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ARCHIVED - 2010-2011 RPPs - Horizontal Initiatives

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Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Erratum

Subsequent to tabling in Parliament and online publication of the 2010-2011 Report on Plans and Priorities, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) determined that the Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan Horizontal Initiative contained an error in both the English and French versions.

In the planning information table for AAFC, the first Expected Result was wrong. It should have been as follows:

  • Increased minor-use pesticides and reduced risk pest management tools permissible or available for use.

The HTML version has been updated to now include the correct wording.

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Flexibility Fund

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity:

The Agricultural Flexibility Fund contributes to several program activities within AAFC: On-Farm Action, Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems, Trade and Market Development, and Science, Innovation and Adoption

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 10, 2009

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2014 (under Budget 2009 - Canada's Economic Action Plan)

Total federal funding allocation: $485.5* million (Announced in Budget 2009 - Canada's Economic Action Plan)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

The Agricultural Flexibility Fund (AgriFlexibility) is a five-year (2009-2014) $500 million fund. Its objective is to facilitate the implementation of new initiatives, both federally and in partnership with provinces, territories and industry. AgriFlexibility will improve the sector's competitiveness and help the sector adapt to pressures through non-business risk-management measures that will reduce costs of production, improve environmental sustainability, promote innovation and respond to market challenges. The AgriFlexibility Fund is being implemented through federal, industry and cost-shared initiatives with provinces and territories. Funding is provided through contribution agreements. This Horizontal Initiative is part of the Canada's Economic Action Plan.

Three federal-only initiatives under AgriFlexibility have been announced and are at various stages of design and implementation. They are: Livestock Auction Traceability Initiative (LATI), AgriProcessing Initiative (API) and Canada Brand Advocacy Initiative (CBAI).

Shared outcomes:

Producers/partners/industry implement actions to improve their environmental practices
Producers/partners/industry implement actions to reduce their costs of production
Improved food safety, biosecurity, traceability and risk management measures

Governance structure:

Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) issues with AgriFlexibility are discussed at the FPT Policy ADM Committee.

Planning Highlights:

In 2010, AAFC plans to fully implement AgriFlexibility. The department is planning to implement additional initiatives to further some specific expected results as described in the table below.


Federal Partner:
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Various program activities Agricultural Flexibility Fund $485.5* $121.4 M Producers and industry improve their environmental practices

Producers and industry reduce their costs of production

Improved food safety, biosecurity, traceability and risk management measures

Total $485.5 M $121.4 M  

* Net of indirect costs

For more information, visit: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1247699434024&lang=eng



Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$485.5 M $121.4 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Overall the same results are to be achieved by provincial and territorial partners

Contact information:
Lynn McGuire
Acting Director,
Adaptation Division
Farm financial Programs Branch
613-773-1905
Lynn.McGuire@agr.gc.ca


Note:
Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved funding and does not include any amounts that may be transferred or brought into the department's reference levels. Total Allocation and Total Planned Spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008 under Growing Forward

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $95.0 million over five years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

This initiative targets four specific regulatory issues that were identified by stakeholders, namely: 1) health claims, novel foods, and ingredients 2) food fortification 3) minor use pesticides and pesticide risk reduction; and 4) veterinary drugs. The Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan supports the general principles of the Government of Canada's Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation. The Plan specifically addresses the development of regulatory frameworks based on the accumulation of sound science, as well as advancing the transparency, timeliness, responsiveness, efficiency, public interest, and government collaboration to minimize regulatory burden for stakeholders.

Shared outcomes:

Addressing key regulatory obstacles to promoting a competitive and innovative sector, while protecting and advancing the public interest

Governance structure:

Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between AAFC and Health Canada set out the roles and responsibilities for the management of this initiative. The Deputy Ministers of the two departments oversee the governance process which includes the following levels of management in accordance with the MOUs:

  • An Assistant Deputy Ministers' (ADM) Committee oversees the management of the MOUs and reports back to the Deputy Ministers.
  • Joint Management Committees (JMC), composed of directors general or equivalent level representatives, have been established to manage the implementation of the MOUs and report semi-annually to the ADM Committee.

Planning Highlights:

Work under the Regulatory Action Plan aims to improve and modernize key aspects of the regulatory system in each of the four priority areas (see Section 7), while reducing the regulatory burden to promote innovation and improve competitiveness within the agriculture and agri-food sector. AAFC's commitments include helping industry best understand and follow regulatory processes and requirements, including responding to the scientific data requirements of submissions to Health Canada. Health Canada's activities are focused on streamlining regulatory processes and improving submission review times, and developing policy and regulatory frameworks that better address priorities of the sector while maintaining health and safety standards.

AAFC's Market and Industry Services and Research Branches, and Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency, Veterinary Drugs Directorate and Food Directorate, have established interdepartmental working groups for the initiatives in which they are partnering. These groups develop business cases, work plans, performance objectives and targets, and budget and expenditure reports. They report to their respective JMCs.

Federal Partner: AAFC

Concerning minor-use pesticides and pesticide risk reduction AAFC's plans involve identifying and prioritizing pest management needs, conducting literature searches and generating data, undertaking regulatory and outreach activities, compiling data, drafting reports and assembling regulatory submissions. With regard to health claims, novel foods, and ingredients AAFC's plans include working with industry, research and regulatory communities to facilitate information collection, analysis and exchange, as well as undertaking and coordinating collaborative scientific research.


($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total
Allocation (from Start
to End Date)
Planned
Spending
for
2010-11
Expected
Results for
2010-11
Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction $36.2 M
(excludes
A-base
funding)
$9.1
(excludes
A-base
funding )

Increased minor-use pesticides and reduced risk pest management tools permissible or available for use.

Health Claims, Novel Foods, and Ingredients $16.1 M $3.6 Enhanced sector ability to navigate the food regulatory system, which should lead to improved sector understanding of regulatory processes/requirements
Total $52.4 M $12.7 M  

*Due to rounding figures may not add up to the totals shown.

Expected results:

Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction

A national list of grower-selected pest management priority projects; data for regulatory submissions for new minor uses; improved pesticide resistance management; and improved crop protection practices: leading to increased availability of newer, reduced-risk pesticides, tools, technologies, and practices; prevention of trade barriers with countries where these products are already available; and an improved Canadian competitive position in international markets.

Health Claims, Novel Foods, and Ingredients

Regulatory-issue/impact documents and literature reviews; domestic and international science networks; and data and evidence to address priority knowledge gaps: leading to targeted sector guidance and communication; complete and substantiated sector regulatory submissions; and an enhanced sector ability to navigate the regulatory system.

Federal Partner: Health Canada

Health Canada will continue to review regulatory submissions for minor-use pesticides in a dedicated manner, and undertake veterinary-drug regulatory harmonization initiatives with international agencies, improve regulatory processes for generic and new veterinary drugs, and develop policy and a pilot program for Minor Uses and Minor Species. With respect to health claims, novel foods, ingredients and food fortification, Health Canada's plans include developing and implementing targeted policies, regulations and pre-market processes.


($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total
Allocation
(from Start
to End Date)
Planned
Spending
for
2010-11
Expected
Results for
2010-11
Pesticide Regulation Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction $16.0 M
(excludes
A-base funding)
$4.0 M
(excludes
A-base funding)
New minor uses of pesticides available to growers through a dedicated minor use review process
Health Products Veterinary Drugs $5.0 M $1.2 M Reduction in review times for veterinary drug submissions and increased availability of drugs for food-producing animals
Food and Nutrition Health Claims, Novel Foods, and Ingredients $17.4 M $3.5 M Modernized and efficient policy and regulatory approaches and pre-market processes leading to new, innovative and safe food products and claims, focusing on health benefits
Food Fortification $4.3 M $1.2 M
Sub Total - Health Canada   $42.6 M $9.9 M  

Due to rounding, figures may not add up to the totals shown.

Expected results:

Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction

New minor uses of pesticides available to growers through a dedicated review process

Veterinary Drugs

A prioritized list of approved drug entities with U.S. Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) requiring Canadian MRLs; information and guidance for industry; and enhanced policies, guidelines and regulatory frameworks, a strategy for streamlining generic drug approvals, and increased scientific capacity for reviewing veterinary drug submissions leading to closer harmonization of technical requirements for veterinary drug approvals with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine, and increased availability of generic and Minor Use/Minor Species veterinary drugs for food producing animals in the Canadian marketplace

Health Claims, Novel Foods, and Ingredients

Policies, regulations and pre-market processes, manuals, consultations and work-sharing agreements, leading to enhanced policy/regulatory/process engagement with industry, consumers and international partners; modernized and efficient policy and regulatory approaches and pre-market processes; and innovative, safe food products and claims, focusing on health benefits

Food fortification

In keeping with the objective of modernizing and improving policy and regulatory approaches and pre-market processes, a system of pre-market approval of industry submissions for foods fortified with vitamin and mineral nutrients on a discretionary basis, consisting of dedicated staff to manage the review and assessment of the safety of fortified foods, implement the authorization (which may include the issuance of Temporary Marketing Authorization Letters), and enhance the knowledge base supporting the development of approaches to manage fortified foods



Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$95.0 M $22.5 M*


* Due to rounding, the figures in the preceding tables may not add to the totals in the above table.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners: Not applicable.

Contact information:

Lynn Stewart, Director
Food Regulatory Issues Division
Food Value Chain Bureau
Market and Industry Services Branch
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 5, Floor 2, Room 242
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
Telephone 613-773-0153
Email lynn.stewart@agr.gc.ca

Note:

AAFC's Growing Forward is the new five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-2009 fiscal year. Total Allocation and Total Planned Spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInsurance (Statutory)

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: AgriInsurance is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Total federal funding allocation: As the program is statutory and demand-driven, it is only possible to provide an estimate of the total cost of the program. The current estimate is that it will cost $1.6 billion over four years (2008-09 to 2011-12 fiscal years).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriInsurance (formerly known as Production and Crop Insurance) aims to reduce the financial impact on producers of production losses caused by uncontrollable natural perils.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal/Provincial AgriInsurance Agreement.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriInsurance
British Columbia
Alberta
Saskatchewan
Manitoba
Ontario
Quebec
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
Prince Edward Island
Newfoundland

Shared outcome:

To mitigate the financial impacts of production losses by providing effective insurance protection.

Governance structure:

AgriInsurance is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM priority.

AgriInsurance is a provincial-territorial program to which the federal government contributes financially under the Federal/Provincial AgriInsurance Agreement. The program is administered provincially in all provinces. The federal and provincial governments cost-share a portion of the premium costs together with program participants. Governments also fully cost-share the administrative costs of the program (60:40 federal-provincial).

Governance structure includes various national standards outlined in Canada Production Insurance Regulations. Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Planning Highlights:

The federal government will continue to work to ensure producer have access to affordable and comprehensive insurance coverage. The federal government will also continue working with the provinces and delivery agencies to develop new insurance options for agricultural products.

Federal Partner: AAFC


($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total
Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected
Results for
2010-11
Business Risk Management AgriInsurance $1.6 B over
four years
(2008-09 -
2011-12)
$413.6 M The financial impacts of production losses are mitigated by providing effective insurance protection.

Additional information on performance indicators is provided below.

Total $1.6 B $413.6 M  

Expected Results:

Performance Indicators:

  • Value of insured production compared to the total value of all agricultural products eligible for insurance reported as follows: Percentage of Crops - Target 60 per cent.
  • Value of crops eligible for insurance compared to the value of all agricultural products reported as follows: Percentage of Crops - Target 85 per cent.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$1.6 B $ 413.6 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Planning and development activities are done jointly with the provinces. Therefore, the expected results are the same, but the achieved results will vary by province.

Contact information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
Floor 3, Room 241
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
Danny.Foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:
Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved funding and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the department's reference levels. This program is statutory and demand driven, therefore actual spending could vary. Spending also includes all costs incurred by the Department for this program (salary, operating, transfer payments, etc.). See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriRecovery, AgriStability and AgriInvest. Total Allocation and Total Planned Spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInvest (Statutory)

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriInvest is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Total federal funding allocation:

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, it is only possible to provide an estimate of the total cost of the program. The current estimate is that it will cost $1.4 billion over five years (2007-08 to 2011-12 fiscal years).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriInvest allows producers to self-manage, through producer-government savings accounts, the first 15 per cent of their margin losses for a production year and/or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues. Under the program, annual producer deposits of up to 1.5 per cent of their allowable net sales are matched by government deposits. Government deposits are cost-shared 60:40 by federal and provincial/territorial governments. In combination with the AgriStability program, AgriInvest is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

AgriInvest provides producers with a secure, accessible, predictable, and bankable source of income assistance to address small drops in farm income and manage on-farm risks.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal/Provincial/Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriInvest
AgriInvest in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)

Shared outcome:

To provide producers with flexibility in how they choose to manage and/or mitigate small income losses through the availability of timely and predictable funds

Governance structure:

The AgriInvest program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM priority. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are cost shared by the federal government and the provinces and the Yukon Territory on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

For the 2008 program year, the AgriInvest program was delivered by the federal government in all provinces except Quebec. Governments are currently working with financial institutions to set up the infrastructure necessary to establish and hold AgriInvest accounts in summer 2010 for the 2009 program year. In Quebec, the AgriInvest program is, and will continue to be, delivered provincially by La Financière agricole du Québec.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Planning Highlights:

The federal government, including program administrators, will continue to work to ensure AgriInvest provides producers with flexible assistance which may be used to address small income farm losses or for investments to either mitigate income losses or reduce farm risks, that all information needed by participants is available and easily understandable, and that matching government contributions are made in a timely fashion.

The department is working closely with financial institutions to launch AgriInvest accounts at financial institutions in all provinces except Quebec in the summer of 2010. This will increase participants' access to their accounts through the services offered by the financial institutions. La Financière agricole administers the AgriInvest program in Quebec and will continue to hold AgriInvest accounts for producers in that province.

In partnership with the provinces and territories, AAFC has put in place a set of performance indicators and targets for the suite of BRM programs. Officials will use these performance indicators and targets to closely monitor and report on the performance of the BRM programs and ensure they are meeting their objectives.

AAFC is also working with the provinces and territories on the Strategic Review of the BRM suite of programs to ensure it continues to meet producers' evolving needs as Canada's agricultural industry continues to change and grow. As part of the first phase of the Strategic Review, analysis was undertaken to understand how effectively the current suite of BRM programs meets its objectives and to identify emerging trends that may affect future program policy. As part of this process, FPT officials also intend to engage industry and stakeholders to seek their views on future programming directions.

The Strategic Review will be instrumental in guiding the Government of Canada, and provincial and territorial partners, as they work towards the next phase of BRM programming beyond the current five-year Growing Forward policy framework.

Federal Partner: AAFC


($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Business Risk Management AgriInvest $1.4 B $168.2 M
  • Producers have the flexibility in managing small financial risks.
  • Producers use program account balances to address income declines or to make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues.

Additional information on performance indicators is provided below.

Total $1.4 B $168.2 M  

Expected Results:

Performance Indicators:

  • Percentage of AgriInvest producers receiving AgriStability payments and making withdrawals from their AgriInvest saving accounts - Target: at least 60 per cent of AgriInvest producers.
  • Percentage of producers indicating that they use their funds to address income declines or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues - Target: at least 75 per cent.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$1.4 B $ 168.2 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

Contact information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
Floor 3, Room 241
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
Danny.Foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:
Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved funding and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the department's reference levels. This program is statutory and demand driven, therefore actual spending could vary. Spending also includes all costs incurred by the Department for this program (salary, operating, transfer payments, etc.). See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriRecovery, AgriStability and AgriInsurance. Total Allocation and Total Planned Spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriRecovery - Agricultural Disaster Relief Program (ADRP)

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

On December 6, 2007, program authorities were obtained to implement the ADRP under the AgriRecovery disaster relief framework beginning with the 2007-08 fiscal year.

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Program authorities for the ADRP expire on March 31, 2011.

Total federal funding allocation:

Authorities for the program consist of $437.2 million over four years - net of indirect costs (2007-08 to 2010-11 fiscal years).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriRecovery facilitates the process for federal, provincial and territorial governments to provide timely assistance to help producers quickly re-establish their income stream and contain the long-term impacts after small- to mid-size disasters (e.g. disease, pest, weather). Programs under AgriRecovery are developed on a case-by-case basis after an assessment is completed and it is determined that there is need for assistance beyond existing programs, such as AgriInvest, AgriStability and AgriInsurance.

Under AgriRecovery, the ADRP helps focus the coordination effort, providing a process to fast-track authorities for programs of up to $20 million (up to $121.7 million per fiscal year - net of indirect costs) to quickly fund initiatives under AgriRecovery. Participating provinces-territories are expected to cost-share these initiatives on a 60:40 federal/provincial/territorial basis. For AgriRecovery programming outside the ADRP, funding options are negotiated with the provinces-territories on a case-by-case basis.

Authorities for the program include sub-section 12(5) of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as various agreements for individual programming developed under AgriRecovery.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit: http://www.agr.gc.ca/agrirecovery

Shared outcome:

To reduce the economic impact of catastrophic natural disasters on producers through timely assistance not otherwise provided by other programs

Governance structure:

The AgriRecovery framework, including the ADRP, is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward policy framework developed by Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FPT) Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the Business Risk Management priority. Under the ADRP, program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are expected to be cost-shared by the federal government and the provinces/territories on a 60:40 basis, respectively. For AgriRecovery programming outside the ADRP, funding options are negotiated with the provinces/territories on a case-by-case basis, however the 60:40 cost share requirement remains in effect.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT BRM Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Specific to AgriRecovery and the ADRP are FTP Task Teams, which are initiated on a case-by-case basis when requested to assess/analyze a disaster and its impacts and, if needed, develop options for an individual disaster assistance initiative to be brought forward to participating FTP Ministers.

Planning Highlights:

Federal officials, together with the provinces and in consultation with impacted producers, will continue to use the AgriRecovery Framework to assess disasters on a case-by-case basis to determine if each situation meets criteria under the Framework and, if so, whether there is need for assistance beyond support available through existing programs. Where it is determined that additional assistance is warranted, federal officials will work with the provinces and impacted producers to develop an assistance program under ADRP/AgriRecovery which will help them to resume their business operations as quickly as possible and/or mitigate the impacts of the disaster.

Federal officials will also continue working with provinces to streamline the AgriRecovery process and improve consistency in the approach to assessing disasters and the decision making process through such things as the implementation of FPT AgriRecovery Guidelines.

Federal Partner: AAFC


($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected
Results
for
2010-11
Business Risk Management AgriRecovery (including the ADRP) $437.2 M ($72.2 M for FY 2007-08 and $121.7 M per year for FYs 2008-09 to 2010-11) $121.7 M
  • Farm business operations resume operations following a natural disaster.
  • Producers affected by a disaster situation benefit from financial assistance.

Additional information on performance indicators is provided below.

Total $437.2 M $121.7 M  

Expected Results:

Performance Indicators:

  • Percentage of producers still farming one year after the disaster. Target is 70 per cent of producers still farming one year later.
  • Percentage of producers who believe that the financial assistance provided under the program played a role in the recovery. Target is 75 per cent.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$437.2 M $ 121.7 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Joint planning and execution (federally and provincially) will be undertaken so that results are consistent

Contact information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
Floor 3, Room 241
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
Danny.Foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:
Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved funding and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the department's reference levels. This program is statutory and demand driven, therefore actual spending could vary. Spending also includes all costs incurred by the department for this program (salary, operating, transfer payments, etc.). See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability, AgriInvest and AgriInsurance. Total Allocation and Total Planned Spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriStability (Statutory)

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriStability is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

Total federal funding allocation:

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, it is only possible to provide an estimate of the total cost of the program. The current estimate is that it will cost $ 3.2 billion over five fiscal years (2007-08 to 2011-12 fiscal years).

For the period of 2007-08, funding in the amount of $649 million pertains to the Canadian Agriculture Income Stabilization (CAIS) program, which preceded AgriStability.

$14.8 million ($2.9 million for 2009-10 and $11.8 million for 2010-11) for the transfer of delivery from the federal administration of the program to British Columbia and Saskatchewan has also been included in the total costs.

These costs are reflected net of indirect costs.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriStability is a margin-based program that provides support when producers experience large farm income losses, which result in drops in their margins (eligible farm income, less eligible farm expenses) for a program year of more than 15 per cent relative to their average margins from previous years (i.e., their reference margins). Thus a payment is triggered under the program when producers' program year margins drop below 85 per cent of their reference margin. AgriStability also includes coverage for negative margins, as well as mechanisms to advance to participants a portion of their expected payments during the year when significant declines in incomes are expected (interim payments and Targeted Advance Payments). In combination with the AgriInvest program, it is the successor to the CAIS program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal/Provincial/ Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.

The program links to the strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriStability
AgriStability in British Columbia
AgriStability in Alberta (Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (AFSC))
AgriStability in Saskatchewan
AgriStability in Ontario (Agricorp)
AgriStability in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)
AgriStability on Prince Edward Island (PEI Agricultural Insurance Corporation)

Shared outcome:

To mitigate the short-term impacts of large income losses

Governance structure:

The AgriStability program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FTP) Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM priority. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are cost-shared by the federal government and the provinces/territory on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

In Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and Prince Edward Island, the AgriStability program is delivered provincially. The transfer of delivery of the AgriStability program from the federal administration to British Columbia and Saskatchewan began in January 2010. The department continues to work closely with these two provinces to facilitate the transition. The AgriStability program continues to be administered by the federal government for Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Yukon Territory.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Planning Highlights:

Federal and provincial governments, including program administrators, will continue to work to ensure the AgriStability program is effectively stabilizing the incomes of producers, that all information needed by participants is available and understandable, and that applications and payments are processed in a timely fashion.

In January 2010, federal and provincial governments began the transfer of delivery of AgriStability to the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. AAFC continues to work closely with these two provinces to ensure the transition is completed in a simple and efficient manner with minimal disruption to the ongoing delivery of the program.

In partnership with the provinces and territories, AAFC has put in place a set of performance indicators and targets for the suite of BRM programs. Officials will use these performance indicators and targets to closely monitor and report on the performance of the BRM programs and ensure they are meeting their objectives.

AAFC is working with the provinces and territories on the Strategic Review of the BRM suite of programs to ensure it continues to meet producers' evolving needs as Canada's agricultural industry continues to change and grow. As part of the first phase of the Strategic Review, analysis was undertaken to understand how effectively the current suite of BRM programs meets its objectives and to identify emerging trends that may affect future program policy. As part of this process, FPT officials also intend to engage industry and stakeholders to seek their views on future programming directions.

The Strategic Review will be instrumental in guiding the Government of Canada, and provincial and territorial partners, as they work towards the next phase of BRM programming beyond the current five-year Growing Forward policy framework.

Federal Partner: AAFC


($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start
to End Date)
Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected
Results for
2010-11
Business Risk Management AgriStability $ 3.2 B for
the fiscal years
2007-08 to 2011-12
$ 657.8 M Short-term impacts of large income losses are reduced.

Additional information on performance indicators is provided below.

Total $ 3.2 B $ 657.8 M  

Notes:
1. Total Allocation: Of this amount, $649 million pertains to the period of 2007-08 for CAIS which preceded AgriStability and $14.8 million is for costs related to the transfer of delivery to British Columbia and Saskatchewan.
2. Planned Spending: This amount includes $11.8 million for costs related to the transfer of delivery to British Columbia and Saskatchewan.

Expected Results:

Performance Indicators:

  • Participants' farm market revenues compared to total farm market revenues for the industry. Target is 80 per cent of total farm market revenues are covered by the program. Participant's production margin with and without payments compared to reference margin. Target is that program payments bring producer's margin up to 75 per cent of reference margin.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$3.2 B $ 657.8 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

Contact information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
Floor 3, Room 241
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
Danny.Foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:
Planned spending represents the amounts included in Main Estimates and currently approved funding and does not include any additional amounts that could be brought into the department's reference levels. This program is statutory and demand driven, therefore actual spending could vary. Spending also includes all costs incurred by the Department for this program (salary, operating, transfer payments, etc.). See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriRecovery, AgriInvest and AgriInsurance. Total Allocation and Total Planned Spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Growing Forward Program Initiatives Development

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2009

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013 under Growing Forward

Total federal funding allocation: $20.9 million  over four years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between AAFC and CFIA sets out the general terms, roles and responsibilities for the management and funding of the various components of the Canadian Integrated Food Safety Initiative (CIFSI), funded under AAFC's Growing Forward Framework Agreement. The following initiatives are delivered by CFIA, in collaboration with AAFC:

  • a) The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support element under the National Food Safety Systems component of the Canadian Integrated Food Safety Initiative (CIFSI): The CFIA-led System Recognition will provide government recognition of on-farm and post-farm food safety systems developed by national (or equivalent) industry organizations. The CFIA will continue to develop and deliver food safety system recognition programs. Under the Scientific and Technical Support element, CFIA will continue to provide scientific and technical advice to support food safety system development based on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP).

  • b) National Biosecurity Standards Development:
    The National Biosecurity Standards Development will allow CFIA to focus on developing nationally consistent plant and animal biosecurity standards. These standards will be developed with industry, commodity organizations and provinces. Once the biosecurity standards are approved by CFIA, they will become the national biosecurity standard for that particular commodity.

  • c) Traceability Information Sharing Solution element under the Developing National Traceability Systems component of the CIFSI:
    The Traceability Information Sharing Solution will explore potential solutions for accessing and querying traceability information between industry and government partners in a planned, measured and constructive way. The allocation of funding will be used to develop materials necessary to define and document the high level requirements and initial project planning for the national Traceability Information Sharing Solution, which may lead to preliminary project approval (PPA). This initiative will be managed through joint leadership between CFIA and AAFC and coordinated through the Traceability Management Office.

  • d) Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure elementunder the Developing National Traceability Systems component of the CIFSI:
    The Traceability Management Office will be established to collaboratively undertake the work relating to the overall government legislative and regulatory infrastructure necessary to put traceability authorities, agreements, and protocols in place. The allocation of funding to CFIA will be used to develop the legislative and regulatory infrastructure for the initiative.

Shared outcome:

This initiative contributes to the following strategic outcomes of AAFC:

  • An environmentally sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector
  • A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk.

Governance structures:

The overall administration of the Memorandum of Understanding for:

  1. AAFC is delegated to:
    Director General - Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
    Director General - Sector Policy Directorate
    Director General - Food Value Chain Bureau
    and
  2. CFIA is delegated to:
    Executive Director - Food Safety and Consumer Protection Directorate
    Executive Director - Animal Health Directorate, Programs
    Executive Director - Plant Health and Biosecurity
    Chief Information Officer - CFIA
    Executive Director - Domestic Policy Directorate

Planning Highlights:

Initiative Outcomes/Results: short- and long-term benefits to Canadians.

  • Government program for the review of national on-farm food safety programs completely operational;
  • Government program for the review of national post-farm food safety programs developed and operational;
  • Development and approval of National Biosecurity Standards for priority commodity groups;
  • Development of a project plan to seek preliminary project approval or effective project approval, depending on the business requirements, for the Traceability Information Sharing Solution; and
  • Development of the Traceability Management Office's legislative and regulatory infrastructure.

Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)


($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start
to End Date)
Planned
Spending
for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems - 2.2 CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support N/A - funds
transferred
to CFIA
N/A - funds
transferred
to CFIA
Work performed by CFIA
National Biosecurity Standards Development N/A - funds
transferred
to CFIA
N/A - funds
transferred
to CFIA
Work performed by CFIA
Traceability Information Sharing Solution N/A - funds
transferred
to CFIA
N/A - funds
transferred
to CFIA
Planned to be completed by March 31, 2010
Traceability Management Office Legislative an Regulatory Infrastructure N/A - funds
transferred
to CFIA
N/A - funds
transferred
to CFIA
Work performed by CFIA
Total N/A - funds
transferred
to CFIA
N/A - funds
transferred
to CFIA
 

Note: Since CFIA is delivering these programs with funds transferred from AAFC, total allocations, planned spending and expected results are reflected in the CFIA table below.

Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)


($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from Start
to End Date)
Planned
Spending
for
2010-11
Expected
Results
for
2010-11
Food Safety and Nutrition Risks CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support $7.3 M $2.1 M

Continuous improvement of the On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program and the Post-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program

On-going technical review and assessment of on-farm and post-farm food safety programs for recognition

Scientific and technical support provided as needed to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders
Animal Health Risks and Production Systems

Plant Health Risks and Production Systems

National Biosecurity Standards Development $9.5 M $2.0 M Review and approval process adopted

Environmental scan of current state of biosecurity within a commodity sector

National biosecurity standard approved

Production and dissemination of standard

Production and dissemination of educational and training material

Quarterly progress report and annual presentation to Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) Committee of Officials and/or FSBT Programs WG

Animal Health Risk and Production Systems Traceability Information Sharing Solution $1.1 M $0.0 M Planned to be completed by March 31, 2010
Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure $3.0 M $0.9 M Establish a National Legislative Framework for Traceability

Ongoing amendment and continuous improvement for a regulatory framework for traceability

Develop information sharing agreements with Canadian provinces

Develop a policy framework for traceability

Initiate Privacy Impact Assessments
Total $20.9 M $5.0 M  

Note: Funds transferred by AAFC to CFIA as reflected in this table.

Expected Results:



Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$20.9 M $5.0 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): not applicable

Contact information:

Linda Parsons
Director General
Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
Farm Financial Programs Branch
1341 Baseline Road - Tower 7, Floor 8, Room 220
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0C5
613-773-1900
linda.parsons@agr.gc.ca

Note:
AAFC's Growing Forward is the new five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-2009 fiscal year (MOU is for the four-year period ending in 2012-13). Total Allocation and Total Planned Spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Co-operative Development Initiative

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Rural and Co-operatives Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008 under Growing Forward

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation: $21.0 million over five years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

The Co-operatives Secretariat provides advice on policies and programs affecting co-operatives and builds partnerships within the federal government and with industry, provinces, and other key stakeholders in the implementation of initiatives to support the development of co-operatives. The Secretariat manages a grants and contributions program, the Co-operative Development Initiative, which includes:

  • providing advisory services and funding innovative co-op projects, delivered by the co-operative sector; and
  • funding research to build knowledge contributing to co-op development.

Shared outcomes:

Access to services across the country creates an enabling environment for co-operative development and growth

More and stronger co-operatives respond to public policy challenges

Canadians are better able to utilize the co-operative model to meet their economic and social needs

Governance structure:

The Co-operatives Secretariat was created as a focal point between Canadian co-operatives and federal departments and agencies. It has instituted mechanisms to raise awareness and inclusion of co-operatives in federal policies and programs. These include dialogue and collaboration with key federal departments as well as with provincial counterparts and the sector.

Planning Highlights:

The Co-operatives Secretariat will continue to manage the partnership agreement with the two national co-operative associations for the delivery of the Co-operative Development Initiative with the objective of enhancing the contribution of co-operatives to meeting the economic and social needs of Canadians.

It will explore opportunities to engage other departments in ensuring the co-operative approach is considered as a tool in delivering their mandates.

Federal Partner: AAFC - Rural and Co-operatives Development


($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results
for
2010-11
AAFC - Rural and Co-operatives Development Co-operative Development Initiative $21.0 M $4.7 M Innovative co-operative development projects are implemented
Total $21.0 M $4.7 M  

Expected Results:

Innovative co-operative development projects are implemented:

  • By providing funding through the two national co-operative associations for co-operative projects that respond to public policy priorities
  • Measured by: Number of innovative co-operative development projects implemented by community partners - Target: 25



Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$21.0 M $4.7 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Program delivery is through third party and the above-noted expected results and measures are to be achieved by the partners.

Contact information:

Donna Mitchell
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
560 Rochester Street, Tour 1, 5th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0C5
(613) 759-7113
Donna.Mitchell@agr.gc.ca

Note:
AAFC's Growing Forward is the new five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Total Allocation and Total Planned Spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada's Rural Partnership

Name of lead department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead department program activity: Rural and Co-operatives Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008 under Growing Forward

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation: $51.8 M over five years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Canadian Rural Partnership (CRP) leads an integrated, government-wide approach through which the government aims to co-ordinate its economic, social, environmental, and cultural policies towards the goal of economic and social development and renewal of rural Canada.

Shared outcome:

Collaboration between rural communities and stakeholders to address barriers and challenges to local development

Information and tools are used by rural communities and regions to develop local amenities and other assets

New economic activities are being implemented in rural Canada

Governance structures:

The CRP is managed by the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat. It has instituted mechanisms that contribute to raising awareness and inclusion of rural Canada in federal policies and programs, as well as engaging government and non-government partners to stimulate economic development in rural Canada. This includes:

  • The Rural Development Network which is a policy maker forum involving 28 federal departments and agencies;
  • The National Rural Research Network which brings together research partners from both academia and government to focus on enhancing knowledge about rural issues to better inform policy making;
  • The Community Information Database, a free web-based resource that provides comprehensive and reliable information on economic, social and demographic factors at the community level, to support decision making and action; and
  • The Community Development Program which offers funding to assist rural and northern regions to obtain information and access/develop the expertise, tools and processes needed to respond to challenges and opportunities and to become more competitive and generate economic activities.

In each province and territory, these efforts are reinforced by Rural Teams, comprised of the federal government representation and, in most cases, members from the provincial or territorial government and/or sectoral stakeholders.

Planning Highlights:

Through its networks and teams highlighted above, and programming, CRP will stimulate collaborative approaches to i) enhance the competitiveness of rural regions; ii) foster the transformation of local ideas and untapped assets into sustainable economic activities; and iii) help develop new economic opportunities from existing natural and cultural amenities.

Federal Partner: AAFC - Rural and Co-operatives Development


($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
AAFC - Rural and Co operatives Development Canada's Rural Partnership $51.8 M $10.3 M Rural communities and regions are using information, tools and processes to develop local natural and cultural amenities and other assets
Total $51.8 M $10.3 M  

Expected Results:

Rural communities and regions are using information, tools and processes to develop local natural and cultural amenities and other assets.

  • by developing and transferring/mobilizing knowledge to support and facilitate innovative rural development;
  • by funding knowledge building proposals
  • Measured by: Number of communities that are using new and updated/adapted information and tools to innovate and diversify their economies. - Target for 2010-11: 40



Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$51.8 M $10.3 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Donna Mitchell
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
560 Rochester Street, Tour 1, 5th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0C5
613-759-7113
Donna.Mitchell@agr.gc.ca

Note:
AAFC's Growing Forward is the new five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-2009 fiscal year. Total Allocation and Total Planned Spending amounts are net of indirect costs.

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Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership

Name of lead department(s): Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Lead department program activity: Community Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2009

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $9,975,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership (ACTP) is a nine-member, pan-Atlantic marketing consortium comprised of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, the four provincial tourism industry associations, and the provincial departments responsible for tourism in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. ACTP is dedicated to promoting Atlantic Canada as a leading vacation destination in key American and European Pacific markets.

The 2009-2012 ACTP is a $19.95-million agreement that supports:

  • fully-integrated marketing strategies (consumer, trade and media relations) based on sound market research, economies of scale, and commonality;
  • funding that is incremental to provincial marketing budgets;
  • the preservation of provincial brand equity;
  • marketing activities being dictated by the marketplace;
  • clear and responsive measurement systems of benefit to all four Atlantic provinces; and
  • end-of-agreement project evaluations.

Additional information on the Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership can be found at: http://www.actp-ptca.ca/index.html.

A memorandum of understanding for the renewal of the Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership was signed on April 1, 2009. This initiative directly supports the Agency's long-term strategic outcome.

Shared outcome(s): The 2009-2012 ACTP is expected to generate $10 in incremental economic activity for every $1 invested in marketing. The three-year revenue target is $190 million in incremental revenues for tourism SMEs in Atlantic Canada.

Governance structure(s): The activities of the ACTP are managed by a ten-person management committee, consisting of the ACOA vice-president responsible for tourism and the director general of Tourism Atlantic; the four provincial deputy ministers responsible for tourism; and the four tourism industry association presidents (or their permanent designates). Decisions of this management committee are by consensus. Six members constitute a quorum, provided all four provinces are represented, with both government and industry present, as well as ACOA. A Canadian Tourism Commission representative sits as an ex-officio member of the management committee.

The management committee is responsible for the administration and management of the agreement, allocation of annual budgets on a per market basis, approval of annual program work plans and budgets, and evaluations of program activities. It oversees the work of a marketing committee, develops and oversees a communications policy, and provides program interpretation and dispute resolution.

Planning highlights: Each year (including 2010-2011) the marketing committee researches and prepares fully integrated consumer advertising, and travel trade and media relations marketing strategies, all for the management committee's approval. These strategies will be implemented by program managers, who report directly to the marketing committee.

Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency.

($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Community Development Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership $9,975,000 $3,325,000 $55.2 million in export revenues
Total $9,975,000  $3,325,000 $55.2 million in export revenues

Expected Results:

$55.2 million in export revenues in each year of the partnership
$165.6 million in export revenues during the life of the partnership

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11
$9,975,000 $3,325,000

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):
$10 in tourism revenues for every $1 investment in marketing.

Contact information:

Rob McCloskey
Director General, Tourism Atlantic
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 40
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
C1A 7K2
Telephone: 902-626-2479
E-mail: Rob.McCloskey@acoa-apeca.gc.ca


Name of Horizontal Initiative: International Business Development Agreement (IBDA)

Name of lead department(s):
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Lead department program activity:
Enterprise Development (program sub-activity: Trade)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:
April 11, 2005

End date of the Horizontal Initiative:
March 31, 2011

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):
$8.4 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
In May 1994, ACOA entered into an agreement (Canada/Atlantic Provinces Agreement on International Business Development, also known as IBDA) with the four Atlantic provinces, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and Industry Canada to “undertake specific measures to optimize regional coordination on a pan-Atlantic scale and combine limited resources to coordinate trade-related activities”. With an initial investment in 1994 of $3 million for three years, the agreement was extended in 1997 for an additional three years and $2 million, and in 2000 for $8 million and an additional four years. Funding was cost-shared 70/30 by the federal (through ACOA's IBDP) and the provincial governments.

In 2005 with $7 million from its IBDP, ACOA entered into a new IBDA with its federal and provincial partners to continue the work done in previous years. The commitment to this IBDA, with the increased funding allocation, attests to both the IBDA's positive results and its significance for the future of the region's international business development.

More information can be found on the IBDA home page: http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/English/ibda/Pages/HomePage.aspx

Shared outcome(s):
The shared outcomes for the IBDA partners support ACOA's priorities for trade, and are (1) increased number of new exporters; (2) existing exporters reporting sales to new markets; and (3) existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets.
Since the original IBDA commenced in 1994, the Agency and its partners have administered over 230 projects involving some 4,000 Atlantic Canadian companies. The IBDA assisted 192 companies to begin exporting, 405 exporters to increase their export sales, and 278 exporters to expand into new markets.

Governance structure(s):
ACOA is the lead organization for this initiative and houses the secretariat responsible for administering the agreement. A management committee, comprising a representative from each of the partners, is responsible for the planning and management of the agreement's programs and the evaluation of projects.

Partners:
Federal departments and agencies (70% funding):
ACOA (lead department)
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (non-funding partner)
Industry Canada (non-funding partner)

Provincial governments (30% funding):
Business New Brunswick
Nova Scotia Business Inc.
Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Innovation
Trade and Rural Development
Prince Edward Island Business Development Inc.

Planning highlights: The IBDA will continue to build upon its accomplishments to date, its extensive experience, and lessons learned to further contribute to sustained growth in international business for the Atlantic region. Through its four key elements, the IBDA will (1) expose sectors and companies to export market opportunities and ensure that they are well prepared with the capability, knowledge and information required for developing international business; (2) develop longer-term strategies and implementation plans for international business development and undertake supporting research on companies' needs and best practices; (3) assist sectors and companies by obtaining market intelligence and contacts, identifying international market opportunities and applying this knowledge to trade development activities; and (4) undertake business activities that support sector export development strategies and contribute to contacts, alliances and ultimately sales for both existing and new exporters.

Federal Partner: ACOA (lead department)
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Enterprise Development International Business Development Agreement (IBDA) $8,400,000 $1,400,000 8 new exporters

20 existing exporters reporting sales to new markets

30 companies reporting increased sales to existing markets
Total $8,400,000  $1,400,000  

Expected results: The expected results will be an increase the number of new exporters, an increase in sales for existing exporters in their existing markets, and an increase in sales for existing exporters in new markets. These targets will be achieved by involving Atlantic companies in training and awareness activities (just-in-time, one-on-one and sector-specific training seminars and workshops), planning and research (development of sector export strategies), market information and intelligence (market studies and in-market consultants) and international business development activities (trade shows, incoming and outgoing missions, etc.). To measure success, progress surveys will demonstrate:
(1) Training and Awareness: the number of companies that have an increased knowledge of their target markets, that are reporting that the training contributed to establishing new alliances, partners brokers or distributors, that are committing more time and money to initiate/expand export activities, etc.;
(2) Planning and Research: the extent to which industries are bringing better thought out and longer-term projects, the degree to which results of studies are reflected in program planning and project proposals, etc.;
(3) Market Information and Intelligence: the number of companies that report first time sales to targeted markets, report new alliances, etc.; and
(4) International Business Development Activities: the number of companies reporting increased sales, investment in time and money in targeted markets, new alliances, pursuing leads, developing new market strategies, etc.

Federal partner:
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
 Expected Results for
2010-11
International Commerce IBDA $0 $0 Same as ACOA
Total $0 $0  

Expected results: Same as ACOA

Federal Partner: Industry Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Internal Services IBDA $0 $0 Same as ACOA
Total $0 $0  

Expected results: Same as ACOA.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11
$8,400,000 $1,400,000

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Same as for federal partners.

Contact information:
Michel Têtu
Director General, Trade and Investment
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 6051
Moncton, New Brunswick
E1C 9J8
Tel: 506-851-6496
E-mail: Michel.Tetu@acoa-apeca.gc.ca


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Canada Border Services Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Supplementary information on the CBSA's participation in horizontal initiatives can be found on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's Web site at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hidb-bdih/home-accueil-eng.aspx.


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Canadian Food Inspection Agency

3.1.2 Horizontal initiatives

3.1.2.1 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

2. Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) (2003-04 to 2007-08)

3. Lead department program activity: Animal Health Risks and Production Systems; Zoonotic Risks (CFIA only)

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-04 (enhanced programming)

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $3,601.1M from 2003-04 to 2013-14 ($26.6M ongoing)

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The BSE program protects human and animal health by conducting research and risk assessments regarding BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and minimizing the risk of exposure to infected materials; maintains consumer confidence through assessing the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks; and supports market access for cattle, beef and related products through promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments regarding human exposure to BSE and other TSEs, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) carries out surveillance and research in this area as well. The CFIA verifies that specified risk material (SRM) is being removed from the animal feed chain and the human food chain, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program. AAFC has been involved in supporting, stabilizing and repositioning Canada's beef and cattle industry, including through the provision of compensation payments to stakeholders impacted by the BSE crisis, which started in 2003.

In 2003-04, the CFIA, AAFC and HC received funding over a five-year period (2003-2004 to 2007-2008) for measures to secure the future of the Canadian beef industry and for the same period, the CFIA received funding for the removal of SRM from the food chain and re-entering export markets (refered to as the enhanced BSE initiative). The CFIA received additional funding in 2004-05 over five years to reposition the Canadian beef and cattle industry to operate on a profitable and sustainable basis. Funding was also received to strengthen animal feed restrictions for a two-year period (2004-2005 to 2005-2006). In 2005-06, funding was received over four years for additional measures to address critical pressures facing the ruminant industry. In 2006, sunsetter funding was received for one year to continue the work the Agency was undertaking for the enhanced feed ban and in 2007-08, received ongoing funding to implement the enhanced feed ban restrictions. In 2008-09, the CFIA received funding to extend sunsetting elements of the enhanced BSE initiative for that year while a review of the enhanced BSE initiative was conducted and a comprehensive BSE risk management strategy developed. In 2009-10, the CFIA, PHAC and HC received funding over five years to continue work on the core BSE activities (for example, CFIA -- SRM removal from the human food chain, BSE surveillance and cattle identification; PHAC surveillance and research for human TSEs; HC risk assessment and targeted research).

8. Shared Outcome(s): Contributing to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

9. Governance Structure(s):
The CFIA is the federal lead for the delivery of the BSE Program. In 2008, a summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program was conducted, which noted that the governance of the program should be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding BSE-related activities, both internally and with other partner organizations. The CFIA accepted this recommendation and agreed to develop options for an improved governance model to facilitate horizontal dialogue that is consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives.

10. Planning Highlights:
For 2010-11, the key plans and priorities from a horizontal perspective are to continue to deliver the BSE Program to current standards as well as improve communication and coordination (for example, governance), performance measurement and reporting, and financial tracking.

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency

12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2010–11 16. Expected Results for 2010–11
Zoonotic Risks SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain $91.5M $9.5M Safe food
Zoonotic Risks Import Controls $2.8M $0.3M Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards
Zoonotic Risks BSE Surveillance $159.9M $15.4M Safe animals and food
Zoonotic Risks Cattle Identification $29.2M $2.8M Safe animals and food
Zoonotic Risks Export Certification $53.2M $5.7M Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries
Zoonotic Risks Technical Market Access Support $44.1M $5.0M Confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets
Animal Health Risks and Production Systems Zoonotic Risks Enhanced Feed Ban $241M (2004-05 to 2013-14) plus $26.6M ongoing $26.6M Safe feed, fertilizer, animals and food
Zoonotic Risks Establishment Review $2.3M - -
Zoonotic Risks Oversupply of Aged Cattle $0.3M - -
Zoonotic Risks Meat Inspection Reform $9.2M - -
Total $633.5M plus $26.6M ongoing $65.3M  

16. Expected Results:
SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain
Outcome: Safe food.
Output/Activities: Continue the enforcement and verification of SRM removal by CFIA inspection staff.
Indicator: Compliance rate of industry for removal of SRM.*
Targets and Tracking: TBD*

Import Controls
Outcome: Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.
Output/Activities: Review and update current import policies and conditions for BSE as required in order to reflect changes to international standards and evolving science.
Indicator: TBD*
Targets and Tracking: TBD*

BSE Surveillance
Outcome: Safe animals and food.
Output/Activities: Analyze options to redesign the BSE surveillance program and consult with stakeholders to explore further targeting of surveillance.
Indicator: Temporal trend in exposure to the BSE agent in the cattle population.*
Targets and Tracking: TBD*

Cattle Identification
Outcome: Safe animals and food.
Output/Activities: Continue work on cattle identification enforcement activities, including verification at auctions and federally and provincially inspected abattoirs that cattle are identified with an official ear tag.
Indicator: TBD*
Targets and Tracking: TBD*

Export Certification
Outcome: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries. Output/Activities: Continue the provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries.
Indicator: Independent assessment reviews.*
Targets and Tracking: TBD*

Technical Market Access Support
Outcome: Maintain and improve confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.
Output/Activities: Continue the establishment and maintenance of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence regarding international policies and standards development.
Indicator: Trends in market demand for Canadian bovines and beef products; media tracking for consumer confidence in beef in Canada.*
Targets and Tracking: TBD*

Enhanced Feed Ban
Outcome: Safe feed, fertilizer, animals and food.
Output/Activities: Continue the enforcement of enhanced feed ban restrictions.
Indicator: Trends in compliance with regulations associated with the enhanced feed ban; trends in proportion of feed mills and renderers using prohibited materials/SRM and producing ruminant feeds.*
Targets and Tracking: TBD*

*Note: A review of the CFIA's performance measurement framework for BSE is currently being undertaken, which has included the development of draft key indicators for certain program elements (as indicated above). Targets and tracking methods have not yet been determined. An interdepartmental Performance Measurement Strategy will be finalized.

11. Federal Partner: Health Canada

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2010–11 16. Expected Results for 2010–11

Health Products

Food and Nutrition

Risk Assessment and Targeted Research $62.1M $6.2M Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance
  Compliance and Enforcement+ $1.0M -  
  Product Assessment+ $6.2M -  
  Tracking and Tracing+ $3.1M -  
Total $72.4M $6.2M  

+Funding sunsetted in 2007/08

16. Expected Results: TBD*
Risk Assessment and Targeted Research
Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance
Output/Activities: Conduct consultations with stakeholders, external collaborations/research and training and conferences attendence.

Indicators and Targets: TBD*

*Note: A review of Health Canada's performance measurement framework for BSE is currently being undertaken, which has included the development of draft key indicators for certain program elements (as indicated above). Targets and tracking methods have not yet been determined.

*Note: An interdepartmental Performance Measurement Strategy will be finalized.

