Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Symbol of the Government of Canada

ARCHIVED - Canada's Performance 2009-10: The Government of Canada's Contribution


Warning This page has been archived.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived on the Web is for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It has not been altered or updated after the date of archiving. Web pages that are archived on the Web are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats on the "Contact Us" page.

Social Affairs

Context

The federal government recognizes that contributions to Social Affairs help ensure the health and well-being of Canadians and their families. These contributions include helping to keep Canadians healthy, addressing health care access and quality issues, supporting higher living standards for Canadian families, and creating a safe and secure nation. The health sector is the main focus of federal spending in Social Affairs. Focus areas include protecting and safeguarding the consumers of health services and products, enhancing access to care, and improving health outcomes.

In 2009-10, the Government of Canada took action to strengthen communities across the country through investments in infrastructure, support for families and workers, and steps to make communities safer. Budget 2010 built on these actions by introducing measures to protect Canadian families and communities, support the vulnerable, invest in the health of people living in the North, and encourage participation in sport.

Summary of expenditures

In 2009-10, 58 federal organizations invested $56.3 billion in the area of Social Affairs, which accounted for 21 per cent of total government expenditures. This amount represents an increase of 6.5 per cent from planned spending in this area.

The federal organizations with the largest spending in Social Affairs were:xvii

  • Department of Finance Canada (including the Canada Health Transfer)—$24.9 billion
  • Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and the Canadian Polar Commission—$4.6 billion
  • Health Canada—$3.7 billion

Figure 3.1—Breakdown of Actual Spending in Social Affairs by Outcome Area for Fiscal Year 2009-10

Figure 3.1 - Breakdown of Actual Spending in Social Affairs by Outcome Area for Fiscal Year 2009-10

Figure 3.1 - Text version

Healthy Canadians

Context

Under the outcome area of healthy Canadians, the Government of Canada aims to create effective, accessible, and sustainable ways of keeping Canadians healthy and providing health care. To this end, the government is building Canada's public health capacities, supporting First Nations and Inuit health, helping provinces create efficiencies and improved access to health services, reducing environmental health risks, and investing in applied health research.

Canada's health system operates through the collaboration of all levels of government and various stakeholders across the country. With financial support from the Government of Canada by way of the Canada Health Transfer, the provinces and territories have primary responsibility for health care. The federal government acts as a catalyst in health system innovation and oversees the principles set out in the Canada Health Act, which enables all Canadians to have access to medically necessary services regardless of their ability to pay.

To provide context for government programs, expenditures, and performance, this report tracks key societal indicators of long-term progress. The indicators for healthy Canadians are life expectancy, perceived health, wait times, and patient satisfaction. Overall life expectancy has steadily improved in Canada in the last decade, from 78.5 years in 1997 to 80.7 years in 2007. Wait times for specialized services generally remained stable between 2001 and 2007.

According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), total health spending accounted for 10.1 per cent of Canada's gross domestic product in 2007 compared with an average of 8.9 per cent across OECD countries. Canada's spending on health per person at US$3,895 in 2007 (adjusted for purchasing power parity) was also higher than the OECD average of US$2,984. Per-capita health spending over 1997-2007 grew in real terms by 3.8 per cent in Canada, slightly less than the OECD average of 4.1 per cent.22

Societal Indicator Data Trend
Life expectancy:23

Represents the overall life expectancy at birth.

80.7 years (2007)
80.7 years (2006)
80.2 years (2004)
Increasing
Perceived health:24

Represents the percentage of the population aged 12 and older who reported perceiving their own health as either "excellent" or "very good."

60.5% (2009)
58.9% (2008)
59.6% (2007)
No clear trend
Wait times:25

Represents the self-reported median wait times for specialized services, by type of service, for household population aged 15 and older.

Specialist visit
4.3 weeks (2009)
4.3 weeks (2007)
4.0 weeks (2003)

Non-emergency surgery
4.3 weeks (2009)
4.3 weeks (2007)
4.3 weeks (2003)

Diagnostic tests
2.0 weeks (2009)
3.0 weeks (2007)
3.0 weeks (2003)
No clear trend
Patient satisfaction:26

Represents the percentage of population who were "very satisfied" or "somewhat satisfied" with the way that overall health care services were provided.

85.7% (2007)
85.0% (2005)
85.3% (2003)
No clear trend

Spending analysis

In 2009-10, a total of 11 federal organizations invested $31.4 billion in the outcome area of healthy Canadians. This represents 56 per cent of total spending in Social Affairs and an increase of 4 per cent, or $1.3 billion, over planned spending for 2009-10.

