Directive on Classification

Outlines the requirements for the management of organization and classification, including data and documentation requirements, job evaluation, job descriptions, reclassification, and new positions.

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1. Effective date

1.1 This directive takes effect on July 1st 2015.

1.2 This directive replaces the following:

  • Guidelines on the Evaluation Process (September 14, 2012);
  • Guidelines on Reclassification (May 31, 2004);
  • Guidelines on Work Description Writing (May 31, 2004).

2. Application

2.1 This directive applies to the core public administration as defined in section 11 of the Financial Administration Act, unless excluded through specific acts, regulations or orders-in-council.

2.2 This directive does not apply to positions within the Executive (EX) group.

2.3 This directive does not apply to members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

2.4 The provisions in sections 8.1 and 8.2 relating to the role of the Treasury Board Secretariat in monitoring compliance and directing measures to be taken in response to non-compliance do not apply with respect to the Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages and the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner. The deputy heads of these organizations are solely responsible for monitoring and ensuring compliance with this policy within their organizations, as well as for responding to cases of non-compliance in accordance with any Treasury Board instruments providing principles and guidance on the management of compliance.

3. Context

3.1 This directive is issued pursuant to sections 7 and 11.1 of the Financial Administration Act.

3.2 This directive supports the Policy on Classification by providing direction to deputy heads and their sub-delegated employees in the sound exercise of classification authority and management of classification activities within their organization.

3.3 The Classification Program establishes the principles for the sound organization and measurement of work in the CPA and provides a basis for employee compensation.

3.4 The Treasury Board authorises deputy heads to classify positions in their organizations conditional on the requirements set out in the Policy on Classification and this directive.

3.5 Deputy heads may sub-delegate their classification authority to employees (managers trained in classification or accredited human resources advisors) in their organizations, in accordance with the requirements set out in the Policy on Classification and this directive.

3.6 Additional mandatory requirements are set out in the following documents:

  • Directive on Classification Grievances;
  • Directive on Classification Oversight;
  • Guide to Allocating Positions Using the 1999 Occupational Group Definitions;
  • Job Evaluation Standards (Classification Standards);
  • Occupational Group Definitions;
  • Policy on Classification; and
  • Table of Concordance.

4. Definitions

4.1 Definitions to be used in the interpretation of this directive can be found in Appendix A of the Policy on Classification.

5. Directive statement

5.1 Objective

This directive:

5.1.1 Supports the equitable, consistent and effective establishment of the relative value of work in the CPA and ensure that jobs are classified appropriately, in accordance with the relevant job evaluation standards (classification standards); and

5.1.2 Supports the sound management of classification activities in organizations across the CPA.

5.2 Expected results

5.2.1 Classification sub-delegation is properly exercised, in accordance with the requirements set out in the Policy on Classification and this directive.

5.2.2 Classification decisions are sound and classification activities are well managed; they comply with the requirements set out in the Policy on Classification and this directive.

5.2.3 Classification decisions are fully documented; documentation and data are complete and accurate. They are retained appropriately in human resources information management systems and classification files.

6. Requirements

Requirements specific to the following are set out in the related appendices to this directive:

  1. Job validation reviews;
  2. Control of vacant positions;
  3. Classification documentation and data management requirements;
  4. Effective dates and retroactivity of classification decisions;
  5. Classification relativity;
  6. Classification disagreements and impasses;
  7. Job evaluation;
  8. Job descriptions;
  9. Reclassification and new positions; and
  10. Deputy head directed decisions.

6.1. Employees with sub-delegated classification authority are responsible for

6.1.1 Exercising their sub-delegated classification authority in accordance with the Policy on Classification and related instruments including this directive.

6.2. Managers are responsible for

6.2.1 Ensuring that efficient and cost effective organizational structures support the mandate and business requirements of the organization;

6.2.2 Ensuring that job descriptions reflect the work assigned and performed by their employees within the organizational structure, that they are updated when the work changes significantly, that they have reasonable and evidence based effective dates, and that job descriptions and organizational charts are approved and dated prior to the job evaluation;

6.2.3 Implementing appropriate standardized job descriptions, wherever possible; and

6.2.4 Providing any additional supporting information to the evaluating accredited human resources (HR) advisors / job evaluation committees upon request.