11. Federal Partner: Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2010–11 16. Expected Results for 2010–11

Comprehensive detection and characterization of all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) in Canada

Research and development to improve diagnostic and surveillance capabilities for human TSEs

Targeted research to improve scientific understanding of biology of human TSEs

Surveillance and Research for Human TSEs $7.9M $0.8M Risks of human TSEs in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.
Total $7.9M $0.8M  

16. Expected Results:
Surveillance and Research for Human TSEs

Outcome: Risks of human TSEs in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled.
Output/Activities: Continued detailed case-by-case, laboratory-based investigation of all human TSEs across Canada; improved methods and strategies for efficient case investigation; research publications.
Indicator: Alignment of PHAC data from human TSE surveillance with international benchmarks.
Targets and Tracking: TBD

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11
$3,601.1M from 2003-04 to 2013-14
($26.6M ongoing)**
$72.3M

**Note: The total federal funding allocation includes funding for AAFC ($2,887.3M), CFIA ($633.5M plus $26.6M ongoing), Health Canada ($72.4M) and PHAC ($7.9M). A table outlining planned spending for AAFC is not included in the RPP as their resources sunsetted in 2008-09.

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A
18. Contact information:
Colleen Barnes
Executive Director
Domestic Policy Directorate
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
613-773-5901

OR

Helen Hayes
Director
Program Policy Integration Division
Canadian Food Inspection Agency\
613-773-5879

3.1.2.2 National Aquatic Animal Health Program

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)

2. Name of lead department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

3. Lead department program activity: Animal Health Risks and Production Systems (CFIA); Diagnostics and Research on Aquatic Animal Health (DFO)

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $59.0M (2005-06 to 2009-10) plus $10.3M ongoing

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The NAAHP goal is to protect Canada's aquatic animals resources and productivity by minimizing the risk of the harmful effects of diseases and by maintaining the seafood industry's competitiveness in international markets. This is in line with the Government of Canada's priority to protect the natural resources of Canada and economic stability. The Agency's priority in this area is a safe and sustainable animal aquatic resource base.

8. Shared Outcome(s):Sustainable Aquatic Resource Productivity and Internationally Competitive Aquatic Animal Resource Base Industry, which will allow trade to continue and expand.

9. Governance structure(s):The CFIA is the federal lead for delivery of the NAAHP. Respective federal roles and responsibilities are outlined in a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The Resource Management Oversight Committee is the horizontal steering committee responsible for monitoring the financial governance within the CFIA budget. An Executive Steering Committee at the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) level from both organizations, is responsible for the strategic direction, monitoring and analysis of the NAAHP implementation. At the Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FPT) level, the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers (CCFAM) has oversight over the program through a working group with the CFIA. There is also an industry / FPT advisory board that meets annually to guide the development of the program.

10. Planning Highlights: Specific regulations related to reportable diseases and import controls (effective March 2011) will be published in Canada Gazette Part II in the spring of 2010 if consultation does not result in change of plans. Once published diseases are reportable, a surveillance system will be in place and serious disease incursions will be investigated. These regulations are under the Health of Animals Act. Other initiatives include development of disease response plans and MOUs with the provinces on disease response.

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2010–11 16. Expected Results for 2010–11
Animal Health Risks and Production Systems National Aquatic Animal Health Programs $32.1M over 5 years (plus $6.3M ongoing) $6.3M Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries. Protection of the NAAH System. Develop and establish an import system for products meeting Canadian standards.
Total $32.1M $6.3M  

16. Expected Results:
Name of Program: National Aquatic Animal Health Program

Outcome 1: Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries. Output/Activities: Developing and certifying export certificates based on importing country requirements, development of training modules for inspection and certification of aquatic animals, increase training of Animal Health operational staff to deliver the program, analysis and publication of domestic disease status, and negotiate based on OIE standards to open new markets.
Indictor: Time taken to issue aquatic animal certificate.
Target: TBD*

Outcome 2: Protection of the NAAH System Output/Activities: A database system that captures information reported by the industry, provinces and laboratories on reportable and notifiable diseases. Initially the determination of whether the report requires further inspection will be made in the program division. Training will be required for aquatic animal inspection and sample submission.
Indicator: Implementation of the Disease Reporting and Response infrastructure.
Target: 95% are triaged for disease reporting.

Outcome 3 : Develop and establish an import system for products meeting Canadian standards Output/Activities: Adapt the Automated Import Requirement System (AIRS) to accommodate live aquatic species. AIRS is a public internet interface for importers and will require a radical restructuring with creation of new international import codes. Training of Canada Border Services Agency, importers and CFIA delivery staff will be required in order to perform live animal and facility inspections and to develop import health conditions based on country of origin risk assessments.
Indicator: CFIA AIRS system is ready and sufficient staff are trained.
Target: System is 100% ready for implementation and an adequate number of staff are trained to use it.

* Note: The target will be determined once the program is ready for implementation, and will therefore be established for the 2010-11 Performance Report.

11. Federal Partner: Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2010–11 16. Expected Results for 2010–11
Diagnostics and Research on Aquatic Animal Health National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System (NAAHLS) $26.9M over 5 years (plus $4.0M ongoing) $4.0M
  1. Diagnostic tests validated to OIE requirements
  2. Operational Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
  3. Amendment of the Fish Health Protection Regulations (FHPR)
  4. Capacity for diagnostic testing
Total $26.9M over 5 years (plus $4.0M ongoing) $4.0M  

16. Expected Results:

Name of Program: National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System (NAAHLS)
Outcome 1: Diagnostic tests validated to OIE requirements
Output/Activities:  Ongoing development and validation of diagnostic tests required to support NAAHP program activities. Laboratory standards and tracking systems meet international requirements for audit/challenge of export certificates and/or import controls International Standards Organization 17025, the main standard used by testing and calibration laboratories. Priority disease list established collaboratively with the CFIA.
Indicator: Validated test methods incorporated into NAAHLS diagnostic repertoire for the priority disease.
Target: End of Fiscal Year 2010-11

Outcome 2: Operational Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
Output/Activities: Continued development of the LIMS.
Indicator:LIMS is operational.
Target: April 2011

Outcome 3: Fish Health Protection Regulations (FHPR) amended and then ultimately rescinded Output/Activities: Work collaboratively with the CFIA on a transition framework for moving from the FHPR to the authorities under amended Health of Animals Regulations (HAR) when they come into force. Indicator: FHPR is rescinded.
Target: End of Fiscal Year 2010-11

Outcome 4: Ensure adequate capacity for diagnostic testing Output/Activities:  In collaboration with the CFIA, establish a network of third party testing laboratories in support of NAAHP program activities.
Indicator: Network of approved provincial, territorial and private laboratories providing specific diagnostic services
Target: End of Fiscal Year 2010-11 

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11
$59.0M ($10.3M ongoing) $10.3M

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Controlling aquatic animal diseases

18. Contact information:

CFIA - Dr. Carolyn Inch (613) 221-4757
DFO Stephen Stephen (613) 990-0292

Top of Page

Canadian Heritage

Table 4: Horizontal Initiatives

  • 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games
  • Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future

Name of Horizontal Initiative: 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games--Delivering on our Commitments

Name of lead department(s): Department of Canadian Heritage

Lead department program activity: Sport

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003–2004

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $582.865M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): To monitor and report on the Government of Canada's contribution to the 2010 Winter Games, which engage Canadians from across the country, reflect Canadian values and priorities in their planning, delivery, and international profile, and promote opportunities to advance public policy goals and to make strategic investments that support long-term tangible economic benefits and sport, social, cultural and environmental legacies for all Canadians (www.pch.gc.ca).

The Government of Canada is a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games. The 2010 Federal Secretariat within the Department of Canadian Heritage works horizontally to support and promote federal engagement in the planning and delivery of the Games, which includes providing high-quality essential federal services as well as capital and legacy funding. Fifteen federal Departments are providing services deemed essential for conducting successful Games. Therefore these departments, whether receiving incremental funding for this purpose or supporting the services from their A-base, are accountable for delivering essential federal services under the Multi-Party Agreement signed in 2002. The 2010 Federal Secretariat works with its partners and stakeholders to leverage the Games as an opportunity to advance public policy objectives, establish lasting legacies, and derive maximum benefit for all Canadians (www.canada2010.gc.ca).

Canadian Heritage is the lead department for federal participation in support of the 2010 Winter Games with the exception of Games Security and Public Safety. In October 2007 the Prime Minister appointed Ward Elcock as the Coordinator for the 2010 Olympic and G8 Security and established an office within the Privy Council Office.  As a result of this appointment, the RCMP became the lead coordinating Department to develop a Horizontal RMAF for Games Security and Public Safety collectively with Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), Department of National Defence (DND), Industry Canada (IC), Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), Public Safety Canada (PS), Transport Canada (TC), Health Canada (HC), Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), Canada Post and Privy Council Office (PCO).

Shared outcome(s): There are three levels of shared outcomes as identified below:

  • Final Outcomes
    • Sport, economic, social and cultural legacies are established for the benefit of all Canadians;
    • Canadian excellence and values are promoted domestically and internationally; and
    • Canada is recognized as a capable and inclusive host.
  • Intermediate Outcomes
    • Pan-Canadian engagement in sport, economic, social and cultural activities related to the 2010 Winter Games;
    • Enhance Canada's domestic and international profile; and
    • Canadians and international participants experience safe and high-quality games.
  • Immediate Outcomes
    • Leverage 2010 Winter Games to advance existing federal priorities;
    • Positive exposure and heightened recognition of the Government of Canada as a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games; and
    • Successful delivery of mandated essential federal services.

Governance structure(s):

2010 Federal Games Secretariat
Representative Working Group (RWG)

The 2010 Federal Secretariat, under the leadership of the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage, supports the Framework for Federal Coordination (FFC). The FCC is the primary mechanism for promoting horizontal management of the Winter Games. This governance structure consists of three levels:

  • A Deputy Ministers and Heads of Agency Coordination Committee that facilitates interdepartmental and intergovernmental consultation and coordination of Games-related issues and commitments;
  • An Assistant Deputy Minister-level Representative Working Group (RWG) that reports on the progress of essential federal service delivery; and,
  • Working-level Issue Clusters that support intergovernmental coordination and information sharing.
In addition, an Essential Federal Services Committee (EFS Committee) has been established under the authority of the RWG to support, promote, coordinate and monitor seamless planning of essential federal services.

Planning Highlights:

Fiscal year 2010–2011 is the sunset period of this Horizontal Initiative.  Therefore, all activities will be related to the reporting requirement since Departments' specific expected results were achieved leading up to and during the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

The Government of Canada will fulfill its evaluation and reporting requirements to Canadians highlighting the sport, economic, social and cultural benefits and legacies.


($ millions)
Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
A. Canadian Heritage Canadians participate and excel in sport 2010 Federal Secretariat $563.24M $2.9M Positive exposure and heightened recognition of the Government of Canada as a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games.
B. Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) The health and safety of federal public service employees working on location during the Winter Games as well as the health protection of the public during the Winter Games are ensured.   $2.7 M N/A No expected results are planned for 2010-2011.
C. Health Canada (HC)

The health and safety of federal public service employees working on location during the Winter Games are ensured.

The program also provides health contingency planning for Internationally Protected Persons and their family members (e.g., visiting dignitaries, members of the Royal family) and others when they are visiting Canada.

Ensure that all conveyances are meeting recommended public health standards or guidelines

Workplace Health

Sustainable Environmental Health

$2.6M
(Health Safety)

N/A No expected results are planned for 2010-2011.

Health Canada evaluates and monitors the safety, quality and efficacy of drugs (human and animal), biologics, medical devices, and natural health products.

During the 2010 Games this activity will prevent unapproved health products from entering Canada.

Health products

$0.325M
(Entry of Goods and Individuals into Canada)

 

   
D. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning. Foreign workers and immigrants

N/A

The Temporary Foreign Workers Program (TFWP) has not received funding through this mechanism to support its Olympic Process
N/A No expected results are planned for 2010-2011.
E. Environment Canada (EC) Weather and environmental predictions and services reduce risks and contribute to the well-being of Canadians. Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision-making. $9.3M $0.3M  

Canada's natural capital is restored, conserved and enhanced.

Environmental Assessment is integral part of program and policy decision-making.

Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes.

Efficient and effective environmental assessments
$4.1M $0.1M

Canadians have greater awareness and understanding of sustainability initiatives associated with the 2010 Games.

Scientific and technical expertise and input to the environmental assessment process including follow-up activities as required.

F. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Healthy and productive aquatic eco-systems. Habitat Management

$0.6 M

$0.1M Environmental effects of regulatory decisions are considered in a timely manner before regulatory decisions are made under the Fisheries Act.
Total $582.865M Total $3.4M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Karen Mackarous (613) 949-7816



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future

Name of lead department(s): Canadian Heritage

Lead department program activity: Official Languages

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1,110.10M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future (Roadmap) is a Government of Canada policy statement that includes a number of initiatives to strengthen and promote linguistic duality. Thirteen federal institutions have received funds for sectoral programs and activities related to official languages. The Roadmap contributes to the attainment of a strategic outcome for Canadian Heritage (Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity) and to the Government of Canada's outcome (A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion).

Two of key components of the Roadmap are the implementation of an accountability framework and a coordinated government-wide approach to official languages. The Roadmap is a component of the Official Languages Program (OLP), as defined and approved by the Committee of Deputy Ministers on Official Languages in December 2004.

Web site: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/slo-ols/strat-eng.cfm.

Shared outcome(s):

Three levels of outcomes have been established.

Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in the official language of choice.

Intermediate outcomes:

  • Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English‑speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in their official language of choice.
  • Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
  • Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.

Immediate outcomes:

  • Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
  • Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
  • Improved social and economic development of official‑language minority communities (OLMC).
  • Strengthened capacity of language industries.
  • Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
  • Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
  • Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
  • Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.

Governance structure(s):

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for the implementation of the Roadmap. The Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) (Canadian Heritage) supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. With respect to roles and responsibilities, the OLS is responsible for developing and coordinating the results of the Roadmap. The OLS ensures that all information (financial and non-financial) needed is gathered and that the content of all logic models of the Roadmap's structure is taken into consideration. The OLS is also responsible for the complete implementation and the accountability framework for the Roadmap. This role was assigned to the OLS by the partners through the development of the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework for the Roadmap, which outlines the activities and results structure, the governance structure, as well as the roles and responsibilities of departments and different interdepartmental committees, while also identifying relevant operational issues concerning its horizontal implementation. The OLS also supports the governance of the OLP through various mechanisms and committees.

A governance structure has been established. To support the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and to ensure that the Roadmap provides results for Canadians, the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages (CADMOL) was created. This committee acts on behalf of all federal departments, agencies and organizations, and partners in the Roadmap in a variety of ways: it supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and all ministers who have responsibilities under the Official Languages Act (OLA); it ensures leadership for managing the OLP, including the Roadmap, by making decisions and overseeing the coordination of partners' actions; it guides the implementation of the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (HRMAF) and it oversees the evaluation of the Roadmap. During CADMOL meetings, departments with specific responsibilities under the OLA (for instance, Canadian Heritage, Justice Canada, and the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer) report on achievements that are specific to their mandates and describe the challenges and issues related to these responsibilities.

Three interdepartmental committees support CADMOL by providing recommendations. Firstly, the Interdepartmental Policy Committee (IPC) provides an information-sharing forum between partners in order to present a joint approach to strategic issues regarding the OLP. The Interdepartmental Management Committee for the Official Languages Program (IMCOLP) seeks to ensure that interdepartmental coordination of the OLP is formalized and structured, most notably by assessing the implementation of the OLP and strengthening the accountability process. The Coordinating Committee on Official Languages Research (CCOLR) ensures that official-languages research is coordinated. The committees may create working groups as needed to complete specific projects. For example, the Working Group on the HRMAF Revision (Working Group) was created in the summer of 2008.

Planning Highlights:

For the year 2010–2011, the implementation of the Roadmap continues in line with the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework released in September 2009. The coordination of the implementation is facilitated by the formal governance structure currently in place. The Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages and its support committees, as well as various interdepartmental groups ensure that the different strategies allow for monitoring, measuring and evaluation of the results expected for 2010–2011. Monitoring the implementation of risk mitigation strategies and the performance measurement strategy is scheduled for 2010–2011. To promote information sharing, dialogue events are also planned with key stakeholders.


($ millions)
Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in their language of choice.
Intermediate outcome 1: Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in their language of choice.
Immediate outcome 1.1: Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
Justice Canada Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs

Contraventions Act Fund
Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Improved capacity to carry on judicial activities and to deliver extrajudicial services related to federal contraventions in both official languages.
$47.46M $9.49M

Signed agreement with Newfoundland & Labrador with a view to offering extra-judicial services and to undertake judicial activities in both official languages.

Negotiations commenced with Saskatchewan and Prince Edward Island in order to enter into an agreement aimed at offering extra-judicial services and to undertake judicial activities in both official languages.
Internal Services Contraventions Act Fund $1.92M $0.38M n/a
Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs

Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training)
Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Increased capacity of partners and the Department to implement solutions relating to access to justice in both official languages.
$38.02M $9.11M

Implementation of pan-Canadian study on justice training needs in both official languages.

Continued judicial awareness and information activities to promote increased access to justice services in both official languages.
Internal Services

Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training)

$1.89M $0.43M

n/a

Immediate Outcome 1.2: Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
Health Canada

Canadian Health System

Official language minority community development

Training, Networks and Access to Health Services

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Increased number of health professionals to meet health service needs of OLMCs in both official languages.

2) Increased coordination and integration of health services for OLMCs within institutions and communities.

3) Increased partnerships, interaction of networks in provincial, territorial health systems.

4) Increased awareness among stakeholders that networks are a focal point for addressing health concerns of OLMCs.

5) Increased dissemination and uptake of knowledge best practices to address health concerns of OLMCs.

$174.30M $37.8M

In 2010–2011, Health Canada will enter into new funding agreements with two community-based stakeholders (primary funding recipients) under two components of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program. Anticipated outcomes are as follows:

  • Société Santé en français: Three to four new funding agreements under the Official Languages Health Projects component will be initiated in 2010–2011 to fund projects aiming to improve the health of French-speaking language minority communities, for a value of $5.5M.
  • Consortium national de formation en santé: A new funding agreement for the Cultural and French-language training subcomponent of the Support for Training and Retention of Health Professionals component will be initiated in 2010–2011 for a value of $1M.

In addition, 19 multi-year funding agreements with community-based stakeholders were initiated in 2009–2010 and will all conclude in March 2013, comprising a total investment of $30.2M in 2010–2011. These funds are for:

  • Health Networking: $5.0M;
  • Training and Retention of Health Professionals: $22.2M;
  • Official Languages Health Projects for English-speaking minority communities:  $3.0M.

In 2010–2011, Health Canada will undertake consultations with official-language minority communities to assess Health Canada's progress in implementing the Official Languages Health Contribution Program and to ascertain community perspectives regarding program renewal in April 2013. Anticipated outcomes are as follows:

  • Official-language minority communities are satisfied with Health Canada's progress in administering the Official Languages Health Contribution Program.

Community perspectives are summarized.

Immediate Outcome 1.3: Improved social and economic development of official language minority communities (OLMCs).
Canadian Heritage

Official Languages

Minority-Language Education – Component: Support to Minority Language Education.

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Increased access of OLMCs to quality education in their language in their milieu

$280.0M $56.0M

Maintain or increase the offers of Provinces and Territories educational programs and activities that promote access to a minority language education.

Official Languages

Minority-Language Education –
Component: Official-language Monitors

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Improved access of OLMCs to a quality education in their language and milieu.

$5.2M $1.04M

Maintain the amount of participants in the Odyssée program, which allows students to work as language assistants in minority-language classrooms.

Official Languages

Minority-Language Education –
Component: Summer Language Bursaries

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Improved access of OLMCs to a first-rate education in their language in their environment.
$1.7M $0.3444M

Support the Destination Clic program to maintain its yearly enrolment. This program helps young francophones outside Québec enrich their first language while discovering new communities in Canada.

Official Languages

Community vitality –
Component: Youth Initiatives

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language.

2) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially for youth).

$10.5M N/A

N/A

Official Languages

Community vitality –Component:  Support to Official-language Minority Communities
Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Improved capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and improved access to a range of programs and services offered in their language.
$22.5M $4.5M

Create, improve and deliver activities, and services intended for OLMC that promote a sense of belonging.

Official Languages

Community vitality –Component: Intergovernmental Cooperation
Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Increased access of OLMCs to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.

$22.5M $4.5M

Improvement of signed Federal/Provincial/Territorial agreements on services and on approved special projects.

Official Languages

Community vitality –Component: Cultural Development Funds

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Increased access to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.

2) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially in culture).

$14.0M $3.5M

Continue to support cultural projects that promote a sense of belonging for OLMC.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Social Development

Strengthening NGOs' means for Early Childhood Development
Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

The capacity of NGOs in early childhood in minority environment will be increased.
$4.0M $0.8M

Ongoing implementation of the National Framework for Collaboration on Early Childhood Development in Minority Francophone Communities in Canada.

The National Framework for Collaboration is a roadmap to guide the initiatives of national, provincial, territorial and community partners.  To ensure implementation of the Framework, the partners under the Table nationale en développement de la petite enfance have agreed to harmonize their activities.

The National Framework will enable groups interested in early childhood development, stakeholders, parents and, ultimately, children to benefit from a continuum of integrated services.

Skills and Employment

Family Literacy Initiative

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Community stakeholders can act in the area of family literacy, and tools and support are available and used by those members of OLMCs that need them.

$7.5M $1.8M

The launch of three research projects on new groups, such as immigrant women, parents of francophone military families and Newfoundland and Labrador's Francophones, to identify specific literacy needs and tools required for these groups.

The development, testing and adaptation of six new family literacy models designed to address the needs of new groups.

The development of two promotional strategies to increase the awareness of literacy partner organizations of new family literacy models for new groups.

Pursue the implementation of a results-based performance measurement framework.

Social Development

Child Care Pilot Project

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

New knowledge on child care services for minority Francophone communities.

$13.5M $2.7M

A research report will be prepared on the short-term impact of the French-language preschool program on the development and readiness to learn of children. The report's results will add to the collective knowledge of what works with respect to early childhood development services.

The project will assess children and survey parents to measure the impact of the French-language preschool program on the development of the children, one year after the end of the preschool program.

A portion of the 2010–2011 money could be spent on other projects to better understand issues relating to early childhood development, literacy and/or immigration

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Integration

Recruitment and integration of immigrants

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

French-speaking immigrants obtain reinforced services of establishment in OLMCs.

$20.0M $4.5M

For 2010–2011, CIC will maintain its existing activities in order to foster immigration to Francophone minority communities (FMCs). It will also continue working towards achieving the priorities of the Strategic Plan to Foster Immigration to Francophone Minority Communities.

More specifically, CIC will work towards:

  • Increasing coordination, cooperation and research activities among main partners
  • Intensifying the promotion and recruitment activities of French-speaking people
  • Supporting targeted recruitment strategies to facilitate the twinning of potential immigrants and labour market needs
  • Strengthening existing networks, forming new networks and strengthening settlement services in FMCs
Canadian Heritage

Official Languages

Broadcasting Policy and Programs

CTRC Study

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) CRTC report is issued on the availability and quality of broadcasting services to English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada.

2) The findings of the report will inform policy and decision-making on the availability and quality of broadcasting services in English and French linguistic communities in Canada.

Non- monetary N/A

N/A

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Community Development

Support to francophone immigration in New Brunswick

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Enhanced capacity to support francophone immigration in New Brunswick.

$10.0 M $3.52M

Applicant will implement the structure necessary to the project overall.

Industry Canada-FedNor

Community, Economic and Regional Development (of Ontario)

Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$4.45 M $1.95M

This funding will support an estimated 52 projects that contribute to innovation, diversification and partnerships as well as enhanced support to small businesses in OLMCs

Industry Canada - Regional Operations Sector

Community, Economic and Regional Development

Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.

$1.6M $0.4M

This funding will support research and consultation to enhance greater capacity of OLMCs.

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)

Northern Economy

Economic Development  Initiative

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$0.4M $0.1M

Funding is expected to be allocated via a proposal-driven process in 2010-2011.

This funding is expected to support the social and economic development of official-language minority communities in the territories.

Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario)

 

Economic Development  Initiative

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$4.45M $1.95M

This funding will support an estimate of 50 projects to address specific economic challenges of OLMCs in Southern Ontario by promoting the development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of economic activities, partnerships, and increased support of small- and medium-sized businesses.

Canada Economic Development (CED) for Quebec regions

Community Development

Economic Development  Initiative

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$10.2M $3.6M

Innovation:

  • 2 projects—$180k (5%)

Support to Small and Medium Enterprises:

  • 10 projects—$540k (15%)

Partnerships:

  • 6 projects—$900k (25%)

Diversification:

  • 12 projects—$1.98M (55%)
Western Economic Diversification Canada

Research and Analysis

Community Economic Planning, Development and Adjustment

Business Development and Entrepreneurship


Innovation

Economic Development  Initiative

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$3.2M $0.75M

Enhanced capacity of OLMCs as reflected by:

  • number of partnerships created or maintained; and
  • project funding leveraged.

Development of francophone enterprises as reflected by:

  • number of enterprises created, maintained or expanded; and
  • project funding leveraged.

Development of francophone communities as reflected by:

  • number of projects, initiatives, or studies that contribute to the diversification or expansion of the economic base of the OLMCs; and
  •  project funding leveraged.
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Community Development

Economic Development  Initiative

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$6.2M $2.882M

Projects implementation with the official-language minority community.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Skills and Employment

Enabling Fund for Official-Language Minority Communities

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Contribute to synergies among Government of Canada programming relevant to OLMCs; Contribution recipients are informed and contribute to knowledge building and program/policy issues; Knowledge shared among federal partners, contribution recipients and OLMCs.

2) Program results are available to inform management and program policy issues.

3) OLMCs' access to Government of Canada programs and services.

4) Collaborative arrangements.

$69.0M $13.8M

The governance structure of the National Committees for Economic Development and Employability will be reinforced to strengthen the commitment of community and federal partners.

An interdepartmental research initiative on community economic and human resource development will be implemented to increase knowledge and share best practices.

The program will implement new reporting requirements with recipient organizations to focus on the achievement of tangible outcomes for communities.

The program will implement contribution agreements with 14 official-language minority organizations responsible to enhance community economic and human resource development. The contribution agreements will begin on April 1, 2010.

Intermediate Result 2: Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
Immediate Result 2.1: Strengthened capacity of language industries.
Public Works and Governmental Services Canada

Linguistic Management and Services

University Scholarships Program in Translation

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Scholarships help encourage students to pursue post-secondary studies in translation, interpretation and terminology.

$8.0M $1.95M

Award scholarships to students.

Linguistic Management and Services

Language Industry Initiative

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Funded projects help enhance the capacity, diversity and effectiveness of the language sector.

$10.0M $3.435M

Offer compensated internships to students.

Grant contributions to businesses to supervise trainees.

National Research Council of Canada

Interactive Language Technologies

Languages Technologies Research Centre

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Collaboration with key partners in the implementation of an R&D strategy responsive to industry needs.

2) Innovative tool prototypes for the support of translation, and the creation and management of multilingual and multicultural content.

Transfer of knowledge and technology.

$10.0M $1.9M

Result 1 - Implementation of a functional R & D strategy to meet the needs of the industry:

  • 3 collaborative agreements and (or) protocols for agreements
  •  2 innovative tools to aid in translation and (or) management of multilingual and multicultural content developed or in the process of development
  • 2 ILT seminars / LTRC / AILIA and 8 presentations at the national level.

 

Result 2 – 60 citations by peers in the scientific community

  • 1 award of excellence, internal and (or) external awards received by staff of the ITL Group
  • 1 invitation for Canadian and foreign researchers
  • 2 students at post-doctoral, doctoral and (or) master's degree received / formed by the ITL Group

Number of tasks on the editorial boards of journals, number of leadership roles in program committees of international conferences, number of tasks of proofreading articles for journals and scientific conferences.

  • 2 writing scientific journals
  • 1 task management of the  committee or sub committee of international program conferences
  • 20 tasks for editing journals and scientific conferences

Number of scientific articles, patents, and licensing of research

  • 10 scientific papers
  • 1 Patent Applications
  • 2 Licensing of Research

Result 3 - Number and quality of knowledge transfer and technology

  • 3 collaborative arrangements of R-D: 3 collaborative projects for a total value of $ 600,000
  • 1 business license for a total value of $ 30,000
  • 2 participations in exchange activities with partners and businesses (eg. LTRC, AILIA, trade shows, etc.):
  • 3 pilot projects with institutional and industrial partners
Immediate Result 2.2: Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
Public Works and Governmental Services Canada

Linguistic Management and Services

Canada Language Portal

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Canadians have better access to quality language resources in both official languages.

$16.0M $3.44M

Develop new articles for the Magazine section of the Portal.

Add new writing tools to the Collection section of the Portal.

Conclude agreements with partners to develop the Magazine section of the Portal.

Obtain authorizations given by our partners to establish links to online language resources.

Canada School of Public Service

Official Languages Learning

Language retention services

Development of new technologies, methodologies and products

Expanding Universities'  Access to Language Learning

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Increased access to language training products to Canadians through new partnerships with Canadian universities.

$2.5M $0.93M

Language learning tools meet university learners' needs.

Access and support to language learning products is provided to learners in the selected universities

Canadian Heritage

Official Languages

Second Language Learning– Component: Support to Second-Language and Minority-Language Education.

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Increased access of OLMCs to quality education in their language in their milieu.
$190.0M $38.0M

Maintain or increase the offers of Provinces and Territories programs and activities that promote learning of French and English as a second official language. Maintain or increase the proportion of Canadians who learn French and English as a second official language.

Official Languages

Second Language Learning-- Component: Summer Language Bursaries

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Improved access of OLMCs to a first-rate education in their language in their environment.

$38.3M $7.66M

Ensure scholarship-holders take advantage of the Explore program, which offers a cultural exchange that helps learners perfect their comprehension of their second official language competencies.

Official Languages

Minority-Language Education–Component: Official-language Monitors

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

2) Improved access of OLMCs to a quality education in their language and milieu.

$14.8M $2.96M

Ensure the number of participants in the Odyssée program is maintained. This program allows students to work as language assistants in second-language classrooms across the country.

Official Languages

Youth Initiatives – Promotion of linguistic duality

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap: More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language

$2.0M N/A N/A
Immediate Result 2.3: Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
Cultural Industries Cultural Industries

National Translation Program for Book Publishing

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.

$5.0M $1.25M

Canadian-owned publishers that benefit from the program select and translate Canadian-authored books in both official languages.

Canadian publishers produce more translations of books by Canadian authors in both official languages.
Cultural Industries

Musical Showcase Program for Artists from Official-language Communities

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.

$4.5M $1.0M

Music showcases are organized and presented.

Artists from OLMCs perform at these Showcases.

Artists from OLMCs are exposed to a larger audience.

OLMCs have access to more music showcases in their language.

Intermediate Result 3: Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.
Immediate Result 3.1: Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
Justice Canada

Legal Services to Government

Accountability and Coordination Framework

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Support to ministers with statutory or sectoral responsibilities for official languages and to work with them.

$2.18M $0.44M

Continue training of Departmental employees to increase awareness of language rights.

Production of two framework opinions on key provisions of the Official Languages Act to better equip legal counsel within legal service units.

Internal Services

Accountability and Coordination Framework

$0.15M $0.03M

n/a

Canadian Heritage (Official Languages Secretariat)

Official Languages

Accountability and Coordination Framework

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) The Government of Canada has official languages strategies.

2) The partners are supported in the implementation of their official languages initiatives.

3) The quality of information on results (financial and non-financial) provided by the partners is improved.

4) The results of the research on official languages are communicated to the partners.

5) The Minister of Official Languages is advised on official languages files.

$13.5M $2.68M

Continuous support to the review of policy instruments on human resources management to ensure the instruments on official languages are simplified, modernized and include general principles.

Support to the development and review of policy instruments from other policy centres on all issues pertaining to official languages.

Policy interpretations on horizontal issues.

Monitoring the status of official languages in institutions subject to the Official Languages Act, through risk based annual reviews on official languages.

An assessment of the official languages performance of institutions as part of the Management Accountability Framework (MAF).

An annual report on official languages submitted to Parliament that presents a strategic overview of the Official Languages Program, and is integrated into the Report on the Human Resources Management of the Public Service of Canada.

Preparing for the compliance review of the Regulation based on the next decennial census data (the data will likely be available by December 2012).

Immediate Result 3.2: Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.

Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer 1

Human resources management - Establishing Directions

Centre of excellence

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Linguistic duality is reinforced in the federal public service.

$17.0M $3.4M

Continue training of DOJ employees to increase awareness of language rights.

Production of two framework opinions on key provisions of the Official Languages Act to better equip legal counsel within legal service units.

Human resources management– Enabling Infrastructure

 

   

Horizontal support to institutions in particular through the advisory committees on official languages, the Network of official languages champions, the annual conference of official languages champions and the annual forum on best practices.

Maintenance of online tools available to institutions (eg. the Official Languages Management Dashboard and The ABCs of linguistic profiles at your fingertips).

Total $1,110.1M $234.92M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Firmin Andzama (819) 934-9197

1 In February 2009, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer has been created. It aggregates the Canada Public Service Agency and some parts of Treasury Board Secretariat related to compensation and human resources.


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Correctional Service Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


CSC participates in but does not lead any horizontal initiatives.


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Department of Finance Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of horizontal initiative: Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime, formerly the National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering (NICML)

Name of lead department: Department of Finance Canada

Lead department program activity: Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework

Start date of the horizontal initiative: June 2000

End date of the horizontal initiative: 2010–11

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $533,786 (thousands)

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement): The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering (NICML) was formally established in 2000 as part of the government's ongoing effort to combat money laundering in Canada. Legislation adopted that year, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act (PCMLA), created a mandatory reporting system for suspicious financial transactions, large cross-border currency transfers, and certain prescribed transactions. The legislation also established the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) to collect and analyze these financial transaction reports and to disclose pertinent information to law enforcement and intelligence agencies. In December 2001, the PCMLA was amended to include measures to fight terrorist financing activities and renamed the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (PCMLTFA).

The NICML was expanded and is now known as Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime. In December 2006, Bill C-25 amended the PCMLTFA to ensure Canada's legislation remains consistent with international anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing standards as set out by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and is responsive to areas of domestic risk. Amendments include enhanced client identification requirements, the creation of a registration regime for money services businesses, and the establishment of an administrative and monetary penalties regime to deal with lesser infractions of the Act.

Shared outcomes: To detect and deter money laundering and the financing of terrorist activities and to facilitate the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences.

Governance structure: Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime is a horizontal initiative comprised of both funded and non-funded partners. The funded partners include the Department of Finance Canada, the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, FINTRAC, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canada Revenue Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; non-funded partners include Public Safety Canada, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada, and Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. An interdepartmental ADM-level group and working group, consisting of all partners and led by the Department of Finance Canada, has been established to direct and coordinate the government's efforts to combat money laundering and terrorist financing activities. In addition, the Department of Finance Canada also chairs a Public/Private Sector Advisory Committee. This is a broad-based advisory committee that includes both public and private sector representatives to provide general guidance for Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist

Planning highlights: The priorities for Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime partners will continue to focus on the following key objectives: detecting, deterring and preventing money laundering and terrorist financing and facilitating the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences. Each partner plays a key role in the Regime and a coordinated effort is a priority. Regime partners will also provide input for the 10-Year Treasury Board Evaluation of the Regime, which will take place in 2010.


Federal partner: Department of Finance Canada
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Federal
Partner's Programs
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
Financial Sector Policy Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $3,300 $300

Effective oversight of Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime (the Regime).

Complete the 10-year Treasury Board-mandated evaluation of the Regime to assess effectiveness and access to continued funding.

Monitor the financial sector for money laundering and terrorist financing risks and other emerging illicit financing risks.

Participate in international forums related to combatting money laundering and terrorist financing—in particular, the G7 Financial Experts meetings, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force, and the Asia Pacific Group on Money Laundering­—and contribute and respond to G20 work on illicit financing.

Implement Budget 2009 measure related to counter- measures to tackle illicit financing.
Total $3,300 $300  

 


Federal partner: Department of Justice Canada
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Federal
Partner's Programs
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $7,100 $100 The Criminal Division of the Department of Justice Canada plays a significant role in the Regime. For 2010–11, it is anticipated that the Criminal Division will use the resources it receives to carry out work related to the FATF, including attending FATF-related international meetings. Resources will also be allocated to ensure the Criminal Division's continued involvement in policy development relating to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, the Human Rights Law Section will receive money to deal with any ancillary constitutional issue raised during the prosecutions. 
Total $7,100 $100  

 


Federal partner: Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Federal
Partner's Programs
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
Addressing criminal issues to contribute to a safer world Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $11,500 $2,300

PPSC plays a significant role in the Regime. For 2010–11, it is anticipated that information provided to law enforcement by FINTRAC will result in law enforcement's need of more prosecutorial legal advice. It is also anticipated that this information will result in additional charges being laid for money laundering and terrorist financing offences and thus result in an increased workload for prosecutors.

PPSC has responsibilities related to the PCMLTFA as well. The work planned includes applications for production orders and prosecutions for PCMLTFA-related offences.

In addition, resources will be used for the training of law enforcement personnel and prosecutors and for the development and coordination of policy as it relates to money laundering and terrorist financing.

Finally, PPSC resources will be used to carry out work related to the FATF, as required.
Total $11,500 $2,300  

 


Federal partner: The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Federal
Partner's Programs
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
Collection, analysis, and dissemination of financial information Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $306,585 $37,500

FINTRAC's financial intelligence and case disclosures on money laundering will be widely disseminated to and used by law enforcement and intelligence agencies.

Enhanced compliance in high-risk reporting entity sectors.
Total $306,585 $37,500  

 


Federal partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Federal
Partner's Programs
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
Money Laundering Units (AML) Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $62,770 $6,872

Enhance national and international opportunities for the detection and investigation of money laundering activities, including leading national joint cash-smuggling interdiction operations.

Develop FINTRAC disclosures, as well as other intelligence, to a point where resources from Integrated Proceeds of Crime Units or from elsewhere in the RCMP could be redirected toward investigations in an effort to increase seizures.

Review current distribution of resources in the Anti-Money Laundering Program to determine effectiveness, with a view to maximizing available resources.
Anti-Terrorist Financing Units Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $28,095 $5,158

Through the gathering and analysis of financial intelligence, the Anti-Terrorist Financing Team will focus on converting that intelligence into proactive investigations, thus enhancing its ability to detect and deter terrorist financing activities.

The Anti-Terrorist Financing Team will continue to work closely with domestic partners to further terrorist financing criminal investigations and will participate and contribute to international forums such as the FATF and international law-enforcement working groups on terrorist financing.
Total $90,865 $12,030  

 


Federal partner: Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Federal
Partner's Programs
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
Special Enforcement Program (SEP) Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $23,768 $2,200

CRA is focussing on the following four pillars:

  • Participate in committees and initiatives to manage and enhance the AML/ATF Regime;
  • Enhance operational relationships with FINTRAC and other partners in the Regime;
  • Conduct research and analysis; and
  • Contribute to the work of international organizations to enhance cooperation between tax administrations and anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing authorities.

In 2010–11, SEP will continue to thoroughly review all disclosures received from FINTRAC and select for audit those with potential. The projected number of audits remains at 90, with a projected federal tax recovery of $7,000,000. However, the complexity of the files resulting from FINTRAC referrals is increasing, and this may lead to a reduction in the number of audits SEP is able to complete in 2011–12.

Results of these audits will be gathered for intelligence purposes to determine if trends can be established.
Charities Directorate Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $16,068 $3,234 CRA, under the Income Tax Act (ITA), has responsibility for administering the registration system for charities. This recognizes that the existence of a strong regulatory deterrence against terrorist abuse of charities contributes to suppressing the financing of terrorism in Canada and to protecting and preserving the social cohesion and well-being of Canadians. CRA's regulatory oversight of charities has been strengthened by the enactment of complementary measures under the Charities Registration (Security Information) Act and the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act and by changes to the Income Tax Act that authorize broader information sharing between AML/ATF agencies. Under these authorities, intelligence provided to CRA assists in its mandate to protect the integrity of the registration system for charities and information disclosed by CRA can be used for investigative purposes. In 2010–11, CRA will consolidate its capacity to identify and respond to cases involving possible links to terrorism through continuing IT development, expanding formal information-sharing arrangements with Regime partners, refining performance measurement and risk management tools, and staffing and training its full complement of program full-time equivalents (FTEs).
Total $39,836 $5,434  

 


Federal partner: Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
($ thousands)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Federal
Partner's Programs
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
Risk Assessment AML/ATF Regime   $2,004 The Risk Assessment Program involves identifying high-risk people and goods as early as possible before their arrival at Canada's border by using advance passenger and cargo information from carriers, importers, exporters, and other partners. Once identified, high-risk people or goods are flagged for closer examination and possible enforcement action at a Canadian port of entry.
Enforcement AML/ATF Regime   $3,487 Border services officers detain, seize or forfeit, and impose penalties on, goods and currency that are non-compliant with the Customs Act or other Canadian legislation and regulations, such as the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act. They are also responsible for administrating and enforcing the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.
Conventional Border AML/ATF Regime   $407 Development and administration of border-related programs and associated policies, regulations, and procedures.
Recourse AML/ATF Regime   $338 Redress process available to people, importers, and carriers for CBSA enforcement-related actions.
Internal Services AML/ATF Regime   $1,290 Internal Services provide program support in areas such as governance and management support (e.g. communications, legal services), resources management services (e.g. human resources and financial management, IT), and asset management services (e.g. real property, acquisitions).
Total $74,600 $7,526*  
* Please note that this figure includes 20 per cent for employee benefits plan (EBP) but not the 13 per cent Public Works and Government Services accommodation costs.

 


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11
$533,786 $65,190

† Certain organizations that are partners in the AML/ATF Regime are exempt from reporting; therefore, the figures presented in the table may not sum to the total amount allocated.


Results to be achieved by non-federal partners: Not applicable

Contact information:

Rachel Grasham
Chief, Financial Crimes Section
Phone: 613-943-2883

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Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Table 4: Horizontal Initiative - Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

1) Name of Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

2) Name of lead department(s): Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

3) Lead department program activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

4) Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 2, 2005; operationalized September 18, 2006

5) End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

6) Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): 1,025.2*

7) Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Funded from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, the GPSF fills a funding gap by providing dedicated resources for activities that are necessary for a timely response with respect to countries in or at risk of crisis, but that are not properly the responsibility of the Department of National Defence and are outside Canada's traditional official development assistance program. Examples of these activities are supporting peace operations and peace processes, supporting justice and security system reform, enhancing transitional justice and reconciliation, and improving the peace enforcement and peace operations capacities of military and police in Africa and the Americas. Major recipients of funding are Afghanistan, Sudan and Haiti.

The GPSF is both a responsive and directive program, established to provide timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges. DFAIT works closely with a range of government departments including the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Department of National Defence (DND), Correctional Service of Canada (CSC), Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and Justice Canada. Among other assistance, these partnerships provide critical expertise in the area of justice and security system reform to the civilian components of UN peace operations. In 2008-2009, the GPSF entered into arrangements with several major implementing partners from the federal government. Of particular note was support to security system reform in several GPSF programming countries and the implementation of stabilization and reconstruction projects in Kandahar province, Afghanistan.

8) Shared outcome(s):

  • safer and more secure environments conducive to stabilization, recovery and long-term reconstruction;

  • greater protection of rights and safety of individuals and populations; and

  • improved global and regional response to crisis situations.

9) Governance structure(s): The GPSF is managed by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) Secretariat in the context of a whole-of-government approach coordinated through the START Advisory Board. Chaired by the Director General of the START Secretariat and comprising senior officials from across government, the START Advisory Board is responsible for establishing, within the framework of individual departmental authorities, whole-of-government strategic policy as well as priority setting and direction with respect to fragile states and complex emergencies. It is also responsible for providing a platform for information exchange to ensure that program-related activities are complementary and avoid duplication. The START Secretariat is located in the Programs and Departmental Security Branch of DFAIT and is accountable to DFAIT, which is responsible for the financial, human and physical resource services for START.

10) Planning Highlights: In the context of ongoing GPSF programming in 2010-11, there are three significant developments central to plans for the coming year. They are: 1) ensuring the effective implementation of GPSF funded initiatives in Afghanistan in preparation for the transformation of Canada's military engagement to a civilian one. More specifically, meeting the challenges of continuing in-kind contributions as Canadian Forces prepare to redeploy from Kandahar by July 2011, and the issue of ongoing protection of deployed Canadian government civilian personnel working on GPSF initiatives; 2) continuing Canadian engagement in Sudan in 2010-11 in the context of national elections and a referendum on independence for the semi-autonomous South. GPSF will seek to provide expert support from relevant government departments within the framework of renewed Canadian commitment to Sudan programming through to 2012-13; and 3) working with other government departments (OGD) partners to develop broader frameworks for funding and managing civilian deployments in recognition of the growing demand for Canadian government expertise to respond to complex emergencies internationally.


11) Federal Partner 12) Federal Partner Program Activity 13) Names of Programs for Federal Partners* 14) Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)** 15) Planned Spending for
2010-11
***
16) Expected Results for
2010-11
DFAIT (Lead)
PA 2: Diplomacy and Advocacy Global Peace and Security Program; Global Peace Operations Program; Glyn Berry Program for Peace and Security   $130.7M Improved Canadian contribution to peace and security and the safety and well-being of beneficiaries living in targeted areas
Department of National Defence (DND) PA 1: Contribute to Canada and the international community Operations in Afghanistan   $7.24M Supporting the Provincial Reconstruction Team and implementation of projects in Kandahar
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP

PA 1: Federal and International Operations

Canadian Police Arrangement and International Police Peacekeeping (IPP)   $23.9M**** Improved security for local citizens through the implementation of RCMP International Police Peacekeeping projects
Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) PA: N/A Delivery of International Assistance under the CCC / DFAIT MOU   $1.22M Enhanced capacity for disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration in Sudan and Canadian material support to Guatemala
Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) PA 1: Security Afghanistan border); Canada's support to the Middle East Peace Process; and Stabilization and Reconstruction in Haiti   $3.55M Deployment of CBSA officials to enhance border management and access for the Palestinian Authority, training of Afghan customs officials and better control over customs revenue in the Afghan Ministry of Finance
Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) PA 1: Correctional Interventions Operations in Afghanistan and Stabilization and Reconstruction in Haiti   $5.65M Deployment of CSC officials to enhance prison reform in southern Sudan and advise and mentor corrections officials in Haiti and Afghanistan

* Amount is for total funding and includes amounts as of GPSF operationalization in September 2006 and excludes amounts reallocated during the Strategic Review Exercise.
Names of programs of federal partners refer to support to GPSF activities and does not necessarily reflect the name of a department's official program. It is often the case that departments working with the GPSF do not have an official program name.
** Exact figures not known due to definitional ambiguities, in particular inclusion/exclusion dates and Human Security Program (now Glyn Berry Program) carry-over from fiscal years 2005-06 and 2006-07.
*** Due to the fluid programming context in high-risk environments GPSF initiatives occur in, planned programming amounts can change based on various factors.
**** This represents funding to cover incremental costs to the RCMP for the deployment of civilian police in support of international police peacekeeping operations. Excluded are reference level transfers to the RCMP to support the International Police Program.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11
$1,025.2M $172.2M

17) Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): The GPSF works with a wide variety of implementing partners, including international and regional organizations, such as the United Nations and its bodies, as well as with non-governmental organizations, academic institutions, foreign governments and other legal entities. Expected and actual results achieved by these partners are outlined in their respective appeal documents, and in the corresponding project and annual reports. The scope and degree of realization of their results will be conditioned by the specific environments in which they work.

Contact information:

Elissa Golberg
Director General, START Secretariat
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
Tel.: 613-665-6689
Fax: 613-944-5911
Email: elissa.golberg@international.gc.ca

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Department of Justice Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Anti-Drug Strategy

Name of lead department: Department of Justice

Lead department program activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-08

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12 and ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $578.6 millions

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Anti-Drug Strategy was launched by the Government of Canada in 2007, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Its goal is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The prevention action plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use, and to develop and implement community-based interventions & initiatives to prevent illicit drug use. The treatment action plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The enforcement action plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

Shared outcomes:

  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced impacts of illicit drug use through prevention and treatment efforts; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.

Governance structure:

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Youth Justice, and Strategic Initiatives and Law Reform Section of the Department of Justice Canada.

The Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC), which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources.  The ADMSC prepares questions for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by the Department of Public Safety Canada, oversees the implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy and the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The Communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy including, making decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative and ensuring coordination of communication.

Planning Highlights:


Federal Partner: Department of Justice
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
A1 – Justice policies, laws and programs a. Drug Treatment Courts $16.2 M $3.6 M Link 1
b. Youth Justice Fund (Treatment Action Plan) $6.8 M $1.6 M Link 2
c. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.4 M $0.3 M Link 3
C1 – Internal Services d. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.5 M $0.3 M Link 4
e. National Anti-Drug Strategy $0.3 M $0.1 M Support programs
Total: $26.2 M $5.9 M  

Link 1:

Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court clients

Link 2:

Overall results:

  • To work collaboratively with interested provinces and territories as well as other stakeholders in order to identify gaps in drug treatment programs for youth in the justice system.
  • To introduce, pilot and evaluate a number of drug treatment options for youth involved in the youth justice system in communities.
  • To share knowledge of the piloted drug treatment programs and promising practices with provinces and territories as well as other interested stakeholders.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Projects on Treatment Services & Program Enhancements
  • Enhanced capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Increased availability of & access to effective treatment services & programs for targeted populations in areas of need
  • Improved treatment systems, programs & services to address illicit drug dependency in targeted populations in areas of need
  • Reduced risk-taking behaviours

Link 3:

Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

  • exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • maintaining the NADS Governance Structure;
  • taking lead responsibility for performance reporting;
  • implementing the recommendations from the Implementation Evaluation;
  • starting the process for Strategy renewal;

Link 4:
Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

  • leading and coordinating all NADS communications activities;
  • taking lead responsibility for Strategy evaluation.



