developed to support Canadian Wildlife Service involvement in the EA process for major resource projects;

  • Draft policies related to the issuance of permits under the Species at Risk Act, the Canada Wildlife Act and the Migratory Birds Convention Act are further developed; and,

  • Draft guidance documents to facilitate the incorporation of wildlife considerations in federal environmental assessment processes for major resource projects are developed.

Aquatic Ecosystems are conserved and protected

  • EC's responsibilities associated with the International River Improvements Act are supported by standard operating procedures and policies for licensing;

  • EC’s responsibilities in the EA process associated with the International River Improvements Act (IRIA) for major natural resource projects are supported by guidance, processes and issues reviews, providing comments on hydrology, water quantity and water management;

  • Environment Canada's expert involvement with respect to hydrology, water quantity, hydraulics and water management in the regulatory review of major resource projects is supported; and,

  • Amendments to the IRIA regulations are developed, reviewed and published through the formal process. 

Environmental assessment and ecological monitoring

  • MPMO’s governance structure is supported through participation in the Major Projects Deputy Minister’s Committee and associated committees and working groups;

  • Departmental EA processes are streamlined to ensure efficiency and effectiveness of the MPMO regulatory process for major resource projects;

  • Regional offices are supported in the delivery of streamlining priorities for major resource projects via National Program liaison activities and coordination;

  • Environment Canada's participation in the regulatory improvement initiative for major resource projects is well coordinated to meet established timelines and deliverables;

  • Departmental EA processes are streamlined, meeting established timelines and incorporating lessons learned from previous EA experience through workshops, post-project evaluations and contributing to operational policy statements;

  • EC contributes to the interdepartmental impact analysis of Supreme Court decisions and supported related guidance on compliance;

  • EC develops guidance, tools and training to support enhanced engagement in MPMO-track regulatory processes for major resource projects; and,

  • Work with MPMO on the development of a Crown record management system.

Risk management/ Risk mitigation and implementation

  • EC provides expert advice on major projects regarding disposal at sea, energy-related projects, mining projects and Metal Mining Effluent Regulations (MMER) for tailings impoundment areas;

  • Expert groups play a central and coordinating role on EA technical matters and projects;

  • Enhancement of departmental technical expertise and processes to contribute to environmental assessments;

  • Environment Canada's involvement in the regulatory process for major resource projects is supported by guidance;

  • Environment Canada's regulatory decisions related to Ocean Disposal permitting are timely; and,

  • EC’s involvement in the regulatory process for major resource projects is supported by triage systems and Regulatory Impact Analysis development work for regulatory amendments for the MMER.

Inter-governmental and stakeholder relations

  • Regular, timely, strategic advice and training is provided on consultation and engaging Aboriginal groups throughout the regulatory process for major resource projects;

  • Environment Canada's participation on the Crown Oversight Committee and associated working groups on Aboriginal consultation is supported;

  • Work with MPMO on the ongoing development of a Crown record management system; and,

  • Provide advice, support and training on public participation and aboriginal consultations relating to major natural resource projects.

Legal services

  • Timely legal advice and support is provided on delivery of national EA program involvement in major resource projects, interpretation of court challenges and key policy considerations.

Core Support Services

  • Core support services are provided to support program delivery.

11. Federal Partner:

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

12. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011–12
Habitat Management Habitat Management Operations $32,467,100 $6,493,420
Habitat Management Program Policy $1,574,700 $314,940
Legal Services Legal Services $958,200 $191,640
Total $35,000,000  $7,000,000 

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Habitat Management Operations:

  • Provision of input to the evaluation of initiative to identify recommendations / proposals to improve program design;

  • Continued participation in MPMO governance mechanisms (e.g., Major Projects Deputy Ministers’ Committee and supporting Director General and Assistant Deputy Minister level working groups, as well as interdepartmental project committees) in support of effective management of the federal regulatory system in relation to major natural resource projects;

  • Provision of DFO technical capacity in the areas of the Fisheries Act, Species at Risk Act (SARA), Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) and Aboriginal consultation activities relative to DFO’s regulatory decisions associated with major resource projects identified under this initiative; and,

  • Implementation of policies and approaches relative to major natural resource projects involving DFO.

Habitat Management Program Policy:

  • Provision of input to the evaluation of initiative to identify recommendations / proposals to improve program design;
  • Provision of input in the development and implementation of a whole-of-government strategy to modernize the federal regulatory review process;

  • Continued participation in MPMO governance mechanisms (e.g., Major Projects Deputy Ministers’ Committee and supporting Director General and Assistant Deputy Minister level groups, as well as interdepartmental working groups) in support of improving the federal regulatory system;

  • Provision of support to the development of policies and approaches led by the MPMO in relation to the areas of regulatory activities, environmental assessment and Aboriginal consultation; and,

  • Communication of policies and approaches and where appropriate, integration of policies and approaches into DFO activities.

  • Link: http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Legal Services:

  • Provision of Legal Services to DFO, or to MPMO members through the MPMO legal working group, on policy and operational issues associated with the implementation of the MPMO initiative with a focus to matters relating to the Fisheries Act, CEAA, SARA and Aboriginal consultation;

  • Provision of legal support to Justice litigators for hearings before boards, tribunals and courts; and,

  • Identification of legal issues/risks associated with ongoing implementation of the MPMO initiative and development of proposed positions/options to address issues/risks.

11. Federal Partner:

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

12. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011–12
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) Northern Land and Resources 6,600,000 1,320,000
Responsible Federal Stewardship 3,400,000 680,000
Total 10,000,000  2,000,000 

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

  • Enhance the capacity of INAC regional offices to enable them to better meet their environmental assessment, Aboriginal consultation and regulatory responsibilities;

  • Provide funding support to regulatory boards in the Northwest Territories to allow them to better meet their aboriginal consultation, regulatory permitting and environmental assessment responsibilities with respect to major resource projects;

  • Improve the transparency and accountability of the federal regulatory review process through increased oversight and regular monitoring, tracking and reporting on progress against commitments in Project Agreements;

  • Provide Aboriginal consultation information services and support to the Major Projects Management Office and all other federal partners; and,

  • Provide funding support to First Nations communities to build capacity to better equip them to coordinate and to participate in major resource development projects.

11. Federal Partner:

Transport Canada

12. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2011–12
Transportation Safety and Security Navigable Waters Protection Program $3,365,555 $773,179
Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs Aboriginal Consultation Unit $1,813,090 $465,951
Sustainable Transportation Development and the Environment Environmental Programs $5,413,592 $1,388,591
Internal Services Departmental Administration, Finance and Legal Services $3,407,763 $872,279
Total $17,500,000  $3,500,000 

16. Expected results by program as per (13):

Navigable Waters Protection Program:

  • To participate in the various governance mechanisms for the MPMO;

  • TC (headquarters and regional staff) to participate in working groups to assist with the creation and approval of key documents, processes and tracking systems required to operationalize the MPMO office; and

  • TC to participate in projects in the MPMO process.

Aboriginal Consultation Unit:

  • TC to participate in consultation with Aboriginal groups.

Environmental Programs:

  • To participate in the various governance mechanisms for the MPMO;

  • TC (headquarters and regional staff) to participate in working groups to assist with the creation and approval of key documents, processes and tracking systems required to operationalize the MPMO office;

  • TC to work on departmental processes to ensure MPMO processes are applied in an efficient manner internally; and

  • TC to participate in projects in the MPMO process.

Departmental Administration, Finance and Legal Services:

  • TC legal services to deal with legal issues associated with the regulatory process across the country; and

  • To support corporate involvement.

  • Link: http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/menu.htm


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
$143,000,000* $30,000,000

*Totals do not equal the total allocation under the initiative (i.e.; $150 million over five years) due to changes that have occurred in departmental Program Activity Architectures since the beginning of the initiative

17. Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable): N/A

18. Contact information:

Mr. Jay Khosla
A/Assistant Deputy Minister
Major Projects Management Office
Natural Resources Canada
155 Queen Street, 2nd Floor
Ottawa, ON  K1A 0E4


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Parole Board of Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

The Board will become involved in the National Anti-Drug Strategy following Royal Assent for legislative proposals calling for introduction of mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug offences. Current plans call for provision of $7.5 million for PBC over four years, including $2.2 million in 2011-12 to manage increased numbers of conditional release reviews as a result of mandatory minimum sentences. This following table illustrates the planned spending and expected results for each of the program activities.

