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ARCHIVED - 2010-2011 DPRs - Horizontal Initiatives

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Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Canadian Polar Commission

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: International Polar Year

Name of Lead Department(s): Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (formerly INAC) – Northern Affairs Program

Lead Department Program Activity: Healthy Northern Communities

Start Date: April 1, 2006

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $150 million over six years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): To support Canada's participation in International Polar Year (IPY), the Government of Canada has invested $150 million over six years. This funding is being used to carry out an innovative and multidisciplinary Arctic science program. The Government of Canada IPY program is led by AANDC and involves 12 federal departments and agencies, including Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (on behalf of Industry Canada), Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Canada's significant involvement and investment in IPY contributes to the government's stewardship of Canada's Northern Region. The Government of Canada IPY program is working with Canadian scientists and Northern communities in developing and conducting activities such as research, training and capacity building.

Key areas of the Government of Canada IPY program include:

  • Undertaking new science and research in and for the North, which includes the involvement of Northern communities
  • Ensuring the health and safety of scientists and communities conducting research in the North
  • Communicating information about the program and the science undertaken
  • Building capacity, through training opportunities for youth and Northerners, aimed at enhancing participation in Northern scientific research
  • Ensuring that the resulting scientific knowledge and data are properly managed, archived and made accessible
  • Supporting the appropriate procedural, regulatory and infrastructure framework for conducting scientific research

Funds are distributed among federal departments and agencies according to their involvement in the various aspects of the program. The Northern IPY coordinators maintain a regional network to support all aspects of Canada's IPY program in four Inuit regions across the North. Federal departments and agencies participating in IPY are undertaking research projects, delivering support for logistics and emergency preparedness and contributing to projects for training, communications and outreach.

Shared Outcome(s):

The IPY program works toward the achievement of two outcomes:

  • Increased understanding of impacts of a changing climate and of health and well-being of Northern communities informs policy and decision making, and contributes to recognition of Canada as an expert on the Canadian North
  • Northern research capacity is enhanced through newly trained scientists, knowledge and skills transfer to Northerners, and greater participation in planning and delivery of research by Northerners

Governance Structure(s):

  • Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) Committee on IPY/Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) (chaired by the ADM of Northern Affairs, AANDC)
  • IPY Federal Program Office (housed at AANDC)
  • Directors general communications committees on IPY
  • IPY advisory subcommittees

Performance Highlights:

From a horizontal perspective, 2010-2011 produced a subsequent series of positive results for the Government of Canada Program for International Polar Year (IPY). During the past year, IPY undertook a cultural shift in redirecting resources and initiatives toward lasting legacy pieces. To ensure an optimal return on investment for each project, managers directed their focus on analyzing results, communications, consultation, deriving next steps and accessing and preserving information. Several key activities intended to synthesize the efforts of all stakeholders include the continued engagement of Northerners; the ongoing operation of the Northern Coordination and Licensing Offices; the establishment of data assembly centres; and preparations for the global IPY 2012 “From Knowledge to Action” conference, to be held April 22-27, 2012, in Montréal, Quebec. Each of these essential success components has been undertaken and continues to positively drive toward its scheduled completion and delivery before the conclusion of the Program.

 

Federal
Partners

Federal Partner
Program
Activity

Names of
Programs for
Federal
Partners

Total
Allocation (from start date
to end date)

2010– 2011

Planned Spending

Actual Spending for

Expected
Results for

Results
Achieved

AANDC

Healthy Northern Communities

Government of Canada IPY program

$59,694,657

$13,591,756

$7,653,460

Dissemination to Northern communities of the results and knowledge acquired through IPY science projects

Increased participation of Northerners and Aboriginal people in Arctic science activities

Dissemination to Northern communities of the results and knowledge acquired through IPY science projects

Increased participation of Northerners and Aboriginal people in Arctic science activities

Established legacy initiatives to preserve and maintain accessible forms of IPY data

Health Canada

Sustainable Environmental Health

Environmental Health Surveillance

(Dietary Choice and Health)

 

$158,234

$575

$575

Increased understanding of the gender-specific determinants of food choices

Identification of culturally acceptable strategies to promote healthy dietary choices

Access was found to be a major determinant of food choices among men and women.

A number of culturally acceptable strategies were found, such as community freezers and increased support to local hunters. Final results will be available in March 2012.

Environment Canada

Biodiversity –Wildlife and Habitat

Water Resources

Weather and Environmental Services for Canadians

Government of Canada IPY program

$11,169,875

$568,740

$973,436

Continued research on climate change impacts and adaptation and the health and well-being of Northern communities; the focus for 2010-2011 will be to complete field work and a data analysis, undertake data management, begin to publish results, and conduct outreach.

Science: EC science projects completed their IPY activities in 2010-2011. While some field work was conducted, activities focused on data analysis, publication and outreach, especially in Northern communities. Four of five EC-led projects presented at the Oslo Science Conference, where EC also distributed approx. 1,800 copies of the ‘EC IPY Achievements Report’ funded in 2009-2010.

Logistics:
EC completed work on infrastructure projects at Eureka and Alert. Funding also supported the ongoing operation of infrastructures at the PEARL facility (heating, lighting, etc.).

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Oceanography and Climate Aquatic Ecosystem Science

Government of Canada IPY program

$31,542,477

$314,530

$314,530

Research conducted on the impacts of climate variability and change on Arctic marine ecosystems under the IPY program; in 2010-2011 the focus will be on publishing scientific results, data management, and continuing the sample and data analysis

Research was conducted on the impacts of climate variability and change on Arctic marine ecosystems under the IPY program; in 2010-2011 the focus was on publishing scientific results, data management, and continuing the sample and data analysis

Natural Resources Canada

 

Adapting to a Changing Climate and Hazard Risk Management

Climate Change Geoscience, Public Safety Geoscience

$3,063,000

 

$147,500

 

$147,500

 

Canada adapts to a changing climate and has the knowledge and tools to manage risks associated with natural hazards and hazards arising from human activities

The program wrapped up its IPY commitments this year, including the development and implementation of seven Northern community adaptation plans that included plans for several coastal communities.

 

Ecosystem Risk Management

Environmental Geoscience Program

Canada understands and mitigates risks to natural resource ecosystems and human health

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC)

Science for Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation

Health and Well-being of Northern Communities

Government of Canada IPY program

$31,290,669

$2,169,680

3,856,079

Funds provided to 37 university-based researchers working on 19 IPY projects in the areas of climate change impacts and adaptation and the health and well-being of Northern communities

Funds were allocated to university-based researchers for projects described in the original application.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Strategic Priority Research

Government of Canada IPY program

$9,747,988

$723,136

$958,015

Sustainable, healthy and resilient Northern communities built

Ecosystem and community vulnerability, resilience and adaptive capacity assessed

Research projects that will help identify ways that Northerners’ health is being affected by climate and cultural change and inform adaptation and health promotion strategies for people living in Northern communities were funded.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Parasitology

$414,500

$11,250

$11,250

Trichinellosis: Testing of samples and analysis of prevalence data based on recovery of trichinella larvae from muscle tissue

Toxoplasmosis (serology): Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in serum or hemolyzed blood samples: analysis of validation data; wildlife used for food and disease reservoirs

Toxoplasmosis (RT-PCR): Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in tissues and blood (analysis of validation data) and analysis of prevalence data based on the detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in tissues or blood samples

A total of 1,547 samples from 614 animals of 18 species were tested. Positive results were obtained from both terrestrial and marine carnivores.

A toxoplasma serological test was developed and game animals and carnivores were tested. Validation work needs to continue.

The qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction) used to detect Toxoplasma DNA was conducted on 342 samples collected from 9 game species. All but two species yielded melting curve results within the range associated with Toxoplasma.

 

Parks Canada Agency

Conserve Heritage Resources

IPY Climate Change Impacts on the Canadian Arctic Tundra

$825,000

$115,000

$115,000

Standard methods developed and applied for conducting terrestrial ecological inventories and ecological integrity monitoring in Ukkusiksalik National Park

Due to logistical issues, we did not work in Ukkusiksalik National Park this year. The funds were used to conduct ecosystem mapping in three national parks and develop applications to climate change vulnerability and adaptation.

 

 

IPY Freshwater Systems

$525,000

$45,000

$45,000

Reconnaissance inventories conducted and ecological integrity monitoring methods developed for Arctic national parks

All expected results were achieved. Freshwater inventories and a set of monitoring methods were developed and are being added for operational use by Northern national parks.

Parks Canada Agency Total

$1,350,000

$160,000 

$160,000

 

 

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Government of Canada IPY program

$617,000

$0

$0

No activities planned and, hence, no expected results for 2010-2011

 

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Agriculture and Agri-food

Government of Canada IPY program

$156,400

$0

$0

A scientific paper to be presented at the 19th World Congress of Soil Science in 2010; work on data analysis and compilation will continue. However, no IPY-related budget allocations were made for 2009-2010 and 2010-2011

Not applicable

Canadian Museum of Civilization

Canadian Museum of Civilization

Government of Canada IPY Program

$795,200

$32,000

$144,301

Inuit History: Climatic Change and Historical Connections in Arctic Canada, 1000-1500 A.D.

Helluland Archaeology Project and Beaufort Sea Archaeological Project components:

Analysis and interpretation of archaeological data

Working in cooperation with local communities on the development of outreach products and teaching resources

Training of students and teachers

Workshop for the principal investigators on the four components of the Inuit history project

Presentations for general and scientific audiences

Preparation of publications

Evidence recovered from archaeological research on southern Baffin Island continues to produce indications of a medieval European presence in the area during the centuries around 1000 AD. The analysis of collections from this locality and from other Dorset Palaeo-Eskimo (Tuniit) and early Inuit sites in the eastern Arctic suggests that contact between Indigenous peoples and Europeans occurred through much of the past millennium. (CMC Helluland Archaeology Project).

Archaeological excavation at an early Inuit village at Resolute Bay indicates two—and perhaps three—distinct early occupations of the High Arctic region during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. (CMC/McGill High Arctic Thule Project).

Knowledge of human adaptation in the Mackenzie Delta-Beaufort Sea region has been advanced through the compilation and correlation of archaeological data and museum collections with traditional knowledge pertaining to the occupation of Banks Island and the Mackenzie Delta region over the past 700 years. (PWNHC Beaufort Sea Archaeological Research Project).

Paleolimnological analyses of pond sediment cores demonstrate that occupation by both Thule Inuit and Dorset Palaeo-Eskimos (Tuniit) can be tracked through their effects on local pond water eutrophication.

Modern climate warming signals are also noted in the upper levels of the cores. (U of Alberta/Queen’s U. Archaeology Palaeolimnology Project).

Grand Total

$150,000,000

$17,719,167

$14,219,146

 

 

 

Comments on Variances:

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada: The forecasted budget of $13,591,756 was overstated and the initial allocation for fiscal 2010-2011 was actually $12,329,261. The largest contributing factor to the variance was the result of a denied $3.73 million annual reference level update request. This request was intended to act as a funding source for the IPY 2012 “From Knowledge to Action” conference, which was identified as an international ministerial commitment, scheduled to take place April 22 to 27, 2012, in Montréal, Quebec. After the request was denied, the identified funds were never returned to the IPY budget for reallocation. As part of regular business practices, the AANDC budget was reduced as a result of transfers to OGDs through the supplementary estimates in the amount of $346,300.00.

Contact Information:

Robert Fortin
Director
International Polar Year Federal Program Office
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
360 Albert Street, Suite 1010
Ottawa, ON K1A 0H4
Tel.: 613-995-6587
Fax: 613-995-7038
Robert.Fortin@ainc-inac.gc.ca

 

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Name of Lead Department(s): Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (OFI)

Lead Department Program Activity: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Start Date: April 1, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $68.5 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) was developed in 1997 to help respond to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres. Through the UAS, the Government of Canada seeks to partner with other governments, community organizations, Aboriginal people and the private sector to support projects that address local priorities.

In 2007, Canada decided to set national priorities that focus on greater economic participation and made a long-term commitment by investing $68.5 million over five years to help respond effectively to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres.

Shared Outcome(s):

The primary goal of the UAS is to better address issues facing Aboriginal people living in cities across Canada, working toward the achievement of the following outcomes:

  • Urban Aboriginal socioeconomic needs are targeted within new and renewed federal initiatives, where appropriate.
  • Access to and coordination of programs and services is improved.
  • Partners coordinate the development and communication of research, policies and knowledge.
  • Horizontal linkages and policy integration within the federal government are improved for seeking opportunities for partnership (i.e., the federal government, provincial and municipal governments, Aboriginal groups and the private sector).

To accomplish these outcomes, UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Governance Structure(s): Steering committees are the catalysts for planning, making funding decisions and coordinating work through the UAS—along with other community activities—to respond to urban Aboriginal issues. Each UAS steering committee is composed of a cross-section of the Aboriginal community to ensure that the steering committee's decisions reflect broad community concerns and priorities. While the steering committee structure is meant to be reflective of local circumstances, each steering committee includes representation from the local Aboriginal community, the federal government, other levels of government and the private sector. The inclusive nature of the steering committees is indicative of the principle of partnership that underlies the UAS, particularly in keeping with the objective to establish strong and active partnerships between government and the community.

In some of the designated cities under the UAS, federal funding is administered through an incorporated community organization that has been delegated authority for delivering UAS projects on behalf of the various partners. Regardless of whether funding is delivered by a community organization, by federal officials or by a combination of the two, funding through the UAS is designed to promote cooperation with other key partners (including other federal departments) and stakeholders in support of community interests.

Performance Highlights: The OFI’s partnership work has resulted in strengthened community capacity, legitimacy, and decision making and funding of over 144 community-based projects (34 included other federal partners) to improve life skills; promote job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and support Aboriginal women, children and families. Examples of this include work on the AANDC Active Measures Initiative; joint funding with Public Safety on an anti-gang strategy that helps young men and women exit the gang life; and also joint funding with Canadian Heritage, through Cultural Connections Canada, on six initiatives that focused on leadership training, career development, continued education and cultural programming.

 

Federal
Partners

Federal Partner
Program
Activity

Names of
Programs for
Federal
Partners

Total
Allocation (from start date
to end date)
($ millions)

2010– 2011 ($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending for

Expected
Results for

Results
Achieved

AANDC – Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

5.1 Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Urban Aboriginal Strategy

$68.5

$13.5*

$2.72**

UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

To address the issues facing Aboriginal people living in cities, the OFI partnered with 3 other federal partners on 34 separate projects in the areas of life skills; job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families to increase urban Aboriginal people’s economic participation and empower them to make important life choices.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada/ Service Canada

 

Youth Employment Strategy

 

Unknown

$0.153

 

The UAS and the Youth Employment Strategy carried out four joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • The Music, Arts and Culture program served as a culturally inclusive learning environment for over 3,000 Aboriginal youth.
  • 80 Aboriginal students were retained in the Edmonton school system due to an attendance circle initiative.
  • 3,551 Aboriginal citizens who were relocating and/or living in Winnipeg were provided with transitional services and programs, and an Aboriginal Service Provider Forum was hosted.
  • More than 50 high-risk youth participated in hands-on training in basic carpentry and minor building renovation.

 

 

Youth Employment Strategy – Skills Link

 

Unknown

$0.520

 

The UAS and the Youth Employment Strategy – Skills Link carried out three joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Life skills and leadership training was offered to 21 Aboriginal youth in Richmond, BC, which helped develop their self-esteem, cultural awareness and interpersonal skills.
  • 37 youth completed the 12-week group-based employment skills and career management training to assist them in preparing for, obtaining and maintaining employment or further education, with an additional 15 taking part in work placements.
  • Additional information will be available once the final report from the recipient is received in mid-June.

 

 

Canada Summer Jobs

 

Unknown

$0.010

 

The UAS and Canada Summer Jobs carried out two joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • 900 people participated in cultural events, 1 employment development service was created, 10 partnerships were developed to improve the delivery of programs and services, 20 people successfully completed training in various capacity-development areas.
  • Provided legal assistance in a variety of areas (e.g., tenancy issues, maintenance support, income support) to 365 low-income clients in the community of Saskatoon. They also provided 1,505 referral services for individuals seeking legal assistance.