Federal Partner: Health Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
3.4.3 Controlled Substances a. Mass Media Campaign (Prevention Action Plan) $29.8 M $7.0 M Link 1
3.4.3 Controlled Substances b. Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF) (Prevention Action Plan) $59.0 M $14.0 M Link 2
3.4 Substance Use and Abuse c. Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP) (Treatment Action Plan) $124.7 M $30.7 M Link 3
4.1.1.2 First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions d. National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) (Treatment Action Plan) $36.0 M $7.5 M Link 4
3.4.3 Controlled Substances e. Office of Controlled Substances (Enforcement Action Plan) $12.8 M $3.1 M Link 5
f. Drug Analysis Services (Enforcement Action Plan) $49.2M $2.3 M Link 6
$3.4M [1] To be determined [1]
Total: 314.9 $64.6 M  

Link 1: The mass media campaign plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit drug use. The mass media campaign's progress and contribution to this outcome will be measured by the change in the level of capacity among targeted populations to prevent illicit drug use and related risk-taking behaviour through post campaign public opinion research conducted with both youth 13-15 years of age and their parents, measured against the baseline surveys that were conducted with parents in 2008 and with youth in 2009.  The campaign's success will also be measured through website hits, booklet downloads, calls to 1-800-O-Canada and number of booklets ordered/shipped; and by evidence of capacity changes for influencing decision-making and behaviours around illicit drug use and associated consequences in targeted populations.

Link 2: DSCIF plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit drug use. The program's success and progress will be measured by the level/nature of acquired or improved knowledge/skills to avoid illicit drug use within the targeted population, and will be measured by evidence that capacity changes are influencing decision-making and behaviours around illicit drug use and associated consequences in targeted populations.

DSCIF also plans to strengthen community responses to illicit drug issues in targeted areas, and will measure their progress based on the type/nature of ways that community responses have been strengthened in targeted areas. For example, the adoption/integration of evidence-informed/best practices within the targeted areas will indicate the program's contribution to this outcome.

Link 3: DTFP plans to increase availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for at-risk youth in areas of need. The Program's success and progress will be measured by the type/nature of treatment services and supports that have been made available by end of FY and will be measured by the program/service utilization trends associated with their populations and areas of need.

DTFP will also seek to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency of affected Canadians. The Program's success and progress in this plan will be measured by the extent to which treatment system improvements have been made; perceptions of stakeholders; and, the extent to which uptake/integration of evidence-informed practices has occurred.

Link 4:  FNIHB plans to increase availability of and access to effective treatment services and programs for Aboriginal populations in areas of need (as determined by regional needs assessments). The progress of this plan will be measured by the nature of new or enhanced services that have been made available through funding in targeted areas and are based on research or best practices. FNIHB also plans to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency in Aboriginal populations in areas of need. The progress of this plan will be measured by the proportion of treatment facilities accredited to F/P/T or other appropriate standards of accreditation; the changes in stakeholder/client perceptions regarding the extent to which treatment services have been improved in NADS-supported investment areas; the types of collaborative/partnerships with Aboriginal organizations to improve systems, programs and services; and the extent to which an uptake/integration of evidence-informed practices has occurred. Lastly, FNIHB plans to reduce risk-taking behaviours among clients of treatment programs. The success of this plan will be measured by changes in stakeholder/client perceptions regarding the extent to which clients are make healthy decisions concerning substance use post-Strategy compared to pre-Strategy. 

Link 5: Office of Controlled Substances plans to increase compliance and reduce risk associated with the diversion of precursor chemicals. The success of this plan will be measured by the level of potential diversion of precursor chemicals and controlled substances (as indicated by Loss and Theft Reports), and by the rates of compliance with policies and regulations.

The Office of Controlled Substances also plans to reduce the health, safety and security risks associated with illicit drug production. The success and progress of this plan will be measured by the size of synthetic drug production disrupted (as indicated by the detailed requests for authorizing disposal of synthetic substances).

Link 6: Drug Analysis Services plans to improve drug enforcement intelligence and evidence. The success and progress of this plan will be measured by the number of acquittals and dismissals that can be attributed to DAS evidence, and will also be measured by the perceptions of stakeholders regarding the benefit and timeliness of DAS contribution to court/police response. Drug Analysis Services also plans to increase safety in dismantling illicit drug operations. The success and progress of this plan will be measured by the number and nature of injuries to law enforcement officers and other first responders during the investigation and dismantling of illegal drug operations, and will also be measured by the level of additional risk to the environment as a result of investigation and dismantling of illegal drug operations.

 


Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
1.4 Health and Health Services Advances Drug Treatment Courts (Treatment Action Plan) $4.0 M $1.0 M Link 1
Total: $4.0 M $1.0 M  

Link 1: Improved knowledge translation with respect to treatment and understanding of the consequences of illicit drug use.

 


Federal Partner: Department of Public Safety Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
3. Law Enforcement a. National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation (Enforcement Action Plan) $4.0 M $0.8 M Link 1
5. Crime Prevention b. Crime Prevention Funding and Programming: (Crime Prevention Action Fund)
(Prevention Action Plan)
$20.0 M $10.6 M Link 2
Link 3
Total: $24.0 M $11.4 M  

Link 1: Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national enforcement policies.

Link 2: Reduced offending among targeted populations.

Link 3: Effective evidence-based responses to substance use/abuse and crime related issues in communities.

 


Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
1.1.2.7 a. Drug and Organized Crime Awareness Services (Prevention Action Plan) $15.1 M $3.0 M Link 1
Link 2
3.5.2 Community and Youth Programs b. National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program (Treatment Action Plan) $3.4 M $0.8 M Link 3
1.1.2.9 c. Marijuana and Clandestine Lab Teams/Proceeds of Crime (Enforcement Action Plan) $91.4 M $20.4 M Link 4
Link 5
Link 6
Total: $109.9 M $ 24.2 M  

*note: Drug Recognition Expertise (DRE) is not included in this report.

Link 1: Increased awareness of the nature, extent and consequences of substance use/abuse within the school, workplace and Aboriginal communities and among youth, professionals and the general public through partnerships with internal and external departments.

Link 2: Improved skills/competencies in the delivery of programs.

Link 3: Increased police awareness of risk and protective factors of youth offenders and victims. Increased community satisfaction with RCMP youth-related services. Increased police awareness of community-based youth-serving resources and referral procedures. Increased referrals to youth addictions treatment and intervention programs by police

Link 4: Expanded international and national cooperation to enhance our understanding and knowledge of drugs, related trends, and production and diversion methods

Link 5: Enhanced ability to detect and respond to the supply of illicit drugs and harmful substances

Link 6: Enhanced ability to improve tactical targeting, through an improved intelligence network. 

 


Federal Partner: Correctional Service Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
3.0 Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of provincial Offenders (Enforcement Action Plan) $23.3 M To be determined Link 1
Total: $23.3 M [2] To be determined [2]  

Link 1:  Timely case preparation; rate of offenders successfully reintegrated into the community

 


Federal Partner: National Parole Board of Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions $4.4 M To be determined Link 1
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability $1.8 M To be determined Link 2
Internal Services Internal Services $1.3 M To be determined Support programs
Total: $7.5 M [3] To be determined [3]  

Link 1: Should the proposed legislation be passed by Parliament and receive Royal Assent this funding will provide the NPB the capacity for effective management of its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. NPB will collect information and report on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated as a result of new legislative provisions (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole). 

Link 2: Should the proposed legislation be passed by Parliament and receive Royal Assent this funding will provide the NPB the capacity for provision of information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings and individuals who seek access to the decision registry in relation to the requirements of the new legislation.  In a similar manner, NPB will report on the extent of involvement of victims, and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by NPB.

Effective management of both these responsibilities will contribute to public safety and reinforce public confidence in the justice system.

 


Federal Partner: Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
1.1 Prosecution of drug, organized crime and Criminal Code offences a. Prosecution and prosecution -related services (Enforcement Action Plan) $9.9 M $2.9M Link 1
b. Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA (Enforcement Action Plan) $33.5 M [4] To be determined [4] Link 2
Total: $43.4M $2.9M  

Link 1: Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and substances Act (CDSA) in response to the workload generated by the enhanced RCMP dedicated anti-drug teams and criminal intelligence and technical operations support staff.

Link 2: Provision of prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations, and prosecution of drug charges under the CDSA resulting from the Mandatory Minimum Penalties, subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.


Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
Risk Assessment Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services (Enforcement Action Plan) $4.7 M $1.2 M Link 1
Link 2
Enforcement Border Intelligence, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services (Enforcement Action Plan) $7.0 M $1.8 M Link 3
Link 4
Link 5
Internal Services Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services (Enforcement Action Plan) $1.0 M $0.3 M Link 6
Link 7
Total: $12.7 M $3.3 M *  

*note: This figure includes 20% EBP and 13% Accommodation (PWGSC) Costs of $0.3 M.

Link 1: Increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illicit drug issues relative to the border.

Link 2: Laboratory and Scientific Services Directorate (LSSD): Continuation of the original NADS plan with respect to additional sampling, analysis and increased use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry.  Safe sampling tools still in development.  Pilot tests anticipated in 2010-11.

Link 3: Increase intelligence support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the strategy.

Link 4: Improve relationships and communication  with partner agencies under the Strategy to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting and information sharing related to illicit drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the Strategy as they relate to the border.

Link 5: LSSD: Continuation of the original NADS plan with respect to additional sampling, analysis and increased use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry.  Safe sampling tools still in development.  Pilot tests anticipated in 2010-11.

Link 6: Establish national coordination of efforts, leverage partner networks and activities to support risk assessment and enforcement activities.

Link 7: Identify best practices domestically and abroad to strengthen border-related operations under the strategy.

 


Federal Partner: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
1.2 Diplomacy and Advocacy - International Operations and Programs Annual Contributions to UNODC and CICAD (Enforcement Action Plan) $4.5 M $0.9 M Link 1
Link 2
Total: $4.5 M $0.9 M  

Link 1: Improved capacity of UNODC to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs and international crime at the global level.

Link 2: Improved capacity of CICAD to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs in the Americas.

 


Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
4 Reporting Compliance Special Enforcement Program (Enforcement Action Plan) $4.2 M $0.8 M Link1
Total: $4.2 M $0.8 M  

Link 1: 15 audits of MGOs and clandestine laboratories resulting in over $2,500,000 of federal taxes.


Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
1.7 Specialized Programs and Services Forensic Accounting Management Group (Enforcement Action Plan) $1.5 M $0.4 Link 1
Total: $1.5 M $0.4 *  

*Note: This figure includes $39,277 in EBP and $25,530 in accommodation premiums

Link 1: Increased operational capacity to provide additional forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies.  Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentive for engaging in criminal activities.

 


Federal Partner: Financial Transactions and Analysis Centre of Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–11
Expected Results for
2010–11
2004113 Detection and deterrence of money laundering and terrorist financing Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (Enforcement Action Plan) $2.5 M $0.8 M Link 1
Link 2
Total: $2.5 M $0.8 M  

Link 1: Law enforcement and intelligence agencies receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.

Link 2: Enhanced compliance in high-risk reporting entity sectors.

 


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11
$578.6 M $116.2 M

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):  N/A

Contact information:

Catherine Latimer
General Counsel and Director General
Youth Justice, and Strategic Initiatives and Law Reform Section
(613) 957-9623
clatimer@justice.gc.ca

[Footnotes]

[1] This funding to implement Mandatory Minimum Penalties (MMPs) for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.

[2] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.

[3] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.

[4] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.

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Environment Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Canadian Group on Earth Observations is a collection of federal Departments participating in the International Group on Earth Observations (GEO).

2. Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada is the lead Department by virtue of the identification of the ADM of the Meteorological Service of Canada as the GEO Principal.

3. Lead department program activity: 2.1 Weather and environmental Services for Canadians

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 2003; though there are no dedicated funds, this initiative is funded from existing A-Base

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Provided through A-Base and in-kind contributions from other federal Departments.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The GEO seeks to implement a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to allow free and open access to earth observations for decision- and policy-makers by all countries. In so doing, users such as Environment Canada and Natural Resources Canada will be better able to better predict the future state of planet earth and better warn citizens of the onset of hazardous conditions. See the GEO website for more detail: http://www.earthobservations.org/.

8. Shared outcome(s):

  • Enhancing access to global Earth observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international
  • Improving evidence-based decision-making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations

9. Governance structure(s): Coordination is achieved through a DG level Interdepartmental Coordinating Committee (ICC)

10. Planning Highlights: An ADM level committee is proposed to provide strategic direction to Departments for the larger issue of data standards, policies and sharing principles. This will be a key effort for Departments interested in earth observations to contribute to through the ICC. A focus of the international GEO this year will be on the continued establishment of biodiversity and carbon monitoring networks. For Canadian GEO efforts, there will be a focus on partnering with the US on test-bed monitoring sites in the Great Lakes Basin, the prairies and the Rocky Mountains for better understanding of the water cycle and better predictions of drought, flood and water quality conditions.

11. Federal Partner: Environment Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

Weather and environmental Services for Canadians

a. Meteorological Service of Canada

$ not available

$150,000 salary
$75,000 O&M
$38,000 G&C
$25 ,000 in-kind

See Link

 

11. Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

N/A

a. Earth Sciences Sector

$ not available

$ to be determined

See Link

b. Canadian Forest Service

$ not available

$ to be determined

See Link

 

11. Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

N/A

a. Science and Technology

$ not available

$ 20,000
In-kind TBD

See Link

b. Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration and Environment

$ not available

$ 20,000
In-kind TBD

See Link

 

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Space Agency
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

N/A

a. Earth Observations

$ not available

$ 40,000
In-kind TBD

See Link

 

11. Federal Partner: Department of Fisheries and Oceans
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

N/A

a. Science and Technology

$ not available

$ to be determined

See Link

 

11. Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

N/A

a. Radiation

$ not available

$ to be determined

See Link

 

11. Federal Partner: Statistics Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

N/A

a. Agriculture

$ not available

$ to be determined

See Link

 

11. Federal Partner: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

N/A

a. Environment

$ not available

$ to be determined

See Link

 

16. Expected results:

  • Bilateral projects and activities with US, including international test beds and research projects.
  • Canadian inputs and positions coordinated for international 2010 GEO Ministerial Summit in China.
  • CGEO departments are engaged in Earth observation data issues and policy development.

 

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)

Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11

N/A

$ to be determined

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

18. Contact information:

Danielle Lacasse
Director General, Business Policy Directorate,
Meteorological Service of Canada,
Environment Canada
141 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, ON K1P 5J3
613-943-5532
Danielle.Lacasse@ec.gc.ca


1.Name of Horizontal Initiative: Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative

2.Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada

3.Lead department program activity: 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystems

4.Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005 (GLAP IV resources)

5.End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2010 (expiration date of 2007-2010 Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem and 2005-2010 Great Lakes Action Plan for Areas of Concern - GLAPIV resources)*

 

 

* Note: The Government of Canada is entering into negotiations with the Government of the United States to amend the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The implications of these negotiations for a new federal program are currently unknown.

 

 

18.Contact information:
Linda Klaamas
Manager, Great Lakes Environment Office
Environment Canada
416-739-5810


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Implementation of the Species at Risk Act

2. Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada

3. Lead department program activity: 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2000

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing (Some sunsetting resources, ending in 2011-2012)

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing resources

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): This horizontal initiative supports the development and implementation of the National Framework for Species at Risk Conservation and the Species at Risk Act (SARA) that came fully into force in June 2004. Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada are the departments and agency responsible for the protection of species at risk under federal jurisdiction. The three departments received funds from Treasury Board in 2000 for the "Implementation of the National Strategy for the Protection of Species at Risk and their Critical Habitat", in 2003 for the "Implementation of the Act respecting the protection of wildlife species at risk in Canada" and in 2007 for "Delivering results under the Species at Risk Act".

8. Shared outcome(s):

  • Implementation of SARA
  • Protection of species at risk
  • Protection of biodiversity

9. Governance structure(s):

  • Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) - federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for wildlif
  • Canadian Wildlife Deputy Ministers
  • Canadian Wildlife Directors Committee (CWDC) - federal, provincial and territorial directors responsible for wildlife
  • Associate Deputy Ministers Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada)
  • Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada)
  • Director General Operations Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada and others)

10. Planning Highlights:

  • As of January, 2010, 447 species are listed on Schedule 1 of SARA, 105 final recovery strategies are posted on the SARA Public Registry and 198 recovery strategies are currently in various stages of development.
  • SARA 5-year Review: support parliamentary review and preparation of response
  • Document SARA requirements in the SARA Quality Management System (QMS) and implement key QMS processes
  • Continue to deliver on ongoing mandated obligations under SARA (assessment, listing, recovery planning and implementation, consultations with Aboriginal Peoples, etc.), with particular focus on:
    • Listing: review input/feedback from Polar Bear consultations
    • Recovery planning document preparation: consultations on caribou, grassland birds and Wood Bison; completion of Accord-led recovery documents including critical habitat (CH) identification where possible
    • Recovery implementation: continued delivery of funding programs
    • Increased species-specific monitoring and evaluation and research based on identified priorities in recovery strategies
  • Address legal challenges as required

 

11. Federal Partner: Environment Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat

Species at Risk

Ongoing (some resources sunsetting in 2011-12)

53.8

See Link

 

11. Federal Partner: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

Species at Risk Management

Species at Risk

Ongoing (some resources sunsetting in 2011-12)

26.0

See Link

 

11. Federal Partner: Parks Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010–11

16. Expected Results for 2010–11

Heritage Resource Conservation

Species at Risk

Ongoing (some resources sunsetting in 2011-12)

14.1

See Link

 

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)

Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11

Ongoing

$ 93.9 million

 

16. Expected results:

1) General administration of SARA, including production of the Annual Report to Parliament

  • Indicator: Timeliness of Annual Report to Parliament

2) Participation in and response to Parliamentary five-year review of SARA and as required, Minister's Roundtable

3) Finalization and implementation of policies

  • Indicator: Publication of the Final Species at Risk Policies on the Species at Risk Public Registry

4) Continued implementation of the SARA evaluation action plan

  • Indicator: % of actions completed prior to the evaluation report of the outcome evaluation (2010/2011)

5) Ongoing administration of contribution funding programs, including the Habitat Stewardship Program (HSP), the Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk (AFSAR), and the Interdepartmental Recovery Fund (IRF)

  • Indicator: Number of projects funded under each of the contribution funding programs

6) Preparation of ministerial response statements to COSEWIC Assessments

  • Indicator: % of response statements issued within 90 days

7) Continued work to finalize bilateral agreements with provinces and territories

  • Indicator: % of bilateral agreements signed

8) Consultations on listing and recovery planning documents

  • Indicator: % of listed species at risk for which listing and recovery planning consultations have taken place

9) Regulatory initiatives as required, including addition of species to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk

  • Indicator: Number of orders to protect species at risk and critical habitat (listing, critical habitat protection, emergency listing, emergency protection and application of section 32 and/or section 33 to non-federal lands orders)

10) Preparation of recovery planning documents

  • Indicator: Number of recovery strategies, action plans and management plans developed and published by lead jurisdiction (federal government, provinces and territories)

11) Development of outreach material, including SARA enforcement and compliance promotion

12) Responding to legal challenges

 

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

1) Assessment and reassessment of species, subspecies and populations by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC)

  • Indicator: Number of species assessed per year by COSEWIC

2) Leveraged funding and various public- and private-sector stewardship activities for the protection of species at risk habitat through the Habitat Stewardship Program

  • Indicator: Number of projects funded under the Habitat Stewardship Program

3) Development of recovery planning documents by provinces and territories, and with involvement of experts from the academic world and non-governmental organizations

  • Indicator: Number of provincial/territorial recovery planning documents developed

4) Research and education efforts to recover Canadian species at risk through departmental funding

  • Indicator: Number of projects funded under each of the contribution funding programs

5) Protection of important or critical habitat through the Aboriginal Critical Habitat Protection Fund and other Stewardship initiatives

  • Indicator: Number of projects funded under the Aboriginal Critical Habitat Protection Fund

 

18. Contact information:

Mary Taylor
Director, Conservation Service Delivery and Permitting Division
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
819-953-9097
Mary.Taylor@ec.gc.ca

Susan Humphrey
Regional Director, Ontario Region
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
416-739-5882
Susan.Humphrey@ec.gc.ca


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), approved March 2005 (followed from the two-year Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP).

2. Name of lead department(s): Environment Canada and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

3. Lead department program activity: 3.1 Substances and Waste Management (EC); Management Policy Development and Oversight (TBS)

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAP in effect since April 2005. Former 2-year FCSAAP program commenced April 2003.

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAP expected to continue for 15 years. However, the current policy approval ends March 31, 2011.

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $1,775.2 million (including PWGSC accommodations charges) to March 31, 2011

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) provides a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites having the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2004, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $3.5 billion. Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial departments, the overall program is administered jointly by Environment Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

8. Shared outcome(s): Reduce federal financial liability and risks to human health and the environment, including fish habitat. Increase public confidence in the overall management of federal real property through the effective risk management or remediation of individual federal contaminated sites.

9. Governance structure(s): Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by a Director Generals Committee, the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.

10. Planning Highlights: Although 2009-2010 was expected to be the final year of the first 5-year policy approval of the FCSAP program, Canada's Economic Action Plan (CEAP) provided an additional year of policy approval as well as two years of additional funding ($245.5M) to accelerate site assessment and remediation/risk management activities until March 31, 2011. As the final year of both the CEAP initiative and the regular program, 2010-2011 will be an exceptional year in terms of planning and deliverables. Program partners will not only be responsible for delivering on their project commitments from the regular and accelerated programs, they will be required to collaborate in the development of a program renewal proposal and 5-year funding submission for consideration and approval by Ministers to enable the continuation of the FCSAP program beyond March 31, 2011.

11. Federal Partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

AAFC expects to complete 34 assessment projects and 11 remediation and risk management projects in 2010-11.

Enterprise Activities

Asset Management

5.5

1.3

See below.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

Corporate Management and Direction

Infrastructure and Environment

1.6

0.0

N/A

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

NA

NA

0.2

0.0

N/A

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Correctional Service Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

Internal Services

Facilities/Asset Management Services

10.4

4.9

See below.

16. Expected results:

Correctional Service Canada 2010-2011 Planned Projects

Sites being risk-managed

3

Sites being remediated (multiyear)

5

Remediations expected to be completed

3

Sites assessments

15

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Environment Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

As a custodian of real property, Environment Canada continues to update its multi-year Contaminated Sites Management Plan on an annual basis. This plan outlines the department's strategy for assessment and remediation of its contaminated sites. Environment Canada will continue to demonstrate due diligence with respect to its contaminated sites through ongoing assessment and remediation activities. In 2010-2011, Environment Canada expects to implement 9 remediation projects and approximately 42 assessment projects, for a total planned spending of $15,617,860 for projects, and $595,177 for program management (excluding PWGSC accommodation charges).

Secretariat: In cooperation with the Treasury Board Secretariat, supports the DG and ADM steering committees and the CSMWG; manages project selection process; coordinates funding and reporting processes; manages data and program communications; evaluates program performance; and oversees audit and evaluation. In 2010-2011 the Secretariat will also lead the development of the 5-year program renewal proposal.

Expert Support: Provides to custodians scientific and technical advice with respect to ecological risks at federal contaminated sites such that the remediation/risk management strategies implemented at these sites will mitigate or reduce these risks; provides supplemental ecological risk assessment tools, as well as a tool to measure ecological risk reduction resulting from remediation/risk management project implementation.

Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized

Asset Remediation and Disposal

48.9

16.2

Custodian

Contaminated Sites

44.9

6.6

Secretariat and Expert Support

Total

93.8

22.9

 

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

In FY 2010-11, DFO plans to undertake the following:

  • 719 baseline assessment projects at a cost of $7,555,151
  • 674 accelerated assessment projects at a cost of $6,110,001
  • 117 baseline remediation/risk management projects at a cost of $5,019,900
  • 37 accelerated remediation/risk management projects at a cost of $2,100,000

Expert Support

  • Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the management of federal contaminated sites that may be impacting, or have the potential to impact, fish or fish habitat.
  • Development of guidance material and provision of training on the management of FCSAP Aquatic Sites to custodial organizations (e.g. the Aquatic Sites Classification System and Aquatic Sites Framework).
  • Review of project submissions to ensure that the potential impacts to fish and fish habitat have been appropriately considered.
  • Review and evaluation of FCSAP projects to ascertain if, and to what level, the risk to fish and fish habitat has been reduced as a result of custodial actions.

Internal Services

Contaminated Sites - FCSAP projects

78.4

22.3

Custodian

FCSAP Expert Support

21.7

3.3

Expert Support

Total

100.1

25.6

 

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

The FNIHB's (First Nation and Inuit Health Branch) expected results are to completely remediate four contaminated sites located at four different communities in Northern Ontario. With the FCSAP funds, the contaminated sites located at the communities of Kasabonika and Moose Factory are scheduled for remediation and completion in 2010-11. In 2010-11, remediation work is also planned at the Ontario communities of Lansdowne House and Summer Beaver, with expected completion in 2011-12.

FNIHB's target is to completely remediate all contaminated sites listed in the FCSAP Interdepartmental Data Exchange Application web tool. In 2010-11, upon completion of the remediation and closure reports for Kasabonika and Moose Factory, the liability of these two sites for FNIHB should be reduced to zero. The closure report for a remediated site, serves as an important tracking tool for measuring the progress of remediation.

Expert Support

Service delivery to federal custodial departments with respect to the provision of guidance, training and advice on human health risk assessment and public involvement; peer review of human health risk assessments conducted for federal contaminated sites; participation in inter-departmental regional working groups and input to public involvement plans and remedial action plans on a site-by-site basis; assistance to custodial departments in the application of the Risk Reduction Metric on a site-by-site basis; publication of national guidance documents on the conduct of human health risk assessments at federal sites; support for scientific research to address data gaps on issues that influence exposure at contaminated sites; toxicological evaluations of toxic substances found at federal contaminated sites; development of scientific criteria documents to support new or revised CCME soil quality guidelines that protect human health.

First Nations and Inuit Health

First Nations and Inuit Health Protection

7.4

0.5

Custodian

Contaminated Sites

Healthy Environments Consumer Safety Branch

43.7

6.7

Expert Support

Total

51.1

7.2

 

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

Responsible Federal Stewardship

Contaminated Sites Management Program

148.3

48.6

See below.

Northern Land and Resources

Contaminated Sites

685.5

139.9

See below.

Total

833.8

188.5

 

16. Expected results:

The financial liability associated with high and medium risk contaminated sites on reserve lands and lands under Indian and Inuit Affairs jurisdiction will be reduced by 15 percent from April 1, 2010 baseline levels.

In support of the Northern Affairs Organization (NAO) Northern Contaminated Sites Program's (NCSP) mandate of reducing and eliminating, where possible, risks to human and environmental health and liability associated with contaminated sites, the following assessment and remediation/risk management activities are projected for 2010-11:

  • Phase I/II Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) activity undertaken at 264 sites;
  • Phase III ESA activity undertaken at 35 sites;
  • Remediation activity undertaken at 89 sites;
  • Ongoing risk management activity and/or long term monitoring at 9 sites; and
  • The completion of 22 priority contaminated sites by fiscal year-end.

In addition to these activities, NCSP will conduct a summative evaluation and plans to draft a new Results-Based Management Accountability Framework (RMAF) in 2010-11. Because the summative evaluation is expected to focus on the intermediate and ultimate outcomes in the logic model, objectives of the performance measurement strategy used in 2010-11 may differ from those being used at the time of completion of the Horizontal Initiatives Template:

  • Objective 1: to meet legal obligations and federal and departmental policy requirements regarding the management of contaminated sites.
  • Objective 2: to require that, where a suspected contaminated site has been identified, the site be assessed in a timely, consistent and cost-effective manner.
  • Objective 3: to remediate, in line with approved resource levels, all National Classification System (NCS) Class 1 contaminated sites in the North, on a priority basis, unless it can be demonstrated that for a specific site an alternative form of management is appropriate.
  • Objective 4: to promote the federal "polluter pay" principle.
  • Objective 5: to promote the social and economic benefits that may accrue to First Nations, Inuit and Northerners when carrying out activities.
  • Objective 6: to provide a scientifically valid, risk management based framework for setting priorities, planning, implementing and reporting on the management of contaminated sites.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

Complete remediation/risk management strategy for 1 project.

Management of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infrastructure, and properties in the Montreal area

N/A

1.0

0.3

See below.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Marine Atlantic Inc. (MAI)
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

To have the Environmental Site Assessment completed and a remediation and risk management plan initiated for 1 project (1 site).

Corporate Management

FCSAP (projects)

0.1

0.1

See below.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: National Capital Commission
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

Performance Targets for 2010-2011: Over the planning period, in the context of its Contaminated Sites Management Program and its long term goal to ensure all contaminated sites are secure by 2017 – i.e. all sites under a comprehensive risk management regime, the NCC will:

a) Investigate use of new (possibly experimental) techniques for in-situ treatment, possibly in collaboration with universities;

b Conduct 28 detailed environmental studies (Phase 2 ESA and higher);

c) Conduct three remediation projects - Ridge Road, 80 Bayview and Hurdman North.

Note: Targets for b) and c) were increased as part of the Economic Action Plan (EAP) as follows:

b) Conduct 35 additional assessments for a total of 63.

c) Conduct four additional remediation projects (Stanley Park, River Front Park, Watts Creek and Richmond Landing) for a total of seven.

Real Asset Management

Land and real asset management

8.6

3.6

See below.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: National Defence
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

The DND Contaminated Sites Program aims to reduce risks to human health and the environment posed by federal contaminated sites, and to reduce the financial liabilities that are associated with those contaminated sites. In 2010-11, 65 more sites will be under remediation or under risk-management and 19 suspected sites will have been assessed and completed Step 3 of the Federal Approach to Contaminated Sites (10-Step process).

The management of contaminated sites continues to be a key target in the Department's overall performance measurement of pollution prevention to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. The Department's current Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS) includes a target for a contaminated sites year over year reduction in liabilities of 7 percent per year. The Departments' performance towards achieving this target is reported annually and included in the Departmental Performance Report. So far, DND has consistently shown an annual decrease in liability of sites that are under remediation that exceeds the Department's performance target of 7 percent.

In addition to linkages to DND's SDS, the Department's Contaminated Sites Program also provides linkages to other Government of Canada priorities such as Northern Sovereignty which affects the management of DND's contaminated sites program. One example is the potential redevelopment of the port at the former Nanisivik mine site on the northeast side of Baffin Island into a Northern Navy facility.

Contaminated sites performance is linked with DND's Program Activity Architecture (PAA). Contaminated sites fall within the Program Activity of “Environmental Protection and Stewardship”.

Environmental Protection and Stewardship (150000)

A Defence Contaminated Sites Management Plan in which funding is provided to clean up worst sites first

380.1

61.1

See below.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: National Research Council of Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

As a result of funding under the Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP) initiative, the National Research Council will successfully complete soil remediation projects at NRC's two existing registered contaminated sites thus reducing human health and ecological risks at these sites. In addition to these remediation projects at Montreal QC and Penticton BC, NRC will complete assessment projects at five other NRC sites. NRC will continue to conduct groundwater monitoring programs at both remediated sites and will establish a risk management plan for those areas of the sites were remediation was not possible or in the interest of the Crown. Pending the results of site assessment work at the five additional sites, NRC will implement its Federal Contaminated Site Departmental Management Plan to continue to achieve the objectives of the FCSAP initiative.

Internal Services

Environmental Operations

4.8

2.5

See below.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Natural Resources Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

Remediation and risk management for 2 projects (3 sites)

Assessment of approximately 6 sites

Corporate Management

The provision of relevant and timely policy analysis and advice for decision-making on government priorities and departmental responsibilities

27.9

9.0

See below.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Parks Canada Agency
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

Assessment Outcome: Increase the number and proportion of sites, registered in the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory (FCSI) as of March 31 2009 that will have been assessed by March 31 2012. Performance for this outcome will be measured by the number and proportion of sites, registered in the FCSI as of March 31 2009 that will have completed at least Step 4 of the federal 10-Step process by March 31 2012. The target is to have 100 percent of all sites registered in the FCSI as of March 31 2009 complete at least Step 4 of the federal 10-Step process by March 31 2012. Management effectiveness of program delivery will be established through setting baseline status (based on March 31 2009 FCSI data) and monitoring annual change in status in updated FCSI records. Parks Canada's baseline status for contaminated sites assessment has been established at 89 percent or 380 sites of 427 records in FCSI as of March 31 2009. Twenty-five contaminated site assessment projects, comprising 61 sites, are planned for 2010-11.

Remediation/Risk Management Outcome: Increase the number and proportion of high-risk sites (Class 1 or 2), registered in the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory (FCSI) as of March 31 2009 that will have a remedial/risk management action plan developed and/or implemented by March 31 2012. Performance for this outcome will be measured by the number and proportion of Class 1 and Class 2 sites, registered in the FCSI as of March 31 2009 that will have completed at least Step 7 of the federal 10-Step process by March 31 2012. The target is to have 50 percent of all Class 1 and Class 2 sites registered in the FCSI as of March 31 2009 complete at least Step 7 of the federal 10-Step process by March 31 2012. Management effectiveness of program delivery will be established through setting baseline status (based on March 31 2009 FCSI data) and monitoring annual change in status in updated FCSI records. High-risk sites account for 52 percent of Parks Canada's 427 records in FCSI as of March 31 2009. The Agency's baseline status for contaminated sites remediation/risk management has been established at 18 percent or 40 sites. Fifty contaminated site remediation/risk management projects, comprising 57 sites, are planned for 2010-11.

Conserve Heritage Resources

Active Management and Restoration

38.8

16.6

See below.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

The FCSAP projects' results are the reduction of the department's financial liability associated with contaminated sites, as well as the reduction of associated risks to human health and the environment.

Expert Support

PWGSC expert support services include the following:

  • the development of project management tools and best practices, to assist with successful implementation of remediation projects by custodial departments thus allowing other departments to achieve their objectives;
  • the collection and sharing of information on innovative technologies to promote their use; and
  • liaising with the environmental industry to ensure that they are aware of future federal demand and can build adequate capacity to respond.

Federal Accommodation & Holdings

FCSAP (projects)

26.4

5.2

Custodian

 

FCSAP (expert services)

5.5

1.0

Expert Support

Total

31.9

6.2

 

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

As indicated in the RCMP's 2010-2013 Contaminated Sites Management Plan, the RCMP plans to complete 23 remediation sites, 6 risk management sites and to assess 154 sites. The RCMP's 2007-2009 Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS) targets to annually reduce the financial liability associated with Contaminated Sites and to complete all suspect site assessments. Although the RCMP may not be completing a 2010 SDS, those targets will continue to be the focus for the RCMP Contaminated Sites Program. As a result of the high volume of assessment work conducted in 2008-09 and 2009-10, the environmental liability has increased and is expected to continue to increase until most of the suspected sites have been assessed.

Corporate Infrastructure/ Internal Services

FCSAP (projects)

23.1

4.5

See below.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Transport Canada
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

Transport Canada will undertake 4 accelerated site assessments and 22 accelerated remediation projects in 2010-11. In addition, 3 baseline site assessments, and 15 baseline remediation projects will be undertaken. Transport Canada will use the indicators, targets and tracking methods for measuring progress against planned results developed by the FCSAP Secretariat to report on progress in 2010-11 for baseline and accelerated projects.

Sustainable Transportation Development and the Environment

Environmental Programs

150.8

62.3

See below.

 

 

11. Federal Partner: Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
($ million)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for
2010–11

16. Expected Results for
2010–11

16. Expected results:

Program Co-lead (with Environment Canada)

Ensures consistency with Treasury Board policies on management of federal contaminated sites, reviews financial aspects of proposals, administers fund, advises Environment Canada on monitoring of government-wide progress, maintains the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory and coordinates planning for the 2010 Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop, to be held in Montreal, Québec from May 10‑ 13, 2010.

Management Policy Development and Oversight

Assets and Acquired Services

2.7

0.5

See below.

 

 

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)*

Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11

*excluding PWGSC accommodations charges

1,766.2

416.7

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

18. Contact information:
FCSAP Secretariat, Contaminated Sites Division,
15th floor, Place Vincent Massey, 351 St. Joseph Blvd
Gatineau, QC K1A 0H3
(819) 934-8153

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Clean Air Agenda

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Lead Department program activity
3.2 - Climate Change and Clean Air
Federal Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Transport Canada, Health Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, National Research Council, Industry Canada

Start Date

April 1, 2007

End Date

March 31, 2011

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $2.57 billion

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Through the Clean Air Agenda (CAA), the Government of Canada has been working towards making tangible improvements in Canada's environment by addressing the challenges of climate change and air pollution. Since 2007, the CAA has been supporting

  • regulatory initiatives in the industrial, transportation, consumer and commercial sectors; and
  • a range of complementary program measures, such as the "ecoACTION" programming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, ways to improve indoor air quality, approaches for mitigating the impacts of climate change, and engagement at the international level.

The CAA is managed through a horizontal management, accountability and reporting framework. This framework facilitates comprehensive and systematic review of planning for and reporting on the financial and non-financial performance of CAA programming. Progress towards the CAA outcomes has been reported publically through this horizontal framework since 2007.

Shared outcomes

The 45 programs of the Clean Air Agenda are organized within eight themes: clean air regulatory agenda, clean energy, clean transportation, indoor air quality, international actions, adaptation, partnerships, and management and accountability.

The shared outcomes for these programs are:

  • The health, economic and environmental benefits for Canadians have been realized;
  • The risks to the health of Canadians and the environment resulting from exposure to air pollution have been reduced; and
  • The risks to communities, infrastructure and to the health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change have been reduced.

The Government of Canada remains committed to a reduction of 17 per cent from 2005 levels in Canada's total Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions by the year 2020.

Governance structure

The horizontal management, accountability and reporting framework is led by Environment Canada and governed by nine Deputy Ministers, 17 Assistant Deputy Ministers and Chief Financial Officers, seven Director General Theme Leads, and Director General Management Committees for the eight themes of the CAA.

The Clean Air Agenda Results Management Secretariat (CAARMS) supports the CAA governance and Environment Canada in facilitating collaboration and overseeing the accountabilities and responsibilities concerning the horizontal management of this Agenda.

Planning Highlights

Planning for the last year of the CAA four year mandate builds on the progress made to date with a focus on developing the next tranche of federal initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve health, economic and environmental benefits for Canadians.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)
(Excludes program funding allocated to 2012)
Total Planned Spending for all Federal Partners for 2010-2011
(Excludes program funding allocated to 2012)
$2,451,195,794
$951,345,654

Contact information: Karen Turcotte, Executive Director, Clean Air Agenda Results Management Secretariat, Environment Canada, (819) 953-5842 Karen.Turcotte@ec.gc.ca

CAA Theme-Level Reporting

Clean Air Regulatory Agenda
Clean Energy
Clean Transportation
Indoor Air Quality
Adaptation
International Actions
Partnerships
Management and Accountability

Theme: Clean Air Regulatory Agenda

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Health Canada

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gases beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada 's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors.
    • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides, and
    • for greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent).

Final Outcome

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved.
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.

Expected achievements in 2010-2011 from Theme programming


The highlights the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) expected results for 2010-2011 are as follows:

  • Continue the development of the domestic regulatory approach in a new context reflecting Government's policy of harmonization with the U.S., including working with provincial governments and other partners on alternative options for a cap and trade system.
  • Launch and begin implementation of Canada's offset system for greenhouse gases.
  • Maintain the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program to ensure compliance with Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) 1999 reporting requirements, including publication and provision of 2009 facility level GHG reporting data annually.
  • Develop a domestic credit tracking system, part of the infrastructure needed to assess compliance in an emissions trading system.
  • Lead the finalization of the multi-stakeholder work on a comprehensive air management system, including the development of mandatory air pollutant emission requirements for key industries.
  • Continue progress on addressing consumer products and indoor air emissions, by:
  • Publishing a Notice of Intent for the renewal of the federal agenda to reduce Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from consumer and commercial products.
  • Publishing Indoor air quality guidelines and developing indoor air quality outreach and awareness products, such as the launch of Environmental Health Guide public awareness campaign.
  • Developing a national residential wood combustion strategy.
  • Continue the development and implementation of air pollutant emission regulations aligned with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Standards for various classes of on-road and off-road vehicles, large and small engines, and heavy-duty vehicles.
  • Transport Canada will take steps to develop enhanced emissions regulations for vessels operating in waters under Canadian jurisdiction by conducting stakeholder consultations and regulatory impact analysis.
  • The department also intends to develop new regulations aligned with the U.S. EPA under the Railway Safety Act, to take effect in 2011.
  • Natural Resource Canada will conduct the analysis, consultation and process necessary to support publication of Amendments 11 and 12 to the Energy Efficiency Regulations.
  • Scientific research will continue in support of air quality improvements, such as adding new sites and additional analytical capacity to monitor air quality and refining and applying air quality models and measurements.

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Environment Canada
8 Programs
$273,245,660 $101,371,030 Expected Results
Transport Canada
1 Program
$19,170,617
$4,769,514
Expected Results
Natural Resources Canada 2 Programs
$35,200,000 $9,150,000 Expected Results
Health Canada
2 Programs
$88,800,000 $27,500,000 Expected Results
Total $416,416,277 $142,790,544

Planned Highlights


Funding received through CARA is scheduled to sun-set after the 2011-2012 fiscal year. Some components sunset in 2010-2011.

CARA lays the foundation for work on clean air and is designed with long-term objectives, having set targets for 2020 and beyond and working towards regulatory approaches that will enter into force post 2011. There will be a requirement for on-going funding for full implementation of the Agenda.

In developing a regulatory framework to reduce GHG emissions and air pollutant emissions, priorities for 2010-2011 may shift due to the evolving GHG policy and the outcome of the multi-stakeholder process for air pollutants. This may include adjustments to workplans, including research, stakeholder consultations and contracts analysis, in order to incorporate consideration of the evolving U.S. approach to greenhouse gas regulation, in line with the Government's commitment to harmonize with the U.S. approach.

Furthermore, the creation of a Clean Electricity Task Force to seek expert advice on greater emission reduction opportunities in the electricity sector will be considered in the context of the scope of the regulatory system.

Evolving policy could further delay full implementation of the Offset System and as well as the drafting of the final regulations, which the domestic credit tracking system is designed to support.
Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2010-2011 Planned Spending for Theme programming
$416,416,277 $142,790,544

Program: Industrial Sector Regulatory Actions

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


  • Continue the development of a regulatory framework to reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from key industrial sectors (including aluminium, base metal smelters, cement, chemical manufacturing, electricity generation, iron and steel and ilmenite, iron ore pelletizing, lime, potash, oil sands, natural gas pipelines, petroleum refineries, pulp and paper and upstream oil and gas) by:
  • Working with provincial governments and other partners to develop regulatory approach.
  • Engaging domestic and U.S. stakeholders to deliver approach in line with the Government's commitment to harmonize with the U.S. on climate change and to collaborate more effectively on clean energy technologies.
  • Developing regulatory provisions once the policy suite is more advance.
  • If electricity Task Force is retained, identifying emission reduction opportunities in the electricity sector beyond those delivered through regulations by seeking expert advice.
  • Work with provincial and territorial governments, industry and Environmental Non- Governmental Organizations (ENGOs) to finalize industrial requirement aspects of a comprehensive air management system.
  • Continue the development of air pollutant emission regulatory approach for the following sectors: aluminium, base metal smelters, cement, iron and steel and ilmenite, iron ore pelletizing, oil sands, natural gas pipelines, petroleum refineries, pulp and paper, upstream oil and gas.
  • Continue gathering information and conducting assessments towards the development of air pollutant emission regulations for the Electricity Generation and Wood Products sectors.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$79,626,478 $29,885,886

Program: Transport sector regulatory actions

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011

Continue the development and implementation of air pollutant emission regulations aligned with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Standards for various classes of on-road and off-road vehicles, large and small engines, by publishing in Canada Gazette in 2010-2011.

  • New regulations to reduce emissions from marine engine and recreational vehicles (personal watercraft, ATVs and snowmobiles).
  • New regulations required for On Board Diagnostics systems which identify malfunctions and facilitate repair for emission related components in heavy-duty vehicles.
  • New regulations for off-road industrial/agricultural diesel equipment to align with U.S. standards.
  • By continuing regulatory compliance testing of vehicles and engines.
Continue the development and implementation of greenhouse gas regulations for cars and light trucks, by establishing stringent standards for 2011-2016 model year vehicles.

Continue to support Transport Canada to reduce air pollutants and greenhouse gases from marine, rail and aviation by:

  • Being part of the Canadian Delegation and participating at meetings of the International Maritime Organization and International Civil Aviation Organization.
  • Conducting scientific analysis (ex. Emissions inventory, air quality modelling, etc) to support the development of domestic and international regulations to control emissions from ships.
  • Supporting development of the North American Emission Control Area with the United States and France.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$29,619,136 $11,151,395

Program: Consumer and commercial products regulatory actions

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2- Climate Change and Clean Air


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Products Environment Canada will publish a Notice of Intent (NOI) in 2010-2011 that will identify the next series of sectors where products are being proposed for VOC emission controls. The associated initiatives will be developed in collaboration with stakeholders and consist of mandatory and voluntary control measures. The Notice of Intent will address the 2010 to 2020 period.

Targets
  • Maximize the reduction of VOC emissions from consumer and commercial products (specific target not yet determined).
Activities
  • Consultations with industry, non-governmental organizations and other jurisdictional stakeholders to develop control measures for sectors identified in the Notice of Intent.
  • Development of control measures.
  • Implementation of existing three VOC product regulations.
Indicators and Tracking Methods
  • Publication of the Notice of Intent in 2010-2011.
  • Public engagement during the development of control measures (process to be determined).
  • Increased availability of products containing lower concentrations of VOCs.
Residential Wood Combustion
Environment Canada will play a leadership role in the development and coordination of a National Residential Wood Combustion (RWC) Strategy. The strategy will be developed in collaboration with stakeholders including other federal departments and, provincial and municipal governments. The strategy will offer instruments aiming at reducing the air pollutants from RWC appliances.

Targets
  • Coordinated approach through a National Residential Wood Combustion Strategy to maximize the reduction of air pollutants from RWC appliance.
Activities
  • Consultations with stakeholders including other federal departments and, provincial and municipal governments will be conducted.
  • Development of non-regulatory instruments.
  • Explore regulatory and/or legal instruments (including those beyond a stand-alone RWC regulation).
Indicators and Tracking Methods
  • Committed engagement from stakeholders to RWC Strategy.
  • Increased number of uncertified appliances decommissioned from active use.
  • Reduced incidence of winter smog and poor air quality notifications in areas greatly impacted by residential wood smoke.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$11,123,220 $3,112,700

Program: Science in support of regulatory activities and accountability

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2 - Climate Change and Clean Air


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The five Environment Canada (EC) Program 5 outputs (described below) represent EC's contribution to the overall CARA Output (O-2) of "Scientific research and studies/information; Analytical information, modeling and monitoring; Cost and benefits/economic/policy analysis and advice". This output supports the immediate outcomes entitled "Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and Greenhouse Gases (GHGs)…" (IMO-1) and "Improved reporting for regulates and compliance facilitated…" (IMO-5).