6.3 Heads of Human Resources are responsible for

6.3.1 Ensuring that positions within the organization are classified in accordance with the Policy on Classification and related instruments, the occupational group definitions, the appropriate job evaluation standards and related application guidelines;

6.3.2 Ensuring that employees to whom classification authority is sub-delegated are trained in accordance with the Organization and Classification Learning Curriculum;

6.3.3 Ensuring that managers have access to an accredited HR advisor for advice;

6.3.4 Implementing inter-departmental standardized job descriptions wherever possible and ensuring that they are applied appropriately within the intended organizational context;

6.3.5 Establishing processes:

  1. for the development and implementation, wherever possible, of standardized job descriptions for jobs exclusive to the organization;
  2. to ensure that unique job descriptions are used on an exceptional basis;
  3. for the resolution of impasses and disagreements in classification decision;
  4. for the consideration, authorization and tracking of classification decisions authorized directly by the deputy head; and
  5. to track all classification decisions that are not to be used for internal and external relativity;

6.3.6 Ensuring prompt, accurate and complete documenting of classification decisions i.e. input to classification files (electronic or paper versions), departmental human resources information management systems and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's information management systems including the Position Classification Information System and the Classification Grievance Tracking System.

6.4 The Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer is responsible for

6.4.1 Developing and maintaining the CPA-wide Classification Program including the occupational group structure, policies and related instruments, classification grievance procedures and requirements, job evaluation standards, tools, learning and oversight;

6.4.2 Providing advice, interpretation and direction to organizations; and

6.4.3 Defining the format of job descriptions; establishing or validating the classification of standardized job descriptions and other related requirements that will be applied across the CPA.

7. Monitoring and reporting requirements

7.1 Government-wide

The Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer is responsible for

7.1.1 Reviewing this directive and its effectiveness at the five-year mark of its implementation.

8. Consequences

8.1 In cases of non-compliance with the Policy on Classification and related instruments, the Chief Human Resources Officer may direct deputy heads to take appropriate corrective actions to address issues or may impose any other measures deemed appropriate.

8.2 These measures may include recommendations by the Chief Human Resources Officer to the Treasury Board to add conditions to, modify or revoke the classification authority of deputy heads. A range of consequences of non-compliance can be found in the Directive on Classification Oversight.

9. References

9.1 Related policy Instruments and publications

  • Canadian Human Rights Act;
  • Organization and Classification Learning Curriculum;
  • Policy on Official Languages;
  • Public Service Employment Act;
  • Public Service Labour Relations Act;
  • Public Service Labour Relations Board Regulations; and
  • Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector.

10. Enquiries

Please direct enquiries about this directive to your departmental corporate human resources office. For advice about the application of this directive, departmental corporate human resources representatives should contact:

Workforce Organization & Classification
Compensation and Labour Relations Sector
Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer
Treasury Board Secretariat


Appendix A - Job Validation Reviews

Job validation reviews (also referred to as “on-site” reviews) are performed by HR advisors through interviews with employees and in consultation with their managers for the purposes of:

  • confirming that there is coincidence between the duties described in the job description and the duties performed by the employee;
  • obtaining additional information about the work and organizational context to assist with job evaluation and classification activities.

Requirements

  1. Job validation reviews are required when a reclassification is being proposed.
  2. Job validation reviews may also be conducted when:
    1. a classification grievance has been submitted;
    2. a better understanding of the job is required;
    3. monitoring activities occur, namely to confirm the appropriate application of standardized job descriptions;
    4. the classification of a position involves contentious issues; and
    5. a cyclical review occurs.
  3. When a job validation review is conducted, the draft job validation report is provided to the manager and to the employee(s) who have been interviewed for comments. The comments obtained are included in, or appended to, the report. In the absence of comments, the report will indicate that the opportunity to comment was provided.
  4. The final job validation report is signed and dated by the human resources advisor and placed on the classification file.
  5. Noted issues including lack of coincidence, missing duties or poorly described work are discussed with the manager and corrective action, such as revising the job description or applying an alternate job description, is undertaken as required.

