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ARCHIVED - Annual Report on Official Languages 2008 — 2009


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Message from the President of the Treasury Board

As President of the Treasury Board, I am pleased to table in Parliament this 21st annual report on official languages for fiscal year 2008–09, in accordance with section 48 of the Official Languages Act (the Act).

The recent festivities marking the 40th anniversary of the Act provide an opportunity to highlight our accomplishments to date. From 1978 to 2009, the number of bilingual positions in the core public administration more than doubled and the percentage of employees in bilingual positions who meet the language requirements of their position rose from 69.7% to 92.5%.

Nevertheless, it remains crucial for federal institutions to continue their efforts to preserve the achievements of the last 40 years and make progress toward the ideal of true linguistic duality.

With its Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008–2013, the government made an ongoing commitment to pursuing this goal.

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, through the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer's Official Languages Centre of Excellence (the Centre), will continue to coordinate the Official Languages Program in federal institutions that are subject to Parts IV, V and VI of the Act, which deal with services to the public, language of work and the equitable participation of Anglophone and Francophone Canadians in federal institutions.

While federal institutions covered by the Act are responsible for its implementation, a large part of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's job involves helping them integrate official languages into the culture of their organization. The new governance structure announced by the Prime Minister in March 2009, which included the creation of the new Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer within the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, strengthens our capacity in this area.

Linguistic duality remains a key element of our Canadian identity and a distinguishing feature of the public service of Canada. Federal institutions are committed to making linguistic duality an integral part of their everyday operations. This is reflected in the active offer of services in both official languages to members of the public, as the theme of this report illustrates. Federal institutions' efforts to increase their linguistic capacity as well as the best practices described in the report are evidence of this commitment.

The Honourable Stockwell Day, M.P.
President of the Treasury Board

Speaker of the Senate

Dear Mr. Speaker:

Pursuant to section 48 of the Official Languages Act, I hereby submit to Parliament, through your good offices, the 21st annual report on official languages covering the 2008–09 fiscal year.

Sincerely,

The Honourable Stockwell Day, M.P.
President of the Treasury Board

June 2010

Speaker of the House of Commons

Dear Mr. Speaker:

Pursuant to section 48 of the Official Languages Act, I hereby submit to Parliament, through your good offices, the 21st annual report on official languages covering the 2008–09 fiscal year.

Sincerely,

The Honourable Stockwell Day, M.P.
President of the Treasury Board

June 2010