Program 5 Output 1: Air quality objectives and guidelines are based on sound scientific information
  • Production of up-to-date maps that describe ambient levels of particulate matter and ozone across Canada to support the continued development of ambient air quality standards (indicator: presence of maps).
  • Collection and assessment of lake chemistry data to refine and up-date aquatic critical load maps for eastern Canada in order to improve the scientific integrity and scope of the long-term target for acid deposition mitigation (i.e., the capacity for the environment to buffer acid deposition) (i.e., critical load is not exceeded) (indicator: presence of up-dated maps).
Program 5 Output 2: Measurements intended to "set-the-baseline" for tracking the benefits of regulations on the health and environmental effects of air pollutants across Canada
  • Continuation of up-grades to the National Air Pollution Surveillance network (NAPS) data management systems; addition of new NAPS sites and analytical capacity at some existig sites; implementation of up-grades to the NAPS continuous PM2.5 monitoring network; and, addition of new Canadian Air and Preciptiation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) sites and analytical capacity at some existing sites in order to improve EC's capacity to monitor levels of air pollutants in urban and rural/background sites across Canada (indicator: increase in the amount and quality of information describing levels of air pollutants across Canada).
  • Collection and analysis of high resolution air quality data to quantify the risks to an urban population from exposure to air pollution (indicator: number of publications in preparation describing this work).
  • Enhancement of measurements to quantify the transport of pollutants across the Pacific to western Canada in order to determine the relative contribution of domestic versus global sources of air pollutant emissions to Canada's air quality (indicator: presence of publications in preparation describing this work).
  • Publication in peer-reviewed literature of studies of current levels of air pollutants in British Columbia and Ontario in order to "set-the-baseline" for measuring the effectiveness of air pollution regulations (indicator: presence of publications).
  • Analysis and reporting of studies describing the status and trends of biological communities in aquatic ecosystems in relation to acidifying pollutants and mercury in order to assess the adequacy of current targets intended to support the recovery of aquatic ecosystem health and productivity (indicator: presence of reports and publications).
Program 5 Output 3: Results from an improved air quality model describing future air quality conditions resulting from the implementation of air pollutant regulations
  • Publication in the peer-reviewed literature of studies describing new insights into the formation of particulate matter which will subsequently be used to develop the next generation of air quality models (indicator: presence of publications).
  • Improvements to EC's global mercury transport model (GRAHM) to improve the ability of the model to predict changes in levels of mercury deposition, and the rate of response to these changes, in response to changes in mercury emissions (indicator: presence of publications in preparation).
  • Continuation of improvements to the medium and short-term predictive capacity of EC's air quality model (AURAMS) for PM, ozone, NO2 and acid deposition through expansion of the capacity of the model to utilize new sources of chemical data (indicator: presence of publications in preparation).
  • Development of a framework for integrating the air quality and climate change models to enable the prediction of air quality in a changing climate (indicator: prototype model and preliminary results).
  • Completion of the application of an ecosystem mercury model to define the state of mercury in Canadian watersheds in response to regulatory actions on mercury (indicator: presence of publications in preparation).
Program 5 Output 4: Scientific information to support the development of air quality regulations, targets, objectives and guidelines; scientific support for Canadian positions and strategies during international negotiations
  • Assessment of changes in exhaust emission profiles from light duty diesel vehicles (LDDV) attributable to the addition of biodiesel into on-road diesel fuels to inform an assessment of the human health impacts of biodiesel use in Canada (indicator: presence of data reports).
  • Provision of scientific information in support of the development of the Comprehensive Air Management System (CAMS) (indicator: reference to scientific information in the material developed by the CAMS committees).
  • Provision of scientific support to the review of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Long Range Transboundary of Air Pollution (UN ECE LRTAP) Gotenburg Protocol (indicator: reference to scientific information in the material developed by the review committees).
  • Provision of scientific support to discussions (both global and domestic) within the context of the negotiation of a legally-binding agreement on mercury emissions under the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) (indicator: reference to scientific information in the material used to support discussions and negotiations).
  • Provision of scientific support to discussions regarding the development of a PM Annex under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement including evaluations of the atmospheric and ecosystem acidification models used by the two countries to inform decision-making and scientific input to the assessment of the potential effectiveness of a bi-national emission trading scheme (indicator: reference to scientific information in the material developed to support these discussions).
Program 5 Output 5: Domestic scientific assessments of smog, acid deposition, mercury and other air pollutants describing emission sources, trends and the forecasted benefits of regulatory actions under CARA on air quality, human health and the environment.
  • Publication of the Canadian Smog Assessment (indicator: presence of report).
  • Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement - Biennial Progress Report (2010) (indicator: presence of report).
  • State-of-the-Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC) State of the Great Lakes Indicators Report - Biennial (2010) (indicator: presence of report).
  • Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) Report (2010) (indicator: presence of report).
  • Provision of Canadian mercury science to the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program's Mercury Assessment Report which reports to the Arctic Council (indicator: presence of report).
  • Provision of Canadian atmospheric science to the UN ECE-led assessment report on the Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollutants (2010) (indicator: presence of report).
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$45,042,288 $16,685,605

Program: Emissions reporting

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2 - Climate Change and Clean Air


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Results for Program 6, Emissions Reporting, includes reporting by and to Environment Canada to support regulations, emissions quantification and verification, and the development of a single-window reporting system

Support of the development and implementation of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) regulations by:
  • Improving the quality of existing air emissions data.
  • Developing a protected network for secured management, analysis and access to a wide range of confidential information collected from Industry under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) (section 71) as well as confidential regulatory compliance information through the implementation of a common secure Protected B network infrastructure within the department. Network is located in the National Capital Region (NCR).
  • Developing potential data sharing agreements with interested parties within the federal government or the provinces.
  • Developing quantification, reporting and verification (QRV) rules for greenhouse gas emissions. Work is ongoing and subject to finalization of GHG regulations, the timing of which is uncertain.
  • Working with the provincial governments and other partners towards the harmonization and streamlining in Canada of existing and future greenhouse gas emissions reporting, quantification and verification rules, where suitable. Emission targets to be developed in regulatory development process.
Expected achievements include:
  • Submission of an annual, compliant National Inventory Report for 2008 data within accepted United Nations (UN) time frames (April 15 of each year), maintaining existing institutional capacity to deliver a monitoring, accounting and reporting system to produce a UN compliant national GHG inventory system and national inventory report.
  • Maintenance of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program to ensure compliance with CEPA 1999 reporting requirements, including publication and provision of 2009 facility level GHG reporting data annually.
  • Technical advice and guidance on matters related to development of quantification and verification protocols, as well as verification guidance for a Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Offsets system.
  • Compilation, updates, improvements, analyses, and the publication of emission inventories, trends, and projections for air pollutants, selected persistent organic pollutants and heavy metals; to support the development of air pollutant regulations and policies; the management of airsheds; air quality modeling and forecasting; inform Canadians; and ensure compliance with domestic and international reporting obligations.
  • Development of quantification, reporting and verification protocols; and tools to accelerate the processing and creation of the emission data files for the air quality models.
In 2010-2011, the Single Window will be expanded.
Expected achievements include:
  • Forms to collect new regulatory reporting requirements by the Federal Government and partner provinces; where applicable, these reporting requirements will be integrated to avoid duplication.
  • Integrating current GHG reporting system at Statistics Canada with Environment Canada's single window reporting system.
  • A Master Data Repository with specified business requirements to facilitate the management of common data.
  • Initiate a contract for a threat and risk assessment to ensure appropriate tools for privacy and security for Single Window Reporting (SWR) data collection, storage and transfer as well as user registration, authorization and authentication processes and options for secure receipt, transmission and storage of data.
  • Development and implementation of a "front-office" for the single window based on program requirements.
  • Modules to facilitate access to data, and the generation of summary reports.
  • Improved identity management module to facilitate the management of identity information by facilities that report.
  • Options for the bulk upload of information by industry.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$50,434,764 $18,930,296

Program: Emissions trading

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2 - Climate Change and Clean Air


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011

The government will publish the final program rules for Canada's Offset System for Greenhouse Gases.

The department is developing a domestic credit tracking system, part of the infrastructure needed to assess compliance in an emissions trading system.

Indicators:
  • Publication of the final program rules for the Offset System.
  • Implementation of a domestic credit tracking system as part of the regulatory infrastructure.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$22,983,651 $10,519,538

Program: Enforcement advice and reporting on progress

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2 - Climate Change and Clean Air Program


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Continue overseeing Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) management, policy and support activities to induce an accountable comprehensive national approach to air emissions reduction. While developing a comprehensive approach, all parties have to consider who will be accountable for the delivery of the targets and reporting: the stakeholders, the provinces and/or the federal government.

Enforcement advice will continue to be provided in support of the development of regulatory approaches.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$6,441,900 $1,602,600

Program: Policy Development, Analysis and Coordination

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2 - Climate Change and Clean Air


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The key deliverables are:
  • Canada's Emissions Outlook to 2050. An emissions outlook, for both greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants, will be developed using a common view for macro-economic growth and energy production and consumption. This emission outlook will provide a reference point for assessing the impacts of the Government's proposed cap-and-trade approach.
  • Impact analysis - energy, emissions and economic - of the government's domestic climate change agenda. The results will provide an understanding of the emissions and economic implications of the Government's proposed cap-and-trade approach on the general economy, key industries and consumers. These results will be presented by province and sector.
  • Economic modeling analysis of alternative options for a North American and Canada-U.S. cap-and-trade regimes. This analysis will help demonstrate the benefits of a harmonized Canada-US approach to Greenhouse Gas (GHG) mitigation.
  • An analysis of the competitive impacts of the proposed cap-and-trade regime on key emission intensive and trade exposed industries.
  • Analysis of comparable effort in reducing Canadian greenhouse gas emissions relative to those of the other Annex 1 and emerging countries. The analysis of the economic impacts of alternative emission reductions targets being proposed by the internationally community will provide a basis to help inform Canada's climate change negotiating position.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$8,615,158 $2,474,479

Program: Transportation sector regulatory actions

Departmen

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air From Transport


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Rail)
The Minister of Transport, with the Minister of the Environment, will continue to support a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Railway Association of Canada that is consistent with the United States (U.S.) air pollution standards and that ensures that the rail industry continues to improve its emission performance during the 2006-2010 period.

The Minister of Transport intends to develop emission regulations for Criteria Air Contaminants (CAC) for the rail sector to take effect in 2011, aligned with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emissions standards.

Light Duty Vehicles
Transport Canada will continue to support the development of regulations, led by Environment Canada, to limit greenhouse gas emissions from the automotive sector under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA). The Government of Canada has committed to put these regulations in place for the 2011 model year.

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Ships)
Transport Canada will implement enhanced emissions regulations for vessels operating in waters under Canadian jurisdiction by March 31, 2011. In addition, Transport Canada will also partner with the United States to establish an Emission Control Area for North American coastal areas by 2012. Transport Canada will conduct stakeholder consultations and regulatory impact analysis for the above regulatory initiatives as they are developed.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$19,170,617 $4,769,514

Program: Transportation sector regulatory actions

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 - Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Expected Results for this program in 2010-2011:

  • In April 2009 the Government announced it would set CO2 emission regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 - a departure from the Government's initial approach to regulate fuel consumption using the Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act. Nonetheless, Natural Resources Canada will continue to lead on the development of regulations that address vehicle labelling. This includes determining the content, format and method for determining ratings to appear on vehicle labels, as well as establishing reporting requirements for vehicle manufacturers and importers. Requirements for the new labelling provisions need to be defined, agreed upon and published in time for the Canada Gazette process.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$3,200,000 $400,000


Program: Consumer and commercial products regulatory actions

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


In 2010-2011, the program will conduct the analysis and consultation to support the publication of Amendments 11 and 12 to the Energy Efficiency Regulations. This will complete the undertaking with respect to energy efficiency standards made in the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda prescribing new standards for and additional 13 products and increasing the stringency of 6 products for which standards already exist. In 2020 these standards will reduce annual energy consumption by approximately 13 Pj and GHG emissions by about 2.8 Mt. It is expected that associated market transformation efforts will result in additional reductions of approximately 4 Pj and 1 Mt.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$32,000,000 $8,750,000

Program: Indoor Air Quality Management Actions

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1 - Healthy Environments and Consumer safety


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.

Within 2010-2011, for the following substances on the priority list of indoor air contaminants, developed as part of a collaborative process with federal departments, provinces/territories, stakeholders and industry:
  • Publish final residential indoor air quality guidelines for toluene and draft versions for naphthalene and benzene;
  • Complete evaluation of carbon dioxide as an indicator of ventilation and health. Determine appropriate further action in collaboration with Health Canada partners;
  • Initiate risk assessments of xylene and trichloroethylene and complete preliminary assessments of other issues on the priority list: phthalates, PBDEs, house dust mites, and Legionella. These assessments will be used to determine the appropriate further action to reduce Canadians' exposure to these substances.
Develop indoor air quality outreach products to be used by public health professionals at the municipal, regional and provincial levels in developing awareness and preventive action programs for the public.

Complete field work in Edmonton and data analysis for Halifax indoor air quality studies. These exposure studies will inform assessments and risk management strategies with respect to improving residential indoor air quality in Canada.

Develop and document a GIS-based procedure for incorporating digital layers of indoor radon data and other data sources and for assigning risk weightings to each data layer to establish areas of highest radon potential in collaboration with federal and provincial partners to ensure consistency in mapping efforts across the country. A map of radon potential for an area extending from Quebec City to Windsor, Ontario will be completed using this protocol resulting in a map of radon potential encompassing ~ 50% of the Canadian population.

Launch of Environmental Health Guide public awareness campaign, of which radon will be a component. Specifically the radon outreach activities will:

  • Increase the percentage of Canadians who are aware of what radon is, the health risk and how to protect themselves - target 25% (currently 17%);
  • Increase the percentage of Canadians who have tested their homes for radon - target 7% (currently 2%);
  • Increase access to and distribution of radon brochures across Canada.
Phase two of a cross-Canada radon survey will be performed in which an additional 9,000 residential homes across the country will be tested for radon. A summary report of the results of the study will be used to identify potential areas of high radon exposure and mapping radon "rich" areas in Canada.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$17,500,000 $4,500,000

Program: Science in support of regulatory activities and accountability

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1 - Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Health research and assessments to be conducted in 2010-2011 are designed to support development and implementation of a regulatory framework to reduce emissions of air pollutants and protect public health.

Fuels and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technology:
Preliminary results of coal sector carbon capture and sequestration technology health assessment will contribute to the identification of potential health risks and benefits of this new mitigation technology. A health assessment of the use of biomass in power generation will be initiated. Both processes were identified as key issues during a prioritization process of emerging technologies. The assessments will support the department's commitment to identify health risks and benefits of new and modified fuel options and greenhouse gas mitigation technologies that may be proposed for use in Canada to address climate change.

Exposure Research:
Conduct community assessments of exposure to critical air contaminants in six cities, to determine levels of exposure, primary sources, and links to human health impacts. This work will help to inform the development of air regulations, land use planning and personal risk management decisions, by providing region-specific information on the sources of air pollutants.

Complete field research studies on exposure of individuals to air contaminants and continued analysis of results, which will assist in accurately determining the extent, levels, and sources of exposure (traffic, industry and consumer products) which cause the most harm at an individual level, including the examination of specific health endpoints for vulnerable populations (e.g. asthma, congestive heart failure).

Research:
Conduct research on the long-term effects of air pollution exposure on mortality. Cohort studies will be used to examine the impact of exposure over time based on geographic location, and to identify co-risk factors to air pollution based on socio-economic data.

National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS):
Continue development of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter and ozone, using an approach providing improvements to air quality to maximize population health benefits.

Risk Assessments:
Initiate single pollutant assessments of nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and carbon monoxide in order to update the science behind the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for these substances.

Complete sector-specific emissions profiles/scientific assessments in support of CARA's multi-pollutant approach focusing on sector-based analysis including health-based assessments of pulp and paper, coal-fired electricity generation, aluminum, iron and steel, and cement.

Economic Analysis:
Apply the Air Quality Benefits Assessment Tool (AQBAT) to the sector-specific analyses to determine the potential health and socioeconomic benefits from proposed future actions under different air quality scenarios and provide direction for appropriate air quality management strategies. Develop estimates of health and socioeconomic impacts of mould and low birth weight for inclusion in AQBAT.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$71,300,000 $23,000,000

Theme: Clean Energy

Lead Department

Natural Resources Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) and Criteria Air Contaminants (CACs).
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcomes

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

Expected achievements in 2010-2011 from Theme programming


In 2010-2011, the Clean Energy Theme will decrease Canadian greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions through the following activities:

  • Promoting energy efficiency in the buildings, houses and industrial sectors
  • Support for a 4-year total of 520,000 grants for energy efficient retrofits for households. As well, 533 contribution agreements are expected to be signed for retrofits with small and medium organizations in 2010-2011.
  • Champion the collaborative updating of the Model National Energy Code for Buildings and work with provinces and territories to encourage uptake of the updated Code, expected to be available in 2011.
  • Administer a voluntary leadership network to encourage industrial energy efficiency and plan meetings to encourage the sharing of best practices and other information. Anticipate 110 new members of this network.
  • Fund 8 new energy assessments to identify opportunities for energy efficiency in companies.
  • Develop a benchmarking system for existing commercial/institutional buildings that will facilitate comparisons of energy efficiency for similar structures.
  • Enable consumer choice in energy efficient housing by administering the labelling of approximately 10,000 new and 125,000 existing houses according to their energy performance.
  • Provide training on software, as well as building and industrial energy efficiency techniques, to increase awareness of energy efficiency performance among building professionals and home- and building owners.
  • Encouraging the deployment of renewable energy technologies
  • Provide financial support for renewable power projects in the private sector, with approximately 40 projects commissioned representing about 1,500 megawatts of new renewable power capacity.
  • Support the installation of approximately 3,000 residential solar water and 146 commercial solar thermal systems.
  • Facilitate the growth of the solar heating industry through capacity building efforts, including development of standards and a skills strategy for solar industries.
  • Provide financial and other support for a total of 15-40 renewable energy, energy efficiency and energy conservation projects, and community energy baseline studies in Aboriginal and northern communities.
  • Supporting clean energy research and development in the areas of clean electricity (including carbon capture and storage), bioenergy, clean transportation, low-emissions industry, oil sands and built environment
  • Financial and expert technical support provided for technology demonstration projects.
  • Knowledge generation and dissemination to encourage adoption of new technologies and research results.
  • Developing policies to support programming decisions
  • Development of broad policy directions for the next suite of clean energy programs in advance of the March 31, 2011 sunset of the Clean Air Agenda.

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Natural Resources Canada
7 Programs
$1,356,700,000 $672,053,000 Expected Results
INAC 1 Program
$15,000,000 $3,750,000 Expected Results
Total $1,371,700,000 $675,803,000


Planned Highlights

Funding for many of the Clean Energy programs sunsets at the end of 2010-2011. As with past years, economic and political factors (e.g., an economic downturn, decisions at other levels of government) pose risks to the achievement of program objectives. To mitigate these risks, program participation is monitored closely to ensure fast response to emerging trends, and communications strategies are developed to inform the public of new developments. The impacts of external challenges may not always be negative, however: economic pressures can in some cases lead to increased interest in a program (e.g. as energy efficiency investments can reduce costs and improve competitiveness), and regulatory barriers can sometimes be addressed through engagement efforts.

The 2009 Canada Economic Action Plan has helped to increase the reach and reduce the risks of the Clean Energy programs. The additional $300 million over two years allocated to the ecoENERGY Retrofit - Homes programs will support an estimated 200,000 additional home retrofits, and will help stimulate consumer spending while maintaining and creating jobs, especially in the home renovation and the energy audit industries. A further $285 million was allocated to the program in 2009-2010: including $205 million from the new Clean Energy Fund, established as part of Canada's Economic Action Plan in Budget 2009. These additional funds will increase activity in 2010-2011, and are expected to allow the ecoENERGY Retrofit - Homes program to retrofit a program total of approximately 520,000 homes.

Additional funding from the Economic Action Plan comes with some challenges as well. The additional funding for the Retrofit - Homes program increased the demand for the program, creating new operating challenges and heightened public expectations. The program added an external process and an executive Steering Committee to address the increased complexity of delivery. As well, some proponents of the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program have requested greater clarity in the eligibility criteria for new programs under Canada's Economic Action Plan. The program is working with proponents to streamline the application process as much as possible.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2010-2011 Planned Spending for Theme programming Funds Received from Canada's Economic Action Plan
$1,371,700,000 $675,803,000
$585,000,000

Program: ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses encourages both the construction and retrofit of more energy-efficient buildings and houses. In 2010-2011, the program expects to contribute to the following Theme-level outcomes:

Immediate Outcomes
  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) and Criteria Air Contaminants (CACs).
  • Championing the updating of the Model National Energy Code for Buildings with a new code for 2011;
  • Continuing collaborative work with provinces on code adoption; and
  • Partnerships with stakeholders are to be cultivated, for the ongoing development of energy codes and other regulatory instruments, as well as for the provision of training and information guides. This means increasing stakeholder engagement (e.g., last year we tracked the number of jurisdictions participating in code related working groups. As of the end of 2008-2009 six provinces have announced changes to their housing codes to achieve the ERS80 level by 2012. In addition, all provinces and territories (except for PEI and NFLD) participate in the Building Energy Code Collaborative, with 8 provinces having codes or code-related projects).
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Based on the current volume of labels being issued under the new housing program, it is anticipated that 10,000 labels will be issued for new homes and 125,000 for existing houses. These labels indicate the home's energy performance. The 10,000 labels in new homes represent improved energy performance compared to conventional practice. The labels in existing houses indicate the home's energy performance and are the pre-cursor to energy improvements (over 70% proceed to increase energy performance by an average of 23%);
  • Continuing to work on a benchmarking program for existing commercial/institutional buildings; and
  • Energy efficient building techniques (e.g., pertaining to whole-house ventilation, water conservation, energy budget, and cleaner heating) are to be provided. These techniques are transmitted through training programs delivered to industry members and will continue through to 2011. Information for homeowners, homebuilders, renovators, etc. is also provided on the Office of Energy Efficiency web-site: http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/english/. Information is provided for both personal and business use in the residential and buildings areas.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Working on a project for commissioning and recommissioning commercial/institutional buildings in order to ensure that buildings operate in an energy efficient manner. Recommissioning can yield an average energy savings of between 5 and 15%, depending upon circumstances;
  • Training on software tools is to continue (e.g., HOT2000 version 10 and CanQuest for new building simulation); and
  • Building professionals, including architects, designers and building managers are to be trained in energy efficiency techniques, through a series of seminars and workshops. The RMAF for the Buildings Component of ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses establishes a target of 75 workshops and 1,025 professionals trained per year.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$61,000,000 $15,300,000

Program: ecoENERGY Retrofit

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


ecoENERGY Retrofit
ecoENERGY Retrofit offers homeowners, along with smaller businesses and organizations, financial support to retrofit their homes, smaller buildings, and industrial processes. In 2010-2011, the program expects to contribute to the following Theme-level outcomes:

Immediate Outcomes
  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
Homes:
  • 18 collaborative agreements with provinces, territories, utilities and other stakeholders are to be signed.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
Homes:
  • Adoption of energy efficiency and renewable energy technology systems and products is to be increased through the incentive program and its informational website.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
Homes:
  • In 2009-2010, the ecoENERGY Retrofit - Homes program received an additional $585 million over two years through Canada's Economic Action Plan. The program is expected to support retrofits in a total of approximately 520,000 homes. Incentives are to be provided directly to property owners who implement home energy retrofits, in the form of grants for approved retrofit costs.
Small and Medium Organizations:
  • Offer small businesses and organizations financial support to retrofit smaller buildings and industrial processes; expect to sign 533 contribution agreements.
  • Awareness is to be raised through communications materials. Details on the program are provided on the Office of Energy Efficiency website http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/english/index.cfm. The Office of Energy Efficiency offers two newsletters that promote energy efficiency in buildings and facilities. Heads Up Energy Efficiency (monthly by e-mail to over 18,000 readers) informs the commercial, institutional and government buildings sectors while Heads Up CIPEC (twice a month by e-mail) keeps industrial clients up to date. Many allies, service providers and utilities subscribe to both.
  • Articles on the program are to be distributed online and by email.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011 Funds Received from Budget 2009 Canada's Economic Action Plan
$801,000,000
$453,500,000
$585,000,000

Program: ecoENERGY for Industry

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


ecoENERGY for Industry aims to accelerate energy-saving investments and the exchange of best-practices information within Canada's industrial sector. In 2010-2011, the program expects to contribute to the following Theme-level outcomes:

Immediate Outcomes
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) and Criteria Air Contaminants (CACs).
  • 110 new companies are to be engaged as members of the voluntary association of companies committed to improving their energy efficiency; and
  • 8 new energy assessments are to be funded to determine where industrial companies can improve their energy efficiency.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • 3 benchmarking studies, best practices guides and tools are to be developed. By studying facilities across an industrial sector, benchmarking provides industrial companies with a standardized method of comparing their own performance with others in their industry. Benchmark studies not only show industrial companies how they are doing, but also provide the information, motivation and targets to help them advance their energy management programs;
  • 770 managers are to be trained. The four one-day Dollars to $ense energy management workshops provide organizations and energy managers across the country with the information and motivation they need to launch, focus and invigorate their energy management programs. The energy-saving tips offered at these workshops help organizations to lower operating and production costs, reduce GHG emissions and increase operation efficiency; and
  • 35 leadership networking meetings are to be conducted, for best practice- and information-sharing. The expected participants for these meetings are industry energy managers within sector task forces. Task forces are led by industry trade organizations representing companies that understand the importance of energy efficiency to industrial competitiveness and corporate citizenship. Regular task force meetings provide a venue for energy managers to discuss problems, identify opportunities, tour facilities and share ideas.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Data to be collected pertaining to industry progress on energy efficiency;
  • Policy, program and analytical studies are to be conducted, looking at the methodology and impacts of ecoENERGY for Industry initiatives.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$18,000,000 $5,300,000

Program: ecoENERGY for Renewable Power

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


In 2010-2011, the program is expected to contribute to the following Theme-level outcomes:

Immediate Outcomes
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of Greehouse Gases (GHGs) and Criteria Air Contaminants (CACs).
  • About 40 projects commissioned, representing about 1,500 megawatts of new renewable power capacity.
  • Full commitment of available funding under the program is expected in early 2010. No new agreements will be negotiated in 2010-2011. Renewable power projects require on average about two years from conception to commissioning. As a result, the program allows developers 18 months to commission their projects after program funds have been committed.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • An additional 1,500 MW of new renewable power capacity in Canada will be commissioned.
Final Outcome
  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.
  • A GHG reduction of approximately 2 megaton's.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$243,000,000 $100,450,000

Program: ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The program expects to contribute to the following Theme-level outcomes:

  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) and Criteria Air Contaminants (CACs.
  • It is expected that 874 commercial systems will be installed over the life of the program for a total program cost of $6.1 million, leading to greenhouse gas (GHG) savings of 18 kilotonnes per year. The program target was 700 systems. It is expected that this number will increase as additional applications are received. In 2010-11, 146 systems are expected to be installed, with a GHG saving of 3.38 kilotonnes.
  • Under the Residential Pilot Incentive activity, 14 Contribution Agreements were entered into with collaborators to run residential solar water programs. The program target was 8 Contribution Agreements. Under these Contribution Agreements, it is expected that 4000 systems will be installed over the life of the program at a total cost of about $4.4 million, leading to GHG savings of 4 kilotonnes per year. Of the total, 3000 systems are expected to be installed in 2010-11, which will yield a GHG saving of approximately 3 kilotonnes per year.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Industry stakeholders are increasing sales of solar water systems. Under the Industry Capacity Building Activity, the Program will have met its commitments to develop standards and a skills strategy for solar industries.
  • The program is helping the industry to grow. Industry surveys indicate that the deployment of solar thermal systems has grown by 57% from 2007 to 2008 in terms of the number of square meters of collector area installed.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • The number of Canadian Solar Industries Association (CANSIA)-certified installers has increased from 3 at the start of the program to 91 in December 2009. This demonstrates the increase in industry capacity to service the growing demand for solar systems.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$36,000,000 $12,000,000

Program: ecoENERGY Technology Initiative

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The program expects to contribute to the following Theme-level outcomes:

  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Significant progress in broad range of research and development (R&D) and demonstration projects in clean energy technologies, aimed at reducing greenhouse gas (GHG), criteria air contaminant (CAC) and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. It is anticipated that all projects will be completed by the end of the program on March 31, 2012. Projects include:
Clean Electricity
  • Complete 2nd year of four-year front-end engineering studies and pre-commercial demonstrations of integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects in partnership with the private sector and provincial agencies. These will provide essential information for assessing different technologies prior to company decisions to proceed to full commercial-scale CCS undertakings.
  • Development of tools, technology demonstrations, and standards in the area of renewable energy technologies and distributed energy resources, and their integration to the electricity grid. Examples include: two successful demonstrations of very low-head hydraulic energy turbines; the establishment of the West Coast Wave Collaboration Program, a stakeholder network in support of future wave energy deployment off the coast of B.C.; and the development of standards for smart grid communications systems to integrate renewables to the grid and enable energy efficiency programs.
Bioenergy
  • Production of inventories of existing, new, and/or opportunity forest and agriculture biomass resources, in a single database (GIS-based web portal). The database will provide local/regional-level (rather than sector-specific) information to both the private and public sectors for the planning, costing and siting of bioenergy, bioproduct or biorefinery operations. The database will be "living," to be updated and enhanced as required from other funding sources after the present program ends.
Clean Transportation
  • Demonstration and integration of pre-commercial hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and infrastructure for successful vehicle demonstration fleet, including a demonstration at Montreal-Trudeau Airport and Vancouver International Airport of hydrogen utility vehicles, as well as knowledge for the development of more efficient hydrogen storage systems and new materials for fuel cells.
Low-emissions industry
  • Development of analytical tools, improved process design, alternative low-energy processes, bench scale testing, and partner site validation to reduce the energy/emissions footprint for industry. Examples include the use of microwave energy to reduce the energy intensity of the conversion of ethane to ethylene, advanced development of membrane separation technology, increased use of recycled materials, integrated furnace-burner systems, alternate fuel use.
Oil sands
  • Several multi-year projects in oil sands production to reduce energy use, reduce GHG, CAC, and VOC emissions in extraction and upgrading processes as well as reduce water use and maximize water recovery in tailings processes.
Built Environment
  • Several projects in partnership with municipalities, builders and developers covering elements of planning and construction of highly energy efficient buildings and communities. The projects will cover early stage community planning as well as building construction projects.
Knowledge dissemination
  • Dissemination of science and technology publications, reports, and organisation of presentations, workshops, etc., targeted at private and public sector stakeholders to ensure take-up and use of the results of ecoETI projects (e.g. for further development or use at the next stage of the innovation continuum such as technological or regulatory development).
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$173,140,000 $79,363,000

Program: Policy, Communications, Monitoring and Reporting

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Policy
  • Provision of advice to senior management on clean energy and environment issues in support of policy and program development and decision making.
  • Continued collaboration with Environment Canada on approach to a regulatory framework for GHG emissions.
  • Coordination of horizontal planning and reporting for Clean Energy Theme programs and the Clean Energy Dialogue.
  • Development of broad policy directions for the next suite of clean energy programs in advance of the March 31, 2011 sunset of the Clean Air Agenda.
Strategic Communications:
  • Providing ongoing strategic communications and marketing advice and risk communications management (communications and marketing strategies)
  • Planning and coordinating announcements to highlight ecoENERGY milestones and successes - ministerial events will take place across the country to reach Canadians and stakeholders.
  • Planning and developing communications products including news releases, backgrounders, fact sheets, speaking notes, media lines, video, Qs&As etc.
  • Producing, as required, targeted marketing and outreach material such as web sites, publications, advertising strategies, and newspaper supplements to promote the ecoENERGY programs and their successes.
  • Responding to media enquiries and monitoring media/public environment on issues related to the ecoENERGY programs.
Forest Policy & Monitoring
  • Ongoing engagement through meetings and workshops with the scientific community and all provinces and territories to improve understanding of forest carbon and the contribution of Canada's forests to global carbon budget, and improve carbon monitoring and reporting. The program works directly with all provinces and the Yukon and Northwest Territories on the development and application of the national forest carbon monitoring, analysis and reporting framework. The National Forest Sinks Committee, which typically holds 1 to 2 face-to-face meetings and 4 conference calls per year, is the principal venue for federal/provincial/territorial collaboration. The program will also continue to engage the scientific community through participation in 5 to 10 domestic and international conferences on forest carbon science.
  • Analysis, development and promotion of post-2012 international GHG accounting rules for forest carbon that improve upon those established under the Kyoto Protocol for 2008-2012, provision of direct support to Canada's negotiators.
  • Continued development of National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting system and preparation of forest-related information for Canada's 2011 National GHG Inventory Report to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), in collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment Canada (EC).
  • Analysis of forest sector opportunities to contribute to climate change mitigation, and engagement of stakeholders to encourage action through workshops and meetings.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$24,560,000 $6,140,000

Program: ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities

Department

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Departmental Program Activity

Community Infrastructure


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


In 2010-2011, the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program will continue to support the efforts of Aboriginal and northern communities within Canada in their development of clean energy projects to help reduce dependence on diesel fuel and other Greenhouse Gas (GHG) intensive fuels, lower their energy costs, contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gases and criteria air contaminants in Canada, and most importantly, assume a role in improving the health of their members.

The Program provides $2.5 million of funding for 15-40 projects in Aboriginal and northern communities annually. Eligible projects will be in the following areas (Immediate Outcomes):
  • Development and implementation of renewable energy projects, specifically in off-grid communities (maximum $250,000 per project);
  • Energy efficiency and conservation projects (maximum $250,000 per project); and
  • Community energy baseline studies (maximum $15,000 per project).
These projects will result in the adoption of energy efficient products and services, as well as the development of new renewable energy projects within Aboriginal and Northern communities. As a result, there will be reduction of GHG and Criteria Air Contaminant (CAC) emissions due to lower consumption of diesel fuel and other GHG intensive fuels (Final, Immediate and Intermediate Outcomes).

During 2010-2011, the Program will also:
  • Assist in various aspects of project development, particularly during the early stages, including project identification and inception, feasibility and planning studies, financial and project management, equity partnerships, power purchase agreements and project completion; and
  • Complete the development and begin implementation of a Departmental Off-Grid Framework, including the development of a priority listing of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects within Aboriginal and northern communities.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$15,000,000 $3,750,000

Theme: Clean Transportation

Lead Department

Transport Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcome

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) or Criteria Air Contaminant (CAC);
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcome

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcome

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

Expected achievements in 2010-2011 from Theme programming


In 2010-2011, nine of the twelve programs of the Clean Transportation Theme will enter their fourth and final year of operation. The ecoAuto Rebate Program, under which incentives were provided to purchasers of high-efficiency passenger vehicles, ended on March 31, 2009. Two programs, ecoMobility and the Marine Shore Power program, were extended to 2011-2012.

The forthcoming year is one in which the Canadian economy will be still recovering from recession, and so firms, consumers and municipal governments may be cautious about spending, especially on capital equipment, while anxious to find ways to lower daily living and operating costs through increased efficiency. This situation offers both promise and problems for efforts to increase the take up of newer technologies and best practices that lower transportation emissions.

There are many new technologies that are proven in the laboratory but not yet tested sufficiently in the market to give potential users enough confidence to invest in them. The Freight Technology Demonstration Fund will complete 12 technology demonstration projects. Through a variety of events, it will promote the transfer of knowledge to the freight industry. The ecoTechnology for Vehicles program will work with vehicle manufacturers to acquire and test 10 advanced light duty vehicles, including clean diesel, hybrid, full electric and fuel cell vehicles. The ecoMobility program will complete 14 projects that provide resources to municipalities to implement Transportation Demand Management (TDM) projects. TDM refers to actions that improve transportation system efficiency by reducing transportation demand, such as transit-friendly development and zoning, ridesharing and park-and-ride facilities.

To reduce the cost sometimes associated with lower-emission transportation choices, the Freight Technology Incentive Program will accelerate the commercialization of proven technologies through funding of 29 projects. Environment Canada's Vehicle Scrappage program will provide incentives to consumers who retire older vehicles, with a goal of retiring at least 50,000 vehicles annually. The Marine Shore Power program will support 2 marine shore power projects to mitigate the cost of installing this innovative approach at major Canadian ports.

Improving capacity involves increasing the ability of organizations to assess and apply emissions reducing technologies and best practices, and enhancing the knowledge and skills of the people who use these technologies and practices. The ecoMobility program will develop guides and case studies to help practitioners integrate transportation demand management (TDM) into their operations. NRCan's ecoENERGY for Fleets program will fund up to 10 projects, and train 2200 transportation professionals, including drivers, driving instructors, mechanics and fleet managers on fuel efficient driving, maintenance and business practices. It will mount 45 workshops. NRCan's ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles program will train 125,000 new drivers on fuel efficient driving and buying practices. The ecoFREIGHT Partnerships program will support implementation of the Memorandum of Understanding with the Railway Association of Canada to reduce greenhouse gas and criteria air contaminant emissions, and will engage the Air Transport Association of Canada and the National Airlines Council of Canada in similar efforts. The Analytical and Policy Support program will increase decision-making capacity within government by working with the provinces and territories to improve transportation emissions data and analytical tools.

It is important that the prevailing frameworks of laws, regulations and standards facilitate the introduction of new emissions-reducing technologies and approaches. The National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry will test emerging technologies to verify their performance and compliance with regulatory standards for on-road trucking operations and work with provinces and territories to remove regulatory barriers to increased use of emission-reducing technologies. The ecoFreight Partnerships program will work with international organizations such as the International Civil Aviation Organization and the International Maritime Organization to support the development of international environmental standards, practices and guidelines.

Finally to improve awareness and knowledge, programs under this theme will use information generated over the first years of the programs and disseminate it through a range of media. The Freight Technology Demonstration Fund and the Freight Technology Incentives Program will prepare case studies and other outreach materials to distribute to decision makers in the freight industry. The ecoFreight Partnerships program will work with the Canadian Industrial Transportation Association (CITA) to monitor the national freight industry's knowledge of emissions reducing opportunities and the actions taken to grasp them. The ecoTechnology for Vehicles program outreach initiatives (including over 15 public events, an interactive website, a quarterly public newsletter and a resource service for schools) are expected to provide over 150,000 Canadians with the information they need to make informed decisions when purchasing a new vehicle. Similarly, NRCan's ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles program will inform purchasers of new vehicles through the publication of the 2011 Energuide for Vehicles fuel consumption guide and the Most Efficient Vehicles List. It will also fund up to $1 million of targeted outreach activities aimed at increasing consumers' awareness and adoption of energy efficient driving and buying practices. NRCan's ecoEnergy for Fleets program will develop an energy-efficient tire consumer information program. Finally, the ecoMobility program will disseminate information products (including Transportation Demand Management Measurement Guidelines and a Sustainable Transportation Options guide for Small and Rural Communities), to inform decision makers and operators in municipal governments and transit systems across Canada .


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Transport Canada
9 Programs
$ 315,300,000 $ 15,241,000
Expected Results
Human Resources Skills Development Canada
1 Program
$11,300,000 $0 Expected Results
Natural Resources Canada
2 Programs
$43,000,000 $11,700,000 Expected Results
Environment Canada 1 Program $92,000,000 $42,588,000 Expected Results
Total $461,600,000
$69,529,000


Planned Highlights

The strategy of the Clean Transportation Theme programs will increase the take up of technologies and best practices through measures aimed at tackling the barriers to their increased market penetration. The central barrier is a lack of knowledge and market acceptance due to the poor availability or quality of information to consumers and firms. Other important barriers include uncertainty about the commercial viability of new technologies, cost, a lack of organizational and knowledge capacity, and the presence (or absence) of regulations, codes and standards that affect user choices.

Reducing these barriers will accelerate the commercial development and use of innovative technologies and best practices, thereby ensuring progress in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. In this way, these programs are laying the foundation for emissions reductions, which is the intermediate outcome of the programs.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2010-2011 Planned Spending for Theme programming
$461,600,000 $ 69,529,000

Program: ecoMobility

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Increased use of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) measures can help reduce urban transportation Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. The ecoMOBILITY program responds to two major findings from the Urban Transportation Showcase Program on barriers to the use of TDM: a lack of knowledge for Canadian practitioners and decision-makers on Transportation Demand Management (TDM) measures as well as a lack of resources to implement TDM initiatives.

Immediate Outcomes
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or Criteria Air Contaminants (CAC) or release of toxic substances.
In 2010-2011, the fourteen pilot projects that were announced for funding under ecoMOBILITY program will enter their second year of implementation. These 13 municipalities (one municipality is delivering two projects) will increase the use of transit, carpooling and active transportation and pilot initiatives in workplaces and schools to encourage Canadians to use more sustainable modes of transportation, while advancing their understanding of how TDM can work in their community to reduce GHG emissions by increasing the use of alternatives to single occupancy vehicles. A qualitative and quantitative results measurement and reporting strategy will continue to be implemented in each of the 13 municipalities with respect to the demonstration projects. Building on the baseline information developed in 2009-2010, the first follow up measurement will occur in 2010-2011, and the final measurement will be completed in 2011-2012. Information on the success factors in implementing various TDM approaches will be shared with other Canadian communities during targeted workshops and web-based information products in 2010-2011 and 2011-2012, thus increasing the knowledge and utilization of TDM measures in a broader number of Canadian communities.

In order to further increase the capacity of Canadian municipalities to implement effective TDM strategies to reduce energy consumption, GHG and CAC, a number of tools will be developed and disseminated under the program in addition to the funded pilot projects. Tools which have already been created, and which will be shared more broadly in 2010-2011, will increase municipal capacity to measure the impacts of TDM strategies underway in their community, to develop and implement a range of options for small and rural communities, launch community Bike Sharing programs/services, establish employee transit discount programs, community-based social marketing approaches to support mode shift away from personal vehicle use, and telework programs and supporting services. At least 5 new tools will be developed and disseminated to municipalities in 2010-2011 will include guidelines (with hands-on professional development events) for identifying the business case for successful TDM strategies, and case studies (approximately 10-15) on specific topics including University and school-based TDM initiatives, transit marketing strategies and recent trends in carpooling. The program will deliver/support approximately 20 learning events in 2010-2011.

In 2010-2011, program staff will monitor and track the number of participating municipalities in the above activities, the number of strategies and information products developed, and the size/of the target audience reached with the information, so as to link the 2010-2011 program activities with the above immediate outcomes.

Intermediate Outcome
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.
The program will not report intermediate outcomes until the final year of the program in 2011-2012. The program measurement strategy will be initiated in 2010-2011 to begin to collect information on the outcomes of the program. Indicators have been developed to measure changes in the Canadian capacity to implement the TDM initiatives addressed by this program. These indicators will seek to identify where TDM has been incorporated into municipal plans and operations, and the number of municipalities that add or enhance TDM commitments in their plans and operations. TDM professionals will be asked the extent to which they increased their knowledge and their ability to implement and measure their initiatives due to program activities. The utility of the tools developed by the program will also be measured. The feedback from participants will also be gathered from ecoMOBILITY learning activities and information dissemination activities.

Final Outcome
  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation
The program is forecasting a GHG reduction of 0.011 MT in 2012. This final outcome will be measured in 2011-2012.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$8,200,000
$2,814,000

Program: ecoTechnology for Vehicles

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Immediate Outcome
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) or Criteria Air Contaminants (CACs);
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.
Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices will be supported in 2010-2011 by the program's extensive testing and evaluation of advanced vehicle technologies in Canada. The program will work in collaboration with vehicle manufacturers to acquire and test 8-10 advanced light-duty vehicles in 2010-2011 - including clean diesel, hybrid, plug-in hybrid, full electric and fuel cell vehicles. These key technologies range from near term availability in the market (clean diesel, advanced gasoline technologies) to medium term introduction (electric and plug-in electric hybrid technologies) to longer-term introduction (hydrogen and fuel cell technologies). Test results will evaluate the safety and environmental performance of a range of emerging technologies. This will be used to inform policies, programs, emergent codes and standards, and the program's outreach activities to reduce barriers to the uptake of these technologies.

The program will also work in collaboration with industry to identify and help address barriers to the adoption of promising technologies for use in Canada, including consumers' knowledge and acceptance of advanced technologies. This will increase the participation of vehicle manufacturers and technology suppliers in educating the Canadian public on emerging emission-reducing vehicle technologies.

The program will continue to draw upon the results of its testing and industry partnerships to disseminate the results of vehicle technology testing and evaluation to Canadians, to promote technology acceptance and adoption. This will include providing technical information to over 15 public events across Canada; an updated and interactive website with over 60 advanced technology articles and 10 videos; a quarterly public newsletter; and an 'edukit/virtual program' that provides resources to secondary school teachers to help them add clean vehicle technology information into the curriculum. The selected program audience targets male and female Canadians who will purchase a vehicle in 1- 10 years time and that fit pre-determined psychographics. Activity outcomes will be measured using web metrics, newsletter subscriptions, event attendance, and event exit evaluations. Through increased exposure to performance information from a credible, neutral government source it is anticipated that the targeted Canadian audience will increase its capacity to understand and adopt vehicles with targeted advanced technologies over the near and medium term.

Intermediate Outcome
  • Use of transportation technologies that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC
The program measurement strategy will be implemented in 2010-2011 to collect information on the immediate and intermediate outcomes of the program. This will include an assessment of the increased penetration of specific advanced vehicle technologies in the Canadian fleet of light-duty vehicle, using the department's Vehicle Fuel Economy Information System (VFEIS) in 2011.

Final Outcome
  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.
The program is forecasting a GHG reduction of 0.15 Mt in 2011. This final outcome will be measured in 2011-2012 using a methodology that includes analysing market sales data, and estimating the increased penetration of relevant advanced vehicle technologies. Based on this, GHG and CAC reductions will be estimated using fuel efficiency data provided by the Canadian Fuel Consumption Guide and driving profiles available from the Canadian Transportation Survey.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$14,100,000 $2,693,000

Program: National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry (NHITI) was established to identify and promote solutions to barriers currently slowing the uptake of emission-reduction technologies in the Canadian trucking industry. It was designed to support provinces and territories in their efforts towards regulatory harmonization supporting emission-reduction technologies in the trucking sector.

Immediate Outcome
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) or Criteria Air Contaminants (CAC);
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities;
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.
The program has successfully supported the move by Ontario and Quebec to mandate the use of speed limiters for the heavy trucks. Although additional provinces outside of Ontario and Quebec have expressed an interest in heavy truck speed limiters, and information will continue to be provided, further regulatory activity on speed limiters is not anticipated within the 2010-2011 timeframe.

In 2010-2011, information will be shared with provinces and governments from the on-going testing of emerging environmental technologies to verify their environmental performance and compliance with regulatory requirements for on-road operation. For example, the program will assess the fuel efficiency improvements and regulatory compliance with safety standards of rear trailer fairings (boat tails) for on-road use in all jurisdictions by Canadian fleets. This is expected to remove barriers to the increased uptake of technologies that reduce trucking energy consumption and GHG.

Intermediate Outcome/ Final Outcome
  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC;
  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.
Increases in the use of specific technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG and CAC in the trucking sector will be evaluated through the ecoFREIGHT demonstration and incentive programs. The National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry is one of six initiatives under the ecoFreight Program which is expected to reduce GHG emissions by a total of 1.25 Mt in 2011. This final outcome will be measured in 2010-2011.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$5,400,000 $1,855,000

Program: Freight Technology Demonstration Fund

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Immediate Outcome
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) or Criteria Air Contaminants (CAC);
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.
The Freight Technology Demonstration Fund has supported industry projects to purchase, install and demonstrate new and under-used emission-reducing technologies in the freight industry. These projects will demonstrate technology such as common rail fuel injection, variable-speed gantry container cranes at a port; ultra low-emitting Genset locomotives for yard and road switching; multiple truck technologies (aerodynamic trailer skirts, base flaps, auxiliary power units and single wide-base tires); truck on-board computers and hybrid reefer technology; an engineless (nonpetroleum) auxiliary power unit. These technologies offer promise to contribute to both economic and environmental objectives, as reducing fuel use is vital to productivity and competitiveness of the transportation industry as well as to reducing emissions. Twelve (12) demonstration projects will be underway within 2010 with total committed funding of $4.1M.

In 2010-2011, the program will receive information from completed technology projects and disseminate the results to industry through events, case studies and other products that explain the business case for the tested technologies and increase the capacity of industry to take advantage of successful technologies. The ecoFREIGHT program will participate in at least four events in Canada to enable the transfer of knowledge acquired from demonstration projects to the broader industry. Events will consist of freight industry conferences, annual general meetings and trade shows where ecoFreight program staff will participate along with industry partners. The ecoFREIGHT Web-base Information Network will be a key outreach tool, and will be enhanced in 2010-2011 with published demonstration results achieved by specific companies and other information enabling the transfer of knowledge to industry. This will broaden the participation of members of the freight industry in emission-reducing activities and technology uptake beyond the initial funding recipients.

Intermediate Outcome
  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.
The final stage of the program measurement strategy will be initiated in 2010-2011 to collect information on the outcomes of the program. Indicators have been developed to measure changes in the uptake, awareness and acceptance of new and under-used energy efficient freight technologies supported by the program. Freight transportation professionals and technology suppliers/users will identify the extent to which they increased their knowledge and their ability to implement and use energy efficient technologies due to program activities. The utility of case studies developed by the program will also be measured.

Final Outcome

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.
The Freight Technology Demonstation Fund is one of six initiatives under the ecoFreight Program which is expected to reduce GHG emissions by 1.25 Mt in 2011. This final outcome will be measured in 2010-2011.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$9,300,000 $2,066,000

Program: Freight Technology Incentives Program

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Immediate Outcome
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) or Criteria Air Contaminants (CAC);
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.
The Freight Technology Incentives Program has supported industry projects to purchase and install available freight transportation technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and/or criteria contaminants. Contribution funds to industry are supporting the purchase and installation of a mix of technologies that include: ultra low emitting Genset locomotives technology, alternative fuel for baggage tractors, refurbishing marine engine with latest fuel efficient technology, bundled advanced truck technologies (i.e. aerodynamic truck technologies, advanced auxiliary power technologies for trucks, single tire technologies and long combination vehicle options for trucks). These technologies offer promise to meet both economic and environmental objectives, as reducing fuel use is vital to productivity and competitiveness of the industry as well as emissions.