 

 

Skills and Partnership Fund

 

Unknown

$0.151

 

The UAS and the Skills and Partnership Fund carried out one joint initiative that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Provided 44 participants with customized training designed to increase employment success and retention. As a result of this project, 37 Aboriginal people are employed at TD Bank, Fortis BC and Friendship Catering or are attending either the Vancouver Community College or the BC Institute of Training and Technology.

 

 

New Horizons for Seniors

 

Unknown

$0.025

 

The UAS and New Horizons for Seniors carried out one joint initiative that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Provided a positive, culturally inclusive learning environment to 306 Aboriginal students. Students learned about sustainable growing practices and environmental responsibility and accessed traditional knowledge from local elders.

 

 

Aboriginal Skills Employment and Training Strategy

 

Unknown

$0.129

 

The UAS and the Aboriginal Skills Employment and Training Strategy carried out two joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • 25-30 elders attended monthly meetings to learn about the services available in the community, took life skills workshops on financial management and participated in cultural activities.
  • Provided academic upgrading to 14 urban Aboriginal, enabling them to obtain the adult dogwood diploma.

 

 

Homelessness Partnering Strategy

 

Unknown

$0.468

 

The UAS and the Homelessness Partnering Strategy carried out eight joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Provided nutritious meals, support, education and referrals to 500 Aboriginal children and youth from Aboriginal families to help them succeed in their daily school activities.
  • 177 Aboriginal people living with HIV/AIDS and/or HCV and those at risk for HIV and HCV received life skills support designed to enhance their adaptive skills for day-to-day living as well as substance abuse counselling.
  • Provided direct and critical support to the target group of Aboriginal women and children facing homelessness. Out of 586 clients, 196 are single women and 80% of clients are of Aboriginal descent. The housing outcomes include 52% of clients having stayed at "My Aunt's Place" securing stable housing.
  • Offered a unique concept of recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. The organization is part of a self-supported non-profit program that provides a North American network for the 1,500+ existing Oxford Houses. The Oxford House concept is based on a proven self-sustaining model. Approximately 80% of addicts who stay in an Oxford House remain sober.
  • Provided housing services to Aboriginal families in urban centres across Manitoba. Its membership manages 1,580 housing units in Manitoba, including 962 housing units in Winnipeg. The program increases community awareness of Aboriginal social housing issues through strategic collaborations, networking and communication activities and delivers training to enhance organizational capacity.
  • Provided nurturing and caring support, guidance, cultural teachings, life skills lessons and skills training to help Aboriginal women build their personal capacity and promote them into leadership roles within their communities.
  • Counselling and support was provided to 60 individuals who rely on emergency housing to help them take the first steps toward improved life skills, employment activities and more stable housing.
  • Provided holistic treatment services to 20 men to eliminate their violent behaviour, both generally and specifically within the family.

Canadian Heritage

 

Aboriginal Women’s Program element

 

Unknown

$0.067

 

The UAS and the Aboriginal Women's Program element carried out three joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Skills training and cultural support to 26 Aboriginal women who suffered from physical and psychological abuse.-Enhanced knowledge and life skills for 11 Aboriginal women involved in the survival sex trade.
  • Various financial education workshops and knowledge on personal finances, valuable life skills and self-esteem were given to 101 Aboriginal women.

 

 

Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth

 

Unknown

$0.531

 

The UAS and Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth carried out six joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Life skills and leadership training was offered to 21 Aboriginal youth in Richmond, BC, which helped develop their self-esteem, cultural awareness and interpersonal skills.
  • 22 youth benefitted from increased community participation in cultural activities as well as increased awareness of and participation in community resources.
  • 7 urban Aboriginal youth participants gained access to life skills and career development resources, and explored culture, language and identity through the development of a facilitated workshop.
  • 12 urban Aboriginal youth gained access to professional filmmaking training, life skills training and cultural support.
  • 86 students stayed in school and 102 students participated in cultural events allowing them to be successful in their educational and personal pursuits.
  • Provided cultural and recreational evening programs for 600 urban Aboriginal youth at the Bernice Sayese Centre including sports, life skills training and Aboriginal awareness activities and workshops.

 

 

Canadian Heritage

 

Unknown

$0.067

 

The UAS and Canadian Heritage carried out four joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

 

  • Provided guidance and training to assist 12 elders in becoming mentors for youth. Elders in the program increased their self-confidence, the self-esteem of their youth mentees, and helped youth realize the importance of finishing high school and planning for the future.
  • 900 people participated in cultural events, 1 employment development service was created, 10 partnerships were developed to improve the delivery of programs and services, 20 people successfully completed training in various capacity-development areas.
  • 450 Aboriginal people gained knowledge and enhanced their capacity to address abuse, violence and injury-prevention issues
  • Provided 95 Aboriginal youth with cultural awareness/life skills training in the areas of active living, healthy eating and environmental stewardship. 1,011 participants were engaged in cultural learning/life skills activities including traditional teachings and cultural events promoting healthier lifestyle choices. 2 Aboriginal youth who managed this project received on-the-job skills training and career development training.

Public Safety Canada/Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

National Crime Prevention Centre

 

Unknown

$0.487

 

The UAS and National Crime Prevention Centre carried out four joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • The Music, Arts and Culture program served as a culturally inclusive learning environment for over 3,000 Aboriginal youth.
  • Provided nutritious meals, support, education and referrals to 500 Aboriginal children and youth from Aboriginal families to help them succeed in their day-to-day school activities.
  • Provided intensive gender-specific counselling in all life areas, such as domestic violence, cultural healing, family and relationship counselling and effective gang exit strategies. The project started with 10 women and ended with 6.
  • Provided 36 at-risk Aboriginal youth with certified health and safety training, cultural awareness, practical work experience and employment placements.

 

 

RCMP Foundation

 

Unknown

$0.02

 

The UAS and the RCMP carried out two joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:

  • Provided holistic treatment services to 20 men to eliminate their violent behaviour, both generally and specifically within the family.
  • Provided education support to 13 incarcerated Aboriginal youth and adults. This project included workshops on topics such as financial literacy, essential skills, literacy and employment opportunities.

Grand Total

$68.5

Unknown

$5.34

 

 

 

Comments on Variances: The UAS is an opportunity-driven strategy—rather than funding planned projects—designed to maximize federal, provincial, municipal and private investment in its three priority areas: life skills; job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families. The primary aim of the UAS is to increase horizontality among federal departments, align programming with provincial and municipal governments and bring in other funding partners to maximize investments and increase the impact of that investment in urban Aboriginal communities.

* In 2010-2011, the UAS was allocated $13.5 M for its entire 2010-2011 budget. Not all UAS planned spending, however, went to horizontal federal initiatives because of the opportunistic nature of the UAS. The UAS spent $1.94 M in contributions and $0.777 M on O&M on the 34 horizontal projects that it undertook with other federal departments, which contributed an additional $2.63 M to the projects. The remaining amount of UAS funding was used for other projects that had provincial, municipal, Aboriginal, private and philanthropic funding partners. Total UAS investments ($10 M in contributions and $4.03 M in operating funds) in 2010-2011 amounted to $14.03 M.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): The UAS has proven effective in leveraging both monetary and in-kind contributions from a variety of funding partners. In the 34 UAS projects that had other federal funding partners in 2010-2011, the UAS also obtained additional contributions from provincial and municipal government partners, the private sector and Aboriginal organizations amounting to $4.1 M.

Contact Information:

Allan MacDonald
Director General
Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
66 Slater Street
Ottawa, ON K1A 0H4
Telephone: 613-992-8186

 

 

Name of Horizontal Initiative: First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan

Name of Lead Department(s): Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Community Infrastructure

Start Date: April 1, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $735,639,806 for 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. Of this amount, $202,500,000 in each of 2008–-2009 and 2009-2010 were funded from existing reference levels. New funds in the amount of $165,318,143 in 2008-2009 and $165,321,663 in 2009-2010, including employee benefit plans and Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation requirements, were sourced from the fiscal framework, as confirmed in Budget 2008.

The program was extended for an additional two years, with funding confirmed as part of Budget 2010. This will provide an additional $845,547,800 in investments into water and wastewater infrastructure over the two additional years, including funds from existing reference levels.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The primarye objective of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan (FNWWAP) is to support First Nation communities on reserves in bringing their drinking water and wastewater services to a level and quality of service comparable to those enjoyed by Canadians living in communities of similar size and location. There are five key activity areas in the FNWWAP: infrastructure investments; operations and maintenance; training; monitoring and awareness; and standards.

To meet the objectives of the FNWWAP, several program enhancements have been introduced, including a national engineering assessment of existing water and wastewater facilities; consultations on a new federal legislative framework for safe drinking water; increased training through the Circuit Rider Training Program; the modification of existing policies related to small water and septic systems and agreements for water and wastewater services; investment in a national wastewater program; and the development of waterborne illness procedures.

The FNWWAP was implemented as part of government commitments announced in Budget 2008, Budget 2010 and the 2007 Speech from the Throne to support First Nations' access to safe drinking water. It supports the continued commitment to promote access to clean water in Aboriginal communities announced in the 2011 Speech from the Throne.

The FNWWAP supports AANDC’s strategic outcome, The Land and The Economy: First Nations and Inuit benefit from their lands, resources and environment on a sustainable basis. The FNWWAP also supports the Health Canada (HC) strategic outcome of the department's First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services: Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians.

More information on these websites:

Backgrounder – First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan

Budget 2008, Responsible Leadership – Chapter 4: Leadership at Home and Abroad

RPP 2007-2008 Health Canada – Health Canada's Regional Operations: An Overview

Budget 2010 – New Investments in Jobs and Economic Growth – Chapter 3.3: Building on a Strong Economic Foundation

 

Shared Outcome(s): The FNWWAP works toward the achievement of four outcomes:

  • First Nations communities have an increased capacity to address potential water quality problems.
  • Health risks associated with water quality and supply are reduced.
  • All First Nations community water and wastewater facilities meet federal standards.
  • First Nations communities have increased confidence in their drinking water.

Governance Structure(s): The FNWWAP is a successor to the joint First Nations Water Management Strategy (2003-2008) and the AANDC Plan of Action for Drinking Water (2006-2008). A memorandum of understanding has been in place between AANDC and HC since 2005 regarding data sharing related to drinking water. AANDC shares information on the proposed water and wastewater infrastructure investments; the annual inspections of water and wastewater treatment plants; and action related to drinking water advisories. Conversely, HC shares information such as drinking water sample results that do not meet the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality and the reasons for recommending drinking water advisories. At the working level, the Strategic Water Management on Reserve Committee, which includes representatives from HC, AANDC, Environment Canada and the Assembly of First Nations, provides a forum for discussion to share information and coordinate joint action, although this is not a formal decision-making body. It also provides integrated and coordinated leadership to ensure safe drinking water for First Nations communities and to implement the FNWWAP.

Directors general and assistant deputy ministers from HC and AANDC meet when needed to exchange and coordinate actions on all relevant issues related to the FNWWAP.

Performance Highlights: The National Assessment—the largest, most in-depth study of on-reserve drinking water and wastewater services in Canadian history—was completed in the spring of 2011. This independent third-party assessment is the most comprehensive and rigorous survey of First Nations water and wastewater systems ever undertaken. This one-time assessment is an unprecedented reference tool that provides Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and First Nations a detailed account of the current state of water and wastewater systems on reserves. The assessment involved the review of 4,000 systems, including 1,300 communal water and wastewater systems, 800 wells and 1,900 septic fields in 571 First Nations communities across the country. The purpose of the assessment was to determine operational needs and establish long-term infrastructure development strategies and needs for each community on a sustainable basis.

 

Federal
Partners

Federal Partner
Program
Activity

Names of
Programs for
Federal
Partners

Total
Allocation (from start date
to end date)
($ millions)

2010– 2011 ($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending for

Expected
Results for

Results
Achieved

AANDC

Community Infrastructure

Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program

$671.0 M

$137.4

$127.5

Percentage of First Nations communities with acceptable water and wastewater facility risk ratings (i.e., not high risk): 85% of systems will be either low or medium risk

The completed National Assessment indicated 314 high-risk systems out of 807 studied.

Therefore, 61% came in as low or medium risk.

The increased risk can be mainly attributed to a much more thorough and detailed National Assessment. This will serve to establish a new baseline for measuring progress in the future long-term water strategy.

Health Canada

First Nations and Inuit Health

Drinking Water Safety Program – FNWWAP funding

$54.6

$24.1

$21.8

(A1) Increased capacity of First Nations to monitor drinking water quality

(A1) In 2010-2011, out of a total of 770 community sites, 713 had access to a Community-Based Drinking Water Quality Monitor (CBWM), which represents a 2% increase from last fiscal year.*

* Note: Results exclude Saskatchewan due to delays in the data collection. Once data is received, results will be updated accordingly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(A3) Increase EHOs to support drinking water quality monitoring

(A3.1) In 2010-2011, 32 out of 40 FNWWAP EHO positions were staffed.*

(A3.2) In 2010-2011, 60% of piped drinking water distribution systems were monitored weekly in First Nations communities, which represents a 7% increase from 2009-2010.*

(A3.3) In 2010-2011, a total of 127,430 water samples were taken and analyzed: 50,905 bacteriological samples were analyzed in accredited laboratories, 72,085 bacteriological samples were analyzed using a portable lab kit, 4,244 samples were analyzed for chemical parameters, and 196 samples were analyzed for radiological parameters.*

* Note: Results exclude Saskatchewan due to delays in the data collection.

Once data is received, results will be updated accordingly

 

 

Drinking Water Safety Program – A-base funding

$10.0

$5.0

$5.0

(B1) Implementation

of early warningdatabase.

(B1) All regions have a water database in place to monitor sample results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(B2) Investigate waterborne diseases and waterborne outbreaks

(B2) There were no instances where gastrointestinal illness was identified as a possible outbreak of waterborne disease.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(B3) Review of water and wastewater project proposals

(B3) In 2010-2011, 40 water, wastewater and solid waste project proposals were reviewed at HQ from a public health perspective.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(B4) Development of a national wastewater program

(B4) The National Framework for the Environmental Public Health Program in First Nations Communities South of 60° was developed and implemented. This document contains a chapter that outlines the objectives, roles, responsibilities, activities and reporting requirements of Health Canada’s First Nations Environmental Public Health Program with regard to wastewater.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(B5) Development of public awareness and educational materials

(B5) HC has developed and distributed the Procedural Guidelines for Waterborne Disease Events in First Nations Communities South of 60°, an annual success stories newsletter on drinking water and environmental health issues, national door hangers to notify residents that an EHO or CBWM came by to test their drinking water and stickers providing residents with cleaning instructions for bottled-water coolers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(B6) Development of a recruitment and retention strategy for environmental health officers

(B6) Recruitment and retention strategies are ongoing. These include the implementation of an EHO exchange initiative in collaboration with US Indian Health Services.

Health Canada Total

$64.6

$29.0

$26.8

 

 

Grand Total

$735.6

$166.5

$154.3

 

 

 

Comments on Variances: $10 M was reprofiled to 2011-2012 to address projects that were late starting.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Sébastien Labelle
Director
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development
Program Design and Regional Partnerships Directorate, Community Infrastructure Branch
Telephone: 819-994-6466
sebastien.labelle@ainc-inac.gc.ca

 

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement – Health Supports component

Name of Lead Department(s): Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Managing Individual Affairs

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: September 2003

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start date to end date): $112,353,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Health Supports component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) ensures that former students of Indian residential schools and their families can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse through all phases of the IRSSA. The Health Supports component of the IRSSA is composed of the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program (formerly the Mental Health Support Program) and a 24-hour crisis line.

Health Canada (HC) delivers the Resolution Health Support Program, which allows eligible former Indian residential school students and their families, to access an appropriate level of health support services, through all components of the IRSSA. Program components include emotional support services provided by Resolution Health Support Workers (RHSWs); cultural support services provided by elders; professional counselling; and assistance with the cost of transportation to access counselling, elder, and/or traditional healer services.

AANDC – Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector (RIAS) provides a national 24-hour toll-free Indian residential school crisis line (1-866-925-4419) to support individuals in crisis, which is operated by trained Aboriginal crisis counsellors. AANDC is also responsible for coordinating the verification of program eligibility, and ensuring that Health Canada is aware of dates for independent assessment and alternative dispute resolution processes, and truth and reconciliation and commemorative initiatives, so that health supports can be provided in a seamless fashion.

