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ARCHIVED - 2010-2011 DPRs - Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

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Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding




Name of Recipient: Canada Pork International (CPI)

Start Date: June 22, 2009

End Date: September 30, 2013

Total Funding: $17.0M

Description:
The Marketing Fund provides support to Canada Pork International (CPI) to assist the sector in adding value to Canadian pork products allowing for greater differentiation from the competition. This funding will be used by CPI to bolster critical market development; undertake strategic activities to capture greater value from export markets; gain recognition for Canadian pork products and building markets; increase market access for Canadian pork products; and enhance capacity that responds to identified industry needs.

Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based product sector that proactively manages risk

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:
In 2010, Canadian pork exports totalled 1,097,694 metric tonnes valued at $2.8 billion, compared to 2009 exports of 1,075,314 metric tonnes valued at $2.6 billion. 2010 pork exports were up 10% over 2007, and up 2% compared to 2009.

Exports to Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, and Australia declined when compared to 2009. However, exports increased to a number of countries in 2010, including United States (2%), Philippines (0.5%) and more significantly to Russia (48%), Mexico (67%), and China (88%). Canada continues to diversify its exports, exporting to more than 100 countries in 2010. Technical seminars, promotional materials and promotions helped to sustain (and increase) export levels.

Japan also continues to be a strategic market; Canada Pork International established their first office outside of Canada in Tokyo in order to further strengthen relationships.

Program Activity: Business Risk Management
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance between
Planned Spending
and Actual Spending
- 17.0 - - - -

Comments on Variance(s):
The CPI agreement was signed on August 10, 2009 and the full amount was paid to the recipient in the 2009-10 fiscal year to be drawn down in accordance with the cash flow requirements set out in their annual business plans and ending in March 31, 2013. As of March 31, 2011 $7.8 million has been drawn down.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
There was no evaluation undertaken for this program in 2010-11. Performance evaluations will be completed by the recipient, with interim and final reports due September 30, 2011 and September 2013 respectively.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
There was no audit undertaken for this program in 2010-11. No audits are currently planned.



Name of Recipient: Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute (CAPI)

Start Date: December 14, 2006

End Date: March 31, 2022

Total Funding: $15.0M

Description:
The conditional grant for CAPI encourages independent policy research benefitting the Canadian agricultural sector. It will help ensure continued success in building an inclusive and forward looking dialogue on the future of Canadian agriculture, and provide a stable and sustained forum to discuss issues of importance to the industry.

Strategic Outcome: A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based product sector that proactively manages risk

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:
During the 2010-11 fiscal year and in line with its Business Plan, CAPI achieved the following:

  • Establishment of three Leadership Panels on "food and wellness connection", "sustainability", and "viability";
  • Publication in May 2010 of a synthesis report: "Challenging Our Past: Preparing for the Future; Ideas and Questions for Agriculture and Agri-Food Policies" summarizing the key findings from the three Leadership Panels;
  • Publication in February 2011 of the Destination report, "Canada’s Agri-Food Destination: A New Strategic Approach";
  • Nineteen (19) commissioned papers; and
  • Several key meetings, in addition to the meetings of the Leadership Panels were held during the fiscal year.
Program Activity: Business Risk Management
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance between
Planned Spending
and Actual Spending
- - - - - -

Comments on Variance(s):
The CAPI agreement was signed on March 31, 2007 and the full amount was paid to the client in the 2006-07 fiscal year in the form of an endowment to be drawn down at the rate of $1 million per year for 15 years ending March 31, 2022.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
The June 2010 evaluation by an independent third party covering the 2007-2009 period concluded that: "CAPI has successfully established its foundation as an independent, non-partisan, not-for-profit organization aiming to provide a neutral venue for policy dialogue and influence policy development in the agriculture and agri-food domain.", and that "CAPI is now beginning to establish its reputation as a policy catalyst and develop a brand among current and potential stakeholders."

The evaluation report findings are summarized below:

  • CAPI had moderate success undertaking what it had planned during the time period evaluated;
  • CAPI was on the right course to deliver the current strategic plan;
  • CAPI’s activities were aligned with the Funding Agreement and scope of the Charter;
  • CAPI has had limited success in becoming relevant to its stakeholders over its first few years;
  • CAPI was somewhat effective during the evaluation timeframe; and
  • CAPI was quite efficient given the available amount of resources that it had available.

To deal with the findings of the interim performance evaluation, CAPI received approval from their Board of Directors in July 2009 on their 3-year strategy. This served as the basis for both the FY 2010-11 Business Plan which was submitted in January 2010, and the 2011-12 Research and Business Plan which was submitted in February 2011.

Further performance evaluation reports by an independent auditor are scheduled for 2015, 2020 and 2022.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
There was no audit undertaken for this program in 2010-11.


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Canadian Heritage

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding



Name of Recipient: National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation

Start Date: 2003–04

End Date: 2010-11

Total Funding: $22M

Description: The National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation (NAAF) promotes the development and education of Aboriginal peoples and their professional advancement in Canadian society through the implementation of such initiatives as the Blueprint for the Future, Post-Secondary Education Program, the National Aboriginal Achievement Awards and Taking Pulse. Overall, the Foundation's programs are made possible through the support of the federal government, corporate sponsors, charitable foundations and individual donors.

The Foundation’s core focus continues to be providing scholarships for Aboriginal students. NAAF is the largest supporter of Aboriginal education outside the federal government. In
2003–04, Canadian Heritage provided a $12M endowment for the establishment of an Aboriginal Post-Secondary Scholarship Program. An additional endowment of $10M was approved in March 2007. Investment revenues of the endowment are used to award scholarships and bursaries to Aboriginal post-secondary students across Canada.

This Endowment Fund encourages higher levels of achievement in education to help Aboriginal Canadians gain the skills and learning needed to fully contribute to the economic life of their communities and Canadian society.

Strategic Outcome: Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: Investment revenues from the endowment provided funding for bursaries to Aboriginal post-secondary students.

Program Activity: Engagement and community participation
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
$227,000.00 $227,000 $340,000 $340,000 $340,000 N/A

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: N/A

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: N/A



Name of Recipient: Endowment Fund – Canadian Institute for Research on Linguistic Minorities

Start Date: 2001–02

End Date: perpetual

Total Funding: $10M

Description: Through an endowment fund from the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Canadian Institute for Research on Linguistic Minorities (CIRLM) was created in March 2002 with a view to becoming a national centre of expertise for better understanding of the challenges faced by official‑language minority communities as well as the trends in their environment. Although it is based out of UniversitÚ de Moncton, the Institute has a mission that is national in scope. It carries out research on official‑language minority communities with the revenues generated by this fund as well as other revenues.

The CIRLM seeks to enhance research on issues that pertain to official‑language minority communities. Increased and improved research will ensure that community leaders and government officials responsible for developing public policy clearly understand the issues affecting the development of Canada’s English‑ and French‑speaking minorities.

Strategic Outcome: Canadians share, express and appreciate their Canadian identity

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

The evaluation conducted of the Institute in 2008–09 confirmed the following results:

  • Research capacity continues to grow nationally. CIRLM experts from across Canada were connected to foster cooperation, which led to a larger pool of researchers with an interest in linguistic minorities. Ties between researchers were solidified and information on research opportunities was disseminated.
  • The Institute is recognized for the quality of its applied and academic research.
  • Research findings are recognized as relevant and useful, especially in the field of education, and are used by many stakeholders, including governments, communities and other researchers.
  • CIRLM researchers often attend seminars and conferences, and publish their research in university publications nation‑wide.

The formative evaluation presented recommendations that the Institute is implementing progressively.

For 20010-11 the CIRLM worked on 29 research projects, a number of which were in partnership with other research centres and community organizations. A total of 13 research projects were conducted on topics such as family, childhood and education, community vitality, minority community health, and OLMC law, governance and public policy. Another 16 projects focussing on the following projects are currently underway: arts, culture, identity and diversity; family, childhood and education; community vitality; minority community health; and OLMC law, governance and public policy. These projects involve academic and community partners. Aside from these projects, 17 other proposals were recently submitted; seven were rejected.

Program Activity: Official Languages
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: N/A

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: N/A



Name of Recipient: Trans Canada Trail/Sentier transcanadien

Start Date: December 2003

End Date: March 2010*

* The agreement with Canadian Heritage was extended to March 31, 2011 and is now terminated. (Note: The organization has now entered into a $10 million agreement with Parks Canada, ending March 31 2013.)

Total Funding: $15M, entirely paid in 2003-04

Description: Trans Canada Trail/Sentier transcanadien leads an initiative, based on widespread voluntary support, to establish a national recreational trail that runs through every Canadian province and territory, linking hundreds of communities. The federal grant for this project is used solely to establish a fund to achieve the following objectives: to administer a program of grants to community-based groups in support of trail-building capital projects (thereby leveraging additional support from other sources); to provide planning for and coordinate development of the Trail; and to establish Trail Pavilions and signage along the route.

The Trail will connect Canadians from all regions of the country with each other, their environment, and Canada’s cultural and natural diversity.

Strategic Outcome: Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

In March 2010, the initial agreement, originally scheduled to end on March 31, 2010, was extended to
March 31, 2011. This allowed the organization responsible for the Trail to use the entire $15.0 million, as well as $2.245 million in interest in accordance with the terms of the agreement, to meet the planned objectives.

Approximately 72.5% of the Trans Canada Trail, or over 16,500 km, has been completed. More than
4 out of 5 Canadians live within 30 minutes or less of the Trail. Once completed, it will be the longest trail (or network of trails) in the world. 

Since 2004, when the grant was awarded, the Trans Canada Trail has contributed to a total of 134 Trail construction projects and 23 engineering studies. As well, 86 pavilions have been built to display the names of people and organizations that have contributed to the Trail’s development from coast to coast to coast.

Program Activity: Heritage
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: As prescribed by the agreement, the recipient has provided, for the period 2004-05 to 2009-10, a third-party evaluation of the expenditure of the grant and its impact toward completion of the Trail. A final update, covering the year 2010-11, will be provided by July 31, 2011.

Significant findings of the evaluation include the following: over the period of the grant, there were substantial and significant increases to the length of the Trail and to the amount of the Trail that was operational. Significant development of Trail segments occurred during this period. There were also major developments under other categories covered by the agreement: the number of pavilions, as key markers and venues for recognition of support, grew from 64 to 86; six regional coordinators, hired under the agreement’s planning and coordination category, made significant contributions to Trail plans and developments at the regional level; and a Trail master planning process was initiated in 2009, with the completion of the first stage in 2010.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: The 2010-11 annual report and audited financial statements will be provided to the Department by July 31, 2011, in compliance with the agreement’s closing procedures.



Name of Recipient: Grant to the 2010 Games Operating Trust

Start Date: 2004–05

End Date: perpetual

Total Funding: A total of $55M was provided by the Government of Canada to the 2010 Games Operating Trust.