In 2010-2011, the program will receive information from completed technology projects and disseminate the results to industry through events, case studies and other products that explain the business case for the tested technologies and increase the capacity of industry to take advantage of successful technologies. The ecoFREIGHT program will participate in at least four events in Canada to enable the transfer of knowledge acquired from demonstration projects to the broader industry. Events will consist of freight industry conferences, annual general meetings and trade shows where ecoFreight program staff will participate along with industry partners. The ecoFREIGHT Web-base Information Network will be a key outreach tool, and will be enhanced in 2010-2011 with published demonstration results achieved by specific companies and other information enabling the transfer of knowledge to industry. This will broaden the participation of members of the freight industry in emission-reducing activities and technology uptake beyond the initial funding recipients.

Intermediate Outcome
  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC;
The final stage of the program measurement strategy will be initiated in 2010-2011 to collect information on the outcomes of the program, including uptake in the industry of technology addressed by this program. Indicators have been developed to measure changes in the uptake, awareness and acceptance of energy efficient freight technologies supported by the program. Freight transportation professionals and technology suppliers/users will provide information on the extent to which they increased their knowledge and their ability to implement and use energy efficient technologies due to program activities. The utility of case studies developed by the program will also be measured.

Final Outcome
Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

The Freight Technology Incentives Program is one of six initiatives under the ecoFreight Program which is expected to reduce GHG emissions by 1.25 Mt in 2011. This final outcome will be measured in 2010-2011.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$9,350,000 $1,670,000

Program: ecoFreight Partnerships

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Immediate Outcome
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) or Criteria Air Contaminants (CAC);
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.
In 2010-2011, the ecoFreight Partnerships program will continue to work with Canadian Industrial Transportation Association (CITA) to better understand the industry's environmental practices and the decision-making with respect to transportation. This will help understand the drivers for industry decision-making, as well as industry's knowledge of the environmental impacts of their decisions and the mitigating options that they can take.

The program will support at least three events with the freight transportation industry and/or industry shippers to transfer knowledge and information on emission-reducing technologies and best practices. With this knowledge, users will be better able to include environmental impacts in the decision making process when selecting between modes and carriers during their freight transportation decisions. The program will sponsor at least one industry award to recognize industry environmental leaders with respect to transportation, and to promote their best practices to their peers.

Overall, the program will develop and disseminate information and tools to stakeholders, including freight shippers and forwarders to increase awareness of sustainable transportation options. This program will support several outcomes, including increased knowledge and uptake opportunities of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHGs and CACs, increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC emissions and increased participation by freight industry in emission reduction activities.

In 2010-2011, Transport Canada will continue to provide an increased presence at international committees, working groups, and other international transportation fora with a dedicated focus on emissions reduction (e.g. International Civil Aviation Organization, International Maritime Organization, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, International Transport Forum and the Commission on Environmental Cooperation). Transport Canada will also continue to provide support to the international development of environmental standards, practices and guidelines, contributing to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants and the improved efficiency of the aviation and marine sectors under the auspices of the International Maritime Organization and the International Civil Aviation Organization.

These initiatives will contribute towards more informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices; and, dissemination and use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption, GHGs and CACs.

Transport Canada will continue to support implementation of the voluntary Memorandum of Understanding with the Railway Association of Canada, in effect until 2010, that identifies commitments by the Canadian railway companies to reduce greenhouse gas and criteria air contaminant emissions on a voluntary basis.

Transport Canada will continue collaboration with domestic aviation industry organizations including the Air Transport Association of Canada and National Airlines Council of Canada. This initiative supports the industry's efforts to reduce emissions and improve fleet and fuel efficiency, and the uptake of new technologies and best practices with the goal of reducing GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcome
  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.
The ecoFreight Partnership program is one of six initiatives under the ecoFreight Program which is expected to reduce GHG emissions by 1.25 Mt in total in 2011. This final outcome will be measured in 2010-2011.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$6,550,000 $1,452,000

Program: Marine Shore Power Program

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Immediate Outcome
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) or Criteria Air Contaminant (CAC);
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.
In 2010-2011, the Marine Shore Power Program will complete its $2.0 million investment in a marine shore power facility at the Port Metro Vancouver. This $9M project is demonstrating the use of shore-based power for marine vessels in Canadian ports to reduce air pollution from idling ship engines, and will be in operation for a second cruise season in 2010-2011. The emissions impact and business case will continue to be measured as part of the demonstration project. The Marine Shore Power Program will support an additional demonstration project for completion in 2011-2012.

Information collected through these demonstration projects will improve the industry's knowledge of the level of funding required to build this type of infrastructure, the level of emissions reduction that can be expected, the partnerships needed to deliver shore power (e.g. electricity provider) and will document the business case for this technology in Canadian ports. These are necessary elementsif Canadian ports are to develop the capacity to implement shore power on a wider scale.

Intermediate Outcome
  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC;
The program's measurement strategy will be initiated in 2010-2011 to collect information on the outcomes of the program with respect to increased take-up and capacity for marine shore power in Canada. Indicators have been developed to measure changes in the uptake, awareness and acceptance of technology approaches supported by the program. These indicators will measure the extent to which port professionals and technology suppliers/users increased their knowledge and their ability to implement shore power technologies. The utility of case studies developed by the program will also be measured

Final Outcome
  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.
The Marine Shore Power Program is expected to reduce GHG emissions by .008 Mt in 2012. This final outcome will be measured in 2011-2012.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$5,700,000 $1,693,000

Program: Analytical and Policy Support

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Under the Analytical and Policy Support function, Transport Canada will work with the Provinces and Territories and other federal departments and agencies to improve data and analytical capacity. Work will include the development of a data strategy, and pilot projects, with some jurisdictions. The goal of this initiative is to update Transport Canada's core knowledge and data to contribute towards more informed positions on policies and programs related to energy consumption and the reduction of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) and Criteria Air Contaminants (CACs).

Policy support will also be provided to the evaluation of Transport Canada's ecoTRANSPORT programs and the Kyoto Protocol Implementation Act reporting.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$4,000,000 $998,000

Program: ecoAUTO Rebate Program

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


This program ended on March 31, 2009.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$252,700,000 $0

Program: ecoAUTO Rebate Program

Department

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Departmental Program Activity

--


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


This program ended on March 31, 2009; there are no expected results for 2010-2011.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$11,300,000 $0

Program: ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 - Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Output targets for 2010-2011

  • Financial support
    • Expect to receive 20 proposals under the ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles funding opportunity, for funding of up to $1 million dollars
  • Partnerships and networks
    • Expect to hold 2 meetings with Auto industry
  • Training and education
    • Expect 125,000 new drivers will be trained on fuel efficient driving practices
  • Information and decision support/analysis
    • Expect to target purchasers of new vehicles through the production of the 2011 EnerGuide for Vehicles fuel consumption guide and the Most Fuel Efficient Vehicles list
Immediate Outcome targets for 2010/11

  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities
    • Increased participation in emission reducing activities will be achieved through delivery of at least five collaborative agreements.
  • Increased capacity to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances
    • Capacity to address emissions from personal vehicles through better driving practices and more efficient vehicle purchases will be enhanced through the training of 125,000 new drivers and through the national distribution of information materials such as the 2011 Fuel Consumption Guide with a targeted circulation of 350,000 units. Additionally, funding of up to $1 million of emissions-reducing projects will enable proponents to deliver targeted outreach activities aimed at increasing consumers' awareness and adoption of energy efficient buying, driving, and maintaining practices for personal vehicles.
Intermediate Outcome targets for 2010-2011

  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or Greenhouse Gas (GHG) or Criteria Air Contaminant (CAC)
  • Expect that 31,250 new drivers will employ fuel efficient driver behaviours as a result of retention of the fuel efficient driving techniques learned through training on fuel efficient driving practices
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$21,000,000 $5,700,000

Program: ecoENERGY for Fleets

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 - Clean Energy


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Output targets for 2010-2011

  • Financial support
    • Expect to receive 10 proposals under the ecoENERGY for Fleets funding opportunity for 2010-2011 with funding up to $1 million dollars.
  • Partnerships and networks
    • ecoEnergy for Fleets program is expected to develop partnerships and networks through participation in 15 trade shows and 30 meetings with industry.
  • Training and education
    • 2200 transportation professionals, including drivers, driving instructors, mechanics and fleet managers, are expected to be trained on fuel efficient driving, maintenance and business practices during 2010-2011.
  • Research studies
    • Expect to complete 2 research studies in support of the development of an energy efficient tire consumer information program that will to steer purchasers to low rolling-resistant and energy-efficient tires. The studies will examine the performance elements of energy efficient tires, and tire purchasing decisions.
Immediate Outcome targets for 2010-2011

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices.
    • the program team will use knowledge gained through research studies related to energy efficient tires and tire purchasing decisions to plan outreach initiatives and more comprehensive messaging for the trucking sector.
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities
    • Increased participation in emission reducing activities will be achieved through delivery of up to ten collaborative agreements.
  • Increased capacity to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gas or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances
    • the capacity of transportation professionals (drivers, driver trainers, mechanics, and managers) to address emissions through their decision making will be enhanced through training and through the provision of decision-support tools and information materials including workshops. These knowledge transfer opportunities encompass the training of 2200 transportation professionals, the mounting of 45 workshops, and 25,000 web hits. Additionally, capacity to undertake emissions-reducing projects will be increased through the provision of up to $1 million of funding, which will enable fleets to gain valuable on-road experience with energy efficient fleet vehicle technologies.
Intermediate Outcome targets for 2010-2011

  • use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or Greenhouse Gas (GHG) or Criteria Air Contaminant (CAC)
    • Expect that 2200 professional drivers and fleet managers trained in fuel efficiency best practices will apply these practices on the road and within fleets in order to secure fuel savings and GHG emission reductions.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$22,000,000 $6,000,000

Program: Vehicle Scrappage

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2 - Climate Change and Clean Air Program


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Financial support
  • The "Retire your Ride" program ("Adieu Bazou" in French) will continue to run in every province, delivered by a network of not-for-profit organizations coordinated by Summerhill Impact (formerly Clean Air Foundation). The goal is to retire at least 50,000 old vehicles annually representing a smog reduction of about 2250 tonnes.
  • Canadians who own older (1995 and before) vehicles will be encouraged to retire them and to choose from a range of attractive rewards such as: free transit passes; rebates on bicycles; memberships in car sharing programs; and rebates on the purchase of a new vehicle offered by vehicle manufacturers.
  • Real-time program results, such as status of vehicles in the program (registered, paperwork verified, scheduled for collection by a vehicle recycler, etc.) and reward selection, are tracked using a national database.
Outreach
  • Regional program delivery agents will promote Retire your Ride through local outreach activities.
  • The second wave of a public awareness campaign will be implemented by the Canadian Urban Transit Association, with contribution funding from Environment Canada. Posters will be displayed on buses and bus shelters across the country.
Partnership and network
  • An exhibit on vehicle recycling and sustainable transportation will be on display at the Biosphere, and smaller, travelling versions of the exhibit will be displayed in one or two other Canadian museums.
Guidelines and agreements
  • To ensure responsible recycling of vehicles, all vehicle recyclers participating in the Retire your Ride program will adhere to a National Code of Practice that outlines the legal requirements and best environmental management practices before, during and after vehicle recycling.
  • Up to 350 audits will be conducted through on-site visits of participating vehicle recyclers to verify their compliance with the code of practice.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$92,000,000 $42,588,000


Theme: Indoor Air Quality

Lead Department

Health Canada

Federal Theme Partners

National Research Council of Canada

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period


Immediate Outcome
  • Improved awareness by public, property managers, and governments of health risks and causes of reduced indoor air quality and strategies to improve it.
  • Stronger interest in and basis for developing technological solutions for improving indoor air quality
  • Strengthened research capacity related to indoor air quality issues.
Intermediate Outcome
  • Reduced health risks from poor indoor air quality.
  • Development and effective application of regulations, guidelines and recommendations related to indoor air quality.
  • Production and uptake of new products/techniques related to reducing health risks from poor indoor air quality.
Final Outcome
  • Adverse effects of poor indoor air on the health of Canadians are reduced.

Expected achievements in 2010-2011 from Theme programming


Radon Strategy

An informative radon Educator's Tool Kit, radon education resources and tools, and a radon factsheet will be distributed to stakeholders, including health professionals and NGO's, by March 31, 2011.

Aerial surveys assessing levels of terrestrial radiation will be conducted, with a target of approximately 35% of Canada's geographic area assessed by 2011. Soil gas radon measurements will be made at 20 major population centres by March 31, 2011.

Ongoing systematic on-site testing and screening will be completed of federal building and facilities for actual radon levels and their comparison against the new radon guidelines. A target has been set to test 5,000 federal buildings by the end of 2011. This is expected to represent the completion of ~ 50% of the buildings in known areas of high radon potential.

Indoor Air Research and Development Initiative

A research intervention field study on ventilation, air distribution and health will be completed by the end of 2010-2011. A target of 100 Quebec city homes will be measured, with six visits to every home by the end of 2010-2011. Interventions in 50% of under ventilated homes or bedrooms will be completed in this fiscal year. A database of research findings, two publications in peer-reviewed journals and two conference presentations related to available findings will be completed in 2010-2011.

Two surveys will be conducted of stakeholders of industry, home owners and general interest groups on awareness of indoor air and improvement strategies.

An evaluation will be completed to assess the true effectiveness of relevant air quality solutions and technologies currently used in the IAQ management. Three protocols will be developed and tested on the assessment of "IAQ improvement solutions/ technologies" in 2010-2011.

By the end of 2010-2011, testing and technical reporting of three IA technologies will be completed: (1) performance of portable air cleaners (PAC), (2) commercial air duct cleaning and (3) heat recovery ventilator (HRV) impact on IAQ. Three submissions of papers to peer-reviewed journals and a general review paper will be completed. A publicly available dataset, including detailed test-results related to these technologies, will also be posted on NRC's website. Using modeling software, 35 homes will be modeled based on the scenarios in the Quebec field study homes.

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
National Research Canada
1 Program
$8,000,000 $2,000,000 Expected Results
Health Canada
1 Program
$15,000,000 $4,100,000 Expected Results
Total $23,000,000 $6,100,000

Planned Highlights


There is a risk that on-site testing and screening of federal buildings will not be completed due to delays in obtaining the appropriate authorities to access the buildings.

A moderate risk of the Ventilation and Health Field Study is that participants may drop out of the study, which will be mitigated by researchers explaining the benefits of the study to homeowners. An additional risk of this field study is that the interventions will be less effective than anticipated, which will be mitigated by modeling and measuring most scenarios in the Indoor Air Research Laboratory and investigating improvements of the interventions directly afterwards.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2010-2011 Planned Spending for Theme programming
$23,000,000 $6,100,000

Program: Indoor Air Research and Development Initiative

Department

National Research Council

Departmental Program Activity

1.1 Research and Development


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Activity 1: Ventilation and Health Field Study
One research intervention field study on ventilation, air distribution and health will be conducted by the end of the 2010-2011.

  • NRC will measure 100 Quebec City homes, with six visits in every home by the end of 2010-2011.
  • NRC will complete all initial home inspections in the 1st quarter of 2010-2011, including a detailed plan of the house, the calculation of the volume of the house, an inspection of the ventilation system, and 7 questionnaires.
  • During 2010-2011, NRC will perform interventions in approximately 50% (representing 40-50 homes) of the homes that are underventilated homes or have underventilated bedrooms of asthmatic children. Analyses of all indoor air quality samples, ventilation samples and health outcomes will be completed.
  • NRC will establish databases and give recommendations related to 'healthy ventilation rates' in 2010-2011.
  • NRC will disseminate several publications, including 2 publications in peer-reviewed journals and 2 presentations at a national and an international conference.

Indoor Air Research Laboratory (IARL) (supporting 'Activity 1' and partially
'Activity 2')

  • NRC will physically model approximately 35 homes based on the scenarios found in the QC field study homes in 2010-2011.
  • The modelling will be a comparative study with one case representing the current situation encountered in the selected homes in Quebec, and the second after the envisaged intervention. The aim of this modelling is to select the most appropriate intervention procedure and anticipate the effectiveness of these interventions.
  • NRC will disseminate several publications, including 1 paper in a peer-reviewed journal and 1 presentation at an international conference.
Activity 2: Evaluation of Indoor Air Quality Solutions and Technologies
The objective of this Activity is to develop means for evaluating the true effectiveness of three to four of the most relevant air quality solutions and technologies currently used in IAQ management.

Two test systems will be built to test different relevant indoor air quality improvement technologies.

  • One test system is the Full Scale Chamber, which is the test facility for the IA technology #1: portable air cleaners (completed early 2010-2011).
  • The second test system is the adapted IARL, which was equipped with HRV and other ventilation systems, which will be the test facility for the IA technology # 3: HRV systems (completed early 2010-2011).
Three protocols will be developed on the assessment of "IAQ improvement solutions/technologies". Three "Indoor Air Quality improvement solutions/technologies" will be tested against three respective protocols.

One common publicly available data set related to IAQ solutions/technologies.
Reports and detailed test results will be posted on NRC's website.

  • IA technology # 1: Performance of portable air cleaners (PAC).
  • A technical workshop is planned for October 2010.
  • Testing of portable air cleaners will be completed by early 2010-2011.
  • A technical report detailing the evaluation of PAC using the IAQST-1 protocol will be reviewed by the TAC.
  • IA technology # 2: Commercial air duct cleaning.
  • NRC will establish and review the test protocol in early 2010-2011
  • Testing of air duct cleaning technologies will start immediately thereafter.
  • The technical report on IAQST-2 is expected to be completed by mid 2010-2011.
  • IA technology # 3: Heat recovery ventilator (HRV) impact on IAQ.
  • A technical workshop related to HRV design/operation/testing will be held in early 2010 to define the scope of this protocol.
  • The testing of the protocol to evaluate the effects of HRVs will start in early 2010-2011.
  • A technical test report for IAQST-3 will be completed by end of 2010-2011.
  • The Technical Advisory Committee will provide further recommendations, advice, reviews and comments.
  • Two papers will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals.
  • A general review paper related to "IAQ solutions and technologies" will be submitted for journal publication in 2010-2011.
Stakeholder meetings with Canadian interest groups and manufacturers will be held to prioritize technologies, validate research protocols, and disseminate findings.

  • NRC will host 3 workshops, each related to one of the IA technologies, to gather key information, identify knowledge gaps, and solicit perspectives and recommendations from stakeholders to develop and test protocols.
Activity 3: Canadian Committee on Indoor Air Quality and Buildings (CCIAQB)

Two surveys will be conducted of stakeholders of industry, home owners, general interest groups, etc. on awareness of indoor air and improvement strategies. Surveys will take place in 2009-2010 and 2011, guided and evaluated by the members of the CCIAQB.

  • There will be 3 Full Committee meetings in 2010-2011 to review deliverables, contract work and propose future steps.
  • At least 1 meeting of the Executive Committee to provide guidance to the Full Committee by November 2010.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$8,000,000 $2,000,000

Program: Radon Strategy

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer safety


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Increased knowledge of health impacts and mitigation strategies related to indoor air pollution:

Activity 1: Education and Awareness

Heightened knowledge, awareness and sensitivity of all key sectors, as well as Canadian consumers and federal employees and building managers, regarding the nature and extent of risks to human health from exposure to radon and of available prevention and mitigation measures to effectively address those risks.

Between 100 to 200 radon Educator's Tool Kits will be developed and distributed to Health professionals (i.e. family physicians, public health units, provincial health authorities), and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO's) including the Canadian Cancer Society, Lung Association, Clean Air Foundation and Health indoor partners. These toolkits will enable these stakeholders to more effectively develop regional and community focused outreach programs. A new radon factsheet for smokers will be developed and distributed by fall of 2010 via stakeholder partners such as cessation programs, health professionals and pharmacies to ensure that smokers understand the increased risk of developing lung cancer from radon exposure. Quantifiable outcomes expected from the issuance of this factsheet include the quantity of factsheets downloaded from the website and the quantity of factsheets distributed by stakeholder partners.

As per the expected achievements for the Indoor Air Quality Management Actions, the Environmental Health Guide public awareness campaign will be launched; of which radon will be a component.

Activity 2: Mapping

Systematic surveying, mapping and identification of radon hotspots in all major populated areas of Canada that are known or believed to be at risk because of local geological and climatic conditions associated with elevated radon levels.

Aerial surveys of selected locations will be conducted across Canada to assess the levels of terrestrial radiation (uranium and other naturally-occurring radioactivity), which are the precursors of radon gas. In 2010-2011, the aerial radiation surveys are expected to concentrate on the prairie provinces (Alberta and Saskatchewan). This will augment other radiation data, ensuring that information for ~35% of Canada's geographic area is available by the end of 2011. In addition soil gas radon measurements will be made at approximately 20 major population centres throughout Canada to generate key data to be integrated into a map of radon potential.

Activity 3: Testing

Systematic on-site testing and screening of federal buildings and facilities for actual radon levels and their comparison against the new radon guidelines, such inventory consisting of all federal facilities located in known and/or potential high-risk areas.

Testing of federal buildings will continue in all regions of Canada. A target has been set to test 5,000 federal buildings by the end of 2011. This process is currently on-going. This is expected to represent the completion of ~ 50% of the buildings in known areas of high radon potential.

A program for certification of radon testing and mitigation service providers will be established by the end of 2011.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$15,000,000 $4,100,000

Theme: Adaptation

Lead Department

Natural Resources Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Health Canada, Environment Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period


Immediate Outcome


  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.
Intermediate Outcome

  • Increased use of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and to reduce air quality related health impacts; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.
Final Outcome

  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due air quality related health risks.

Expected achievements in 2010-2011 from Theme programming


As 2010-2011 will be the last year of funding under the current phase of the Clean Air Agenda for most of the programs of the Adaptation theme, the programs expect to deliver a variety of outputs and activities in 2010-2011 that will contribute significantly to the achievement of the immediate outcomes of the theme.

Immediate Outcome - Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products

  • Information products to address health related risks including health messaging toolkit, Best Practices Guidebook for Heat Alert and Response Systems and Healthcare Worker Guidelines for Extreme Heat Events will be completed and disseminated.
  • Tools (such as risk maps) necessary for decision making on monitoring and control of key infectious diseases will be completed or well under way.
  • At least 3 reports and information products and 2 decision-support tools to address local level decision making and adaptation planning will be completed and disseminated.
  • National air quality health programs expect to promote the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) across 27 census Metropolitan areas across Canada by developing and distributing a suite of national outreach products.
  • Climate models such as the Global Climate model and the new Regional Climate model will be enhanced and results from the models will be disseminated to users and the public via Internet and these runs will contribute to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th assessment.
Immediate Outcome - Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts

  • Frameworks will be developed in conjunction with the territories, to support regional and community based adaptations.
  • Partnerships will be established and strengthened through collaboration with key players including Federal, Provincial and Municipal governments, Aboriginal Communities and other stakeholders.
  • National Scale Committees, Program Advisory Committee and Working Groups will be set up to contribute to designing effective solutions to support adaptation planning.
  • Agreements will be signed with Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and National Media Partners for promotion of air quality health index.
  • Collaborations will be in place with infrastructure agencies to incorporate the changing climate into national codes and standards.
Immediate Outcome - Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science

  • Research projects will be funded and conducted
  • Trends of perception of the capacity of northerners to adapt will be recorded.
  • 6 workshops/ presentations and 5 training sessions focused on application of tools will be delivered to target audience, such as Planners, Engineers and Resource Managers.
  • INAC's program will fund 20 projects and target at least 10 Aboriginal and Northern communities.
  • 4 Pilot Projects focused on community engagement to assess infectious disease risks associated with climate change will be completed.
  • All regional nodes for Climate Change Scenarios network will be completed and regional technical support on use of scenarios and model inter-comparisons will be expanded, including training for users on new products.
No funds were received through the Canadian Economic Action Plan for Adaptation theme programs.


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Indian and Northern Affairs
1 Program
$14,000,000 $6,050,000
Expected Results
Environment Canada

2 Programs


$36,300,000

$10,689,629
Expected Results
Health Canada
2 Programs
$23,600,000
$7,100,000
Expected Results
Natural Resources Canada
1 Program
$23,655,000 $11,199,600
Expected Results
Public Health Agency of Canada
1 Program
$6,750,000 $2,544,210
Expected Results
Total $104,305,000 $37,583,439

Planned Highlights

Programs are increasingly dealing with enquiries about funding beyond March 2011. It is clear that some initiatives are not yet self-sustaining, as predicted, and without additional federal support, long term outcomes may be at risk. As well, some programs have received requests for funding that exceed the funding available.
The adaptation theme programs are diverse in their target audiences and activities.

Barriers to achieving planned outcomes include:

  • Differences in approach to air quality monitoring and implementation among partners (AQHI-EC)
  • The development of climate models is limited by the availability of super computing resources. (EC)
  • There have been challenges in delivering communications products and implementing surveys which affect both the availability of products and evaluation of results.

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)'s program has taken measures to counter the delayed approval of the Adaptation theme.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2010-2011 Planned Spending for Theme programming
$104,305,000 $37,583,439

Program: Assist Northerners in Assessing Key Vulnerabilities and Opportunities

Department Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Departmental Program Activity Northern Land and Resources

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


In 2010-2011, the Assist Northerners in Assessing Key Vulnerabilities and Opportunities Program will continue to support Aboriginals and Northerners through program measures which are aimed at improving access to information and increasing technical expertise on adaptation to climate change, evaluating climate risks and identifying responses to risks, putting in place collaborative mechanisms to design effective solutions, and developing adaptation actions by Aboriginal and northern communities to address key vulnerabilities.

It is expected that the Program will fund 20 projects during 2010-11. Through the work of these projects, it is anticipated that at least 10 Aboriginal and northern communities will be targeted.

The Program is expected to achieve the following during 2010-2011 (Immediate and Intermediate Outcomes):

  • Develop frameworks, in conjunction with the territories, which support regional and community based adaptations while delivering on territorial priorities;
  • Expand the work with local-level northern partners on the assessment of risks and building adaptive capacity;
  • Support the collection, analysis and dissemination of information which is necessary for local-level decision-making and adaptation planning;
  • Continue work with partner organizations and aboriginal communities south of 60° to identify vulnerabilities and work towards future regional and community-based adaptation planning;
  • Continue to build on strengthened relationships within Indian and Northern Affairs Canada sectors (headquarters and regional offices), to develop an approach to ensure that climate change impacts and adaptation are considered within departmental operations;
  • Continue to partner with other federal departments around common themes in order to maximize the successful delivery of the adaptation programs and build necessary capacity.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$14,000,000
$6,050,000

Program: National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program

Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.2 - Weather and Environmental Services for Targeted Users

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


As of March 31, 2011, the expected outcome is for all 27 census metropolitan areas (CMAs), with the exception of those in Alberta, and select locations in Quebec and Ontario to be receiving Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) forecasts. It is our expectation that Ontario will agree to implement province-wide by the summer of 2011. Furthermore, plans are underway in Quebec to integrate the AQHI forecast into the current Info-Smog program and we expect that AQHI forecasts will be available for the majority of CMAs with supporting air quality monitoring by the summer of 2011.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$21,300,000
$5,800,000

Program: Improved Climate Change Scenarios

Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 - Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Post output from latest coupled model runs on Environment Canada (EC) web site for use by other researchers; begin more complete suite of global climate projections, along with regional model downscaling for Canada; begin analysis of changes in extremes based on model outputs; continue testing and evaluation of new coupling scheme; integrate latest atmosphere, ocean and sea-ice components into next-generation coupled model capable of running at significantly higher spatial resolution; begin process of updating regional climate model to be consistent with updated global model; collaborate with OURANOS on analysis of regional climate model downscaling results and assist in transferral of regional climate information to impacts researchers.

Complete all regional nodes for the Climate Change Scenarios Network (CSN); expand web-based suite of products and tools on extremes; provide and expand regional technical support on use of scenarios and model inter-comparison, including training for users on new products.

Continue to enhance methodologies and products that incorporate changing climate change extremes into risk assessment and infrastructure climatic design information; develop new hazards information on the changing and future climate for all regions of Canada; collaborate with infrastructure agencies and organizations on implementation measures to incorporate the changing climate into national codes and standards.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$15,000,000
$4,889,629

Program: National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program

Department Health Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


  • Through partnership agreements with provincial/municipal jurisdictions across Canada, promote the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) and build internal capacity for the continuation of AQHI into the future. Target partners will include the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, British Columbia and Toronto Public Health.
  • Produce and distribute suite of national outreach products (posters, brochures, tear sheets, fact sheets) to Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO) partners across Canada for AQHI promotion. Aim is to provide outreach products to 5 national health NGOs, 5 national environmental NGOs and at least 10 regional/local health or environment NGOs.
  • Develop partnerships with national media providers to promote AQHI content in locations where AQHI is available; this could be through radio, television or internet. First partnership with The Weather Network (TWN) / MétéoMédia (MM) should be in place early in 2010. Expected reach is 8.5 million viewers weekly.
  • Partner with a national outreach/marketing partner to provide national promotion of the AQHI through their locations or through national distribution (examples may include a national retail partner, a national pharmacy chain, medical journals or national health non-profit organization).
  • Promotion of e-learning course developed by the University of British Columbia in partnership with Health Canada to raise awareness among health professionals of the tool which will permit AQHI information dissemination directly to patients. Goal is to have 250 health professionals complete the course by March 2011.
  • With external collaboration, the health science underpinning the AQHI will be expanded from exclusively mortality data to include additional health endpoints such as emergency room visits and hospital admissions. This will strengthen the scientific basis of the AQHI.
  • Population specific health messages will be refined through a literature review and health message workshop expected to be held in summer 2010. Workshop will include 30 experts in the field of air quality and health.
  • The Implementation Committee and its working groups on Outreach and (Air Quality) Advisories will meet face to face at least once in the fiscal year. The Implementation Committee will continue to provide stakeholder led guidance on the national roll-out of the AQHI. The Outreach working group will develop and begin to implement a national outreach strategy. Through a pilot program, the Advisories working group will test the possibility of issuing AQHI advisories that would alert the public to poor or deteriorating air quality conditions.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$8,700,000
$2,200,000

Program: Climate Change and Health Adaptation in Northern/Inuit Communities

Department Health Canada
Departmental Program Activity 4.1 First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Immediate Outcomes:
  • Increased availability of adaptation information and products.
  • Number of communities applying for research grants - through interviews, program documents and files.
  • Number of mitigation strategies transferred to other communities - program documents and files.
  • Increased capacity (additional resources, tolls, knowledge base) to conduct and apply adaptation science.
  • Number of research projects funded and conducted - program documents and files.
  • Greater collaboration to address issues of climate change and health impacts.
  • Number of agreements/joint projects/partnerships established - program documents and files.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Increased use of adaptation information and products.
  • Number and type of mitigation strategies to address climate change - interviews.
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate.
  • Level of awareness of potential health implications due to climate change - interviews.
  • Increased capacity to adapt to climate change.
  • Perception of changes in capacity, e.g., has the program helped address barriers, change attitudes, increased understanding - interviews.
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.
  • Number of action plans - through interviews, program documents and files.
Final Outcome (information will not be available to be reported on in 2010-2011)

  • Communities have taken actions to reduce their vulnerabilities and risks and have adapted to predicted impacts of climate change.
  • Percentage of respondents that used adaption strategies to take action and reduce their vulnerability due to climate change - survey.
  • Perceptions as to whether risks to the health of northern First Nations and Inuit from the health impacts of climate change have been reduced through program activities - survey and interviews.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$7,000,000
$2,150,000

Program: Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System to Protect the Health of Canadians

Department Health Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The program's overall objective is to increase the knowledge of the impacts of climate change on health and the protective measures that can be taken. The primary focus being on extreme heat and human health. The 2010-2011 expected program achievements are as follows:

  • Completion of four community-based pilot heat alert and response systems in Fredericton, NB; Windsor, ON; Winnipeg, MB and Assiniboine Region, MB.
  • Final review by stakeholders and publication of Best Practices Guidebook for Heat Alert and Response Systems for use by public health and emergency management officials at the provincial, regional and municipal level and by non-governmental service providers. Broad dissemination beginning in Spring 2011 through targeted mailings to all medical officers of health and emergency management officials (approximately 1000) and relevant associations and professional networks.
  • Final review by stakeholders and publication of Healthcare Worker Guidelines for Extreme Heat Events for use by clinicians, pharmacists, homecare workers, nurses, naturopaths and others. Broad dissemination beginning in Spring 2011 through targeted mailings and relevant associations and professional networks.
  • Develop an Extreme Heat and Health Communications toolkit available for use by pilot project communities. The toolkit will be used by the pilot communities to support the development and rollout of their heat alert and response system communications plan.
  • The Toolkit will be made available as a companion document to the Best Practices Guidebook for Heat Alert and Response Systems.
  • Conduct multi-lateral meetings with stakeholders and health portfolio partners on lessons learned and experiences of piloting heat alert and response systems at the municipal scale for the purposes of broader adaptation by other Canadian communities.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$7,900,000
$2,750,000

Program: Innovative Risk Management Tools / Regional Adaptation Action Partnerships

Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.1 Adapting to a Changing Climate and Hazard Risk Management

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Innovative Risk Management Tools and Regional Adaptation Collaboratives program will be undertaking several activities and producing outputs that contribute to meeting the outcomes of the Adaptation theme.
  • [Immediate Outcome]- Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products.
  • At least 3 reports and information products will be developed.
  • At least 2 decision support tools will be developed.
  • [Immediate Outcome] Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and air quality health impacts.
  • Northern Regional Adaptation Collaboratives (RAC ) will be established and will contribute to addressing adaptation planning in the north.
  • National scale committee will be developed to co-ordinate efforts and share regional and sectoral information on adaptation.
  • [Immediate Outcome] - Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science.
  • At least 6 presentations or workshops will be delivered to target audiences such as Planners, Engineers and Resource Managers.
  • 5 training sessions will be delivered on adaptation tools.
These activities will be tracked by progress reports submitted by project recipients as well as by project monitoring activities of Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Division of NRCan.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$23,655,000 $11,199,600

Program: Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System to Protect the Health of Canadians

Department Public Health Agency of Canada
Departmental Program Activity 1.5 Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation
2.1 Internal Services

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The Pilot Infectious Disease Impact and Response System (PIDIRS) program has two areas of focus, targeted research and community engagement:

For the Applied Research component - outcome-level expected achievements (Immediate Outcomes):
The directed solicitation process with five academic institutions for contribution funding of just less than 2 years of research will provide awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and adaptation products for public health stakeholders via knowledge and tools necessary for decision making on surveillance, intervention and control of key infectious diseases with an environmental origin (particularly vector-borne and waterborne infectious diseases). The indicators of success include: research studies producing scientific publications and reports (e.g. relationship between climate, temperature etc. and the occurrence of vector and water-borne disease), information products, and decision support tools (e.g. risk maps, decision analysis tools) for use by Federal/Provincial/Territorial public health stakeholders and establishment of national/international partnerships/networks via research studies and a recently formed program Expert Advisory Committee (EAC) of national and international experts in climate change and infectious disease to provide overall guidance on progress of the research and community engagement elements of the program. Targets include: signed contribution agreements with the five academic institutes (Universities of Victoria, Saskatchewan York, McGill and Université de Montréal) to deliver on achievements outlined above; and EAC established in early 2010 and continue for the duration of the program. The tracking methods include evaluation methods built into the contribution agreement process related to ongoing progress reports and defined deliverables, site visits with each academic institute, and evaluation/guidance/feedback provided by the program Expert Advisory Committee.

For the Regional/Community component - outcome-level expected achievements: Four pilot regions across Canada are participating in the community-based approach to assessing infectious disease risk associated with climate change. When complete in the fall of 2010, these pilot communities will serve as a template for other jurisdictions across the country to develop and implement adaptation strategies on surveillance and control of key infectious diseases from the environment (particularly vector-borne and waterborne infectious diseases). The indicators of success include: increased availability / access to climate change adaptation information and products, increased capacity (additional resources, risk prediction and surveillance tools, knowledge base) to conduct and apply adaptation science. Targets include signed memoranda of agreement with the pilot jurisdictions (completed deliverables by October 2010), development of processes and systems and standards (best practices) for adaptation to the impacts of infectious disease attributed to or exasperated by climate change. The tracking methods include site visits with each pilot jurisdiction and evaluation/guidance/feedback provided by the program Advisory Committee.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$6,750,000
$2,544,210

Theme: International Actions

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Industry Canada

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Canada has complied with its financial and other obligations under international climate change treaties and agreements.
  • Canada's positions for a future international climate change agreement are advanced.
  • Increased consideration of domestic stakeholders' interests in the development of Canada's negotiating positions.
  • Increased awareness of trade opportunities in climate-friendly technologies to reduce transboundary flows of air pollutants or to address climate change.
  • Implementation of recommendations in the Clean Energy Dialogue Action Plan.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • International climate change agreements are consistent with Canada's interests.
  • Canada's profile as a provider of climate friendly technologies is enhanced.
  • International air quality agreements are consistent with Canada's interests.
  • Increased collaboration between Canada and the U.S. on clean energy technology research, development, demonstration and broader engagement with the U.S. on developing compatible policy/regulatory frameworks consistent with Canada's interests.

Final Outcomes

  • International trends on climate change are consistent with Canada's interests.
  • Innovations related to reducing air pollution and addressing climate change have maintained Canadian competitiveness and provided economic benefits.
  • Transboundary movement of air pollutants has been reduced.

*Additional funding received in 2009 for International Actions required the updating of the International Actions Theme Logic Model.

Expected achievements in 2010-2011 from Theme programming


Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and the Department of Foreign Affairs are working together to support the advancement of Canada's strategic interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality and are working to align Canada's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies through continued participation in United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations towards a legally-binding post-2012 agreement and strengthening cooperation on climate change and air quality with key countries. These departments are also working together with the U.S. to enhance the development and deployment of clean energy technologies in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and build a competitive North American clean energy technology sector. For 2010-2011 the Clean Energy Dialogue Program will develop a Clean Energy Research, Development and Deployment (RD&D) collaboration Framework and work on a technology roadmap that will identify and describe the technology and associated Research and Development pathways that would allow Canada and the U.S. to meet Canada's and U.S. respective goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Industry Canada support Canada's private sector in gaining exposure to international markets and research and development opportunities to transfer and adopt technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution as well as enhancing Canada's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies through participation in multiple projects in the Asia Pacific Partnership (APP), Methane to Markets (M2M) and Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership (REEEP).


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Environment Canada
5 Programs
$39,831,067 $13,418,671 Expected Results
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
3 Programs $ 9,264,900
$2,527,000
Expected Results
Natural Resources Canada
3 Programs
$7,838,550 $2,304,000
Expected Results
Industry Canada
1 Programs $240,000
$40,000
Expected Results
Total $57,174,517 $18,289,671


Planned Highlights


The Copenhagen Accord represents an important step in the development of the International Climate Change regime. It is consistent with Canada's negotiating objectives and Canada will focus on implementing the Accord and working towards a legally-binding post-2012 Climate Change Agreement.

Almost thirty clean technology projects, jointly funded by the Private sector and the International Actions Theme of the Clean Air Agenda, will be deployed in Canada and in other Asia Pacific Partnership member countries in 2010-2011. These projects range across all the APP's eight sectoral Task Forces (Aluminum, Buildings and Appliances, Cement, Cleaner Fossil Energy, Coal Mining, Power Generation and Transmission, Renewable Energy and Distributed Generation, and Steel) as well as Methane to Markets.

Implementation of the Clean Energy Dialogue Program requires commitment from industry and governments to be successful and travel ceilings are resulting in limited partnership development.

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2010-2011 Planned Spending for Theme programming
$57,174,517 $ 18,289,671

Program: International Obligations

Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


This program pays Canada's share of the annual fee needed to operate and support the International Transaction Log (ITL) and to support the activities of the Registry System Administrators (RSA) Forum. The payment is made to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Secretariat and is an obligation under the Kyoto Protocol.

Canada's membership dues to multilateral organizations outside the United Nations, such as Methane to Markets and Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership, are paid from this program.

Funding is provided to selected international organizations that play a key role in enhancing the analysis and assessment of options related to the development of a future climate change agreement. The funding includes payments to support the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development, which established the UNFCCC Annex 1 Expert Group (A1XG), and to support the Center for Clean Air Policy's "Dialogue on Future International Actions to Address Global Climate Change". These payments contribute to Canada's objective to constructively and actively participate in international climate change discussions through fostering and enhancing the understanding of the main issues related to a legally-binding post-2012 climate change agreement which is currently being negotiated under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$2,892,000
$623,000

Program: International participation and negotiations

Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Continued advancement of Canada's strategic interests related to climate change in multilateral (e.g. the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate) and bilateral (e.g. Canada Mexico Partnership and the Canada China Climate Change Working Group) fora by working, in consultation with other government departments, to develop policy, provide strategic advice, and elaborate positions consistent with the objectives of the Government of Canada on a range of issues relating to the negotiation of a legally binding post-2012 agreement based on the Copenhagen Accord under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Continued advancement of Canada's national interests and objectives related to climate change, by attending and constructively participating in the UNFCCC negotiations and key international processes that complement these negotiations, including the G8/G20, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, and the US-led Major Emitters Forum to advocate Canadian positions and views. Canada's positions in these international processes are consistent with Canada's domestic climate change policy and promote national economic and environmental interests.

Increased awareness of Canada's objectives and priorities for the UNFCCC negotiations on climate change by Provincial and Territorial governments, aboriginal groups, and other domestic stakeholders. Environment Canada will have increased understanding of the views and advice related to international climate change of the Provincial and Territorial governments, aboriginal groups and other domestic stakeholders.

Strengthen bilateral cooperation on climate change with key countries, with particular emphasis on China, Mexico and India, through policy discussions, project implementation and capacity building.

Environment Canada will continue its engagement within the Methane to Markets Partnership (M2M), consulting with its departmental partners (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Natural Resources Canada), as well as with its international partners to advance cost-effective, near-term methane recovery and use as a clean energy source in order to reduce global methane emissions. To this end, Environment Canada will be collaborating with the Canadian private sector with a primary focus on projects, mainly in Mexico, related to methane capture from oil and gas transmission systems and landfill sites.

Environment Canada will pursue its continuing engagement within the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership (REEEP), to catalyze the market for renewable energy and energy efficiency, with a primary focus on supporting the development of zero-energy housing in Mexico.

Environment Canada will continue to monitor developments and/or opportunities that might arise for Canada from the recent creation of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). Canada is not yet a member and the Department will provide advice to the Minister and Cabinet on whether Canada should become a member, as appropriate.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$11,400,000
$2,700,000

Program: Asia-Pacific Partnership

Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.2. Climate Change and Clean Air

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Work with Industry Canada, Natural Resources Canada and selected project proponents to manage Canadian APP-funded projects (presently 28) that promote the development, diffusion and deployment of clean technologies. These projects fall into the APP's eight Greenhouse gas-intense economic sectors, and include, for example, energy-efficient "smart" residential buildings, deployment of geothermal, biomass, wind and solar technology, recovery of landfill gas, and carbon capture and storage. These projects will be deployed in Canada and in other APP partner countries during 2010-2011.

Environment Canada seeks to influence the scope and direction of the APP through participation in the APP's Policy Implementation Committee (PIC), and International Ministerial and sectoral Task Force meetings.

Alignment of participation in the Asia-Pacific Partnership (APP) with Canada's domestic, continental and international objectives for climate change, clean air, and clean technology partnerships.

Along with Industry Canada, Natural Resources Canada, International Trade Canada, industry associations and other relevant partners, Environment Canada continues its efforts under its current outreach strategy to maintain and attract further private sector participation in its clean technology programs through outreach sessions with industry and ongoing communications with industry associations.

Environment Canada works with departmental partners, including Industry Canada, Natural Resources Canada and International Trade Canada to coordinate technical and policy work related to Canada's participation in the APP's Task Forces, Policy and Implementation Committee, and Ministerial meetings.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$18,882,664
$7,308,166

Program: PM Annex

Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.2 - Climate Change and Clean Air

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Activities to be undertaken for the development of a Particulate Matter Annex to the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement will include :

  • Scientific and policy analysis in support of the development of negotiating positions. Complete analysis of U.S. and Canadian domestic air policy frameworks that could contribute to the negotiation of a PM Annex by March 2011. Note that currently both countries are in the process of refining their domestic policy approaches for managing PM emissions.
  • Continued consultation with stakeholders in preparation for future negotiating sessions.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$2,200,000
$550,000

Program: Clean Energy Dialogue

Department Environment Canada
Departmental Program Activity 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


CED Secretariat

The overall objective of the Clean Energy Dialogue (CED) is to enhance bilateral collaboration with the U.S. on the development and deployment of clean energy technologies in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and build a competitive North American clean energy technology sector. In order to support this outcome, the CED Secretariat will undertake the following activities and outputs.

  • Research and analysis to identify opportunities for expanding collaboration with the U.S. in the research, development and deployment of clean energy technologies.
  • Strategic advice to senior management on Canada-U.S. clean energy and climate change engagement.
  • Monitoring and analysis of relevant initiatives aimed at advancing Canada's goal of reduced greenhouse gas emissions (domestically, continentally and globally), and reinforcing Canada's domestic regulatory approach to climate change.
  • Engagement with key stakeholders (including the U.S. Department of Energy, interdepartmental officials, and Canadian private sector advisors) to identify ways to facilitate and advance the implementation and delivery of clean energy projects and initiatives identified in the Clean Energy Dialogue Action Plan.
  • Preparation and delivery of regular progress reports to the Minister (March 2010 and September 2010) and Prime Minister (Spring of 2010 and March 2011) on the implementation of CED projects and initiatives.
  • Work with the Canadian Embassy in Washington to identify priority areas for U.S. engagement in the area of clean energy research, development and deployment, and to advance the overall objectives of the CED.
Clean Energy R&D Working Group

With respect to expanding cooperation on clean energy research and development (R&D), the CED Action Plan and Report to Leaders commit to:

  • Development of a Clean Energy Research, Development, and Deployment (RD&D) collaboration Framework ("the Framework").
  • Work on a technology "roadmap" ("the Roadmap") that will identify and describe the technology and associated R&D pathways that would allow Canada and the U.S. to meet our respective goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.
Canada and the U.S. also agreed to launch several collaborative R&D projects, starting in 2009, with others to follow through the Framework.

In 2010-2011, the R&D working group will continue to work on the delivery of the Framework and the Roadmap with products expected by the end of the fiscal year. Each could be delivered at a variety of different scales (existing resources allow delivery only on a very minimal scale) and so the scale of planned results remains uncertain. At the same time, Environment Canada will continue to provide support to the R&D working group (policy and logistical support for meetings, coordination of engagement with private sector advisors and with stakeholders, and research and analysis around its activities) as well as advance its mandate through further Canada-U.S. R&D partnership development activities and initiatives.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$4,456,403
$ 2,237,505

Program: International Obligations

Department Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
Departmental Program Activity 1.3 Global Issues

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The assessed contributions, are part of the core budget for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that is negotiated by all Parties to the Convention. Funds are directed as per decisions by the Conference of the Parties. The Clean Air Agenda provides $477,000 of Canada's assessed contribution.

The provision of these funds is required as part of our obligations as a Party to the UNFCCC, and has allowed us to remain a participant in good standing. These funds combined with the contributions of other countries will enable the UNFCCC to continue to hold negotiating sessions in order to progress towards a successful outcome on an international climate change agreement for the post 2012 period.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$1,908,000
$477,000

Program: International participation and negotiations

Department Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
Departmental Program Activity 1.3 Global Issues

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) will continue to provide substantive analytical and policy input for the formulation and presentation of Canadian views for the negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and its Kyoto Protocol. Provision of timely and substantial input to senior officials will continue to enable informed participation and engagement in international processes. DFAIT will participate actively in the UN process and promote Canada's interests, lead negotiations on adaptation and coordinate negotiations on aspects related to the Kyoto Protocol. Moving forward, DFAIT will engage in discussions at the UNFCCC regarding the Copenhagen Accord with the goal of reaching a legally binding agreement. In addition, DFAIT will advocate Canada's positions within other multilateral processes, e.g., the G8 for which Canada holds the Presidency for 2010, is a co-chair of the G20, the Major Economies Forum process, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), Arctic Council, Commonwealth, other UN events, and through bilateral channels through DFAIT's network of Embassies and other Missions abroad. DFAIT will also participate actively in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) deliberations.