The Canada Health Transfer is the primary federal transfer of health care funds to provinces and territories. In 2009-10, the transfer reached $24.8 billion, representing 79 per cent of federal spending dedicated to ensuring that Canadians lead healthy lives.

After the Department of Finance Canada, the federal organizations with the largest spending in this outcome area were:xviii

  • Health Canada—$3,749 million for the following program activities: First Nations and Inuit health programming and services, sustainable environmental health, pesticide regulation, consumer products, workplace health, substance use and abuse, health products, food and nutrition, the Canadian health system, assisted human reproduction, and international health affairs;

  • Veterans Affairs Canada—$1,132 million for the program activity of veterans health care and re-establishment; and

  • Public Health Agency of Canada—$900 million for the following program activities: health promotion, chronic disease prevention and control, infectious disease prevention and control, and strengthen public health capacity.

Figure 3.2—Distribution of Actual Spending by Federal Organization for Healthy Canadians in 2009-10

Figure 3.2 - Distribution of Actual Spending by Federal Organization for Healthy Canadians in 2009-10

Figure 3.2 - Text version

Federal organizations that contributed to this outcome area in 2009-10 were:

  • Assisted Human Reproduction Canada
  • Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  • Department of Finance Canada
  • Hazardous Materials Information Review Commission Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and the Canadian Polar Commission
  • Patented Medicine Prices Review Board Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Veterans Affairs Canada

Spending trends

Total federal spending dedicated to healthy Canadians increased by $3.4 billion over the last three years, from $28.0 billion in 2007-08 to $31.4 billion in 2009-10. In 2007-08, the amount represented 12.03 per cent of total federal spending, while in 2009-10 it represented 11.45 per cent of total federal spending.

Figure 3.3—Trends in Actual Spending in Healthy Canadians from 2007-08 to 2009-10

Figure 3.3 - Trends in Actual Spending in Healthy Canadians from 2007-08 to 2009-10

Figure 3.3 - Text version

Performance highlights

Protecting youth from tobacco

Amendments to the Tobacco Act in 2009 are ending tobacco marketing practices that have had a noticeable impact on Canada's young people. It is now illegal to use fruit flavourings and additives that add candy-like flavours in cigarettes, little cigars, and wrapping sheets or tubes made of tobacco ("blunt wraps"). Likewise, the retail sale of "kiddy packs" of fewer than 20 little cigars and blunt wraps is no longer permitted. These measures are part of a much broader effort by the Government of Canada and its partners that is helping to reduce the rates of Canadian tobacco use.
Source: Health Canada-Substance Use and Abuse

H1N1 preparedness and response

During the H1N1 pandemic crisis, the Public Health Agency of Canada supported its Chief Public Health Officer and the Minister of Health in leading Canada through the largest national immunization campaign in Canadian history. The measures put in place to ensure a coordinated response to the national health risks posed by H1N1 were cited in the Fourth Report of the Prime Minister's Advisory Committee on the Public Service. The federal public service demonstrated its capacity and ability to adapt quickly to changing conditions.
Source: Public Health Agency of Canada-Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation

Partnering to maximize results

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research regularly collaborates with other organizations in the health field to advance common goals and maximize results. By working closely with others, the Agency was able to leverage the contribution of the Government of Canada toward additional research that improves the health of Canadians. For example, in 2009-10, the Agency responded to the growing numbers of Canadians suffering from Alzheimer's disease by creating an International Collaborative Research Strategy for Alzheimer's Disease. In addition, the France-Quebec-Canada joint funding initiative for Alzheimer's disease was launched in September 2009, and collaborations with the United Kingdom and Germany are in development.
Source: Canadian Institutes of Health Research-National and International Partnerships

Did you know?
In 2009-10, provincial and territorial governments received billions of dollars from the Government of Canada through major transfer programs to assist them in providing universally accessible health care services, post-secondary education, social programs, and other important public services and programs. There are four main transfer programs: the Canada Health Transfer, the Canada Social Transfer, Equalization, and Territorial Formula Financing. Through the Canada Health Transfer, the government provides long-term predictable funding for health care and supports the principles of the Canada Health Act (universality, comprehensiveness, portability, accessibility, public administration, and the prohibitions against user fees and extra billing).