Description: In accordance with a Multi-Party Agreement (MPA), the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia each contributed a one-time $55M grant to the Legacy Endowment Fund, which is managed by the 2010 Games Operating Trust. The 2010 Games Operating Trust Society is the legal entity that oversees the business activities of the 2010 Games Operating Trust. The Legacy Endowment Fund supports the maintenance and operating expenses of specific 2010 Winter Games sporting venues and charitable and not-for-profit organizations conducting high-performance amateur sport and coach development programming at those venues and elsewhere in Canada. The three legacy facilities receiving the funds are the Richmond Oval (Richmond, BC), Whistler Olympic Park and the Whistler Sliding Centre (Resort Municipality of Whistler, BC). This commitment by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia ensures that Canadians will continue to use the venues and benefit from sport programming well beyond 2010 (http://www.vancouver2010.com).

The Board of Directors of the 2010 Games Operating Trust Society consists of eight representatives from the signatories to the MPA (Government of Canada, the Province of British Columbia, the Canadian Olympic Committee, the Canadian Paralympic Committee, the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC), the City of Vancouver, the City of Richmond, and the Resort Municipality of Whistler). The 2010 Games Operating Trust Society will oversee and manage this Trust until an agreed-upon future date or until the end of the Monarchy.

Sustainable social, economic, cultural and sports benefits for Canadians are the overall strategic goals for hosting the Olympic Games. Beyond maintaining and operating the three principal venues, the 2010 Games Operating Trust will provide the needed funding to continue high-performance programming for Canadian athletes at these venues and elsewhere in Canada.

Strategic Outcome: Canadians participate and excel in sport

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

The Trust successfully maintained and operated the three legacy venues and continued to fund high-performance programming for Canadian athletes at these venues and elsewhere in Canada.

During the 2010 calendar year, the 2010 Games Operating Trust distributed $4.5M to the 2010 Games Legacies. In addition, the 2010 GOT was able to generate a net investment return in excess of $10.0M (about 10%) and has declared that distributions totaling $5.4M ($2.7M for the Richmond Legacy and $2.7M for the Whistler Legacies) will be made during the 2011 calendar year. This represents an increase over 2010 distributions of 20%.

The Trust Fund’s assets ended the year at $114.7M, compared to $109.0M at the end of the previous year.

Program Activity: Sport
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
$ 0.0 $ 0.0 $ 0.0 $ 0.0 $ 0.0 N/A

Comments on Variance(s): Note that financial information reflects funding provided by the 2010 Games Operating Trust to the designated legacy venues for the calendar year ending December 31 falling within the fiscal year identified. There were no funds provided by the Government of Canada to the 2010 GOT or to the distribution recipients during the year.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: N/A

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting year and Future Plan: N/A

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Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding


Name of Recipient: Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko

Start Date: 2008–09—One-time Conditional Grant

End Date: Funding agreement governing endowment ends in May 2023.

Total Funding: $10 million*

* Funding was provided on a one-time basis when the Multiculturalism Program was part of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Description: In appreciation of the historical significance of the First World War internment, the Government of Canada provided a conditional grant of $10 million to the Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko (the Foundation) for the establishment and management of an endowment fund, known as the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund (the Fund) for all affected communities. Through calls for proposals managed by the Foundation, applicants are invited to apply to the Fund for financial support for activities that commemorate, acknowledge and educate Canadians about the experiences of communities affected by the First World War internment in Canada, and the contributions of these communities to the shaping of this nation. The Fund was established under the Community Historical Recognition Program. A funding agreement to establish this endowment was signed in Toronto on May 9, 2008. The funding agreement will remain in effect for 15 years.

Summary of annual plans of recipient:

Recipient’s objectives:

The Fund is designated for the support of projects to commemorate and recognize the experiences of ethnocultural communities affected by the First World War internment. The Fund will help to bring closure to these communities and satisfy their long-standing requests for appropriate measures of recognition for their experiences.

Recipient’s performance expectations:

Due to the global economic situation, the value of the principal of the Fund decreased from its original level of $10 million.

Strategic Outcome(s): Successful integration of newcomers into society and promotion of Canadian citizenship

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: In calendar year 2010, the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund Endowment Council reported spending $95,537 in grants, for a total of $210,737 in the two years since it was launched in 2008. The call for proposals closed on April 1, 2010, and the Endowment Council reviewed 15 grant applications, deferring seven pending further information. Funding was approved for the other eight applications, which included research on the Ottoman Turkish community in Brantford, Ontario, and a book on the experiences of the internees. One of the largest projects the Council has undertaken since its inception is a pledge of $400,000 toward the $1.2-million construction of the Spirit Lake Quebec Interpretive Centre in La Ferme, near Amos, Quebec.

Program Activity: Citizenship Program
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil Not applicable (N/A)

Comments on Variance(s): Not applicable.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan: No Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) evaluation was planned for this investment.

The Foundation agrees to carry out, at least every five years, an evaluation of the activities and projects related to the Fund by an independent third party using recognized evaluation standards.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan: No internal audit was completed or planned. As per the funding agreement, “the Foundation agrees to have carried out, no less frequently than every five years, an independent performance (value-for-money) audit of the Fund to ensure the economy, efficiency and effectiveness with which funds from the Fund have been used.” The organization will therefore be conducting an audit by 2013.



Name of Recipient: Global Centre for Pluralism (GCP)

Start Date: 2006–07—One-time Conditional Grant (Endowment)

End Date: Perpetual

Total Funding: $30 million*

* Funding was provided on a one-time basis when the Multiculturalism Program was part of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Description: The GCP is a not-for-profit organization, co-founded by the Aga Khan Development Network and the Government of Canada, which addresses a global gap in institutions that advocate pluralism as a foundation for new governance, peace and human development at the international level. The mission of the GCP is to promote pluralism as a fundamental human value and cornerstone of peace, stability and development. The Centre will pursue its mandate through four core functions: (1) sustaining an international policy dialogue on pluralism in governance, elections, judicial systems, media and education to help factions integrate in states at risk; (2) providing programs for academic and professional development; (3) fostering research and learning on pluralism; and (4) fostering and sharing the results of research and learning on pluralism. These activities will target primarily the developing world, offering a platform from which existing organizations and experts on pluralism in Canada can reach an international audience.

Strategic Outcome(s): Successful integration of newcomers into society and promotion of Canadian citizenship

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: The GCP reported on deliverables outlined in its funding agreement with the Government of Canada, through its 2009 annual report and its 2010 and 2011 corporate plans. The Board of Directors was appointed in October 2010, and with the support of GCP Members, is responsible for establishing an institutional framework to support and implement the founding vision for the GCP. The fact that both of the GCP’s governing bodies (Board of Directors and Members) are now in place completes a critical stage in the GCP’s formative development, establishing the governance structure needed to move forward with substantive operational initiatives. In this regard, an architectural firm has been engaged to begin the process of redeveloping the GCP’s future international headquarters at 330 Sussex Drive in Ottawa, an executive search was undertaken to fill the executive position of Secretary General, and the GCP website was revitalized to provide increased public access to the GCP’s organization and activities.

Program Activity: Citizenship Program
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil N/A

Comments on Variance(s): Not applicable

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan: No CIC evaluation was planned for this investment.

The funding agreement between the Government of Canada and the GCP requires that the GCP carry out, at least every five years, “an evaluation of its activities and projects according to a framework and time to be approved by the Board” by an independent third party. The first evaluation will be undertaken in 2012–13.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan: No internal audit was completed or planned. The GCP agreement requires that the GCP carry out, at least every five years, “an independent performance (value for money) audit to ensure the economy, efficiency and effectiveness with which funds have been used.” The first audit will be undertaken in 2012–13.


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Environment Canada

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding




Name of Recipient: Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences (CFCAS).

Start Date: February 2000.

End Date: March 2012.

Total Funding: $110 million. A one-time $60 million grant to be disbursed over six years was received in 2001, and a second grant of $50 million to be disbursed by the end of March 2011 was received in 2004. The Minister of the Environment approved a one-year no-cost extension to CFCAS’s mandate, which will allow the Foundation to operate until March 31, 2012.

Description: To invest strategically in excellent university-based research on climate and atmospheric sciences to achieve the following:

  • provide relevant scientific information to support federal policy making;
  • generate better knowledge regarding climate change and its impacts on the natural environment;
  • provide results to help Canada respond to its international environmental commitments; and
  • ensure a supply of skilled human resources to meet future environmental challenges.

Strategic Outcome(s): Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

During 2010–2011, CFCAS supported 11 research consortia (networks), 24 major projects and 11 outreach initiatives. The results improved policy making and decision making in federal departments and other government, non-government and industry sectors. For example, studies in two major Canadian cities helped improve the prediction of smog, heat stress, extreme winds and wind chill, and these improvements led to advance warning measures that enable citizens and services to prepare for such weather hazards. In the north, work on stratospheric conditions provided information on changes in ozone conditions; a major scientific paper on ozone levels and health impacts confirmed Canadian leadership in international ozone work. Studies of arctic storms in Iqaluit helped improve the safety of northern communities, industries, rescue operations and transport. CFCAS-funded work on prairie drought enhanced the ability of federal and provincial governments and farming authorities to predict drought and adapt to severe dry conditions. The team extended its work to extreme conditions in the Prairies generally and held a workshop with a broad range of stakeholders on hazards that also include floods and hailstorms (February 2011). Other network results were also showcased at workshops and conferences.

The Foundation, in collaboration with Environment Canada, held the major symposium, Canadian Water Security: The Critical Role of Science, in Ottawa in May 2010. The symposium allowed the high-level examination and discussion of water security issues by researchers, policy-makers, decision-makers and other stakeholders. The report on the symposium is available from the Foundation.

Program Activity: 2.1. Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians
($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–2009
Actual
Spending
2009–2010
Planned
Spending
2010–2011
Total
Authorities
2010–2011
Actual
Spending
2010–2011
Variance(s)
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comments on Variance(s): N/a

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan:

The Foundation tracks the progress, management and outputs of networks and projects on an ongoing basis through progress reports, meetings and performance audits. On June 10, 2010, it submitted to the Minister of the Environment a comprehensive, independent assessment of the efficiency, effectiveness and value for money delivered by the Foundation since it was established in 2000. The report demonstrated that, as of February 2010, CFCAS-funded research had

  • leveraged more than $145 million in direct and in-kind contributions from federal, provincial, university, industry and other partners;
  • contributed to developing expertise in areas with particularly important economic and social implications for Canada; and
  • contributed to the development of national and international climate- and weather-prediction models, unique data sets, research tools (e.g. software), science infrastructure and scientific capacity.

CFCAS-funded research has encouraged close collaboration with government scientists, and government departments have applied many of the research results within their operations. Over 140 federal scientists have been involved in CFCAS-funded initiatives that are important to their departmental missions and, of these, 63 have been from Environment Canada.