Federal Partner: National Parole Board of Canada
Federal Partner
Program Activity
Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2011–12
Expected Results for
2011–12
Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions $4.4 M $1.3 M Note [1]
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability $1.8 M $0.5M Note [2]
Internal Services Internal Services $1.3 M $0.4M Support programs
Total: $7.5 M $2.2 M  


[1] Should the proposed legislation receive Royal Assent this funding will provide the PBC the capacity for effective management of its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. PBC will collect information and report on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated as a result of new legislative provisions (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole).

[2] Should the proposed legislation receive Royal Assent this funding will provide the PBC the capacity for provision of information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings and individuals who seek access to decision registry in relation to the requirements of the new legislation.  In a similar manner, PBC will report on the extent of involvement of victims, and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by PBC. Effective management of both these responsibilities will contribute to public safety and reinforce public confidence in the justice system.

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Public Health Agency of Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada

Name of Horizontal Initiative: link Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada (FI)

Name of Lead Department(s): Public Health Agency of Canada (the Agency)

Lead Department Program Activity: Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: January 13, 2005

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement): The FI strengthens domestic action on HIV and AIDS, builds a coordinated Government of Canada approach, and supports global health responses to HIV and AIDS. It focuses on prevention and access to diagnosis, care, treatment and support for those populations most affected by HIV and AIDS in Canada — people living with HIV and AIDS, gay men, Aboriginal people, people who use injection drugs, federal inmates, youth, women, and people from countries where HIV is endemic. The FI also supports and strengthens multi-sector partnerships to address the determinants of health. It supports collaborative efforts to address factors which can increase the transmission and acquisition of HIV including sexually transmitted infections (STI) and also addresses co-infection issues with other infectious diseases (e.g., Hepatitis C and tuberculosis) from the perspective of disease progression and morbidity in people living with HIV and AIDS. People living with and vulnerable to HIV and AIDS are active partners in shaping policies and practices affecting their lives.

*Shared Outcome(s):

First level outcomes

  • Increased knowledge and awareness of the nature of HIV and AIDS and ways to address the disease;
  • Increased individual and organizational capacity;
  • Increased Canadian engagement and leadership in the global context; and
  • Enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS.

Second level outcomes

  • Reduced stigma, discrimination, and other barriers;
  • Improved access to more effective prevention, care, treatment and support;
  • Internationally informed federal response; and
  • Increased coherence of the federal response.

Ultimate outcomes

  • Prevent the acquisition and transmission of new infections;
  •  
  • Improved quality of life for those at risk and living with HIV and AIDS;
  • Contribute to the global effort to reduce the spread of HIV and AIDS and mitigate its impact; and
  • Contribute to the strategic outcomes of partner departments.

*Shared Outcomes have been refined in response to an April 2009 link Federal Initiative (FI) to Address HIV/AIDS in Canada Implementation Evaluation Report, which recommended strengthening of the FI’s performance measurement framework.

Governance Structure(s): The Responsibility Centre Committee (RCC) is the governance body for the FI. It is comprised of directors from the nine Responsibility Centres which receive funding through the FI. Led by the Agency, the RCC promotes policy and program coherence among the participating departments and agencies, and ensures that evaluation and reporting requirements are met.

The link Agency is the federal lead for issues related to HIV and AIDS in Canada responsible for overall coordination, communications, social marketing, reporting, evaluation, national and regional programs, policy development, surveillance and laboratory science.

link Health Canada (HC) supports community-based HIV and AIDS education, capacity-building, and prevention for First Nations on-reserve and Inuit communities south of the 60th degree parallel and provides leadership on international health policy and program issues.

As the Government of Canada’s agency for health research, the link Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) sets priorities for and administers the extramural research program.

link Correctional Service Canada (CSC), an agency of the link Public Safety Portfolio, provides health services (including services related to the prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of HIV and AIDS) to offenders sentenced to two years or more.

Planning Highlights: Provide inter-sectoral leadership on common approaches to monitoring systems and to program interventions in order to prevent and control HIV and AIDS and related infectious diseases in Canada.

Federal Partner: The Agency
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Science and Technology for Public Health HIV/AIDS Reference Testing and Quality Assurance Ongoing   2.9 link ER 1.1
link ER 1.2
Surveillance and Population Health Assessment Surveillance of Infectious Disease Ongoing   4.5 link ER 2.1
Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation Infectious Disease Prevention and Control and Community Associated Infections Ongoing 34.9 link ER 3.1
link ER 3.2
link ER 3.3
Total Agency   42.3  

Expected Results:

ER 1.1: Public health decisions and interventions by public health officials are supported by timely, reliable and accredited reference service testing that accurately captures all the circulating HIV strains in Canada and directs attention to new outbreaks and increases in HIV transmission.

  1. Identify best treatments for reduced mother to child transmission.
  2. Develop standards and methods for testing.
  3. Improve understanding of HIV variation.
  4. Provide drug resistance information that will guide treatment selection for treatment-naïve patients.
  5. Monitor quality of HIV testing in Canada.

ER 1.2: Use of laboratory-generated knowledge is increased.

  1. Develop linkages with epidemiologists and other social scientists to examine magnitude of HIV test results and social determinants that have an influence in HIV infected persons.
  2. Identify, confirm, and provide recommendations to address performance of HIV diagnostic test kits in Canada.
  3. Collaborate with the Canadian Association of HIV Clinical Laboratory Specialists on standards development for increased quality of HIV diagnostic, prognostic, and drug resistance testing.
  4. Collaborate with the Standards Council of Canada and the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute on the creation and implementation of quality standard guidelines/practices in medical laboratories in Canada and worldwide.
  5. Disseminate technical information to partners on HIV testing to enhance quality, reliability, and comparability.
  6. Collaborate with CIHR and the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control on funded projects including HIV transmission patterns in at-risk communities in Vancouver in order to determine whether new infections are over-represented.

ER 2.1: Trends are monitored and assessed in reported HIV infections, and patterns of prevalence and risk and health behaviours related to HIV and associated infections among populations most affected by HIV and AIDS in Canada are assessed. This will be achieved by designing and implementing targeted survey data collection, analysis, and interpretation, as well as knowledge transfer and exchange. These efforts will particularly be focussed in areas and in populations that have noted recent increases in HIV infection rates, such as Aboriginal persons in Saskatchewan who inject drugs.

ER 3.1: Increased knowledge and awareness of the nature of HIV and AIDS and ways to address the disease, as indicated by:

  1. The number and type of evidence-based information products developed and disseminated, including the national report on HIV/AIDS Surveillance; the National Report on HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance; comparative international studies of HIV incidence and prevalence; three population-specific reports; an HIV prevention and related co-infection framework; HIV counselling and testing guidelines and a chapter on disclosure; the Canadian Guidelines on Sexually Transmitted Infections; Canadian Sexual Health Education Guidelines information products; interdepartmental pilot projects to address HIV and the determinants of health; augmented HIV case reporting; targeted epidemiological studies among most at risk populations; improved knowledge and characterization of HIV strains in Canada; and implementation of recommendations from the PHAC study of HIV and AIDS funding programs’ structure;
  2. Ongoing support and guidance provided to partners, including the number and type of knowledge and awareness activities and products, and processes to develop funding proposals aligned with public health priorities;
  3. Project data on number of presentations and workshops and their reach;
  4. Project data on increases in knowledge of HIV transmission and risk factors among target populations;
  5. Identification of novel transmission mechanisms of HIV infection; and
  6. The efficacy of policies aimed at addressing HIV transmission.

ER 3.2: Enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS, as indicated by:

  1. Intersectoral leadership;
  2. Coordinated approaches to data collection and dissemination, enhanced collaboration with key stakeholders in the response to HIV and AIDS, and STI’s, including committees, partnerships and collaborative documents;
  3. Focussed advisory and coordination agendas that link to FI expected results;
  4. Engagement of community organisations in the response to HIV and AIDS and the factors that impact those affected and at risk for infection;
  5. The number of invitations to submit applications and the number of funded project proposals;
  6. Project data on number and type of partnerships; and,
  7. On-going guidance provided to NGO partners.

ER 3.3: Increased individual and organizational capacity to address HIV and AIDS, as indicated by:

  1. The accessibility, quality and reliability of HIV molecular diagnostic and monitoring assays;
  2. The development and implementation of effective interventions for the prevention and control of infectious diseases in community settings;
  3. Sustained support to community-based organizations, including the number of projects funded and funds provided to community-based funding;
  4. The number of projects in which target populations contribute to management and delivery of projects;
  5. The number and type of capacity building activities for non-governmental and community-based organizations;
  6. Project data on actions to improve access to health and social services;
  7. Project data on number of volunteers and volunteer hours;
  8. Improved methods for determining the immune health of people with HIV; and
  9. Identifying key prevention strategies for vulnerable groups.

Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Internal Services Governance and Management Support Services Ongoing 0.9 link ER 4.1
link ER 4.2
First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care Bloodborne Diseases and Sexually Transmitted Infections — HIV/AIDS Ongoing 4.5 link ER 5.1
link ER 5.2
Total HC   5.4  

Expected Results:

ER 4.1: Increased Canadian engagement and leadership in the global context through exchanging best practices with global partners to inform global and domestic policies on HIV and AIDS. This will be achieved by supporting the development and dissemination of information, and through increased dialogue and engagement with stakeholders and other Government of Canada departments in three global fora to share expertise and influence policies.

ER 4.2: Enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS through supporting the development of advice documents to inform global collaboration on HIV and AIDS and policy coherence across federal government’s global activities on HIV and AIDS.

ER 5.1: Areas for improved programming regarding HIV-blood borne sexually transmitted infections (HIV-BBSTI) and tuberculosis (TB) co-infections are identified via enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address underlying factors related to HIV and AIDS through partnerships with the link National Native Alcohol and Drug and Alcohol Abuse Program (NNADAP) and the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch’s TB Program.

ER 5.2: Increased individual and organizational capacity to address HIV and AIDS, as indicated by the:

  1. Development of a training module to be used by NNADAP workers and community nurses in HIV-BBSTI risk factors;
  2. Number of community nurses receiving training on HIV-BBSTI and related health issues; and
  3. Number of NNADAP workers receiving training on HIV-BBSTI risk factors and the need for HIV testing.

Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Health and Health Services Advances HIV and AIDS Research Initiative Ongoing 21.0 link ER 6.1
link ER 6.2
link ER 6.3
link ER 6.4
Total CIHR   21.0  

Expected Results:

ER 6.1: Increased knowledge and awareness of the nature of HIV and AIDS and ways to address the disease through the funding of high-quality research and knowledge translation grants in HIV and AIDS. This will be achieved through the ongoing development and administration of strategic research funding programs.

ER 6.2: Increased individual and organizational capacity for HIV and AIDS research through the funding of high-quality capacity-building grants and awards in HIV and AIDS. This outcome is achieved through the ongoing development and administration of strategic research capacity-building funding programs.

ER 6.3: Enable Canadian participation and leadership in HIV/AIDS research in the global context through the funding of internationally focused research projects and partnerships and contributing to relevant FI activities.

ER 6.4: Enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV/AIDS through on-going participation in FI committees and activities and the development of collaborative activities to address common priorities.


Federal Partner: Correctional Services Canada
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Custody Institutional Health Services Public Health Services Ongoing 4.2 link ER 7.1
link ER 7.2
Total CSC   4.2  

Expected Results:

ER 7.1: Increased knowledge and awareness of the nature of HIV and AIDS and ways to address the disease, as indicated by the percentage of federal offenders who indicate improved general knowledge of HIV and AIDS after attending CSC’s Peer Education Course.

ER 7.2: Enhanced engagement and collaboration on approaches to address HIV and AIDS through the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Heads of Corrections Working Group on Health. The emphasis will be on developing and strengthening partnerships with: provincial and territorial governments involved in addressing HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted and blood borne infections; federal departments at national and regional levels (e.g., PHAC, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch of Health Canada); and the Council of Chief Medical Officers of Health.

($ M)
Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
Ongoing 72.9

Results to be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if Applicable): N/A

Contact Information:
Stephanie Mehta
100 Eglantine Drive
Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9
613-954-4502
stephanie.mehta@phac-aspc.gc.ca

Preparedness for Avian and Pandemic Influenza

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Preparedness for Avian and Pandemic Influenza Initiative

Name of Lead Department(s): Public Health Agency of Canada (the Agency)

Lead Department Program Activities:

  • Public Health Preparedness and Capacity
  • Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation
  • Surveillance and Population Health Assessment
  • Science and Technology for Public Health
  • Regulatory Enforcement and Emergency Response

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 21, 2006

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement): This initiative is directed at mitigating Canada’s risk from two major, inter-related animal and public health threats: the potential spread of avian influenza (AI) virus (i.e., H5N1) to wild birds and domestic fowl in Canada; and, the potential for a human-adapted strain to arise resulting in human-to-human transmission potentially triggering a human influenza pandemic. A coordinated and comprehensive plan to address both avian and pandemic influenza is maintained.

The bulk of the initiative is ongoing. Activities have been launched in the areas of vaccines and antivirals, surge capacity, prevention and early warning, emergency preparedness, critical science and regulation, risk communication, and inter-jurisdictional collaboration. To enhance the federal capacity to address an on-reserve pandemic, efforts have been made to increase surveillance and risk assessment capacity to fill gaps in planning and preparedness.

Shared Outcome(s):

Immediate Outcomes

  • Strengthened Canadian capacity to prevent and respond to pandemics; and
  • Increased internal and external awareness, knowledge and engagement with stakeholders.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Increased prevention, preparedness and control of challenges and emergencies related to AI/PI; and
  • Strengthened public health capacity.

Long-Term and Strategic Outcomes

  • Increased/reinforced public confidence in Canada’s public health system; and
  • Minimization of serious illness, overall deaths, and societal disruption as a result of an influenza pandemic

Governance Structure(s): In January 2008, the link Agency, the link Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the link Canadian Food Inspection Agency and link Health Canada  finalized the Avian and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Interdepartmental/Agency Governance Agreement. The primary scope of the Agreement is the management of specific horizontal issues and/or initiatives relating to avian and pandemic influenza preparedness.

The Agreement is supported by a structure that falls within the auspices of the Deputy Minister’s Committee on Avian and Pandemic Influenza Planning. Implementation of the Agreement is led by the Avian and Pandemic Influenza Assistant Deputy Ministers (API ADM) Governance Committee focusing on implementation of the initiatives. The API ADM Governance Committee provides strategic direction and oversight monitoring.

An Avian and Pandemic Influenza Operations Directors General Committee supports the API ADM Governance Committee, makes recommendations to it and oversees the coordination of deliverables.

Planning Highlights: In 2011-12 the Agency, working collaboratively with Health Canada, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, intends to expand upon previous activities in avian and pandemic influenza preparedness, through the continuation of the vaccine readiness strategies, antivirals, surge capacity, prevention and early warning, emergency preparedness, critical science and regulation, risk communication, and inter-jurisdictional collaboration. Planned activities and expected results reflect lessons learned from the H1N1 pandemic, notably the Management Response and Action Plan (MRAP) following the Senate study.

Federal Partner: The Agency
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Science and Technology for Public Health Rapid vaccine development and testing Ongoing   1.0 link ER 1.1
Winnipeg lab and space optimization Ongoing 18.8 link ER 2.1
Surveillance and Population Health Assessment Surveillance Ongoing   8.7 link ER 3.1
Public Health Preparedness and Capacity Vaccine readiness and clinical trials Ongoing   3.6 link ER 4.1
Capacity for pandemic preparedness Ongoing   5.2 link ER 5.1
Emergency preparedness Ongoing   6.0 link ER 6.1
link ER 6.2
link ER 6.3
link ER 6.4
link ER 6.5
link ER 6.6
Emergency human resources Ongoing   0.4 link ER 7.1
Strengthening the public health laboratory network Ongoing   1.2 link ER 8.1
link ER 8.2
link ER 8.3
Influenza research network Ongoing   1.8 link ER 9.1
Pandemic influenza risk assessment and modelling Ongoing   0.8 link ER 10.1
link ER 10.2
Evaluation Ongoing   0.6 link ER 11.1
link ER 11.2
link ER 11.3
Pandemic influenza risk communications strategy Ongoing   1.8 link ER 12.1
link ER 12.2
Skilled national public health workforce Ongoing   5.9 link ER 13.1
link ER 13.2
link ER 13.3
link ER 13.4
Regulatory Enforcement and Emergency Response Contribution to National Antiviral Stockpile Ongoing   0.1 link ER 14.1
link ER 14.2
link ER 14.3
Total Agency   55.9  

Expected Results:

ER 1.1: Progress made on the development of different clinical-grade commercial H5N1 influenza vaccines.

ER 2.1: Construction of the new lab is 60% completed, therefore increased research capacity underway.