 

Shared Outcome(s): The IRSSA Health Supports component works toward the achievement of two outcomes:

  • Eligible former students of Indian residential schools and their families have access to an appropriate level of mental wellness support services.
  • Eligible former students of Indian residential schools can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse.

Governance Structure(s): AANDC is responsible for the overall implementation of the IRSSA. AANDC is working in partnership with HC to coordinate and provide services to former Indian residential school students across all components of the IRSSA.

Planning Highlights:

The Health Supports component will:

  • Continue to deliver professional, paraprofessional and cultural supports to former Indian residential school students and their families through the Resolution Health Support Program (RHSP), as required under the IRSSA;
  • Provide former Indian residential school students and their families with access to a 24-hour national crisis line;
  • Undertake communication activities to ensure that the health supports program is well known; and
  • Strengthen research, knowledge and training initiatives to ensure that health supports are well-suited to meet the needs of Indian residential school claimants, their families and communities.

 

Federal
Partners

Federal Partner
Program
Activity

Names of
Programs for
Federal
Partners

Total
Allocation (from start date
to end date)
($ millions)

2010– 2011 ($ millions)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending for

Expected
Results for

Results
Achieved

Health Canada

First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program

$112.4

$14.8

$53.8

Demand-driven health supports are provided to former IRS students and their families throughout all phases of the IRSSA.

Provided over 4,000 health support interactions at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) first national event in Winnipeg, June 2010.

At Independent Assessment Process (IAP) hearings, provided support to all those who requested it (100%).

Provided health support services to former Indian Residential Schools (IRS) students and their families at community events, during TRC statement gatherings and during the TRC’s Northern tour.

Total

$112.4

$14.8

$53.8

 

 

 

Comments on Variances: Actual spending was higher than planned spending as a result of securing the Budget 2010 funding ($65.9 M over two years for the Resolution Health Support Program). This funding permitted the program to meet the increased number of IAP hearings and allowed for the commencement of the Truth and Reconciliation events.

 

Contact Information:

Health Canada
Andrea Challis
Manager, Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program
Mental Health and Addictions Division
Community Programs Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
Tel.: (613) 952-1377
andrea.challis@hc-sc.gc.ca

 

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Alia Butt
Director
Policy and Strategic Planning
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Tel.: 613-996-2603
alia.butt@ainc-inac.gc.ca

Top of Page

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan of Growing Forward

Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation

Start Date: April 1, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $94.9 million over five years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

This initiative targets four specific regulatory issues that were identified by agri-food stakeholders, namely: 1) minor use pesticides and pesticide risk reduction; 2) veterinary drugs; 3) health claims, novel foods, and ingredients; and 4) food fortification. The Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan supports the general principles of the Government of Canada's Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation. The Plan specifically addresses the development of regulatory frameworks based on the accumulation of sound science, as well as advancing the transparency, timeliness, responsiveness, efficiency, public interest, and government collaboration to minimize regulatory burden for stakeholders.

Shared Outcomes:

Addressing key regulatory obstacles to promoting a competitive and innovative sector, while protecting and advancing the public interest

Governance Structure:

Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between AAFC and Health Canada set out the roles and responsibilities for the management of this initiative. The Deputy Ministers of the two departments oversee the governance process that includes the following levels of management in accordance with the MOUs:

  • An Assistant Deputy Ministers' (ADM) Committee oversees the management of the MOUs and reports back to the Deputy Ministers.
  • Joint Management Committees (JMC), composed of directors general or equivalent level representatives, have been established to manage the implementation of the MOUs and report semi-annually to the ADM Committee.

Performance Highlights:

The plan continued to foster government collaboration while supporting the development, implementation and enhancement of regulatory frameworks to address issues identified by stakeholders. In the area of minor use pesticides and pesticide risk reduction, project prioritization and expedited regulatory reviews increased the number of approved minor use pesticides. Enhanced guidance to stakeholders and the improved uptake of joint review opportunities increased the number of veterinary drugs available for food-producing animals in Canada. In the area of health claims, novel foods, and ingredients, key matters of food regulatory modernization were identified to accompany food industry innovation efforts and scientific substantiation of health claims. Finally, policy options continued to be explored, informed by nutrition-related data in the area of food fortification.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) ($ millions) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to the totals shown.
AAFC Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction 36.2 9.1 8.5 Increased minor-use pesticides and reduced risk pest management tools permissible or available for use Data and information were generated for 80 minor-use pesticides submissions and 20 new reduced risk tools, resulting in increased pesticide risk reduction tools, practices and technologies available to growers.
Health Claims, Novel Foods, and Ingredients 16.1 3.6 3.4 Enhanced sector ability to navigate the food regulatory system, which should lead to improved sector understanding of regulatory processes/requirements Sector analysis-based input led to several regulatory policy updates and advice including scientific, provided to industry and sector groups resulted in two health claims and two novel food submissions meeting regulatory requirements.
Health Canada Pesticide Regulation Minor Use Pesticides and Pesticide Risk Reduction 16.0 4.0 4.0 New minor uses of pesticides available to growers through a dedicated minor use review process Developed a new approach to streamline the regulatory submission process, and registered 135 new pesticide minor uses. Six transition strategies were developed.
Health Products Veterinary Drugs 5.0 1.2 1.2 Reduction in review times for veterinary drug submissions and increased availability of drugs for food-producing animals Completed the first Minor Use Minor Species submission. Eliminated the backlog of submissions and reduced the review time of new drugs.
Food and Nutrition Health Claims, Novel Foods, and Ingredients 17.4 3.5 3.5 Modernized and efficient policy and regulatory approaches and pre-market processes leading to new, innovative and safe food products and claims, focusing on health benefits Drafted amendments to modernize the Food and Drugs Act. Completed 14 regulatory amendments and 12 Interim Marketing Authorizations, published summaries of assessment for two new health claims, and classified 600 products at the food/natural health product interface.
Food Fortification 4.3 1.2 1.2 Increased staff capacity to deliver Temporary Market Authorisation Letters, while continuing to explore policy options for the voluntary addition of vitamins and mineral nutrients to foods.
Total 94.9 22.5 21.8    

Comments on Variances: Not applicable

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners: Not applicable

Contact information:

Lynn Stewart, Director
Food Regulatory Issues Division
Sector Development and Analysis Directorate
Market and Industry Services Branch
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Room 242, Floor 2, Tower 5
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-0153
lynn.stewart@agr.gc.ca

Note:

AAFC's Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008–09 fiscal year. Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2010–11 RPP. They represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. They do not include any additional amounts that may have been brought into the Department's reference levels during 2010–11, due to the timing of the 2010–11 RPP. Total Federal Funding Allocation reflects all currently approved TB Submissions and reallocations. Total allocation, planned spending and actual spending are net of indirect costs.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Flexibility Fund

Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity:

The Agricultural Flexibility Fund contributes to several program activities within AAFC: Environmental Knowledge, Technology, Information and Measurement; On-Farm Action; Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems; Trade and Market Development; Science, Innovation and Adoption; and Agri-Business Development.

Start Date: July 21, 2009

End Date: March 31, 2014

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

$412.2 million (of which $140.6 million is funding through Canada’s Economic Action Plan)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Agricultural Flexibility Fund (AgriFlexibility) is a five-year fund (2009–2014) that helps implement new initiatives, both federally and in partnership with provinces, territories and industry. AgriFlexibility’s goal is to improve the sector's competitiveness and help the sector adapt to pressures through non-business risk-management measures that will reduce costs of production, improve environmental sustainability, promote innovation, and respond to market challenges. AgriFlexibility initiatives can be implemented federally (Federal Initiatives), in partnership with provinces and territories (Cost-Shared Federal-Provincial/Territorial Initiatives) or by the industry (Industry-led initiatives).

Funding for industry-led initiatives is provided through a contribution agreement while funding for federal-provincial cost-shared initiative is provided through a bilateral agreement. This Horizontal Initiative is part of the Canada's Economic Action Plan.

Three federal initiatives under AgriFlexibility have been announced and implemented. They are: Livestock Auction Traceability Initiative (LATI); AgriProcessing Initiative (API); and Canada Brand Advocacy Initiative (CBAI).

Shared Outcomes:

  • Producers/partners/industry to improve their environmental practices
  • Producers/partners/industry to reduce their costs of production
  • Improved food safety, biosecurity, traceability, and risk management measures
  • Increase in value-chain efforts focussed on innovation and adaptation
  • Agri-industry implement actions to respond to market threats and take advantage of emerging market opportunities

Governance Structure:

The following is a description of the internal governance for approval/rejection of AgriFlexibility proposals:

  • AgriFlexibility is administered within the Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate. Once AgriFlexibility proposals have been assessed, they are presented to the Directors General Innovation (DGI) Committee which is comprised of Directors General from across the Department and is co-chaired by: the Director General of Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate, Farm Financial Programs Branch, and the Director General, Innovation Directorate, Research Branch. This Committee reviews proposals, verifies program eligibility, provides expert advice; makes a recommendation to one of the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) boards: the Policy, Programs and Results Board (PPRB) or Horizontal Management Board (HMB). The DGI Committee also reviews the financial status and status reports of AgriFlexibility on a regular basis.
  • PPRB and HMB are comprised of ADMs from across the Department. Since these two boards have very similar membership and meet on alternate weeks, either one or the other is used to review AgriFlexibility proposals and make funding recommendations, in order to make decisions on proposals in a timely manner.
  • Final approval of proposals is granted by the Minister, with a recommendation from the Deputy Minister.

Performance Highlights:

A lesson learned from AgriFlexibility is that providing industry, provinces and territories the ability to develop proposals to address specific needs enables industry to take action and a leading role in addressing specific issues of relevance to them. As of March 31, 2011 a total of 36 projects/initiatives from provinces, territories and industry have been approved for a total value of about $149.4 million in funding under the AgriFlexibility.

As most AgriFlexibility projects/initiatives are taking place over several years, and results are known at the end of activities, it is a challenge to report on an annual basis on the achievement of targets. Provinces and territories are to provide an annual report in the fall on the progress of their initiatives.

It should also be noted that provinces and territories are allowed to change their targets annually under their bilateral agreements.

Federal Partners Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
($ millions)
2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
*As most AgriFlexibility projects are taking place over several years, it is not possible to report annually on the achievement of specific targets. It should also be noted that targets may change, as provinces and territories are allowed to change their targets annually under their contribution agreements. A total of 36 projects from provinces, territories and industry have been approved for a total value of about $149.4 million in funding under AgriFlexibility.
AAFC Various program activities Agricultural Flexibility Fund 412.2 121.4 28.9 Producers and industry improve their environmental practices N/A*
Producers and industry reduce their costs of production N/A*
Improved food safety, biosecurity, traceability and risk management measures N/A*
Total 412.2 121.4 28.9    

For more information on AgriFlexibility visit: http://www.agr.gc.ca/agriflexibility.

Comments on Variances:

As announced in Budget 2010, a total of $42M of 2010-11 planned spending was transferred to the Slaughter Improvement Program (SIP), the Over Thirty Months Payment program (OTMPP) and the Slaughter Waste Improvement Program (SWIP), and is not reflected in the AgriFlexibility actual spending. A portion of the unspend funding is expected to be carried forward into future years.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:

Overall the same results are to be achieved by provincial and territorial partners.

Contact information:

Linda Parsons, Director General
Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
Farm Financial Programs Branch
Room 220, Floor 8, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-1900
linda.parsons@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2010–11 RPP. They represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. They do not include any additional amounts that may have been allocated to this initiative during 2010–11, due to the timing of the 2010–11 RPP. Total Federal Funding Allocation reflects all currently approved Treasury Board Submissions and reallocations. Total allocation, planned spending and actual spending are net of indirect costs.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInsurance

Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date: April 1, 2008

End Date:

AgriInsurance contributions are statutory and ongoing.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, actual spending may vary. Total federal funding allocation is $1,629.4 million over four years (2008–09 to 2011–12).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriInsurance (formerly known as Production and Crop Insurance) aims to reduce the financial impact on producers of production losses caused by uncontrollable natural perils.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and the Federal/Provincial AgriInsurance Agreement.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriInsurance
British Columbia
Alberta
Saskatchewan
Manitoba
Ontario
Quebec
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
Prince Edward Island
Newfoundland

Shared Outcome:

To mitigate the financial impacts of production losses by providing effective insurance protection

Governance Structure:

AgriInsurance is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM priority.

AgriInsurance is a provincial-territorial program to which the federal government contributes financially under the FPT AgriInsurance Agreement. The program is administered provincially in all provinces. The federal and provincial governments cost-share a portion of the premium costs together with program participants. Governments also fully cost-share the administrative costs of the program (60:40 federal-provincial).

Governance structure includes various national standards outlined in Canada Production Insurance Regulations. Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT AgriInsurance Working Group (AIWG), the FPT BRM Policy Working Group and the FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT government officials and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), FPT Deputy Ministers and FPT Ministers.

Performance Highlights:

The value of insured to eligible production for insurance for 2009-10 exceeded the target of 60% with 62.68%. Production losses were mitigated with indemnity payments of $1.116 billion (including $257.3 million for unseeded benefits). The value of insured production amounted to $12.3 billion as 65.6 million of acres were covered.

The value of agricultural products eligible for insurance for 2009–10 compared to the total value of all agricultural products exceeded the target of 85% at 86.95%. This ratio has remained fairly consistent over the last two years.

Federal Partners Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
($ millions)
2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
AAFC Business Risk Management AgriInsurance 1,629.4
over four years
(2008-09 – 2011-12)
413.6 517.2

The financial impacts of production losses are mitigated by providing effective insurance protection.

 

Indicators:

Value of insured production compared to the total value of all agricultural products eligible for insurance - Target 60 %.

The ratio of insured to eligible production for insurance for 2009-10 exceeds the target of 60% with 62.68%.
Value of agricultural products eligible for insurance compared to the value of all agricultural products - Target 85 %. The ratio exceeded the target of 85% at 86.95% in 2009-10.
Total 1,629.4 413.6 517.2    

Comments on Variances:

Actual spending was higher than planned spending for 2010–11 due to a substantial increase in premiums caused by higher grain prices that are reflected in the insurable values.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:

Planning and development activities are done jointly with the provinces. Therefore, the expected results are the same, but the achieved results will vary by province.

Contact information:

Danny Foster, Director General
Business Risk Management Program Development
Room 241, Floor 3, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
danny.foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2010–11 RPP. They represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. They do not include any additional amounts that may have been allocated to this initiative during 2010–11, due to the timing of the 2010–11 RPP. Total Federal Funding Allocation reflects all currently approved Treasury Board Submissions and reallocations. Total allocation, planned spending and actual spending are net of indirect costs.

This program is statutory and demand-driven; therefore, actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability, AgriInvest and AgriRecovery.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInvest

Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

End Date:

AgriInvest grants and contributions are statutory and ongoing.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, actual spending may vary. Total federal funding allocation is $843.0 million over five years (2007-08 to 2011-12).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriInvest allows producers to self-manage, through producer-government savings accounts, the first 15% of their margin losses for a production year and/or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues. Under the program, annual producer deposits of up to 1.5% of their allowable net sales are matched by government deposits. Government deposits are cost-shared 60:40 by federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) governments. In combination with the AgriStability program, AgriInvest is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

AgriInvest provides producers with a secure, accessible, predictable, and bankable source of income assistance to address small drops in farm income and manage on-farm risks.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriInvest
AgriInvest in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)

Shared Outcome:

To provide producers with flexibility in how they choose to manage and/or mitigate small income losses through the availability of timely and predictable funds

Governance Structure:

The AgriInvest program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by FPT Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM priority. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are cost shared by the federal government and the provinces and the Yukon Territory on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

As a transitional measure, the deposit requirement was waived for the 2007 program year. Producers were required to make a deposit for the 2008 program year in order to receive matching government funding. The federal government held the AgriInvest accounts for both of these years except in Quebec.

For the 2009 program year, the AgriInvest program continued to be delivered by the federal government in all provinces except Quebec. However, governments worked with financial institutions to set up the infrastructure necessary to establish and hold AgriInvest accounts. Producers were able to make deposits under the AgriInvest program with financial institutions in the summer of 2010 for the 2009 program year. In Quebec, the AgriInvest program is, and will continue to be, delivered provincially by La Financière agricole du Québec.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT government officials and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), FPT Deputy Ministers and FPT Ministers.