At the request of the Minister, CFCAS prepared a business plan that provided evidence of the need for, and value of, university-based research partnerships on weather and climate. This was submitted to the Minister in October 2010 and to his successor in January 2011.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan:

The Foundation’s annual financial audit for 2010–2011 indicated that the Foundation had good financial controls. The reporting of its financial position as of March 31, 2011, the results of its operation, and its cash flows in fiscal year 2010−2011, were all in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. The audit showed a ramping down in the release of grant funds, which is consistent with the Foundation’s final disbursement of research funding as its last (2003) federal endowment runs out.



Name of Recipient: Clayoquot Biosphere Trust

Start Date: February 2000.

End Date: In perpetuity.

Total Funding: $12 million.

Description: Creation of an endowment fund for the Clayoquot Biosphere Trust (CBT), which is the cornerstone of the Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. The CBT will use the income from the endowment fund to support local research, education and training in the Biosphere Reserve Region.

Strategic Outcome(s): Canada’s natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

During 2010–2011, the CBT achieved the following results:

  • received renewed Biosphere Reserve status from UNESCO following a successful 10-year periodic review;
  • conducted a review of the CBT’s investment policy and fund manager’s performance, concluding that the CBT’s strategic asset allocation met the need for balancing growth and risk exposure and that the fund manager continued to outperform the benchmark, despite very difficult market conditions;
  • successfully administered all streams of funding, including two annual scholarships for local First Nations graduates, a $50,000 call for projects and community committee discretionary funding, and continued its commitment to educational, cultural and heritage events in the Biosphere Reserve region by providing funding to eligible societies and local governments for public events, including the Pacific Rim Summer Festival, Pacific Rim Whale Festival, National Aboriginal Day, Ukee Days and the West Coast Maritime Festival;
  • advanced significant work in the CBT’s three core priority areas, particularly in the area of Youth and Biosphere via support of a region-wide participative youth consultation in partnership with the Coastal Family Resource Coalition. Also supported the “What I learnt about my Biosphere” initiative for the second school year, supporting field trips within the Reserve for all schools within the region;
  • opened a Facebook page to support more focused outreach to youth of the area;
  • secured a YM–YWCA ECO internship to focus on the marketing and promotion of the Biosphere Reserve beyond its boundaries;
  • secured external funding to support the construction of a greenhouse and garden in Hesquiaht Harbour, restoration of a traditional harvest site and creation of a corresponding sustainability plan;
  • coordinated with the Ucluelet Community Food Initiative a series of region-wide stakeholder input sessions on regional food security issues as part of the development of a regional food action plan; and
  • convened a Board-led fundraising committee to develop and deliver on a fund development strategy; also secured reinstated federally registered charitable status and redesigned their website to support increased external fundraising.
Program Activity: 1.3 Sustainable Ecosystem
($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–2009
Actual
Spending
2009–2010
Planned
Spending
2010–2011
Total
Authorities
2010–2011
Actual
Spending
2010–2011
Variance(s)
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comments on Variance(s):

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan:

  • Evaluations of community events and initiatives supported by the Trust over this period indicated a high level of community awareness of and support for the Biosphere Reserve and the Trust, and satisfaction with activities undertaken.
  • As part of the UNESCO periodic review, community members and leaders were engaged in a feedback process on the Trust’s performance and profile over its first 10 years. The final report provided a summary of accomplishments and offered recommendations for future direction.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan:

  • Audit findings indicated that the financial position of the endowment contravenes the general requirements of the Canada Fund Agreement, which requires it to maintain the original value of the fund as adjusted using the Canadian Consumer Price Index, and a specific requirement of Board Governance and Policy Statement 5.2 stating that cost-of-living allowance requirements will be maintained within consecutive three-year periods. Erosion of the fund’s principal value as a result of poor market performance and fund withdrawals has resulted in plans for significant reductions in operating budgets and intensified revenue generation. The Board of Directors continues to balance the need to recover the lost value of the fund with a certain level of programming and, to this end, the Board has established a realistic timeline to recover the fund and match ongoing inflation. This entails new measures for reducing administrative overhead costs, including the use of wage subsidy programs and subleasing a portion of the new office facilities.


Name of Recipient: Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) Green Municipal Fund (GMF).

Start Date: February 2000.

End Date: In perpetuity.

Total Funding: $550M shared equally between Environment Canada (EC) and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). EC’s share is one half, specifically $275M.

Description: The Green Municipal Fund (GMF) is a $550M revolving fund administered by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM). The GMF supports grants, loans and loan guarantees to encourage investment in environmental municipal projects. The Government of Canada (GoC) endowed the FCM with a total of $550 million for this initiative through a series of Budget decisions from 2000 to 2005.

The GMF was established to have a positive impact on the health and the quality of life of Canadians by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improving local air, water and soil quality and promoting renewable energy by supporting environmental studies and projects within the municipal sector. Eligible projects may fall into one or more of the following categories: energy, water, waste, sustainable transportation, brownfields, or integrated community projects. The sum of $150 million is to be used exclusively to support brownfield remediation and redevelopment.

The amount of GMF financing available to municipalities is directly related to the environmental benefits or the innovation of the projects undertaken, with grant-loan combinations of up to 80 percent of eligible costs available for capital projects with exceptional environmental benefits.

The FCM has created two advisory bodies: the GMF Council and the Peer Review Committee, as stipulated in the GMF Funding Agreement between the FCM and the GoC. The Council’s role is to assist the FCM Board of Directors, the decision-making body for the GMF, in approving projects proposed by municipalities. The 15-member GMF Council includes five federal members: two from EC, two from NRCan and one from Transport Canada. All federal members are appointed by the FCM Board of Directors based on recommendations from the Minister of Environment. EC peer reviewers provide the GMF and federal Council Members with expert environmental science and clean technology advice. They also review and analyze funding proposals and help evaluate the environmental outcomes of funded projects.

Strategic Outcome(s): Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: The 2010–2011 GMF Annual Report is expected to be available in July 2011 on the FCM website at http://fmv.fcm.ca/About_Us/Annual_Reports.

Since the inception of the GMF in 2000, FCM has committed more than $450M to support over 800 sustainable community plans, feasibility studies, field tests and capital projects. Of these, 155 have been capital projects. These capital projects are anticipated to reduce annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by almost 1.1 million tonnes and criteria air contaminant emissions by over 3,335 tonnes. Seventy-three of these projects are expected to have an impact on water resources and 25 are expected to improve soil quality.

The 2009 GMF review and performance audit, conducted by KPMG, found that FCM is a key player in supporting environmentally sustainable municipal infrastructure investments. The final reports observed that studies funded by GMF are highly incremental and most would not have been undertaken without GMF support; in addition, GMF funding has made a direct contribution to helping Canadian municipalities achieve their environmentally sustainable objectives.

Program Activity: 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air
($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–2009
Actual
Spending
2009–2010
Planned
Spending
2010–2011
Total
Authorities
2010–2011
Actual
Spending
2010–2011
Variance(s)
- - - - - -

Comments on Variance(s): All funds to the GMF were paid out in prior years.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan: Section 11.05 of the funding agreement stipulates that the FCM shall agree to obtain, make public and forward to each minister, for tabling in Parliament, an independent review using recognized evaluation standards on the following timelines: an initial review within six months following March 31, 2009; and subsequent reviews every five years from the date of the first review. The next independent review will take place starting in the year 2014.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan: In Section 11.07 of the funding agreement, it stipulates that the FCM agrees to have carried out an independent performance (value-for-money) audit to ensure the economy, efficiency and effectiveness with which funds have been used. An initial review must be carried out within six months following March 31, 2009, and subsequent reviews every five years from the date of the first review. The next independent performance audit will take place starting in the year 2014.



Name of Recipient: Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC)

Start Date: March 2007.

End Date: In perpetuity (until the total funding is expended).

Total Funding: $225 million.

Description: The Nature Conservancy of Canada works to ensure the long-term protection of biodiversity by working with private landowners and managers to secure ecologically significant lands that have been identified as priorities for conservation action. To that effect, the Conservancy acquires and preserves land through one of four methods: land purchase, land donations, conservation easements or relinquishment of rights. It also ensures support for the ongoing management and restoration of habitat it secures. The goal of the program is to secure 200 000 ha of private land for conservation.

Strategic Outcome(s): Canada's natural environment is conserved and restored for present and future generations.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: As of the end of March 2011, the Conservancy has drawn $167.2 million under the federal allocation (equivalent to 74% of the total Natural Areas Conservation Program (NACP) funding available). To date, the Conservancy and its partners have raised more than $121 million in matching funds and pledges from private and other public sources, and received donations of conservation lands and easements valued at $146 million from private landowners, for a total of $267 million in matching contributions. The Conservancy and its partners have already reached the goal to match the federal investment of $225 million over the life of the program. The Conservancy and its partners have now secured more than 160 000 ha of land, through more than 800 land transactions. These lands are found in every province and provide habitat for at least 101 species at risk.

Program Activity: 1.1 Biodiversity – Wildlife and Habitat
($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–2009
Actual
Spending
2009–2010
Planned
Spending
2010–2011
Total
Authorities
2010–2011
Actual
Spending
2010–2011
Variance(s)
$46.1 $29.3 $0.0 $21.7 $21.7 ($21.7)

Comments on Variance(s): This conditional grant was fully accounted for in the 2006–2007 fiscal year. Payments made under the grant are based on the Conservancy's fiscal year, which commences on July 1. Instalments under the grant were $70.2 million in 2007–2008, $46.1 million in 2008–2009, $29.3 million in 2009–2010 and $21.7 million in 2010–2011.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan: The third annual progress report spanning April 1, 2007, to June 30, 2010, was received from the Conservancy on January 28, 2011, and was deemed to be satisfactory. Under the grant, program evaluations are to be carried out no less frequently than every five years from the date of the agreement and when the funding has been expended.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan: A financial audit, dated June 30, 2010, was conducted by Ernst & Young to inform the third annual progress report on the program, spanning July 1, 2009, to June 30, 2010. The auditor's report indicated that "...the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Fund as at June 30, 2010 and the revenue and expenses in the NCC and OQO (except DUC) columns for the cumulative period from March 30, 2007 to June 30, 2010 and for the year ended June 30, 2010.”

URL to Recipient's Site: www.natureconservancy.ca



Name of Recipient: Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC).

Start Date: March 2001: Sustainable Development Technology Fund (SD Tech Fund™); and April 2007: Next-Generation Biofuels Fund (NextGen Biofuels Fund™ or NGBF).

End Date: June 2015: SD Tech Fund; and September 2027: NGBF.

Total Funding: $1.05 B ($550M for SD Tech Fund and $500M for NGBF) shared equally between Environment Canada (EC) and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). EC’s share is one half of $1.05B, specifically $525M.