Source: Department of Finance Canada

A safe and secure Canada

Context

Building a safe and secure Canada involves maintaining the security of Canada and its citizens through crime prevention, law enforcement, managing custody and correctional facilities, and keeping Canada's borders secure. It is a goal that complements Canada's international work of maintaining safety and security throughout the world. Federal government responsibilities in this outcome area also involve building capacity to prepare for and respond to security and public health threats and to safely manage nuclear installations.

To provide context for government programs, expenditures, and performance, this report tracks key societal indicators of long-term progress. The indicators for a safe and secure Canada are the crime rate, the crime severity index, personal safety, and major disasters.

The police-reported crime rate dropped significantly over the last decade, from 7,694 offences reported in 1999 to 6,406 in 2009-the lowest level in over 30 years. Not only was there less reported crime in Canada, but it was also less serious in nature. In 2009, the Crime Severity Index, which is a measure of the seriousness of police-reported crime, dropped 4 per cent from 2008. It is now 22% lower than it was in 1999. However, in 2009 just under one third (31%) of all incidents were reported to the police, down from 34% in 2004. In the case of violent crime, 29% of incidents were reported to police while about 36% of household incidents were brought to their attention.27

A safe and secure Canada also involves emergency preparedness, which is a core responsibility of the Government of Canada and a collective responsibility of all federal government institutions. Compounding variables such as climate change, increasing societal interdependencies, and terrorist threats contribute to the major disasters indicator. In 2007, there were relatively few disaster events. In 2009-10, however, the H1N1 influenza pandemic resulted in 8,582 infections and 425 deaths. This demonstrates the high variation in the annual data related to major disasters and why a trend is not applicable. It is nonetheless important to review the data to assist in readiness, preparation, and response.

Societal Indicator Data Trend
Crime rate:28

Indicates the number of Criminal Code offences reported to police, including violent and property crime (excludes traffic violations and the contravention of federal statutes such as drug offences).

Crime rate
(per 100,000 population)
6,406 (2009)
6,588 (2008)
6,862 (2007)
Decreasing
Crime Severity Index:

Is a measure of crime that reflects the relative seriousness of different offences.

Crime Severity Index
87.2 (2009)
90.4 (2008)
94.6 (2007)
Decreasing
Personal safety:29

Represents the percentage of population 15 years of age and older who indicated that they were "somewhat satisfied" or "very satisfied" with personal safety.

Personal Safety
94% (2004)
91% (1999)
Increasing
Major disasters30

Represents the number of injuries, infections, deaths, and evacuations caused by major disasters.

Injuries/infections
8,582 (2009)
57 (2008)
0 (2007

Deaths
427 (2009)
24 (2008)
0 (2007)

Evacuations
24,228 (2009)
16,930 (2008)
4,972 (2007)
NA

Spending analysis

In 2009-10, a total of 23 federal organizations invested $9.6 billion in the outcome area of a safe and secure Canada. This represents 17 per cent of total spending in Social Affairs and a decrease of 12.7 per cent, or $1.4 billion, from planned spending for 2009-10.xix

The federal organizations with the largest investments in this outcome area were:xx

  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police—$3,180 billion for the following program activities: community, contract, and Aboriginal policing; federal and international operations; protective policing services; Canadian Firearms Centre; criminal intelligence operations; technical policing operations; policing support services; and national police services;

  • Correctional Service Canada—$2,265 million for the following program activities: custody, correctional interventions and community supervision; and

  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada—$893 million for the program activity of the Canadian Coast Guard.

Figure 3.4—Distribution of Actual Spending by Federal Organization for a Safe and Secure Canada in 2009-10

Figure 3.4 - Distribution of Actual Spending by Federal Organization for a Safe and Secure Canada in 2009-10

Figure 3.4 - Text version

Federal organizations that contributed to this outcome area in 2009-10 were:

  • Canada Border Services Agency
  • Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
  • Canadian Security Intelligence Service
  • Canadian Space Agency
  • Commission for Public Complaints Against the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  • Correctional Investigator Canada (The)
  • Correctional Service Canada
  • Department of Justice Canada
  • Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
  • Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada
  • National Capital Commission
  • Parole Board of Canada
  • Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner
  • Parks Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Public Prosecution Service of Canada
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  • Transport Canada
  • Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada
  • Transportation Safety Board of Canada

Spending trends

Total federal spending dedicated to a safe and secure Canada increased by $0.6 billion over the last three years, from $9.0 billion in 2007-08 to $9.6 billion in 2009-10. In 2007-08, the amount represented 3.87 per cent of total federal spending, while in 2009-10 it represented 3.50 per cent of total federal spending.

