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2009-10
Report on Plans and Priorities



Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Canadian Polar Commission






The original version was signed by
The Honourable Chuck Strahl, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians






Table of Contents

Minister’s Message

SECTION I — Departmental Overview
Raison d’ętre and Responsibilities
Program Activity Architecture Changes for 2009–10
Planning Summary
INAC’s Priorities
Risk Analysis
Expenditure Profile
Voted and Statutory Items Displayed in the Main Estimates

SECTION II — Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcomes
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Strategic Outcome: The Government
Strategic Outcome: The People
Strategic Outcome: The Land
Strategic Outcome: The Economy
Strategic Outcome: The North
Strategic Outcome: The Office of the Federal Interlocutor
Internal Services
Canadian Polar Commission

SECTION III — Supplementary Information
List of Tables
Contact for Further Information



Minister’s Message

On behalf of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and the Canadian Polar Commission, I am pleased to present to Parliament and the people of Canada the Report on Plans and Priorities for 2009–2010.

Looking over the year gone by, I am proud of the collective progress we have made through our determined effort, genuine collaboration and concrete action to address the fundamental obstacles that stand in the way of greater prosperity for Aboriginal peoples and Northerners. Through this collaborative approach, progress has been made on numerous fronts. The Prime Minister’s historic apology to all former students of Indian Residential Schools was an important step in the ongoing journey toward healing and reconciliation. Progress has also been made in economic development, housing, safe drinking water, land claim settlements, improving education and the extension of human rights protection to First Nations on reserve. I am equally proud of the work we have done to move forward on our vision of a new North that realizes its full social and economic potential for the benefit of all Canadians.

Looking ahead, increasing Aboriginal and northern participation in the Canadian economy is a key element of this year’s plan with the ultimate objective of ensuring that Aboriginal and northern Canadians enjoy the same opportunities for success when it comes to education, housing, health care, social services and other key ingredients of healthy and fulfilling lives. As revealed in this plan, our government will be taking steps to ensure that Aboriginal Canadians fully share in economic opportunities, putting particular emphasis on improving education for First Nations in partnership with the provinces and First Nations communities.

In support of our Northern Strategy, we will be continuing our efforts to develop the tremendous potential of Canada’s North — improving infrastructure, supporting Northern science research and harnessing the North’s vast resources in a way that is environmentally sustainable, as well as good for the economy and Northerners. We will be continuing our work towards reducing regulatory and other barriers to help facilitate resource development in the North. These measures will help bring jobs and create employment across the country.

It is also important to acknowledge the challenges that remain, that more progress is needed and that this can only be achieved through ongoing co-operation with our many partners. The 2009–2010 Report on Plans and Priorities acknowledges these challenges and maps out practical courses of action to address them in a manner designed to strengthen accountability to Parliament and to all Canadians.

Investments made in Budget 2009 will allow the department to accelerate progress on several elements of this plan by providing additional support to current initiatives or generating new ones. I look forward to reporting on these initiatives in future reports to Parliament.

The Honourable Chuck Strahl, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indian

SECTION I — Departmental Overview

Raison d’ętre and Responsibilities

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), including the Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (OFI), is the federal department primarily responsible for meeting the Government of Canada’s obligations and commitments to Aboriginal peoples (Indians, Inuit and Métis), and fulfilling the government’s constitutionally mandated role in the North. To this end, INAC helps Canada’s Aboriginal and northern peoples foster healthy and sustainable communities, and pursue economic and social development. More specifically, INAC leads 33 other federal departments and agencies in:

  • promoting improved education for Aboriginal peoples;
  • pursuing frameworks for effective governance and self-governance;
  • helping empower Aboriginal citizens and protect those who are most vulnerable;
  • working to resolve outstanding land claims; and
  • supporting the sustainable economic development that contributes to Aboriginal and northern employment and strengthens local communities.

These diverse and complex responsibilities flow from the department’s central mandates: Indian and Inuit Affairs, Northern Development, and the Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis, and Non-Status Indians.

Indian and Inuit Affairs and the Office of the Federal Interlocutor

INAC’s mandate derives from the Canadian Constitution, the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act, numerous legislation and regulation under the responsibility of the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and treaties. The mandate continues to be shaped by evolving jurisprudence which impacts on its policy decisions and program development.

The mandate of the Office of the Federal Interlocutor derives from an Executive Order providing authority to the Minister to act as federal government’s primary Interlocutor with and in regard to Métis and Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people. The Office of the Federal Interlocutor maintains and strengthens the Government of Canada’s relations with organizations representing these groups.

INAC’s responsibilities for Indian and Inuit Affairs include:

  • negotiating land claim and self-government agreements with members of Aboriginal communities, and overseeing the implementation of settled claims on behalf of the federal government;
  • facilitating economic development opportunities for Aboriginal individuals, communities and businesses;
  • funding the delivery of province-like services such as education, housing, community infrastructure and social support to Status Indians on reserves;
  • addressing and resolving issues that arise from the legacy of Indian residential schools;
  • liaising effectively between Government of Canada (federal services and policies) and Inuit communities, governments and organizations; and
  • fulfilling duties prescribed by the Indian Act, including managing Indian reserve lands and financial resources belonging to First Nations communities, and approving or rejecting by-laws in First Nations communities.

The Office of the Federal Interlocutor’s responsibilities in relation to Métis and Non-Status Indians include delivering improved federal services to Aboriginal people who do not live on reserves, and serving as a point of contact within the Government of Canada for Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people.

Northern Development

INAC’s Northern Development mandate is derived from a series of legislative acts, including statutes enacted in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and those that concern modern treaties north of 60°, and environmental and resource management. Statutes that enact the devolution of services and responsibilities from INAC to territorial governments also frame the mandate. As a result, INAC is the lead federal department responsible for two-fifths of Canada’s land mass.

INAC has a direct role in the political and economic development of the territories and significant resource, land and environmental management obligations. The territorial governments generally provide the majority of programs and services normally funded by INAC to Aboriginal people and other Northerners.

INAC’s responsibilities for Northern Development include:

  • promoting political and economic development in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut;
  • negotiating the transfer of federal responsibilities for land and resource management to the territorial governments;
  • managing the resources, land and environment of the North in places where federal responsibilities have not been previously transferred to territorial governments;
  • coordinating initiatives, such as the management of contaminated sites, and subsidizing the delivery cost of nutritious perishable food; and
  • advancing circumpolar interests, such as Canada’s Arctic sovereignty, climate change adaptation and environmental protection, Canadian representation at circumpolar forums, and scientific research in, and understanding of, the North.

The Canadian Polar Commission also supports polar research and strengthens Canada’s international reputation as a leader among circumpolar nations. In addition to promoting knowledge of Canada’s polar regions and their importance to the country, the Commission also provides polar science policy direction to government.

Entrusted with the responsibilities of both mandates, INAC will continue to advance initiatives both of immediate relevance to Aboriginal peoples and of critical importance to all Canadians. Through increased emphasis on educational programs, for example, the department will work to improve scholastic achievement in members of First Nations communities and increase Aboriginal participation in economic development.

In the North, progress toward the implementation of a comprehensive Northern Strategy will be fostered through such INAC-led initiatives as the Canadian Arctic Research Station, and the projected establishment of a stand-alone agency to support northern economic development. Sustainable economic development, an improved regulatory system, environmental protection and capitalization on the tremendous potential of the land and people of the North will bring increased employment and prosperity to all Northerners.

Program Activity Architecture Changes for 2009–10

The department has significantly revised its program activity architecture for 2009–10. Changes include a new strategic outcome for the North that groups the four existing northern program activities, and a restructured strategic outcome for the Office of the Federal Interlocutor organized around the department’s programs. In addition, the Internal Services program activity was reorganized to be in keeping with new Treasury Board guidelines, and the Office of Indian Residential Schools Resolution Canada, which joined the department on June 1, 2008, was added to the Claims Settlements program activity under the government strategic outcome. Minor changes, mostly to headings, were also made at the sub-activity level to better reflect program associations.


detailed Program Activity Architecture

Planning Summary



Financial Resources ($ millions)
  2009–10 2010-11 2011-12
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada 7,336.8 6,995.7 6,717.7
Canadian Polar Commission 1.0 1.0 1.0



Human Resources (FTEs)
  2009–10 2010-11 2011-12
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada 4,805.4 4,631.2 4,553.2
Canadian Polar Commission 5 5 5

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada



Strategic Outcome: The Government
Performance Indicators Targets
Develop a performance indicator for the Government Strategic Outcome March 31, 2010


Program Activities Forecast Spending
2008-09
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Governance and Institutions of Government 623.9 641.2 642.2 647.3 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Co-operative Relationships[1] 239.8 270.5 231.0 227.7 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Claims Settlements[2] 777.0 828.0 681.8 665.2 Strong economic growth
Total ($ millions) 1,640.7 1,739.7 1,555.1 1,540.1  

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.
[1] Reflects changes in the approved funding profile for the negotiation of specific and comprehensive claims.
[2] Reflects changes in the approved funding profile for the settlement of specific and comprehensive claims as well as a change in the approved cash flow for the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.



Strategic Outcome: The People
Performance Indicators Targets
Scores on the Aboriginal Human Development Index (HDI) and Community Well-Being Index (CWB) for First Nations and Inuit Reduce the difference between the HDI/CWB scores of Aboriginal communities and those of the general Canadian population


Program Activities Forecast Spending
2008-09
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Education 1,666.0 1,705.2 1,751.5 1,796.9 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Social Development[1] 1,484.5 1,458.3 1,491.1 1,510.3 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Managing Individual Affairs[2] 24.4 30.2 21.9 21.7 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Total ($ millions) 3,174.9 3,193.7 3,264.6 3,328.9  

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.
[1] 2008–09 forecast includes additional resources provided for social development; planned spending in 2009–10 and 2010–11 includes funding for Child and Family Services announced in Budget 2009.
[2] Reflects changes in the approved funding profile for the Certificate of Indian Status Project.



Strategic Outcome: The Land
Performance Indicators Targets
Percentage of First Nations applying sustainable land management strategies Study completed to establish both baseline data and a target for improvement


Program Activities Forecast Spending
2008-09
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Clarity of Title to Land and Resources[1] 8.5 10.9 7.2 7.2 Strong economic growth
Responsible Federal Stewardship[2] 137.8 76.0 51.2 48.9 A clean and healthy environment
First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment 15.4 25.2 25.4 25.4 Strong economic growth
Total ($ millions) 161.7 112.2 83.8 81.5  

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.
[1] Primarily reflects changes in the approved funding profile for the implementation of treaty land entitlement claims.
[2] Primarily reflects changes in the approved cash flow for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and in funding provided to address urgent health and safety pressures for First Nations communities (additional funding was provided in 2008–09).