Description: SDTC is a not-for-profit foundation created by the Government of Canada, with a series of federal grants that now total to $1.05 billion. Assponsoring departments for the federal government, EC and NRCan provide federal oversight of SDTC to ensure it complies with the two funding agreements and the founding legislation. NRCan is the federal SDTC lead.

SDTC manages two separate funds: the SD Tech Fund™ ($550M) to provide financial support to projects that have the potential to advance sustainable development, including technologies to address climate change, clean air and water and soil quality issues; and the NGBF ($500M) to provide financial support towards the establishment of facilities producing next-generation renewable fuels at large demonstration‑scale. SDTC-funded projects are active in all major Canadian economic sectors, including energy exploration and production; power generation; energy utilization; transportation; agriculture; forestry and wood products; and waste management.

Strategic Outcome(s): Threats toCanadians and their environment from pollution are minimized.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

i. SD Tech Fund™: In 2010,* under the SD Tech Fund™, SDTC approved 33 projects for funding, with SDTC providing $92M or 39 percent of the total eligible project value of $233M. Disbursements increased from $47M in 2009 to $58M in 2010 and, as more projects are completed, disbursements are projected to continue increasing to $60M in 2011 and $80M in 2012. Eight projects were completed in 2010.

Since its inception, the SD Tech Fund™ has awarded grants of $514M for 210 projects with a total project value of $1.8B and the potential for 7 to 17 megatonnes of CO2 emission reductions annually by 2015. As of December 2010, $231M has been disbursed. A total of 41 projects have been completed since the foundation’s inception.

As required by legislation, SDTC submitted the annual report documents on time to EC and NRCan and posted these on the SDTC website, making them available to the public.

ii. NGBF: In 2010,* no allocations from NGBF were made; however, four applications were in the NGBF project assurance process, which is based on best practices used by multinational companies and includes a review by a roster of biofuels experts. SDTC received indications of interest from 5 proponents working towards eligibility for funding. Some 20 high-potential candidates are aligned with promising technology rollouts, while more than 100 companies are being tracked.

* Unlessspecified otherwise, SDTC yearly results and data refer to the calendar year as per SDTC annual reports.

Program Activity: 3.2 Climate Change and Clean Air
($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–2009
Actual
Spending
2009–2010
Planned
Spending
2010–2011
Total
Authorities
2010–2011
Actual
Spending
2010–2011
Variance(s)
$31.5 $0 $0 $37.5 $0 $0

Comments on Variance(s):

All funds to the SD Tech Fund™ were paid out in prior years.

All of the above financial data pertains to the NGBF only and represents EC’s share. The $25M that was appropriated by Parliament for NGBF in 2010–2011 was re-profiled forward to 2012–2013. In addition to this $25M, $12.5M for NGBF was previously re-profiled from 2009–2010 to 2010–2011 and again to 2012–2013. No payments were made to SDTC in 2010–2011 because actual spending by NGBF was significantly lower than its estimates and it had on hand the funds that it required (see also “Details of Transfer Payment Programs” for NGBF).

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan: As per Funding Agreement Three for the SD Tech Fund™, SDTC had completed the Second Interim Evaluation in 2009, and consequently there was no evaluation in 2010. The next evaluation by the recipient is due in 2015. An evaluation by Canada is optional at any time. For NGBF, there was no evaluation in 2010. The first of three interim evaluations for NGBF is required in November 2012.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient during the Reporting Year and Future Plan: A value-for-money (performance) audit for the SD Tech Fund™ was initiated by the government in fiscal year 2009–2010 (which is equivalent to once every 5 years as per Funding Agreement Three). The final report was completed in July 2011. In addition, a standard financial audit was completed as required for the financial data in the SDTC annual report.


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Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding


Pacific Salmon Foundation

Strategic Outcome: Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Program Activity: Fisheries and Aquaculture Management

Start Date : September 1997

End Date : None

Description : The Pacific Salmon Endowment Fund, supported by a $30 million federal endowment from Fisheries and Oceans Canada in 1999, and managed by a non profit organization (Pacific Salmon Foundation), uses interest income proceeds from the fund to undertake specific plans and activities to support salmon. The mission of the Pacific Salmon Endowment Fund is to: conserve and rebuild Pacific salmon populations through strategic and focused efforts where people and resources are mobilized to work together to achieve common goals.

Summary of Annual Plans of Recipient: http://www.psf.ca

Link to Recipient's Website: http://www.psf.ca

($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Variance(s)
1.0 1.0

Comment on Variance: The 2010 Report on Plans and Priorities indicated that the Pacific Salmon Endowment Fund Forecast Spending for 2010-11 would be $1.0 million. The $1.0 million in Forecast Spending is for the Fraser Basin Initiative administered by the Pacific Salmon Foundation but is considered a separate initiative.



Atlantic Salmon Conservation Foundation

Strategic Outcome: Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Program Activity: Fisheries and Aquaculture Management

Start Date: January 2007

End Date: None

Description: The Atlantic Salmon Endowment Fund is a one time conditional grant that will be invested in order to provide long-term funding for the operation of the Atlantic Salmon Conservation Foundation (ASCF). The ASCF will invest the funds and use the income to assist community groups in the restoration, protection and improved conservation of the Atlantic salmon resource in Atlantic Canada and Quebec. This will promote projects in research, conservation, habitat restoration and enhancement for the attainment of healthy and sustainable wild Atlantic salmon stocks and the projects the ASCF funds.

Summary of Annual Plans of Recipient: http://www.ascf-fcsa.ca/

Link to Recipient's Website: http://www.ascf-fcsa.ca/

($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Variance(s)

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Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding




Name of Recipient: Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada

Start Date: March 31, 2005

End Date: Ongoing

Total Funding: $50 million

Description: The Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, created by an Act of Parliament in 1984, is an independent, not-for-profit think tank on Canada's relations with Asia. The Foundation provides research, analysis and information on Canada's trans-Pacific relations. It promotes dialogue on economic, security, political and social issues related to Canadian interests in Asia Pacific. The Foundation also provides grants to support research on Canada's relations with Asia Pacific. The Foundation is funded primarily by the proceeds of an endowment of $50 million from the Government of Canada.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

  • Launched the National Conversation on Asia, an initiative aimed at encouraging Canadians to better understand the rise of Asia and its implications for Canada.
  • Completed a series of papers on the Canadians Abroad Project.
  • Strengthened Canada’s university research capacity on Asia with the establishment of the Chanchlani India Policy Centre, a joint initiative with the University of Waterloo and the Canada India Foundation.
  • Launched the Asia Pacific Opinion Panel, a survey of over 600 Canadians involved in Canada-Asia affairs that deals with Canada-Asia relations.
Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
0 0 0 0 0 0

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan: N/A

Significant Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan: N/A



Name of Recipient: Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)

Start Date: January 30, 2003

End Date: Ongoing

Total Funding: $30 million

Description: CIGI supports world-leading research in the area of global governance, particularly in the area of global economic and financial governance, and furthers Canada's interest in having a stable and well-governed global economic system by bringing together academics, policy analysts and researchers from around the world to discuss and carry out research on current topics and trends.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: CIGI’s research interests focused on international economic and financial governance; the role of the G-20 and the newly emerging powers in the evolution of global diplomacy; Africa and climate change; and other issues related to food and human security. CIGIs Nuclear Energy Futures Project, completed in April 2010, offered recommendations for safe management of the global industry to 2030. CIGI produces 50 to 100 publications annually, hosts high-level conferences and public events on global governance issues and maintains a dynamic web presence at www.cigionline.com. CIGI also partnered with DFAIT in a number of events, including at the International Studies Association annual convention in Montreal as part of the department's open policy approach to engaging stakeholders to better inform Canada's international agenda. Following recommendations of a federal evaluation completed in 2008, the new CIGI strategic plan for 2010–15 was adopted and is being implemented. CIGI’s endowment investment policy was approved by the Department of Finance and adopted by CIGI’s Operating Board in May 2011.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
0 0 0 0 0 0

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan: The next evaluation is scheduled for 2013.

Significant Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan: N/A



Name of Recipient: Forum of Federations

Start Date: April 1, 2005

End Date: March 31, 2011

Total Funding: $20 million

Description: The conditional grant provided by DFAIT to the Forum of Federations provides concrete help to the Forum in its efforts to promote programs of mutual cooperation and assume an international leadership role on work related to governance and federal political systems. The programs are designed to help develop best practices by providing expertise and promoting exchanges with other countries interested in federal approaches. The Forum's independence, and its ability to draw on both Canadian experience and international resources, responds to the Canadian government's priorities of promoting better governance and greater democracy both at home and abroad and is the best existing mechanism to provide an exploration of comparative federalism. This grant also covers Canada's annual $50,000 contribution as a member of the Forum's Strategic Council, an advisory body to the Forum's Board of Directors consisting of partner governments that have signed a framework arrangement with the Forum.

Funding of Forum activities reaffirms Canada's commitment to the Forum to the world, thus encouraging other governments to partner with the Forum and further promoting its internationalization. The drawdown nature of the grant anticipates an increase in funding from other partners that will diminish Canada's financial commitment in the future as the sole or principal source of funding, while concurrently sending a clear message to foreign governments that Canada supports the important work of the Forum and is committed to its becoming a global organization. The pursuit of internationalization will help to further the Forum's reputation and prominence by integrating a broader base of federal experiences and continuing to attract high-quality international personnel.

On the domestic front, the Forum reflects a core value of our national political identity: Canada's commitment to open federalism. Now that the Forum has established its credibility on the international stage, its neutral status and its expertise could continue to pave the way for further activities in the domestic arena, including as a source of ideas on flexible federalism through its Canada Program.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

Governance Programs: The Forum hosted a broad range of thematic programs, conferences, country-specific events and Global Dialogue workshops in 2010–11. Forum events contributed to improving governance through cross-cutting themes such as internal markets, immigrant integration, public security, benchmarking, oil and gas, metropolitan and local governance, joint service delivery, fiscal federalism, and the impact of conflict on federalism and constitutional processes, in particular. Highlights include:

  • The Forum organized or contributed to more than 50 governance activities, including six conferences, seven round tables, 24 workshops and seminars, and 14 consultations.
  • The Forum worked with 28 partner organizations, including 18 governments.
  • More than 1,200 participants from 18 countries participated in events.
  • Four volumes were published as part of the Forum’s ongoing publications program: Access to Property Rights: Integrating Indigenous Communities into the Federal Scheme—International Experiences; Fiscal Federalism: A Comparative Introduction; Diversity and Unity in Federal Countries; and Intergovernmental Relations in Federal Countries. Thematic publications on sub-national tax autonomy, oil and gas, immigrant integration, and internal market integration were completed.

The Fifth International Conference on Federalism was held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in December 2010. The first conference of its kind to be held in Africa, the conference brought together approximately 600 practitioners of federalism and numerous African leaders. Experts, practitioners and academics presented 45 papers related to the conference theme, Equality and Unity in Diversity for Development. The Forum worked closely with the Government of Ethiopia to identify advisers, develop the conference themes and format, and produce the pre- and post-conference publications.