Figure 3.5—Trends in Actual Spending in a Safe and Secure Canada from 2007-08 to 2009-10

Figure 3.5 - Trends in Actual Spending in a Safe and Secure Canada from 2007-08 to 2009-10

Figure 3.5 - Text version

Performance highlights

Leading edge policing and security technology

To keep Canadians and their communities safe and secure in 2009-10, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) demonstrated strong leadership in the development and delivery of police services. Through the Canadian Police Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (CPCMEC), the RCMP continued to combat Internet-facilitated child sexual exploitation by expanding the Child Exploitation Tracking System (CETS). CETS is used at 47 locations across Canada and holds information on over 10,200 investigations. As of March 31, 2010, more than 149 Canadian and international victims were identified by Canadian law enforcement agencies, often in collaboration with the CPCMEC.
Source: Royal Canadian Mounted Police-National Police Services

An operationally ready Coast Guard fleet

Funds provided through Canada's Economic Action Plan ensured the Canadian Coast Guard's continued contribution to the government outcome of a safe and secure Canada through its operationally ready fleet that facilitates Canada's on-water needs and priorities-safety and security, sovereignty, fisheries enforcement, environmental response, science, and other maritime requirements. Projects under the Action Plan included the construction of five 47-foot search-and-rescue lifeboats and three in-shore science vessels, a number of vessel life extensions (VLEs) and refit projects for the 40 large vessels, and the purchase of a number of small craft and environmental response barges. All Action Plan refit activities and VLEs planned for 2009-10 have been completed. Contracts have been awarded for the building of the science vessels and the purchase of 51 of the 60 expected small craft, of which 30 have been delivered. Construction of the lifeboats is underway.
Source: Fisheries and Oceans Canada-Canadian Coast Guard

New tools to fight organized crime

In efforts to address justice system issues, a number of bills were introduced, and several important bills received royal assent during 2009-10. Bill C-14, An Act to Amend the Criminal Code, provides police and justice officials with important new tools in the fight against organized crime. This includes making murders connected to organized crime automatically first-degree and therefore subject to a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment without eligibility for parole for 25 years. Other bills introduced included Bill C-25, legislation that strictly limits the amount of credit granted for time served in custody prior to conviction and sentencing, and Bill S-4, legislation that provides police and justice officials with important new tools in the fight against identity theft, a fast-growing crime throughout North America.
Source: Department of Justice Canada-Justice Policies, Laws and Programs

Enforcement activities help keep Canada safe and secure

In 2009-10, the Canada Border Services Agency made a substantial number of seizures, including 11,580 drug seizures, 460 firearms, and 8,791 prohibited weapons. In addition, the Agency intercepted 10,712 plants and soil products and 17,671 pieces of meat and meat products, animals, and animal products. The Agency also removed 14,775 people who were inadmissible to Canada, 1,858 of whom were criminals. By preventing dangerous goods and people from entering the country, or removing those who have no legal right to remain in Canada, the Agency helps to ensure that Canadians and their communities are safe.
Source: Canada Border Services Agency-Enforcement

Did you know?
On an average day in 2009-10, Correctional Service Canada was responsible for approximately 13,500 federally incarcerated offenders and 8,700 offenders in the community. Over the course of the year, including all admissions and releases, the Agency managed 19,968 incarcerated offenders and 16,702 supervised offenders in the community.

In a recent study by the Conference Board of Canada, the net fiscal benefit of Correctional Service Canada programs is valued at approximately three dollars for every one dollar invested. Correctional programs are seen to save the government and taxpayers money while increasing the safety of Canadians.

Source: Correctional Service Canada

A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion

Context

Government efforts in the outcome area of a diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion include the promotion of bilingualism, social justice, the social engagement of Canadians, the celebration of Canada's diversity and multicultural heritage, and the elimination of racism and discrimination. Spending in this area included support for immigration programs, labour market needs, programs for children and families in First Nations communities, Aboriginal education and social development, official languages policy, and investment in social housing.

To provide context for government programs, expenditures, and performance, this report tracks key societal indicators of long-term progress. The indicators for a diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion are general support for bilingualism, volunteering, political participation, and the urban core housing need. Support for bilingualism has greatly improved over the last 10 years. Data show an increase in support from 57 per cent of Canadians in 2000 to 76 per cent of Canadians in 2006. Volunteering was also important for Canadians. In 2007, almost 12.5 million Canadians, or 46 per cent of the population aged 15 and older, volunteered their time to a group or organization.