Performance Highlights:

About 60% of participants who suffered an income decline and triggered AgriStability payments in the 2008 program year also made withdrawals from their AgriInvest accounts, suggesting that the majority of producers are using the program to manage income declines. The 60% target was met.

The 2010 BRM performance indicator survey indicated that 90% of those who withdrew money from the accounts used it to address income declines, which is far better than the target of 75%.

AAFC has also established the target of 65% for the percentage of producers participating in AgriInvest. Participation in AgriInvest reached over 70% of all Canadian producers in the 2008 program year, which was similar to the first year of the program.

Federal Partners Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
($ millions)
2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
*As most AgriFlexibility projects are taking place over several years, it is not possible to report annually on the achievement of specific targets. It should also be noted that targets may change, as provinces and territories are allowed to change their targets annually under their contribution agreements. A total of 36 projects from provinces, territories and industry have been approved for a total value of about $149.4 million in funding under AgriFlexibility.
AAFC Business Risk Management AgriInvest 843.0 168.2 208.8

Producers have the flexibility in managing small financial risks.

Producers use program account balances to address income declines or to make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues.

The following results are based on the 2008 program year, the latest year for which processing is complete and data is available.

Indicators:

Percentage of AgriInvest producers receiving AgriStability payments and making withdrawals from their AgriInvest saving accounts – Target: at least 60% of AgriInvest producers

About 60% of participants who triggered AgriStability payments in 2008 also made withdrawals from their AgriInvest accounts.

Percentage of producers indicating that they use their funds to address income declines or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase to farm revenues – Target: at least 75% 90% of those who withdrew money from the accounts used it to address income declines.
Total 843.0 168.2 208.8    

Comments on Variances:

AgriInvest is demand-driven, rather than being funded from a set allocation for each fiscal year. Although the administrative costs of the program remain relatively constant, the variance of the year-to-year grant and contribution payments is directly related to both participation and commodity prices, as producer deposits and government contributions are based on a percentage of their income generated from the sale of commodities for a production year.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

Contact information:

Danny Foster, Director General
Business Risk Management Program Development
Room 241, Floor 3, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
danny.foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2010-11 RPP. They represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. They do not include any additional amounts that may have been allocated to this initiative during 2010-11, due to the timing of the 2010-11 RPP. Total Federal Funding Allocation reflects all currently approved TB Submissions and reallocations. Total allocation, planned spending and actual spending are net of indirect costs.

This program is statutory and demand-driven; therefore, actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability, AgriInsurance and AgriRecovery. Total allocation does not include funding for the one-time federal-only 2007 AgriInvest Kickstart program.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriRecovery – Agricultural Disaster Relief Program (ADRP)

Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date: December 6, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012

During the 2010-11 fiscal year, the program authorities were extended until March 31, 2012.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

Total federal funding allocation is $814.1 million over five years (2007–08 to 2011–12 fiscal years).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriRecovery enables federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) governments to provide timely assistance to help producers quickly re-establish their income stream and contain the long-term impacts after small- to mid-size disasters (e.g. disease, pest and weather). Programs under AgriRecovery are developed on a case-by-case basis after an assessment is completed and it is determined that there is need for assistance beyond existing programs, such as AgriInvest, AgriStability and AgriInsurance.

Under AgriRecovery, the ADRP helps focus the coordination effort, providing a process to fast-track authorities for programs to quickly fund initiatives under AgriRecovery.

Participating provinces and territories cost-share initiatives on a 60:40 FPT basis. For AgriRecovery programming outside the ADRP, funding options are negotiated with the provinces and territories on a case-by-case basis.

Authorities for the program include sub-section 12(5) of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as various agreements for individual programming developed under AgriRecovery.

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit: http://www.agr.gc.ca/agrirecovery.

Shared Outcome:

To reduce the economic impact of catastrophic natural disasters on producers through timely assistance not otherwise provided by other programs

Governance Structure:

The AgriRecovery framework, including the ADRP, is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward policy framework developed by FPT Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the Business Risk Management (BRM) priority. Under the ADRP, program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are expected to be cost-shared by the federal government and the provinces and territories on a 60:40 basis, respectively. For AgriRecovery programming outside the ADRP, funding options are negotiated with the provinces and the territories on a case-by-case basis, however the 60:40 cost share requirement remains in effect.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT government officials and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), FPT Deputy Ministers and FPT Ministers.

Specific to AgriRecovery and the ADRP are FPT Task Teams, which are initiated on a case-by-case basis when requested to assess and analyze a disaster and its impacts and, if needed, develop options for an individual disaster assistance initiative to be brought forward to participating FPT Ministers.

Performance Highlights:

Producers affected by a disaster situation benefit from financial assistance from federal, provincial and territorial governments. Since the inception of AgriRecovery, about 58,000 producers have received payments under various initiatives.

Federal Partners Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
($ millions)
2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
AAFC Business Risk Management AgriRecovery (including ADRP) 814.1 121.7 256.9 Farm business operations resume operations following a natural disaster Thirteen initiatives were put in place in 2010–11 under the ADRP to help producers deal with disaster events.
Producers affected by a disaster situation benefit from financial assistance The results of the initiatives put in place will be available in the 2011–12 program year.

Indicators:

Percentage of producers who believe that the financial assistance provided under the program played a role in the recovery. Target is 75%

For 2009–10, provinces reported that almost all of the producers who received AgriRecovery assistance indicated it has helped in the recovery of their operations, surpassing the target of 75%.
Percentage of producers still farming one year after the disaster. Target is 70% of producers still farming one year later In the majority of cases, the producers were still in business one year after the disaster payments.
Total 814.1 121.7 256.9    

Comments on Variances:

The increase is as a result of four initiatives that were implemented to respond to wide spread excessive moisture and flooding in the western provinces.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:

Joint planning and execution (federally and provincially) will be undertaken so that results are consistent.

Contact information:

Danny Foster, Director General
Business Risk Management Program Development
Room 241, Floor 3, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
danny.foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2010–11 RPP. They represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. They do not include any additional amounts that may have been allocated to this initiative during 2010–11, due to the timing of the 2010–11 RPP. Total Federal Funding Allocation reflects all currently approved Treasury Board Submissions and reallocations. Total allocation, planned spending and actual spending are net of indirect costs.

This program is statutory and demand-driven; therefore, actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability, AgriInvest and AgriInsurance.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriStability

Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

Start Date:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

End Date:

AgriStability grants and contributions are statutory and ongoing.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, actual spending may vary. Total federal funding allocation is $3,141.1 million over five fiscal years (2007–08 to 2011–12).

For the period of 2007–08, funding in the amount of $561.1 million pertains to the Canadian Agriculture Income Stabilization (CAIS) program, which preceded AgriStability.

Included in the total allocation is $14.8 million ($3.0 million for 2009-10 and $11.8 million for 2010–11) for the transfer of delivery from the federal administration of the program to British Columbia and Saskatchewan, which is a Canada Economic Action Plan Initiative.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriStability is a margin-based program that provides support when producers experience large farm-income losses that result in drops in their margins (eligible farm income, less eligible farm expenses) for a program year of more than 15% relative to their average margins from previous years (i.e., their reference margins). Thus a payment is triggered under the program when producers' program-year margins drop below 85% of their reference margin. AgriStability also includes coverage for negative margins, as well as mechanisms to advance to participants a portion of their expected payments during the year when significant declines in incomes are expected (interim payments and Targeted Advance Payments). In combination with the AgriInvest program, AgriStability is the successor to the CAIS program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal/Provincial/ Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.

The program links to the strategic outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

For more information, visit the following websites:

Federal AgriStability
AgriStability in British Columbia
AgriStability in Alberta (Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (AFSC))
AgriStability in Saskatchewan
AgriStability in Ontario (Agricorp)
AgriStability in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)
AgriStability on Prince Edward Island (PEI Agricultural Insurance Corporation)

Shared Outcome:

To mitigate the short-term impacts of large income losses

Governance Structures:

The AgriStability program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FPT) Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM priority. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are cost-shared by the federal government and the provinces/territory on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

In British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Quebec, and Prince Edward Island, the AgriStability program is delivered provincially. The AgriStability program is administered by the federal government in Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Yukon Territory.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT government officials and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

Performance Highlights:

Participation in the 2008 program year declined largely due to improved farm incomes, particularly in the grains and oilseeds sector. Although participation was below the 75% target, the program continues to play a significant role in the management of risk on Canadian farms with the percentage of market revenues covered by the program being 68%.

For producers receiving AgriStability payments, their current year margins improved from about 24% of their historical average margin to 63% in the 2008 program year, slightly below the target of 65%.

AAFC has established a target of 97% for accuracy of payments for the federal delivery of AgriStability. In 2010-11, the accuracy rate for federal payments for the 2008 program year was 98.3%.

In addition, for timeliness of payments, a target has been set to process 75% of all final applications in a program year within 75 days of receipt. The percentage of applications processed within 75 days by all administrators of the program, although still below the 75% target, improved significantly from 52% in 2007 to 68% in the 2008 program year.

Federal Partners Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
($ millions)
2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Note: The performance measures reported in the RPP supplementary table have been revised to better target the objectives and outcomes of the AgriStability program.
AAFC Business Risk Management AgriStability 3,141.1
for 2007–08
to 2011–12
657.8 395.9 Short-term impacts of large income losses are reduced The following results are based on the 2008 program year, the latest year, for which processing is complete and data is available.

Indicators:

Participants' farm market revenues compared to total farm market revenues for the industry. Target is 75% of total farm market revenues are covered by the program (see note below).
The percentage of market revenues covered by the program in the 2008 program year was 68%.
Participant's production margin with payments compared to reference margin. Target is that program payments bring producer's margin up to 65% of reference margin (see note below). Program payments, brought producer’s current year margin to 63% of the reference margin in the 2008 program year.
Total 3,141.1 657.8 395.9    

Comments on Variances: Fiscal requirements for the AgriStability program decreased in 2010–11 primarily due to stronger commodity prices and payments from AgriInsurance and AgriRecovery which reduced the funding requirements of the program.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

Contact information:

Danny Foster, Director General
Business Risk Management Program Development
Room 241, Floor 3, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
danny.foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2010–11 RPP. They represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. They do not include any additional amounts that may have been allocated to this initiative during 2010–11, due to the timing of the 2010–11 RPP. Total Federal Funding Allocation reflects all currently approved Treasury Board Submissions and reallocations. Total allocation, planned spending and actual spending are net of indirect costs.

This program is statutory and demand-driven; therefore, actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriInvest, AgriInsurance and AgriRecovery. Total allocation does not include funding for the one-time, federal-only 2007 AgriInvest Kickstart program.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada's Rural Partnership

Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Rural and Co-operatives Development

Start Date:

Start date under the Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2008 (Original start date under Agricultural Policy Framework: April 1, 2003)

End Date: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

$52.9 million over five years (including in-year transfers)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Canada's Rural Partnership (CRP) leads an integrated, government-wide approach through which the government aims to co-ordinate its economic, social, environmental, and cultural policies towards the goal of economic and social development and renewal of rural Canada.

Shared Outcomes:

  • Collaboration between rural communities and stakeholders to address barriers and challenges to local development
  • Information and tools are used by rural communities and regions to develop local amenities and other assets
  • New economic activities are being implemented in rural Canada

Governance Structures:

The CRP is managed by the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat. It has instituted mechanisms that contribute to raising awareness and inclusion of rural Canada in federal policies and programs, as well as engaging government and non-government partners to stimulate economic development in rural Canada. This includes:

  • the Rural Development Network, a policy-maker forum involving 28 federal departments and agencies;
  • the National Rural Research Network that brings together research partners from both academia and government to focus on enhancing knowledge about rural issues to better inform policy making;
  • the Community Information Database, a free web-based resource that provides comprehensive and reliable information on economic, social and demographic factors at the community level, to support decision-making and action; and
  • the Community Development Program that offers funding to assist rural and northern regions to obtain information and to access or develop the expertise, tools and processes needed to respond to challenges and opportunities in order to become more competitive and to generate economic activities.

Performance Highlights:

As lead of CRP, AAFC funded 19 rural community initiatives with partners in 2010-11 (bringing the total to 38) that enhance capacity for innovative rural development and develop and transfer knowledge (information, expertise, tools and processes) to rural communities and regions to assist them in responding to barriers to development.

AAFC was involved in 39 partnership initiatives in 2010-11 with government organizations and rural stakeholders to help address barriers to development and capture new economic development opportunities. More specifically, barriers to access to services were identified in over 160 communities in 18 regions. AAFC is engaging with rural stakeholders to address those that would have the most impact on economic development.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) ($ millions) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
AAFC Rural and Co-operatives Development Canada's Rural Partnership 52.9 10.3 11.1 40 Rural communities and regions are using information, tools and processes to develop local natural and cultural amenities and other assets 32 rural communities used new and updated/adapted information and tools to innovate and diversify their economies
Total 52.9 10.3 11.1    

Comments on Variances:

Building on the partnership experience over the last two years, AAFC staff has fostered partnerships and/or participated in networks with the purpose of connecting rural communities to useful and quality information and tools to innovate and diversify their economies. The results, although lower than anticipated, will increase in future years; this is due to the fact that building partnership is a complex process that takes time.

Moreover, fewer projects than planned were funded; actual project funding spent ($1.5 million) was also lower than planned ($3.2 million). Project proponents' difficulty in securing matching contributions and the time necessary to build a project with communities and stakeholders involvement have been significant factors in lower than expected program participation.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners: Not applicable

Contact information:

Michaela Huard
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
Room 125, Floor 2, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2916
michaela.huard@agr.gc.ca

AAFC's Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of 2008-09. Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2010-11 RPP. They represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. They do not include any additional amounts that may have been allocated to this initiative during 2010-11, due to the timing of the 2010-11 RPP. Total Federal Funding Allocation reflects all currently approved Treasury Board Submissions and reallocations. Total allocation, planned spending and actual spending are net of indirect costs.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Co-operative Development Initiative

Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Rural and Co-operatives Development

Start Date:

Start date under the Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2008 (Original start date under Agricultural Policy Framework: April 1, 2003)

End Date: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

$23.6 million over five years (including in-year transfers)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Through the Co-operative Development Initiative, the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat provides advice on policies and programs affecting co-operatives, and builds partnerships within the federal government and with industry, provinces and other key stakeholders in the implementation of initiatives to support the development of co-operatives. The Secretariat manages a grants and contributions program, which includes:

  • providing advisory services and funding innovative co-op projects, delivered by the co-operative sector; and
  • funding research to build knowledge contributing to co-op development.

Shared Outcomes:

  • Access to services across the country creates an enabling environment for co-operative development and growth
  • More and stronger co-operatives respond to public policy challenges
  • Canadians are better able to utilize the co-operative model to meet their economic and social needs

Governance Structure:

The Co-operatives Secretariat (now integrated into a single Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat) was created as a focal point between Canadian co-operatives and federal departments and agencies. It has instituted mechanisms to raise awareness and inclusion of co-operatives in federal policies and programs. These include dialogue and collaboration with key federal departments as well as with provincial counterparts and the sector.

Performance Highlights:

AAFC continued its partnership with the two national co-op sector organizations in program delivery to provide advisory services and fund innovative co-operative projects across Canada.

As a result of this partnership, an integrated co-op development information and support referral system (utilizing the Internet and a toll-free line) is in place across the country. AAFC has also invested in a partnership with the co-op sector and the academic community towards the elaboration of a knowledge sharing platform that will serve to better link researchers and stakeholders and improve knowledge for co-operatives development.

In 2010–11, the Secretariat began discussions with the Business Development Bank of Canada to develop a financing product to help meet co-operatives’ capitalization and expansion needs. The Secretariat also embarked on a joint research initiative with Industry Canada to study the applicability of various co-op models for business succession in communities that fall under the definition of official language minority communities included in the Federal Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008–2013.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) ($ millions) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
AAFC Rural and Co-operatives Development Co-operatives Development Initiative 23.6 4.7 5.1 25 Innovative co-operative development projects are implemented

82 co-operative innovation projects were approved and implemented

Another 45 projects were approved to be implemented in 2011–12.