Strategic Outcome: The Economy
Performance Indicators Targets
First Nations socio-economic Well-Being Index (employment, income, education and housing sub-indices) A 25 percent decrease in the overall Well-Being Index gap between members of First Nations communities, Inuit, and Métis peoples, and other Canadians


Program Activities Forecast Spending
2008-09
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Individual and Community Business Development
203.0
45.6 45.6 45.6 Strong economic growth
Community Investment[1] 172.2 173.1 173.1 Strong economic growth
Community Infrastructure[2] 1,046.4 1,327.6 1,214.1 959.2 Strong economic growth
Total ($ millions) 1,249.4 1,545.4 1,432.9 1,177.9  

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.
[1] Includes Budget 2008 funding for economic development including resources which may be allocated to other government departments or to other program activities.
[2] Primarily reflects changes in the approved funding profile for Budget 2008 (water and wastewater action plan) and Budget 2009 (housing, school construction, water and wastewater projects) which does not extend beyond 2010–11; does not reflect in-year reallocations to address pressures in other program areas.



Strategic Outcome: The North
Performance Indicators Targets
Employment rates for Aboriginals and Northerners in Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut By 2011: Yukon — 71 percent; Northwest Territories — 70 percent; Nunavut — 58 percent


Program Activities Forecast Spending
2008-09
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Northern Governance[1] 7.7 22.0 17.2 14.2 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Healthy Northern Communities[2] 119.7 133.2 143.2 85.5 Healthy Canadians
Northern Land and Resources[3] 157.5 169.8 71.7 65.8 A clean and healthy environment
Northern Economy[4] 23.8 22.0 31.7 31.7 Strong economic growth
Total ($ millions) 308.7 347.0 263.8 197.3  

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.
[1] Reflects changes to the approved funding profile to support the Government of Nunavut’s efforts to strengthen its financial management, practices and systems.
[2] Reflects a change in the approved funding profile for the Northern Air Stage Food Mail Program (additional funding was provided in 2008–09), for activities and research stemming from the International Polar Year and Budget 2009 funding for Arctic research infrastructure.
[3] Primarily reflects changes in the approved cash flow for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and for the implementation of adaptation initiatives in support of Canada’s Clean Air Agenda.
[4] Primarily reflects changes in Budget 2009 funding profile for the creation of a new regional economic development agency (expected to be a stand-alone agency beginning in 2010–11) and the renewal of the Strategic Investments in Northern Economic Development program.



Strategic Outcome: Office of the Federal Interlocutor
Performance Indicators Targets
Socio-economic conditions of Métis, Non-Status Indians, and urban Aboriginal people Improved socio-economic conditions of Métis, Non-Status Indians, and urban Aboriginal people by 2011, according to the indicators incomes, educational attainment, and employment


Program Activities Forecast Spending
2008-09
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Urban Aboriginal Strategy


40.8
13.3 13.4 13.4 Income security and employment for Canadians
Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development 14.6 14.6 14.6 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Métis Rights Management[1] 12.1 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Total ($ millions) 40.8 40.0 28.0 28.0  

[1] Reflects the current approved funding profile provided for the Effective Management of Métis Aboriginal Rights initiative.


Canadian Polar Commission



Strategic Outcome: Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge
Performance Indicators Targets
Performance indicators to be developed March 31, 2010


Program Activity Forecast Spending
2008-09
Planned Spending Alignment with Government of Canada Outcomes
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Research Facilitation and Communication 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 A clean and healthy environment

INAC’s Priorities

Canada’s shifting social, economic, and political landscape has strongly influenced INAC’s priorities, performance and programs. While the post-apology context has provided an unprecedented opportunity to move forward in a spirit of mutual respect and responsibility, Canada and most of its major trading partners now find themselves in uncertain and difficult economic times. INAC will continue to do its part to advance the Aboriginal and northern agenda in this new and challenging environment.

Departmental activities will include the review of many INAC programs and policies, with a view to achieve better results, align more closely with provincial approaches and integrate seamlessly into strategies across the federal government. Greater focus will be given to strengthening core business practices to ensure the effective, efficient and accountable delivery of INAC programs. As well, the department will continue to tackle manageable goals in five priority areas: education; reconciliation, governance and self-government; economic development; empowering citizens and protecting the vulnerable; and resolution of land claims.

Future Challenges and Opportunities

A unique convergence of trends will drive the Aboriginal and northern agenda for years to come, representing both opportunities and challenges for the federal government. These trends include:

A young and rapidly growing Aboriginal population

Canada’s Aboriginal population is young and growing almost twice as fast as the country’s general population (1.8 percent per annum versus 1.0 percent). This population growth will affect demand for education, housing, public infrastructure, family services and other programs. At the same time, the growth suggests potential for strong Aboriginal participation in regional and national economies. If properly supported through skills training and education programs adapted to the unique circumstances (e.g. poor health, poverty, remote location) of Canada’s Aboriginal communities, this burgeoning population could provide Canada with the skilled labour force of tomorrow.

Additionally, more Aboriginal businesses and communities are creating wealth and employment opportunities through partnerships essential to continued growth in Canada’s major economic sectors. Economic development programming will aid these businesses and communities in making up an increasingly important segment of the Canadian economy.

Social and economic progress for Aboriginal Canadians

Social and economic progress has been made. The Indian Residential Schools Apology and the launch of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the passage of Bill C-21, which protects human rights on reserves, and the establishment of a market-housing fund to support on-reserve private homeownership are all steps in the right direction. There remains, however, much that must be done to reduce the gaps that persist between the socio-economic outcomes of Aboriginal Canadians and those of the general Canadian population. To this end, the department must recognize and address the diverse challenges that arise as a result of location, historical context, and the unique demographic realities of Canada’s Aboriginal population.

Unprecedented northern opportunities

Land claim and self-government agreements with Aboriginal northern peoples, devolution of federal powers to territorial governments, prudent management of land and resources, and ground-breaking private sector investment have prepared Canada’s North for a period of unprecedented development. Unparalleled opportunities will transform not only the lives of all Northerners, including Aboriginal people, but also the communities in which they live, and Canada as a whole.

Resource development, claims settlements, new program delivery arrangements (i.e., devolution) and modern legislative frameworks for Aboriginal and northern communities are creating an environment that helps communities take control over their own affairs and pursue their own priorities.

It is important to note, however, that while the North is currently a place of incredible opportunity for regional economies, and revenue for governments, it is also on the front line of climate change impacts and adaptation. The importance of the North to sovereignty continues to increase as sea ice melts and the opening of the Northwest Passage becomes a reality. INAC must balance the need to support the North’s economic potential with sustainable development and environmental protection.

Growing Aboriginal leadership and provincial willingness to engage

With a growing number of enterprising, resourceful Aboriginal leaders advancing their communities’ social and economic goals, members of First Nations communities have a stronger sense of accountability in numerous communities. Many economic and governance successes are indeed best practices and could serve as examples for future initiatives.

Provinces and territories are increasingly realizing the potential benefits of looking beyond jurisdictions and working together to find practical solutions, notably where the Aboriginal population will form an important segment of the workforce.

Moving Forward

When responding to new and emerging opportunities, INAC has great potential to bring direct benefits and heightened self-reliance to Aboriginal and northern people and communities. However, these opportunities are linked increasingly to a broader range of partnerships with provinces, territories and the private sector, and INAC must at times depend on the priorities and schedules of these parties. The availability of resources, judicial decisions, and other unanticipated events and developments also impact INAC’s ability to support Aboriginal and northern Canadians. For INAC to ensure the effectiveness of its planned activities as much as possible, it must consider how to:

  • ensure that programs adapt and respond in effective and accountable ways to the many facets of Aboriginal and northern realities;
  • build and nurture the partnerships necessary to achieve strategic outcomes; and
  • promote responsible and sustainable resource development in the face of rising concerns about climate change and the environment.

Evolution of INAC’s policies, programs and organizational capacity

As one of 34 federal departments and agencies involved in Aboriginal and northern programming, INAC is challenged to meet the needs of its client base without working at cross purposes with other players. This is also true within INAC, as the department responds to a range of needs in a variety of regional contexts.

Canada’s Aboriginal and northern communities, as well as Canadian taxpayers, must get the full benefit of investments. For its part, INAC will continue to lead the government on Aboriginal and northern economic development issues. During the planning period, INAC will help renovate policies and programs to place greater emphasis on implementation, enhance program effectiveness and accountability, and improve the ways in which Aboriginal and northern individuals and communities are supported.

To ensure the department has the capacity to pursue these activities, INAC will continue to:

  • develop robust performance indicators that focus on outcomes;
  • advance human resources development by emphasizing recruitment and further expanding the Integrity, Values and Conflict Resolution Centre;
  • strengthen information and resource management capacities in direct support of strategic outcome planning and enhanced stewardship of resources; and
  • focus on communications activities that raise public awareness about Aboriginal and northern realities and opportunities.

Emphasis on partnerships

Most INAC programs are delivered through funding agreements with Aboriginal communities, federal-provincial or federal-territorial agreements, or formal bilateral or multilateral negotiating processes. Accordingly, INAC will pursue a number of initiatives during the planning period to make partnerships more effective, including:

  • improving important claim and self-government negotiation processes, with an emphasis on specific claims;
  • implementing the federal government’s Consultation and Accommodation Action plan;
  • co-operating closely with First Nations communities to implement recently enacted statutes that give communities expanded jurisdiction over monies and resources; and
  • signing federal-provincial-First Nations community protocols on education, and child and family services.

The Office of the Federal Interlocutor will continue to implement the 2007–2012 Urban Aboriginal Strategy, which is based on problem-solving partnerships with provincial governments, urban Aboriginal organizations, municipalities and other federal departments. As well, the Office of the Federal Interlocutor will collaborate with a wide range of partners to respond to Métis rights, support tripartite governance arrangements for Métis and Non-Status Indians, and establish a research network to address policy challenges.

The Inuit Relations Secretariat will launch the Inuit Research Agenda during the current planning period, and begin negotiations around selected elements of the Inuit Action Plan to address education, economic development, youth and urban Inuit issues. Strengthening relations with the Inuvialuit, Nunavut, Nunavik and Nunatsiavut regions will be a priority for the Inuit Relations Secretariat as well.

Focus on sustainable development and environmental stewardship

Aboriginal and northern Canadians have a fundamental relationship with the land and its resources. For years, they have been calling attention to the effects of climate change, and demanding a broader, more sustainable approach to how all Canadians relate to nature.

Aboriginal and northern Canadians will become increasingly major players in the development of Canada’s resources. South of 60°, the reserve land base is expected to increase by over 55 percent between 1990 and 2010. This dramatic expansion will encompass extensive mineral and other resources. And all across Canada, land claims and self-government agreements give Aboriginal control over — or participation in — the management of large land masses with resource and hydro-development potential.