ER 3.1: Capacity to rapidly identify and report human cases of avian and pandemic influenza and public health events of international concern is improved though the revamping of the current severe respiratory illness early detection system which includes a pilot study on the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) reporting system.

ER 4.1: Capacity for vaccine-adverse event surveillance and effectiveness monitoring during a pandemic is improved through upgrades to the current Canadian Adverse Events Following Immunization Surveillance System (CAEFISS) database to ensure maximum functionality.

ER 5.1: Capacity for increased use of the regional communication systems is improved through the regional Public Health Capacity program.

ER 6.1: Response mechanisms are established to respond to an avian or pandemic influenza outbreak in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Canadian Pandemic Influenza Plan (CPIP).

ER 6.2: The National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) is capable of working with certified influenza strains as the lead influenza reference centre for Canada.

ER 6.3: Quarantine entry and exit screening options are developed and assessed for use during all phases of a pandemic.

ER 6.4: The Health Portfolio Emergency Operations Centre is maintained in a state of readiness.

ER 6.5: Incident response plans are maintained with provincial and territorial departments and non-governmental organizations through testing exercises where the testing criteria are established on lessons learned and through the after action reports and plans which are revised, updated and maintained regularly.

ER 6.6: Increased efficiency and effectiveness of regional resources placed to facilitate the flow of information between federal, provincial and territorial levels through the regional public health capacity program.

ER 7.1: An updated Human Resources Emergency Response Plan is implemented by end of fiscal year 2011-12.

ER 8.1: The current number of equipped and trained federal laboratory liaison technicians in place in provinces and territories will be maintained.

ER 8.2: Communications between provincial and territorial labs and the NML is improved thereby strengthening the national lab’s capacity through a series of meetings throughout the year.

ER 8.3: Components of the Canadian Pandemic Influenza Plan’s Annex C (Pandemic Influenza Laboratory Guidelines) are updated as a result of the H1N1 pandemic.

ER 9.1: Research resources are optimally allocated through proactive research protocols and international collaboration to respond to the needs of avian and pandemic influenza preparedness.

ER 10.1: Predictive and assessment models used for pandemic preparedness are developed and established.

ER 10.2: More potential learners in university and college settings are being trained as mathematical modelers to augment public health capacity in mathematical modeling.

ER 11.1: Evaluation improvements proposed in the Evaluation Plan for avian and pandemic influenza preparedness are implemented.

ER 11.2: Components of the performance measurement framework are in place at the responsibility-centre level.

ER 11.3: Performance data and evidence are collected using a Web-based system and are used for management and reporting.

ER 12.1: Social marketing plans and activities are reviewed and appropriate modifications have been made in light of the H1N1 experience.

ER 12.2: H1N1 lessons learned in communicating with stakeholders during a pandemic influenza are addressed.

ER 13.1: Letters of Agreement with selected placement sites for public health officers across the country are completed.

ER 13.2: Public health officers and Canadian Public Health Service regional coordinators are in place across Canada.

ER 13.3: Training modules continue to be developed, and new and existing modules are made available to public health officers in the field.

ER 13.4: Competency profiles for public health officers are developed.

ER 14.1: Lead time on an outbreak of a pandemic is improved through information sharing, international collaborations and increased surveillance systems.

ER 14.2: Pandemic vaccine availability is improved by optimizing the approval processes.

ER 14.3: The National Antiviral Stockpile is maintained and plans are established for the replacement of antiviral stocks as they reach the end of their shelf-life.


Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Health Products Regulatory activities related to pandemic influenza vaccine Ongoing 1.1 link ER 15.1
link ER 15.2
link ER 15.3
link ER 15.4
link ER 15.5
link ER 15.6
Resources for review and approval of antiviral drug submissions for treatment of pandemic influenza Ongoing 0.2 link ER 16.1
link ER 16.2
link ER 16.3
Establishment of a crisis risk management unit for monitoring and post-market assessment of therapeutic products Ongoing 0.3 link ER 17.1
link ER 17.2
Health Infrastructure Support for First Nations and Inuit Strengthen federal public health capacity through Governance and Infrastructure Support to FN/I Health System Ongoing 0.7 link ER 18.1
link ER 18.2
link ER 18.3
link ER 18.4
link ER 18.5
FN/I emergency preparedness, planning, training and integration Ongoing 0.3 link ER 19.1
Specialized Health Services Public health emergency preparedness and response (EPR) on conveyances Ongoing 0.3 link ER 20.1
Total HC   2.9  

Expected Results:

ER 15.1: World Health Organization (WHO) Guidance on Regulatory Preparedness for Human Pandemic Influenza Vaccines is revised and updated as required.

ER 15.2: Finalize Extraordinary Use New Drugs (EUND) regulations and develop accompanying guidance document.

ER 15.3: Maintain links established with international regulatory bodies (WHO, Chinese State Food and Drug Administration, United States, Europe, Australia) by continuing to participate in regulatory and technical initiatives which increase the timeliness and availability of information in the event of a pandemic (i.e., pandemic influenza strain).

ER 15.4: Review response to the H1N1 events and produce and implement lessons learned.

ER 15.5: Continue coordinating blood system preparedness through regular teleconferences and regulatory advice/decisions to Canadian Blood Services and Headquarters. Share lessons learned and better practices with WHO Blood Regulators Network.

ER 15.6: Work with the WHO to develop recommendations for new pneumococcal conjugate vaccine through the WHO Expert Committee on Biologic Standardization.

ER 16.1: Complete review of any anti-viral submissions that may be received.

ER 16.2: Finalize Expedited Pandemic Influenza Drug Review (EPIDR) Protocol, incorporating H1N1 pandemic experiences.

ER 16.3: Ongoing on-the-job reviewer training for the accelerated review. Review procedures for antivirals submissions, before and during pandemic occurrences are established.

ER 17.1: Maintenance of the crisis risk management unit.

ER 17.2: Ongoing post-market assessment of therapeutic products.

ER 18.1: Educational initiatives regarding passenger conveyance of infection control are integrated into program activities, training and outreach to conveyance operators.

ER 18.2: Collaborate with PHAC, the Public Service Commission, and Indian and Northern Affairs Commission for planning and response.

ER 18.3: Work on surveillance needs with PHAC.

ER 18.4: Enhanced federal capacity to support First Nations communities in planning and responding to a pandemic.

ER 18.5: Increase links with national and regional Emergency Preparedness and Response program staff and with provinces and territories.

ER 19.1: Continue to support the testing and revision of community pandemic plans.

ER 20.1: Risks to public health on passenger conveyances are mitigated through the development and implementation of emergency preparedness and response policies, programs and training.


Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Health and Health Services Advances Pandemic Preparedness Research Strategic Initiative $40.9 M
The end date of the PPSRI is March 31, 2011, however, additional partner funds are committed in 2011-12
3.8 link ER 21.1
link ER 21.2
Total CIHR   3.8  

Expected Results:

ER 21.1: Progress on funded projects and outcomes of research are reviewed.

ER 21.2: Uptake of research results is facilitated, and consultations on future research needs are completed through reports and meetings of researchers, stakeholders and decision makers.


Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Animal Health and Zoonotics Program / Internal Services Enhanced enforcement measures Ongoing   1.5 link ER 22.1
Avian biosecurity on farms Ongoing   2.7 link ER 23.1
Real property requirements $4.0M (2006-07 to 2007-08)   0.0 link ER 24.1
Domestic and wildlife surveillance Ongoing   3.1 link ER 25.1
Strengthened economic and regulatory framework Ongoing   0.9 link ER 26.1
Performance and evaluation Ongoing   1.2 link ER 27.1
Risk communications Ongoing   1.6 link ER 28.1
Field training Ongoing   1.1 link ER 29.1
link ER 29.2
AI enhanced management capability Ongoing   1.0 link ER 30.1
Updated emergency response plans Ongoing   2.0 link ER 31.1
Risk assessment and modelling Ongoing   2.0 link ER 32.1
AI Research Ongoing   1.5 link ER 33.1
International collaboration Ongoing   1.6 link ER 34.1
Animal vaccine bank $0.9M (2006-07 to 2008-09)   0.0 link ER 35.1
Access to antivirals Ongoing   0.1 link ER 36.1
Specialized equipment $20.7M (2006-07 to 2008-09)   0.0 link ER 37.1
Laboratory surge capacity and capability Ongoing   3.7 link ER 38.1
Field surge capacity Ongoing   1.0 link ER 39.1
National veterinary reserve Ongoing   0.8 link ER 40.1
Total CFIA   25.8  

Note: Total CFIA planned spending reflects adjustments made to federal funding allocation due to Strategic Review.