Development Assistance: The Forum maintained an active development assistance program in 2010–11, centred on existing country programs in Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Sudan and Ethiopia. Activities were varied, ranging from the provision of technical assistance and training support to the conduct of comparative research, thematic workshops, and the production and dissemination of educational materials. Overall, 38 development assistance events were organized, which involved more than 2,000 participants, 17 partner organizations and eight governments.

Public Information and Education: In response to feedback from its partners, the Forum has placed greater emphasis on web-based material and its online database. The organization has streamlined its annual report to provide greater analysis and explanation of the nature of the Forum's work. Two issues of Federations magazine were published: one focused on Africa (volume 10, no. 1) and a special Arabic-English issue focused on Sudan.

Operations: The secondments of senior officials from Switzerland and Germany to the Forum were extended through partnership agreement negotiations.

Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
0 0 0 0 0 0

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan: At the direction of the Office of the Inspector General, a planned Summative Evaluation of the conditional grant provided to the Forum was not conducted in 2010–11 due to the decision not to renew the organization’s core funding.

Significant Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan: No audits were required by the grant agreement in 2010–11.


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Health Canada

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding




Name of Recipient: Rick Hansen Man in Motion Foundation

Start Date: April 1, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Funding: $30M

Description:

The Rick Hansen Man in Motion Foundation (RHF) is an independent, not-for-profit organization founded by Rick Hansen in 1988 to create solutions to improve the lives of Canadians with spinal cord injury (SCI) and to drive advances in SCI research.

Funding is used to implement a Strategy being carried out by the Rick Hansen Institute (RHI). The Strategy has the following objectives:

  1. reduce the incidence and severity of permanent paralysis resulting from SCI;
  2. increase the recovery of function following SCI;
  3. reduce the incidence and severity of secondary complications associated with SCI;
  4. increase the level of satisfaction with quality of life among Canadians with SCI;
  5. enhance the customized response to the priority unmet needs of Canadians with SCI; and,
  6. establish a world class Canadian SCI registry and data management platform.

Strategic Outcome(s): Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: Key accomplishments of the RHI include:

  • The development and expansion of the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry to promote collaborative national research and the collection of longitudinal clinical data of people with traumatic SCI across the health care continuum.
  • Partnering with Accreditation Canada to develop comprehensive, evidence-based standards for SCI service delivery in Canada.
  • Sponsorship of the ReJoyce (Rehabilitation Joystick for Computerized Exercise) system clinical trial. ReJoyce is a hand and arm rehabilitation system that is now a commercial product being sold in North America and Europe and waiting approval for sale in Asia.
  • Creation and dissemination of "Actionable Nuggets" on best practices in SCI care to family physicians in Canada.
  • Creation and dissemination of SCI Physical Activity Guidelines.
  • Support of translational research (24 projects in 2010-11).
Program Activity: Canadian Health System
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comments on Variance(s): None noted for 2010-2011 (the full $30M was provided to the recipient upon signing of the agreement in 2007).

Significant Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan:

The RHI conducted an Independent Mid-Point Review to measure its overall performance in achieving the strategic plan as outlined in the funding agreement with Health Canada. The Mid-Point Review, submitted to Health Canada June 18, 2010, confirmed the underlying rationale for HC funding and the need for the continued work of the RHI. Generally, good progress was reported in creating the infrastructure to engage SCI clinicians and researchers, create and manage the translational research program, and expand the Rick Hansen SCI Registry.

Some methodological issues and limitations were noted with the Review and the data collected. In addition, opportunities were identified for improved communication and transparency, establishing linkages with other funding agencies (such as the Canadian Institutes of Health Research), and improving the research grants administration process. The RHF and RHI are working closely with Health Canada to implement improvements outlined in their management response to the Mid-Point Review.

A summative performance evaluation for the RHI is scheduled to be submitted to Health Canada by July 31, 2012.

Significant Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan:

As outlined in the funding agreement, the RHI must engage an independent auditor to conduct a full audit of its financial statements each Fiscal Year. The 2009-2010 annual audit showed no major concerns. The 2010-2011 audited financial statements have now been completed and were submitted to Health Canada July 29, 2011.

The RHI is also required to engage an independent auditor to conduct a performance audit. The performance audit is scheduled to be submitted to Health Canada by March 31, 2012. The performance audit will assess the efficiency, economy and effectiveness with which Health Canada's funds have been used.



Name of Recipient: Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF)

Start Date: 1996-1997

End Date: N/A

Total Funding: $151.5M

Description:

1996 - $66.5 M endowment (received over five years) to establish the CHSRF;

1999 - $25 M one-time grant to support a ten-year program to develop capacity for research on nursing recruitment, retention, management, leadership and the issues emerging from health system restructuring (Nursing Research Fund or NRF); and a $35 M one-time grant to support the CHSRF's participation in the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR); and

2003 - $25 M one-time grant to develop a program to equip health service professionals and their organizations with the skills to find, assess, interpret and use research to better manage the Canadian health care system (Executive Training for Research Application or EXTRA) over a thirteen-year period.

CHSRF's mission is to improve the health of Canadians by:

  • Capturing the best evidence about how healthcare and other services can do more to improve the health of Canadians;
  • Filling critical gaps in evidence about how to improve the health of Canadians, by funding research and evaluation; and
  • Supporting policy makers and managers to develop the skills needed to apply the best evidence about services to improve the health of Canadians.

CHSRF's work contributes to Health Canada's aim of strengthening the knowledge base to address health and healthcare priorities. More specifically, CHSRF's programs further the development of health human resources, provide health managers with tools to improve primary and continuing care, and support nursing research from a health system perspective.

Strategic Outcome(s): Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

Effective Governance for Quality and Patient Safety

  • The effective governance program (for citizens on healthcare boards) was delivered as a pilot in three Manitoba regional health authorities, and to 15 health organizations in the Hamilton-Niagara-Haldimand-Brant region.
  • Following the official launch of the program where 19 health organizations participated, one regional health authority and the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency took part in the program, followed by a session for eight health organizations in Saskatoon.
  • After the Manitoba pilot, Manitoba Health, the Regional Health Association of Manitoba and the Manitoba Institute for Patient Safety jointly requested training for the remaining regional health authorities in 2011.
  • In Fall 2010, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and the Ontario Hospital Association entered into discussions around the delivery of effective governance programs across Ontario in 2011.

Patient Engagement

  • A call for proposals attracted 74 applications; 11 patient engagement projects (PEP) were selected.
  • Twenty-five team members, including representatives from all selected projects met for a learning workshop, following which all PEP teams submitted their project implementation and evaluation plans.

Accelerating Evidence-Informed Change

  • Launched new conference series, Picking Up the Pace (PUP), a biennial event showcasing innovation in key areas of the health system. Approximately 300 senior policy-makers, healthcare managers and clinicians participated. Forty-seven effective innovations in primary care from across Canada were featured.

Executive Training for Research Application (EXTRA)

  • Ongoing cohort management (fellows participate in four residency sessions over two years during which they study six curriculum modules)
  • Twenty-four new fellows were accepted through competition into EXTRA

CEO Forum

  • The theme of the 2010 forum was Metrics for Healthcare Quality: The Leader's Role, and focused on ways to measure healthcare in order to support efforts to improve quality and performance. More than 120 CEOs attended.
  • CHSRF launched a new, annual survey of leaders' perspectives on the challenges facing the healthcare system to inform the CEO Forum, establish a channel for CHSRF to engage with organizations that are leading improvements and contribute to renewal of the EXTRA curriculum.

Northern Initiatives

  • CHSRF and the Northwest Territories Department of Health and Social Services hosted the first of four workshops aimed at developing a model for chronic disease management in the territory.
  • Awarded a two-year grant to the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research and the Yellowknife Health and Social Services Authority to explore the use of information technology to improve physician support services in the Northwest Territories.
  • Capacity for Applied and Developmental Research in Evaluation in Health Sciences and Nursing (CADRE)
  • Much of the effort in 2010 was focused on wind-down, fulfilling accountability and reporting requirements, and evaluation. The formal evaluation, to be completed in 2011 and released in 2012, will assess the extent to which CADRE has influenced health system decision-making and academia.

Nursing

  • Published "Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners in Canada: A decision support synthesis." Based on the recommendations of the report, CHSRF, the Canadian Nurses Association and Health Canada's Office of Nursing Policy are providing direction on a forum on advanced practice nursing to be held in 2011. CHSRF also funded a special issue of the Journal of Nursing Leadership, which will be released in 2011.

Healthcare financing, innovation and transformation

  • Five research papers on cost drivers, a paper on healthcare financing, and a policy options paper on hospital funding were completed (for release in 2011). Health Canada contributed $500K in contribution funding to this work.
  • Partnered with policy research groups on events across Canada including: the Invitational Symposium on Healthcare Renewal, a healthcare roundtable to discuss the recommendations of the healthcare chapter of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's Economic Survey of Canada 2010; and a national forum on high-quality, sustainable funding models with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and the Institute of Health Economics.

Planning for the aging population

  • Hosted a national and five regional roundtables as part of its series, Better with Age: Health systems planning for the aging population, which brought together more than 200 policy-makers, healthcare executives, researchers and citizens from across Canada. Analysis of the themes that emerged--including integrated care, ageism, choice, patient-centred care and health human resource availability--is underway and CHSRF will release six roundtable reports and one synthesis report in 2011.

Primary healthcare innovation

  • Provided funding for and worked with a pan-Canadian primary healthcare working group to help plan the Canadian Institutes of Health Research's primary healthcare summit (+500 attendees in January).
  • Published three reports on primary healthcare improvement; released Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners in Canada: A decision support synthesis; supported five Research, Exchange and Impact for System Support (REISS) projects focusing on the interface between primary healthcare and public health; and provided a one-time grant of $50,000 to the C.T. Lamont Primary Healthcare Research Centre at the University of Ottawa for an economic analysis of the consequences of achieving a high-quality primary healthcare system in Canada.

Publications and programs

  • 5 Researcher on Call webinars
  • 3 Mythbusters articles
  • 2 editions of Pass it on!
  • Published Quality of Healthcare in Canada: A Chartbook, undertaken with the Canadian Institute for Health Information, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute and Statistics Canada.

Recognition and capacity development

  • Excellence through Evidence Award and Health Services Research Advancement Award Mythbusters Award
  • Canadian Harkness Fellowships in Health Care Policy and Practice (worked with The Commonwealth Fund to support the annual selection of up to two Canadian fellows, and hosted the annual Canadian Health Policy Briefing tour)

Additional information is available in CHSRF's 2010 Annual Performance Report which was submitted to Health Canada on 30 May 2010 (available online at www.chsrf.ca).