During the planning period, INAC will act on a number of issues, including contaminated sites, environmental assessments, infrastructure challenges, and Aboriginal and northern resource management capacity and governance. In addition, INAC’s Environmental Stewardship Strategy will be one of the department’s vehicles for co-ordinating efforts to enhance sustainable land and resource management.

Moving forward, the greatest challenge is to resist the urge to try to fix everything at once. INAC has set out manageable priorities that focus on the following:

  • improving education outcomes;
  • strengthening Canada’s relationship with Aboriginal peoples;
  • improving economic well-being, prosperity and self-reliance;
  • contributing to better health outcomes and safer communities; and
  • addressing, resolving and implementing claims.

Together, the advancement of this Aboriginal and northern agenda and a fundamental review of departmental policies and programs will put as many individuals and communities as possible on a path toward greater economic participation, the diminished need for government support and improved conditions and services in First Nations communities over the long term.

Risk Analysis

INAC uses a formal risk management and oversight regime to identify, monitor and manage risks that could compromise the achievement of the department’s strategic outcomes. The regime includes frequent risk assessment, the integration of risk information with departmental planning, resource-allocation and reporting processes, and regular reporting of risk exposures to senior executives. Collectively, these regime components ensure that INAC’s managers and senior executives monitor significant risks regularly and have the information necessary to make proactive, educated decisions.

In managing risk, INAC aims to strengthen organizational resilience, reinforce management excellence and, ultimately, enhance program results and reduce the need for crisis management. The department’s Risk Management Team works collaboratively with departmental managers across the country to support risk management initiatives and foster awareness of risks and best practices to manage risk. At the senior executive level, the Risk Champion (Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Regional Operations Sector) promotes the value and importance of risk management and participates actively in risk management initiatives.

In 2009–10, the department is taking two new and important steps forward. Risk management practices will become further embedded in the operational planning and priority-setting exercises respective to each strategic outcome. As well, risk-awareness sessions will be provided to all managers and planners across Canada.

The updated Corporate Risk Profile, along with other risk assessments undertaken in the past year, has informed the department’s plans and priorities for 2009–10. The department’s corporate risks are:

  • implementation risk;
  • information for decision making risk;
  • program alignment risk;
  • legal risk;
  • human resources capacity and capabilities risk;
  • Aboriginal-relationship risk;
  • Government partnership risk; and
  • Management practices risk.

Each strategic outcome is also subject to risks, some of which are as significant as the corporate risks. These risks are identified in later sections of this report.

Expenditure Profile

Planned Spending Breakdown

Planned Spending BreakdownOver 60 percent of departmental spending (3 of 20 program activities) is committed to basic services, such as education, social services and community infrastructure to provide access to provincial-type services.

Total Planned Spending — Explanation of Trend

The increase in spending from 2005–06 to 2009–10 is primarily due to:

  • incremental funding provided to meet the demand for ongoing First Nations and Inuit programs and services;
  • transfer of responsibility for the Office of Indian Residential Schools Resolution of Canada to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada;
  • incremental funding for accelerating the resolution of specific claims;
  • payment to the Quebec Cree to settle implementation issues respecting the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and related litigation;
  • funding provided in Budget 2006 for priorities, including education, women, children, families, water and housing;
  • Explanation of Trendfunding provided in Budget 2008 for a new framework for economic development, enhancing education outcomes, expanding First Nations child and family services and for the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan; and
  • funding provided in Budget 2009 for First Nations housing and infrastructure, strengthening economic development in the North and Arctic research infrastructure.

Planned spending over the period from 2009–10 to 2011–12 diminishes mainly because of reductions related to the sunset of targeted funding for:

  • payment to the Quebec Cree to settle implementation issues respecting the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and related litigation;
  • the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan (Budget 2008);
  • the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (Budget 2004); and
  • Budget 2009 initiatives which do not extend beyond 2010–11.

2009–10 Main Estimates and Planned Spending

The 2009–10 Main Estimates for the department are approximately $6.9 billion. In addition, it is expected that adjustments of about $0.4 billion will be included in the 2009–10 Supplementary Estimates, resulting in total planned spending of approximately $7.3 billion.



  ($ millions)
2009–10 Main Estimates 6,934
Adjustments (planned spending not in Main Estimates)* 403
Total Planned Spending 7,337

*Includes: Budget 2008 funding for economic development; Budget 2009 funding for First Nations housing and infrastructure, strengthening economic development in the North and Arctic research infrastructure; funding for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan; funding for the Tsawwassen Final Agreement; and, funding for the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.

Voted and Statutory Items Displayed in the Main Estimates



Vote # or Statutory Item (S) Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording ($ millions)
2008-09
Main Estimates
2009-10
Main Estimates
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
1 Operating expenditures 665.4 937.7
5 Capital expenditures 22.7 44.4
10 Grants and contributions 5,314.9 5,657.9
15 Payments to Canada Post Corporation 27.6 27.6
20 Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and non-Status Indians — Operating expenditures 5.3 9.0
25 Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and non-Status Indians — Contributions 21.4 29.9
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 52.4 61.1
(S) Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development — Salary and car allowance 0.1 0.1
(S) Grants to Aboriginal organizations designated to receive claim settlement payments pursuant to Comprehensive Land Claim Settlement Acts 74.3 65.5
(S) Grant to the Nunatsiavut Government for the implementation of the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement pursuant to the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement Act 18.0 18.0
(S) Liabilities in respect of loan guarantees made to Indians for Housing and Economic Development 2.0 2.0
(S) Payments to comprehensive claim beneficiaries in compensation for resource royalties 1.5 1.5
(S) Indian Annuities Treaty payments 1.4 1.4
(S) Grassy Narrows and Islington Bands Mercury Disability Board
Total budgetary 6,207.0 6,856.1
L30 Loans to native claimants 25.9 47.4
L35 Loans to First Nations in British Columbia for the purpose of supporting their participation in the British Columbia Treaty Commission Process 34.6 30.4
Total non-budgetary 60.5 77.8
Total 6,267.5 6,933.9
Canadian Polar Commission
40 Program expenditures 0.9 0.9
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 0.1 0.1
Total 1.0 1.0

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

 

SECTION II — Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcomes

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Strategic Outcome: The Government

Good governance, effective institutions and co-operative relationships for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners

The Government strategic outcome enables and promotes good governance and effective institutions in First Nations, Inuit and northern communities. First, the outcome helps First Nations, Inuit and northern communities exercise core functions of government. The outcome then supports capable and accountable First Nations, Inuit and northern governments through reform initiatives.

Results under this strategic outcome help Aboriginal people and Northerners participate more fully in Canada’s political, social, and economic development. The results also contribute to the Government of Canada outcomes: strong economic growth, and a diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion.

In addition, federal, provincial and territorial governments, and First Nations and Inuit governments and institutions are able to build a foundation for cooperative relationships through this outcome. Activities undertaken to support this objective include: negotiating land claims and self-government agreements, improving understanding of the Crown and First Nations communities with respect to pre-1975 treaties, and promoting the engagement of stakeholders.



Government of Canada Outcomes A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion

Strong economic growth
Program Activities Governance and Institutions of Government Co-operative Relationships Claims Settlements
Expected Results Capable and accountable governments and institutions Relationships between parties based on trust, respect, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability, rights and dialogue Canada honours its negotiated obligations
Key Strategic Risks Lack of stakeholders’ participation Inability to engage First Nations people, provincial/territorial government and/or other federal departments in the negotiation process Ability to fulfill obligations in a timely manner
Priorities Redesign Indian Government Support Programs

Reforms to leadership selection
Implement the Specific Claims: Justice at Last — Canada’s Specific Claims Action Plan Make settlement payments resulting from the Justice at Last initiative

Implement the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement
Strategies Work with First Nations communities to achieve program and legislative reforms Reduce specific claims backlog

Streamline specific claims settlement process
Fulfill claims settlement and residential school agreement requirements


Program Activity: Governance and Institutions of Government
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
88.0 641.2 88.0 642.2 88.0 647.3

This program activity supports legislative initiatives, programs and policies, and administrative mechanisms that foster and support legitimate, stable, effective, efficient, publicly accountable and culturally relevant First Nations and Inuit governments.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Capable and accountable governments and institutions Percentage of assessed communities with capacity development plans Capacity development plans prepared for 25 percent of communities assessed
Meeting statutory and regulatory obligations under the Indian Act with respect to elections and lawmaking Percentage of by-laws and elections processed within the statutory time frames identified in the Indian Act 100 percent
Governance capacity in First Nations communities and institutions Percentage of First Nations communities under financial intervention Less than 5 percent
Operational Aboriginal and public institutions of government Percentage of funding (as written in the final agreement and implementation plan or contract) to be provided to implementation bodies to carry out their obligations/activities 100 percent of funding provided to implementation bodies

Planning Highlights

For 2009–10, INAC will redesign the Indian Government Support Programs to consolidate and better support modern, democratic, accountable First Nations governments. The department will also pursue reform of leadership selection provisions in partnership with Aboriginal representative organizations. These two initiatives will help First Nations communities implement strong, effective and capable governments at various stages of development.

Benefits to Canadians

Capable and accountable First Nations and Inuit governments, supported by appropriate institutions, are the foundation from which First Nations and Inuit people participate in the Canadian economy. Communities that demonstrate strong attributes of good governance are most likely to attract private sector investment and so become more self-reliant and less dependent on government support.



Program Activity: Co-operative Relationships
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
394.2 270.5 394.2 231.0 394.2 227.7
*Reflects changes in the approved funding profile for the negotiation of specific and comprehensive claims.

This program activity builds co-operative and productive intergovernmental and treaty relationships with members of First Nations communities and Inuit. To this end, the program activity gives Inuit a voice in policy program development; stakeholder engagement; the reconciliation of Aboriginal and other interests through research, assessment, negotiation and implementation of claims and self-government agreements; quest for common understanding of the pre-1975 treaty relationship; and legislative and administrative arrangements that reflect evolving governance capacities and relations.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Relationships between parties based on trust, respect, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability, rights and dialogue Increased percentage of active negotiation tables that are productive, based on the three-point scale assessment tool Establish a target by March 31, 2010
Obligations are honoured as set out in final agreements, to contribute to shared objectives Percentage of obligations met by INAC 100 percent
Inuit have a voice in federal policy and decision making Increased percentage of formal multi-partner processes in areas identified jointly by Inuit people and the federal government 100 percent increase

Planning Highlights

For 2009–10, INAC will continue to implement the Specific Claims: Justice at Last — Canada’s Specific Claims Action Plan. This plan aims to ensure that specific claims are resolved with finality in a faster, fairer and more transparent way. The establishment and operation of the Specific Claims Tribunal will help achieve this goal, as will the implementation of a streamlined process that accelerates the reduction of the specific claims backlog, reaches specific claims settlements and avoids costly litigation for all parties.