Total 23.6 4.7 5.1    

Comments on Variances:

Demand for both advisory services and project funding remains strong. Three calls for proposals were administered in 2010–11. The number of projects approved and implemented is significantly higher than the target. This is explained by the strong demand seen from all parts of the country. Program administrators are also processing proposals that are more focussed and smaller in scope. The median recommended contribution is correspondingly smaller than would normally have been expected were the projects multi-phased and faceted.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:

Program delivery is through third party and the above-noted expected results and measures are to be achieved by the partners.

Contact information:

Michaela Huard
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
Room 125, Floor 2, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2916
michaela.huard@agr.gc.ca

Note:

AAFC's Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of 2008-09. Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2010-11 RPP. They represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. They do not include any additional amounts that may have been allocated to this initiative during 2010-11, due to the timing of the 2010-11 RPP. Total Federal Funding Allocation reflects all currently approved Treasury Board Submissions and reallocations. Total allocation, planned spending and actual spending are net of indirect costs.



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Growing Forward non-BRM Cost-Shared Programs (formerly known as the Growing Forward Program Initiatives Development)

Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Lead Department Program Activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems

Start Date: April 1, 2009

End Date: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $20.8 million over four years

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between AAFC and Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) sets out the general terms, roles and responsibilities for the management and funding of the various components of the Canadian Integrated Food Safety Initiative (CIFSI), funded under AAFC's Growing Forward Framework Agreement. The following initiatives are delivered by CFIA, in collaboration with AAFC:

  1. CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support element under the National Food Safety Systems component of the CIFSI:
    The CFIA-led System Recognition will provide government recognition of on-farm and post-farm food safety systems developed by national (or equivalent) industry organizations. CFIA will continue to develop and deliver food safety system recognition programs. Under the Scientific and Technical Support element, CFIA will continue to provide scientific and technical advice to support food safety system development based on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP).

  2. National Biosecurity Standards Development:
    The National Biosecurity Standards Development will allow CFIA to focus on developing nationally consistent plant and animal biosecurity standards. These standards will be developed with industry, commodity organizations and provinces. Once the biosecurity standards are approved by CFIA, they will become the national biosecurity standard for that particular commodity.

  3. Traceability Information Sharing Solution element under the Developing National Traceability Systems component of the CIFSI:
    The Traceability Information Sharing Solution will explore potential solutions for accessing and querying traceability information between industry and government partners in a planned, measured and constructive way. The allocation of funding will be used to develop materials necessary to define and document the high level requirements and initial project planning for the national Traceability Information Sharing Solution, which may lead to preliminary project approval. This initiative will be managed through joint leadership between CFIA and AAFC and coordinated through the Traceability Management Office.

  4. Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure element under the Developing National Traceability Systems component of the CIFSI:
    The Traceability Management Office will be established to collaboratively undertake the work relating to the overall government legislative and regulatory infrastructure necessary to put traceability authorities, agreements and protocols in place. The allocation of funding to CFIA will be used to develop the legislative and regulatory infrastructure for the initiative.

Shared Outcomes:

This initiative contributes to the following strategic outcomes of AAFC:

  • An environmentally sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector
  • A competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk

Governance Structures:

The overall administration of the MOU for:

  1. AAFC is delegated to:
    Director General - Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
    Director General - Sector Policy Directorate
    Director General - Food Value Chain Bureau
    and
  2. CFIA is delegated to:
    Executive Director - Food Safety and Consumer Protection Directorate
    Executive Director - Animal Health Directorate, Programs
    Executive Director - Plant Health and Biosecurity
    Chief Information Officer - CFIA
    Executive Director - Domestic Policy Directorate

Performance Highlights:

To better reflect the CFIA progress towards obtaining final acceptance by Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) governments of the On-Farm and Post-Farm Food Safety Recognition Programs, this memorandum was amended by changing the target dates for acceptance to May 2012 and December 2012 respectively.

The National Farm Level Biosecurity Standard for the Beef Sector has been drafted and is in the final phase of consultation.

The Traceability Information Sharing Solution is proceeding as planned. This is subject to a separate MOU with CFIA, with a complementary, but different governance structure.

The CFIA is in the process of seeking authority to develop a legislative and regulatory framework for traceability.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to the totals shown.
AAFC Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support N/A - funds
transferred to CFIA
N/A - funds
transferred to CFIA
  Work performed
by CFIA
Results reported
by CFIA
National Biosecurity Standards Development N/A - funds
transferred to CFIA
N/A - funds
transferred to CFIA
  Work performed
by CFIA
Results reported
by CFIA
Traceability Information Sharing Solution N/A – funds
transferred to CFIA
N/A – funds
transferred to CFIA
  Planned to be completed by March 31, 2010 Completed March 31, 2010
Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure N/A – funds
transferred to CFIA
N/A – funds
transferred to CFIA
  Work performed
by CFIA
Results reported
by CFIA;
CFIA Food Safety and Nutrition Risks CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support 7.3 2.1 1.8 Continuous improvement of the On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program and the Post-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program

Completed the draft of the on-farm recognition procedures manual for Phase II, implementation and third party audit and Phase III implementation assessment.

The post-farm recognition procedures manual for Phase I – Technical Review nearly completed and Phase II development has started.

Ongoing technical review and assessment of on-farm and post-farm food safety programs for recognition

Technical review of one national producer organization (NPO) was completed. Three reviews currently in process.

Two 18-month reviews conducted. Other reviews suspended until 2011-12.

Scientific and technical support provided as needed to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders Six application reviews conducted as submitted by NPOs under the Growing Forward Food safety development component of AAFC.
Animal Health Risks and Production Systems National Biosecurity Standards Development 9.5 2.0 1.7 Review and approval process adopted The Canadian Swine Health Board has developed a National Farm Level Biosecurity Standard for the swine sector and review of the standard is in process.
Plant Health Risks and Production Systems Environmental scan of current state of biosecurity within a commodity sector

Two new expert groups established for Sheep and Grains and Oilseeds increasing the total to seven.

Benchmark tools and national sampling plans developed for dairy, bees (alfalfa leaf cutting) and in the process of being developed for potato and bees (bubble bee and honey) and sheep.

National biosecurity standard approved None of the agri-commodity specific biosecurity standards have been completed this year. Beef, Dairy and Bees standards are scheduled to be completed by the end of 2011-12.
Production and dissemination of standard Multi-species plant and animal biosecurity planning templates have been finalized to assist the provinces in their design and development of biosecurity implementation programming.
Production and dissemination of educational and training material Communication products have been developed and disseminated for these agri-commodities: Beef, Potato, Bees and Dairy.
Quarterly progress report and annual presentation to FPT Committee of Officials and/or Food Safety Biosecurity and Traceability (FSBT) Programs Working Group Several presentations were made to the FPT FSBT Programs Working Group
Animal Health Risk and Production Systems Traceability Information Sharing Solution 1.1 0.0 N/A Planned to be completed by March 31, 2010 Completed March 31, 2010
Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure 3.0 0.9 0.9 Establish a National Legislative Framework for Traceability

A recommended option for traceability was presented to FPT ministers in July 2010 and CFIA is proceeding forward pursuant to FPT Ministers’ direction.

CFIA is in process of seeking authority to develop a legislative and regulatory framework for traceability.

Ongoing amendment and continuous improvement for a regulatory framework for traceability Health of Animals regulations were amended so all non-electronic cattle tags initially approved were revoked to support movement reporting.
Develop information sharing agreements with Canadian provinces Traceability information sharing negotiations started with British Columbia and still ongoing with Quebec, Manitoba and Ontario.
Develop a policy framework for traceability

CFIA has advanced the policy framework document through internal governance for approval.

Working with AAFC to develop implementation plans for the four priority species (cattle, sheep, hog and poultry) identified in the FPT ministers’ commitment.

Initiate Privacy Impact Assessments (PIA) The results of the PIA for the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency is now in the process of being published on the CFIA web site. Additional PIA with NPOs are being planned.
Total 20.8 5.0 4.4    

Comments on Variances:

Actual spending is $600,000 less then expected because 1) the delay in re-establishing the FPT Food Safety Recognition sub-committee, 2) the delay in a NPO starting the post-farm food safety recognition program, 3) delays in hiring two CFIA staff to conduct 18-month reviews and 4) the extensive time needed for consultation in the development of biosecurity national standards.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners: Not applicable

Contact information:

Linda Parsons, Director General
Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
Farm Financial Programs Branch
Room 220, Floor 8, Tower 7
1341 Baseline Road
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-1900
linda.parsons@agr.gc.ca

Note:

AAFC’s Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of 2008–09. Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2010–11 RPP. They represent the amounts included in Main Estimates. They do not include any additional amounts that may have been allocated to this initiative during 2010–11, due to the timing of the 2010–11 RPP. Total Federal Funding Allocation reflects all currently approved Treasury Board Submissions and reallocations. Total allocation, planned spending and actual spending are net of indirect costs.


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Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative:
Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership (ACTP)

Name of Lead Department:
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

Lead Department Program Activity:
Community Development

Start Date:
April 1, 2009

End Date:
March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):
$9,975,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The ACTP is a nine-member, pan-Atlantic marketing consortium comprising ACOA, the four provincial tourism industry associations, and the provincial departments responsible for tourism in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. The ACTP is dedicated to promoting Atlantic Canada as a leading vacation destination in key American, European and Pacific markets.

The 2009-12 ACTP is a $19.95-million agreement that supports:

  • fully integrated consumer, trade and media relations marketing strategies based on sound market research, economies of scale and commonality;
  • funding that is incremental to provincial marketing budgets;
  • the preservation of provincial brand equity;
  • marketing activities dictated by the marketplace;
  • clear and responsive measurement systems that benefit all four Atlantic provinces; and
  • end-of-agreement project evaluations.

Additional information can be found on the ACTP website.

A memorandum of understanding for the renewal of the ACTP was signed on April 1, 2009. This initiative directly supports the Agency’s strategic outcome.

Shared Outcomes:
The goal of the ACTP exemplifies the Agency’s priority to increase revenues, profits, investments and wages. It aims to:

  • increase Atlantic Canada’s competitiveness in targeted markets;
  • promote regional co-operation (e.g. federal, provincial, industry);
  • promote incremental marketing activities;
  • achieve economies of scale in marketing;
  • raise awareness of Atlantic Canada as a “top-of-mind” destination; and
  • increase tourism arrivals and tourism revenues for the four Atlantic provinces.

The 2009-12 ACTP is expected to generate $10 in incremental economic activity for every $1 invested in marketing. The three-year revenue target (2009-10 through 2011-12) is $190 million in incremental revenues for small and medium-sized tourism enterprises in Atlantic Canada.

Governance Structure:
The activities of the ACTP are managed by a ten-person management committee, consisting of:

  • the ACOA vice-president responsible for tourism;
  • the ACOA director general of Tourism Atlantic;
  • the four provincial deputy ministers responsible for tourism; and
  • the presidents of the four provincial tourism industry associations (or their permanent designates).

Decisions taken by this management committee require a consensus of members. Six members constitute a quorum, provided all four provinces are represented by both government and industry present, as well as ACOA. A representative of the Canadian Tourism Commission sits as an ex officio member of the management committee.

The management committee is responsible for the administration and management of the agreement, allocation of annual budgets on a per-market basis, approval of the program’s annual work plans and budgets, and evaluations of its activities. It oversees the work of a marketing committee, develops and oversees a communications policy, and provides program interpretation and dispute resolution.

Performance Highlights:
During fiscal year 2010-11, the ACTP generated $45.3 million in export revenues for small and medium-sized tourism enterprises in Atlantic Canada. With a return on investment (ROI) of $10.86 for every $1.00 invested in marketing, the partnership surpassed its ROI target of 10 to 1. The ACTP also generated $2.7 million in media buying efficiencies and leveraged $456,072 from its joint marketing agreement with tour operators based in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
ACOA Community Development Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership $9.975 million 3.325 3.591 Export revenues:  55.2 45.3

Comments on Variances:
Spending - The variance in planned spending is due to reduced advertising expenditures of $0.266 million in fiscal year 2009-10 following a cautious approach to the ACTP’s developmental markets in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. This amount was reallocated to fiscal year 2010-11, increasing ACOA’s investment from $3.325 million to $3.591 million.

Results - The variance of $9.9 million less revenues generated by the ACTP in 2010-11 was the result of reduced advertising expenditures, a weak U.S. economy and the ACTP’s new focus on development markets in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:
The ACTP enables industry and the four Atlantic provincial governments to pool their resources in order to increase their visibility in priority markets; in most cases, this exposure would not be accessible to them individually. The ACTP facilitates the following: relationship building and a collaborative partnership with the Canadian Tourism Commission; joint marketing partnerships with tour wholesalers/operators; marketing efficiencies (e.g. media buys, media relations); research efficiencies that support marketing strategies and tactics; familiarization tours that provide travel writers and tour operators with first-hand information on (and exposure to) the region’s tourism assets; and support to Atlantic Canada Showcase, a venue that allows small and medium-sized enterprises in the tourism industry to interact with tour wholesalers and tour operators.

Contact information:
Rob McCloskey
Director General, Tourism Atlantic
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 40
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
C1A 7K2
Telephone: 902-626-2479
E-mail: Rob.McCloskey@acoa-apeca.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative:
International Business Development Agreement (IBDA)

Name of Lead Department:
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)

Lead Department Program Activity:
Enterprise Development (program sub-activity: Trade)

Start Date:
April 1, 2005

End Date:
March 31, 2011

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):
$8.4 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
In May 1994, ACOA entered into an agreement (Canada–Atlantic Provinces Agreement on International Business Development) with the four Atlantic Provinces, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and Industry Canada to “undertake specific measures to optimize regional coordination on a pan-Atlantic scale and combine limited resources to coordinate trade-related activities.” 1  With an initial launch in 1994, the agreement was extended in 1997, 2000, 2005 and 2010, for a total investment of $25 million over the course of 17 years. Funding is cost-shared 70-30 between the federal and provincial governments.

In April 2011, ACOA renewed the agreement with its partners for another five years (2011-16) with a budget of $10 million ($7 million ACOA, $3 million provinces). The commitment to this IBDA, with the increased funding allocation, attests to both the agreement’s positive results and its significance for the future of the region’s international business development.

More information can be found on the IBDA website.

Shared Outcomes:
The shared outcomes for the IBDA partners support ACOA’s Trade program sub-activity and are (1) increased number of new exporters, (2) existing exporters reporting sales to new markets, and (3) existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets.

Between 2005 and 2010, the Agency and its partners administered over 90 projects. Clients surveyed to date have reported the following results: 23 companies started exporting; 135 exporters increased sales in existing markets; and 107 exporters expanded into new markets.

Governance Structure:
ACOA is the lead organization for this initiative and houses the secretariat responsible for administering the agreement. A management committee comprised of a representative from each of the partners is responsible for the planning and management of the agreement’s strategic elements and the evaluation of projects.

Partners

   Federal government (70% funding)

  • ACOA (lead department)
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (non-funding partner)
  • Industry Canada (non-funding partner)

   Provincial governments (30% funding)

  • Business New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia Business Inc.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development
  • Prince Edward Island Department of Innovation and Advanced Learning

Performance Highlights:
During 2010-11, the Agency and its partners approved 16 projects. The coordination of the projects on a pan-Atlantic basis provided an opportunity to streamline the funding and application approach and to simplify the administration of the projects by consolidating all the services in one office and creating a central point of control. A client survey demonstrates that 2 companies began exporting, 28 exporters increased their exporter sales in existing markets, and 26 exporters expanded into new markets.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
ACOA Enterprise Development International Business Development Agreement $8.4 million 1.4 0.6 New exporters: 8 2
Existing exporters reporting sales to new markets: 20 26
Companies reporting increased sales to existing markets: 30 28

Comments on Variances:
Spending - In addition to not having received the number of proposals projected, claims for eight projects, valued at $400,000, were not paid before April 1, 2011.

Results - Proposals received over the reporting period were mostly from existing exporters rather than non-exporters.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:
Same as federal partners.

Contact information:
Michel Têtu
Director General, Trade and Investment
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 6051
Moncton, New Brunswick
E1C 9J8
Telephone: 506-851-6496
E-mail: Michel.Tetu@acoa-apeca.gc.ca 

[1] Canada-Atlantic Provinces Agreement on International Business Development (April 1, 2005).