Societal Indicator Data Trend
General support for bilingualism:32

Represents the percentage of Canadians in favour of bilingualism for all of Canada.

72% (2006)
56% (2003)
57% (2000)
Increasing
Volunteering:33

Represents the percentage of the population aged 15 and older who volunteered for charitable and non-profit organizations.

46% (2007)
45% (2004)
27% (2000)
Increasing
Political participation:34

Measures the percentage of voter participation in general elections.

58.8% (2008)
64.7% (2006)
60.9% (2004)
No clear trend
Urban core housing need:35

Represents the percentage of urban Canadian households that fell below at least one basic standard (adequacy, suitability, or affordability) and did not have sufficient income to afford alternative, acceptable rental housing in their local market.

12.4% (2007)
13.1% (2006)
13.5% (2005)
Decreasing

Spending analysis

In 2009-10, a total of 8 federal organizations invested $12.2 billion in the outcome area of a diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion. This represents 22 per cent of total spending in Social Affairs and an increase of 34 per cent, or $3.1 billion, over planned spending for 2009-10.xxi

The federal organizations with the largest spending in this outcome area were:xxii

  • Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and the Canadian Polar Commission—$4,472 million for the following program activities: northern governance, governance and institutions of government, cooperative relationships, Métis and Non-Status Indian organizational capacity development, Métis rights management, managing individual affairs, education, and social development;

  • Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation—$2,986 million for the following program activities: research and information dissemination, emergency planning, assisted housing programs, the Affordable Housing Initiative, on-reserve housing programs, and housing repair and improvement programs; and

  • Human Resources and Skills Development Canada—$2,815 million for the program activity of social development.

Figure 3.6—Distribution of Actual Spending by Federal Organization for a Diverse Society That Promotes Linguistic Duality and Social Inclusion in 2009-10

Figure 3.6 - Distribution of Actual Spending by Federal Organization for a Diverse Society That Promotes Linguistic Duality and Social Inclusion in 2009-10

Figure 3.6 - Text version

Federal organizations that contributed to this outcome area in 2009-10 were:

  • Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  • Canadian Heritage
  • Canadian Human Rights Commission
  • Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
  • Citizenship and Immigration Canada
  • Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
  • Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and the Canadian Polar Commission
  • Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Spending trends

Total federal spending dedicated to a diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion increased by $6.3 billion over the last three years, from $5.9 billion in 2007-08 to $12.2 billion in 2009-10. In 2007-08, the amount represented 2.53 per cent of total federal spending, while in 2009-10 it represented 4.45 per cent of total federal spending.

Figure 3.7—Trends in Actual Spending in a Diverse Society that Promotes Linguistic Duality and Social Inclusion from 2007-08 to 2009-10

Figure 3.7 - Trends in Actual Spending in a Diverse Society that Promotes Linguistic Duality and Social Inclusion from 2007-08 to 2009-10

Figure 3.7 - Text version

Performance highlights

Facilitating the integration of newcomers

In 2009-10, Citizenship and Immigration Canada continued to implement its modernized approach to settlement programming and continued to support specific projects that facilitate the integration of newcomers to Canada. For example, the Department developed a standardized language test and undertook a pilot project to provide a single entry point for newcomers seeking language training in Ontario. The Department also initiated a pilot project to give language training vouchers to newcomers in order to increase the uptake of Department-funded language training and test an alternative delivery method. Finally, the Department coordinated activities to recruit, integrate, and retain Francophone newcomers in minority communities.
Source: Citizenship and Immigration Canada-Integration Program

Affordable housing for Canadians

In 2009-10, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation provided ongoing federal funding for its core social housing programs as well as new federal investments in social housing under Canada's Economic Action Plan. Expenditures in social housing totalled $3.0 billion in 2009-10, of which $1.7 billion subsidized 620,000 households in social housing supported by ongoing federal subsidies. Another 18,000 households benefited from the Agency's renovation programs that repair or rehabilitate housing units for Canadians in need, and 3,810 new units were developed under the Affordable Housing Initiative in 2009-10. Seniors, persons with disabilities, First Nation families on reserve as well as families living in the North were among those able to secure federally subsidized housing.
Source: Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation-Assisted Housing Programs, Affordable Housing Initiative, Housing Repair and Improvement Programs, and On-Reserve Housing Programs