To further improve nation-wide co-ordination, monitoring and management of the implementation of Comprehensive Land Claims Agreements, the department will develop a comprehensive management framework. INAC will also work with other government departments, the province of British Columbia and the Tsawwassen First Nation to bring the Tsawwassen Final Agreement into effect on April 3, 2009.

In addition, INAC will implement Canada’s Action Plan on Consultation and Accommodation. This plan sets out a federal approach to increase departments’ awareness and understanding of their legal duty to consult with Aboriginal peoples. The plan encourages Aboriginal groups to participate in an engagement process to help develop policy positions regarding the legal duty to consult.

The Inuit Relations Secretariat continues to serve as a point of contact within the Government of Canada for Inuit. It has established the Interdepartmental Standing Committee on Inuit Priorities and is working alongside federal government departments and agencies to develop common approaches to Inuit issues, and make federal policies and programs that affect Inuit more coherent, relevant and effective. The Standing Committee also identifies and seizes opportunities to leverage existing resources to address Inuit needs and priorities, clarify and strengthen federal, provincial, territorial, and Inuit intergovernmental relations, and further relations with national, regional, international and urban Inuit organizations.

Benefits to Canadians

Co-operative relationships result in more productive claims and self-government negotiations. By helping to achieve settlements, co-operative relationships avoid litigation processes that can be lengthy and costly for all parties. Even more importantly, the settlement of land claims and the finalization of self-government agreements help members of First Nations communities realize their goals of improving their social and economic conditions, and making greater contributions to Canada’s society and economy.



Program Activity: Claims Settlements
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
462.0 828.0 388.0 681.8 328.0 665.2
*Reflects changes in the approved funding profile for the settlement of specific and comprehensive claims as well as a change in the approved cash flow for the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.

This program activity’s objective is to honour obligations and commitments that result from the Indian Residential Schools Agreement as well as land, specific and special claims agreements.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Canada honours its negotiated obligations Claims settlement dollars transferred during the fiscal year in accordance with the Indian Residential Schools Agreement and specific, special and comprehensive claims negotiations 100 percent of planned spending for the fiscal year

Planning Highlights

For 2009–10, the department will focus on reducing the number of outstanding specific claims and providing payments to First Nations communities in accordance with settlement agreements. The implementation of the Justice at Last initiative will guide this process. Furthermore, INAC will monitor the implementation of the Indian Residential School Agreement which will improve the relationship between Aboriginal people and the Government of Canada through a fair resolution of personal and collective damages from the legacy of Indian Residential Schools.

Benefits to Canadians

The settlement of claims provides certainty over ownership of lands and resources, which in turn improves the investment climate in Canada. Settlements also help improve First Nations governance, and social and economic conditions in communities. The resolution of historic grievances reflects Canadians’ desire to see all Canadians treated fairly and equitably.

Strategic Outcome: The People

Individual and family well-being for First Nations and Inuit

People are at the heart of INAC’s business and are central to the outcomes of all departmental programs and activities. Whether in the area of governance, education, social development, managing individual affairs, sustainable land use or economic development, the department helps people improve the quality of their lives. All specific programs under The People strategic outcome are dedicated to achieving a Canada where there is strengthened individual and family well-being for members of First Nations communities and Inuit. Three program activities support The People strategic outcome:

  • Education,
  • Social Development, and
  • Managing Individual Affairs.


Government of Canada Outcome A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Program Activities Education Social Development Managing Individual Affairs
Expected Results First Nations and Inuit achieving comparable educational outcomes to that of the rest of Canada Individuals and their First Nation families are self-sufficient, secure and safe within supportive, sustainable communities Well-managed affairs (e.g. registration, membership, estates, treaty annuities, and band and individual moneys) for Aboriginal people and First Nations families
Key Strategic Risks Lack of information necessary to assess student performance and grade progress

Limited opportunities for First Nations communities and provincial schools to co-ordinate and share expertise
Economic conditions may prevent achievement of target to reduce Income Assistance dependency rate

Increased funding pressures due to the higher rates, needs and costs associated with the number of children in care
Impact to project schedule due to delays external to the department
Priorities Build a foundation for structural reform to improve education outcomes Increase First Nation engagement in Active Measures

Emphasize prevention for the Child and Family Services

Improve the safety and security of reserve residents
Implement the new national Secure Certificate of Indian Status
Strategies Work with First Nations communities to help schools develop success plans, conduct learning assessments, and develop performance measurement systems

Develop tripartite partnerships with First Nations communities and provinces
Strengthen existing partnerships with provinces, other government departments and First Nations to support training and (Active Measures) services to reduce the Income Assistance dependency rate

Collaborate with provinces and First Nations communities to implement additional tripartite enhanced prevention frameworks
Establish a project-governance framework to ensure milestones are achieved


Program Activity: Education
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
163.0 1,705.2 163.0 1,751.5 163.0 1,796.9

This program activity provides members of First Nations communities and Inuit with tools to achieve educational outcomes comparable to those of other Canadians. The Education Program will continue to support and improve the provision of elementary and secondary education services through both a partnership and a student success program. The Education Program will also provide special education services, financial supports for Status Indians and Inuit who participate in post-secondary education, and culturally relevance in education.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
First Nations students achieving comparable educational outcomes to those achieved by students in the provincial system where the reserve is located High school graduation rates by age Increase graduation rates of First Nations students by 2013
Literacy and numeracy levels Literacy and numeracy levels of the members of First Nations communities that participated in standardized testing are benchmarked with provincial system students
First Nations and Inuit learners have improved educational attainment Post-secondary education participation and graduation rates First Nations and Inuit learners graduate from post-secondary education at a rate comparable to their provincial average

Planning Highlights

To improve the educational attainment of members of First Nations communities, INAC will introduce two new programs under the First Nations Education Reform Initiative: the First Nations Student Success Program and the Education Partnerships Program. The goal of the First Nations Student Success Program is to retain students and improve literacy and numeracy levels. To accomplish this goal, the program will empower First Nations participants to help their schools develop and implement success plans, learning assessments and performance measurement systems. The new Education Partnerships Program will strengthen partnerships between participating First Nations communities and provinces to improve educational outcomes in band-operated and provincial schools. INAC will continue to provide post-secondary education (PSE) supports to First Nations and Inuit students. The department is now reviewing its PSE program to ensure it is co-ordinated with other programs which will provide the support that students need in order to stay in school and complete their education.

Benefits to Canadians

Improving the educational attainment of members of First Nations communities is the key to enhancing Aboriginal people’s participation in the labour market and future economic success. First Nations communities, and Canada as a whole, benefit from the social returns of learning, such as individuals’ enhanced self-esteem and sense of well-being, and increased participation in Canadian society.



Program Activity: Social Development
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
34.0 1,458.3 34.0 1,491.1 34.0 1,510.3
*Planned spending in 2009-10 and 2010-11 includes funding for Child and Family Services announced in Budget 2009.

This program activity supports the safety and well-being of Aboriginal people and First Nations families through the delivery of social services on reserves. Social services include support for a wide range of basic and special needs for not only individuals, but also families and whole communities.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Reduce the percentage of Income Assistance recipients Income Assistance dependency rate Reduce the Income Assistance dependency rate by 2 percent by March 31, 2010 and be on track to meet the target of 5 percent in 2013
First Nations families and children have safe, nurturing living environments Proportion of on-reserve children in the care of Child and Family Services agencies who are not in the parental home Reduce the gap between First Nations and provincial rates by 2.5 percent
Safety and security of reserve residents is enhanced Number of family violence shelters Open five new shelters by March 2011

Planning Highlights

This program activity will focus on strengthening the self-sufficiency of individuals and their families through pre-employment training and other programs and services that help eligible Income Assistance recipients enter the workforce. INAC and its provincial, territorial and First Nations partners will continue to renovate social programs to emphasize prevention, active measures and a results-based approach to helping individuals and their families become self-sufficient, secure and safe within supportive, sustainable communities.

Another priority is to support safe, secure and nurturing family environments by reducing the proportion of children who are out of the parental home and in the care of child and family services agencies. To this end, INAC will continue to implement the Enhanced Prevention-Focused Approach across the country, and construct five new on-reserve family violence shelters by 2011. INAC will also continue to improve social programs and services through stronger program management and accountability.

Benefits to Canadians

Members of First Nations communities who feel safe in their environment enjoy a sense of well-being and so are better equipped to participate in and contribute to the Canadian economy and society. Greater inclusion of Aboriginal people in all aspects of Canadian life will enhance and strengthen the diversity of Canadian society.



Program Activity: Managing Individual Affairs
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
107.0 30.2 107.0 21.9 107.0 21.7
*Reflects changes in the approved funding profile for the Certificate of Indian Status Project.

This program activity issues the Certificate of Indian Status and provides other programs and services to Aboriginal people and First Nations communities, including registration and band membership, and the provision of Treaty payments. Under this activity, the department also oversees the creation of new bands and administers individual and band moneys held in trust in the Consolidated Revenue Fund and First Nations estates.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
National implementation of the new Secure Certificate of Indian Status Percentage of operational regional and First Nation application centres 100 percent by March 31, 2010
First Nations and individuals access moneys held in the Consolidated Revenue Fund in accordance with established service standards Percentage of requests disbursed that meet established service standards Increase the current 90 percent compliance with the 120-day service standard to 91 percent
INAC’s role in the estates of deceased on-reserve Indians is discharged in accordance with established service standards Administration of estates in accordance with established service standards The service standard for the appointment of non-departmental administrators is 90 to 120 days. Increase to 91 percent compliance

50 percent of estates opened by a departmental administrator are closed within one year

Planning Highlights

In 2009–10, this program activity will continue to enhance the delivery of its programs and services both at the regional and First Nations level. The department aims to implement a new nation-wide Secure Certificate of Indian Status card that is consistent with national and international standards for document integrity. Other key priorities include regional and First Nations training, the modernization of business tools such as policy manuals and computerized reporting systems, and the continuous improvement of service standards.

Benefits to Canadians

By building the capacity of First Nations communities to manage individual affairs, including registration, band membership, estates and Indian moneys, INAC offers communities opportunities to prepare for self-government. In turn, good governance and accountability increase investor confidence, support economic partnerships and improve living conditions in First Nations communities.

Strategic Outcome: The Land

Sustainable management of lands, resources and environment by First Nations and Inuit

The 2009–10 priorities for The Land strategic outcome are to add land to reserves, manage the changing land base effectively, build the capacity of First Nations communities, and enable economic development. The recent creation of the department’s Lands and Economic Development Branch will facilitate a more co-ordinated and strategic approach to promoting economic opportunities related to the already sizeable, and growing, Aboriginal land base. Moreover, a key element of the new federal framework for Aboriginal economic development, with its “whole-of-government” policy approach, is to integrate INAC’s Land and Economy strategic outcome priorities.