Note

A sample of encumbered positions may be used when performing job validation reviews where standardized job descriptions are being used.

Appendix B - Control of Vacant Positions

The abolishment of vacant positions contributes to:

  • Maintain the integrity of the Classification Program by ensuring that positions reflect the organization's resource allocation;
  • the currency and accuracy of organizational charts and
  • the integrity of interdepartmental Position and Classification Information System data, which is used for various purposes including classification relativity studies.

Requirements

  1. Organizations manage their vacant positions through regular reviews.
  2. The number of vacant positions (including inactive positions) is kept to a minimum at all times.
  3. Positions that have been vacant for over two years are reviewed for continued relevancy.
  4. Positions that have been vacant for five years or longer are deleted.
  5. When abolishing vacant positions, the organizational structures are reviewed to assess impacts on subordinate and supervisory positions.

Note

Typically, vacant positions should represent no more than 10% to 15% of an organization's total population. This includes banks of vacant positions maintained for the purpose of developmental programs or ongoing temporary needs, such as seasonal recruitment.

Appendix C - Classification Documentation and Data Management Requirements

Complete and accurate classification documentation and information contained in the departmental classification files, human resources information management systems and the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer ’s information management systems, including the interdepartmental Position and Classification Information System (PCIS) contributes to:

  • accountability and transparency of departmental classification programs because it records the basis upon which classification decisions have been made; and
  • efficient conduct of various classification activities including relativity studies, auditing and monitoring.

Requirements

  1. For each classification action, the following documents are required on the classification file (electronic or paper):
    1. Job description
      • describing the duties and responsibilities of the position;
      • signed and dated by the manager; and
      • indicating the effective date.
    2. Organization chart
      • depicting the organizational location of the position and its relationship to the other positions in the same unit or division; and
      • signed and dated by the manager.
    3. Classification action form (“Electronic Position Action Report”)
      • signed by an accredited HR advisor with sub-delegated classification authority or a manager with sub-delegated classification authority.
    4. Classification evaluation rationale for the classification decision
      • substantiating the occupational group and level of the position and reflecting benchmark comparisons; and
      • signed by all the committee members, if a committee was used to classify the job or by an accredited HR advisor, if a committee was not used.
    5. Analysis and summary of the relevant departmental and interdepartmental classification relativity.
    6. Job validation report, if a job validation review was conducted.
    7. Statement from the manager summarizing the evolution of the work when a reclassification is being proposed.
    8. For a reclassification, information that substantiates the selection of the effective date.
    9. Any other data, reports or information that substantiate the classification decision.
    10. National Occupational Classification code.
    11. When a standardized job description is applied, information that substantiates the decision to apply that particular job description such as an e-mail or notation on the human resources request from the manager.
  2. For each classification decision, organizations must ensure the completeness and accuracy of:
    1. classification file documentation;
    2. data entered in the departmental human resources information management system ; and
    3. data transferred to the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer information management systems, including but not limited to Position and Classification Information System.
  3. Classification evaluation data is entered in the departmental human resources management system to facilitate data upload to PCIS on a monthly basis.
  4. The Disclosure of Position Reclassification is posted on the departmental web site on a quarterly basis.

Note

In the case of standardized job description records where more than one position has identical duties and responsibilities, classification records may consist of a complete set for one of the positions (i.e. a master file), to which the remainder are cross-referenced.

Appendix D - Effective Dates and Retroactivity of Classification Decisions

Effective dates establish when the work described in the job description has officially been assigned to a position.

Managers are responsible for establishing the effective date, which must be reasonable and evidence-based.

