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ARCHIVED - Annual Report on Official Languages 2010 – 2011


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Message from the President of the Treasury Board

As President of the Treasury Board, I am pleased to table in Parliament this 23rd annual report on official languages for the 2010–11 fiscal year, in accordance with section 48 of the Official Languages Act.

At the midpoint of the implementation of the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008‑2013: Acting for the Future, the government is pursuing its commitment to advance linguistic duality in federal institutions.

The human resources management regime has undergone changes over the preceding year, allowing deputy heads to have flexibility and to be able to exercise stronger leadership in human resources management, particularly in implementing the Official Languages Act in their respective institutions. Deputy heads are primarily responsible for human resources management in their organizations and therefore must ensure that their organizations continue to make efforts to advance linguistic duality in the public service, while making effective use of their resources.

In an environment where the government must exercise sound management of Canadian taxpayers' money, it is important that federal institutions continue their efforts to ensure that members of the public are able to communicate and receive services in the language of their choice, as stipulated in the Official Languages Act and the Official Languages (Communications with and Services to the Public) Regulations. Federal institutions must also continue to work toward creating a work environment that is conducive to the effective use of both official languages. Having a public service that is representative of the population and that strives for excellence and efficiency in delivering services to Canadians involves sound human resources management, including official languages.

More than 40 years after the Official Languages Act came into effect, linguistic duality has become an integral part of our Canadian identity and a distinctive characteristic of the Canadian public service. This report demonstrates that the efforts made by federal institutions, as well as the ongoing leadership provided by them, are just some examples of the progress that has been made so far.

Original signed by

The Honourable Tony Clement,
President of the Treasury Board and Minister for FedNor

Speaker of the Senate

Dear Mr. Speaker,

Pursuant to section 48 of the Official Languages Act, I hereby submit to Parliament, through your good offices, the 23rd annual report on official languages covering the 2010–11 fiscal year.

Sincerely,

Original signed by

The Honourable Tony Clement,
President of the Treasury Board and Minister for FedNor

November 2011

Speaker of the House of Commons

Dear Mr. Speaker,

Pursuant to section 48 of the Official Languages Act, I hereby submit to Parliament, through your good offices, the 23rd annual report on official languages covering the 2010–11 fiscal year.

Sincerely,

Original signed by

The Honourable Tony Clement,
President of the Treasury Board and Minister for FedNor

November 2011