Government of Canada Outcomes Strong economic growth

A clean and healthy environment
Program Activities Clarity of Title to Land and Resources Responsible Federal Stewardship First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment
Expected Results Clarity of title and access to land and resources by First Nations and Inuit Responsible federal stewardship of reserve land, resources and environment First Nations governance over reserve land, resources and environment
Key Strategic Risks Reluctance or inability of various parties to settle on and implement land-related agreements in a timely manner

Lack of information from First Nations communities for INAC to implement claim settlement agreements
Loss of economic development opportunities because INAC’s inadequate HR capacity and capabilities hinder the department from responding effectively to the increasing volume and complexity of innovative approaches of proposed transactions on reserve land INAC’s limited capacity to meet the federal government’s legislated and contractual obligations to First Nations communities

Members of First Nations communities becoming less inclined to vote in favour of assuming full control over the management of reserve land, resources and environment
Priorities Make additions to reserves (ATR) to satisfy obligations under Treaty Land Entitlement agreements in Manitoba and Saskatchewan

Transfer land as a result of the acceleration of specific-claim settlement agreements
Strengthen INAC’s ability to respond effectively to all aspects of proposed transactions on reserve land

Build First Nations land, resource and environmental management capacity under the Indian Act
Improve First Nations communities’ access to the First Nations Land Management (FNLM) regime substantially
Strategies Build and maintain good relationships with external stakeholders

Review the ATR policy and process
Modernize the Indian Lands Registry

Implement the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act, and reintroduce legislation to amend the Indian Oil and Gas Act and modernize its regulations

Implement the Reserve Land and Environment Management Program

Build the capacity of First Nations communities to manage on-reserve emergencies
Generate data for a proper cost-benefit analysis of First Nations communities’ management of land transactions, including cost-distribution strategies

Develop policies for First Nations communities which do not hold a vote within a fixed timeframe or whose vote is unsuccessful


Program Activity: Clarity of Title to Land and Resources
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
33.0 10.9 32.0 7.2 32.0 7.2
*Primarily reflects changes in the approved funding profile for the implementation of treaty land entitlement claims.

This program activity clarifies title to reserve land, adds land to reserves, and implements land transfers under specific and comprehensive claim settlement agreements.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Clarity of title and access to land and resources by First Nations and Inuit Percentage of change in the hectares of land accessible per capita to members of First Nations communities and Inuit through the clarification of title 2.4 percent increase by March 31, 2010

Planning Highlights

The department will continue to work with numerous parties, including members of First Nations communities and Inuit, provincial and municipal governments, and third parties such as businesses and private interests, to settle — often longstanding — disputes over land tenure and use.

Clarification of reserve title requires negotiations that return various historically expropriated or otherwise taken land and resource rights to reserve status. Many of these negotiations concern railway takings and rights of way, particularly in the Prairie Provinces and British Columbia. Work over the next three years will therefore focus on railway takings and rights of way.

This program activity also involves additions to reserves (ATR), which typically occur as part of the implementation of claim settlement agreements with First Nations communities. Over the next three years, the department will continue to implement Treaty Land Entitlement related additions to reserves, particularly in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, while responding to other ATR requirements from across the country. INAC will also plan for the increase in the volume of land to be added to reserves as a result of the acceleration of specific-claim settlements announced by the Prime Minister in June 2007.

Land must be selected, prepared and legally transferred as a result of comprehensive claims settlement agreements. For example, over the next three years in British Columbia, Northern Quebec and north of 60°, work will centre on the transfer of lands when the Final Agreements with the Cree Eeyou Istchee over off-shore rights are completed.

Benefits to Canadians

When longstanding disputes are resolved, efforts can be refocused on First Nations and Inuit community and economic development activities that ultimately benefit all Canadians through job creation, and resource and business development. Clarity of title creates more opportunities for partnerships between private sector investors and Aboriginal communities. Financial institutions and other investors are typically much more willing to take risks when title to land and resources is undisputed.



Program Activity: Responsible Federal Stewardship
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
236.3 76.0 228.8 51.2 222.0 48.9
*Primarily reflects changes in the approved cash flow for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan.

Through this program activity, INAC discharges the Crown’s statutory obligations and fiduciary duties concerning land, resource and environmental management. This activity also supports the development of First Nations governance in all these areas.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Responsible federal stewardship of reserve land, resources and environment Average number of days to register an instrument 10 days from reception at headquarters
Dollar value of moneys collected by Indian Oil and Gas Canada on behalf of First Nations communities $160 Million by March 31, 2010
Linear distance covered by land surveys 275 km by March 31, 2010

Planning Highlights

To meet emerging challenges and opportunities under this program activity, INAC will improve its ability to respond effectively to the increasing volume, complexity and innovativeness of proposed transactions on reserve land. The department will also build First Nations communities’ land, resource and environmental management capacity under the Indian Act. Aboriginal confidence in federal management of land, resources and the environment is expected to increase as a result.

Responsible federal stewardship of reserve lands, resources and environment helps members of First Nations communities realize economic benefits by ensuring that legal interests in reserve lands are clearly defined and recorded. To this end, INAC will complete the modernization of the Indian Lands Registry, improve land surveys, explore options for updating land tenure arrangements on reserves and continue to implement the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act. To encourage First Nations communities to assume greater control over reserve lands by making management decisions on behalf of the Minister, INAC will also work over the planning period to make all members of these communities aware that the Reserve Land and Environment Management Program is an available option.

As well, INAC will focus on modernizing the Indian Oil and Gas Act and Regulations in order to ensure both sound stewardship of these resources and economic benefits for members of First Nations communities.

In the area of environmental management on reserves, INAC will continue to implement its Environmental Stewardship Strategy, particularly with respect to continued remediation of contaminated sites. The department will also increase the capacity of First Nations communities to manage on-reserve emergencies and implement emergency management plans in co-operation with the provinces.

Benefits to Canadians

All Canadians benefit from activities that support responsible federal stewardship, as these activities uphold the honour of the Crown and reduce the number of federal liabilities incurred while managing reserve land, resources and environment.

Aboriginal people are best positioned to improve social and economic conditions in their communities when they have the tools necessary to create a positive climate for private sector investment and realize the economic potential of reserve lands. Financial institutions and other investors are typically more willing to take risks when reserve lands, resources and environment are well managed.



Program Activity: First Nations Governance over Land, Resources and the Environment
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
20.0 25.2 20.0 25.4 20.0 25.4

This program activity focuses on the implementation of the First Nations Land Management (FNLM) regime and the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act (FNOGMMA).


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
First Nations governance over land, resources and the environment Percentage increase in the number of First Nations communities that manage their own reserve land, resources and environment (First Nations Land Management Act) 10 percent by March 31, 2010
Number of First Nations communities operating under the oil and gas provisions of the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act Two by March 31, 2010

Planning Highlights

Under the First Nations Land Management (FNLM) regime, First Nations communities develop land codes and vote on taking over responsibility for the management of their reserve land, resources and environment. INAC’s challenge over the next three years will be to give more First Nations communities the opportunity to opt into the FNLM regime, while maintaining support for current participants. To meet this challenge, INAC will explore new funding model options with its partners, the Lands Advisory Board, the First Nations Land Management Resource Centre and participating First Nations communities.

Under the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act, First Nations communities develop oil and gas codes, enter into enforcement agreements with provinces, and hold community votes on issues related to the assumption of management and control of on-reserve oil and gas resources. By March 31, 2010, three First Nations communities will become the first potential participants to decide whether or not to opt into the Act. INAC will consider applications from up to four more interested First Nations.

Benefits to Canadians

First Nations are no longer governed by the land management sections of the Indian Act or by the Indian Oil and Gas Act. As a result, authorities and liabilities related to land management are transferred from the department to participating First Nations communities. By establishing their own land and oil and gas codes, First Nations communities are no longer constrained by the federal government’s statutory and fiduciary responsibilities and so can seize economic opportunities with the speed and flexibility of the private sector.

Furthermore, financial institutions and other investors are typically much more willing to take risks when members of First Nations communities have governance over their land, resources and environment. Consequently, First Nations and non-Aboriginal communities will both benefit from job creation and resource and business development.

Strategic Outcome: The Economy

Economic well-being and prosperity of First Nations, Inuit and Métis people

Working with public and private sector partners, the department is taking measures to increase Aboriginal participation in the Canadian economy. Through community investment, community infrastructure programming, and individual and community business development, INAC provides funding and other supports to viable and sustainable proposals brought forward by First Nations, Métis and Inuit entrepreneurs, as well as by communities and Aboriginal businesses and financial organizations. As a result, Aboriginal people are more successfully building entrepreneurial capacity and tapping into emerging economic opportunities.

In 2009–10, INAC, in collaboration with other key federal departments and agencies, will put forward a new “whole-of-government” policy approach based on extensive nation-wide discussions with Aboriginal groups and other stakeholders. The new federal framework for Aboriginal economic development will set new strategic policy directions, and aid in identifying federal actions and in developing programming priorities across the federal government appropriate to today’s marketplace and help ensure that Aboriginal Canadians fully share in economic opportunities that support their well-being and prosperity.



Government of Canada Outcome Strong economic growth
Program Activities Individual and Community Business Development Community Investment Community Infrastructure
Expected Results Business ownership by First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities Economic development benefits (e.g. employment and income) for First Nations and Inuit communities First Nations communities have a base of infrastructure that protects the health and safety and enables engagement in the economy
Key Strategic Risks Sustained economic slow-down discourages financial partners from making investments

Results from key pilot projects not available in time to inform an approved Aboriginal Economic Development Framework
Sufficient economic development benefits not realized due to an inability to create and maintain the systems, practices and governance rigour necessary to support redesigned programs Lack of technical and management capacity in government and First Nations communities

Increasing backlog of projects that require funding reduces the ability of the department and First Nations communities to address pressing health and safety needs
Priorities Ensure management practices within Aboriginal Financial Institutions are sound and can enable effective third party delivery of the Aboriginal Business Development Program (ABDP) for small businesses, and increased ABDP focus on medium and large businesses Improve program management and performance measurement capacity

Redesign programs to meet the ongoing and evolving needs of stakeholders
Renew policies and procedures for community infrastructure investments and the construction and management of education facilities

Improve access to safe drinking water within First Nations communities
Strategies Increase investments in medium and large businesses, particularly in the resource and energy sectors Implement updated program guidelines and enhance data collection processes

Undertake program reforms and stakeholder engagement consistent with a new/approved federal framework
Develop performance-based programming to increase technical and management expertise and a new approach to financing and management infrastructure


Program Activity: Individual and Community Business Development
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
88.0 45.6 88.0 45.6 88.0 45.6

This program activity helps aspiring Aboriginal business people overcome barriers to participating in Canada’s economy and sharing in the country’s prosperity. INAC’s Aboriginal Business Development Program (ABDP) supports sustainable business development and a modern business climate. Program activities and funding help individuals and communities access private sector business financing at competitive rates and obtain business information and advice. The program also facilitates private sector partnerships for major business projects and helps Aboriginal owned and controlled financing institutions provide developmental lending and advisory services to Aboriginal businesses.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Business ownership by Aboriginal people, and First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities Business ownership rate 25 percent decrease in the gap between the average of Aboriginal owned businesses and that of businesses not owned by Aboriginals by 2011
Establishment, acquisition and expansion of viable businesses Survival rate of supported businesses after three years 38 percent by March 2010 and 40 percent by March 2011

Planning Highlights

INAC will continue to encourage Aboriginal small-business growth and facilitate access to financing for Aboriginal businesses. The department will also carry on its work with Aboriginal entrepreneurs and Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFIs) to create conditions for long-term economic development. Concurrently, programs will be restructured to deliver business-development programs more effectively.