Requirements

  1. The effective date of the duties described in the job description is confirmed prior to issuing the classification decision.
  2. When a reclassification is proposed, a reasonable and evidence-based effective date will be established taking into consideration the following:
    1. when all or parts of the work were added;
    2. when all or parts of the work were added at the same time; and
    3. the parts of the work that made the difference in group allocation and/or level.
  3. Information that validates the selection of the effective date for a reclassification is placed on the classification file.
  4. If a position is new or when an existing position is updated / reviewed and there is no change in duties, the effective date reflects the point at which the job has been officially classified.
  5. The effective date of a new position may be retroactive if:
    1. the new position is being created to compensate an employee retroactively for work performed;
    2. the new position is being created as a result of an upheld grievance.
  6. Departmental classification programs should include direction on the level of approval and approval process required for effective dates carrying a long retroactivity period (i.e. 6 months or more).

Notes

In the case of a reclassification, employees may be entitled to retroactive pay for the period during which they have been performing all aspects of the newly assigned work. As a best practice, when a reclassification is being proposed, the manager is encouraged to discuss the effective date with the HR advisor and employee(s) prior to the classification evaluation.

Appendix E - Classification Relativity

Classification relativity analysis is used in the job evaluation process. It involves the comparison of jobs within the organization (i.e. internal or departmental relativity) and – where relevant – with similar jobs, in similar organizational contexts, in other organizations (i.e. external or interdepartmental relativity) to ensure a consistent application of job evaluation standards and the appropriateness of classification decisions within the organization and across the CPA.

Although the application of occupational group definitions, inclusion and exclusion statements, job evaluation standards and related benchmarks take precedence over a relativity analysis, this analysis is valuable in ensuring that similar jobs, in similar organizational contexts and environments produce consistent classification evaluation results.

Requirements

  1. When a job evaluation occurs, a classification relativity analysis is conducted.
  2. When a classification relativity analysis is conducted:
    1. the organizational context within which the work is performed is taken into consideration when comparing job descriptions and evaluation results in different organizations; and
    2. a brief analysis and summary of the relevant departmental and interdepartmental relativity is placed on the classification file of the position being evaluated.
  3. To ensure the maintenance of appropriate departmental and interdepartmental classification relativities:
    1. organizations consult with the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer prior to authorizing any classification decisions that may have a significant impact on interdepartmental relativity or result in a significant increase of salary expenditures;
    2. standardized job descriptions are used wherever possible as they are supportive of relativity when appropriately applied (e.g. in the intended organizational context) and unique job descriptions are used on an exceptional basis;
    3. job descriptions, including standardized job descriptions, developed in other organizations are evaluated within the new organizational context before they are implemented in a new organization;
    4. classification anomalies are not replicated;
    5. information and documentation, such as job descriptions, organizational charts and rationales, are shared among organizations for the purpose of relativity analysis;
    6. classification data is complete and accurate in the departmental human resources information management systems and monthly updates are made to the interdepartmental Position and Classification Information System ; and
    7. National Occupational Classification codes are assigned to jobs whenever classification evaluations occur and are entered into the departmental human resources information management system for subsequent transfer to the Position and Classification Information System.

Appendix F - Classification Disagreements and Impasses

In the event of a disagreement about a classification evaluation or when a job evaluation committee reaches an impasse and is unable to come to a consensus, resolution is sought through a departmental process.

Requirements

  1. A process is in place in the organization to resolve classification disagreements and impasses where consensus is not achieved between or among HR advisors, classification committees and/or managers.
  2. Upon request, all relevant information pertaining to the classification decision is provided to the manager by the accredited HR advisor to ensure mutual understanding of all issues affecting the decision.

Note

The resolution process may include referral to a senior departmental officer with classification authority, an HR advisor or a job evaluation committee (departmental or interdepartmental) not involved in the original classification evaluation.

As a best practice, informal discussions between accredited HR advisors and managers take place before a classification decision is made or escalating the matter.

Appendix G - Job Evaluation

Job evaluation (classification evaluation) is the process of assessing the relative worth of jobs within an organization. Ultimately, it establishes a hierarchy of jobs within the organization.