Of particular note, DFAIT will:

  • Lead the UNFCCC negotiations on adaptation
  • Coordinate the negotiations under the Kyoto Protocol
  • Provide support to Canada's member on the UNFCCC's Least Developed Country Expert Group
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$6,400,000
$1,450,000

Program: Clean Energy Dialogue

Department Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
Departmental Program Activity -

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Key objective is to enhance Canada's visibility as an international leader in clean energy technology and deepen engagement with the U.S. on climate change issues. In support of this objective, the Embassy in Washington will undertake heightened advocacy efforts that will include the following activities:

  • Build and maintain relationships with key energy players in the US to better leverage Canada's positions (in cooperation with Environment Canada (EC), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) and the Clean Energy Dialogue (CED) Secretariat).
  • Advance intelligence gathering and coordinate dissemination of updates on energy and climate change developments in the US, including economic, legal and policy analyses and reporting concerning Canada-US climate change and energy relations.
  • In collaboration with EC and NRCan, seek to expand Canada's voice within the US regulatory processes on climate change and energy impacting Canada.
  • Better leverage and coordinate Canada's existing presence at the state-level, through existing energy-focused resources in consulates in order to ensure consistent messaging.
  • Work with the EC, NRCan and the Clean Energy Dialogue (CED) Secretariat to advance the overall objectives of the CED and facilitate the implementation of various projects and policy initiatives outlined in the CED Action Plan.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$956,900
$600,000

Program: International Participation and Negotiations

Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy
2.1.2 Domestic and International Clean Energy Policy

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


NRCan will contribute toward the program outcome of advancing Canada's positions for a future international climate change agreement through the following expected achievements:

  • Aligning international climate change policies and negotiating positions with Canada's domestic energy and other natural resource interests, as well as with Canada's domestic climate change and clean energy policies.
  • Advancing Canadian interests in a range of high-level climate change-related international meetings, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the G8, the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF), and Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).
  • Providing strategic policy advice to NRCan decision makers on key global climate change developments, and the links with energy policy and other natural resource issues.
  • Demonstrating leadership and providing expert advice on key issues related to NRCan's mandate, including energy, technology, forestry and adaptation, in support of Canada's negotiations for a global post-2012 climate change agreement at COP15 and beyond.
  • Supporting future implementation actions on climate change and clean energy at home and abroad, particularly in the area of clean energy technology and the promotion of sustainable forest management and adaptation practices.
  • Continuing to contribute technical advice and expertise to the Expert Group on Technology Transfer, established under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), to analyze and identify ways to facilitate and advance technology development and transfer activities.
2010-2011 targets for NRCan include ensuring that:

  • Advice and recommendations to NRCan senior management are consistently strategic, substantive and timely.
  • NRCan interests are reflected in Government of Canada international climate change policies and negotiating positions.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$5,200,000
$1,200,000

Program: Asia-Pacific Partnership

Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


With the official approval, in June 2009, by Minister Prentice of the first round of funding for Canadian APP projects, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) will work with its industry partners on the following projects:

International Net-Zero Energy Homes (NZEH) Coalition Project.

The intent of the coalition will be to establish a formal international partnership to map the path to achieving NZEH. Through a series of workshops Canada will offer APP partners an opportunity to set a precedent for housing performance optimization by bringing together the fragmented supply chain to discuss issues facing the sector. Outputs from these workshops will include the documenting of best practices from participating countries.

Investigation for Demonstration of Plasma Ignition System.

This project aims to implement plasma systems for the Canadian power sector in order to enhance energy efficiency and reduce emissions. Canadian Engineers will visit a R&D center of plasma technology in China, to provide the preliminary data required for a customization study that will investigate the applicability of the system in Canada. It is expected that, due to the differences in the type of coal being used by China and Canada to power their plants, modifications will need to be identified at CanmetENERGY before a utility is willing to install such a system. The unmodified Chinese system is valued at ~$800,000.

Coal Mine Health and Safety Project

This project will collaborate with other partner countries such as China and India on issues of coal mine health and safety, coal explosibility testing, legislative review and risk management.

China Deep Unmineable Coal CO2 Sequestration Project

The project, will further develop CO2 injection and storage technology in deep coal beds and determine the suitability and capacity of coal seams in China as long-term storage sites for CO2. It will also develop important data relative to the potential commerciality of enhanced Coal Bed Mining production using CO2 injection. The intent of this project will involve development and transfer to China of Canadian CO2 enhanced Coal bed methane recovery and CO2 storage technology. This transfer will provide feedback and leverage to Canada's domestic CBM programs. It will also include human resource capacity building/training of Chinese employees.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$877,200
$181,800

Program: Clean Energy Dialogue

Department Natural Resources Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The Canada-U.S. Clean Energy Dialogue (CED) was created to enhance collaboration on the development of clean energy technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and address climate change. It is comprised of three working groups: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), Electricity Grid, and Clean Energy Research and Development (R&D). The CED Action Plan commits Canada to:

Carbon Capture and Storage Working Group

  • Expanding existing collaboration in CO2 injection and storage testing, share information from large CCS demonstration projects, and working together to map CO2 sources of geological storage opportunities;
  • Working towards a consistent regulatory framework for Canada and the US, including compatible CCS project rules, standards, and monitoring, as well as verification and accounting principles;
  • Holding bilateral meetings to engage Canadian and U.S. experts on CCS from the public and private sectors, to share best practices and provide updates on joint activities. The US will host the first conference in May 2010 in Pittsburgh; the 2011 conference will be held in Canada.
Electricity Grid Working Group

  • Increasing opportunities for trade in clean electricity through work with industry and other levels of government to facilitate the identification of potential resources and markets;
  • Advancing smart grid and clean power technologies by ensuring joint participation and open information exchange around government-sponsored research, development and deployment, reliability standards, cyber security and interoperability guidelines development;
  • Realizing the potential power of storage by improving understanding of existing storage potential and the role it may play in the expansion of renewable energy;
  • Building the workforce of tomorrow by working to identify the skills required to meet future labour needs associated with modernizing and building a more efficient grid; and
  • Keeping the dialogue going through a regular smart grid forum to enhance collaboration and cooperation.
The anticipated results of these activities will be development through discussion with U.S. counterparts.

Clean Energy Research and Development Working Group

The Research and Development (R&D) Working Group is led by Environment Canada (EC) and supported by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). NRCan intends to support EC with its CED R&D Working group activities and expected results.

With respect to expanding cooperation on clean energy research and development (R&D), the CED Action Plan and Report to Leaders commits to:

  • Development of a Clean Energy Research, Development, and Deployment (RD&D) collaboration Framework ("the Framework"); and
  • Working together on a technology roadmap ("the Roadmap") that will identify and describe the technology and associated R&D pathways that would allow Canada and the U.S. to meet our respective goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.
Canada and the U.S. also agreed to launch immediately several collaborative R&D projects, with others to follow through the Framework.

The collaborative R&D projects that are being developed are the following: the ENERGY STAR Criteria and Programs Expansion; Algal Biomass; Lightweight Materials Development; Demand Response Potential of Buildings; and potentially a biomass project. The last two items listed were initiated under the North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG). These projects will last 2 to 3 years so that we expect progress to be made in these areas of clean energy. A Declaration in the Area of Bioenergy between NRCan and the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) is in the process of being negotiated.

In 2010-2011 NRCan will continue to work with EC on the delivery of the Framework and the Roadmap with currently available resources. At the same time, NRCan will continue to provide support to the EC-led R&D working group (policy and logistical support for meetings, coordination of engagement with private sector advisors and with stakeholders, and research and analysis around its activities) as well as advance its mandate through further Canada-U.S. R&D partnership development activities and initiatives.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$1,761,350
$922,200

Program: Asia-Pacific Partnership

Department Industry Canada
Departmental Program Activity 2.1 Clean Energy

Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Participation in the Asia Pacific Partnership's (APP) Policy Implementation Committee (PIC) to influence the policy direction of the APP to align with Canadian objectives that are supported by Industry Canada's mandate (e.g., raising Canadian companies' global competiveness level).

Participation in the five sector Task Force (Steel, Cement, Aluminum, Cleaner Fossil Energy and Renewable Energy) meetings to provide Industry Canada's sector expertise.

Encouraging companies in these five sectors to participate in APP projects, exposing them to new international markets for technology transfer, including, clean energy technologies, and to opportunities to share efficiency and productivity best practices with other APP member countries.

Providing Industry Canada's expertise (e.g. sharing carbon capture & storage and enhanced oil recovery technology knowledge with Mexican colleagues through the Canada-Mexico Partnership) to strengthen existing, and developing new, bilateral and multilateral relationships (e.g. bilateral between Canada and Mexico, Canada and India) and to promote collaboration to reduce greenhouse gas emissions globally.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$240,000
$40,000

Theme: Partnerships

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

--

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcome

  • Program materials and tools, including application forms, proposal evaluation tools, project tracking database, and GHG/CAC valuation tools are developed;
  • Program is launched; and
  • Funding of community initiatives to reduce emissions in support of the Clean Air Agenda is leveraged from the private sector and other orders of government.

Intermediate Outcome

  • Incentives are provided to encourage Canadians to adopt more sustainable behaviours at home, at school, at the workplace; and
  • Emissions (smog-forming and GHGs) are reduced as Canadians adopt more sustainable behaviours.

Final Outcome

  • Increased awareness amongst Canadians of (impact of individual behaviours, preferred technologies / actions);
  • Canadians adopt more sustainable choices at home, at school, in the workplace (beyond the expiry of incentives); and
  • Emissions are reduced.

Expected achievements in 2010-2011 from Theme programming


This program was proposed by the federal government in support of Turning the Corner: A Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution to improve the capacity of communities and individuals to take action on clean air and climate change by stimulating the trial of new actions and purchases, which may have lasting benefits and result in significant reductions over the longer-term, which will lead Canadians to take positive environmental actions at home, school and workplace.

However, the program will not be launched. Complementary and alternative initiatives, such as Environment Canada's EcoAction Community Funding Program and Vehicle Scrappage program, Natural Resources Canada's ecoENERGY Retrofit - Homes program, Transport Canada's ecoMobility Program are being used to fulfill this role as a more cost-effective approach. While this has resulted in an overall reduction in investment in the specific agreements meant to be funded by the Clean Air Community Partnerships program, the department will continue to invest in a variety of similar program activities aimed at achieving desired results and ensuring a continuing federal presence to support community funding focussed on energy efficiency and reduced air pollution.


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Environment Canada
1 Program
$12,000,000 $0 Expected Results
Total $12,000,000
$0


Planned Highlights

N/A

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2010-2011 Planned Spending for Theme programming
$12,000,000 $0

Program: Clean Air Community Partnerships

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2 - Climate Change and Clean Air


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


Program will not be launched.

Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$12,000,000 $0

Theme: Management and Accountability

Lead Department

Enviornment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Transport Canada, Health Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, National Research Council, Industry Canada

Expected results from Theme's programming over the 2007-2011 period

Immediate Outcomes

  • Clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for implementing, managing and reporting on CAA activities
  • Appropriate balance of departmental and horizontal CAA accountabilities
  • Coherent CAA program architecture
  • Effective alignment of resources to CAA priorities
  • Effective and timely collection and reporting of performance information

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Active engagement of partner departments and agencies in horizontal aspects of CAA activities
  • Effective decision-making regarding CAA activities
  • Improved accountability of federal government to parliamentarians and Canadians for CAA expenditures and activities

Final Outcome

  • Increased ability to achieve CAA outcomes.

Expected achievements in 2010-2011 from Theme programming


The Management and Accountability Theme will support completion of the overall implementation plan for the 2007-2011 Clean Air Agenda (CAA).

This will be achieved through the use of the piloted horizontal management, accountability and reporting framework to:

  • Support the CAA governance (which integrates departmental and horizontal roles and responsibilities) in accounting to Parliament and Canadians in a transparent manner for the progress made over 4 years with CAA investments;
  • Complete the horizontal performance reports for Parliament and Canadians about the horizontal federal investments made within the context of the CAA to ensure transparency for the federal management of clean air;
  • Assist federal partner departments and agencies in transitioning to the next tranche of environmental programming by facilitating senior management forward planning and leadership for emerging government priorities, supported by findings from evaluations and record of performance results over the 4-year mandate; and
Assist central agencies with their responsibilities for ongoing horizontal governance and accountability for federal management of environmental investments.


Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Environment Canada
1 Program
$5,000,000 1,250,000 Expected Results
Total $5,000,000
$1,250,000


Planned Highlights

The overall planning environment will be shaped by the emerging federal priorities for clean air programming

Total Approved Spending over the 2007-2011 period for Theme Total 2010-2011 Planned Spending for Theme programming
$5,000,000 $1,250,000

Program: Management and Accountability

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air


Program's expected achievements in 2010-2011


The Management and Accountability Program will support the completion of the pilot of a horizontal management, accountability and reporting framework for the Clean Air Agenda (CAA) by:

  • Developing innovative performance management tools based on the horizontal performance record for use by senior management in forward planning;
  • Assisting CAA governance in discussions towards effective and integrated approaches to emerging government priorities;
  • Liaising with central agencies to assist their oversight of the horizontal governance and accountability for federal management of environmental investments;
  • Completing the record of results for the 4 year investment in federal clean air initiatives by integrating comprehensive financial with non-financial performance information; and
  • Completing the horizontal performance reports for Parliament and Canadians about the horizontal federal investments made within the context of the CAA to ensure transparency for the federal management of clean air.
Program's approved spending over the 2007-2011 period Program's planned spending in 2010-2011
$5,000,000 $1,250,000
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Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

Horizontal Initiatives



Over the next three years, FINTRAC will be involved in the following horizontal initiatives as a partner:

  • Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing (AML/ATF) regime (partner)
  • Public Security and Anti-Terrorist (PSAT) Initiative (partner)
  • National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS) (partner)

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Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Health of the Oceans

Lead department Strategic Outcome: Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems

Lead department Program Activity: Oceans Management

Start date: April 1, 2007

End date: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation: $61.5 million

Description: The Health of the Oceans (HOTO) initiative provides funds, as part of the National Water Strategy, over a five year period to support 22 initiatives across five departments and agencies. HOTO reflects at Budget 2007 commitment and contributes to meeting domestic obligations under the Oceans Act, as well as international obligations under the Convention on Biological Diversity and the World Summitt on Sustainable Development. The goal of the initiative is to achieve progress on the health of the oceans through establishing new marine protected areas, increasing the capacity of government to enforce pollution prevention rules and to respond to environmental emergencies; and through strengthening collaborative oceans arrangements with our partners in the Arctic and in the Gulf of Maine.

Shared outcomes: The initiative is targeted to achieve three shared outcomes, as defined by the RMAF, namely:

  • Protecting sensitive areas, mainly through the establishment of Marine Protected Areas;
  • Pollution Control; and
  • Collaborative Oceans Management.

Governance structure: This initiative is subject to interdepartmental governance through the Assistant Deputy Ministers Interdepartmental Committee on Oceans (ICO), supported by a shadow Directors' General Committee. This Governance structure aligns oceans policy and program planning. The ICOs review the initiatives on a regular basis including the annual reports on the progress of this initiative.

Planning Highlights: The Oceans Directorate at DFO monitors the HOTO initiative biannually and develops tools and processes to capture and report performance information. The monitoring and reporting process assesses progress against work plans and thus provides an opportunity for adaptive functions during the projects life cycle. The collaborative governance structure contributes to facilitated information access and exchange and leads to better informed decisions relating to program planning and management. An annual performance summary is prepared for submission to TBS.

 


($ Thousands)
Federal Partner/Program Activity Names of Program for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Fisheries and Oceans
Oceans Management Federal Marine Protected Areas Strategy Implementation in DFO 1250.0 250.0 Advance the creation by 2012 of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada's oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management framework.
Development of a Federal-Provincial-Territorial MPA Network 2,500.0 650.0 Significant progress in planning and advancement of a National (federal-provincial-territorial) Marine Protected Area Network in Canada's three oceans. For 2010-11, further alignment with the Federal Network, and considerable engagement/consultation with other jurisdictions and oceans stakeholders.
Arctic Council — Ecosystem Projects 1,000.0 225.0 Continued work towards the development of a State of the Arctic Basin Report and use of common ecosystem monitoring strategies in shared and boundary waters by 2012.
Canada's continued participation in expert workshops and major conferences on ecosystem approach for advancing EBM concepts and approaches, promoting Canada's leadership in EBM applied to the Arctic, and sharing information and practices with other circumpolar countries, including the US.
A suite of indicators for monitoring and assessing ecosystem status and trends, socio-economic aspects and governance structures in place in Arctic.
Oceans Centres of Expertise (Coastal, Corals, Data Integration, Traditional Ecological Knowledge) 3,000.0 600.0 Four national centres of expertise have been established within the regions of DFO. Through 2010-11, development and implementation of common tools and approaches in the five LOMAs will continue to protect deep sea corals and sponge reefs, incorporate traditional knowledge, develop state of the oceans reports and accelerate progress in addressing coastal management issues.
Collaboration with World Wildlife Fund (WWF) 213.0 42.6 Greater contribution by environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGOs), such as the WWF, to the Health of the Oceans, with an emphasis on joint initiatives between WWF-Canada and DFO in the Newfoundland and Labrador region. Activities in 2010-11 will be targeted towards advancing ecosystem-based management in the Placentia Bay/Grand Banks LOMA, the development of a Cold Water Coral Conservation Strategy for the Newfoundland and Labrador region, and the identification/pursuit of collaborative projects with provincial government, aboriginal groups, stakeholders and other ENGOs.
Gulf of Maine (at DFO) 750.0 147.5 This initiative builds on the existing successful trans-boundary collaboration and management of Groundfish stocks through the CA-US Steering Committee, and the excellent cooperation between states and provinces through the Gulf of Maine Council. Based on DFO's national standard, a literature review and project work plan for a joint CA-US Bay of Fundy/Gulf of Maine Ecosystem Overview and Assessment Report was developed as part of the 2005 Oceans Action Plan. Through 2010-11, transboundary, multi-jurisdicational governance structures will be advanced. Further discussions regarding the possible mechanisms/structure for developing a collaborative Canada/US management model for the Gulf of Maine.
Marine Protected Areas Establishment 5,250.0 937.5 Six new MPAs will be designated by 2012 and a national monitoring and reporting system will be implemented for all Oceans Act MPAs. Through 2010-11, public and stakeholder consultation will continue to advance six proposed areas of interest toward designation in 2011-12.
Habitat Management Integrated Management and Canadian Environmental Assessment Act Assessment Tools Linkages 1,450.0 425.0 Integrated management carried out under the Health of the Oceans initiative will be bridged with other tools, such as project environmental assessment conducted under the authority of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. Work on the Regional Strategic Environmental Assessment Pilot Projects as well as training and education on pathways of effect models will continue.
Science for Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems Ecosystem Science Support and Advice on Health of the Oceans 5,500.0 1,100.0 Science advice on Marine Protected Areas and on priority sector-specific impacts and mitigation, as outlined by the Oceans programs, will be provided. Specific projects will be developed through the Canadian Science Advisory process.
Canadian Coast Guard Spill Capacity and Emergency Response Strategy 2,260.0 134.11 Canada's spill response capacity in the Arctic assessed, and equipment and systems to respond to the unique risks prepared. The procurement of remaining systems and equipment required to complete the project will take place in 2010-11.
Environment Canada
Biodiversity and Corporate services Federal Marine Protected Areas Strategy - Implementation in EC 1,250.0 250.0 Advance the creation by 2012 of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada's oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management framework.
Marine Wildlife Areas Establishment 2,000.0 507.0 Both the National Wildlife Area at Sable Island and Marine Wildlife Area at Scott Islands will be ready for designation by 2012, and a contribution will have been made to the Federal Marine Protected Area Network building process.
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision making and Corporate services Sable Island Weather Station 4,000.0 800.0 The risk of loss of life or property due to weather events is reduced for mariners, Canadian citizens and the international community, by producing more accurate weather forecasts and warnings using data from the Sable Island Weather Station.
The understanding of upper atmospheric conditions and the flow of airborne pollutants and greenhouse gases is improved, by enabling scientific research through the continued existence of the Sable Island weather Station infrastructure.
The unique and fragile ecosystem of Sable Island is conserved by protecting it from human degradation.
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes and Corporate services Gulf of Maine (at EC) 751.0 148.0 Increased support for the Gulf of Maine Council and implementation of the joint Canada-US five-year action plan that includes implementation of regional strategies for adaptation to climate change, indicators development, education and engagement and joint monitoring for toxic contaminants in the trans-boundary ecosystem.
Parks Canada Agency
Heritage Places Establishment Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy Implementation in Parks Canada 1,250.0 361.0 Advance the creation by 2012 of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada's oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management framework. By 2010-11, the Education and Outreach Strategy will be finalized. Developmnet of communications products will continue.
National Marine Conservation Area in Lancaster Sound 5,000.0 1,250.0 By 2012, achieve a full understanding of the feasibility of establishing a National Marine Conservation Area in Lancaster Sound with the support of Inuit, Nunavut and key sectoral stakeholders, leading to the conservation of a significant representative component of Canada's marine environment and a clear demonstration of Arctic sovereignty in the Northwest Passage.
Transport Canada
Transportation Safety and Security and Internal Services Enforcement of Ballast Water Regulations 4,500.0 966.5 Enforcement of regulations that minimize the risk of harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens from being introduced through ship ballast water to waters under Canadian jurisdiction.
Pollution Prevention - Surveillance 13,000.0 3,180.6 Enforcement of Canada's pollution prevention regulations in the Pacific, Arctic, East Coast Waters, the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the St. Lawrence Estuary.
Pollution Prevention - Dash 7 Outfitting 5,000.0 0 Project completed in 2009-10.
Enforcement of Canada's pollution prevention regulations in the Pacific, Arctic, East Coast Waters, the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the St. Lawrence Estuary.
Modernization of the current Dash 7 surveillance aircraft to a standard equal to the Dash 8 surveillance aircraft dedicated for use on the East and West Coast.
Arctic International Marine Shipping Assessment 550.0 0 Project completed in 2009-10.
An assessment of projected shipping activities and the associated environmental, social and economic impacts and risks as reduced sea ice may lead to increased marine transport in the Arctic.
Pollution Prevention — Ship Waste Reduction Strategy 800.0 200.0 Adequate reception facilities for wastes; appropriate legislation and standards.
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Northern land Resources Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment/ Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment from land-based sources of pollution 175.0 0 Project completed in 2008-09.
An expanded arctic regional program of action on land-based sources of pollution; a greater understanding of Aboriginal Arctic marine resource use; and a greater understanding of the social, economic and environmental impacts from changing shipping patterns on northern and aboriginal communities.
Total 61,449.0 12,174.8  

1Funds from previous fiscal year transferred to 2010-11.

 

Contact information:

Wayne Moore

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

200 Kent Street

Ottawa, Ontario

K1A 0E6

Telephone: (613) 990-0001

Email: Wayne.Moore@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Top of Page

Health Canada

Horizontal Initiative - 1

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:  Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS)

2. Name of lead department(s):  Health Canada

3. Lead department program activity:  Substance use and abuse

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:  April 1, 2007

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative:  March 31, 2011

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):  $361.0 million

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The FTCS establishes a framework for a comprehensive, fully-integrated, and multi-faceted approach to tobacco control.  It is driven by the longstanding commitment of the Government of Canada to reduce the serious and adverse health effects of tobacco for Canadians.  It focuses on four mutually reinforcing components: prevention, cessation, protection, and product regulation.

8. Shared outcome(s): ): The goal of the FTCS is to reduce overall smoking prevalence from 19% (2005) to 12% by 2011.

Objectives:

  • reduce the prevalence of Canadian youth (15 to17) who smoke from 15% to 9%;
  • increase the number of adult Canadians who quit smoking by 1.5 million;
  • reduce the prevalence of Canadians exposed daily to second-hand smoke from 28% to 20%;
  • examine the next generation of tobacco policy control in Canada;
  • contribute to the global implementation of the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control; and
  • monitor and assess contraband tobacco activities and enhance compliance.

9. Governance structure(s):

Health Canada is the lead department in the FTCS and is responsible for the coordination and implementation of the FTCS, including delivering the contribution program component and undertaking activities related to our components and objectives. The role of federal partners will remain to monitor and assess tobacco contraband activities.
The partner departments and agencies are:

  • Public Safety Canada - monitors increases in contraband tobacco activity and related crime;
  • Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions - monitors federal fines imposed in relation to tobacco and other types of offences in order to enforce and recover outstanding fines;
  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police - works with federal partners to identify criminal activities and to coordinate information on national and international contraband tobacco issues;
  • The Canada Revenue Agency - administers the Excise Act 2001, which governs federal taxation of tobacco products and regulates activities involving the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada; and
  • The Canada Border Services Agency - increases knowledge of contraband domestically and internationally by liaising with tobacco authorities at all levels and by monitoring and providing regular reports on both national and global contraband tobacco.  The CBSA provides reports, information and guidance to the Department of Finance Canada on matters that will impact the future tax structure of tobacco.

10. Planning Highlights:

Implementation of the 'Cracking Down on Tobacco Marketing Aimed at Youth' Act, including compliance measures to ensure no tobacco advertising appears in magazines or newspapers, and that certain flavoured tobacco products (e.g. little cigars and blunt wraps) are no longer used in Canada.

11. Federal Partner #1:  Health Canada


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
Substance use and abuse FTCS $284.2M $42.7M Link 1
Total $284.2M $42.7M  

16. Expected results:

Reduce overall smoking prevalence from 19% (2006) to 12% by 2011

11. Federal Partner #2:  Public Safety Canada (PSC)


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
1.Law Enforcement Strategies FTCS $3.0M $0.61M Link 1
Total $3.0M $0.61M  

16. Expected results:

  • Enhanced partnership arrangement with Akwesasne Mohawk Police through the administration of contribution funding for monitoring activities in connection with determining levels of contraband activity.
  • Leading the Canadian Delegation in preparation and participation in the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Controls negotiations for a Protocol in illicit tobacco.
  • Provide policy leadership and development of strategies to support law enforcements efforts to combat organized crime in the trade of contraband tobacco.

11. Federal Partner #3: Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
Increase efforts towards coordination of activities related to contraband tobacco enforcement (criminal intelligence updates on illicit tobacco trade; monitoring of illegal activities along the Canada/U.S. border through the use of detection equipment; and international cooperation). FTCS $8.6M $1.5M Link 1
Total $8.6M $1.5M  

16. Expected results:

  • Provide regular reports on the illicit tobacco situation to Finance and Health Canada, including data on seizures, organized crime involvement and trends.  Side bar reports and presentations to other partners and key Ministerial entities upon request, such as the Government of Canada Task Force on Illicit Tobacco, the Senior Revenue Officials Conference and the Interprovincial Investigations Conference.  Attend regular meetings to brief the Department of Finance on the illicit tobacco market.
  • Improve border security through the use of sophisticated technology which permits detection and monitoring of illegal border intrusions, resulting in vital intelligence.
  • Co-host the 2011 Joint U.S./Canada Tobacco Diversion Workshop with American and Canadian agencies to be held in spring 2011.  Participate in information sharing sessions with American Law Enforcement partners.  To give presentations at law enforcement courses/workshops in Canada and the U.S. on the subject of contraband tobacco.

11. Federal Partner #4:  Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP)


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
ODPP FTCS $11.2M $2.35M Link 1
Total $11.2M $2.35M  

16. Expected results:

  • Prioritize recovery for fines ordered under cigarette contraband and tobacco sales to youth convictions.
  • Increase the number of fines satisfied by a minimum of 18 percent.
  • Continue to prioritize the most effective and least costly recovery methods.
  • Prioritize payment of fines over incarceration, but enhance enforcement measures when appropriate.
  • Increase registration of outstanding fines in CRA's Set-off program by 20%.
  • Recover against estates whenever possible.

11. Federal Partner #5:  Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
Taxpayer and Business Assistance FTCS: Assessment and Benefit Services Branch $4.0M $0.2M Link 1
FTCS; Legislative Policy and Regulatory Affairs Branch   $0.7M Link 2
Total $4.0M $0.9M  

16. Expected results:

Systems adjustments and maintenance to reflect the legislative changes that affect rates, reporting and refunds as well as program changes to include duty-free shops and ships stores.

  • Ensure compliance with legislative requirements imposed on the manufacture, possession and sale of tobacco products in Canada.
  • Work with stakeholders to monitor and assess the effectiveness of measures used to reduce contraband tobacco.
  • Provide the Department of Finance with advice to assist in the development of policy and the determination of the magnitude and timing of future tax increases.
    Support RCMP/CBSA enforcement activity.

11. Federal Partner #6:  Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
1.1 Risk Assessment
2.2 Conventional Border
Internal Services
Loss of Duty Free Licensing
FTCS $28.4M $5.7M * Link 1
$21.5M $4.3M Link 2
Total $50M $10M*  

*Please note that this figure includes 20% EBP but not the 13% PWGSC Accom. costs.

16. Expected results:

  • -Provide advice to Department of Finance on matters that will impact the future tax structure on tobacco.
  • -Monitor and report on the contraband tobacco situation in Canada.
  • -Expand cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners.

Collection of the tobacco duties imposed on personal importations of returning Canadians.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$361.0 $58.06M

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):  N/A

18. Contact information: 
Cathy A. Sabiston, Director General
Controlled Substances and Tobacco Directorate
(613) 941-1977

Horizontal Initiative - 2

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Chemicals Management Plan

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada/Environment Canada

3. Lead department program activity:  Sustainable Environmental Health/Substances and Waste Management

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-2008

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-2011

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $299.2 M

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) is part of the Government's comprehensive environmental agenda and is managed jointly by Health Canada (HC) and Environment Canada (EC). The activities identified in this plan build on Canada's position as a global leader in the safe management of chemical substances and products, and focus upon timely action on key threats to health and the environment.  It includes risk assessment, risk management, monitoring and surveillance, as well as research on chemicals which may be harmful to human health or the environment.

The CMP also puts more responsibility on industry through realistic and enforceable measures, stimulates innovation, and augments Canadian competitiveness in an international market that is increasingly focused on chemical and product safety.

HC and EC collectively manage the CMP funding and ensure that it is aligned with human health and environmental priorities.

The following program areas are involved in CMP activities:

In Health Canada:

  •  Health Products and Food Branch:
    • Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate
    • Food Directorate
    • Natural Health Products Directorate
    • Office of Science and Risk Management
    • Therapeutics Products Directorate
    • Veterinary Drugs Directorate
  •  Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:
    • Consumer Product Safety Directorate
    • Safe Environments Directorate
    • Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate
  •  Pest Management Regulatory Agency

In Environment Canada:

  •  Environmental Stewardship Branch
    • Chemical Sectors Directorate
    • Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Directorate
    • Public and Resources Sectors Directorate
    • Energy and Transportation Directorate
    • Environmental Protection Operations Directorate
  •  Science and Technology Branch
    • Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
    • Wildlife and Landscape Sciences Directorate
    • Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate
    • Water Science and Technology Directorate
  • Enforcement Branch
  • Strategic Policy Branch
    • Economic Analysis Directorate

For more information, see the Government of Canada's Chemical Substances Portal at: http://www.chemicalsubstanceschimiques.gc.ca/

8. Shared outcome(s):

High-level outcomes for managing the CMP include:

  • Canadians and their environment are protected from the harmful effects of chemicals;
  • identification, reduction, elimination, prevention or better management of chemical substances and their use;
  • direction, collaboration and coordination of science and management activities;
  • understanding of the relative risks of chemical substances and options to mitigate;
  • biomonitoring and environmental monitoring of substances;
  • risk assessment and risk management; and
  • informed stakeholders and the Canadian public.

9. Governance structure(s):

HC shares the lead on the CMP with EC. The CMP consists of five inter-related program elements to be planned, delivered and evaluated within an integrated framework, managed jointly by HC and EC.

Governance is assured through a joint HC/EC Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee) and the Interdepartmental Chemicals Management Executive Committee (CMEC). These Committees were established to maximize the coordination of efforts, while minimizing duplication between the two departments.

The CMP ADM Committee provides strategic direction, coordination and a challenge function for the overall implementation and review of results and resource utilization on CMP initiatives.  The Committee serves as a high-level forum for making recommendations on chemicals management to respective Deputy Ministers.

The CMEC is the key management committee at the Director General level to support the development of joint EC-HC strategic directions.  It is also a formal body for joint consultations and cooperation to ensure timely and concerted actions in implementing the CMP work activities in an integrated fashion.  The CMEC reports to the ADM Committee, providing recommendations on program implementation, results and resource utilization.

10. Planning Highlights:

In 2010-2011, CMP partners will continue to assess and manage the risks from the highest priority substances according to established timelines and begin to implement a program of work for medium priorities.  Leveraging the work of other jurisdictions, the CMP will further reduce threats to Canadians and their environment from harmful substances, and strengthen relations with international and domestic partners.

An assessment strategy for moderate priorities will be developed and screening assessment reports (SARs) and risk management (RM) strategies for high priorities will be completed (Final SARs and RM approaches for Batches 8, 9 & 10; Draft SARs and RM scopes for Batches 10, 11 & 12).  RM measures will continue to be developed, implemented and monitored for Batches 1 through 10 during 2010-2011.  Work on final SARs and RM approaches for Batches 11 and 12 will be undertaken. Screening assessments for some non-challenge substances will also be completed, as well as an update to the Domestic Substances List to inform program decisions and future policy.

While continuing to develop regulations and guidelines to address risks posed by toxic substances in existing consumer products and cosmetics, Health Canada will also be receiving and assessing nomination packages from industry to support the addition of substances in products regulated under the Foods and Drugs Act (F & DA) to the revised In Commerce List (ICL).  A framework for the prioritization of substances on the revised ICL will be developed as well.

HC and EC will continue to maintain research and monitoring programs to address chemicals of emerging concern, risk assessment needs and risk management activities.  The first cycle of biomonitoring results from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) are scheduled to be released in July 2010. Collection for the second cycle of the CHMS began in September 2009 and will be in progress in 2010-1011.  Research in support of current CMP themes and priorities will continue and opportunities for synergies and ways and means of improving knowledge transfer will also be addressed.

Environmental Assessment Regulations to address the potential environmental and human health impact of new substances contained in products regulated under the F & DA will be published in Canada Gazette, Part 1 by April 2011.  Work will continue on development of new Best Management Practices, where necessary, to mitigate exposure to the environment of substances/products regulated under the F&DA.

Assessments and risk management strategies on substances that might have food-related uses, or for which a potential route of exposure is food, will continue to be reviewed.  Health Canada is also committed to completing the re-evaluation of all of the 401 older pesticides registered before 1995 - the remaining re-evaluations will be completed in 2010-2011 and the next phase of the re-evaluation program will be rolled out, respecting the Pest Control Products Act commitment to re-evaluate all pesticides on a 15 year cycle.
The CMP team will follow up on the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development's (CESD) recommendations to periodically assess all risk management strategies and develop innovative approaches to effectively and efficiently manage harmful substances.

CMP partners will continue to promote better integration between EC and HC, including the development of a foundation of a quality management system and ensuring that structures are in place to identify and implement specific integration activities.

11. Federal Partner #1: Health Canada


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
Sustainable Environmental Health (HECSB) a. Risk Assessment $9.9 M $3.5 M Link 1
b. Risk Management $50.1 M $16.1 M
c. Research $26.6 M $6.8 M
d. Monitoring & Surveillance $34.0 M $13.8 M
e. Program Management $5.4 M $1.4 M
Consumer Products a. Risk Management $12.6 M $5.4 M
Pesticide Regulation a. Risk Assessment $9.9 M $3.3 M
a. Risk Management $13.6 M $4.7 M
Health Products a. Risk Assessment $3.3 M $1.5 M
b. Risk Management $12.5 M $4.3 M
c. Research $2.5 M $ 1.4 M
d. Monitoring & Surveillance $1.1 M $ 0.6 M
e. Program Management   $0.1 M
Food & Nutrition a. Risk Assessment $3.8 M $1.4 M
b. Risk Management $6.2 M $2.1 M
c. Research $1.2 M $0.4 M
d. Monitoring & Surveillance    
Total $192.7 M $66.8 M  

16. Expected results (HC):

Increase level of Canadian public awareness of chemical management issues and actions being taken

Risk assessments are conducted and risk management objectives are met for regulations and other control instruments for substances and the products of biotechnology

Declining trends in levels of risk, adverse reactions, illnesses and injuries from toxic chemical substances in the environment and their use and/or the risk of exposure to Canadians

Enhanced knowledge of environmental hazards and evidence on which regulatory decisions are based

11. Federal Partner #2: Environment Canada


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
Chemicals Management a. Risk Assessment $13.1 M $4.8 M Link 1
b. Risk Management $64.9 M $24.4 M
  c. Research $2.1 M $ 0  
d. Monitoring & Surveillance $26.4 M $7.8 M
Total $106.5 M $37.0 M  

16. Expected results (EC):

  • Risks to Canadians and impacts on their environment posed by toxic and other substances of concern are reduced.
  • Direction, collaboration and coordination of science and management activities
  • Increased knowledge of the risks of toxic chemical substances through research and options to mitigate
  • Risk assessments conducted in a timely fashion as required
  • Risk management objectives are met, e.g. effective controls identified and implemented
  • Enhanced knowledge of stakeholders and the Canadian public regarding risk assessment/management activities, including knowledge on the effectiveness of control actions

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$299.2 M $103.8M

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

18. Contact information:

Suzanne Leppinen, Director
Horizontal and International Programs
Safe Environments Directorate
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Health Canada
269 Laurier Avenue West - Room: 5-009
Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9
Ph: (613) 941-8071
suzanne_leppinen@hc-sc.gc.ca

Mark Cuddy, Director
Environmental Stewardship Branch Coordination
Environmental Stewardship Branch
Environment Canada
Place Vincent Massey (PVM) - Room: 2158
351 St Joseph Blvd
Gatineau, Quebec  K1A 0H3
Ph: (819) 994-7467
Mark.Cuddy@ec.gc.ca
 

Horizontal Initiatives - 3

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children.

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada (HC)

3. Lead department program activity: First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative:

ECD component - October 2002
Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC) component- December 2004

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative:

ECD component - ongoing.
ELCC component - ongoing

6.  Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

ECD: $320 million 2002-03 to 2006-07 ($60 million in 2002-03 and $65 million thereafter). Ongoing: $65 million per year.
ELCC: $45 million 2005-06 to 2007-08 ($14.5 million in 2005-06; $15.3 million in 2006-07; $15.2 million in 2007-08). Ongoing: $14 million per year.

7.   Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The ECD Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children was announced on October 31, 2002.  The Strategy provides $320 million over five years to: improve and expand existing ECD programs and services for Aboriginal children; expand ECD capacity and networks; introduce new research initiatives to improve understanding of how Aboriginal children are doing; and work towards the development of a "single window" approach to ensure better integration and coordination of federal Aboriginal ECD programming.
In December 2004, as first phase of a "single window", Cabinet approved an additional $45 million over three years (beginning fiscal year 2005-06) and $14 million ongoing to improve integration and coordination of two ECD programs-- Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve (AHSOR) and the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative (FNICCI).
The objectives of these funds are to increase access to and improve the quality of ELCC programming for First Nations children on reserve, and improve integration and coordination between the two programs through joint planning, joint training and co-location.
The Strategy also includes Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)-funded child/day care programs in Alberta and Ontario.

8.   Shared outcome(s):

The ECD component complements the September 2000 First Ministers F/P/T ECD Agreement.  It seeks to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children by improving the developmental opportunities to which Aboriginal children (and their families) are exposed at an early age (0-6 years).
The ELCC component complements funding released to provinces and territories under the March 2003 Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Childcare (ELCC) to improve access to ELCC programs and services.

9.   Governance structure(s):

  • Interdepartmental ECD ADM Steering Committee;
  • Interdepartmental ECD Working Group.

10. Planning Highlights:

11. Federal Partner #1:  Health Canada
Electronic Link:  http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnihb-dgspni/fnihb/cp/ahsor/index.htm


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) $M 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11 $M
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services a. Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR) $107.595 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;  $21.519/year). $21.519/year ongoing.
Committed in 2002.
ELCC
$24.000 (2005-06 through to 2007-08, $7.500 in 2005-06, $8.300 in 2006-07; $8.200 in 2007-08). $7.500 in 2008-09 and ongoing
Committed in 2005.
$21.519

$7.500
Link 1
b. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (FASD-FNIC) $70.000  (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$10.000 in 2002-03 and $15.000 thereafter). $15.000/ year ongoing.
Committed in 2002.
$15.000 Link 2
c. Capacity Building $5.075
(2002-03 through to 2006-07; $1.015/year). $1.015/ year ongoing.
Committed in 2002.
$1.015 Link 3
Total From start to 2009-10:
ECD: $295.272
ELCC: $39.000
ECD: $37.534
ELCC: $7.500
 

16. Expected results:

Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve (AHSOR):

  • Program support and enhancement
  • Increase integration, coordination,  access, and quality

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (FASD-FNIC):

  • Program enhancement (e.g. complete evaluation of FASD Community Coordinator pilot projects towards the development of an evidence-based project framework; and continue to develop strategies to support FN/I women with addictions.)

Capacity Building:

  • Increase capacity of National Aboriginal Organizations
  • Enhance capacity of community Early Childhood Education practitioners

11. Federal Partner #2: PHAC
Electronic Link: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/dca-dea/programs-mes/ahs_main_e.html


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) $M 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11 $M
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
Health Promotion a. Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC) $62.880 (2002-03 through to 2006-07;
$12.576/ year and ongoing.
Committed in 2002.
$12.576 Link 1
b. Capacity Building $2.500  (2002-03 through to 2006-07; $0.500/year) and ongoing
Committed in 2002
$0.500 Link 2
Total From start to 2009-10: $104.608 $13.076  

16. Expected results:

Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities (AHSUNC):

  • Continue to support program delivery to increased number of special needs and parental outreach workers; enhance special needs training

Capacity Building:

  • Enhance capacity of existing sites; horizontal coordination, engagement and development of tools and resources to build capacity

11. Federal Partner #3: HRSDC
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/employment/aboriginal_employment/childcare/index.shtml
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/hip/sd/300_UEYInfo.shtml


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) $M 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11 $M
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
Lifelong Learning - Health Human Resources (HHR) a. First Nations  and Inuit  child Care Initiative (FNICCI) $45.700   (2002-03 through to 2006-07; $9.140/year) and ongoing.
Committed in 2002
ELCC
$21.000 (2005-06 through to 2007-08; $7.000/year). $6.500/ year ongoing.
Committed in 2005
$9.140

$6.500
Link 1
b. Research and Knowledge $21.200
(2002-03 through to 2006-07); $4.240/year and ongoing.
Committed in 2002
$4.240 Link 2
Total From start to 2009-10:
ECD: $107.040
ELCC: $34.000
ECD: $13.380
ELCC: $6.500
 

16. Expected Results:

First Nations  and Inuit  child Care Initiative (FNICCI):

  • Program expansion and enhancement
  • Increase program integration, coordination, access and quality

Research and Knowledge:

  • Information on the well-being of Aboriginal children through an Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the Aboriginal component of "Understanding the Early Years" (UEY)
  • Align collection of Aboriginal children information with Federal strategy on Aboriginal data

*Please note that effective 2004-05, when the national Understanding the Early Years Initiative was assigned to HRSDC's Income Security and Social Development Branch, the management of the Aboriginal component was also transferred, with an allocation of $700,000 per year on an ongoing basis.  The allocation and planned spending figures in this table reflect an allocation of $800,000.

11. Federal Partner #4 INAC


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) $M 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11 $M
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
The people- social development a. Family Capacity Initiatives $5.050  (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07; 1.010/year)
2007-2008 and ongoing.
Committed in 2002.
$1.010 Link 1
Total From start to 2009-10: $8.080 $1.010  

16. Expected results:

Family Capacity Initiatives:

  • Improved partnerships and enhanced coordination with other governmental departments (Health Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, and Public Health Agency Canada) to improve knowledge and awareness of Federal Early Childhood Development programs

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
ECD (2002-03 to 2006-07): $320.000
($60.000 in 2002-03 and $65.000/year hereafter); $65.000/year ongoing.

Total from start to 2009-10: $515.000

ELCC (2005-06 to 2007-08): $45.000
($14.500 in 2005-06; $15.300 in 2006-07; $15.200 in 2007-08); and $14.000/year ongoing.

Total from start to 2009-10: $73.000
ECD: $65.000/year ongoing.

ELCC: $14.000/year ongoing.

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

18. Contact information:

Cathy Winters, Senior Policy Coordinator,
Children and Youth Division, Community Programs Directorate, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada Postal Locator 1919A Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa
Telephone: (613) 952-5064  Email: Cathy_winters@hc-sc.gc.ca

Horizontal Initiative - 4

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (the Action Plan)

2. Name of lead department(s): The lead is shared between Health Canada (HC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

3. Lead department program activity:

  • HC: Health Products, Consumer Products, Food Safety, and Pesticide Regulation;
  • CFIA: Food Safety;
  • PHAC: Health Promotion, Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, and Infectious Disease Prevention and Control;
  • CIHR: Strategic Priority Research.

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: Fiscal Year 2008-2009.

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Fiscal Year 2012-2013 (and ongoing).

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date):

$489.5 million over five years ending in Fiscal Year 2012-2013 (and $126.7 million ongoing).

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The federal government is responsible for promoting the health and safety of Canadians. A key part of this role is ensuring that the food, health and consumer products used by Canadians are safe. Adverse consequences associated with unsafe products impact not only the Canadian public, but also the Canadian economy. The Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan (Action Plan) is a horizontal initiative aimed at modernizing and strengthening Canada's safety system for food, health and consumer products. A number of recent high-profile incidents, such as lead and ingestible magnets in children's toys, foodborne illness outbreaks, and the global withdrawal of some prescription medicines, have underscored the need for government action.

The Action Plan modernizes Canada's regulatory system to enable it to better protect Canadians from unsafe consumer products in the face of current realities and future pressures. The Action Plan bolsters Canada's regulatory system by committing to amending or replacing outdated health and safety legislation with new legislative regimes that respond to modern realities, and by enhancing safety programs in areas where modern legislative tools already exist. The Action Plan ensures that Canadians have the information they need to assess the risks and benefits associated with the consumer and health products they choose to use, and to minimize risks associated with food safety.

The Action Plan is an integrated, risk-based plan and includes a series of initiatives that are premised on three key pillars: active prevention, targeted oversight and rapid response. We focus on active prevention to avoid as many incidents as possible and work closely with industry to promote awareness, provide regulatory guidance, and help identify safety concerns at an early stage. Targeted oversight provides for early detection of safety problems and further safety verification at the appropriate stage in a product's life cycle. To improve rapid response capabilities and ensure the government has the ability to act quickly and effectively when needed, we work to enhance health and safety risk assessments, strengthen recall capacity, and increase the efficiency in responding and communicating clearly with consumers and stakeholders.

8. Shared outcome(s):

  • Increased knowledge of food risks and product safety (scientific and surveillance/monitoring);
  • Increased industry awareness and understanding of regulatory requirements;
  • Increased industry compliance with safety standards;
  • Increased consumer awareness and understanding of safety risks associated with health and consumer products and food;
  • Strengthened oversight and response to safety incidents;
  • Increased consumer confidence in health and consumer products and food;
  • Increased trade-partner confidence in Canadian controls, which meet international standards
  • Increased availability of safe and effective products; and
  • Level playing field where imports can be demonstrated to meet Canadian requirements.

9. Governance structure(s):

The Minister of Health and the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada have joint responsibility and accountability for results, and for providing information on progress achieved by the Action Plan.

A Governance Framework has been established and endorsed by all of the partner departments/agencies. To facilitate horizontal coordination, the following Director General (DG)/Executive Director (ED) level Task Forces have been established:

  • Legislative and Regulatory Task Force,
  • Health Products Task Force,
  • Consumer Products Task Force,
  • Food Task Force, and the
  • Communications Task Force

These Task Forces report to a DG/ED level Coordinating Committee. An Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)/Vice President (VP) level Steering Committee provides direction to the Coordinating Committee. An Oversight Committee of Deputy Heads facilitates the provision of high level guidance to the Steering Committee.

Health Canada's Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) provides the Secretariat function for the Action Plan and plays an integral role in supporting the ongoing operation and decision-making of the governance committees, the oversight and integration of performance against commitments, and providing advice to senior management. SPB is also the lead for coordinating the implementation of the legislative and regulatory initiatives.

Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) has primary responsibility for implementing Action Plan activities related to health products with support from Health Canada's Strategic Policy Branch (SPB) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) on one initiative (increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness).
Health Canada's Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch (HECSB) and the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), along with the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), work together to implement Action Plan activities related to consumer products.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch (HPFB) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) work together to implement Action Plan activities related to food safety.

The Public Affairs, Consultation and Communications Branch (PACCB) provides communications support for all of the above activities and will coordinate or lead many of the horizontal Departmental activities under the Consumer Information Strategy.

10. Planning Highlights:

The Action Plan reflects the need to modernize and sharpen the focus of Government action to protect Canadians and responds to the new technological and economic realities of the 21st century, such as globalization and the introduction of more complex products. The Action Plan is an integrated, risk-based plan with the streams of initiatives (premised on the three key areas of action) aligned to meet these needs.