In addition, the department will keep filling equity gaps, and leveraging investment to promote the creation and expansion of viable businesses owned and controlled by Aboriginal people. INAC’s continued operational support to AFIs will enable these institutions to address the growth needs of Aboriginal small businesses, while a comprehensive third party review will ensure AFIs have the management and operational capacity to provide comprehensive services to Aboriginal clients.

In 2009–10, INAC will focus more on medium and large businesses. Specifically, the department will encourage commercial lenders to work with First Nations businesses on reserves, and team up with Aboriginal, provincial and private sector investors to increase access to major resource and energy business opportunities.

Benefits to Canadians

The current focus on medium and large businesses will ensure all Aboriginal ventures have the opportunity to thrive. To the benefit of all Canadians, new investments will add an estimated $860 million to Canada’s gross domestic product, reduce government transfers and raise federal revenue. In addition, program restructuring efforts will benefit Canadians through a more cost-effective delivery of program services, and the provision of a supportive business environment for Aboriginal people across the country.



Program Activity: Community Investment
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
50.0 172.2 50.0 173.1 50.0 173.1
*Includes Budget 2008 funding for economic development including resources which may be allocated to other government departments or to other program activities.

This program activity enhances communities’ ability to benefit from economic development opportunities. The programs that support this goal include: the Community Economic Opportunities Program, the Aboriginal Workforce Participation Initiative, the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business, the Community Economic Development Program, and the Community Support Services Program.

Together, these programs help communities identify and activate economic potential, resulting in increased community employment, greater use of community controlled land and resources, enhanced community economic infrastructure, more and larger community businesses, more business opportunities, and a better environment for community economic development.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Economic development benefits for First Nations and Inuit communities First Nations and Inuit Community Economic Well-being Index (employment and income sub-indices) 25 percent decrease in the difference between the Well-Being Index of First Nations and Inuit communities, and other Canadian communities by 2011 (measured between 2006 and 2011 Census years)
First Nations and Inuit economic institutions have capacity to support community economic planning Percentage of First Nations and Inuit communities that have developed and implemented, or are implementing, an economic plan Establish a baseline by 2010

Planning Highlights

By improving the access of First Nations and Inuit communities to quality professional support and advisory services over the next three years, community investment programming will continue to help these communities identify and pursue economic opportunities that increase community revenue and employment. As a result, community investment programming will also encourage proactive community economic development planning.

Critical drivers that will impact planning in both the short and long terms include: the expiry of program authorities in 2010, Budget 2008’s commitment to develop a new partnership-based and opportunity-driven economic development framework, and the results of an overall program evaluation. Based on these drivers and additional research and analysis, the department will develop a new integrated suite of program activities to strengthen program governance, enhance performance measurement capacity and address ongoing and evolving client needs. The suite will improve economic benefits for stakeholders as well as the department’s ability to measure and report on program results and outcomes.

Benefits to Canadians

Given their rapidly expanding land, capital and population base, Aboriginal Canadians are poised to end decades of slow economic development within Canada’s mainstream economy. Redesigned community investment programming addresses the critical elements of market forces and opportunity, and helps create the pre-conditions for enterprise and job creation that will enable Aboriginal individuals and communities to achieve greater economic self-reliance. The new suite of programming will establish the conditions, planning and partnership mechanisms by which Aboriginal assets can be unlocked and activated for the good of all Canadians. This renewed programming will enable Aboriginal Canadians both to contribute to and benefit from Canada’s prosperity.



Program Activity: Community Infrastructure
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
110.0 1,327.6 110.0 1,214.1 103.8 959.2
*Primarily reflects changes in the approved funding profile for Budget 2008 (water and wastewater action plan) and Budget 2009 (housing, school construction, water and wastewater projects) which does not extend beyond 2010–11; does not reflect in-year reallocations to address pressures in other program areas.

This program activity helps achieve targeted results through the Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program, and supports the provision of funding to First Nations communities for the construction and maintenance of community facilities. Additional support is provided through the application-based First Nations Infrastructure Fund.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
First Nations communities have a base of infrastructure that protects health and safety and enables engagement in the economy Percentage of First Nations community infrastructure assets on par with generally accepted standards 80 percent by 2011
Percentage of First Nations communities with acceptable water- and wastewater-facility risk ratings (i.e. not high risk) 85 percent of systems will be either low or medium risk by 2010

Planning Highlights

In 2009–10, the department will begin to develop a new approach to financing and managing infrastructure in First Nations communities. The approach will support communities to adopt the asset management and replacement practices used in most Canadian communities.

INAC will maintain support for community infrastructure on reserves and invest an additional $365 million over the next two years in schools and water, as announced in Budget 2009.

INAC will increase technical and management expertise support and improve performance and accountability of the Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program. The department will review the policies and procedures for the construction and management of education facilities to ensure students in First Nations communities have safe, healthy learning environments.

INAC will continue to support concrete improvements in First Nations housing. Budget 2009 provided INAC an additional $150 million over the next two years to address First Nation on-reserve housing. This will assist the transition to market-based housing on reserve and address immediate housing needs while serving as an economic stimulus for many First Nations. The department and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) are conducting a comprehensive evaluation of the government’s support of housing in First Nations communities to inform future policy and program development.

INAC will carry on work with First Nations communities to improve members’ access to safe drinking water through the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan. INAC and Health Canada are engaging First Nations communities, regional First Nations organizations, provinces and territories and other stakeholders in the development of a legislative framework for drinking water and wastewater in First Nations communities. A national engineering assessment of water and wastewater services in all First Nations communities on reserve will begin in 2009.

Benefits to Canadians

INAC must help First Nations communities develop and manage their infrastructure to ensuring a well-planned and well-managed base of community infrastructure assets. With modern facilities, First Nations communities can preserve the health and safety of their members and build successful economies, which will in turn benefit all Canadians.

Strategic Outcome: The North

The people of the North are self-reliant, healthy, skilled and live in prosperous communities

INAC’s Northern Affairs Organization fulfills the federal government’s constitutionally mandated responsibilities in Canada’s three northern territories. The organization carries out this vital role through partnerships with territorial governments, Aboriginal groups, non-Aboriginal Northerners, the private sector and other stakeholders.

As a result of INAC-led program activities, Northerners are enjoying greater prosperity and gaining political authority. Canada’s circumpolar interests are being advanced, the development of the North’s land and resources is proceeding in an environmentally sustainable manner, scientific research is building a knowledge base that supports personal health and sustainable development in the region, and Northerners are gaining tangible benefits which improve the quality of their lives and strengthen their communities.



Government of Canada Outcomes A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion

Healthy Canadians

A clean and healthy environment

Strong economic growth
Program Activities Northern Governance Healthy Northern Communities Northern Land and Resources Northern Economy
Expected Results Devolution of governance for northern land and resources Northerners have access to products, services and information that can enhance the health of their communities Sound stewardship of land and resources Northerners have the resources and support to capitalize on economic development opportunities
Key Strategic Risks The different dynamics and expectations of participating parties may hinder decision making and progress in a multi-phased process Inability to meet increasing demand for food in isolated communities with existing program resources

Increasing effects of climate change
Unimproved regulatory system will impact future economic projects

Insufficient scientific infrastructure and logistics in the North to inform decision making and economic development
Potential for loss of momentum in progress towards results during the renewal of the Strategic Investments in Northern Economic Development (SINED) program
Priorities Achieve milestones in separate, yet parallel, devolution processes in NWT and Nunavut Approve and implement Food Mail Program reforms

Work with Northerners on strategies for understanding and adapting to environmental change
Respond to McCrank recommendations

Increase Arctic science research capabilities
Raise awareness of and interest in the potential of the SINED program
Strategies Continue to discuss and negotiate devolution, while ensuring the inclusion and participation of all stakeholders Address logistical and financial challenges to the Food Mail Program

Promote the study of and remedial action on environmental change
Engage in consultative discussions about the regulatory system

Work toward establishing a Canadian Arctic Research Station
Implement SINED economic development

Implement a new stand-alone agency for northern economic development


Program Activity: Northern Governance
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
29.0 22.0 29.0 17.2 29.0 14.2
*Reflects changes to the approved funding profile to support the Government of Nunavut’s efforts to strengthen its financial management, practices and systems.

This program activity strengthens northern governments by devolving province-like responsibilities for the land and natural resources; adopting effective intergovernmental mechanisms; managing strategic issues; and strengthening domestic and international intergovernmental co-operation on circumpolar issues.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Devolution of governance over northern land and resources Estimated number of years to achieve full devolution for NWT and Nunavut Phase 2 by March 31, 2011
Canadian interests reflected in national and international circumpolar co-operation activities Percentage of Canadian priorities advanced by Arctic Council, and Canada-Russia Arctic Co-operation activities 100 percent by March 31, 2011

Planning Highlights

INAC will continue to help advance the devolution process in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Devolution is a long-term, multi-phased process, with operational and policy challenges. Negotiations concerning the transfer of province-like responsibility for land and resource management will be conducted according to a five-phase process: protocol, Agreement in Principle, final agreement, legislation and implementation. Legislative, policy and programming initiatives, such as strengthening financial management and networking capacity in Nunavut, will also foster the growth of effective and efficient government structures.

In addition, Canadian concerns and priorities pertaining to circumpolar issues will be addressed in domestic and international forums. Working groups will pursue Canadian priorities leading up to the Arctic Council Ministerial Declaration. Canadian interests will be advanced further in the context of bi-lateral activities under the Canada-Russia Arctic Co-operation.