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Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Table A: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) (2003-04 to 2007-08)

Lead Department Program Activity: Zoonotic Risks / Internal Services (CFIA only)

Start Date: 2003-04 (enhanced programming)

End Date: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) and $26.6M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The BSE program protects human and animal health by conducting surveillance, research and risk assessments regarding BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and minimizing the risk of exposure to infected materials; maintains consumer confidence through assessing the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks; and supports market access for cattle, beef and related products through promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.

The CFIA verifies that specified risk material (SRM) is being removed from the animal feed chain and the human food chain, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (for example, through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program. Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments regarding human exposure to BSE and other TSEs, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) carries out surveillance and targeted supporting research in this area as well. AAFC has been involved in supporting, stabilizing and repositioning Canada's beef and cattle industry, including through the provision of compensation payments to stakeholders impacted by BSE in Canada.

 
Year Departments Funding Period Intent of Funds
2003-04 CFIA, AAFC, HC 2003-04 to 2007-08 Measures to secure the future of the Canadian beef industry
2003-04 CFIA 2003-04 to 2007-08 The removal of SRM from the food chain and re-entering export markets (referred to as the Enhanced BSE Initiative)
2004-05 CFIA 2004-05 to 2008-09 Reposition the Canadian beef and cattle industry to operate on a profitable and sustainable basis
2004-05 CFIA 2004-05 to 2008-09 Strengthen animal feed restrictions
2005-06 CFIA 2005-06 to 2008-09 Additional measures to address critical pressures facing the ruminant industry
2006-07 CFIA 2006-07 Continue the work the Agency was undertaking for the enhanced feed ban
2007-08 CFIA On-going Implement the enhanced feed ban restrictions
2008-09 CFIA 2008-09 Extend sunsetting elements of the enhanced BSE initiative
2009-10 CFIA, PHAC, HC 2009-10 to 2013-14 Continue work on the core BSE activities

Shared Outcome(s): Contributing to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

Governance Structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for the delivery of the BSE Program. In 2008, a summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program was conducted, which noted that the governance of the program should be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding BSE-related activities, both internally and with other partner organizations. The CFIA accepted this recommendation and agreed to develop options for an improved governance model to facilitate horizontal dialogue that is consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives. In 2010, the CFIA launched a new committee structure to bring the Agency's overall approach to governance more in line with evolving business needs. The new governance structure focuses on the importance of sharing information internally and ensures a more efficient and streamlined senior-level committee structure. It is expected that the renewed structure will foster a whole-of-Agency approach to decision-making and will support day-to-day operations across the Agency. To ensure business line perspectives are integrated into decision-making, the three senior executive-level committees are supported by four committees: Animal Health, Plant, Food and Horizontal Management.

Performance Highlights: In 2010-11, the Government continued to work on core BSE activities that contribute to the protection of human and animal health.

($ Millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Zoonotic Risks

Internal Services

SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain 91.5 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 9.5 7.0 Safe food. Continue the enforcement and verification of SRM removal by CFIA inspection staff.

Federally inspected boning establishments and slaughter establishments continue to be verified on-site and record reviews are performed by CFIA inspection staff to ensure that:

Operators are following their written HACCP System related to the removal and control of Specified Risk Material (SRM).

Effectiveness of Operator's written HACCP system to meet regulatory requirements related to the removal and control of SRM in boning establishments.

In the 2010-11 fiscal year, a compliance rate of 99.76% has been achieved in 5,023 tasks delivered on the enforcement and verification of SRM removal.

Provincially inspected slaughter establishments continue to be verified on-site and record reviews are performed by CFIA inspection staff to ensure that the removal, segregation and disposal of SRM, are carried out to determine the adequacy of Provincial oversight regarding plant controls.

These reviews have been and will continue to be a crucial part in our ongoing efforts to strive for continuous improvements to the consistency and overall quality of our inspection verifications and related activities in non-registered provincial establishments.

Import Controls 2.8 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 0.3 0.4

Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards.

The CFIA reviews and updates current import policies and conditions for BSE as required in order to reflect changes to international standards and evolving science.

Update relevant import policies and procedural directives (by priority, minimum 25% per year) to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and CFIA domestic disease control; and to support market access by maintaining and improving Canada's animal health status and production of safe food, feed, fertilizer from imported animal origin ingredients

CFIA acceptance of OIE BSE disease categorization for trading countries: negligible risk, controlled risk or undetermined risk

Co-partnered scientific evaluation with Health Canada on the manufacture process of gelatine from cattle hides sourced from controlled and undetermined risk for BSE countries

Revised BSE import policy (umbrella import policy) officially signed off by Health Canada partners and Chief Veterinary Officer of CFIA. Submitted to WTO for comments (2009) and implementation (2010).

Updated 25 percent of the procedural imports directives for precision and clarity; further updates continuing this year (2010-2011) more specifically combined the 5 different rendered and inedible products directives into one document by commodity type.

All Terrestrial Animal Health Division, Import Section activities support domestic disease control (EFB, 1997 FB) programs, align with international obligations, advance scientific knowledge, and support market access by maintaining Canada's domestic reputation for animal health.

The CFIA continues to conduct animal health risk assessments on TSE to support the National Terrestrial Animal Health Program.

The CFIA conducted a joint scientific advice on reduction of BSE infectivity in the production of bovine hide derived gelatine in collaboration with Health Canada.

BSE Surveillance 159.9 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 15.4 18.8

Safe animals and food.

1. Monitoring prevalence of BSE in Canada and assessing the effectiveness of the BSE control measures including the Feed Ban and imports controls

2. Analyzing options to redesign the BSE surveillance program and consulting with stakeholders to explore further targeting of surveillance

The Canadian BSE surveillance program continues to be delivered in accordance with national and international / OIE guidelines.

CFIA collected 35,655 samples during the 2010 calendar year and triggered, in compliance with the national reimbursement program eligibility criteria, an approximately equivalent number of payments to eligible partners of the program including cattle producers, private veterinarians and dead stock collection operators.

TSE Laboratories network completed the testing of 35,655 received samples with a detection of one BSE case

The CFIA explored, in a joint working group with the Government of Alberta, avenues to refine the program by having a more targeted surveillance focussed on sampling high risk category of animals.

Results of the Canada-Alberta BSE surveillance pilot continue to be periodically reviewed.

Further analysis to be undertaken regarding the integration of criteria being evaluated in the pilot project, into the remaining national program.

The CFIA conducted national training for clarification of sampling technique and maintenance of chain of evidence for samples (from September 2010 continuing into February 2011).

Cattle Identification 29.2 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 2.8 2.2

Safe animals and food.

Continue work on cattle identification enforcement activities, including verification at auctions and federally and provincially inspected abattoirs that cattle are identified with an official ear tag.

Federal abattoir operators are routinely verified in order to ensure all cattle received bear an approved tag.

In the 2010- 2011 fiscal year, a compliance rate of 99.76% was achieved in over 1,265 tasks delivered at federally inspected abattoirs on cattle identification enforcement activities.

The CFIA inspection staff continues to monitor and enforce the Canadian Livestock Identification program at auctions, dead stock collectors, farms and livestock operations, feedlots, provincial abattoirs, renderers and tag distributors. 8,848 visits were performed. <0.7% of visits were reported as in violation. 98% of cattle were tagged.

The CFIA's livestock identification and traceability program has performed extensive work on:

  • training material and a Manual of Procedures for the implementation of compliance verification system (CVS) in the program;
  • a livestock traceability data sharing agreement with Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives;
  • an epidemiological, disease control and compliance verification perspective of acceptable enhancements to the cattle traceability system;
  • a revised tag approval and revocation framework with the objective of improving the performance of approved tags;
  • program delivery and design options in order to meet ministerial expectations with respect to livestock traceability;
  • a legislative framework which will provide stronger traceability regulatory-making authorities; and,
  • a single-window initiative through which authorized used would have access to traceability data collected in multiple databases in order to enhance our ability in managing a sanitary issue and verifying compliance.
Export Certification 53.2 (2003-04 to 2013-14) 5.7 3.4

Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Continue the provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries.

The CFIA remains committed to promoting an international regulatory framework to protect Canadian exporters from discriminatory and unnecessary barriers. The CFIA also leads or participates in a number of international and bilateral agreements. Consistent with its international regulatory cooperation framework, the CFIA maintains close relations with key foreign regulatory counterparts.

Enhanced Feed Ban 241.0 (2004-05 to 2013-14) plus 26.6 ongoing 26.6 16.8

Safe feed, fertilizer, animals and food.

Continue the enforcement of enhanced feed ban restrictions.

The CFIA began enforcing an initial set of feed ban regulations in 1997. At that time, these new regulatory requirements (without benefit of any additional funding) were integrated into existing inspection programs for feed and feed ingredient manufactured, distributed and used by inedible rendering plants, commercial feed mills and on farms.

In response to the detection of a native-born case of BSE in Canada in 2003, the CFIA received additional funding in 2005-06 and subsequent fiscal years to support implementation and enforcement of an enhanced feed ban regulatory framework that took effect in 2007. The impact of implementing the enhancements principally involved:

1. Increasing inspection capacity and frequency throughout the feed supply and use chain (i.e. at inedible rendering plants, commercial feed mills, feed retail outlets, and farms); and

2. Implementing and administering a system of control permits and compliance inspection activities at abattoirs, dead stock collectors, landfills and other processing and disposal sites regarding the collection, transport, treatment and disposition of cattle Specified Risk Material (SRM) tissues. As part of the enhanced regulations, SRM must be segregated, identified and appropriately managed until final disposal. CFIA workload increased to include inspection oversight of SRM equipment and facilities, tracking movement at several points in the chain to final disposal or alternative use not historically subject to CFIA inspection.

3. During 2010-11, the CFIA continued to monitor fertilizer and supplement products as possible SRM outlets unless its use was authorized by a permit issued under the Health of Animals Regulations. These permits continued to be issued on a case-by-case basis and included requirements for processing the material (e.g. composting) as well as conditions for its final disposal (i.e. use on non-food, non-feed and non grazing land) to mitigate against potential risks to human, animal health and the environment. As an added measure, a marketplace monitoring program targeting proper record keeping and recall procedures was put in place to ensure manufacturers, distributors, importers and sellers could expedite an effective product recall if necessary.

During 2010 calendar year, the CFIA continued to verify compliance with the 2007 regulatory enhancements at rendering plants, commercial feed manufacturers, feed retail outlets, on-farm feed manufacturers and ruminant feeders as well as at meat slaughter and processing establishments, cattle dead stock collectors, transporters and receivers of SRM downers and dead stock and commercial composting and fertilizer manufacturing facilities.

Performance Summary:
Feed inspections in the 2010 calendar year:
Commercial Feed Mills: 4884 tasks were performed at 460 facilities;
Rendering Facilities: 884 tasks were performed at 45 facilities; and
Retail: 2473 tasks were performed at 468 facilities.
Farms: 332 tasks were performed at 73 facilities
Renewed and issued a total of 1,401 permits for the control of SRM in Canada

Technical Market Access Support 44.1 (2004-05 to 2013-14) 5.0 1.8

Confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets.

Continue the establishment and maintenance of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence regarding international policies and standards development.

The CFIA continues to play an active and participatory role at the international level. In addition, the CFIA is contributing to and influencing international science-based disease control standards for BSE, which are critical components of the foundation for safe trade and the maintenance of international market confidence. On a bilateral basis this involves the invitation to trading partners for incoming technical missions to confirm first hand the integrity and implementation of Canada's inspection controls. At the multi-lateral level, the CFIA is maintaining the official designation as a BSE Controlled Risk country through the evaluation process of the 176 member country World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The CFIA continues to contribute to the discussions at OIE, not only with respect to at the General Session and in revisions to the various Codes, but also with respect to having an OIE BSE reference laboratory as well as CFIA employees on a number of the OIE commissions.

Establish-ment Review 2.3 (2004-05 to 2006-07) - -

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Over-supply of Aged Cattle 0.3 (2004-05) - -

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Meat Inspection Reform 9.2 (2005-06 to 2007-08) - -

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

CFIA's Subtotal 633.5 (2004-05 to 2013-14) plus 26.6 ongoing 65.3 50.4    
Public Health Agency of Canada

Surveillance and Population Health Assessment +

Public Health Surveillance +

Prion Diseases Program 7.9 0.8 0.8 Ongoing prospective surveillance of all human TSEs in Canada, to ensure that risks of zoonotic (animal-to-human) and secondary (human-to-human) infectious transmission of these diseases are closely monitored, promptly investigated, thoroughly characterized, and appropriately mitigated.

The PHAC Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Surveillance System (CJDSS) continues to conduct comprehensive national surveillance of human TSEs – detailed statistics can be found at http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hcai-iamss/cjd-mcj/cjdss-ssmcj/stats-eng.php. All forms of human TSE – sporadic, genetic, and those acquired by infectious transmission – continue to be detected in Canada, as a direct result of the high-quality laboratory services and non-laboratory support provided to Canadian health professionals by the CJDSS.

In the last calendar year (2009) for which CJDSS data are complete, the estimated mortality rate for all human prion diseases in Canada was 1.57 per million, which is consistent with international benchmarks.

A case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (the second to date in a Canadian resident) was confirmed by the CJDSS in February 2011 (see http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/ccdrw-rmtch/2011/ccdrw-rmtcs1011r-eng.php). The case was found to be an imported one, confirming the absence of negative implications for the safety of Canadian beef.

Research continues with the goal of developing improved methodologies for detection and diagnosis of human and animal prion disease – for example, the PHAC Prion Diseases Program has discovered potential urine-based biomakers for BSE; and the CJDSS has completed a 6-year prospective study of the accuracy of biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid for diagnosis of human prion disease.

PHAC's Subtotal 7.9 0.8 0.8    
Health Canada Health Products Risk Assessment and Targeted Research 44.0 4.4 3.5

Review of master files and product licence applications which contain ingredients where the ingredients are sourced from animals and which may be susceptible to TSE.

To track and assess all ingredients in each application, which are sourced from animal tissues, with regards to BSE risk.

Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance.

Health Canada continued to review master files and product licence applications which contain ingredients where the ingredients are sourced from animals and which may be susceptible to TSE. As part of the risk assessment, every review requires an assessment for animal sourced ingredients. During this time period, approximately 80 new and 210 generic drug submissions were reviewed with a percentage, approximately 15%, being contracted out for review. In addition, 250 Notifiable Change Applications and 15 Drug Master File submissions were reviewed by contractors.

All applications assessed for animal tissue sources. To date, approximately. 32% of product licences issued (equal to 9,176 product licences) list an active bovine or cattle animal tissue form. This includes 2,088 product licences that were issued in 2010, and 496 issued so far in 2011.

Pre-market review activities of biologics with accompanying risk assessments for variant CJD (human equivalent of mad cow disease) and or for BSE. These activities are conducted as part of the biologics review process to verify that animal-derived materials that are being used in the manufacture of biologics have low risk for transmission of BSE to Canadian population.

Activities related to the development of risk management strategies for mitigating risk of BSE and vCJD in blood products (post-market with PHAC). Ongoing oversight or surveillance to determine the need for deferrals when evidence becomes available on potential risk of transmission of BSE and vCJD. Appropriate risk management actions are put in place in consultation with PHAC.

Scientific and clinical input to policies related to managing vCJD risk (vCJD Directives and ongoing analyses of relevancy of travel deferrals for exposure of Canadians to BSE risk). Ensure that new scientific and clinical evidence are incorporated into the development or revision of directives on vCJD to minimize the exposure of Canadians to BSE risk.

International collaborative efforts to harmonize strategies for managing BSE and vCJD risk of biologics. Sustain collaboration with international partners to ensure sharing of scientific and clinical information and forge development of harmonized strategies to deal with identified risk of transmission of BSE in biologics.

Update of BGTD's"Draft Guidance Document: Regulatory Requirements to Minimize the Risk of Transmission of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs) via Animal-Sourced Materials used in the Manufacture of Schedule D (Biologic) Drugs" to reflect the information contained within the revised WHO document entitled "Tables on Tissue Infectivity Distribution in Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies".

Compliance and Enforcement * 1.0 (2003-04 to 2007-08) - - Not Applicable Not Applicable
Product Assessment * 6.2 (2003-04 to 2007-08) - - Not Applicable Not Applicable
Tracking and Tracing * 3.1 (2003-04 to 2007-08) - - Not Applicable Not Applicable
Food and Nutrition Risk assessment and targeted research 18.1 1.8 1.3

Outcome: Increased expertise and knowledge of BSE/TSE science, risks and product surveillance.