Expected Results:

ER 22.1: Increased capacity to support enhanced screening procedures for live birds or poultry products at Canada’s ports of entry with a view to mitigating the risk of future avian influenza outbreaks in Canada.

ER 23.1: Continuation of stakeholder and general public education, communications and outreach programs in support of the implementation of the National Avian On Farm Biosecurity Standard. Provide stakeholder consultations and develop communication tools to expand education and awareness to the poultry industry service sector.

ER 24.1: No planned expenditures as investments were realized in previous fiscal years.

ER 25.1: Enhanced/integrated Canadian surveillance system, supported by a robust systems platform and the analysis and interpretation of the data collected to allow more timely identification of potential outbreaks, and more timely response to avian influenza situations. Targeted wild bird surveillance plan for 2011 is currently being reviewed. The Canadian Notifiable Avian Influenza Surveillance System is entering its fourth year of operations, providing a real time relay of sampling and reporting of flock status through the National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease.

ER 26.1: Initiatives to strengthen regulatory capacity during outbreaks, including a review and analysis of current legislative/regulatory framework continues.

ER 27.1: Management and evaluation of CFIA’s AI activities, including ongoing performance measurement to monitor results.

ER 28.1: Continued implementation of the “Be Aware and Declare” international border biosecurity outreach campaign. Ongoing media monitoring and training and risk communications related to AI prevention, preparedness and response activities.

ER 29.1: Continued training that will contribute to a skilled and experienced workforce ready to respond to an AI outbreak. A national training initiative for avian influenza response in three core areas is scheduled for the winter of 2011.

ER 29.2: Continued development of training materials (instructor-led and e-learning) in support of emergency response procedures and plans and of trainers in support of end-user training.

ER 30.1: A multi-disease version for the Canadian Emergency Management Response System (CEMRS) application for national surveillance/outbreak use will be available. Translation of CEMRS is currently underway. CEMRS is now used routinely for outbreak document management.

ER 31.1: Continued development and updating of emergency response procedures and plans.

ER 32.1: Continued development of models to better understand the influence and interaction of various factors on the spread of AI and the effectiveness of the various methods used to control and eradicate the disease. A retrospective analysis of the data arising from the 2004 AI outbreak in Abbottsford, BC, is coming to completion after five years' work.  There will be several publications in 2011 describing the key risk factors affecting disease transmission of AI.

ER 33.1: Investment through research in an improved federal capacity for control, risk assessment, diagnostics and vaccines on avian influenza issues will allow a better understanding of the spread of influenza and the effectiveness of disease control measures. These investments will allow more timely and evidence-based decision making on avian influenza responses, thus helping to reducing the risk of transmission to humans and mitigating economic and production losses.

ER 34.1: CFIA staff continue to provide assistance to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Central Bureau in the Communications Department in an effort to promote the development and implementation of science based standards. Furthermore, the CFIA continues to support the OIE's mandate and efforts to assist member countries in the control and eradication of animal diseases, including zoonotics, through its annual contribution to the OIE. In addition, the CFIA continues to support the development of capacity to address emergence of risk at the animal level through the Canadian chapter of Veterinarians Without Borders.

ER 35.1: Future AI vaccines will be purchased on an “as need” basis.

ER 36.1: Maintenance of access protocols and bank of antivirals to provide appropriate protection to federal employees, ensuring a more timely and effective response to an avian influenza situation and better protection of Canadians.

ER 37.1: No planned expenditures as investments realized in previous fiscal years.

ER 38.1: Maintaining, coordinating and managing the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network, an integrated network of federal, provincial and university labs. This network allows for rapid testing, detection and reporting of AI.

ER 39.1: Continued development of a viable response plan, including HR capacity and data management tools.

ER 40.1: Continued training of a reserve of professional veterinarians to enhance surge capacity, expertise and rapid response capability for animal disease control efforts.

Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
Ongoing 87.4

Results to be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if Applicable): N/A

Contact Information:
Dr. John Spika
130 Colonnade Road
Ottawa ON K1A 0K9
613-948-7929
john.spika@phac-aspc.gc.ca

Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative

Name of Horizontal Initiative: link Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative

Name of Lead Department(s): Public Health Agency of Canada (the Agency)

Lead Department Program Activity: Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: February 20, 2007

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2017

Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $111 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (Including Funding Agreement): link The Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative (CHVI) is a collaborative undertaking between the Government of Canada (GoC) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) to contribute to the global effort to develop a safe, effective, affordable and globally accessible HIV vaccine. This collaboration, formalized by a Memorandum of Understanding signed by both parties in August 2006 and renewed in July 2010, builds on the Government of Canada’s commitment to a comprehensive, long-term approach to address HIV/AIDS. Participating federal departments and agencies are the Agency, Health Canada, Industry Canada, the Canadian International Development Agency, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

The CHVI’s overall goals are to: advance the basic science of HIV vaccine discovery and social research in Canada and low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs); support the translation of basic science discoveries into clinical research, with a focus on accelerating clinical trials in humans; address the enabling conditions to facilitate regulatory approval and community preparedness; improve the efficacy and effectiveness of HIV Prevention of Mother-to-Child (PMTCT) services in LMICs by determining innovative strategies and programmatic solutions related to enhancing the accessibility, quality, and uptake; and ensure horizontal collaboration within the CHVI and with domestic and international stakeholders.

Shared Outcome(s):  

Immediate (1-3 years) Outcomes

  • Increased and improved collaboration and networking among researchers working in HIV vaccine discovery and social research in Canada and in LMICs;
  • Greater capacity for vaccines research in Canada;
  • Enhanced knowledge base;
  • Increased readiness and capacity in Canada and LMICs; and
  • An Alliance Coordinating Office established.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Strengthened contribution to global efforts to accelerate the development of safe effective, affordable, and globally accessible HIV vaccines;
  • An increase in the number of women receiving a complete course of anti-retroviral prophylaxis to reduce the risk of mother to child transmission of HIV; and
  • A CHVI Research and Development Alliance established.

Long-Term Outcomes

  • The CHVI contributes to the global efforts to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS particularly in LMICs.

Governance Structure(s): The Minister of Health, in consultation with the Minister of Industry and the Minister of International Cooperation, is the lead Minister for the CHVI. An Advisory Board will be established and be responsible for making recommendations to responsible Ministers regarding projects to be funded and will oversee the implementation of the Memorandum of Understanding between the GoC and the BMGF. The CHVI Secretariat, housed in PHAC will continue to provide a coordinating role to the GoC and the BMGF.

Planning Highlights: In 2011-12, CHVI participating departments and agencies will continue to implement activities initiated in 2010-11. For example, the selection process for the Alliance Coordinating Office; the establishment of a HIV vaccine translational support fund to assist researchers in moving HIV vaccine candidates from preclinical research into clinical trials; the completion and awarding of CIDA-CIHR large team grants; the establishment of a new transfer payment fund to encourage private sector participation; and CHVI regulatory capacity-building activities.

In addition, community-based initiatives, research projects approved in 2009-10/2010-11 and support to the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise will continue in 2011-12. New activities planned for 2011-2012 include the establishment of the Alliance Coordinating Office; provision of training and mentoring programs for capacity building to address identified needs of developing national regulatory authorities; and enhancement of the access, quality and uptake of PMTCT services.

Federal Partner: The Agency
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation Infectious Disease Prevention and Control   5.5 1.5 link ER 1.1
  5.0 0.5 link ER 2.1
link ER 2.2
  7.5 0.8 link ER 3.1
link ER 3.2
link ER 3.3
Total PHAC 18.0 2.8  

Expected Results:

ER 1.1: New vaccine policy approaches and increased community involvement.

ER 2.1: Efficient and more timely transition from preclinical research into clinical trials.

ER 2.2: Increased number of clinical trial lots manufactured for promising HIV vaccine candidates.

ER 3.1: Establishment of a strong and vibrant network of HIV vaccine researchers and other vaccine researchers both in Canada and internationally.

ER 3.2: Development of innovative solutions to the challenges facing HIV vaccine research and development (such as strengthening career development opportunities for young and early-career investigators).

ER 3.3: Effective communications, strategic planning, coordination, reporting and evaluation within the Government of Canada.


Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Internal Services Governance and Management Support Services 1.0 0.1 link ER 4.1
Health Products Regulatory Capacity Building Program for HIV Vaccines 4.0 0.8 link ER 5.1
link ER 5.2
Total HC 5.0 0.9  

NOTE: Health Canada/IAD is awaiting TBS approval of supps. B

Expected Results:

ER 4.1: Promote the harmonization and exchange of domestic and international best practices, policies and protocols related to the regulation of vaccines and clinical trials.

ER 5.1: Ensure that trials with HIV vaccines are performed in accordance with the internationally accepted principles of Good Clinical Practices.

ER 5.2: Strengthen the regulatory capacity of developing national regulatory authorities targeted for vaccine and clinical trial submissions, including those related to HIV/AIDS.


Federal Partner: Industry Canada
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Commercialization and Research and Development Capacity in Targeted Canadian Industries Industrial Research Assistance Program’s Canadian HIV Technology Development Component 13.0 2.5 link ER 6.1
Total IC 13.0 2.5  

Expected Results:

ER 6.1: Further advancement of new and innovative technologies in pre-commercial development at small and medium- sized enterprises that operate in Canada for the prevention, treatment and diagnosis of HIV.


Federal Partner: Canadian International Development Agency
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Global Engagement and Strategic Policy International Development Assistance Program 16.0   4.1 link ER 7.1
12.0   0.8 link ER 8.1
30.0   6.0 link ER 9.1
  2.0   0.5 link ER 10.1
Total CIDA 60.0 11.4  

Expected Results:

ER 7.1: Increased capacity to conduct high-quality clinical trials of HIV vaccine and other related prevention technologies in LMICs through new teams of Canadian and LMICs researchers and research institutions.

ER 8.1: In collaboration with CIHR, increased capacity and greater involvement and collaboration amongst researchers working in HIV vaccine discovery and social research in Canada and in LMICs through the successful completion of the development stage of the Team Grant program to support collaborative teams of Canadian and LMIC researchers.

ER 9.1: Increased number of women receiving a complete course of anti-retroviral prophylaxis to reduce the risk of mother to child transmission of HIV.

ER 10.1: Increased capacity of regulatory authorities in LMICs especially those where clinical trials are planned or ongoing, through training and networking initiatives.


Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
($ M)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011-12
Expected Results for
2011-12
Health and Health Services Advances Institute Strategic Advances – HIV/AIDS 15.0 1.5 link ER 11.1
Total CIHR 15.0 1.5  

Expected Results:

ER 11.1: Increased capacity and greater involvement and collaboration amongst researchers working in HIV vaccine discovery and social research in Canada and in LMICs through:

  • Ongoing support for operating and catalyst grants undertaken by Canadian researchers;
  • Ongoing support for two emerging teams of Canadian researchers; and
  • Collaboration with CIDA in award and support of the Large Team Grant program for collaborative teams of Canadian and LMIC researchers.
($ M)
Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011-12
111.0 19.0

Results to be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if Applicable): Non-governmental stakeholders (including research institutions and not-for-profit community organizations) are integral to the success of the CHVI. Their role is to engage and collaborate with participating departments and agencies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and other funders to contribute to the CHVI goals and to Canada’s contribution towards the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise.

Contact Information:
Steven Sternthal
200 Eglantine Driveway
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9
613-952-5120
steven.sternthal@phac-aspc.gc.ca

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Public Safety Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Integrated Market Enforcement Teams (IMET) Program

Name of lead department(s): Public Safety Canada

Lead department program activity: Countering Crime

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-04

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $344,299,000 from 2003-04 through 2013-14 and $40,000,000 ongoing*.

*All numbers includes the employee benefits plans and PWGSC accommodation

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The objective of the IMET program is to effectively enforce the law against serious criminal capital market fraud offences in Canada. To achieve this objective, IMET is mandated to investigate serious Criminal Code capital market fraud offences that are of regional or national significance and threaten investor confidence or economic stability in Canada.

Shared outcome(s): Improved Canadian and international investor confidence in the integrity of Canada’s capital markets

Governance structure(s): The IMET Executive Council is composed of senior officials from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (co-chair), Department of Finance (co-chair), the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, Department of Justice and Public Safety Canada who provide strategic oversight for the IMET program.

Planning Highlights: IMET partners will continue to address the recommendations of the Le Pan Report.  IMET partners will also discuss the coordination of the enforcement work between the proposed Canadian Securities Regulatory Authority and the IMET program.

Federal Partner: Public Safety Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (FY 2003-04 to 2013-14) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Countering Crime IMET

FY 2003-04 to FY 2007-08:
$1,125,000
FY 2008-09 to FY 2013-14:
$2,043,948

(Ongoing: $340,658)
$340,658
Internal Services IMET

FY 2008-09 to 2013-14 : $658,792

(Ongoing: $68,132 per year)
$68,132
Total $3,827,740  $408,790 

Expected Results: Fulfillment of Public Safety Canada's IMET program management responsibilities, including coordinating reporting, evaluations, policy development and research.

Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (FY 2003-04 to 2013-14) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Federal and International Operations IMET

FY 2003-04 to FY 2007-08:
$74,000,000

FY 2008-09 to FY 2013-14:
$185,552,827

$30,968,817 per year)
$30,968,817
Total $259,552,827  $30,968,817 

Expected Results: Fulfillment of the RCMP's IMET prevention and investigation responsibilities, including the operation of the securities intelligence units (SIUs), investigative teams, headquarters operational support, and program management.  IMET will strive to fulfill its mandate to the fullest extent possible based on funding received.

Federal Partner: Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (FY 2008-09 to FY 2013-14) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Regulatory offences and economic crime prosecution program IMET

FY 2008-09 to FY 2013-14: $35,120,022


(Ongoing: $5,853,337 per year)
$5,853,337
Total $35,120,022  $5,853,337 

Expected Results: Provision of pre-charged legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of serious capital fraud offences under the Criminal Code in response to the workload generated by the IMETs.

*Prior to the establishment of the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP) in 2006, funding for this program activity was allocated to Justice Canada's Federal Prosecution Service. The amount shown does not include a transfer of $3.75M from Justice Canada to ODPP for FY 2007-08 following the creation of this organization.

Federal Partner: Department of Justice
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (FY 2008-09 to FY 2013-14)* Planned Spending for
2011–12
1. Justice, Policies, Laws and Programs IMET

FY 2008-09 to FY 2013-14:
$13,180,936

(Ongoing: $2,405,156 per year)
$2,405,156
2. Services to Government IMET

FY 2008-09 to FY 2013-14: $1,012,932

(Ongoing: $168,822 per year )
$168,822
3. Internal Services IMET

FY 2008-09 to FY 2013-14:
$136,110

(Ongoing: $22,685 per year)

$22,685
Total

Total

(Ongoing:  $2,596,663 per year) 
 
$14,329,978 $2,596,663

*The Department of Justice received a total funding of $26.7M for FY 2003-04 to
2007-08 and this amount takes into account a transfer of $3.75M to ODPP for the FY 2007-2008 following the creation of this organization.

Expected Results: 1. Provincial Attorney General of IMET participating provinces are aware of and able to access the IMET Reserve Fund. 

Performance Indicators: number of applications and/or inquiries about the IMET Reserve Fund received; and number of agreements signed and types of eligible expenditures funded.

Targets: All Provincial Attorneys General of IMET participating provinces are aware of the IMET Reserve Fund and the application procedure.

2. The International Assistance Group (IAG) provides legal advice on international assistance requests and coordinates all IMET requests to and from foreign countries. Once a request for mutual legal assistance has been executed, it is the responsibility of the RCMP, not the IAG, to monitor the outcome of the relevant investigation or prosecution for which the evidence was gathered.