Benefits to Canadians

Responsibility for land and resource management was devolved to the Yukon government in 2003; and devolution towards province-like authority for the Northwest Territories and Nunavut is advancing in a way that respects the needs and concerns of all stakeholders. Canadians will profit from the establishment of the conventions and institutions of northern responsible government, and have the assurance that the North’s land and resources will continue to be managed soundly for all citizens’ benefit. Environmental change in the circumpolar region is increasingly attracting national and international attention. In the area of circumpolar relations, INAC will therefore advance Canada’s national and local interests and articulate a perspective that reflects the needs and values of Northerners and all Canadians.



Program Activity: Healthy Northern Communities
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
14.0 133.2 12.0 143.2 12.0 85.5
*Reflects a change in the approved funding profile for activities and research stemming from the International Polar Year and Budget 2009 funding for Arctic research infrastructure.

This program activity benefits all Northerners by reducing the cost of transporting nutritious, perishable foods and other essential items to isolated northern communities; researching the sources and effects of contaminants on the Arctic food chain; and undertaking initiatives to help residents of the North deal with broad issues such as climate change impacts. Through grants for hospital and physician services, the program activity also supports improvements to the health and well-being of members of First Nations communities and Inuit who live in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Northerners have access to products, services and information that can enhance the health of their communities Percentage reduction of previously identified contaminant levels in the environment and people 5 percent reduction in 1990 levels by March 31, 2014
Perishable and other nutritious foods and other essential items are available in isolated northern communities at reduced prices Estimated reduction in the cost of the nutritious, perishable foods that make up a healthy diet for a family of four as a result of the Food Mail Program $40 (minimum) and $770 (maximum)

Planning Highlights

Various INAC programs will continue to contribute to individual and community health and well-being across the North. The Northern Contaminants Program, for example, will continue to monitor and research the amounts and effects of contaminants in the food chain, and reduce contamination levels within the population and natural environment. INAC will also reimburse the governments of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut for a portion of costs associated with the provision of hospital and physician services to First Nations and Inuit residents. By subsidizing Canada Post transportation costs, the Food Mail Program will continue to help ensure the delivery of nutritious, perishable foods and other essential items to isolated northern communities, as well as provide Northerners with information they need to make sound decisions about their health and well-being. Activities under the International Polar Year will continue to inform Canadians, and Northerners in particular, about climate change impacts, and develop relevant adaptation strategies.

Benefits to Canadians

The Government of Canada is taking action to promote the health and well-being of Northerners, including First Nations and Inuit populations. For its part, the department delivers programs to help identify and monitor environmental changes, offset the costs of essential foodstuffs and hospital and physician services, and provide important information about healthy lifestyles and preventative healthcare to residents of the North. All of these activities reduce healthcare costs.

In addition, all Canadians benefit from International Polar Year activities, which foster greater understanding of challenges in the North, and contribute capacity building resources for northern science. For more information on International Polar Year, refer to the horizontal initiatives table.



Program Activity: Northern Land and Resources
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
285.7 169.8 269.0 71.7 266.0 65.8
*Primarily reflects changes in the approved cash flow for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and for the implementation of adaptation initiatives in support of Canada’s Clean Air Agenda.

This program activity supports the sustainable development of natural resources, including offshore oil and gas development, in the North. It improves the effectiveness of the northern regulatory environment, expands the knowledge base necessary for sound decision making, and emphasizes the importance of environmental management and stewardship, including the clean-up of contaminated sites.

As the federal government entity with legislative and policy authority over most of the North’s natural resources, INAC carries out this program on behalf of all Canadians, and Northerners in particular.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Sound stewardship of land and resources Mineral sector interest in the North 5,700 mineral claims by March 31, 2010
Increase in the number of hectares brought under protection 10 million by March 31, 2010
Contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the environment Number of contaminated sites remediated, and number of sites in steps eight through ten of the 10-step Contaminated Sites Action Plan 11 remediated sites and 30 sites in steps eight through ten by March 31, 2010
Land and resource development for oil and gas Number hectares licensed for oil and gas exploration (based on a five-year moving average) Three million hectares by March 31, 2010

Planning Highlights

As resource sector investment increases, INAC helps ensure the North’s natural resources are developed sustainably and its land protected. The department will identify, study and remediate sites negatively affected by past actions, improving the state of the environment while bringing employment to the North. The development and implementation of an action plan to respond to the McCrank report recommendation will pave the way for an improved regulatory system in the North. Also, the establishment of a Major Projects Management Office for the North will help facilitate future development. Together, these initiatives will ensure that the exploration, use and protection of land and resources in the North proceed effectively and efficiently. The creation of Arctic science infrastructure, in particular a state-of-the-art Canadian Arctic Research Station, will enable Northerners and Canadians to better understand and address the developmental, environmental and sovereignty challenges facing the North.

Benefits to Canadians

All Canadians benefit when resource development is promoted in a manner that profits businesses, strengthens local populations and respects the environment of the North. Resource-based economic development, combined with an effective regulatory system, will bring revenue, employment and community stability to the North. Moreover, by addressing environmental issues such as the risks and opportunities of climate change, the department will ensure the long-term sustainability of northern communities. INAC’s assessment and remediation of polluted sites demonstrates the Government of Canada’s commitment to sound environmental stewardship. The establishment of Arctic science infrastructure will aid economic development, bolster Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic, help protect the environment and raise awareness across the country and around the world about the North’s unique values.



Program Activity: Northern Economy
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
7.8 22.0 5.4 31.7 5.4 31.7
*Primarily reflects changes in Budget 2009 funding profile for Strategic Investments in Northern Economic Development program.

This program activity supports the sustainable growth of the territorial economies through investments in regional-development programming, innovation and research, and advocacy and other activities. The Strategic Investment in Northern Economic Development (SINED) Program contributes funding as well as other forms of support to the development of proposals that aim to strengthen economic drivers, diversify the economy, increase the participation of Northerners in the marketplace and improve the co-ordination of federal programs.

The program works with the territorial governments, Aboriginal organizations and the not-for-profit sector to promote economic development in the North. Additionally, a centre of federal economic expertise in relation to each territory is provided as well as assistance in the coordination of various federal funding sources in relation to particular projects to promote northern development.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Northerners have resources and support to capitalize on economic development opportunities Number of strategic territorial investment plans Three by March 31, 2010
Strategic investments in economic development Percentage of projects progressing on track 100 percent as of March 31, 2010
Strategic investments in innovation and partnerships Percentage of projects progressing on track 100 percent as of March 31, 2010

Planning Highlights

To help build strong, stable territorial economies that contribute to the individual and community well-being of Aboriginal peoples, Northerners and all Canadians, INAC will continue to advocate northern economic development within the federal government. Crucial economic development funding will be allocated to meet the territories’ needs in four categories: building a knowledge base; enhancing the economic infrastructure base; improving capacity; and diversifying economies. The establishment of a new, stand-alone Agency will be instrumental in supporting economic development in the North.

Benefits to Canadians

INAC ensures that economic opportunities generated by northern projects are available to Aboriginal people. All Canadians, however, will benefit from the increased independence and diversification of the expanding territorial economies. By fostering sustainable, collaborative relationships with all stakeholders, INAC supports the region’s growing economy and helps the North fulfill its tremendous potential — an undertaking that serves the interests of Canada and all its citizens.

Strategic Outcome: The Office of the Federal Interlocutor

Improved socio-economic conditions of Métis, Non-Status Indians, and urban Aboriginal people

The Office of the Federal Interlocutor partners with other federal departments, local, provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal representative organizations and community leaders to raise awareness about the circumstances of Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people, and create opportunities for these Aboriginal people to participate in the Canadian economy and society. To this end, the Office strengthens the Government of Canada’s relationship with national Aboriginal organizations that represent Métis, Non-Status Indians (MNSI) and urban Aboriginal people, including the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples and the Métis National Council. The Office also participates in negotiations with these organizations and the provinces, and co-ordinates the Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS).



Government of Canada Outcomes A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion

Income security and employment for Canadians
Program Activities Urban Aboriginal Strategy Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development Métis Rights Management
Expected Results Self-reliant urban Aboriginal people who participate in the economy MNSI organizations that engage with the private sector and all levels of government

MNSI organizations that advocate on behalf of their constituents
Respect for the Aboriginal rights of Métis under section 35
Key Strategic Risks Limited flexibility of certain provinces and municipalities to meet cost-sharing requirements

Limited community capacity prevents the development of a strategic vision and meaningful partnerships
The financial administration capacity of MNSI organizations may deteriorate

MNSI organizations may not be sufficiently accountable to their membership
The Aboriginal rights of the Métis may not be respected or recognized within the federation because of uncertainty regarding their evolving scope and nature
Priorities Ensure communities can achieve program objectives and create joint action plans to address issues early

Co-ordinate INAC’s activities with regional operational plans and the planning processes of communities
Improve accountability for public funding

Develop sound funding eligibility criteria and risk assessment for MNSI organizations
Build intergovernmental relationships and communicate with the provinces about the management of Métis Aboriginal rights
Strategies Make flexible arrangements for financial and in-kind contributions

Invest nearly $2M in capacity building

Facilitate provincial and municipal UAS contributions
Focus MNSI capacity funding on financial management

Adopt targeted auditing procedures and strict application criteria for funding eligibility
Lead practical initiatives, such as joint federal-provincial research projects, to develop a common understanding about approaches to addressing assertions of Métis Aboriginal rights


Program Activity: Urban Aboriginal Strategy
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
34.0 13.3 34.4 13.4 34.4 13.4

This program activity helps respond to the needs of Aboriginal people living in urban centres. It promotes the self-reliance and economic participation of urban Aboriginal people and expands their life choices. Through the Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS), the federal government partners with other governments, community organizations and Aboriginal people to support projects that respond to local priorities. The Strategy enhances the federal government’s ability to align expenditures directed toward urban Aboriginal people in key centres with provincial and municipal programming in a way that both advances federal objectives and responds effectively to local challenges and opportunities.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Economic participation and self-reliance of — and expanded life choices for — Aboriginal people in urban centres Socio-economic conditions of Métis, Non-Status Indians, and urban Aboriginal people Improved socio-economic conditions of Métis, Non-Status Indians, and urban Aboriginal people by 2011, as indicated by income, educational attainment, and employment

Dollars leveraged on a 50:50 basis through relationships with other federal departments and provincial and municipal governments

Planning Highlights

Through capacity building investments in designated cities, the UAS will improve Aboriginal people’s access to learning, training, employment and social supports. The Community Assessment Tool will help INAC identify areas where joint action plans can resolve issues early. UAS projects will focus investments strategically in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families — all areas that will help enhance the social and economic well-being of Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people. Projects undertaken by the UAS will enhance existing relationships, build new partnerships, and make prudent investments that will enable Aboriginal communities to be more self-reliant within strong and vibrant cities across Canada.