11. Federal Partner #1: Health Canada:


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($M)
15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
($M)
16. Expected Results
for 2010-11*
Health Products Active Prevention 57.6 9.7 Increased industry awareness and knowledge of regulatory requirements
Increased oversight of the risk management and risk mitigation strategies for health products
Increased awareness and understanding of the safe use of health products by consumers and health care professionals
Targeted Oversight 34.6 8.05 Enhanced capacity of HC and industry to identify and respond to risk issues
Increased capacity to identify safety issues with health products on the market
Improved ability to monitor and control importation of health products
Rapid Response Existing Resources Existing Resources Improved ability to respond with better tools when safety incidents occur
Consumer Products Active Prevention 41.0 9.26 Increased awareness and understanding of product safety obligations and standards and regulatory requirements by industry
Increased awareness and understanding of consumer product safety issues by consumers
Targeted Oversight 15.7 3.8 Improved timeliness and quality of information on consumer product safety
Improved Cosmetic Regulations of the Food and Drugs Act
Increased sharing of information with international regulators
Rapid Response 17.9 4.6 Improved legislative authority and regulatory tools
Improved monitoring of consumer and cosmetic products
Pesticide Regulation Active Prevention 6.9 1.64 Increased industry (manufacturers and retailers) awareness of risks and related regulatory requirements
Rapid Response 8.0 2.1 Improved monitoring of pest management products using a risk management approach
Food and Nutrition Active Prevention 29.6 6.7 Establishment of the appropriate instrument or mix of instruments, including regulatory and non-regulatory measures (standards, policies, etc.) to address immediate areas of concern
Rapid Response 1.3 0.3 Increased public understanding of food safety risks, alert systems and safety systems
Sub-total 212.6 46.1 --

* It should be noted that the above Expected Results (Column 16) reflect immediate outcomes that will be implemented over a multi-year period for the Action Plan. As such, preliminary progress on these initiatives is anticipated in FY 2010-11.

11. Federal Partner #2: Canadian Food and Inspection Agency:


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($M)
15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
($M)
16. Expected Results
for 2010-11*
Food Safety Active Prevention 114.2 25.8 Increased understanding of food safety risks by HC, PHAC & CFIA
Increased industry understanding of and engagement in the development and implementation of food safety risk mitigation processes
Improved international collaboration in addressing common import risks
Targeted Oversight 77.0 19.2 Increased verification of industry food safety measures
Improved ability to monitor and control importation of food
Rapid Response 32.2 7.4 Timely and efficient recall capacity
Increased public understanding of food safety risks, alert systems and safety systems
Sub-total 223.4 52.4 --

* It should be noted that the above Expected Results (Column 16) reflect immediate outcomes that will be implemented over a multi-year period for the Action Plan. As such, preliminary progress on these initiatives is anticipated in FY 2010-11.

11. Federal Partner #3: Public Health Agency of Canada:


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($M)
15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
($M)
16. Expected Results
for 2010-11*
Health Promotion Targeted Oversight 4.5 1.1 More and better data on accidents, injuries, illnesses and deaths due to consumer products
Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Targeted Oversight 3.5 0.9 Engagement of risk assessment stakeholders (for consumer products)
Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Active Prevention 18.3 4.1 Increased understanding of food safety risks by HC, PHAC & CFIA (e.g., new information and data on enteric illnesses and their causes and the impact of interventions on public health)
Sub-total 26.3 6.1 --

* It should be noted that the above Expected Results (Column 16) reflect immediate outcomes that will be implemented over a multi-year period for the Action Plan. As such, preliminary progress on these initiatives is anticipated in FY 2010-11.

11. Federal Partner #4: Canadian Institutes of Health Research:


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)
($M)
15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
($M)
16. Expected Results
for 2010-11*
Strategic Priority Research Targeted Oversight 27.1 6.93 Increased knowledge of post-market drug safety and effectiveness to inform decisions;

Increased capacity in Canada to address priority research on post-market drug safety and effectiveness
Sub-total 27.1 6.93 --

* It should be noted that the above Expected Results (Column 16) reflect immediate outcomes that will be implemented over a multi-year period for the Action Plan. As such, preliminary progress on these initiatives is anticipated in FY 2010-11.


Federal Partner Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
Health Canada 212.6 46.1
Canadian Food and Inspection Agency 223.4 52.4
Public Health Agency of Canada 26.3 6.1
Canadian Institutes of Health Research 27.1 6.93
Total 489.4 111.5

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable.

18. Contact information:

Hélène Quesnel, Director General, Legislative and Regulatory Policy Directorate, Strategic Policy Branch, Health Canada, telephone: (613) 952-3484, fax: (613) 946-1430, e-mail: helene_quesnel@hc-sc.gc.ca.

Horizontal Initiative - 5

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Implementation of an Action Plan to Protect Human Health from Environmental Contaminants

2. Name of lead department(s): Health Canada

3. Lead department program activity: 3.1 Sustainable Environmental Health

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2008-2009

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-2013

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $84.6M

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Recent surveys show that Canadians are concerned about environmental contaminants. There is a clear need to ensure that Canadians have credible information on the impact of chemicals in the environment and the steps that they should take as a result.

The Government has already taken steps to address environmental contaminants through the Chemicals Management Plan and the Clean Air Agenda, focusing on substances which have known potential for harming human health and the environment. Both industry and stakeholders have been supportive of these initiatives but continue to insist that decisions be made based on scientific evidence. This requires mechanisms such as monitoring, surveillance and research to ensure that the effectiveness of interventions to address known potential risks can be assessed and that emerging risks can be detected.

The Action Plan to Protect Human Health from Environmental Contaminants is designed to further protect the health of Canadians from environmental contaminants while increasing the knowledge-base on contaminant levels and potential impacts on health, in particular:

  • to foster awareness and provide information for Canadians to take action;
  • to identify and monitor trends in exposures to contaminants and potentials association with health problems such as asthma, congenital anomalies and developmental disorders; and
  • to better understand the association between contaminants and illness.

$13.1M has been allocated to Health Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 to develop an Environmental Health Guide for Canadians, as well as tailored guides for First Nations and Inuit communities. The objective of the guide is to help make Canadians aware of the risks that harmful environmental contaminants may pose to their health along with direct actions that they can take to reduce these risks and improve their health.

$54.5M has been allocated to Statistics Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 towards conducting the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) and $5.6M from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 for Health Canada to conduct the First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative (FNBI).  The CHMS is used to collect information from Canadians about their general health and lifestyles and includes collection of blood and urine specimens to be tested for environmental contaminants among other things. The CHMS will not provide data on First Nations on-reserve or Inuit communities. The FNBI will focus on these communities.

$5.9M has been allocation to the Public Health Agency of Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 to enhance surveillance of congenital anomalies.

$5.5M has been allocation to the Public Health Agency of Canada from 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 to conduct surveillance of developmental disorders.

8. Shared outcome(s): Reduce health risks to Canadians (particularly vulnerable populations) from environmental contaminants

9. Governance structure(s):

All action plan initiatives take advantage of governance and management structures already established for ongoing government programs such as: the Canadian Population Health Statistics Program, the Chemicals Management Plan, the Healthy Living and Chronic Disease initiative of the Public Health Agency of Canada, as well as components of existing national surveillance systems developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada in partnership with stakeholders.

Each program within Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada will be fully responsible for the management of initiatives they are leading within the action plan. Consultations and stakeholder involvement will be governed through consultative structures and interdepartmental committees already established.

A tripartite governance structure between Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada will be used to oversee the implementation of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). The CHMS will use the existing Canadian Population Health Statistics Program as a governance structure, which includes senior officials from all three federal organizations.

10. Planning Highlights:

Environmental Health Guide for Canadians

Text for the Environmental Health Guide for Canadians has been developed with partners across the Health Portfolio and with the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation to raise awareness of environmental hazards among Canadians and let them know what they can do to reduce their exposure to these risks.  Guidance is also provided on where they can go for more information to address their specific concerns and personal situations. Content for the main guide, including information for parents/caregivers has been developed this year.

Background research is underway for a Guide focusing on senior's health as well as for fact sheets designed for health care providers and teachers/students which will be developed in 2010-11.

Text for tailored guides for First Nations and Inuit have been developed and are being distributed for review by Aboriginal partners. For 2010-11, the tailored guides for First Nations and Inuit for homes and children should be released. Tailored guides for First nations and Inuit for outdoor activities are to be developed and distributed to aboriginal partners for review.

Work on a marketing campaign has been undertaken to coincide with the development of the Environmental Health Guide, and will be launched in early 2010.  The campaign will include advertising, a web site, and various outreach activities.  The purpose of the above-mentioned marketing activities is to raise awareness of the link between health and the environment, and to promote/support the launching of the Environmental Health Guide. A First Nations and Inuit campaign is also being developed to support tailored guides.  This includes a general Home Guide, guides with a seasonal focus (fall/winter and spring/summer), and another for First nations and Inuit youth which will be developed in 2010-2011.

Following up on the launch, 2010-11 activities are currently being planned to build on the momentum generated from the launch of the campaign. Partnerships with various non-Governmental and private sector collaborators are being discussed.  As well, public relations and outreach activities will continue throughout the year.

First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative

The First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative (FNBI) was established to address the need for baseline information on human exposure to environmental chemicals on First Nations reserves, in a way that is complimentary to the Canadian Health Measures Survey.  The survey is being implemented through leadership and partnership with First Nations authorities.  The FNBI is being designed as a parallel survey to the Canadian Health Measures Survey, with a smaller sample size and more limited subset of measurements more tightly focused around environmental chemical exposure.  The methodology and instrument will be adapted for cultural appropriateness and safety.  The first 2 years (ending March 2010) of the program is being spent in consultations with national and regional First Nations organizations to determine priorities and to develop suitable programs.

For 2010-11, for the First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative, First Nation priorities will be determined and suitable biomonitoring parameters, sampling protocol, and parameters for an ethics review are to be developed including mechanisms to ensure appropriate comparability of data with the CHMS are in place. Sampling of selected communities is also expected to commence.

Enhanced Congenital Anomalies Surveillance

In 2010-2011 the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will continue to work with the provinces and territories on implementation of congenital anomalies surveillance systems in the various jurisdictions.  It will also continue its participation in the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Reporting, and PHAC will organize the 8th Annual Scientific Meeting for the Network.

Surveillance of Developmental Disorders

In 2010-2011 the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will build on previous developmental work for the surveillance of autism, as the target developmental disorder for the initiative.  The focus will be on identifying a committee of multidisciplinary experts to guide the work, establishing the surveillance methodology, and preparing for the funding of sentinel surveillance centres.

Canadian Health Measures Survey

In 2010-11 the CHMS team will be working simultaneously on three cycles of the survey:

CHMS Cycle 1: Data dissemination and data release will continue in FY 2010-11 with the release of the environmental biomarkers planned for July 2010 and the activity monitor data release planned for November 2010.

CHMS Cycle 2 data collection, which began in August 2009, will continue during FY 2010-11. The mobile examination centres will be set up in eight different sites situated in Newfoundland and Labrador, British Columbia, Manitoba, Alberta, Ontario and Nova Scotia. The CHMS cycle 2 data collection will continue through fall 2011.

CHMS Cycle 3 content planning has started in FY 2009-10. During FY 2010-11, the CHMS team will finalize the feasibility studies related to specific content identified by federal partners (HC and PHAC) as well as experts from the health domain. In addition to content specification, the CHMS team will work toward the development of the Privacy Impact Assessment, the Ethics Board submission and other approvals required for the implementation of the survey planned for January 2012.

11. Federal Partner #1: Health Canada


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
PA 3.1 Sustainable Environmental Health
PA 4.1 First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
Environmental Health Guide for Canadians $13.1M HECS: $0.385M
FNIHB:
$0.7M

PACCB:
$1.6M
Link 1
First Nations Biomonitoring Initiative $5.6M FNIHB:
$1.17M
Link 2
Total $18.7 $3.855M  

16. Expected results:

  • Distribution of The Environmental Health Guides and subsequent development of Guides for specific populations
  • A Guide focusing on senior's health as well as for fact sheets designed for health care providers and teachers/students will be developed.
  • Tailored guides for First Nations and Inuit for homes and children to be released.
  • Tailored guides for First Nations and Inuit for outdoor activities are to be developed and distributed to aboriginal partners for review.
  • Continuation of the Environmental Health marketing campaign (mainstream and First Nations components).

First Nation priorities will be determined and suitable biomonitoring parameters, sampling protocol, and parameters for an ethics review are to be developed including mechanisms to ensure appropriate comparability of data with the CHMS are in place. Sampling of selected communities is expected to commence.

11. Federal Partner #2: Public Health Agency of Canada


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
1.2 Surveillance and Population Health Assessment Enhanced Congenital Anomalies Surveillance $5.9M $1.2M Link 1
Surveillance of Developmental Disorders $5.5M $1.4M Link 2
Total $11.4 $2.6M  

16. Expected results:

Enhanced Congenital Anomalies Surveillance

  • increased capacity in the provinces and territories for surveillance of congenital anomalies in their jurisdictions
  • strengthened networks across Canada for surveillance and research into prevention of congenital anomalies

Surveillance of Developmental Disorders

  • a network for surveillance of autism in Canada
  • increased public health scientific capacity in autism within the federal government

11. Federal Partner #3: Statistics Canada


12. Federal Partner Program Activity 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for
2010-11
16. Expected Results for
2010-11
PA 2 Social Statistics Canadian Health Measures Survey $54.5M $14M Link 1
Total $54.5M $14M  

16. Expected results:

CHMS cycle 1 data release (including tables, fact sheets and research articles) media coverage will be monitored. In addition, access to the website and request for information will be tracked. The CHMS micro-data files will be available to external researchers through Statistics Canada Research Data Centres located in Canadian universities.

CHMS cycle 2 data collection response rate is monitored regularly to ensure adequate representation of the Canadian population by age group and sex. In addition, ongoing data quality control and data quality assurance activities (including health experts' observations of the data collection procedures) are performed to ensure a high data quality level.

CHMS cycle 3 content specifications will be based on extensive consultation with federal partners and health experts through the tripartite governance structure between Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada and Statistics Canada as well as their working committees; and the CHMS advisory committees (Expert, Physician, Laboratory and Quality Assurance and Quality Control). Feasibility studies will be conducted to ensure adherence to existing resources and operations limitations while maintaining a high response rate and quality data.


Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
$84.6M $20.455M

17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

18. Contact information:

Dahlia Stein
Head, Stakeholder Engagement Office
Safe Environments Directorate, Healthy Environments and Consumer Product Safety Branch, Health Canada
613-954-9413
dahlia.stein@hc-sc.gc.ca

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Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Table 3 - Horizontal Initiatives

1. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Skills and Employment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 3, 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $292.0 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership focuses on developing the skills of Canada's Aboriginal workforce, promoting maximum employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments across the country and providing lasting benefits for Aboriginal communities, families and individuals.

The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership program is an opportunity driven initiative that is implemented through formalized partnerships between the private sector and Aboriginal communities (and others such as the provincial governments and training institutions). The partnerships are responsible for jointly developing and managing comprehensive, multi-year skills development plans that will ensure long-term highly skilled sustainable employment as a result of the projects. The comprehensive Aboriginal training-to-employment plan covers a broad continuum ranging from basic skills, literacy and academic upgrading, through job-specific training and apprenticeships to retention counselling and other on-the-job supports. The plan must have a commitment from the employers to provide at least 50 long-term (sustainable) jobs for Aboriginal people. The partnership must also make a significant financial contribution (at least 50% of the total cost) to the training plan and must develop a governance model that will manage and oversee the project.

" As part of Canada's Economic Action Plan the Government of Canada increased funding for the program by an additional $100 million over three years. "

For more information, please visit: http://www8.hrsdc.gc.ca

Shared outcome(s):

Long term sustainable employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments.

Governance structure(s):

Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership is a national, centrally managed program. It promotes the maximum employment of Aboriginal people through a collaborative partnership approach. Employment to training plans under the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership projects are implemented through formalized partnerships consisting of Aboriginal organizations the private sector, provincial governments and others as appropriate.

Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership partnerships receive direct support through a multi-year contribution agreement negotiated by HRSDC based on a human resources development plan. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership proponents are responsible for interim and final financial and performance reports.

Planning Highlights:


Federal Partner:
($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Skills and Employment Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships $292.0M $99.4M

Aboriginal clients served : 2,200-2,600

Interventions completed : 3,300-3,900

Clients returned to employment following an ASEP intervention : 1,600-1,800

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada   ASEP   TBD Spending will be reported in the DPR HRSDC does not set expected results for other federal departments
Natural Resources Canada   ASEP   TBD Spending will be reported in the DPR
Total $ $292.0M $99.4M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:

Catherine Adam
Director General
Aboriginal Affairs Directorate
(819) 997-8551
Catherine.adam@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage Gatineau, Québec

2. Youth Employment Strategy

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Youth Employment Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Skills and Employment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Through the Youth Employment Strategy, the Government of Canada is working to provide young Canadians with both valuable work experience and earnings to help support their further education. The Youth Employment Strategy supports Canadian youth as they move into the world of work. The Strategy plays a role in developing Canada's workforce by providing young Canadians with access to programs and services to help them gain the skills, knowledge, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment and make a successful transition into the labour force.

The Youth Employment Strategy is designed to respond to labour market challenges facing youth, aged 15 to 30. The Strategy has three program streams: Skills Link, Career Focus and Summer Work Experience, which includes the Canada Summer Jobs initiative. Skills Link provides youth-at-risk with opportunities to develop skills they need to find work or return to school. Career Focus helps post-secondary graduates find work in their area of specialization. Summer Work Experience helps secondary and post-secondary graduates acquire career-related skills and financing for their education through summer jobs.

The Government of Canada's support to young Canadians is a shared responsibility and a partnership effort among many departments and organizations. Human Resources and Skills Development, along with 10 other federal government departments, work cooperatively with other levels of government, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, and private sector, not-for-profit and voluntary sector organizations to deliver Youth Employment Strategy initiatives.

Canada's Economic Action Plan increased funding by $10 million in 2009 and is again providing an additional $10 million in 2010 for Canada Summer Jobs. This is part of the overall Government of Canada strategy to create the best educated, most skilled and most flexible workforce in the world.

For more information, please visit: http://www.youth.gc.ca.

Shared outcome(s):

The shared outcomes of partners for the common key results are:

  • Number of youth served
  • Number of youth employed / self-employed
  • Number of youth returning to school

Governance structure(s):

The Youth Employment Strategy has in place horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework that represents a commitment among the eleven participating federal departments to undertake ongoing collection of common performance management data to ensure effective overall performance management of the program.

Oversight of the Youth Employment Strategy horizontal initiative is provided through a collaborative committee structure. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for facilitating coordination among the departments and agencies funding Youth Employment Strategy activities. As lead of this horizontal initiative, HRSDC chairs and is responsible for the coordination and management of Youth Employment Strategy Interdepartmental Operations Committee and the Youth Employment Strategy Evaluation Sub-Committee. HRSDC is ultimately accountable for attaining the expected results for Youth Employment Strategy and has the ultimate decision making authority for issues related to the overall policy, design and implementation of Youth Employment Strategy.

Youth Employment Strategy initiatives are delivered nationally, regionally and locally using a variety of funding instruments, such as contribution agreements and some direct delivery methods. Transfer payments are provided primarily by participating departments through contribution agreements and service delivery agreements in support of participants' remuneration and overhead costs.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (with Service Canada) Skills and Employment Career Focus Ongoing $13.0M

Projected Range of Results

For POB-Service Canada

Clients Served: 370

Employed or Self-Employed: 220

Return to School: 37

Contribution Agreements: 150

Funds Leveraged: 4M$-6M$

For Sector Council

Clients Served: 350

Employed or Self-Employed: 309

Return to School: 35

Contribution Agreements: 163

Funds Leveraged: TBD

    Skills Link Ongoing $149.4M

Service Canada
Projected Range of Results

Clients Served: 15,500

Employed or Self-Employed: 1,860
Return to School: 5,890

Contribution Agreements: 955

Funds Leveraged: 50M$-65M$

    Summer Work Experience (Canada Summer Jobs) Ongoing $111.6M

Clients Served: not available

Employed or Self-Employed: not available

Return to School: not available

Contribution Agreements: not available

Funds Leveraged: TBD

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada   Career Focus Ongoing $1.1M  
Canadian International Development Agency   Career Focus Ongoing $7.3M
Canadian Heritage   Career Focus Ongoing $0.9M
Summer Work Experience Ongoing $7.8M
Environment Canada   Career Focus Ongoing $3.3M
Industry Canada   Career Focus Ongoing $9.8M
Summer Work Experience Ongoing $7.4M
National Research Council   Career Focus Ongoing $25.4M
Natural Resources Canada   Career Focus Ongoing $0.6M
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation   Skills Link Ongoing $1.0M
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada   Skills Link Ongoing $16.0M
Summer Work Experience Ongoing $8.0M
Parks Canada   Summer Work Experience Ongoing $2.0M
Total Career Focus $61.4M  
Total Skills Link $166.4M  
Total Summer Work Experience $136.8M  
Total Youth Employment Strategy $364.6M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:

John Atherton, Director General
Active Employment Measures
Skills and Employment Branch
(819) 994-6916
john.atherton@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Québec

3. Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Temporary Foreign Worker Program

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Skills and Employment

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: June 13, 2007

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

" The Temporary Foreign Worker program enables Canadian employers to hire foreign workers on a temporary basis to meet immediate skills and labour needs when Canadians are not available, subject to employers and workers meeting specified criteria. The program is jointly managed by CIC and HRSDC ". The Temporary Foreign Worker Program includes program streams such as the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program and the Live-in-Caregiver Program, the Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training, and the Arranged Employment Opinion program.

In the province of Quebec, the Temporary Foreign Worker Program is administered through a partnership with the Government of Quebec.

The Temporary Foreign Worker Program is funded from the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/workplaceskills/foreign_workers/index.shtml

Shared outcome(s):

  • To enhance Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets and internationally competitive workplaces;
  • To respond to regional, occupational, and sectoral skills and labour demands;
  • To protect employment opportunities for Canadians; and
  • Ensure that temporary foreign workers have the same rights and protections as Canadians.

Governance structure(s):

  • Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for providing a Labour Market Opinion to Citizenship and Immigration Canada and employers indicating if the employment of the temporary foreign worker is likely to have a positive, negative or neutral impact on the labour market in Canada.
  • Service Canada delivers the program regionally for Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and processes Labour Market Opinion applications to support the work permit application process.
  • Citizenship and Immigration Canada is responsible for assessing work permit applications and issuing work permits to workers.
  • Each Department is responsible for the design and management of those elements of the program under its Minister's responsibility.

($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Skills and Employment and Internal Services program activities Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing $35.9M

Program enhancements, including those in proposed regulatory changes, to strengthen worker protection, enhance program integrity and respond to the recommendations of the Auditor General of Canada, will be implemented:

  • design and implement a Quality Assurance Framework to ensure national quality and consistency standards in the LMO assessment process;
  • in partnership with CIC, design and implement processes to ensure that the genuineness of job offers is more systematically verified;
  • in partnership with CIC, design and implement processes to restrict access to the program where employers have been found to have provided significantly different wages, working conditions and/or job duties offered in the past;
  • clarify departments' respective roles and responsibilities in the administration of the TFWP;
  • support planning for a joint HRSDC-CIC evaluation of the TFWP with results expected in 2012-13;
  • design and implement a new HRSDC/SC opinion process framework;
  • in partnership with Service Canada, implement jointly-managed employer monitoring processes;
  • develop new approaches to employer monitoring to enhance our ability to accurately identify and mitigate program integrity risks;
  • enhance mechanisms to report publicly on TFWP outcomes, including program statistics, results of compliance work to date and tools and information for employers;
  • develop and implement information sharing agreements with Provinces/Territories to assist in the administration and enforcement of legislation and assist HRSDC in administering the Labour Market Opinion process;
  • in partnership with Citizenship and Immigration Canada, develop and participate in F/P/T Temporary Foreign Workers Working groups;
  • negotiate and implement, with Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Federal-Provincial Temporary Foreign Worker Annexes.
Citizenship and Immigration Canada Temporary Resident Program Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ongoing $35.1M

Program enhancements, including those in proposed regulatory changes, to strengthen worker protection, enhance program integrity, and respond to the recommendations of the Auditor General of Canada, will be implemented:

  • in partnership with HRSDC, design and implement processes to ensure that the genuineness of job offers is more systematically verified;
  • clarify departments' respective roles and responsibilities in the administration of the TFWP;
  • in partnership with HRSDC, design and implement processes to restrict access to the program where employers have been found to have provided significantly different wages, working conditions and/or job duties offered in the past;
  • support planning for a joint HRSDC-CIC evaluation of the TFWP with results expected in 2012-13;
  • in partnership with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, develop and participate in F/P/T Temporary Foreign Workers Working groups;
  • negotiate and implement, with HRSDC, Federal-Provincial Temporary Foreign Worker Annexes.
Total $ Ongoing $71.0M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Not applicable

Contact information:

Andrew Kenyon, Director General
Temporary Foreign Workers
Skills and Employment Branch
(819) 994-1021
andrew.kenyon@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec

NOTE: The June 2007 start date represents the latest authorities for the Temporary Foreign Worker program. The above planned spending figures are for Citizenship and Immigration Canada and HRSDC only. Figures exclude planned spending for other government departments such as DFAIT and PWSGC and therefore do not represent the full Government of Canada costs for the Temporary Foreign Worker Program.

4. Canada Student Loans Program

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada Student Loans Program

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)

Lead department program activity: Learning

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: September, 1964

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Canada Student Loans Program lowers financial barriers to post-secondary education by providing loans to students with a demonstrated financial need. This helps increase their opportunities to develop the knowledge and skills.

Information for Canadians about saving, planning and paying for post-secondary studies and specific information for Canada Student Loans Program clients (including information about learning opportunity selection, financial planning, and how to apply for, maintain and repay student loans and the new Student Grants and Repayment Assistance the program offers) can be accessed at: www.canlearn.ca.

Shared outcome(s):

Maintain the Government's commitment to accessible post-secondary education by:

  • lowering financial barriers to post-secondary education through the provision of financial assistance to eligible Canadians; and
  • ensuring a more manageable debt burden for borrowers

Governance structure(s):

The Government of Canada has entered into Integration Agreements with four provinces (Ontario, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador) in order to create a "one-student-one-loan" service approach. These four integrated provinces accounted for over 60% of the Canada Student Loans Program borrowers.

The administration of the current Program is the product of a co-operative effort between Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Service Canada, Canada Revenue Agency, participating provinces and the Yukon Territory, a Service Provider, financial institutions and Public Works and Government Services Canada. These agents are responsible for conducting one or more activities during the loan lifecycle. Program documents and communications tools are typically prepared with the input and approval of both federal and participating provincial and territorial governments. Quebec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut do not participate in the Canada Student Loans Program. These jurisdictions receive an alternative payment to assist in the cost of delivering a similar student financial assistance program.

Effective management of the Program and relations with third-party agents is the primary responsibility of the Canada Student Loans Program. Program activities include, for example, defining the operational and financial processes for the delivery of the program by the service providers, investigation of escalated cases by the Client Relations office and control and monitoring by the Comptroller's Office.

The application and needs assessment for the Program is delivered by provincial student assistance offices, which also administer provincial aid. The participating provinces and the Yukon Territory:

  • determine individual eligibility for loans and grants based on federal criteria;
  • assess students' financial needs based on federal criteria;
  • issue loan certificates;
  • administer and deliver grants; and
  • designate educational institutions that students may attend with assistance from the Canada Student Loans Program.

While the Canada Student Loans Program provides guidance and direction on how the Program is to be delivered, the Service Provider assumes responsibility for the administration of the loans once the loan agreement is signed and submitted for processing. Responsibilities of the Service Provider include:

  • verifying loan agreements;
  • managing the in-study interest-free period;
  • negotiating and handling loan repayment; and
  • managing debt management activities, advising and counselling borrowers on their debt management options.

Public Works and Government Services Canada is responsible for disbursing loans and grants to the borrowers and to Educational Institutions, for any funds directed to pay for tuition.

Canada Revenue Agency Non-Tax Collection Services is the agent responsible for debt collection. Delinquent guaranteed and risk-shared loans become debts to the Crown when the Government of Canada buys back the debt from financial institutions. Delinquent direct financed loans are returned to government after the Service Provider has attempted collection for a set period of time and the borrower has either not made payments on their loan or is unwilling to repay. In the past, private collection agencies under contract with Canada Revenue Agency were used for collection activities. Starting in September 2009, Canada Revenue Agency has stopped using private collection agencies and is providing collection activities in house.

Planning Highlights :

Planning highlights for the Canada Student Loans Program in 2010-2011 include:

  • Ensuring the sustained delivery of core services to help Canadians access post-secondary education;
  • Implementing mandated program initiatives to improve post-secondary related services and programs, including the implementation of the new Service Delivery Vision. (The new Service Delivery Vision will expand online services and enable students to manage their loans online from application through repayment.);
  • Reviewing and enhancing client service delivery in support of post-secondary education;
  • Continuing to implement initiatives to enhance management excellence and accountability, such as continuing to support Public Service Renewal; and
  • Developing and advancing policy options in support of post-secondary education awareness and participation.

($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011
HRSDC Learning Canada Student Loan Program $1179.2M

Loans disbursed under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act:

$2.0B
$1270.7M

Loans disbursed under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act:

$2.0B
Estimated number of Canadians to benefit from loans and non repayable in study interest subsidies received (in the 2009 Loan Year beginning August 1, 2009) through the Canada Student Loans Program: 492,000
        Estimated number of Canadians to benefit from the Canada Student Grant Program (in the 2009 Loan Year beginning August 1, 2009): 250,000
         
Total $1179.2M $1270.7M  

Expected results :

Continued promotion of access (both participation and completion) to post-secondary education by removing financial and information barriers

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable) :

Not Applicable

Contact information :

Barbara Glover, Director General
Canada Student Loans Directorate
200 Montcalm Street
Gatineau, Quebec
Canada
K1A 0J9
(819) 997-1094
barbara.glover@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca

5. National Child Benefit

Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Child Benefit Program Initiative

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Income Security

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 1998

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Statutory

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Through the Federal/Provincial/Territorial (F/P/T) National Child Benefit initiative, the Government of Canada is working with provincial and territorial governments1 to provide income support, as well as benefits and services, for low-income families with children. The initiative also includes a First Nations component.

Shared outcome(s):

The National Child Benefit initiative has three goals:

  • Help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty;
  • Promote attachment to the labour market by ensuring that families will always be better off as a result of working; and
  • Reduce overlap and duplication by harmonizing program objectives and benefits and simplifying administration.

Annual National Child Benefit Progress Reports include information on the level of spending by all jurisdictions. There is a data collection process to which all participating jurisdictions contribute in order to present comparable information on benefits, programs and services provided as a result of the National Child Benefit initiative. The data submitted by each jurisdiction is reviewed jointly to ensure consistency in reporting. To obtain the most recent Progress Report or for further information, please visit the federal, provincial and territorial National Child Benefit website: www.nationalchildbenefit.ca.

Federal Spending:

The Government of Canada contributes to the National Child Benefit initiative through a supplement to its Canada Child Tax Benefit. In addition to the base benefit of the Canada Child Tax Benefit, which is targeted to both low- and middle-income families, the National Child Benefit Supplement provides extra income support to low-income families with children. Federal spending on the Canada Child Tax Benefit is tracked by the Canada Revenue Agency, which is responsible for the delivery of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

In 2009-2010, total annual federal support delivered through the Canada Child Tax Benefit, including the National Child Benefit Supplement, is projected to reach $9.96B, including a projected $3.69B through the National Child Benefit Supplement.

Provincial and territorial and First Nations Spending:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2006, reports that in 2005-2006, provinces, territories, and First Nations spent $873.9M in programs and services in key areas such as child/day care initiatives, child benefits and earned income supplements, early childhood services and children-at-risk services, supplementary health benefits, and youth initiatives. This includes First Nations reinvestments in programs and services which are estimated to be $58.0M in 2005-2006.

Indicators and Impacts:

The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2006 includes an analysis of both societal level indicators, which measure areas such as low income and labour force attachment and do not infer that any changes are the result of the initiative, and direct outcome indicators, which measure only those changes that are directly attributed to the National Child Benefit initiative.

With respect to societal level indicators, the report shows that the proportion of families with children living in low income has declined significantly since the mid-1900s, decreasing from 17.6 percent in 1996 to 11.6 percent in 2004, based on Statistics Canada's post-tax low-income cut-offs. During this period, the number of children living in low income decreased from 1,304,000 in 1996 to 877,300 in 2004, a decrease of approximately 426,700 children.

Further, the report estimates that in 2004, as a direct result of the National Child Benefit initiative:

  • 125,000 children in 59,000 families were prevented from living in low income, a reduction of 12.1 percent. This means that in 2004, there were 12.1 percent fewer families with children living in low income than there would have been without the National Child Benefit. These families saw their average disposable income increase by an estimated $2,400, or 9.3 percent.
  • For those families with children who remained in low income, the National Child Benefit improved their disposable income by an average of $1,600 (9.1 percent). This means that the low-income gap (the additional amount of income needed by low-income families to reach the low-income line) was reduced by 18.5 percent in 2004.

In addition, in June 2005, federal, provincial and territorial governments released a synthesis report of a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the National Child Benefit initiative (1988-1999, 1999-2000, 2000-2001). The evaluation compiled evidence from a number of studies and showed that the National Child Benefit initiative is meeting its goals. In addition, a process to launch further evaluation has begun.

For a complete discussion of indicators, please see Chapters 5 and 6 of the National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2006. For a discussion of evaluation results, please see the Evaluation of the National Child Benefit Initiative: Synthesis Report. These reports are available free of charge on the National Child Benefit website, at: www.nationalchildbenefit.ca.

Governance structure(s):

The National Child Benefit initiative Governance and Accountability Framework outlines the key characteristics of the federal, provincial and territorial partnership: cooperation, openness, flexibility, evolution and accountability. As a co-operative effort among governments, the National Child Benefit initiative combines the strengths of a national program with the flexibility of provincial and territorial initiatives designed to meet the specific needs and conditions within each jurisdiction.

With respect to accountability, under the Governance and Accountability Framework, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services have committed to sharing data on reinvestment initiatives and reviewing results and outcomes achieved in order to identify best practices. Federal, provincial and territorial governments have also agreed to report annually to the public with a primary focus on performance of the initiative. To date, eight annual progress reports have been published, as well as a synthesis report on a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the initiative.

The Federal Role:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, the Government of Canada provides additional income support to low-income families with children via the National Child Benefit Supplement component of the Canada Child Tax Benefit. Canada Revenue Agency delivers these benefits to families.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, and the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development represents the Government of Canada in this federal/provincial/territorial initiative.

The Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments

The Provincial and Territorial Role:

Under the National Child Benefit initiative, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The initiative is designed so that provinces, territories and First Nations have the flexibility to develop and deliver programs and services that best meet the needs and priorities of their communities. As part of this flexibility, provinces and territories may adjust social assistance or child benefit payments by the full or partial amount of the National Child Benefit Supplement. This approach has resulted in families on social assistance being no worse off in terms of their level of benefits, while providing additional funds for new or enhanced provincial and territorial programs benefiting low-income families with children.

It is important to note that, as the National Child Benefit initiative has matured, the majority of provinces and territories no longer recover increases to the National Child Benefit Supplement. This means that the vast majority of children living in low-income families, including those on social assistance, are currently receiving some or all of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

Under the National Reinvestment Framework, provincial and territorial governments, along with First Nations, have committed to re-allocating available social assistance funds into benefits and services for children in low-income families that further the goals of the initiative. Jurisdictions have focused reinvestments primarily in key areas:

  • Child Benefits and Earned Income Supplements;
  • Child Care;
  • Early Childhood Services and Children-at-Risk Services;
  • Supplementary Health Benefits;
  • Youth Initiatives; and
  • Other Benefits and Services.

First Nations Role:

The federal government is responsible for ensuring programs for First Nations children on reserve are comparable to those available to other Canadian children. Under the National Child Benefit, First Nations have the flexibility to reinvest savings from adjustments to social assistance into programs and services tailored to meet the needs and priorities of individual communities. Some 500 First Nation communities participate in the National Child Benefit and implement their own programs.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011
Canada Revenue Agency2 Administers the National Child Benefit Supplement and delivers income benefits directly to low income families a. National Child Benefit Supplement Ongoing $3.79B (projected) Continued progress on the goals of the National Child Benefit initiative, as described in the "Shared Outcomes", above.
Total $ N/A $3.79B  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:

François Weldon, A/Director General
Social Policy Directorate
Strategic Policy and Research Branch
HRSDC
(819) 994-3184


1 The Government of Quebec has stated that it agrees with the basic principles of the National Child Benefit. Quebec chose not to participate in the initiative because it wanted to assume control over income support for children in Quebec; however, it has adopted a similar approach to the National Child Benefit. Throughout this text, references to joint federal, provincial and territorial positions do not include Quebec.
2 While Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, the Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency. In addition, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.

6. Homelessness Partnering Strategy

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Homelessness Partnering Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Social Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2009

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2011

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $269.6M over two years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy makes strategic investments in community priorities and includes a planning process that encourages cooperation between governments, agencies and community-based organizations to find local solutions for homeless people and those at risk of becoming homeless. The Homelessness Partnering Strategy is designed to provide supports to 61 designated communities and some small, rural and Aboriginal communities to develop community-based measures that assist homeless individuals and families move toward self-sufficiency, thereby contributing to society and the economy. Although the responsibility for homelessness programs falls under Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, most Homelessness Partnering Strategy program components are delivered by regional staff, now part of Service Canada.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy works to prevent and reduce homelessness across Canada through:

  • investments in transitional and supportive housing through a housing-first approach;
  • support to community-based efforts to prevent and reduce homelessness;
  • partnerships between the federal government, provinces, and territories; and
  • collaboration with other federal departments and agencies.

For more information, please visit the Homelessness Partnering Strategy website:
www.homelessness.gc.ca http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/homelessness/index.shtml

Shared outcome(s):

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Governance structure(s):

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy community-based program is delivered via two models:

  • community entity model: Under this model, the Community Advisory Board recommends projects to the community entity (an incorporated organization) which is the decision-making body responsible for approving project proposals and determining the eligibility of projects. HRSDC is responsible for managing the contribution agreement and all related activities. The community, in consultation with Service Canada, has designated responsibility for program delivery to a specific local organization; and
  • shared delivery model: Under this model, the community advisory body reviews project proposals and makes recommendations to HRSDC which manages the contribution agreement and all related activities. Both Service Canada and the community work in partnership to support funding priorities, resulting in a joint selection and decision-making process. The Minister approves the project proposals.

In Quebec, the Homelessness Partnering Strategy stream is delivered under a formal Canada-Quebec Agreement, in collaboration with the Province of Quebec.

The Homeless Individuals and Families Information System (HIFIS) supports the Homelessness Partnering Strategy's national data system on homelessness. Using data collected mainly through shelters, HIFIS provides information on the characteristics of Canada's homeless population. This information contributes to: increased understanding of homelessness in Canada; informed policy development; and improved planning and development of effective measures to prevent and reduce homelessness. HIFIS serves stakeholders across the country, including service providers, researchers and multiple levels of government. In addition, HIFIS provides operational support to shelters and other facilities through free-of-charge software and training support.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy recognizes that the prevention and reduction of homelessness requires collaboration among all levels of government, particularly the federal and provincial/territorial governments. Provinces and territories are being invited to enter into bilateral agreements with the federal government to support community efforts to address homelessness. The Canada-Quebec agreement serves as a model that will be adapted for other jurisdictions. Partnering agreements offer provinces and territories the opportunity to participate in community planning and priority-setting at the outset. Agreements support the alignment of federal, provincial and territorial investments to enhance linkages between social services and housing as well as to address the operational sustainability of community projects. This partnering approach ensures that all of the necessary tools and supports are in place for homeless people to secure housing and supports that effectively meet their needs and for those at-risk of homelessness to attain housing stability.

Enhanced collaboration with other federal departments and agencies whose policies and programs are linked to homelessness is also essential. Horizontal pilot projects continue to be developed to facilitate a more coordinated approach to homelessness at the federal level, in recognition that homelessness interacts with an array of factors that relate to other federal program and policy areas, including: housing affordability; mental/physical health; labour market vulnerabilities; skills, education and literacy levels; community and personal safety; barriers facing newcomers; issues facing discharged offenders and Aboriginal issues. The key objectives of horizontal pilot projects are to: address common risk factors associated with homelessness and other policy areas; prevent homelessness by addressing its root causes; and reduce the negative outcomes on other policy areas caused by homelessness. These pilot projects test approaches on homelessness, and their results are expected to inform future policy development.

The Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative is a Homelessness Partnering Strategy program co-managed by Public Works and Government Services Canada and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, with advice and support from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Social Development Homelessness Partnership Initiative (HPI) 219.2M 126.5M
  • Homelessness Partnership Initiative- Designated Communities have demonstrated cost-matching with other partners.
Federal Horizontal Projects 5.2M 3.0M
  • Increased availability and access for homeless people, to a range of services and facilities along the continuum (i.e., emergency, transitional and supportive housing).
  • Horizontal pilot projects - Implementation of projects with key departments such as Justice Canada, Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Correctional Service Canada, and Urban Aboriginal Strategy.
Homelessness Knowledge Development 3.7M 2.1M
  • Increased knowledge (e.g., best practices, research findings) exchanged among community service providers, researchers, and all levels of government working on issues of homelessness.
Urban Aboriginal Strategy / Homelessness Partnering Strategy 35.5M 20.5M
  • Better coordination and complementarity among Government of Canada policies and programs to address Aboriginal homelessness and other related issues.
PWSGC   Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative 6.0M 3.0M
  • Enhanced capacity of communities to provide facilities to homeless individuals and families.
Total $ 269.6M 155.1M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact information:

Barbara Lawless, A/Director General
Homelessness Partnering Secretariat
Place du Portage, Phase II
165 Hotel-de-Ville St.
Gatineau QC
(819) 994-4748
barbara. lawless@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca

7. Early Childhood Development Agreement

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Early Childhood Development Agreement

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: September 2000 with funding beginning April 2001

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $530.45 million for 2010-2011

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

In September 2000, First Ministers reached agreement on the federal, provincial and territorial Early Childhood Development Agreement, to improve and expand early childhood development supports for young children (prenatal to age 6) and for their parents.

In support of these objectives the Government of Canada transfers $500M/year via the Canada Social Transfer (CST) to provinces and territories. In budget 2007 a 3% escalator was added to CST transfers starting in 2009-2010.

Information about the Agreement, including the text of the First Ministers' communiqué on Early Childhood Development, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at www.ecd-elcc.ca.

Shared outcome(s):

The objectives of the initiative, as outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement are:

  • to promote early childhood development so that, to their fullest potential, children will be physically and emotionally healthy, safe and secure, ready to learn, and socially engaged and responsible; and
  • to help children reach their potential and to help families support their children within strong communities.

Governance structure(s):

In the Early Childhood Development Agreement, First Ministers recognized that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early childhood development programs and services.

Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services and Ministers of Health are responsible for implementation of the commitments in the Agreement. Implementation has been tasked to a Working Group comprised of officials from all jurisdictions (including Quebec, which participates as an observer). The Working Group reports to Deputy Ministers Responsible for Social Services. The Working Group is jointly chaired by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Saskatchewan.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Provincial and territorial governments are investing the funds transferred to them by the Government of Canada in any or all of the following four areas of action outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement:

  • promoting healthy pregnancy, birth and infancy;
  • improving parenting and family supports;
  • strengthening early childhood development, learning and care; and
  • strengthening community supports.

All participating federal, provincial and territorial governments have committed to three reporting requirements:

  • Each government released a first report on Early Childhood Development programs and expenditures for the 2000-2001 fiscal year, providing a baseline against which new investments can be tracked.
  • In fall 2002, governments began annual reporting, using a shared framework with comparable program indicators, to track progress in improving and expanding early childhood development programs and services within the four areas for action.
  • In fall 2002, governments began regular reporting on children's well-being, using a common set of outcome indicators. Government of Canada reports are available at www.socialunion.gc.ca.

The Government of Quebec supports the general principles expressed in the Early Childhood Development Initiative but did not participate in developing the Initiative because it wants to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Contact information:

François Weldon
Director
Family Policy Division
Telephone: (819) 997-9950

8. Federal Elder Abuse Initiative

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Federal Elder Abuse Initiative

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Lead department program activity: Social Development

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2011

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $13,050,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The overarching objectives of the Federal Elder Abuse Initiative are to raise awareness of elder abuse throughout society, particularly among seniors, their families, and key professional groups, and to ensure the availability of appropriate elder abuse-related information, resources and tools.

To address this, federal elder abuse activities are coordinated interdepartmentally and will involve the cooperation and collaboration of the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police under the leadership of HRSDC.

The centrepiece of the Federal Elder Abuse Initiative is a public awareness campaign using various media and in particular, television. Generic information and resource materials for frontline workers (medical and legal, etc.) will be developed to provide key professional groups with the information necessary to identify cases of elder abuse, access the appropriate resources, and take measures to provide assistance to victims.

Shared outcome(s):

  • Seniors, their families, the general population and frontline professionals are more aware of elder abuse and what to do to respond to it.

Governance structure(s):

The Seniors and Pensions Policy Secretariat within HRSDC is the focal point for Government of Canada activities related to seniors.

The Task Force on Elder Abuse within the Seniors and Pensions Policy Secretariat leads a working group of officials from partner departments/agencies to coordinate the implementation of Government of Canada initiatives to raise awareness and to develop and disseminate tools and supports for frontline workers. Partner departments/agencies retain responsibility for planning, programming and budgeting their own resources to implement their activities.

The working group developed a performance measurement framework, including a logic model, to identify the relationships between departmental/agency activities, outputs, and outcomes, and a suite of performance indicators to measure progress against outputs/outcomes. The working group coordinates reporting and monitors performance and results over the course of the initiative.

The Interdepartmental Committee on Seniors provides senior-level oversight and direction for the Federal Elder Abuse Initiative. The Committee provides a forum to update federal departments on the progress and achievements of the initiative and identifies opportunities to align the initiative with other government initiatives and priorities.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Social Development   $10.2M $2.5M 2010-2011 will see partner departments increase awareness about elder abuse through promotion and/or the involvement of key stakeholders on elder abuse.
Department of Justice     1.4M 0.3M  
Public Health Agency of Canada     1.4M 0.5M  
RCMP     Coming from internal allocations    
Total $ 13.0M 3.3M  

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Through a call for proposals process, national associations will be supported to develop information materials about elder abuse for their frontline professionals who regularly come in contact with older Canadians.

Contact information:

Dominique La Salle, Director General
Seniors and Pensions Policy Secretariat
Income Security and Social Development
Place Vanier, Tower B
355 North River Road
Ottawa ON
dominique.lasalle@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca

9. Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Childcare

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care

Name of lead department(s): Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $371.315 million in 2010-2011

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

In March 2003, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services, reached agreement on a framework for improving access to affordable, quality, provincially and territorially regulated early learning and child care programs and services. Under the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, the Government of Canada provided $1.05 billion over five years (2003-2008) through the Canada Social Transfer (CST) to support provincial and territorial government investments in early learning and child care. In budget 2007 the CST was renewed until 2013-2014 and a 3% escalator was added to CST transfers starting in 2009-2010. The Government of Canada is providing over $1.97 billion over six years (2008-2014).

The objective of this initiative, which complements the September 2000 Early Childhood Development Agreement, is to further promote early childhood development and support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

Governments also committed to transparent public reporting that will give Canadians a clear idea of the progress being made in improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services, beginning with a baseline report in November 2003. Government of Canada reports are available at www.socialunion.gc.ca.

Information about the initiative, including the text of the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial Web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at www.ecd-elcc.ca.

Shared outcome(s):

The objectives of the initiative, as outlined in the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care are:

  • to promote early childhood development; and
  • to support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

Governance structure(s):

The Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Child Care recognizes that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early learning and child care programs and services.

Implementation of the commitments outlined in the Multilateral Framework has been tasked to a Working Group comprised of officials from all jurisdictions (including Québec, which participates as an observer). This Working Group reports to Deputy Ministers Responsible for Social Services, and is jointly chaired by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Saskatchewan.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable) :

Provincial and territorial governments have agreed to invest the funding provided in regulated early learning and child care programs for children under the age of six. Early learning and child care programs and services funded through this initiative will primarily provide direct care and early learning for children in settings such as child care centres, family child care homes, preschools, and nursery schools. Investments can include capital and operating funding, fee subsidies, wage enhancements, training, professional development and support, quality assurance, and parent information and referral. Programs and services that are part of the formal school system are not included in this initiative.

Governments also committed to transparent public reporting that will give Canadians a clear idea of the progress being made in improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services, beginning with a baseline report in November 2003 and annual reporting in November 2004.