3. Program support

Federal Partner: Finance Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework IMET

FY 2008-09 to FY 2013-14:
$1,044,433

(Ongoing: $172,393)
$172,393
Total $1,044,433  $172,393 

Expected Results:

  • As Co-Chair of the IMET Executive Council and the Interdepartmental Working Group, Finance Canada is to provide strategic direction to the IMET program that reflects the Government of Canada's broader capital markets agenda.
  • Finance Canada is to provide leadership in engaging external stakeholders in efforts to enhance program performance, including opportunities to strengthen the continuum of enforcement.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
$344,299,000 $40,000,000

Contact information:

Barry MacKillop
Director General
Law Enforcement and Border Strategies
Public Safety Canada
(613) 991-4281


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Public Works and Government Services Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens Remediation Project

Name of Lead Department(s): PWGSC

Lead Department Program Activity: Specialized Programs & Services

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: May 12, 2004

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2014

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $282 million for PWGSC Cost share with the Province of Nova Scotia. (The Province of Nova Scotia’s share is up to $120 million for a total project cost of $402 million.) Related costs outside of the cost share for federal operations for oversight and regulatory responsibility with regard to the site are: PWGSC federal led oversight $25.8 million, funded through PWGSC Special Purpose allotment, Environment Canada $7.6 million and Health Canada $5.5 million. PWGSC does not administer funding to Environment Canada and Health Canada for this project. Their portion of funding is part of their respective departmental allotments.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): This initiative is a Federal - Provincial Cost Share to remediate the Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens sites situated on 99 hectares of federally and provincially owned lands in the heart of Sydney, Nova Scotia. These sites were contaminated with over 1,266,000 tonnes of contaminated soil and sediments, as a result of a century of manufacturing steel. The project is in support of the federal government’s sustainable development initiative, recognizing the environmental, social and economic dimensions of the Sydney area. The project will have long term benefits for all Canadians. An Aboriginal Procurement Strategy was developed and specific project work elements were set aside for competition among Canadian First Nations businesses and contractors. When remediation is complete, Nova Scotia will take ownership of the lands. Any remaining contaminants will be managed and monitored by the Province of Nova Scotia in accordance with the Memorandum of Agreement. The provincial agency’s website can be found at: www.tarpondscleanup.ca. The website for the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency is: www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/viewer_e.cfm?cear_id=8989#Documents

Shared Outcome(s): The targeted result to be achieved by the partners is to continue to eliminate the pathways to exposure to contaminants, resulting in long term environmental, economic, and social benefits for Nova Scotians, First Nations Communities and all Canadians. Downtown Sydney will have new land to be developed, which will aid in the rejuvenation of the economically depressed area.

Governance Structure(s):

  1. Memorandum to Cabinet dated April 2004 mandated Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) as the federal lead for the project.

  2. Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between Canada and the Province of Nova Scotia was signed on May 12, 2004.

  3. The Interim Cost Share Agreement with the Province, signed on October 20, 2004, provided for interim governance and funding and for undertaking preventative works and preliminary works as set out in the MOA.

  4. The Sydney Tar Ponds Agency was set up by the Province to manage and implement the project. Its operating charter was established on August 18, 2004.

  5. An Independent Engineer was appointed in October 2005 to monitor and confirm the engineering and financial integrity of the project as work progresses.

  6. A Project Management Committee (PMC), which includes senior representatives from both the federal and provincial governments, oversees all aspects of the project.

  7. A Project Management Committee Secretariat, which includes senior representatives from both the federal and provincial governments, supports the PMC and coordinates day to day administration of the Final Cost Share Agreements and its implementing agreements.

  8. An Operational Advisory Committee gives the Sydney Tar Ponds Agency opportunity to report to federal and provincial officials on operational issues and to seek and be provided with advice.

  9. An Environmental Management Committee composed of Federal and Provincial Regulators, expert departments and, the Sydney Tar Ponds Agency, coordinates the provision of advice to the proponent and the PMC on issues related to Environmental Management of the Project.

  10. A Community Liaison Committee provides, in accordance with a mutually agreed upon federal/provincial strategy, information to the community on the Project; liaison between the community and governments with respect to identification and management of community stakeholder interests; and, facilitates exchanges of information on matters of a general interest or on specific Project issues and concerns.

  11. A Protocol Agreement was established October 28, 2005, allowing for meaningful economic participation of First Nations communities. An Aboriginal Procurement Strategy was developed and specific project work elements were set aside for competition among Canadian First Nations businesses and contractors.

  12. Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) and Risk-based Audit Frameworks (RBAF) were established for the length of the project. Continuous monitoring of the RMAF’s key performance indicators are ongoing to ensure evidence based information.

  13. On May 31, 2007, Treasury Board Decision #833589 granted approval of the terms and conditions of the Final Cost Share Agreement (FCSA) and associated funding for the cost shared activities, with PWGSC as the federal lead, as well as for costs of federal operations of Environment Canada and Health Canada. The FCSA was signed on September 27, 2007, incorporating Environmental Assessment panel recommendations, reaffirming funding commitments and further delineating the governance structure for the final seven years of the remediation project to its completion in 2014.

  14. On March 18, 2009, a MOA was signed between Canada and Nova Scotia to share expertise and coordinate relevant environmental regulatory process.

Planning Highlights for 2011-2012: Continuous monitoring of the Results-based Management and Accountability Framework’s key performance indicators are ongoing to ensure evidence based information.

The Construction phase of the North and South Ponds continues with project elements TP6A – Water Flow Diversion (pump around) which will redirect two brooks away from remediation activities; TP6B - solidification and stabilization treatment of contaminated sediments in the Tar Ponds; and, TP7 – Capping of the Tar Ponds.

Key plans and risks are as follows:

A three phase approach is being implemented for completion of the North and South Ponds.

Phase I - South Pond - pump around and solidification to be completed Fall 2010; capping to be completed Spring 2011.

Phase II – North Pond (mid section) – pump around to begin January 2011; solidification to begin Spring 2011; and, capping to begin Fall 2011.

Phase III – North Pond (final section) – pump around to begin January 2012; solidification to begin Spring 2012; and, capping to begin Spring 2013.

TP6C – Ferry Street Bridge, was to occur in fiscal year 2010/2011, but was delayed to alleviate vehicle movements on site and is scheduled to be primarily completed during Fiscal year 2011/12. This delay has no impact to the overall project schedule. The following year, the bridge structure replacement is planned.

CO6 –Coke Ovens Surface Cap is a two phased project. One is a First Nation set aside, and the second is open to all qualified contractors. Both phases are scheduled to be completed in Fall 2011.

Federal Partners: Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) - lead federal department.

Environment Canada (EC)

Health Canada (HC)

Electronic Link to Government Performance Reports.

Electronic Link to Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens Sites cleanup.

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (2004-2014) Planned Spending for 2011-2012 Expected Results for 2011-2012
Federal lead, PWGSC

Sydney Tar Ponds & Coke Ovens Remediation Project

Operating:
$25,870,000

Cost Share Payment to Province of Nova Scotia:
$282,240,000

Operating:
$3,234,312

Cost Share Payment to Province of Nova Scotia:
$45,921,614

PWGSC’s project team, as federal lead, ensures the project is complying with the project agreements, the efficient and effective use of public funds, application of federal standards and policies, and effective communication with stakeholders, using appropriate oversight and due diligence.

Environment Canada -Provision of advice to PWGSC

Sydney Tar Ponds

$7,640,000

$678,931

Provision of expert and technical advice to PWGSC on technical issues, historical studies and scientific issues related to contaminated sites.

Health Canada - Provision of advice to PWGSC

Sydney Tar Ponds

$5,500,000

$285,662

Provision of expert and technical advice to PWGSC on issues related to human health, technical issues and risk assessment.

 

Total
$321,250,000

Total
$50,120,519

 

Results to be achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): The Sydney Tar Ponds Agency, who is implementing the day to day technical aspects of the Project elements in accordance with the agreements signed by the government partners, has planned remediation work for cost shared expenditures for fiscal year 2011-2012 in the amount of $76.5M ($45.9M federal cost share).

Contact Information:
Randy Vallis,
Director,
Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens Remediation Project,
295 Charlotte Street,
Sydney, NS
B1P 6J9
Tel: 902-564-2543
Email: randy.vallis@pwgsc.gc.ca

Brenda Powell,
Chief Business Management,
Sydney Tar Ponds and Coke Ovens Remediation Project
Tel: 902-368-0359
Email: brenda.powell@pwgsc.gc.ca

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Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Games Security and Public Safety (GS&PS) for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games

Name of lead department(s): The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) led a multi-organizational, Integrated Security Group known as the Vancouver 2010 Integrated Security Unit (V2010 ISU). The Departments and Agencies that formed the V2010 ISU were: Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), Department of National Defence (DND), Health Canada (HC), Industry Canada (IC), Privy Council Office (PCO), Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), Public Safety Canada (PS) and Transport Canada (TC).

Lead department program activity: Protective Policing Services

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2004-2005

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-2011

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Approximately $900M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

As the lead agency responsible for the development and delivery of the 2010 Winter Games security, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) led a multi-organizational, Integrated Security Groups known as the Vancouver 2010 Integrated Security Unit (V2010 ISU) which had the overall responsibility for coordinating and providing security for the 2010 Winter Olympic Games.