The UAS will also better align federal initiatives internally and externally with provincial-municipal initiatives and other activities. As a result, it will be easier to implement regionally responsive strategies that meet federal objectives, address community needs, and raise awareness of urban Aboriginal issues.

Benefits to Canadians

The well-being of entire economies and societies in Canada is inextricably linked to the well-being of the Aboriginal population, given the following demographic realities. In 2006, the number of self-identified Aboriginal people was 1,172,790 — almost 4 percent of Canada’s total population. Of that number, 355,505 people (30.3 percent) are estimated to be Métis and 133,155 people (11.3 percent) Non-Status Indians. Also, it is important to note that 54 percent of Aboriginal people in Canada now live in urban areas, and projections suggest this percentage will continue to rise.

Urban centres offer unique employment and education opportunities for Aboriginal people that are unavailable elsewhere. Consistent with the Government of Canada’s pledge to “ensure that Aboriginal Canadians fully share in economic opportunities, putting particular emphasis on improving education for First Nations in partnership with the provinces and First Nations communities,” the UAS will help urban Aboriginal people take advantage of these opportunities[1]. In so doing, the Strategy will contribute substantially to Canada’s economic growth and prosperity.

[1] Government of Canada, November 2008, Speech from the Throne.



Program Activity: Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
23.0 14.6 23.0 14.6 23.0 14.6

This program activity is carried out by the Office of the Federal Interlocutor, the Government of Canada’s principal point of contact for Métis and Non-Status Indian organizations, and an advocate within government on their key issues. The main mandate of the Office is to support the work of these organizations, and help find practical ways to reduce dependency and improve the self-reliance, and social and economic conditions of Métis, Non-Status Indians and off-reserve Aboriginal people. The Office fulfills this mandate by helping Métis and Non-Status Indian organizations develop their organizational and professional capacity, so that they can build effective partnerships with federal and provincial governments, and the private sector.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
MNSI organizations that engage with the private sector and all levels of government

MNSI organizations that advocate on behalf of their constituents
Percentage of successful audits 60 percent in 2009–10
Submitted and approved work plans and activity reports 60 percent in 2009–10
Percentage of reported results that comply with work plans 60 percent compliance with work plans by the next program evaluation in 2012–13

Planning Highlights

The Office of the Federal Interlocutor provides funding to help eligible MNSI organizations maintain relationships with the federal government at the political level, strengthen membership systems, and improve financial and electoral accountability. To further support sustainable MNSI organizations that represent the main concerns of their members and are accountable for achieving results, the Office will develop sound funding eligibility criteria and related risk assessments. The Office will also audit the financial accountability of recipient MNSI organizations to ensure specific targets are met.

Benefits to Canadians

The present legal and constitutional environment regarding the Aboriginal rights of Métis and Non-Status Indians is unclear, as the outcomes of pending and future court decisions could have significant implications for all levels of government. As a result, it is especially critical to build the capacity of MNSI organizations and form relationships with them based on trust and respect. The Canadian economy will benefit from any partnerships MNSI organizations develop with government and the private sector to improve the socio-economic conditions of Aboriginal people. Also, an enhanced quality of life for the off-reserve Aboriginal population will help strengthen Canada’s reputation as a diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion.



Program Activity: Métis Rights Management
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending* ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
9.0 12.1
*Reflects the current approved funding profile provided for the Effective Management of Métis Aboriginal Rights initiative.

This program activity is the federal response to the 2003 Supreme Court of Canada’s Powley decision, which affirmed that Métis hold section 35 Aboriginal rights under the Canadian Constitution. The program works with non-profit, representative Aboriginal organizations that have substantial Métis memberships to develop objectively verifiable membership systems for Métis members and harvesters in accordance with the Supreme Court’s direction.


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Respect for the Aboriginal rights of Métis under section 35 Identification of Métis harvesters The development of targets relating to the number of harvester membership systems applying objectively verifiable criteria by March 31, 2010
Level of public awareness Creation of baseline data in relation to the public awareness of Métis rights by March 31, 2010

Planning Highlights

In 2009–10, the Office of the Federal Interlocutor will strengthen federal-provincial relationships and improve communications with an aim to develop greater understanding of — and more consistent approach to — Métis rights across the federation. The Office of the Federal Interlocutor will also conduct a trend analysis using INAC’s communications tools and external surveys to examine what progress has been made to balance Métis rights within the federation. Joint federal-provincial research projects into subjects such as traditional harvesting patterns and membership registry systems, for example, will help improve the common understanding of MNSI organizations and federal and provincial governments.

Benefits to Canadians

As noted in the previous Program Activity, the outcomes of pending and future court decisions could have significant implications for all levels of government. It is therefore critical that all governments maintain a relationship with representative MNSI organizations based on trust and respect. Such relationship building will also help reconcile the Aboriginal rights of Métis and Non-Status Indians with Canada’s overall governance structure, and enshrine the rights as fundamental elements of a just, fair and respectful Canadian federation. The ability to manage Métis rights is also important in the context of the Crown’s legal duty to consult, as this obligation relates to rights-bearing Métis communities.


 
Internal Services
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
2,617.4 358.8 2,553.4 367.5 2,553.4 364.0

Internal Services consist of 11 groups of related activities and resources that organizations administer to meet program needs and fulfill corporate obligations. The 11 groups are:

  • Management and oversight services,
  • Communications services,
  • Legal services,
  • Human resources management services,
  • Financial management services,
  • Information management services,
  • Information technology services,
  • Real property services,
  • Materiel services,
  • Acquisition services, and
  • Travel and other administrative services.

Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply to an entire organization and not to activities and resources that are provided to a select number of programs.

Canadian Polar Commission

Strategic Outcome: Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge

The Canadian Polar Commission’s strategic outcome is meant to provide Canada with the wide range of information it needs to develop effective policy and research programs in the polar regions, and so help Canada maintain its position as a leading polar nation. The Commission ensures that adequate polar science infrastructure and logistics are available to Canadian researchers, and that all stakeholders participate in the development of a polar science policy that supports and co-ordinates Canadian polar research. The Canadian polar research community is diverse and dispersed, with small research institutes supporting a broad range of research activities. The Commission co-ordinates research activities to increase efficiency and generate greater exchange of information.


Government of Canada Outcome A clean and healthy environment
Program Activity Research Facilitation and Communication
Expected Results Canada acquires the wide range of information needed to develop effective policy and research programs in the polar regions, and maintain the country’s position as a leading polar nation

Growing awareness and understanding among Canadians of the polar regions, and timely Northern issues such as the environment, sustainable development, sovereignty, social issues and climate change
Key Strategic Risks Inability to fulfill mandate at current funding levels
Priorities Co-ordinate research activities to improve efficiency, generate greater exchange of information, increased economic benefits to Canadians and create healthier polar environments
Strategies Communicate and consult regularly with the wider polar research community in Canada (federal and territorial governments, universities and research institutes, and northern communities and organizations) to keep abreast of current issues, and anticipate and prepare for future ones


Program Activity: Research Facilitation and Communication
Human Resources (FTEs) and Planned Spending ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending FTEs Planned Spending
5 0.8 5 0.8 5 0.8


Key Expected Results Key Performance Indicators Targets
Growing awareness and understanding among Canadians of the polar regions, and timely northern issues such as the environment, sustainable development, sovereignty, social issues and climate change Increased public knowledge of polar science and related issues Four publications
Improved understanding of polar climate change scenarios and the development of polar research programs and projects A commissioned Web site and an up-to-date Canadian Polar Information Network
Co-operation among governments, universities, research institutes, and northern communities on issues of infrastructure, logistics and science policy Better co-ordination within the research community, as well as improved infrastructure, monitoring, and ability to attract the next generation of polar scientists A fully researched and published report on the costs of renewed Arctic and subarctic research infrastructure
Canada acquires the wide range of information needed to develop effective policy and research programs in the polar regions, and maintain its position as a leading polar nation Development of a polar science policy A developed polar science policy by 2012
Co-operation with polar research nations and level of Canadian influence over international polar science An increased level of Canadian influence

Increased co-operation with polar research nations

Planning Highlights

To help maintain Canada’s position as a leading polar nation, the Commission will produce an initial policy discussion paper for the Polar Science Policy. It will also review and assess International Polar Year’s spending and results, and promote awareness of the initiative’s achievements. To improve general public awareness of the state of northern science infrastructure, the Commission will implement the second phase of the Infrastructure Evaluation on health infrastructure. The Commission will collaborate with other countries as well to gain more access to international research infrastructure (including Antarctica) in exchange for access to the Canadian North.

Benefits to Canadians

By acquiring the wide range of information needed to develop effective policy and research programs in the polar regions, Canada can maintain its position as a leading polar nation. The technological advances that result will create a host of economic and development opportunities for Canadians. Moreover, better international collaboration and co-operation in polar research programs and initiatives will lead to a better understanding of polar issues and a cleaner, healthier environment.


Internal Services
Planned Spending ($ millions)
2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
0.2 0.2 0.2

Internal Services consist of 11 groups of related activities and resources that organizations administer to meet program needs and fulfill corporate obligations. The 11 groups are:

  • Management and oversight services,
  • Communications services,
  • Legal services,
  • Human resources management services,
  • Financial management services,
  • Information management services,
  • Information technology services,
  • Real property services,
  • Materiel services,
  • Acquisition services, and
  • Travel and other administrative services.

Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply to an entire organization and not to activities and resources that are provided to a select number of programs.



SECTION III — Supplementary Information

List of Tables

The following tables are located on the Treasury Board Secretariat Web site:

  • Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)
  • Evaluations
  • Green Procurement
  • Internal Audits
  • Loans, Investments and Advances (Non-Budgetary)
  • Sources of Non-Respendable Revenue
  • Summary of Capital Spending by Program Activity
  • Sustainable Development Strategy

Horizontal Initiatives

  • First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan
  • Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program
  • International Polar Year
  • Labrador Innu Comprehensive Healing Strategy
  • Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Contact for Further Information

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Les Terrasses de la Chaudičre
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Quebec
Mailing Address: Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0H4
E-mail: webmaster@ainc-inac.gc.ca

General and Statistical Inquiries, and Publication Distribution
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604
TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554
E-mail: InfoPubs@ainc-inac.gc.ca

Departmental Library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
E-mail: Reference@ainc-inac.gc.ca

Media Inquiries — Communications
Telephone: 819-953-1160

Canadian Polar Commission
Constitution Square
360 Albert Street, Suite 1710
Ottawa, Ontario K1R 7X7
Telephone: 613-943-8605
Toll-free: 1-888-POLAR01 (1-888-765-2701)
E-mail: mail@polarcom.gc.ca
International Polar Year