Program Activity:
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comments on Variance(s): Conditional grants to CHSRF (see list in section 5 above) were all issued prior to the 10-11 reporting period.

Significant Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan:

  • Instituted a new organization-wide Program Performance Management (PPM) evaluation system based on the "outcome mapping" methodology
  • Initiated several major evaluations including: a review of the Executive Training for Research Application program; a review of the Capacity for Applied and Developmental Research and Evaluation in Health Services and Nursing program (in wind-down); and an evaluation, in collaboration with Health Canada, of the Listening for Direction national consultation exercise

Significant Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan:

The 2010 external financial and pension plan audits showed no major concerns, with the auditors reporting clean audits with no evidence of fraud or illegal acts.

The 2010 internal controls review examined the operational area of investments, insurance and commodity taxes functions. The recommendations from the internal controls review will be implemented in 2011.



Name of Recipient: Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)

Start Date: March 9, 2001

End Date: N/A

Total Funding: $2.1B*
*Infoway received $1.2 B as lump-sum grants between 2001 and 2004. The $400M allocated in 2007 was subject to new conditions - these funds flow to Infoway on an as-needed basis. An additional $500M for Infoway was announced in Budget 2009 and confirmed in Budget 2010. In March 2010, Health Canada and Infoway signed a related funding agreement. The $500M funds will flow to Infoway on an as-needed basis.

Description:

Canada Health Infoway Inc. (Infoway) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in 2001 to accelerate the development of health information and communication technologies such as electronic health records, telehealth and public health surveillance systems on a pan-Canadian basis. Its Corporate Members are the 14 federal, provincial and territorial Deputy Ministers of Health.

Since 2001, the federal government has committed the following funding allocations: $500 million in 2001 in support of the September 2000 First Ministers' Action Plan for Health System Renewal to strengthen a Canada-wide health infostructure (with the electronic health record - EHR - as a priority); $600 million in the First Ministers' Health Accord of February 2003, to accelerate implementation of the EHR and Telehealth; $100 million as part of Budget 2004 to support development of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system; and $400 million as part of Budget 2007 to support continued work on EHRs and wait times reductions. Also, as part of the Economic Action Plan, and as indicated in Budget 2009, the Government of Canada announced an additional investment of $500 million in Infoway, to support continued implementation of EHRs, implementation of electronic medical records in physicians' offices, and integration of points of service with the EHR system. Following a due diligence process, Budget 2010 announced the government's intention to move forward with the transfer of the funds. In March 2010, Health Canada and Infoway signed a related funding agreement, which includes enhanced accountability provisions.

It is anticipated that Infoway's approach, where federal, provincial and territorial (F/P/T) governments participate as equals, toward a goal of modernizing the health information system, will reduce costs and improve the quality of health care and patient safety through coordination of effort and avoidance of duplication.

Strategic Outcome(s): Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

Investment Strategy - Infoway is a strategic investor, with a funding formula covering up to 100% of territorial and 75% of provincial project development and implementation costs. Infoway provides a portion of system development costs and supports project oversight while P/T partners are responsible for actual system development, implementation and overall funding, including ongoing operational costs. In 2010-2011, Infoway approved $390.5 million in new projects (21 projects), bringing its cumulative allocation of investments to $2.007 billion (315 projects since Infoway's inception).

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) - Infoway's goal for EHRs, endorsed by all jurisdictions is that: "by 2010, every province and territory and the populations they serve will benefit from new health information systems that will help transform their health care delivery system. Further, by 2010, the electronic health records of 50 per cent of Canadians and by 2016, those of 100 per cent of Canadians, will be available to their authorized health care professionals." The first part of this goal has been achieved; as of March 31, 2011, the core components of an EHR were in place for 50.1% of Canadians.

In 2010-2011, Infoway and the P/Ts continued to make significant progress on the various components of the EHR - client and provider registries, laboratory information and diagnostic imaging systems, drug information systems and clinical reports. For example, the following results were achieved in 2010-2011.

Drug Information Systems (DIS): It is estimated that 30,000 health care professionals are using second generation drug information systems. As an example, British Columbia's PharmaNet DIS captures every prescription dispensed in the province's pharmacies and provides alerts to pharmacists. In 2010, more than 60 million prescriptions were reviewed via PharmaNet, resulting in the identification of 32 million potential drug interactions.

Diagnostic Imaging Systems (DI Systems): As of March 2011 an estimated 43,000 health care professionals are using diagnostic imaging system technology. This has improved the turnaround time of receiving the results of these tests by 30-40%, patients are able to get their results faster and start treatment earlier. Infoway's DI system program is available in several provinces.

Telehealth - Infoway is working to implement solutions that facilitate the delivery of health information and services between patients and providers over distance, with a focus on Aboriginal, official language minority, northern and remote communities. Strategic telehealth plans are in place in most jurisdictions.

In 2010, Infoway commissioned an independent pan-Canadian study to describe telehealth use in Canada and the benefits achieved to date. The report was released in May 2011. This report, Telehealth Benefits and Adoption: Connecting People and Providers Across Canada, describes how telehealth has delivered a number of benefits for clinicians, patients and the health care system. The report highlights that telehealth is:

  • Growing and on its way to becoming a mainstream way of delivering care
  • Reducing travel by patients, families and health care providers
  • Making it easier for Canadians in rural and remote areas to access specialized care that they need

Electronic Medical Records (EMR) - As a result of the new funding in 2010, Infoway has allocated funds toward investment in EMR systems in community based practices and outpatient settings. Investments will be used toward clinical peer support networks, innovation projects and consumer health solutions.

In 2010-2011, Infoway worked with jurisdictions and vendors to develop user guides and a set of software solutions to accelerate the interoperability of EHRs, especially with point of service systems such as physicians' office EMRs, hospital information systems and community pharmacy systems.

Consumer Health Solutions - As an emerging area of interest and investment for Infoway, this program will educate and empower Canadians by providing electronic access to their medical record. For example, Infoway is funding Alberta's MyHealth.Alberta.ca initiative. Once complete, Alberta's personal health portal --- the first in Canada -- will provide Albertans secure access to their personal health information through the province's electronic health record system. Patients will be able to track their own personal health data such as blood pressure readings, insulin levels, weight, and immunizations. The portal was launched in May, 2011.

Innovation and Adoption - In the past fiscal year, Infoway launched new investment programs focused on accelerating the extent to which clinicians and Canadians receive tangible value from the use of information and communications technology. Investment is being made in Clinician Peer Support Networks, training and other initiatives to foster innovation in eHealth.

Program Activity: Canadian Health System
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
$122.9 $64.49 $91.84 $91.84 $91.84 $0

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan:

In March 2011, Infoway released an independent evaluation of its performance in achieving the objectives of the 2003 funding agreement with the Government of Canada. The report concluded that Infoway has met or made progress on the outcomes specified in the 2003 funding agreement, despite the existing challenges. The evaluation found that the appropriate strategies are in place to achieve the outcomes specified in the funding agreement and projects are managed in a cost effective manner and are achieving the intended results.

In March 2013, Infoway is expected to release an independent evaluation to measure its performance in achieving the objectives of the 2010 funding agreement.

Significant Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan:

No audit activity was undertaken in the 2010-2011 fiscal year.

In March 2013, Infoway is expected to submit an independent performance evaluation (value-for-money) audit report, relating to use of funds under all funding agreements.



Name of Recipient: Mental Health Commission of Canada -- Conditional Grant to support Research Demonstration Projects in Mental Health and Homelessness

Start Date: April 1, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2013

Total Funding: $110M

Description: As part of Budget 2008, the federal government committed $110 million in funding to the MHCC to support five research demonstration projects in mental health and homelessness over five years (2008-2013). Among the objectives, these projects will contribute to building knowledge on how to increase access to adequate housing in combination with the provision of necessary support services, and will result in the development of best practices that will support future interventions and long-term improvements to the lives of Canada's most vulnerable.

The initiative uses a 'Housing First' approach, which stresses recovery and consumer/tenant choice, and compares this with traditional care. A total of 2285 homeless people living with a mental illness will participate of which 1,325 people will be given a place to live, and will be offered services to assist them over the course of the initiative. The remaining participants will receive the regular services that are currently available in their cities. The goal is to find out which services provide the best outcomes to homeless people living with mental illness. Expected results include:

  • the development of a knowledge-base accessible to all jurisdictions;
  • the identification of effective approaches to integrating housing supports and the Basket of Necessary Services or other "prerequisites";
  • the development of Best Practices and Lessons Learned; produce data that is reflective of mental health issues among Canada's homeless population;
  • the identification of unique problems and solutions for diverse ethno-cultural groups within this population; and
  • support improvements at each project site to address fragmentation through improved system integration and support.

Strategic Outcome(s): Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: The project, entitled, At Home /Chez Soi (French)/Niapin (Cree), was launched in November, 2009, in Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montreal, and Moncton. Each project focuses on a distinct group of homeless people living with mental illness such as those who also have a substance abuse problem, Aboriginal Canadians and non-English speaking new immigrants. As of May 2011, 95% of the intended participants have been enrolled in the study, of which, 900 have been provided housing. Overall, all sites are well on track in meeting their target enrolment. The initiative continues to gain national and international recognition, with interest from various stakeholders and countries including France and Australia interested in adapting the program. The Commission continues to work collaboratively with provincial and municipal levels of government, researchers, local service providers and people with lived experience of mental illness and homelessness.

Program Activity: Canadian Health System
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
$110 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan: As per the terms and conditions of the funding agreement, the Commission is required to carry out an Independent Evaluation within 5 years and 180 days to measure the Commission's overall performance in achieving the purpose of the Grant funding.

The homelessness initiative was also included as part of the overall performance evaluation for the Commission that took place in FY 2010-2011. The evaluation set out to assess the Commission's progress between July 2007 and December 2010 in the areas of:

  • ability to meet its mandate
  • effectiveness of policy and/or programs;
  • intended and unintended impacts across the mental health system; and
  • alternative ways to achieve expected results.

The evaluation demonstrated the organization's positive efforts to strengthen its accountability, and performance management processes and practices, and is making progress on most of its initiatives including the Homelessness initiative. Findings were based on a review of project documents, an online survey, focus groups, and a series of interviews with key informants

Significant Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan: As outlined in the funding agreement, the Commission must engage an independent auditor to conduct a full audit of its financial statements each Fiscal Year. The 2010-11 audited financial statements have now been completed and were presented to the Board of Directors for approval on June 14, 2011.

The Homeless project is expected to be part of the internal audit by Health Canada planned for 2011-12.


Top of Page

Industry Canada

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (Notes 1 and 2)

Industry Canada is responsible for administering funding agreements with the following foundations.

Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

  • Brain Research Centre
  • Canada School for Energy and the Environment (formerly known as The Canada School of Sustainable Energy)
  • Council of Canadian Academies
  • Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery
  • Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute (St. Michael's Hospital)
  • Life Sciences Research Institute (Dalhousie University)
  • Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation
  • The National Optics Institute

Note 1: Only funding agreements of $5 million or more still in effect as of 2010–11 are reported.
Note 2: Funding already reported in the Transfer Payment Program Tables is not duplicated here.

Strategic Outcome
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy


Name of Recipient:  Brain Research Centre

Start Date: February 28, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Funding ($ millions): 15.0

Description:
The Brain Research Centre (BRC) is a research facility that operates as a hub-and-spoke facility, with teams of neuroscientists (over 190 investigators) located at the University of British Columbia campus and in various locations in Vancouver. The Centre's structure and multidisciplinary approach is designed to bridge the gap between basic science and its clinical applications, while contributing to significant discoveries and development of effective new therapies.

The BRC's expected results are:

  • providing infrastructure to enable and advance innovation research and commercialization in neurodegenerative diseases, multiple sclerosis, mental health and addictions, stroke, neurotrauma, and vision;
  • developing and expanding laboratories;
  • developing an environment to foster collaboration, knowledge translation and commercialization opportunities;
  • facilitating the development of neurotechnology enterprises and industrial partnerships; and 
  • enabling translational training in clinical neuroscience.

Strategic Outcome:
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

  • BRC's activities relate to the construction of the building, which is scheduled to be completed in the summer of 2013. The facility will encourage collaboration among basic and applied researchers and health practitioners to improve knowledge of brain diseases and, in turn, accelerate the introduction of new therapies and biotech ventures.

In 2010–11, the BRC:

  • leveraged $15 million in new private donor funding, enabling the expansion of the building plan to include a full 30,000-square-foot basement; and
  • revised the building plan, completed design tasks and began the working drawing phase in preparation for the construction of the research facility scheduled to begin in August 2011.
Program Activity: Canada's Research and Innovation Capacity

($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–09
Actual
Spending
2009–10
Planned
Spending
2010–11
Total
Authorities
2010–11
Actual
Spending
2010–11
Variance(s)
- - - - - -

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
$15 million was paid upfront in 2007-08.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
The compliance audit completed in 2010–11 provided the project review.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
A compliance audit was conducted on the BRC in 2010–11, which found that the BRC was in compliance with the requirements of its funding agreement with Industry Canada. It included recommendations to provide greater clarity and more information in its corporate plans and annual reports.

URL to Recipient's Site: Brain Research Centre

 


Name of Recipient:  Canada School of Energy and Environment (formerly known as The Canada School of Sustainable Energy)

Start Date: March 7, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2014

Total Funding ($ millions): 15.0

Description:
The Canada School of Energy and Environment's (CSEE) goal is to address the challenge of resource sustainability, while protecting environmental quality and addressing climate change. CSEE builds on capacity within the University of Calgary, the University of Alberta and the University of Lethbridge, located in the heart of Canada's energy sector. It brings together the best thinking in academia, industry and government for the economic, social and environmental benefit of all Canadians.
CSEE's 5 objectives are to:

  • create opportunities for national and international collaborations on policy issues;
  • provide advice to industry, academia and government;
  • coordinate research and academic programming;
  • facilitate technology transfer and commercialization; and
  • facilitate the exchange of research findings and information and promote collaboration in the international community.

Strategic Outcome:
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

In 2010–11, the CSEE achieved the following results:

  • The 3rd round of proof-of-principle research funding competitions was completed. From the 39 applications, the review panel selected 10 projects, with a total funding of $522,000. These projects are now underway under the supervision of the University of Alberta and the University of Calgary. 
  • The CSEE hosted, with a number of other organizations, the April 2010 Banff Clean Energy Dialogue, which brought together government officials, industry chief executive officers, think tank directors and environmental non-governmental organization representatives. 
  • The CSEE worked with the Winnipeg Consensus Group think tanks and environmental non-governmental organizations on ideas to build a Canadian energy strategy. 
  • The CSEE moderated the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers Oil Sands Dialogues, an attempt to bridge the gap of information and understanding on oil sands between industry and stakeholders.
Program Activity: Canada's Research and Innovation Capacity

($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–09
 
Actual
Spending
2009–10
 
Planned
Spending
2010–11
 
Total
Authorities
2010–11
 
Actual
Spending
2010–11
 
Variance(s)
- - - - - -

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
$15 million was paid upfront in 2007–08.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
A compliance audit to be completed in 2013–14 will provide the project review.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
A compliance audit of the CSEE is scheduled to be completed by September 30, 2013.

URL to Recipient's Site: Canada School of Energy and Environment



Name of Recipient:  Council of Canadian Academies

Start Date: July 2005

End Date: March 2015

Total Funding ($ millions): 30.0

Description:
The Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) is an arm's-length, not-for-profit organization that was established to assess the state of scientific knowledge underpinning key public policy issues. Its founding members are the Royal Society of Canada, the Canadian Academy of Engineering and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. The Government of Canada provided a $30-million, one-time conditional grant in July 2005 from Budget 2005, which entitles the Government to up to 5 assessments per year. All CCA assessments are undertaken by independent panels of qualified experts from Canada and abroad. Each assessment takes 12 months to 2 years to complete.

Strategic Outcome:
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

  • CCA published 2 assessment reports in 2010–11: Honesty, Accountability, and Trust: Fostering Research Integrity in Canada (November 2010), and Canadian Taxonomy: Exploring Biodiversity, Creating Opportunity (November 2010). This is 1 fewer than expected due to delays in the peer review process.
  • In fiscal year 2011–12 the CCA will complete 2 more assessments on Approaches to Animal Health Risk Assessment and the Integrated Testing of Pesticides. 
  • In 2010, the CCA published its External Evaluation Report and, in response, has developed its 2011–14 Strategic Plan entitled Insight & Impact.
Program Activity: Canada's Research and Innovation Capacity

($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–09
 
Actual
Spending
2009–10
 
Planned
Spending
2010–11
 
Total
Authorities
2010–11
 
Actual
Spending
2010–11
 
Variance(s)
- - - - - -

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
$30 million was paid upfront in 2005–06.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
In 2010, the CCA undertook an external evaluation and published the results in a report entitled Review of the Council of Canadian Academies: Report from the External Evaluation Panel 2010. The evaluation concluded that the CCA is delivering on its objectives and adding value to public debate. The panel produced 19 overarching recommendations for the CCA, which can be broken down into 5 key areas: the development of science advice in Canada, the relationship with the Member Academies, stakeholder engagement, communications and outreach, organizational excellence, and sustainable funding. The full report is publicly available on the CCA's website. 

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
No audit was completed or planned in 2010–11.

URL to Recipient's Site: Council of Canadian Academies


Name of Recipient: Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery

Start Date: March 7, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Funding ($ millions): 15.0

Description:
The Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery (HSFCSR), affiliated with the University of Toronto and the University of Ottawa, is developing a program of integrated, translational research that includes molecular biology, laboratory models and clinical studies that help pave the way for designing and testing post-stroke interventions and therapies more quickly. The Centre's primary research objective is to establish a program of excellence in brain recovery research that will be globally competitive and will have a realistic likelihood of leading to effective functional improvements after a stroke.

Strategic Outcome:
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

In 2010–11, the HSFCSR:

  • recruited world-renowned neuroscientist Dr. Dale Corbett in the role of Scientific Director and CEO of the Centre;
  • engaged 93 member researchers in 64 projects and 2 platforms, including the launch of 16 new projects;
  • increased the number of patients enrolled in the Rehabilitation Affiliate Program from 157 to 269; and
  • built new capacity in the Stroke Patient Recovery Research Database to ensure security, reliability and ease of collaboration.
Program Activity: Canada's Research and Innovation Capacity

($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–09
 
Actual
Spending
2009–10
 
Planned
Spending
2010–11
 
Total
Authorities
2010–11
 
Actual
Spending
2010–11
 
Variance(s)
- - - - - -

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
$15 million was paid upfront in 2007–08.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
The compliance audit completed in 2010–11 provided the project review.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
A compliance audit was conducted on the HSFCSR in 2010–11, which found that the HSFCSR was in compliance with the requirements of its funding agreement with Industry Canada. It included recommendations to improve reporting practices.

URL to Recipient's Site: Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery


Name of Recipient:  Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute (St. Michael's Hospital)

Start Date: March 13, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2011

Total Funding ($ millions): 15.0

Description:
The Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute (LKSKI) at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto will bring together research, education and clinical care with a commitment to knowledge translation in order to bridge the gap between research knowledge and health care practice. The Institute will initially focus on inner-city health, heart and lung disease, diabetes, nutrition, brain injury, and multi-organ failure, building on existing research teams of scientists, research coordinators, programmers and technicians.

Strategic Outcome:
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

In 2010–11, the LKSKI:

  • completed construction and began occupancy of the building;
  • recruited 5 leading researchers and educators and increased staff of the Applied Health Research Centre to 30 employees;
  • provided a training course on knowledge translation to 22 employees at St. Michael's Hospital; and
  • provided 115 knowledge translation consultations within the University of Toronto community, leading to 44 knowledge translation projects at St. Michael's Hospital.
Program Activity: Canada's Research and Innovation Capacity

($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–09
 
Actual
Spending
2009–10
 
Planned
Spending
2010–11
 
Total
Authorities
2010–11
 
Actual
Spending
2010–11
 
Variance(s)
- - - - - -

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
$15 million was paid upfront in 2007–08.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
The compliance audit completed in 2010–11 provided the project review.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
A compliance audit was conducted on the LKSKI in 2010–11, which found that the LKSKI was in compliance with the requirements of its funding agreement with Industry Canada. It included recommendations to improve recognition of federal funding and official language offering.

URL to Recipient's Site: Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute


Name of Recipient:  Life Sciences Research Institute (Dalhousie University)

Start Date: February 19, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2011

Total Funding ($ millions): 15.0

Description:
The Life Sciences Research Institute (LSRI) is a partnership of Capital Health, Dalhousie University and the IWK Health Centre. LSRI will provide open-concept research and incubator space for the Halifax region's growing life sciences and biotechnology sector and has the potential to create employment, attract investment, foster innovation, and improve the quality of health care and life for people in the region.

Strategic Outcome:
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

In 2010–11, the LSRI:

  • completed the construction of the building; and
  • put in place the LSRI Scientific and Commercialization Committee, which has begun the development of a plan to assess the calibre and progression of the future work of LSRI tenants. The Committee will also be responsible for recommending new tenancy
Program Activity: Canada's Research and Innovation Capacity

($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–09
 
Actual
Spending
2009–10
 
Planned
Spending
2010–11
 
Total
Authorities
2010–11
 
Actual
Spending
2010–11
 
Variance(s)
- - - - - -

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
$15 million was paid up front in 2007–08.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
The compliance audit completed in 2010–11 provided the project review.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
A compliance audit was conducted on the LSRI in 2010–11, which found that the LSRI was in compliance with the requirements of its funding agreement with Industry Canada. It included recommendations to improve recognition of federal funding, reporting practices and official languages offering.