The participating Departments and Agencies worked closely together, using a four-phased approach to major event planning: design and planning; a robust exercise and testing stage leading to a declaration of operational readiness; Games operation; and demobilization/debrief.

The overall goal of the V2010 ISU was to provide a “safe and secure game” for the athletes, officials and visitors. This was accomplished through and integrated security model and in close collaboration with partners, including all levels of government, Vancouver 2010 Organizing Committee (VANOC) and private corporations.

The total budget for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games is estimated at $900 million, in which the Province of British Columbia cost-shares a portion through a 2010 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Security Cost Sharing Memorandum of Agreement.

Shared outcomes:

a. Safe and Secure Games

  • When a safety or security issue did occur, it did not result in a disruption to the Games.

b. Effective Policing in Games Security area and Urban Domain

  • RCMP – Access control was successful in prohibiting the ability for unauthorized vehicles, material and people from entering a designated area.
  • RCMP – The athletes, officials and other accredited individuals were transported successfully between the athlete’s village and all venues in accordance with the plan.
  • RCMP – Traffic patterns and flows in the area on an approach were managed.
  • RCMP – Flow rates were met without compromising security procedures.

c. Effective Land Security

  • DND – Land interdiction operations were successful.
  • TC – Level of compliance with policy, regulatory and/or voluntary requirements.

d. Effective Air Security

  • DND – Air interdiction operations were successful.
  • RCMP – Systems and forces provided effective early warning and detection of aircraft into the Olympic Control Area (OCA) being breached.
  • TC – Level of compliance with policy, regulatory and/or voluntary requirements.

e. Effective Marine Security

  • DND – Maritime interdiction operations were successful.
  • RCMP – Breaches of unauthorized vessels in the exclusion zone (EZ) were dealt with successfully.
  • TC – Level of compliance with policy, regulatory and/or voluntary requirements.

f. Effective Intelligence

  • CSIS – Effective and efficient disclosure of information and intelligence to the Joint Intelligence Group (JIG).
  • DND – Appropriate information/intelligence shared in a timely manner.
  • RCMP – Intelligence shared was accurate as possible.
  • TC – Effective information flows between JIG and TC.

g. Effective Border Integrity

  • CBSA – Successfully delivered integrated border services.
  • CBSA – Was able to provide an assessment of increased volumes and heightened security in a pre/during/post Olympic Games operational environment to senior management which will help in decision making for future major events.
  • RCMP – Detection and interdiction of illegal entry into Canada between ports of entry were dealt with successfully.
  • RCMP – Response to reports of international or organized crime human trafficking were dealt with in an effective and timely manner.

h. Effective Operational Support

  • CSIS – Respected the Service Level Agreement (SLA) that was established with the RCMP in regards to the accreditation program.
  • CSIS – Participated fully in the Exercise program; this validated the flow of information and intelligence and the roles and responsibilities of CSIS officers who were deployed for the Games.
  • DND – Personnel were deployed in a timely manner.
  • DND – Accommodations and/or transportation for the key Canadian Forces (CF) security delivery assets were available and needs were met.
  • IC – Number of security agencies requesting the use of the radio frequency spectrum provided fair access to the radio frequency spectrum; where and when appropriate, provided alternatives to requests that cannot be accommodated.
  • IC – Confirmation of advanced planning by demonstrating that each radio frequency assigned to a user was disruption-free or highly unlikely to encounter disruption as a result of a detailed analysis of the proposed system and knowledge of radio frequency environment.
  • IC – Number of incidents of disruption to radio communications systems investigated and resolved in a timely manner.
  • IC – Assignment of highest priority of service granted to security system service requests.
  • PS – All required stakeholders at regional, federal and municipal levels are engaged to support Situational Awareness and response activities.
  • PS – Effective communications between PS, PREOC and the GOC: vertically between the GOC and the FERP Governance and horizontally between the GOC and federal/provincial partners in the activation of an emergency response.
  • RCMP – Background checks were conducted efficiently with the tools available.
  • RCMP – Control measures were in place to ensure compliance to recommendations given by the Accreditation Screening and Verification Team (ASVT).
  • TC – RCMP requirements for staffing Operations Centres were met.
  • TC – Provision of timely and accurate information to ISU and TC Senior Management.

i. Effective Information Technology

  • CSIS – Installed telecommunication technologies to ensure those CSIS officers who were deployed for the Games could effectively and efficiently communicate with other CSIS colleagues and colleagues from other departments and agencies.
  • DND – The uninterrupted provision of accurate and relevant information to decision makers.
  • RCMP – Attempts of intrusion at the venues were detected by PIDS successfully.
  • TC – Effective resolution of service calls taken by TC IT support.

Governance structures:

The Games Security and Public Safety Group has completed a security Results-based Management Accountability Framework (RMAF) as required by the Treasury Board Secretariat. The RMAF formalizes the federal commitment of the RCMP and its federal partners to be accountable for the implementation of this initiative.

The RMAF describes the roles and responsibilities of Key Federal Departments and Agencies participating in this horizontal initiative, as well as its goals and objectives, its related components and expected results and a coordinated performance measurement and evaluation plan.

The Commissioner of the RCMP reports to the Minister of Public Safety Canada. The participating departments/agencies have a working relationship with the RCMP and report to their respective Ministers.

The Deputy Ministers Working Group is chaired by the Coordinator for 2010 Olympics and G8 and G20 Security. This working group is comprised of the respective Security Departments and Agencies participating as members in order to facilitate an integrated federal approach to security.

Planning Highlights:

N/A

Federal Partner: CBSA

($ millions)

Federal Partner Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2011–12
PA1 Risk Assessment $5.311 $0
PA2 Enforcement $1.095 $0
PA3 Facilitated Border $3.780 $0
PA4 Conventional Border $2.134 $0
PA5 Trade $0.184 $0
PA6 Recourse   $0
PA5 Internal Services $3.296 $0
Total $15.8  $0

Expected results by program:

a. Safe and Secure Games: Finalize/implement plans, processes and policies. Deliver training and perform accreditation screening. Operational Readiness.

g. Effective Border Integrity

Federal Partner: CIC

($ millions)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
PA1 a) Selection and processing
of temporary residents

$ 5.1 Incremental funding

$ 2.1 Foregone revenue

$0
Total $0

Expected results by program:

a. Safe and Secure Games

g. Effective Border Integrity

Federal Partner: CSIS

($ millions)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
PA1 a) Intelligence Program $11  
b) Security Screening Program    
Total  

Expected results by program:

a) Safe and Secure Games

f) Effective Intelligence

h) Effective Operational Support

i) Effective Information Technology

Federal Partner: DND

($ millions)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
PA1 a) Conduct Operations

$ 231.1

($212 + $19.1
(frozen contingency))

$0
Total $ 231.1 $0

Expected results by program:

a) Safe and Secure Games

c) Effective Land Security

d) Effective Air Security

e) Effective Marine Security

f) Effective Intelligence

h) Effective operational Support

i) Effective Information Technology

Federal Partner: HC

($ millions)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
PA1 Sustainable
Environmental health
$1.196
$0
Total $1.196 $0

Expected results by program:

a) Safe and Secure Games

b) Effective Policing in Games Security Area and Urban Domain

h) Effective Operational Support

Federal Partner: IC

($ millions)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for
Federal Partners
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
PA1 Provide access to the
radio frequency spectrum
$9.8 $0
PA2 Minimize the impact of interference
to radio communications systems

$0
Total $9.8 $0

Expected results by program:

a) Safe and Secure Games

h) Effective Operational Support

i) Effective Information Technology

Federal Partner: PHAC

($ millions)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
PA1 Emergency Preparedness
and Response
$0.9 $0
Total $0.9 $0

Expected results by program:

a) Safe and Secure Games

f) Effective Intelligence

h) Effective Operational Support

i) Effective Information Technology

Federal Partner: PS

($ millions)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for
Federal Partners
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
PA1 Emergency Management
and National Security
$1.2 $0
Communications   $0
Law Enforcement and
Policing
  $0
Total $1.2 $0

Expected results by program:

a) Safe and Secure Games

h) Effective Operational Support

Federal Partner: RCMP

($ millions)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
PA1 Protective Policing Services
$558 $0
Total $558 $0

Expected results by program:

a) Safe and Secure Games

h) Effective Operational Support

Federal Partner: RCMP

($ millions)

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2011–12
PA1 Protective Policing Services
$558