Output/Activities: Conduct consultations with stakeholders, external collaborations/research and training and conferences attendance.

The BSE Summative Evaluation was originally planned to be conducted in 2009-10, but was delayed until 2010-2011 because of the one-year extension of funding. The Summative Evaluation is expected to be completed in 2011-2012.

Health Canada (HC) continues to conduct risk assessments and unique research projects on TSE in collaboration with external partners (CFIA, Germany, and France) to generate novel and critical data related to the pathogenesis of BSE, TSEs, and specified risk material to support hazard characterization, risk assessment and standard setting. Also, HC continued its scientific and consultative role as a member of Canada's national and international delegations for BSE and TSEs

The BSE Summative Evaluation Planning was done in 2010-2011 for a cost of $50K salary. The Summative Evaluation will be contracted in fiscal year 2011-2012 for $160K O&M and managed for $50K salary.

CFIA's Subtotal 72.4 6.2 4.8    
Total 3,601.1 (2003-04 to 2013-14) and 26.6 ongoing** 72.3 56.0    

+ PHAC: In the 2010-11 RPP, incorrect descriptive information was entered for the Public Health Agency of Canada's Prion Diseases Program in columns 12 and 13 of Table 9c. In the present version of the table, the correct information has been provided.

*Health Canada: Funding sunsetted in 2007-08.

**Note: The total federal funding allocation includes funding for AAFC ($2,887.3M), CFIA ($633.5M plus $26.6M ongoing), Health Canada ($72.4M) and PHAC ($7.9M). A table outlining planned and actual spending for AAFC is not included in the RPP or DPR as their resources sunsetted in 2008-09.

Comments on Variances:

CFIA: The variance between Planned Spending and Actual Spending is related to funding reallocated to expenditures that support this initiative, along with other Agency priorities. While efforts are made to meet the intended program objectives, reallocation occurs to deal with items which take precedence at the time.

AAFC: No variance required.

PHAC: No variance required.

Health Canada: HC underspent BSE funding by $1.4M in 2010-11 for a number of reasons. Following a retirement, a senior advisor position became vacant for approximately one year and many meetings and follow-up contracts were delayed until FY 2011-12 when the position was staffed. A BSE evaluation planned for 2010-11 was delayed until 2011-12. A realignment of responsibility in 2010-11 prevented full expenditure in some areas.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Colleen Barnes
Executive Director
Domestic Policy Directorate
613-773-5901

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
John Ross
Director, Animal Industry Division
613-773-0220

Public Health Agency of Canada
Dr. Michael Coulthart
Director, Prion Diseases Program
Prion Diseases Program
204-789-6026

Health Canada
Scott LeBrun
A/Director
Strategic Planning and Accountability Division
Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada
613-952-6178


Table B: National Aquatic Animal Health Program

Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Lead Department Program Activity: Animal Health Risks and Production Systems (CFIA); Aquatic Animal Health (DFO)

Start Date: April 1, 2005

End Date: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $59.0M (2005-06 to 2009-10) and $10.3M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The NAAHP goal is to protect Canada's aquatic animal's resources and productivity by preventing the introduction and spread of aquatic animal diseases and by maintaining the seafood industry's competitiveness in international markets. This is in line with the Government of Canada's priority to protect the natural resources of Canada and economic stability. The Agency's priority in this area is a safe and sustainable animal aquatic resource base.

Shared Outcome(s): Sustainable Aquatic Resource Productivity and Internationally Competitive Aquatic Animal Resource Base Industry, which will allow trade to continue and expand.

Governance Structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for delivery of the NAAHP in collaboration with DFO. Respective federal roles and responsibilities are outlined in a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The Animal Health Business Line and the Horizontal Steering Committee for Aquatic Animal Health are responsible for monitoring the financial governance within the CFIA budget. An Executive Steering Committee at the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) level from both organizations, is responsible for the strategic direction, monitoring and analysis of the NAAHP implementation. At the Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FPT) level, the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers (CCFAM) has oversight over the program through a working group with the CFIA. There is also an industry/Federal/Provincial/Territorial advisory committee, the Aquatic Animal Health Committee, that meets annually to guide the development of the program.

Performance Highlights: Regulations were amended to protect the health of aquatic animals in December 2010 and January 2011. To implement these amendments, the mandatory notification was put in place and progress was made on the establishment of an Aquatic Animal Health Import Program for December 2011. Discussions continued with different partners to ensure their information needs were met under the legislative implementation of the NAAHP.

($ Millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Animal Health Risks and Production Systems

Internal Services

National Aquatic Animal Health Program 32.1 (2005-06 to 2009-10) and 6.3 ongoing 6.3 4.9

Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries.

Protection of the National Aquatic Animal Health (NAAH) System.

Develop and establish an import system for products meeting Canadian standards.

The Aquatic Animal Health Division (AAHD) continued to provide market access for Canadian aquatic animals and seafood products through country to country negotiations.

Through successful revisions to regulations supporting the National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP) in December 2010 and January 2011, the CFIA can now receive and respond to any suspected or confirmed cases of the 20 reportable diseases and 15 immediately notifiable diseases for aquatic animals.

Work continued on the implementation of the Aquatic Animal Health Import Program for December 2011 to ensure compliance with Canadian requirements.

The CFIA continued to work with its partners such as industry, provinces, territories and Aboriginal organizations to ensure that their information needs were met under the legislative implementation of the NAAHP by leading and participating to meetings with the industry, provinces and territories; developing and distributing materials; and organizing consultations on program activities.

The CFIA continued to conduct aquatic animal health risk assessments related to: import/ export; aquatic animal health diseases; scientific advice; and, evaluation of the disease status of countries, zones and regions.

CFIA's Subtotal 32.1 (2005-06 to 2009-10) and 6.3 ongoing 6.3 4.9    
Department of Fisheries and Oceans

Aquatic Animal Health

National Aquatic Animal Health Program 26.9 (2005-06 to 2009-10) and 4.0 (2010-11) ongoing 4.0 3.8

Diagnostic tests developed and validated to OIE requirements.

Operational Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS).

Amendment of the Fish Health Protection Regulations (FHPR).

Capacity for diagnostic testing.

Development and validation of diagnostic tests are proceeding on a top down priority basis, on track.

LIMS development is progressing. Planned date for national roll out is Fall 2011.

Work continued on the FHPR amendments to coincide with coming into force by CFIA of the Aquatic Animal Health Import Program in December 2011.

Laboratory capacity is commensurate with resource base at the three DFO NAAHP laboratories.

DFO's Subtotal 26.9 (2005-06 to 2009-10) and 4.0 (2010-11) ongoing 4.0 3.8    
Total 59.0 (2005-06 to 2009-10) and 10.3 ongoing 10.3 8.7    

Comments on Variances:

CFIA: This variance is due to amounts being reallocated corporately and because of staffing delays. Delays in consultations, translation, training and procurement also contributed to the lapse.

DFO: No explanation necessary.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
Annie R. Champagne
Director
Aquatic Animal Health Division
(613) 221-3779

Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO)
Stephen J Stephen
Director
Biotechnology and Aquatic Animal Health Science Branch
(613) 990-0292



Table C: Listeria

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Health Canada (HC); and, Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

Lead Departments Program Activity: CFIA: Food Safety and Nutrition Risks; HC: Food and Nutrition; and, PHAC: Surveillance and Population Health Assessment

Start Date: 2009-10

End Date: 2011-12

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $75.0M (2009-10 to 2011-12)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The objective of this horizontal initiative is to address recommendations made in the report by the government-appointed Independent Investigator, Sheila Weatherill, who reviewed the circumstances leading to the 2008 Listeriosis outbreak in Canada. The Government developed an action plan based on three thematic areas: address immediate food safety risks, enhance surveillance and early detection, and improve Government response to food-borne illness outbreaks in Canada.

To implement the action plan, the three federal organizations – CFIA, HC, PHAC – received a total spending authority of $75.0 million over three years (CFIA: $46.8 million, PHAC: $17.7 million, and HC: $10.5 million). Each federal organization has identified the resource requirements, strategic outcomes, objectives and implementation plan for each thematic area. Implementation of this horizontal initiative will further enhance Canada's food safety system.

Shared Outcome(s): Address Immediate Food Safety Risks by hiring and training new Ready-to-Eat (RTE) meat inspection staff, updating food safety programs and directions to industry, building 24/7 capacity for health risk assessments, and improving electronic access for inspection staff.

Enhanced Surveillance and Early Detection by upgrading (web-based) national public heath surveillance system, improving detection methods for Listeria, enhancing laboratory testing capacity, and improving laboratory diagnostic tools.

Improve Government Response to Food-borne Illness Outbreaks in Canada by strengthening federal leadership capacity for outbreak response, revising the national Foodborne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol (FIORP), improving risk communication during food-borne emergencies, targeting communications to vulnerable populations, and improving public access to integrated Government of Canada food safety information.

Governance Structure(s): Responsibility for the implementation of the recommendations made by the Independent Investigator is based on the mandates of the CFIA, HC, PHAC. In addition, the Deputy Minister of AAFC chairs a special committee of deputy heads from CFIA, HC and PHAC which provides recommendations to improve the ways the organizations work together to deliver their food safety mandates. The CFIA, PHAC, HC, and AAFC work horizontally through a governance structure to implement and monitor the implementation of the recommendations.

The governance framework includes an ADM-level Committee on Food Safety (ADM-CFS) that is supported by a DG-level committee. The ADM-CFS receives support and direction from the AAFC, CFIA, PHAC, and HC deputy heads. Furthermore, each department monitors the implementation of the recommendations through a department specific governance structure that includes inter-branch director-level, executive director or DG-level, vice-president or ADM-level, and senior management-level committees.

Performance Highlights: Key performance results achieved by CFIA, HC, and PHAC include clarified roles and responsibilities, enhanced coordination of oversight of food safety among federal partners and industry, and improved communication among federal partners, industry and the public on food safety issues. These achievements have led to improved management of risks associated with Listeria in RTE meats and better prevention of foodborne illnesses in Canada.

($ Millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Internal Services

Hiring of Inspection staff in Ready to Eat Meat Facilities 21.3 10.3 7.1 Improved management of Food Safety risks.

The Government made funds available to hire 70 full-time inspectors. As of January 2011, the CFIA had hired all 70 inspectors. As a result, management of food safety risks has been improved in federally regulated ready-to-eat meat facilities.

Scientific and technical training programs 11.6 4.3 4.1

Enhance scientific and technical knowledge among RTE meat inspection staff in all federally registered meat establishments.

The CFIA has completed an assessment of training needs and has developed a new national training plan for meat processing plant inspectors. The plan includes a new course curriculum that incorporates instruction in required skills and facilitates continual training for both new and incumbent inspectors. The enhanced training is now being delivered on an ongoing basis.

Enhanced connectivity of Inspectors 3.0 1.0 0.2

Improved and timely documentation and communication of inspection results.

The CFIA has increased the use of laptops and cell phones and has provided faster network connectivity. In addition, a pilot project completed on April 1, 2010 assessed whether inspectors – particularly those in remote areas – could benefit from wireless technology, which would allow them secure access to the CFIA computer network applications.

The pilot project results informed CFIA's plan for the first phase of a new system to improve connectivity. The new system will improve communication and provide inspectors with better access to information to support decision-making.

The project to deliver wireless technology is currently in the execution phase and the installment of the supporting infrastructure was completed by March 31, 2011.

In 2011-2012, CFIA will deploy the wireless devices to the identified inspectors.

Enhanced Food Safety Program Risk Management 4.6 1.8 1.9

Review of food safety programs and directives to apply similar lessons learned.

The CFIA works to review and update its programs, regulations and directives on an on-going basis. In April 2011, CFIA began developing a framework, as well as business processes that will facilitate the routine updating of manuals. These manuals provide information on program requirements to CFIA staff, including guidance to CFIA staff and regulated parties regarding the interpretation of legislation, regulations, and related policies, and what is required to achieve compliance.

Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other food-borne hazards 1.2 0.5 0.8

Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other food-borne hazards to provide greater availability and choice of testing methods for the detection of Listeria, and faster turn around time for reporting of results.

The CFIA continues to improve and validate detection methods for Listeria in meat products and in the meat processing environment to reduce the time required to test samples and enable more rapid response during food safety investigations.

The CFIA validated three rapid methods in 2010-11 that are currently undergoing technical review to determine if these methods are suitable for regulatory testing for product and/or environmental testing.

Additional Listeria testing 4.1 1.4 1.3

Conduct additional Listeria testing to contribute to improved decision making and earlier detection and faster response to potential foodborne illness outbreaks.

The CFIA's laboratory capacity was enhanced to enable testing of additional RTE meat and environmental samples, which were planned as a result of the updated Listeria Directives. As well, the funding enabled the purchase of environmental test kits, which are used to conduct environmental sampling to identify the presence of Listeria in the processing environment.

Government of Canada food safety portal 1.0 0.3 0.5

Improve public access to integrated Government of Canada food safety information.

The Government of Canada's online Food Safety Portal (www.foodsafety.gc.ca) as a one-stop source of information about food safety and foodborne illness. The food safety and foodborne illness information initiatives developed by CFIA, PHAC and HC can now be found on the Portal along with links to CFIA, PHAC and HC websites. To raise awareness on the Food Safety Portal, CFIA issued a social media news release that encouraged individuals to share information about the Portal online by using social media book-marking and tagging options. As well, the Agency participated in six food related events and exhibits between May 2010 and March 2011 to promote the Food Safety Portal and raise awareness of safe food-handling practices and recall procedures.

CFIA's Subtotal 46.8 19.6 15.9    
Public Health Agency of Canada

Surveillance and Population Health Assessment

Surveillance of Infectious Disease 2.9 1.3 1.0 Strengthen laboratory diagnostic and networking tools.

PulseNet Canada is a key PHAC program that utilizes laboratory DNA fingerprinting technology to perform surveillance for food-borne disease, detect outbreaks at the earliest possible stage, and to serve as a primary data sharing and communications link between all provincial public health laboratories, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Health Canada, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). The goal of PulseNet Canada and these member agencies is to identify the emergence of food-borne illness (both regionally and nationally) and to help identify the contaminated food source so that public health and food safety responses can then be initiated. PulseNet Canada is currently developing a comprehensive online training program, and is continuing to expand and improve its training and certification programs to new and existing member laboratories to ensure that lab capacity exists across provincial and federal laboratories

The PulseNet Canada DNA fingerprinting method used to detect and confirm the emergence of food-borne outbreaks has the benefits of being applicable to a wide range of food-borne pathogens. The resulting laboratory data can be readily shared and jointly analyzed between PulseNet Canada members. This method will continue to be used in the future. In addition, public health investigators have recognized that the latest generation of genomics technologies will revolutionize the diagnosis, surveillance and control of disease through vastly improved molecular epidemiologic investigation of food-borne pathogens. Genomics was formerly a research tool and technological advances have made whole-genome sequencing feasible and suitable for use in public health investigations of bacterial diseases. Within the programs instituted at the National Microbiology Laboratory through this initiative, PHAC is now acknowledged as an international innovator for the use of public health genomics and continues the pursuit of public-health ready versions of these emerging laboratory technologies.

Public health Preparedness and Capacity

Public Health Tools 4.5 1.5 1.0 National public health surveillance tools and platforms.

To implement its commitments, PHAC initiated defining, documenting and validating PHAC and provincial/territorial (P/T) requirements for pan-Canadian management of food-borne outbreaks using electronic systems. PHAC worked with subject matter experts to define these requirements so that corresponding functionalities within the Panorama system could be improved. For the purposes of this project, it was determined that information sharing agreements would not be required as artificial data will be used to test the system.

The work encountered unplanned delays due to prolonged unavailability of Panorama governance structure, which was revived through PHAC leadership after about nine months.

The current project and the insights gained from participating in the Panorama governance have drawn the conclusion that it is highly improbable for a sole electronic system to be used for the collection and analysis of public health data. Since it is recognized that PHAC and its P/T partners will always be using multiple electronic systems for such purposes, it is therefore critical for the forward strategy to provide leadership and support in the area of data and systems interoperability standards. This will facilitate the seamless and standardized collection and transmission of public health data, particularly during emergency and outbreak situations.