Improving First Nation education programs

To help set the foundation for long-term improvements in education, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada funded 37 proposals in 2009¬-10 under the First Nation Student Success Program and the Education Partnerships Program. This represented roughly $30 million in funding. Approximately 72 per cent of First Nation communities participated in the First Nation Student Success Program in its first year of operation, and 73 per cent participated in the Education Partnerships Program, also in its first year. To improve performance measurement, the Department also developed the Education Information System, which will make it possible for First Nations and the Department to access comprehensive information, link performance results to inputs, and allow comparison with provincial systems.
Source: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and the Canadian Polar Commission-Education

Did you know?
Close to 2.5 million young Canadians are learning French or English as a second official language, and 245,000 students are attending schools in the Francophone or Anglophone minority school system of their province or territory. In support of this, $279 million has been provided by the Government of Canada in 2009-10 under bilateral agreements with each province and territory. The amount is funded through the Government of Canada's investment of $1.1 billion to implement the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future to solidify its commitment to enhancing the vitality of Canada's two official languages

Source: Canadian Heritage

A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage

Context

Under the outcome area of a vibrant Canadian culture and heritage, the Government of Canada provides support for a broad range of cultural and heritage initiatives, including funding artists, the arts, and cultural institutions. It also promotes public knowledge of Canadian history and participation in cultural activities and supports the protection of national heritage sites. Canadian cultural and heritage industries play an important role in developing our sense of a unique Canadian identity and our pride in regional differences. This fosters patriotism, enhances Canada's reputation, and improves our quality of life.

To provide context for government programs, expenditures, and performance, this report tracks key societal indicators of long-term progress. The indicator for a vibrant Canadian culture and heritage is participation in cultural and heritage activities. The level of participation in cultural and heritage activities has generally increased from 1998 to 2005. This is particularly true for professional concert and performance attendance.

Societal Indicator Data Trend
Participation in cultural and heritage activities:36

Represents the percentage of population among Canadian individuals aged 15 and older participating in selected cultural activities.

Professional concert / performance attendance
41% (2005)
35% (1998)
Public art gallery and museum visits
26% (2005)
22% (1998)
Movie-going
60% (2005)
59% (1998)
Increasing

Spending analysis

In 2009-10, a total of 23 federal organizations invested $3.2 billion in the outcome area of a vibrant Canadian culture and heritage. This represents 6 per cent of total spending in Social Affairs and an increase of 16 per cent, or $446 million, over planned spending for 2009-10.

The federal organizations with the largest spending in this outcome area were:xxiii

  • Canadian Broadcasting Corporation—$1,140 million for the following program activities: television services, radio services, and the transmission and distribution of programs;

  • Canadian Heritage—$811 million for the following program activities: cultural industries, arts, heritage, and sport; and

  • Parks Canada—$388 million for the following program activities: heritage places establishment, public appreciation and understanding, and visitor experience.

Figure 3.8—Distribution of Actual Spending by Federal Organization for a Vibrant Canadian Culture and Heritage in 2009-10

Figure 3.8 - Distribution of Actual Spending by Federal Organization for a Vibrant Canadian Culture and Heritage in 2009-10

Figure 3.8 - Text version

Federal organizations that contributed to this outcome area in 2009-10 were:

  • Canada Council for the Arts
  • Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal
  • Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
  • Canadian Heritage
  • Canadian Museum for Human Rights
  • Canadian Museum of Civilization
  • Canadian Museum of Nature
  • Canada Science and Technology Museum
  • Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
  • Canadian Space Agency
  • Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada
  • Library and Archives Canada
  • Library of Parliament
  • National Arts Centre Corporation
  • National Battlefields Commission (The)
  • National Capital Commission
  • National Film Board
  • National Gallery of Canada
  • Old Port of Montréal Corporation Inc.
  • Parks Canada
  • Registry of the Specific Claims Tribunal of Canada
  • Telefilm Canada
  • Veterans Affairs Canada

Spending trends

Total federal spending dedicated to a vibrant Canadian culture and heritage increased by $0.2 billion over the last three years, from $3.0 billion in 2007-08 to $3.2 billion in 2009-10. In 2007-08, the amount represented 1.29 per cent of total federal spending, while in 2009-10 it represented 1.17 per cent of total federal spending.

