Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Symbol of the Government of Canada

Legal Protection (Canada)

These technical specifications (T-105) explain the legal protection of the official symbols of the Government of Canada. Consult your Federal Identity Program coordinator for more information.

Figure T-105: Official government symbols: Arms of Canada as revised in 1994, Government of Canada signature, Canada Wordmark, Arms of Canada as designed in 1921 and revised in 1957, flag symbol, and federal emblem used from 1974 to 1987. (View larger version of figure T-105)

Figure T-105: Official government symbols

Trade-mark and copyright

The official symbols of the Government of Canada are protected under the Trade-marks Act and the Copyright Act and cannot be used or reproduced without authorization.

Commercial use and reproduction

The Government of Canada does not permit commercial use or reproduction of the official symbols. The official symbols are protected to ensure their integrity to identify Parliament, the federal judiciary and Government of Canada institutions in Canada and abroad. Marks and designs similar to the official symbols are pursued as a copyright or trade-mark infringement.

Requests and complaints

Requests and complaints about the use of the official symbols of the Government of Canada are forwarded to:

Federal Identity Program
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
300 Laurier AVE. W
Ottawa ON  K1A 0R5
Canada
Contact the Federal Identity Program by email: information@fip-pcim.gc.ca

Requests and complaints about the National Flag of Canada or the 11-point maple leaf are forwarded to:

State Ceremonial and Protocol Directorate
Department of Canadian Heritage
25 Eddy Street, 11th floor
Gatineau QC  K1A 0M5
Canada
Contact the State Ceremonial and Protocol Directorate by email: CeremonialetSymboles-CeremonialandSymbols@pch.gc.ca

Related information


Note: If there is a discrepancy between an official Treasury Board policy instrument and information on this Web page, the Treasury Board policy or standard prevails.