The Government of Quebec supports the general principles expressed in the Early Learning and Child Care Initiative but did not participate in developing the Initiative because it wants to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Contact information:

François Weldon
Director, Family Policy Division
Telephone: (819) 997-9950

Top of Page

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Canadian Polar Commission

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of horizontal initiative: International Polar Year

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) — Northern Affairs Program

Lead department program activity: Healthy Northern Communities

Start date of the horizontal initiative: April 1, 2006

End date of the horizontal initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $150 million over six years

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement): To support Canada's participation in International Polar Year (IPY), the Government of Canada has invested $150 million over six years. This funding is being used to carry out an innovative and multidisciplinary Arctic science program. The Government of Canada IPY program is led by INAC and involving 12 federal departments and agencies, including Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (on behalf of Industry Canada), Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Canada's significant involvement and investment in IPY contributes to the government's stewardship of Canada's Northern Region. The Government of Canada IPY program is working with Canadian scientists and northern communities in developing and conducting activities such as research, training and capacity building.

Key areas of the Government of Canada IPY program include:

  • undertaking new science and research in and for the North, which includes the involvement of northern communities;
  • ensuring the health and safety of scientists and communities conducting research in the North;
  • communicating information about the program and the science undertaken;
  • building capacity, through training opportunities for youth and Northerners aimed at enhancing participation in northern scientific research;
  • ensuring that the resultant scientific knowledge and data are properly managed, archived and made accessible; and
  • supporting the appropriate procedural, regulatory and infrastructure framework for conducting scientific research.

The funds are distributed among federal departments and agencies according to their involvement in the various aspects of the program. The Northern IPY Co-ordinators maintain a regional network to support all aspects of Canada's IPY program in four Inuit regions across the North. The federal departments and agencies participating in IPY are undertaking research projects, delivering support for logistics and emergency preparedness, and contributing to projects for training, communications and outreach.

Shared outcome(s): The IPY program works toward the achievement of two outcomes:

  • Increased understanding of impacts of a changing climate and of health and well-being of northern communities informs policy and decision making, and contributes to recognition of Canada as an expert on the Canadian North.
  • Northern research capacity is enhanced through newly trained scientists, knowledge and skills transfer to Northerners, and greater participation in planning and delivery of research by Northerners.

Governance structure(s):

  • Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) Committee on IPY / High Arctic Research Station (HARS) (chaired by the ADM of Northern Affairs, INAC);
  • IPY Federal Program Office (housed at INAC);
  • directors general communications committees on IPY; and
  • IPY advisory subcommittees.

The Government of Canada IPY program links with the International Joint Committee and other international scientific organizations to assist in the program development of the IPY From Knowledge to Action Conference that Canada will host in April 2012. As of June 2009, the ADM Committee on IPY merged with the ADM Committee on HARS to ensure a smooth transition from IPY activities and work conducted under HARS.

Planning Highlights: IPY will focus its efforts on synthesizing the results of IPY scientific research, managing data and information, communicating these results to northern communities, and articulating this new knowledge to facilitate and generate discussions about policy and program development that address short- and long-term issues.

Federal partner: INAC
Federal Partner Program Activity
(PA)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011
Healthy Northern Communities

Government of Canada IPY program

$59,694,657

$13,591,756

Dissemination to northern communities of the results and knowledge acquired through IPY science projects

Increased participation of Northerners and Aboriginal people in Arctic science activities

Total

$59,694,657

$13,591,756

 


Federal partner:
HC
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011
Sustainable Environmental Health

Environmental Health Surveillance

(Dietary Choice and Health)

$158,234

$575

Increased understanding of the gender-specific determinants of food choices

Identification of culturally acceptable strategies to promote healthy dietary choices

Total

$158,234

$575

 


Federal partner: Environment Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011

Biodiversity — Wildlife and Habitat

Water Resources

Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

Government of Canada IPY program

$11,169,875

$568,740

Continued research on climate change impacts and adaptation and the health and well-being of northern communities; the focus for 2010–2011 will be to complete field work and data analysis, undertake data management, begin to publish results, and conduct outreach

Total

$11,169,875

$568,740

 


Federal partner: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011

Oceanography and Climate Aquatic Ecosystem Science

Government of Canada IPY program

$31,542,477

$314,530

Research conducted on the impacts of climate variability and change on Arctic marine ecosystems under the IPY program; in 2010–2011 the focus will be on publishing scientific results, data management, and continuing sample and data analysis

Total

$31,542,477

$314,530

 


Federal partner:
Natural Resources Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011

Adapting to a Changing Climate and Hazard Risk Management

 

Climate Change Geoscience, Public Safety Geoscience

$3,063,000

$147,500

Canada adapts to a changing climate and has the knowledge and tools to manage risks associated with natural hazards and hazards arising from human activities

Ecosystem Risk Management Environmental Geoscience Program   Canada understands and mitigates risks to natural resource ecosystems and human health
Total

$3,063,000

$147,500

 


Federal partner: Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011

Science for Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation

Health and Well-being of Northern Communities

Government of Canada IPY program

$31,290,669

$2,169,680

Funds provided to 37 university-based researchers working on 19 IPY projects in the areas of climate change impacts and adaptation and the health and well-being of northern communities

Total

$31,290,669

$2,169,680

 


Federal partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011

Strategic Priority Research

Government of Canada IPY program

$9,747,988

$723,136

Sustainable, healthy and resilient northern communities built

Ecosystem and community vulnerability, resilience and adaptive capacity assessed

Total

$9,747,988 

$723,136 

 


Federal partner: Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Parasitology

$414,500

$11,250

Trichinellosis: Testing of samples and analysis of prevalence data based on recovery of Trichinella larvae from muscle tissue

Toxoplasmosis (serology): Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in serum or hemolyzed blood samples: analysis of validation data; wildlife used for food and disease reservoirs

Toxoplasmosis (RT-PCR): Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) for detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in tissues and blood (analysis of validation data) and analysis of prevalence data based on detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in tissues or blood samples

Total

$414,500 

$11,250 

 


Federal partner: Parks Canada Agency
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011

Conserve Heritage Resources

IPY Climate Change Impacts on the Canadian Arctic Tundra

$825,000

$115,000

Standard methods developed and applied for conducting terrestrial ecological inventories and ecological integrity monitoring in Ukkusiksalik National Park

IPY Freshwater Systems

$525,000

$45,000

Reconnaissance inventories conducted and ecological integrity monitoring methods developed for Arctic national parks

Total

$1,350,000 

$160,000 

 


Federal partner: Public Health Agency of Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011

Public Health Agency of Canada

Government of Canada IPY program

$617,000

$0

No activities planned and, hence, no expected results for 2010–2011

Total

$617,000 

$0 

 


Federal partner: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011

Agriculture and Agri-food

Government of Canada IPY program

$156,400

$0

A scientific paper to be presented at the 19th World Congress of Soil Science in 2010; work on data analysis and compilation will continue, however, no IPY-related budget allocations were made for 2009–2010 and 2010–2011

Total

$156,400 

$0 

 


Federal partner: Canadian Museum of Civilization
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010–2011
Expected Results for
2010–2011

Canadian Museum of Civilization

Government of Canada IPY program

$795,200

$32,000

Inuit History: Climatic Change and Historical Connections in Arctic Canada, 1000–1500 A.D.

Helluland Archaeology Project and Beaufort Sea Archaeological Project components:

  • analysis and interpretation of archaeological data
  • working in co-operation with local communities on development of outreach products and teaching resources
  • training of students and teachers
  • workshop for the principal investigators about the four components of the Inuit history project
  • presentations for general and scientific audiences
  • preparation of publications
Total

$795,200 

$32,000 

 

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–2011

$150,000,000

$17,719,167

Contact information:

Kathleen Fischer
Executive Director
International Polar Year Federal Program Office
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
10 Wellington Street, Room 745
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H4
Tel: 819-934-6085
Fax: 819-934-0584
fischerk@ainc-inac.gc.ca



Name of horizontal initiative: First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)

Lead department program activity: Community Infrastructure

Start date of the horizontal initiative: April 1, 2008

End date of the horizontal initiative: March 31, 2010

This program was seeking renewal at time of publication.

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $735,639,806 for the two years. Of this amount $202,500,000 in each of 2008–2009 and 2009–2010 are funded from existing reference levels. New funds of $165,318,143 in 2008–2009 and $165,321,663 in 2009–2010 including employee benefit plans and Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation requirements were sourced from the Fiscal Framework, as confirmed in Budget 2008.

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement): The prime objective of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan (FNWWAP) is to support First Nation communities on reserves in bringing their drinking water and wastewater services to a level and quality of service comparable to those enjoyed by Canadians living in communities of similar size and location. There are five key activity areas in the FNWWAP: infrastructure investments; operations and maintenance; training; monitoring and awareness; and standards.

To meet the objectives of the FNWWAP, several program enhancements have been introduced, including a national engineering assessment of existing water and wastewater facilities; consultations on a new federal legislative framework for safe drinking water; increased training through the Circuit Rider training program; modification of existing policies related to small water and septic systems and agreements for water and wastewater services; investment in a National Wastewater Program; and development of waterborne illness procedures.

The FNWWAP was implemented as part of government commitments, announced in Budget 2008 and the 2007 Speech from the Throne, to support First Nations' access to safe drinking water.

The FNWWAP supports INAC's strategic outcome, The Economy: Economic well-being and prosperity of First Nations, Inuit and Métis people. The FNWWAP also supports the Health Canada (HC) strategic outcome of the department's First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services: Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians.

More information at these websites:

Backgrounder — First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan

Budget 2008, Responsible Leadership — Chapter 4 — Leadership at Home and Abroad

RPP 2007_2008 Health Canada — Health Canada's Regional Operations — An Overview

Shared outcome(s): The FNWWAP works toward the achievement of four outcomes:

  • First Nation communities have an increased capacity to address potential water quality problems.
  • Health risks associated with water quality and supply are reduced.
  • All First Nation community water and wastewater facilities meet federal standards.
  • First Nation communities have increased confidence in their drinking water.

Governance structure(s): The FNWWAP is a successor to the joint First Nations Water Management Strategy (2003–2008) and the INAC Plan of Action for Drinking Water (2006–2008). A memorandum of understanding has been in place between INAC and HC since 2005 regarding data sharing related to drinking water. INAC shares information on the proposed water and wastewater infrastructure investments; the annual inspections of water and wastewater treatment plants; and action related to drinking water advisories. Conversely, HC shares information such as drinking water sample results that do not meet the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality and reasons for recommending drinking water advisories. At the working level, the Strategic Water Management on Reserve Committee, which includes representatives from HC, INAC, Environment Canada and the Assembly of First Nations, provides a forum for discussion to share information and co-ordinate joint action, although this is not a formal decision-making body. It also provides integrated and co-ordinated leadership to ensure safe drinking water for First Nation communities and to implement FNWWAP.

Directors general and assistant deputy ministers from HC and INAC meet when needed to exchange and co-ordinate action on all relevant issues related to the FNWWAP.

Federal partner: INAC

($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011
Community Infrastructure Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program 671.0 To be determined (TBD)
TBD
Total 671.0  TBD
TBD

Expected Results: TBD

Federal partner: HC

($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011
First Nations and Inuit Health Drinking Water Safety Program – FNWWAP funding 54.6 TBD
TBD
Drinking Water Safety Program – A-base funding 10.0 TBD
TBD
Total 64.6  TBD  

Expected results: TBD

Total Allocation dor All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partner for 2010–2011
($ millions)
735.6 TBD

Contact information:

Sébastien Labelle
Director, Policy
Indian and Northern Affairs
Policy Directorate, Community Infrastructure Branch
Telephone:819-994-6466
sebastien.labelle@ainc-inac.gc.ca


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement — Health Supports component

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)

Lead department program activity: Managing Individual Affairs

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: September 2003

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $112,353,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Health Supports component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) ensures that former students of Indian residential schools can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse through all phases of the IRSSA. The Health Supports component of the IRSSA is composed of the Indian residential schools Resolution Health Support Program (formerly Mental Health Support Program) and a 24-hour crisis line.

Health Canada delivers the Resolution Health Support Program, which ensures that eligible former Indian residential school students, and their families, have access to an appropriate level of health support services, through all phases of the IRSSA, so that they may safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuses. Program components include: emotional support services provided by Resolution Health Support Workers (RHSWs); cultural support services provided by Elders; professional counselling; and assistance with the cost of transportation to access counseling, Elder, and/or Traditional Healer services.

INAC — Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector, provides a national 24-hour toll-free Indian residential school crisis line is also provided to support individuals in crisis and is operated by trained Aboriginal crisis counsellors. INAC is also responsible for co-ordinating the verification of program eligibility, and ensuring that Health Canada is aware of dates for independent assessment process/alternative dispute resolution hearings, litigation, and Truth and Reconciliation and Commemoration events as they arise, so that health supports can be provided in a seamless fashion.

Shared outcome(s): The IRSSA Health Supports component works toward the achievement of two outcomes

  • Eligible former students of Indian residential schools, and their families, have access to an appropriate level of mental wellness support services.
  • Eligible former students of Indian residential schools can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse.

Governance structure(s): INAC is responsible for the overall IRSSA model and is working in partnership with Health Canada to co-ordinate and provide services for former Indian residential school students throughout all phases of the IRSSA.

Planning Highlights: The Health Supports component will:

  • continue to deliver professional, paraprofessional and cultural supports to former Indian residential school students and their families through the Resolution Health Support Program;
  • provide former Indian residential school students and their families with access to a 24-hour national crisis line;
  • undertake communications activities to ensure that health supports program is well-known; and
  • strengthen research, knowledge and training initiatives to ensure that health supports are well-suited to meet the needs of Indian residential school claimants, their families and communities.
Federal Partner: Health Canada
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011
($ millions)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program 112.4 14.8 Demand-driven health supports are provided to former Indian residential school students and their families through all phases of the IRSSA.
Total 112.4  14.8   

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–2011
112.4 14.8

Contact information:
Health Canada
Andrea Challis
Manager, Indian Residential School Resolution Health Support Program
Mental Health and Addictions Division
Community Programs Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
Phone: (613) 952-1377
andrea.challis@hc-sc.gc.ca

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada:
Patricia Power
A/Director
Policy and Strategic Planning
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Tel: 613-947-4146
ppower@ainc-inac.gc.ca



Name of horizontal initiative: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (OFI)

Lead department program activity: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Start date of the horizontal initiative: April 1, 2007

End date of the horizontal initiative: March 31, 2012

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $68.5 million

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement): The Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) was developed in 1997 to help respond to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres. Through the UAS, the Government of Canada seeks to partner with other governments, community organizations, Aboriginal people and the private sector to support projects that address local priorities.

In 2007, Canada decided to set national priorities that focus on greater economic participation and made a long-term commitment by investing $68.5 million over five years to help respond effectively to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres.

Shared outcome(s): The primary goal of the UAS is to better address issues facing Aboriginal people living in cities across Canada, working toward the achievement of the following outcomes:

  • Urban Aboriginal socio-economic needs are targeted within new and renewed federal initiatives, where appropriate.
  • Access to and co-ordination of programs and services is improved.
  • Partners co-ordinate development and communication of research, policies and knowledge.
  • Horizontal linkages and policy integration within the federal government are improved for seeking opportunities for partnership (i.e., the federal government, provincial and municipal governments, Aboriginal groups, and private sector).

To accomplish these outcomes, UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Governance structure(s): Steering committees are the catalysts for planning, making funding decisions, and co-ordinating work through the UAS — along with other community activities — to respond to urban Aboriginal issues. Each UAS steering committee is composed of a cross-section of the Aboriginal community, to ensure the steering committee's decisions reflect broad community concerns and priorities. While the steering committee structure is meant to be reflective of local circumstances, each steering committee includes representation from the local Aboriginal community, the federal government, other levels of government and the private sector. The inclusive nature of the steering committees is indicative of the principle of partnership that underlies the UAS, particularly in keeping with the objective to establish strong and active partnerships between government and community.

In some of the designated cities under the UAS, federal funding is administered through an incorporated community organization that has been delegated authority for delivering UAS projects on behalf of the various partners. Regardless of whether funding is delivered by a community organization, by federal officials or by a combination of the two, funding through the UAS is designed to promote co-operation with other key partners (including other federal departments) and stakeholders in support of community interests.

Planning Highlights: The UAS works in partnership with other federal departments, provincial and municipal governments, Aboriginal communities and the private sector to make strategic investments designed to enhance the economic participation of Aboriginal people in Canada's urban centres. Community projects funded through the UAS focus on three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families. The UAS also invests in building capacity within the urban Aboriginal community through investments that support the formation of effective partnerships and the development and implementation of strategic plans that address the unique needs of each community.

The UAS will continue to work toward achieving greater horizontality across federal departments to maximize investments. It will explore and implement new and innovative approaches to increase horizontality, including through a proactive Horizontal Action Plan. To this end, INAC is undertaking an analysis of horizontal projects (funded under the UAS Horizontal Terms and Conditions) to better understand the mechanics of horizontality and to identify and overcome barriers to increased federal collaboration. In tandem, the UAS is implementing performance measurement tools that can be used to identify successes and mitigate risks.

The UAS will also work toward making progress on its core objectives, including closing the unacceptable socio-economic gaps between urban Aboriginal people and other residents of cities, by leveraging funding from other levels of government and the private sector and by better aligning federal initiatives with provincial-municipal initiatives and other activities.

Federal Partner: Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011

Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Urban Aboriginal Strategy

68.5 13.5

UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Total 68.5  13.5   


Federal Partner: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada/Service Canada; Canadian Heritage; Health Canada; Public Health Agency Canada; Industry Canada; Justice Canada; and Public Safety Canada.
($ millions)
Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2010-2011
Expected Results for
2010-2011

Various program activities

Various programs

unknown at this time
unknown
(Funding is
dependent on
availability of
funds at the
departmental
level and the
types of
priorities
identified
at the local
level.)

Total      

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11
68.5 To be determined

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): The UAS has been redesigned to better address issues facing urban Aboriginal people. The refocused UAS improves program co-ordination within the Government of Canada to maximize its investments and aims for equal cost sharing with provincial and municipal governments.

Through sustainable partnership policy development, program co-ordination at the federal level and with provincial and municipal governments, Aboriginal, and private sector partners, the UAS addresses local priorities and engages partners in the process of reducing the disparities that urban Aboriginal people face.

The UAS strives to make significant progress along the road of horizontal management as well as shared accountability with all its partners. It represents a practical step that illustrates how Canada's government is moving in the right direction to ensure that Aboriginal people living in cities across Canada have greater access to the skills and experiences they need to gain access to and succeed in urban centres.

Contact information:

Allan MacDonald
Director General
Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
66 Slater Street Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Telephone: 613-992-8186
allan.macdonald@ainc-inac.gc.ca


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Industry Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Strategic Outcome
Competitive Businesses are Drivers of Sustainable Wealth Creation


Program Activity: Entrepreneurial Economy

Name of Horizontal Initiative: BizPaL

Lead Department
Industry Canada

Start Date
January 31, 2005

End Date
March 31, 2011

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $18 million

Description (including funding agreement)
BizPaL is a unique collaboration of federal, provincial/territorial and municipal governments working together in a new service delivery model to improve access to information on permits and licences needed from all levels of government to start or operate a business.

Integrated into local government websites or portals, BizPaL provides a single point of contact for entrepreneurs, enabling them to quickly learn which permits and licences they will need from municipal, provincial/territorial and federal governments.

Federal funding supports secretariat services, expansion and development of the service and the federal role. None of the participants (provinces/territories/municipalities) receive federal funds for the BizPaL initiative. They provide “in-kind” support in their respective jurisdictions. Provincial participants also contribute funds to a Specified Purpose Account to support basic operating costs in accordance with a cost-sharing formula based on population size.

Shared Outcomes

  • Increased awareness of and access to business permits and licences from all levels of government
  • Increased cost savings for businesses by avoiding involuntary non-compliance
  • Support of government efforts to reduce the paperwork burden and red tape that face small business owners and operators

Governance Structure
BizPaL represents a shared governance model that involves participants from the federal, provincial/ territorial and local/municipal levels of government. Industry Canada manages the expansion and evolution of the BizPaL service and develops relationships among participating jurisdictions. A Steering Committee has been established with representation from each level of government to provide strategic direction and to ensure business directions and corporate initiatives align with those of the participants. A project managers' committee supports day-to-day operations and executes approved operational plans.

Although governance is shared through various participant committees, Industry Canada is accountable for the federal resources contributed to the BizPaL initiative. In addition, the Department is responsible for enlisting the participation of federal government departments in BizPaL and managing the National BizPaL Office.  

Planning Highlights
BizPaL's vision is to support entrepreneurs by providing quick and easy online access to government requirements. The overall plan to support this vision is captured through 6 themes outlined in the 2009–11 Strategic Plan: Population Coverage, Business Sector Coverage, Usage, Satisfied Clients and Partners, Technical Platform Sustainability, Long-term Service Sustainability. Key priorities and commitments associated with these themes will be further discussed in the “Results to be achieved by non-federal partners” section below.

Possible risks having a direct impact on the Strategic Plan could include:

  • Jurisdictions withdrawing their membership, impacting the value delivered to clients
  • Federal withdrawal of continued support
  • Differing objectives and priorities of governments/changes in government directions

Federal Partner Program Activity

Names of Programs for Federal Partners

Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

Planned Spending for 2010–11

Expected Results
for 2010–11

BizPaL

BizPaL

$18 million

$3 million

Integrated business permits, licences and information from all levels of government provide value to clients by enabling them to easily find permit and licence information pertinent to their business and location.

Total

$18 million

$3 million

 

Expected Results
Integrated business permit and licence information from all levels of government provide value to clients by enabling them to easily find permit and licence information pertinent to their business and location.

Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)

Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11

$18 million

$3 million

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable)
Key priorities, commitments and results to be achieved by non-federal partners pertaining to each strategic theme are as follows:

Population Coverage
In 2009–10, participating jurisdictions will use resources to continue to recruit new provinces/territories and local governments and introduce the BizPaL service as a way to service a larger Canadian population base.
Results: Increase in the number of jurisdictions that offer the service so that 80% of the Canadian population has access to the service in 2010–11.

Business Sector Coverage
Current implementation of business sectors by jurisdiction will be investigated to identify gaps and beneficial additions.
Results: Additions will be made to ensure that BizPaL contains permit and licence information for business sectors that are most represented by Canadian industry. Measures will be used to assess the percentage of Canadian businesses that are covered by the sectors offered in the BizPaL service.

Usage
Marketing and promotion activities will be used to target the Canadian business sector. Beneficial additions/changes to content will be made to improve the quality of the service and to enrich the information on government requirements that is offered to business clients. Measures will be used to assess the annual utilization of the service.
Results: Increase business clients' awareness of the BizPaL service and improve relationships with the business community.

Satisfied Clients and Partners
Continuous improvement and service expansion activities.
Results: Enhanced client experience and higher satisfaction and the delivery of an exceptional service. Measures will be used to assess both client and partner satisfaction levels.

Technical Platform Sustainability
Resources will be dedicated to investigating and implementing enhancements to the technical platform. Measures will be used to assess the technical provider's capacity to meet service level standards, and ultimately, to assess whether sufficient resources are in place to support the long-term sustainability of BizPaL.
Results: Ensuring the sustainability of the BizPaL service.

Long-Term Service Sustainability
Research on client needs, system requirements, service requirements and collaboration needs will be used to develop a future plan for the service as well as to enhance and sustain the current governance model.
Results: Investigative capacity will be used to develop a long-term vision for BizPaL beyond 2011.

Contact Information
Executive Director, Service Delivery and Partnership
Small Business and Marketplace Services Sector




Program Activity: Entrepreneurial Economy

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada Business Network (Amalgamation of Canada Business Service Centres (CBSC) and Business Gateway (BG))

Lead Department

Industry Canada

Atlantic Canada Opportunity Agency

Western Economic Diversification Canada

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Start Date

April 1, 1995 (CBSC)

April 1, 2000 (BG)

End Date

Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date)

$216.6 million (since 1995)

$6.8 million (since 2000)

$223.4 million (total)

Description (including funding agreement)
The Canada Business Network (CBN) was established to improve service to small business and start-up entrepreneurs by providing a comprehensive first stop for information on government services, programs and compliance requirements from federal and provincial/territorial levels of government.

On behalf of the Government of Canada and its partners, the CBN delivers a host of information products and resources through a variety of channels across Canada (Internet, in-person, telephone). Through its collaboration with the provinces and territories, information products and resources are supplemented by jurisdictionally relevant content — providing a truly client-centred, integrated information service.

Shared Outcomes

  • Improved access to business-related information
  • Improved client usage of business-related information
  • Effective program delivery

Governance Structure
The CBN is managed on behalf of the Government of Canada by the following managing partner organizations: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA), Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED), Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD) and 2 sectors of Industry Canada: the Regional Operations Sector (ROS) and the Small Business and Marketplace Services Sector (SBMS).

The Director General Managing Partners Committee oversees program policy and service delivery strategies. The CBN Operations Committee, composed of representatives of the managing partners and service centre managers, operationalizes policy. This committee coordinates and resolves shared operational issues in matters related to training, reporting, marketing, communications and web content development.

Planning Highlights
As part of the funding renewal effort carried out in 2008, the CBN updated its mission and introduced a new service delivery strategy. Key features include an integrated web presence, a new telephone management strategy, increased marketing and outreach activities and updated service standards.

Implementation of the new strategy will start in 2009–10 and continue through 2010–11.

Federal Partner Program Activity

Names of Program for Federal Partners

Total Allocation (from Start to End date)

Planned Spending for 2010–11

Expected Results for 2010–11

Industry Canada

Canada Business Network (Entrepreneurial Economy)

Started: 2009–10
$6,503,983

$6,503,983

SME use of government business-related information, programs and services, and facilitated compliance for business

ACOA

Canada Business Network (Entrepreneurial Economy)

Started: 2009–10
$2,640,788

$2,640,788

WD

Canada Business Network (Entrepreneurial Economy)

Started: 2009–10 $3,977,494

$3,977,494

CED

Canada Business Network (Entrepreneurial Economy)

Started: 2009–10 $1,877,735

$1,877,735

Total

$15,000,000

$15,000,000

 

Expected Results
SME use of government business-related information, programs and services, and facilitated compliance for business

Total Allocation for All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date)

Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11

A Base Funding

$15,000,000

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable)

N/A

Contact Information
Executive Director, Service Delivery and Partnership
Small Business and Marketplace Services Sector


Top of Page

Infrastructure Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund:

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-2004

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2012-2013

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $4.9 Billion

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund, which received funding in the 2001 and 2003 federal budgets, is a cost-shared contribution program for strategic infrastructure projects. To date, funding has been approved to support 75 projects.

Investments are directed to projects of major national and regional significance, and are to be made in areas that are vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life for Canadians. The fund is delivered through negotiated agreements with provincial, territorial or local governments, private partners or non-governmental organizations. Contribution agreements are tailored based on the project requirements.

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Act outlines the prime categories of investments in projects that involve fixed capital assets that are used or operated for the benefit of the public. The categories eligible under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund are:

  • Highway and Rail Infrastructure;
  • Local Transportation Infrastructure;
  • Tourism or Urban Development Infrastructure;
  • Water or Sewage Infrastructure; and
  • Other categories approved by regulation, e.g. Advanced Telecommunications and High-Speed Broadband, Northern Infrastructure.

More information on the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund can be found at: http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/csif-fcis/csif-fcis-eng.html.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The overall planned results Infrastructure Canada expects to achieve through the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund are to invest in projects which:

  • facilitate the movement of goods and people on Canada's National Highway System for the purposes of increasing the productivity, economic efficiency, and safety of Canada's surface transportation system;
  • facilitate the safe and efficient movement of goods and people, ease congestion, or reduce greenhouse gases and airborne pollutants;
  • ensure that tourism continues to contribute to the economic well-being of Canadians and to serve as a bridge between Canada and the world;
  • ensure that drinking water is safe, clean, and reliable at drinking water facilities, and ensure sustainable treatment of wastewater; and expand broadband networks in Canada.

9. Governance Structure(s):

All Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. After project selection, Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution. At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by the implementing departments/agencies are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The fund is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review, selection, approval, public announcements, environmental assessment in some cases, and program evaluation. It leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients. It also develops, in coordination with the implementing department/agency, the submission to Treasury Board for the approval of funds. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative will sit on the project's Agreement Steering Committee usually as the federal co-chair, except for transportation projects where Transport Canada is the lead.
  2. An implementing department/agency: Infrastructure Canada's relationship with each implementing department or agency varies with their capacity and the complexity of the project. Responsibilities are also negotiated specifically for each project. The implementing department/agency may provide technical assistance in the analysis of the business case, determining the costs and benefits to be realized, and providing advice on the development of the contribution agreement and Treasury Board submission. The implementing department/agency will support implementation of the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: overseeing the implementation of mitigation measures identified in the environmental assessment, assessing the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, providing information pertaining to cash flow and budget, approving claims, making payments, and conducting audits and evaluation of projects. The implementing department/agency would normally be represented on the project's Agreement Steering Committee. The implementing department/agency will also ensure adherence to information management requirements, including the use of the Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, which captures, monitors and reports on project information. The implementing department/agency also provides communication support.
  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be provincial, territorial, or local government, a private partner, a non-government organization or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, Infrastructure Canada leads the negotiations to develop a contribution agreement. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

10. Planning Highlights:

  • Continue to manage the federal contributions under the fund to support the construction, renewal and enhancement of public infrastructure;
  • Obtain assurance that the construction work of projects under the fund are completed; and
  • Continue to manage the program at the federal level in a collaborative fashion, in cooperation with the respective Federal Delivery Partners.

11. Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $163.8 Million $18.7 Million Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency will continue to co-manage approximately 11 projects still underway across the four maritime provinces. The construction of three new wastewater treatment plants in Halifax, Dartmouth and Herring Cove, which are designed to eliminate the flow of raw sewage into the Halifax Harbour and is supported by a federal contribution of $60M, is scheduled to be completed during the 2010-2011 fiscal year.
Total: $163.8 Million $18.7 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Canada Economic Development Quebec Regions (CEDQR)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $142.5 Million $33.7 Million Several co-managed projects are ongoing in the Province of Quebec. The sanitary drainage and river bank re-naturalization of the Rivière St-Charles, which is designed to minimize future wastewater overflows and to recreate a more natural riverbank habitat, and is supported by a federal contribution of $36.5M, is scheduled to be completed during the 2010-2011 fiscal year.
Total: $142.5 Million $33.7 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification (WED)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity: 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011 16. Expected Results for 2010-2011
PA1 a. $652.0 Million $54.0 Million Approximately 15 co-managed projects are ongoing across the Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. Work on enhancing the Manitoba Floodway, which is designed to increase flood protection for the City of Winnipeg and includes a federal contribution of $332.5M, is scheduled for completion in 2010-2011. Work on the development and upgrading of water treatment and regional distribution facilities in rural Saskatchewan, which involves a federal contribution of $27.3M, is also scheduled for completion in the regions of Caronport and La Ronge.
Total: $652.0 Million $54.0 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Industry Canada
12. Federal Partner Program Activity: 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011 16. Expected Results for 2010-2011
PA1 a. $282.5 Million $48.5 Million Infrastructure Canada and Industry Canada will continue to co-manage several ongoing projects in the Province of Ontario. The re-development of the former Don Valley Brick Works Site in Toronto, Ontario into a multi-use, multi-component building complex that will serve as an environmental education and community-focused centre, is scheduled for completion in the spring of 2011. The work is supported by a federal contribution of $20M.
Total: $282.5 Million $48.5 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)
12. Federal Partner Program Activity: 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011 16. Expected Results for 2010-2011
PA1 a. $41.0 Million $2.3 Million Infrastructure Canada and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) will continue to co-manage several projects across the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. An example of this work is the urban development initiatives underway to upgrade the function and appearance of the waterfronts in Whitehorse and Carcross, which is supported by a federal contribution of $11M.
Total: $41.0 Million $2.3 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Transport Canada
12. Federal Partner Program Activity: 13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011 16. Expected Results for 2010-2011
PA1 a. $3,227.5 Million $247.7 Million Transport Canada will continue to serve as the lead partner in the management of programs across the country that deal with highways and other major transportation projects. Transport Canada will continue to manage 11 active projects under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund. None of the construction projects are expected to be completed in 2010-2011.
Total: $3,227.5 Million $247.7 Million  
 
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (From Start to End Date)1 Total Planned Spending For All Federal Partners for 2010-2011
$4,509.3 Million $404.9 Million
 
17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a.
18. Contact Information:
Jocelyne St Jean
Director General of Intergovernmental Operations
(613) 948-8003
E-Mail: jocelyne.stjean@infc.gc.ca

Border Infrastructure Fund

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Border Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Border Infrastructure Fund

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-2004

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2013-2014

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $675 Million

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Border Infrastructure Fund, which was announced in Budget 2001, is a $675 million cost-shared contribution program. It complements some of the Government of Canada's other infrastructure programs such as the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund and the Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program, a Transport Canada program.

As part of "Canada's commitment to address land border pressures, such as traffic congestion, and to continue to facilitate the large volume of trade across the Canada - United States border", the Border Infrastructure Fund contributions are directed at or on routes leading to Canada's border crossings, with a particular focus on the six largest:

  • Windsor, Ontario;
  • Sarnia, Ontario;
  • Fort Erie, Ontario;
  • Niagara Falls, Ontario;
  • Douglas, British Columbia; and,
  • Lacolle, Quebec.

The fund also directs some funding toward smaller and regionally important border crossings throughout Canada. Once completed, projects supported under the Border Infrastructure Fund will help alleviate traffic congestion, increase system capacity and further the Smart Border Declaration (a Canada - US Declaration; see http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/anti-terrorism/declaration-en.asp).

More information on this fund can be found at: http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/bif-fsif/bif-fsif-eng.html.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The overall planned results that Infrastructure Canada expects to achieve through the Border Infrastructure Fund are to invest in projects that contribute to safe and efficient border crossings. Expected outcomes are to alleviate border congestion and increase border crossing capacity, and to increase security and safety at border crossings, leading to cross border trade efficiencies.

9. Governance Structure(s):

All Border Infrastructure Fund projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults with other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. After project selection, public announcements are made by the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Treasury Board approval is sought for each contribution. At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by Transport Canada are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The fund is delivered in partnership involving primarily three sets of key collaborators:

  1. Infrastructure Canada: As the coordinating and funding agent for the contribution, Infrastructure Canada is responsible for project review and selection. It leads the negotiation of contribution agreements with each of the funding recipients and is responsible for the evaluation of the program. To monitor activities and milestones throughout the project life cycle, an Infrastructure Canada representative will sit on the project's Agreement Steering Committee.
  2. Transport Canada: This department has the project-specific technical knowledge with regard to each project. Transport Canada provides analysis and advice for the review and approval of projects. It is responsible for implementing the Border Infrastructure Fund projects in a manner that upholds federal due diligence in such areas as: environmental assessment, the eligibility and reasonability of project costs, the provision of information pertaining to cash flow and budget, the approval of invoices, making payments, the conducting of audits and evaluation of the projects. Transport Canada reviews the business case for the project, and determines the costs and benefits. It works with Infrastructure Canada to jointly negotiate the project agreement and prepares the Treasury Board submission; the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities signs both documents. Transport Canada is the federal co-chair of the project's Agreement Steering Committee. It also ensures adherence to information management requirements to capture, monitor and report on project information.
  3. The funding recipient: The recipient may be a provincial, territorial or local government, private partner or a combination thereof. Once the project has been selected, the funding recipient enters into negotiations with Infrastructure Canada to develop a contribution agreement. The funding recipient is responsible for ensuring that the project is completed as per the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

10. Planning Highlights:

  • Work with our portfolio partner Transport Canada, to oversee the implementation of the remaining projects announced under the Border Infrastructure Fund; and
  • In partnership with our portfolio partner Transport Canada, continue to oversee the implementation of project-specific agreements, ensuring that the terms of agreements are respected and that claims for payment are processed efficiently to meet the program's scheduled end date of 2013.

11. Federal Partner: Transport Canada

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $628.1 Million $83.8 Million Transport Canada will continue to serve as the lead partner in the management of programs across the country that deal with highways and other major transportation projects. Transport Canada will continue to manage 13 active projects under the Border Infrastructure Fund. It is expected that construction of two projects will be completed in the 2010-2011 fiscal year, including: Truck Ferry Infrastructure and Signage Project in Windsor, Ontario, and the Widening of the Highway 401 from Highway 3 to West County Road 17 near Windsor, Ontario as well.
Total: $628.1 Million $83.8 Million  
 
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (From Start to End Date)2 Total Planned Spending For All Federal Partners for 2010-2011
$628.1 Million $83.8 Million
 
17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a.

18. Contact Information:
Jocelyne St Jean
Director General of Intergovernmental Operations
(613) 948-8003
E-Mail: jocelyne.stjean@infc.gc.ca


Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2004-2005

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2013-2014

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $1.1 Billion

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The $1.1 billion Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund has been structured to provide a balanced response to local infrastructure needs in urban and rural Canada and will ensure that all Canadians, whether they live in large, small or remote communities will share in the benefits of infrastructure investments.

The fund improves and increases the stock of core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, culture, recreation, and those very things that make our communities vibrant and productive places to live, work and raise families. It targets communities of less than 250,000 residents as well as First Nation communities.  Like other infrastructure programs, the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund seeks to ensure that the projects it funds support the goals of the Government of Canada, encourages new and innovative approaches and favours partnerships, including an emphasis on 'green' projects which are sustainable and reduce greenhouse gases.

Through the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund, the Government of Canada continues to work in productive partnerships with provinces, territories, and municipalities, as well as First Nations and the private sector, to invest in local infrastructure projects. These projects will be vital to sustaining economic growth and supporting an enhanced quality of life in Canadian communities.

The fund is cost-shared, with the Government of Canada contributing, on average, one-third of total project eligible costs. Provinces and municipalities contribute the remainder of these costs. In recognition of the unique circumstances of the First Nations and the Territories, where many communities have no tax base, the Government of Canada may contribute a higher percentage of total project eligible costs.

More information on the fund can be found at: http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/mrif-fimr/mrif-fimr-eng.html.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The overall expected outcomes are:

  • Improved and increased core public infrastructure in areas such as water, wastewater, culture and recreation; and
  • Improved quality of life and economic opportunities for smaller communities and First Nations.

9. Governance Structure(s):

The Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund is based on a federal partnership arrangement between Infrastructure Canada and five federal departments: Western Economic Diversification, Industry Canada (for Ontario projects), Canada Economic Development Quebec Regions, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. It involves 14 sub-programs, one joint sub-program for each province and territory and a sub-program for First Nations communities.  Each of the 14 sub-programs follows the same general conditions, priorities and approaches. Also, recognizing the individual nature of each sub-program, the various agreements reflect the nature of the partnership as it relates to the order of government.

To effect expected outcomes, the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund eligible projects must conform to a policy leveraging framework, based on a common baseline, but adapted for each jurisdiction. To ensure broad support and effective, innovative project delivery, partnerships of various types, including public-private partnerships are encouraged in the formulation and delivery of the fund projects.  The program relies on strong input from local and rural municipalities, including the support of the locally elected councils. In addition, municipal representatives are involved in the processes and management of the program in the respective province or territory.

10. Planning Highlights:

  • The program will continue its long-term commitment to public infrastructure designed to promote economic growth, innovation and healthy communities, as per the Fund's recent extension until March 31, 2013;
  • This commitment will continue to be focused on projects such as water and wastewater treatment or cultural and recreation projects for smaller and First Nations communities; and
  • Projects will continue to be managed in a collaborative manner through the respective umbrella of federal-provincial-territorial contribution agreements.

11. Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $139.2 Million $17.8 Million Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency will continue to co-manage the over 250 projects likely underway during the 2010-2011 fiscal year. Over 60% of the federal contribution is committed to green projects which support and maintain a healthy and sustainable environment.
Total: $139.2 Million $17.8 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Canada Economic Development Quebec Regions (CEDQR)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $241.8 Million $5.6 Million Infrastructure Canada and the Canada Economic Development Quebec Regions will continue to co-manage the over 200 projects likely underway during the 2010-2011 fiscal year. Over 60% of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.
Total: $241.8 Million $5.6 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification (WED)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $286.3 Million $38.4 Million Infrastructure Canada and Western Economic Diversification will continue to co-manage the over 250 projects likely underway in the Provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba during the 2010-2011 fiscal year. Over 55% of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.
Total: $286.3 Million $38.4 Million  
         

11. Federal Partner: Industry Canada

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $373.3 Million $62.1 Million Infrastructure Canada and Industry Canada will continue to co-manage the over 500 projects likely underway, including the 35 projects which have been allocated the Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up funding, and are mostly scheduled for completion in the 2010-2011 fiscal year. Over 85% of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.
Total: $373.3 Million $62.1 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $59.1 Million $0 Million Infrastructure Canada and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) will continue to co-manage the over 50 projects likely underway in the 2010-2011 fiscal year. Over 50% of the total federal contribution is committed to green projects.
Total: $59.1 Million $0 Million  
16. Expected Results:
 
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (From Start to End Date)3 Total Planned Spending For All Federal Partners for 2010-2011
$1,099.7 Million $123.9 Million
 
17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a.

18. Contact Information:
Jocelyne St Jean
Director General of Intergovernmental Operations
(613) 948-8003
E-Mail: jocelyne.stjean@infc.gc.ca


Infrastructure Canada Program

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Infrastructure Canada Program

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Not Applicable (Funds transferred to Federal Delivery Partners)

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2000-2001

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-2011

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $2.05 Billion

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Infrastructure Canada Program is a contribution program introduced in 2000 for local municipal infrastructure projects. The Government of Canada matches the provincial/territorial governments' contributions, providing up to one-third of the cost of each municipal infrastructure project. It is a $2.05 billion program in effect until 2010-2011. The fund is well underway and projects are ongoing across the country. Most of the funding has either been committed to approved projects or notionally allocated to those that are under review.

The fund's first priority for funding is "green municipal projects", i.e. projects with environmental benefits that enhance the quality of the environment or health benefits that enhance the quality of human life. Other priorities include affordable housing, culture, tourism and recreation, rural and remote telecommunication, high-speed access for local public institutions and local transportation. Recognizing that individual communities know their needs best, the program operates in a "bottom-up" fashion, with the flexibility for municipalities and First Nations to identify their own infrastructure priorities. It also includes provisions to ensure an equitable balance of funding between urban and rural communities.

Further information may be obtained at http://www.infc.gc.ca/ip-pi/icp-pic/icp-pic-eng.html.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The overall planned results are that urban and rural municipal infrastructure in Canada is enhanced and Canadians' quality of life is improved through investments that protect the environment and support long-term community and economic growth.

9. Governance Structure(s):

The key roles and responsibilities of partners are as follows:

  • Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities - overall program management and accountability to Parliament, including media relations, appointment of Management Committee members, project approval for projects where the federal share is between $1M - $10M;
  • Infrastructure Canada - oversight and monitoring of the program ensuring effective management and a coordinated approach to communications and provision of services including operational services, information management, and communications services;
  • Ministers or Ministers of State responsible for delivery (Industry Canada; Western Economic Diversification; Canada Economic Development - Quebec; Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency; Indian and Northern Affairs Canada) - with Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities joint authority to enter into contribution agreements with provinces/territories, and project approval where federal share is less than $1M;
  • Federal-Provincial/Territorial Management Committees (one per jurisdiction) - administration and management of the Infrastructure Canada Program in accordance with the terms and conditions of the applicable federal-provincial/territorial agreement;
  • Provinces/Territories - signatories to the negotiated agreements with the federal government;
  • Local governments - main applicants for Infrastructure Canada Program projects; also responsible for sponsoring projects with non-governmental organizations and/or private sector;
  • Non-governmental organizations and private sector - eligible to propose projects that are sponsored either by a municipality, a province/territory or the federal government; and
  • Other government departments - provide key expertise for all or some types of Infrastructure Canada Program projects (e.g., Transport Canada, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency).

10. Planning Highlights:

  • The program will continue to support the enhancement of municipal infrastructure in urban and rural communities across the country while improving quality of life for Canadians through investments that protect our environment and support long-term economic growth.
  • The program's focus on innovation and efficiency means commitment to the continued use of existing infrastructure while allowing for the introduction of new approaches and best practices.
  • Infrastructure Canada will continue to manage this program in collaboration with provinces, territories, municipalities and First Nations and will remain committed to the regular and strong audit and evaluation of the program.

11. Federal Partner: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $188.2 Million $0.0 Million Infrastructure Canada and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency will continue to co-manage the federal funds allocated across the Atlantic provinces. All funds allocated have been claimed as expenses as of the beginning of the 2009-2010 fiscal year.
Total: $188.2 Million $0.0 Million  
         

11. Federal Partner: Canada Economic Development Quebec Regions (CEDQR)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $525.3 Million $2.1 Million Infrastructure Canada and the Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions will continue to co-manage the federal funds allocated across the Province of Quebec. Nearly $500M of the allocation had been claimed as expenses as of the beginning of the 2009-2010 fiscal year.
Total: $525.3 Million $2.1 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Western Economic Diversification (WED)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $568.3 Million $0.0 Million Infrastructure Canada and Western Economic Diversification will continue to co-manage the federal funds allocated across the western provinces. Almost the entire allocation had been claimed as expenses as of the beginning of the 2009-2010 fiscal year.
Total: $568.3 Million $0.0 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Industry Canada

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $693.8 Million $0.0 Million Infrastructure Canada and Industry Canada will continue to co-manage the federal funds allocated across the Province of Ontario. The entire allocation had been claimed as expenses as of the beginning of the 2009-2010 fiscal year.
Total: $693.8 Million $0.0 Million  
         
11. Federal Partner: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)

12. Federal Partner Program Activity:

13. Names of Programs for Federal Partners

14. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date)

15. Planned Spending for 2010-2011

16. Expected Results for 2010-2011

PA1 a. $40.0 Million $0.0 Million Infrastructure Canada and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) will continue to co-manage the federal funds allocated across the territories. The entire allocation had been claimed as expenses as of the beginning of the 2009-2010 fiscal year.
Total: $40.0 Million $0.0 Million  
 
Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (From Start to End Date)4 Total Planned Spending For All Federal Partners for 2010-2011
$2,015.6 Million $2.1 Million
 
17. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): n/a.

18. Contact Information:
Jocelyne St Jean
Director General of Intergovernmental Operations
(613) 948-8003
E-Mail: jocelyne.stjean@infc.gc.ca


Building Canada Fund

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Building Canada Fund

2. Name of lead department(s): Infrastructure Canada

3. Lead department program activity: Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component, Building Canada Fund-Communities Component and Building Canada Fund-Communities Component Top-Up

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-2008

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2016-2017

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (Start to End Date): $8.5 Billion5

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Building Canada Fund focuses on projects that deliver economic, environmental, and social benefits to all Canadians.

The national priorities for funding are core national highway system routes, drinking water, wastewater, public transit and green energy. Other eligible categories include projects that support economic growth and development (short-line rail and short-sea shipping, connectivity and broadband, tourism and regional and local airports), environmental projects (solid waste management), as well as projects that contribute to the ongoing development of safe and strong communities (disaster mitigation, culture, sport, local roads and bridges, and brownfield re-development). Funding is used to support public infrastructure owned by provincial, territorial and municipal governments and entities, as well as the non-profit sector and private industry, in certain cases.

Funding is allocated for projects in the various provinces and territories based on their population (as of the 2006 Census). In the provinces, the program operates through two components: the Major Infrastructure Component and the Communities Component. In the territories, in recognition of their very low per capita allocations, the Building Canada funding has been rolled into the Provincial-Territorial Base Funding Program and is managed under the terms of this latter program in each territory.

The Major Infrastructure Component targets larger, strategic projects of national and regional significance. Under this component, two-thirds of national funding is directed to the above-mentioned national priorities. Projects under the Major Infrastructure Component are selected jointly on the basis of merit through a federal-provincial/territorial negotiation process, and all projects are required to meet criteria targeting environmental, economic and quality-of-life objectives. Innovative technologies and partnerships will also be emphasized.

The Communities Component is focused on projects in communities with populations of less than 100,000. Projects will be selected through an application-based process and, like projects under the Major Infrastructure Component, will be evaluated on the extent to which they meet environmental, economic and quality of life objectives. This will significantly help smaller communities address their infrastructure pressures and serve as a complementary instrument to the Gas Tax Fund.

More information on the Building Canada Fund can be found at: http://www.buildingcanada-chantierscanada.gc.ca/funprog-progfin/target-viser/bcf-fcc/bcf-fcc-eng.html

8. Shared Outcome(s):

The overall expected outcomes are to deliver results that matter to Canadians--cleaner air and water, safer roads, shorter commutes, and prosperous, liveable communities while supporting the Canada's priorities--a stronger economy, cleaner environment and better communities.

9. Governance Structure(s):

i. Major Infrastructure Component of the Building Canada Fund

All Major Infrastructure Component projects are selected under the authority of the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Priorities are identified through discussions with provinces, territories, including through the Infrastructure Framework Committees. Prior to selecting projects, the Minister consults other Ministers who have an interest in the region or in the substantive project area. Following due diligence, Treasury Board approval is required for contributions to any projects above the delegated threshold (e.g. $50 million federal contribution). At the same time, incremental operating funds required for project oversight and management by the implementing departments/agencies are identified and sought in the Treasury Board submission.

The Major Inf