The job evaluation process is the same regardless whether there is a job evaluation committee or a single evaluator.

Job evaluation committees contribute to sound classification decisions by:

  1. reducing personal biases about the work. The requirement for all parties to reach consensus ensures that all information is shared and clarification is sought when required;
  2. bringing greater knowledge about the work, the organizational context and relativities to the job evaluation process. Such insight may not be available if a single evaluator is used;
  3. supporting transparency in the evaluation process; and
  4. promoting gender neutrality in classification decisions by having men and women participating in the evaluation process.

Organizations must ensure that all classification decisions are arrived at in a transparent, equitable and consistent manner, and that these decisions are appropriate and supportable.

Requirements

  1. A job evaluation committee is required when:
    1. the evaluation outcome may have a significant impact on departmental and interdepartmental relativity or result in a significant increase of salary expenditures;
    2. there is the likelihood of a reclassification;
    3. the evaluation outcome may be precedent setting;
    4. the job description applies to several positions;
    5. the position to be evaluated is contentious and the need for credibility and transparency is paramount;
    6. a new organizational structure with the potential to set new or impact existing relativities is being implemented; and
    7. a new occupational group is introduced in the organization.
  2. Job evaluators/job evaluation committees must ensure that they have complete and comprehensive information and documentation about the job or the position to be evaluated, including:
    1. a current, signed and dated organization chart that accurately reflects the organizational location of the position and its relationship to other positions in the same unit or division;
    2. a signed and dated job description that reflects the work assigned and performed/to be performed;
    3. information supporting the chosen effective date;
    4. classification relativity analysis;
    5. any additional information that may assist in evaluating the job/position, e.g. project descriptions, legislation, etc.
  3. Any additional information obtained during the job evaluation process is documented on the classification file.
  4. Job descriptions and standardized job descriptions developed in other organizations are evaluated within the new organizational context before they are implemented in a new organization.
  5. The use of an interdepartmental job evaluation committee is recommended when:
    1. the classification decision relates to positions found in many or most organizations and may be precedent setting for the CPA;
    2. interdepartmental relativity concerns are at issue; and
    3. an organization does not have a sufficient pool of trained committee members with the particular expertise required for the purpose of objective deliberations.
  6. A job evaluation committee is normally composed of:
    1. three members, comprising;
    2. an accredited HR advisor;
    3. at least one trained manager;
    4. a member with the required level of sub-delegated classification authority to authorize the resulting classification decision (manager or accredited HR advisor); and
    5. both men and women.
  7. As a whole, job evaluation committee members should be knowledgeable about:
    1. the relevant job evaluation standard;
    2. the work being evaluated; and
    3. the organization in which the work is performed.
  8. Job evaluation committee members and single job evaluators:
    1. are trained in job evaluation, as per the Organization and Classification Learning Curriculum requirements;
    2. are not in a conflict of interest situation i.e. they should not be in a position to benefit, either personally or operationally, from the results of the evaluation;
    3. understand classification including the job evaluation standards and the process of allocating positions to occupational groups, including the use of the Table of Concordance and the Guide to Allocating Positions Using the 1999 Occupational Group Definitions;
    4. apply the job evaluation standards consistently and appropriately in accordance with classification policy instruments;
    5. are aware and free of personal biases and do not make assumptions about the work being evaluated – namely, principles of consistency and gender neutrality are respected;
    6. do not substitute their own knowledge for that of the manager, the employee in the position or the information provided in the job description; and
    7. do not make assumptions about the work or current hierarchical relationships as it introduces bias into the evaluation process.
  9. When a job evaluation committee is used, the following steps are followed to ensure that the committee operates effectively and efficiently:
    1. prior to the job evaluation committee, the committee chair reviews the job description to ensure that it contains all the relevant information and is accompanied by a complete and current organizational chart and other supporting documentation required per the job evaluation standard;
    2. the committee chair provides each committee member with the complete and relevant classification documentation prior to the job evaluation committee convening;
    3. each committee member first evaluates the job description independently, in preparation for the committee;
    4. the sponsoring manager provides information and answers questions from the committee as required;
    5. the committee chair (accredited HR advisor or HR advisor trainee under the guidance of an accredited HR advisor) provides additional information as applicable and technical expertise on the application of the job evaluation standard;
    6. once all the necessary information has been collected and supporting documentation provided, the committee members review the job description and allocate it to an occupational group and sub-group (if applicable), referring to the Table of Concordance;
    7. the appropriateness of the occupational group allocation within the organizational structure and organization's mandate is analyzed;
    8. once the work has been allocated to an occupational group, and sub-group if applicable, the subsequent steps to be followed are those detailed in the appropriate job evaluation standard;
    9. the internal and external classification relativity of similar positions is analyzed and considered;
    10. the final decision is arrived at by consensus rather than through voting or majority rule. The evaluation process is a search for the most appropriate rating; the committee makes every effort to resolve differences and reach an agreement on the rating; and
    11. if a consensus cannot be reached, the classification impasse is settled using the departmental process.
  10. Organizations consult with the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer prior to authorizing any classification decisions that may have a significant impact on interdepartmental relativity or result in a significant increase of salary expenditures