Figure 3.9—Trends in Actual Spending in a Vibrant Canadian Culture and Heritage from 2007-08 to 2009-10

Figure 3.9 - Trends in Actual Spending in a Vibrant Canadian Culture and Heritage from 2007-08 to 2009-10

Figure 3.9 - Text version

Performance highlights

Investing in new digital production technologies

The National Film Board (NFB) continued to provide leadership in the digital challenge of producing and distributing its audiovisual works. Its online screening room (ONF.CA and NFB.CA) generated over 4 million views of NFB films in 2009-10. The launch of the NFB iPhone application in October 2009 enabled over 700,000 views of films on the iPhone and was named one of the 10 best applications of the year by iTunes. The use of new and innovative transmission technologies ensured the accessibility of distinctive Canadian content in both official languages in a globalized digital space.
Source: National Film Board-Distribution Accessibility and Outreach

Establishing and expanding heritage places

In 2009-10, Parks Canada accomplished the expansion of the Nahanni National Park Reserve of Canada, which will protect approximately 91 per cent of the Greater Nahanni Ecosystem in the Deh Cho region of the Northwest Territories. This is an area of over 30,000 square kilometres. In addition, the Agency reached an agreement with the government of Newfoundland and Labrador to take the necessary steps to establish a new national park reserve in the Mealy Mountains area of Labrador. The park reserve encompasses 10,700 square kilometres and will protect a stunning array of boreal ecosystems and wildlife.
Source: Parks Canada-Heritage Places Establishment

New media tools to share traditional messages

For the first time, Veterans Affairs Canada used new media tools to share traditional messages in its support for the Veterans' Week 2009 call to action "How Will You Remember?" The Department introduced a Facebook remembrance page that had over 175,000 fans and posted the Veterans' Week 2009 vignette on YouTube to an audience of over 32,000. The Department also made videos and images available for Canadians to create electronic tributes to veterans, partnered with MuchMusic and MusiquePlus to engage Canadian youth in remembrance, and posted 478 Veterans' Week 2009 activities on its calendar of events, up from 320 activities in 2008.
Source: Veterans Affairs Canada-Canada Remembers

Bringing art and technology together

To ensure better access to its Portrait Gallery Program, Library and Archives Canada collaborated with the Canada Science and Technology Museum in exhibiting close to 100 Yousuf Karsh portraits, which included iconic images of Winston Churchill, Audrey Hepburn, Gratien Gélinas, and Karen Kain. These portraits were drawn from the 350,000 items in the Karsh collection at Library and Archives Canada. The partnership brought together technology (e.g., Web and social media) and works of art and opened up new avenues to reach more Canadians. This kind of innovation and collaboration ensures that the national collection is proudly and prominently displayed across the country.
Source: Library and Archives Canada-Making the Documentary Heritage Known and Accessible for Use

Did you know?
CBC/Radio-Canada is Canada's pre-eminent purveyor of Canadian media content. The Corporation delivers a comprehensive range of radio, television, Internet, and satellite-based services in English, French and eight Aboriginal languages. It also broadcasts internationally in seven languages. Performance highlights for 2009-10 included the continued improvement of its television services. CBC television increased its audience share to 9.3 per cent from 8.6 per cent in 2008-09; Télévision de Radio-Canada attracted about one fifth of Francophone audiences. Radio sustained its outstanding performance, with CBC Radio One matching its all-time high of 11.1 per cent of listeners. The Corporation continued to innovate on new platforms, launching TOU.TV, Canada's largest French-language entertainment Web television site.

Source: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

The Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games

Summary

The Government of Canada is proud to have been a major partner in making the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games37 an outstanding success. From supporting Vancouver's bid for the Games to helping ensure that they were the most sustainable Games ever, many federal organizations worked together in numerous ways to create a lasting legacy for all Canadians.

Successfully hosting an international event of the magnitude of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games is a complex venture. For the Government of Canada, the effort to deliver on its commitment to support high-quality Games that would engage all Canadians and deliver lasting benefits started in 2001, nine years before the opening of the Games in February 2010.

Contributing departments

Public servants from 46 federal departments, agencies, and Crown corporations worked with other government partners, the private sector, international agencies, and the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC) to create opportunities for all Canadians to experience the Games and deliver the quality services that were a big part of the Games' success.

The Government of Canada made the commitment to provide essential services, which included controlling the entry of people and goods into Canada, public security, public health and safety, intellectual property protection, radio spectrum management, and weather forecasting.