URL to Recipient's Site: Life Sciences Research Institute


Name of Recipient: Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation

Start Date: March 31, 2002

End Date: Ongoing

Total Funding ($ millions): 125.0

Description:
The Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation supports the research and dissemination of research findings in the humanities and human sciences, such as Canadian studies, history, international relations, journalism, law, peace and conflict studies, philosophy, political economy, political science, sociology, and urban and community studies.

Utilizing a peer-review process, the Foundation offers 3 types of awards: Scholarships awarded to doctoral candidates, Fellowships awarded to established researchers at Canadian universities and Mentorships awarded to seasoned professionals who are able to counsel the Scholars. The Foundation also supports the Public Interaction Program, which communicates the work of the Foundation through conferences, lectures and symposia.

Strategic Outcome:
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

In 2010–11, the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation

  • awarded 4 Trudeau Fellowships, 15 Trudeau Scholarships and 10 Trudeau Mentorships; and
  • held its 7th annual Conference on Public Policy, annual Summer Institute, Trudeau Lecture Series, as well as other events under the Public Interaction Program throughout the year.
Program Activity: Canada's Research and Innovation Capacity

($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–09
 
Actual
Spending
2009–10
 
Planned
Spending
2010–11
 
Total
Authorities
2010–11
 
Actual
Spending
2010–11
 
Variance(s)
- - - - - -

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The federal government endowed the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation with $125 million in March 2002.

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
An evaluation was completed in 2008–09 with the next one scheduled for 2013–14.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
No audit was completed or planned in 2010–11.

URL to Recipient's Site: www.trudeaufoundation.ca 


Name of Recipient:  The National Optics Institute

Start Date: February 19, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2011

Total Funding ($ millions): 15.0

Description:
The National Optics Institute (INO), located in Quebec, is a centre of expertise in optics and photonics, and works with businesses to help them find solutions and technology platforms to meet their needs. INO provides research and development support for clients, prototype production and technology transfer, and promotes innovative projects.

Strategic Outcome:
Science and Technology, Knowledge, and Innovation are Effective Drivers of a Strong Canadian Economy

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:

In 2010–11, INO:

  • advanced optics and photonics research and technology with broad applications in health, defence and security, space and astronomy, manufacturing, information and communications technologies, and energy and environment;
  • generated $12 million in external revenues from research and development contracts, prototype sales and technology transfers, of which 61% came from small and medium-sized enterprises, 25% from large companies, 8% from government agencies and 6% from universities; and
  • received 10 patents, created 1 spinoff company and completed 3 technology transfers.
Program Activity: Canada's Research and Innovation Capacity

($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008–09
 
Actual
Spending
2009–10
 
Planned
Spending
2010–11
 
Total
Authorities
2010–11
 
Actual
Spending
2010–11
 
Variance(s)
- - - - - -

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
$15 million was paid upfront in 2007–08

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
The compliance audit completed in 2010–11 provided the project review.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:
A compliance audit was conducted on INO in 2010–11, which found that INO was in compliance with the requirements of its funding agreement with Industry Canada. It included recommendations for INO to provide greater clarity and more information in its corporate plans and annual reports.

URL to Recipient's Site: www.ino.ca

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Natural Resources Canada

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding




Name of Recipient: Green Municipal Fund (GMF) (Statutory)
Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ (FCM) Green Municipal Fund (GMF) formerly known as the Green Municipal Enabling Fund (GMEF) and the Green Municipal Investment Fund (GMIF) 

Start Date: March 31, 2000

End Date: In perpetuity

Total Funding: $550M*

Description: The Government of Canada endowed the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM), a non-profit organization, with $550 million* to establish the Green Municipal Fund (GMF) to provide long-term, sustainable financing for municipal governments and their partners.  The GMF invests in plans, studies and projects that provide the best examples of municipal leadership in sustainable development and that can be replicated in other Canadian communities.

The intent of the GMF is to encourage investment in environmental municipal infrastructure.  Specifically, the priorities of the fund are to have a positive impact on the health and the quality of life of Canadians by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, improving local air, water and soil quality and promoting renewable energy by supporting environmental studies and projects within the municipal sector.  Additional considerations include the potential for economic and/or social benefit.

Under the GMF agreement, the Government of Canada (represented by NRCan and Environment Canada) participates in governance of this revolving fund, along with representatives from the public and private sectors, including municipal officials and technical experts, through a Peer Review Committee and an advisory Council. The FCM Board of Directors approves projects based on the Council’s recommendations.
*NRCan’s share is $275M

Strategic Outcome(s): Environmental Responsibilities - Canada is a world leader in environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: As of March 31, 2011, the GMF had committed $555.2 million for more than 870 sustainable community plans, feasibility studies, field tests and capital projects with the potential to leverage over $3 billion of economic activity in approximately 430 Canadian communities. Actual environmental benefits include the reduction of an estimated 175,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide annually from 40 completed capital projects.

More details can be found in the Green Municipal Fund Annual Report 2010–2011.

Program Activity: Clean Energy
($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Variance(s)
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: An independent review of the GMF was completed in 2009.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: An independent audit of the GMF was completed in 2009.



Name of Recipient: Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) for the SD Tech Fund™ (statutory)

Start Date: March 26, 2001

End Date: June 30, 2015

Total Funding: $ 550 million*

Description: SDTC (the Foundation) is managing the SD Tech Fund™ to stimulate the development and demonstration of Canadian technologies aimed at climate change, clean air, clean water and clean soil.

* The funding was equally divided between NRCan and Environment Canada.

Strategic Outcome(s): Environmental Responsibility - Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient:  

SDTC has allocated $515 million to leverage $1.2 billion in funding from other partners for a total of $1.8 billion in portfolio value across its 210 projects.  SDTC reported that 90% of its projects are led by small and medium-sized companies. 

In 2010 alone, SDTC allocated $77 million to new projects and $15 million as modifications to existing projects, supporting an additional 33 companies and saw the completion of eight projects.  Disbursements to date equal $231 million, of which $58 million was allocated in 2010. 

Of the total portfolio of 210 funded projects: 90% have climate change benefits; 78% have clean air benefits; 43% have soil or water benefits and 89% of all SDTC projects have more than one environmental benefit.

In terms of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), SDTC projections estimate a total annual reduction in 2015 of between 7 and 17 megatonnes, based on the 210 projects SDTC has funded thus far.

Program Activity: Clean Engergy
($ millions)
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Variance(s)
- - - - - -

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: Two interim evaluations were performed by an independent 3rd party (in 2006 and 2009) as required in the Funding Agreement.  The evaluations reports are available at:
http://www.sdtc.ca/index.php?page=boards-and-committees&hl=en_CA

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan:The Agreement requires the Foundation to hire an auditor to audit the accounts and financial transactions of SDTC and appoint an Audit Committee to oversee the financial management of the Foundation.  It also stipulates that Canada or the Auditor General may undertake a compliance audit at any time over the life of the Fund.



Name of Recipient: Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) for the NextGen Biofuels Fund™

Start Date: July 30, 2007

End Date: Agreement ends Sept 30, 2027; last disbursement of funds to SDTC by March 31, 2015

Total Funding: $250 M

Description: SDTC is managing the NextGen Biofuels Fund™, which will support up to 40% of eligible project costs to a maximum of $200M per project for the establishment of first-of-kind, large-scale demonstration next-generation renewable fuel production facilities to encourage the future sustainability and success of renewable fuels.  Next-generation renewable fuels are derived from non-traditional renewable feedstocks, such as forest biomass, fast-growing grasses, and agricultural residues, and are produced with non-conventional conversion technologies.

Since next-generation technologies are capital equipment intensive, they constitute a greater debt financing risk.  The support provided by the NextGen Biofuels Fund™ will encourage the retention and growth of technology expertise and innovation capacity for next-generation renewable fuels production in Canada.

Of the $250M in total funding, $100M is statutory and the remaining $150M is appropriated funding.

Environment Canada contributes an equal amount of $250 million.

Strategic Outcome(s): Environmental Responsibilities - Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: As of March 31, 2011, the Fund had four applications in the Project Assurance Process, compared with only one application at the end of 2009.

Throughout 2010, SDTC saw increased interest in the NGBF due to worldwide progress on the technology and pre-commercial demonstration fronts, as well as global economic recovery.  The Fund is currently tracking over 100 companies, with twenty high potential candidates well aligned with promising technology roll-outs.

Program Activity: Clean Energy
($ millions)
ActualSpending
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Variance(s)
Statutory 19.0 0.0 20.0 0 20.0
Appropriation 12.5 0.0 37.5 0 37.5

Comments on Variance(s): SDTC required no additional funding in 2010-11

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: Three interim evaluations will be performed by an independent 3rd party (Nov 30, 2012, Nov 30, 2017 and Nov 30, 2022); a final evaluation by Sept 30, 2027.  Canada may choose to evaluate the Foundation at any time over the life of the agreement to determine whether it is fulfilling its objectives.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plan: The agreement with SDTC requires the Foundation to hire an auditor to audit the accounts and financial statements and appoint an Audit Committee to oversee the financial management of the Foundation.  It also stipulates that Canada or the Auditor General may undertake a compliance audit at any time over the life of the Fund.


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Western Economic Diversification Canada

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding


Name of Recipient: Primrose Lake Economic Development Corporation (PLEDC)

Start Date: March 30, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2027

Total Funding: $15 million

Description: Create a community controlled trust fund for economic development.

Strategic Outcome(s): The western Canadian economy is developed and diversified.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: During fiscal 2010-11, the Board focused on three areas:

  1. Communications – Launched a website in January 2011; prepared a brochure outlining mandate, background, programs; began publishing regular newsletters.
  2. Administration – The part-time interim CEO has implemented the board decision to combine the part-time CEO contract and the term Fieldworker position into a full-time General Manager. The position was advertised in March, and staffed in April, 2011. Operating costs are usually $150,000 ; and
  3. Established strategic goals for 2011-12.

Since 2009, $470,279 has been invested in 48 projects in the four communities, and the Board continues to review new applications.

Program Activity: (amounts do not include Operating costs)
($ millions)
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Planned
Spending
2010-11
Total
Authorities
2010-11
Actual
Spending
Variance(s)
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comments on Variance(s): n/a

Significant Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan: No evaluation by WD yet, but the Office of Federal Interlocutor contracted a “Strategic Assessment” on PLEDC; report submitted January 2011. Recommendations include a focus on overall investment strategy, investment of trust income (instead of spending). WD has also encouraged Board and Staff training and a full time CEO. The WD agreement requires that an evaluation be completed by March 2012.

Significant Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plan:
No audits performed to date. Date for an audit in the future has not yet been identified.

URL to Recipient's Site: www.pledco.ca