Note

Personal performance (unless an employee-oriented evaluation plan is being used), recruiting difficulties, salaries, or the present classification (group or level) of the position are not to be considered in the evaluation process. Making assumptions about the work or current hierarchical relationships introduces bias about its value into the evaluation process.

As a best practice, accredited HR advisors should provide a quality review of the job description prior to the job evaluation to ensure that all relevant information is adequately captured.

Percentage of time is not a reliable indicator in determining the primary purpose of the job.

Appendix H - Job Descriptions

The CPA classification program is position-based. The work assigned to individual positions is described in a job description and evaluated by applying the occupational group and sub-group definitions and the appropriate job evaluation standard. The resulting occupational group, sub-group (if applicable), and level provide a basis for the compensation of employees in the CPA.

Poorly described work can result in erroneous classification decisions which, in turn, may cause employee dissatisfaction, recruitment and retention difficulties, and grievances. Furthermore, if a job description is under-classified, it might adversely affect employees' career advancement. If a job description is over-classified, it will lead to inefficient use of salary dollars and could potentially create an inappropriate precedent for reclassification of similar jobs.

It is important to maintain the currency and accuracy of job descriptions, particularly as the work changes or new work is assigned.

Requirements

  1. Organizations must ensure that:
    1. job descriptions are reviewed within a reasonable time frame (preferably in five (5) year cycles) and as soon as possible when significant changes in the work occur or when new work is assigned;
    2. standardized job descriptions are developed and implemented wherever possible for jobs exclusive to the organization;
    3. interdepartmental standardized job descriptions are implemented wherever possible and are applied appropriately, including application within the intended organizational context and environment; and
    4. unique job descriptions are used on an exceptional basis.
  2. Managers must ensure that:
    1. they design organizational structures that support the mandate and business requirements of the organization, are efficient and cost effective;
    2. job descriptions in their area of responsibility reflect the work assigned and performed by their employees, are updated as the work changes or new work is assigned and have reasonable and evidence-based effective dates;
    3. they use standardized job descriptions wherever possible; and
    4. they consult with accredited HR advisors as required to obtain advice on organizational design, the content and format of job descriptions, the application of job descriptions and standardized job descriptions within their organizational context, and the establishment of reasonable and evidence-based effective dates
  3. A job description must have the following characteristics:
    1. it includes the following identifying information (tombstone information) i.e.:
      • position number and title;
      • authorized group and level;
      • National Occupational Classification code;
      • effective date;
      • organization;
      • branch/division;
      • location;
      • job/standardized job description number;
      • language, security and communication requirements;
      • supervisor's position number, group and level.
    2. it contains :
      • a statement summarizing the products or services or a combination of the two that the position delivers in order to determine the primary purpose of the work (client service results);
      • the primary duties (key activities) that must be performed to deliver the client service results;
      • a description of all significant aspects of the work assigned to the job (body of the job description) outlined in the key activities in relation to the four criteria identified in section 11 (2) of the Canadian Human Rights Act (i.e. Skills, Effort, Responsibility and Working Conditions);
    3. it is written concisely and, preferably, is no longer than 3 pages;
    4. a reader can identify the work being done from the job description alone and it is not necessary to write additional fact sheets of information describing the duties;
    5. the work described is appropriate to the organizational context including mandate and supervisor/subordinate reporting relationships;
    6. the language is bias-free and describes with equal complexity the work done by women and men; and
    7. it does not feature the percentage of time because it is not a reliable indicator of the primary purpose of the job.
  4. When a standardized job description is used, it must have the following characteristics:
    1. it can be applied in the intended organizational context;
    2. it can be applied to more than one position all of which are classified at the same occupational group, sub-group (if applicable) and level; and
    3. the nature of any work not explicitly described in the selected job description would not be significant enough to make a difference in the ratings, occupational group, sub-group (if applicable) or level.
  5. If the job description does not accurately describe the work performed (i.e. an aspect of the work described therein is not expected to be performed and is significant enough to make a difference in the ratings, occupational group, sub-group, or level) the job description is updated accordingly or a different job description is selected.
  6. All positions using the same standardized job description are linked with a common job/standardized job description number.