For the host country, ensuring that the Games were safe and secure for everyone was perhaps the largest responsibility. Planning for security and delivering the necessary measures to protect the safety of Canadians and visitors involved a coordinated approach that included a large number of federal, provincial, and local government partners, in addition to VANOC and other agencies involved in utilities, telecommunications, and transportation.

The broad partnership that the Government of Canada helped to build was also reflected in the Games' state-of-the-art sport venues, the spectacular ceremonies, the broad-reaching Aboriginal participation program, the cross-country Olympic and Paralympic Torch Relays, and the sophisticated weather forecasting technology.

Shared Outcomes

Final Outcomes:
  • Sport, economic, social and cultural legacies established for the benefit of all Canadians;
  • Canadian excellence and values promoted domestically and internationally; and
  • Canada recognized as a capable and inclusive host.
Intermediate Outcomes:
  • Pan-Canadian engagement in sport, economic, social, and cultural activities related to the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games;
  • Canada's domestic and international profile enhanced; and
  • Safe and high-quality Games for Canadians and international participants.
Immediate Outcomes:
  • The Vancouver 2010 Winter Games leveraged to advance existing federal priorities;
  • Positive exposure and heightened recognition of the Government of Canada as a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games; and
  • Successful delivery of mandated essential federal services.

Financial information

The Federal government's collaboration on the 2010 Winter Games included the signing of a multi-party agreement in 2002 that guaranteed the provision of essential federal services and capital funding for venues and sport legacies. The Government of Canada's total commitment to the Games was approximately $1.25 billion. The list below features some of the major initiatives that received funding:

Table 3-Government of Canada expenditures for the 2010 Winter Olympic Games
Initiatives Actual Spending
($ millions)
Essential federal service delivery (including security) $686.6
Capital investments (venue construction) $290.0
The Vancouver 2010 Paralympic Winter Games $32.0
Legacy investments (endowment fund) $55.0
Opportunities to promote and leverage the Games $135.0
Ensuring bilingual Games (official languages) $7.7
Government of Canada operations $37.0

Major achievements

  • Canadian Olympians won 14 gold medals, the most for any country at a single Olympic Winter Games, and the Canadian team won 26 medals in all, more than Canada has won at any previous Olympic Winter Games. Canadian Paralympians won 10 gold medals and 19 medals overall.
  • "Own the Podium 2010" was a national initiative designed to help Canadian winter athletes win the most number of medals at the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic Games and help Canada place in the top-three nations in the gold-medal count at the Vancouver 2010 Paralympic Winter Games.
  • The Cultural Olympiad provided a unique opportunity to showcase and celebrate Canadian artistic innovation and creativity before a global audience. Canadian artists performed to highly appreciative audiences in a dynamic and creative environment.
  • Canada's First Nations, cultural diversity, and official languages were showcased to promote Canada as an inclusive society that exemplifies the Olympic and Paralympic ideals every day.
  • Record-breaking broadcasting and new media coverage brought the Games to more homes in Canada than ever before. The Games were watched by an estimated 3.5 billion television viewers worldwide.
  • The Government of Canada played an integral role in working closely with VANOC to ensure that both official languages were incorporated into the planning and hosting of the Games. As a result, the Games were bilingual, and Canadians and visitors from around the world were able to experience and enjoy Canada's culture and heritage.

Benefits for Canadians

  • The Government of Canada's investments in public projects as part of its Games commitment will strengthen the economic, social, and cultural foundations of host communities, including Aboriginal communities. These investments supported the construction of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games venues that are now providing Canadians with world-class training facilities and new recreational opportunities. They also draw visitors to Canada from around the world.
  • Hosting the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games provided a unique opportunity for the Government of Canada to further promote Canada and its values to the international community and to stimulate tourism, foreign investment, and trade.
  • The Government of Canada's horizontal, whole-of-government approach has yielded unprecedented benefits. As a result of the extensive collaboration that marked preparations for the Games, federal departments and agencies forged new relationships and found new ways to improve major business processes. These best practices are being used to organize and host other major domestic and international events.

Did you know?
During 2009-10, Library and Archives Canada created a collection of over 300 significant Canadian websites associated with the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Websites were selected according to themes that included official sites, news media, Canadian sports associations, event venues, anti-Olympic sentiment, Aboriginal perspectives, municipal involvements, and green impact studies. With the site owners' permission, the archived content will be made accessible through various search strategies. The content will be stored by Library and Archives Canada for long-term preservation so that Canadians will continue to have access to information about the 2010 Winter Games at their fingertips.

Source: Library and Archives Canada