Note

By signing and dating a job description prior to submission for job evaluation, managers confirm that it reflects the work assigned and to be performed.

As a best practice, managers provide incumbents whose job description is being revised with an opportunity to comment on the content and sign the job description, confirming that they have been given the opportunity to do so. Final approval of the job description remains the responsibility of the manager.

When writing or updating a job description, care should be taken to avoid the following pitfalls:

  • insufficient, missing, inconsistent or too detailed information;
  • jargon, weak or vague terminology;
  • bias, including gender bias and making assumptions about the work;
  • over writing or underwriting certain aspects of the work; and
  • a position title that does not reflect the nature of the work

Appendix I - Reclassification and New Positions

A reclassification occurs when there is a change in the occupational group, sub-group (if applicable) and/or level of an existing job or position in accordance with the Classification Program.

A reclassification may occur as a result of central agency or departmental oversight, a grievance decision or to correct an error; or as a result of a substantial change in duties or responsibilities, providing there is no change to the minimum qualifications established in accordance with section 31 of the Public Service Employment Act.

A reclassification may also occur following:

  1. Legislative changes resulting in new program requirements;
  2. Central agency or departmental policy resulting in changes to existing programs or changes to organizational mandates;
  3. Reorganization of work; and
  4. Natural evolution of work within the same work continuum.

For greater certainty, reclassification excludes situations where jobs/individuals are transferred from a separate agency to the core public administration under the Public Service Rearrangement and Transfer of Duties Act.

Requirements

When a reclassification is proposed or anticipated, a job validation review is conducted, the job evaluation is performed using a job evaluation committee and information that validates the selection of the effective date is placed on the classification file.

New Positions

Requirements

A new position is established in the following circumstances:

  1. It is being created/classified for the first time;
  2. There are significant changes in the work that break the continuity of its evolution. The functions have evolved outside of the original work continuum and are changed to the extent that for different qualifications are required; or
  3. There is a change in the occupational group, sub-group and/or level of an existing job or position and the circumstances for reclassification are not met.

Appendix J - Deputy Head Directed Classification Decisions

Application

In unique and exceptional circumstances where there is no clear and obvious fit with classification standards, deputy heads are authorized to approve classification decisions that may not be aligned with departmental or inter-departmental relativity.

The biennial monitoring report must include all classification decisions approved directly under this authority

This authority may not be sub-delegated.

Requirements

  1. A formal process is in place for the authorization, tracking, documenting and reporting of classification decisions approved directly by the deputy head.
  2. These decisions may not be used for relativity purposes and may not be cloned or replicated within or outside of the organization.
  3. Positions established using this authority must be deleted each time they become vacant. Each instance of the exercise of this authority is considered creation of a new position.
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