Public health Preparedness and Capacity

Emergency Preparedness 4.2 1.6 1.3 Develop an operational framework that provides procedures and guidance to the Health Portfolio for the coordination and management of food-borne illness emergencies.

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), in consultation with Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, developed a Food-borne Illness Emergency Response Plan (FIERP) for food-borne illness outbreaks requiring a response beyond the scope of the Foodborne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol (FIORP). The FIORP is the existing national technical and operational protocol that is used in the investigation and management of any food-borne illness outbreak involving more than one province/territory or country.

The FIERP builds on the FIORP, which was updated in 2010, and sets out the principles for Health Portfolio management of a food-borne illness emergency and makes use of a common incident command structure. Once endorsed at the federal level, the FIERP will be exercised in conjunction with the FIORP (2010) in a national multi-lateral exercise in 2011-12.

Disease and Injury Prevention and Mitigation

Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Diseases 2.8 1.0 1.1 Revise and modernize the Food-borne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol (FIORP).

Following extensive consultations with federal, provincial and territorial (F/P/T) partners, the Food-borne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol (FIORP) was updated, and endorsed by the F/P/T Deputy Ministers of Health and Agriculture, the F/P/T Food Safety Committee and the Council of Chief Medical Officers of Health in June 2010.

The revised protocol includes clearer language and guidance for improved coordination of public communications among F/P/T partners, and an appendix that discusses communicating with the public and with those at greater risk. The FIORP (2010) also provides an enhanced description and a template for guidance of the post-outbreak review process. The process includes confirmation of the outbreak's cause, proposed measures to prevent reoccurrence, assessment of the effectiveness of outbreak-control measures and evaluation of utilized processes and methods. Three post-event reviews have been conducted since the FIORP (2010) was finalized in June 2010. The results of post-event reviews will be used to evaluate the FIORP and make required changes.

Bilateral FIORP (2010) exercises were held with each province and territory from January to April 2011, in order to test the FIORP and to support related knowledge development. These exercises included testing for communication gaps, assisting with knowledge development, and strengthening networks among communication partners. A national multi-lateral exercise of the FIORP (2010) will be held in 2011-2012.

Regulatory Enforcement and Emergency Response

Health Emergency Response Team 3.3 1.5 1.1 Pilot test a surge capacity model of qualified public health experts.

An inventory of knowledge and skill sets required to detect and respond to food-borne illness events was created and validated, and a gap analysis was completed. This informed the scope of the Public Health Reserve pilot and the training strategy. In consultation with internal and external public health experts, the Public Health Reserve framework was developed, and will be tested and assessed in 2011-12 through various training and exercise events. The outcomes of the assessment will support recommendations for the Public Health Reserve concept.

The project also supported planning of the Field Services Training Institute (FSTI) 2011 event, which included training of FSTI facilitators and development of course materials related to food-borne illness surveillance and response.

Internal partners have been engaged to support the strategic development and implementation of the pilot (e.g., administrative models, Memoranda of Understanding, etc). The data requirements gathering process for the reserve database/web application was completed, which will support the application development. This database will be used to support surge capacity requirements.

PHAC's Subtotal 17.7 6.9 5.5    
Health Canada Food and Nutrition Build health risk assessment capacity 4.9 1.5 1.5

HC will continue to enhance its ability to provide risk assessments, based on the best available science and risk modelling methods to strengthen prevention and response to food safety incidents.

HC hired 5 additional, specialized experts, trained and cross-trained more staff to conduct risk assessments, and enhanced the procedures used to support the CFIA during its food safety investigations. This included clarification of timelines in the Health Risk Assessment (HRA) process. All HRAs have been conducted within established service standards (less than 8 hours for the highest risk category of assessments).

  • Health Canada continued to prioritise the review and approval of novel processes and applications with demonstrated food safety benefits, which are under its regulatory oversight.
    • In order to enable prioritization of approvals of food safety interventions with proven health benefits, Health Canada has developed a policy which provides guidance and criteria to assist industry in identifying these interventions when seeking pre-market approval. This policy was posted on Health Canada's website in January 2011. Specific eligibility criteria have been developed and will be used to determine which applications would be subject to priority handling.
    • In addition, Health Canada is assessing other areas where regulatory modernization would contribute to shortening approval timelines for safe additives and other food safety interventions. For instance, Health Canada has initiated a streamlined approach to publishing its intent to amend regulations to allow the use of certain food additives. The approach consists of web posting consultations of intended amendments and notify trading partners while the drafting of the regulations is underway. Publication in Canada Gazette Part II of the final regulations would proceed once stakeholders comments are addressed.
    • As result of these streamlined processes, two "High Pressure Treatment" processes and a new food additive aimed to reduce microbial contamination of foods, were reviewed and approved in 2010-11.
  • Health Canada finalized and published a guidance document on the weight of evidence needed to support appropriate and timely actions to protect consumers during foodborne illness outbreak investigations.
Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards 3.6 2.2 2.2 HC will continue to have a suite of rapid, validated analytical tools available to industry and government partners, to allow early detection of hazards , reducing the exposure of Canadians in a food safety emergency.
  • An enhanced method for isolation of Listeria (results in 3-5 days instead of the former 7-10 days) has been developed and is currently being validated for different food commodities/categories by Health Canada and the CFIA. Industry and other stakeholders will be notified when the validated method is published in the Microbiological Methods Committee's Compendium of Analytical Methods.
  • 13 methods for Listeria have been updated in the Compendium of Analytical Methods. These methods will be used by both industry (to demonstrate compliance with the new requirements) and by the CFIA (in its enforcement activities). Listeria methods were given priority for validation. This will be expanded to other microbiological methods in the near future
  • HC began collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) in a multi-year project to develop a microchip-based laboratory method for Listeria which would allow results in 48hrs
  • Rapid purification and screening of priority toxins including mycotoxins, phycotoxins and process induced toxins in food and feed stocks have been and are being developed. These methods allow for the detection and quantification of toxins in hours rather than days and have the capability to be multiplexed to detect several toxins in one analysis. Immunological reagents used in these assays have been developed and characterized for six priority toxins are currently being developed into assays and purification tools. Once methods are validated and published, they will be made available to stakeholders through posting on the Health Canada website.
  • An enhanced mass spectrometry method using multiple reaction monitoring has been developed to simultaneously detect and quantify 23 mycotoxins and metabolites in a single sample. This multiplex method is currently being validated and will allow for increased sampling and data collection for risk assessment.
Marketing and Communications Safe Food Handling Social Marketing Strategy 2.0 0.7 0.7

HC will deliver the second year of the Safe Food Handling social marketing strategy to three at-risk groups: older adults, pregnant women and those with compromised immune systems, building awareness among these groups that they are at higher risk and communicating safe food handling practices specific to their needs.

For each audience, educational resources were developed and made available in both printed and electronic formats. Outreach activities focused on raising awareness of the safe food handling messages found within these publications through print and web advertising. In addition, web content and web interactive tools were developed to help all consumers learn about safe food handling practices in the home and grocery store. Communications activities were strengthened with 2-3 monthly Food Safety related Information Updates distributed to media, tweeted to 10,700+ followers and emailed to 200 stakeholders.

Results achieved this year specific to each audience included:

Adults 60+:

  • Articles and print ads in targeted publications such as the seniors edition of Reader's Digest and Bel Age, with a readership total of over 5 million people;
  • Just under 500,000 booklets distributed through magazines and partnerships with Meals on Wheels;
  • Distribution of 35,000 posters to health professionals who treat older adults;
  • Insertion of 400,000 brochures in Old Age Security mailings; and
  • YouTube video with 920 views.

Pregnant Women:

  • Strategic alliance with Thyme Maternity provided 300,000 booklets for point of purchase distribution at 76 stores nationally;
  • Articles and print ads in magazines directed to pregnant women, such as Expecting Magazine and C'est Pour Quand? with a readership total of over 5 million people;
  • Distribution of 35,000 posters to family doctors, obstetricians and midwives;
  • Web advertising on pregnancy and women's health Web sites; and
  • YouTube video with 4,025 views

Immunocompromised:

  • Distribution of 22,750 booklets through disease associations;
  • Distribution of 20,000 posters to specialized health practitioners and cancer clinics;
  • Articles and print ads in targeted publications, such as Best Health;
  • Web advertising on health Web sites; and
  • YouTube video with 891 views.
HC's Subtotal 10.5 4.4 4.4    
Total 75.0 (2009-10 to 2011-12) 30.9 25.8    

Comments on Variances:

CFIA: The variance in relation to hiring inspectors was due to the timing of funds being released and gaps in the timing of hiring inspection staff. Some inspectors accepted job offers as late as January. In addition, inspector hiring occurred in several areas and regions at different paces.

The variance in relation to enhancing the connectivity of inspectors was due to the fact that the pilot project was not rolled out to other inspectors because of concerns around costs and long term funding. Now that additional funding has been secured through budget 2011 for inspector modernization, the roll out of the connectivity solution is expected to be completed by March 31, 2012.

PHAC: The Public Health Agency of Canada encountered unexpected and prolonged delays in securing staff and contractor resources which impeded progress of the files. Additionally, the restructuring of a national advisory council placed unexpected strains on the advancement of the initiative.

Health Canada: There were no planned spending amounts identified in the 2010-11 RPP for this initiative. The amounts shown are based on the funding received through the supplementary estimates.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Theresa Iuliano
Senior Director
Policy and Strategies Division
Policy and Programs Branch
(613) (773) 5827

Health Canada
Sylvain Gauthier
Planning Analyst
Policy, Planning and International Affairs Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
(613) 960-0553




Table D: Invasive Alien Species (IAS)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Invasive Alien Species (IAS)

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)

Lead Department Program Activity: Plant Health Risks and Production Systems

Start Date: 2010-11

End Date: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $95.0M (2010-11 to 2014-15) and $19.0M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Invasive alien species (IAS) are those species introduced by human action outside their natural distribution (past or present), that threaten the environment, economy, or society, including human health. Annually, IAS causes billions of dollars in direct losses, control costs, increased production costs and lost market access. The annual impact of IAS is estimated to be as much as $20 billion to the forest sector, $7 billion for aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes, and $2.2 billion for invasive plants alone in the agricultural sector. IAS have gained international attention as globalization, climate change, and increases in international trade have elevated the risks of IAS introductions.

In recognition that responding to IAS is a shared responsibility, "An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada" was adopted in 2004 by federal, provincial and territorial resource ministers as a national coordinated approach toward prevention and management of IAS. The objective of the Strategy is to initiate implementation of the priority objectives (i.e. prevention, early detection and rapid response to new invaders and management of established and spreading invaders) and will be met through contributions to work in five thematic areas: Risk Analysis, Science and Technology, Legislation, Regulation and Policy, Engaging Canadians and International Cooperation. Environment Canada is the lead for invasive animal species; the Department of Fisheries and Oceans leads the aquatic invasive species issues; the Canadian Food Inspection Agency leads for invasive plants and other plant pests; and, Natural Resources Canada leads for forest pests.

Budget 2010 allocated $19 million per year to Environment Canada, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, National Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to continue implementation of the Government of Canada's IAS Strategy as well as maintain and enhance the advances made in the previous five years in invasive alien species activities. Ongoing implementation of the IAS Strategy is critical to continue the protection of Canada's ecosystems and resource-based economy.

Shared Outcome(s): Continuing the implementation of the Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada is essential to protect Canada's aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and their native biological diversity as well as domestic plants and animals from the risks of invasive alien species. The key outcomes of the Strategy are the prevention and management of IAS in a manner that ensures environmental sustainability, economic competitiveness and societal well being.

Governance Structure(s): The government-wide IAS Strategy involves the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. The departments and agencies are committed to ongoing collaboration on IAS issues. Federally, coordination continues to be discussed through the Directors' General Interdepartmental Committee on Invasive Alien Species. Currently, the governance model for the National IAS Strategy is under revision. Nevertheless, inter-jurisdictionally, federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) cooperation on IAS issues continue under the auspices of the annual joint meeting of Resource Ministers' Councils for wildlife, forests, fisheries and aquaculture, and endangered species, as well as associated meetings of Deputy Ministers and Assistant Deputy Ministers. The Minister of Agriculture is the lead federal Minister responsible for responding to invasive alien plants and plant pests. Efforts will continue to seek the full engagement of federal, provincial, and territorial Ministers of agriculture and facilitate their participation in addressing invasive alien species.

Performance Highlights: The Departments of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency worked collaboratively on a successful submission to Treasury Board to acquire funding to continue implementing their respective contributions to the National IAS Strategy. Work toward meeting the objectives of the Strategy resulted in the initiation and advancement of key projects within the thematic areas for each partner as specified in section 18 of the tables. Work to revise the governance structure for the IAS strategy to enhance engagement and communication was undertaken. Notable among cooperative projects between and among the groups were the initiation of a decision support framework for forest IAS (FIAS) as a joint endeavour between the CFIA and NRCan, initial review of IAS Partnership program propsals for the 2011-2012, and completion of the Canadian Invasive Plants Framework document and initiation of the national Invasive Plants Early Detection and Rapid Response plan. Engagement with other governments (federal, provincial, territorial, municipal and international), partners and stakeholders was enhanced.

($ Millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Plant Health Risks and Production Systems

Internal Services

Risk Analysis 60.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 12.0 ongoing 12.0 7.7

Prevention and spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed in a risk based manner.

Outcome: The CFIA will continue to identify highest risk potential IAS, their pathways, and appropriate means by which to mitigate identified risks through continuing to conduct pest and weed risk analyses, assess import controls and develop initial response to early detections.

  • Several pest risk assessments and weed risk assessments completed.
  • Enhancement of weed risk assessment methods and harmonization of approaches with US.
  • Early Detection Rapid Response framework for invasive plants was initiated.
  • Initiated development of a Risk-Based Decision Support Framework with Canadian Forest Service.
Science and Technology      

Outcome 1: Entry and domestic spread of invasive plants and plant pests is managed.

Outcome 2: The Agency will support IAS prevention, detection and response through continued efforts to develop scientific tools and expertise.

Outcome 3: The impact of IAS introductions will be minimized through continued efforts in early detection.

  • Developed rapid and accurate diagnostic tests for detection of IAS including new molecular methods for distinguishing plant pests.
  • Increased capacity for weed identification implemented through augmentation of seed and herbarium reference samples, inspector training, as well as research projects focusing on foreign weed species.
  • Delivery of targeted inspection and surveillance activities such as invasive plants around grain and seed importing facilities.
  • Removal of jointed goat grass from two existing sites in Ontario in support of further regulatory action.
Legislation, Regulation and Policy      

Outcome 1: Entry, domestic spread and response to invasive plants and plant pests are planned, implemented and evaluated.

Outcome 2: The CFIA will continue to modernize the legislative framework by updating regulations or creating new ones and harmonizing approaches, where possible, in consultation with stakeholders.

Outcome 3: To ensure consistency with international standards and its own mandate, the CFIA will continue to develop and design new science-based program policies and update existing ones, with a focus on high risk pathways of introduction.

  • Formation of new working relationships and partnerships with provincial and territorial agencies for eradication and management of IAS (e.g. woolly cupgrass in Québec).
  • Proposed revisions to the Weed Seeds Order, development of the Invasive Plants Policy and review of Canada's List of Regulated Pests;
  • A domestic management plan for woolly cupgrass was developed in consultation with industry and partners. This plan will support further regulatory action on this species.
Engaging Canadians      

Outcome 1: Increased cooperation and awareness from stakeholders on plants and plant pests and compliance with policies and regulations.

Outcome 2: The Agency will continue to facilitate information sharing among federal departments and other partners to ensure that CFIA's mandate is met.

Outcome 3: Awareness will be raised about IAS, their potential pathways and associated policies and programs.

Outcome 4: Early reporting of IAS and best management practices for reducing the risk to Canada's plant resources will be promoted.

  • Facilitated collaboration, mutual support and information sharing among organizations through participation at industry meetings and workshops (e.g. participation in Ontario Critical Plant Pest Management Committee, British Columbia Pest Advisory Committee, Ontario Invasive Plants Council, Invasive Plants Council of British Columbia).
  • Completed of the Canadian Invasive Plants Framework.
  • Developed and distributed information products (field guides, fact sheets, posters) to organization and members of the public across Canada. To enhance Canadian's awareness of invasive species and how they spread.
  • Conducted broad Canadian stakeholder consultation to validate Invasive Plants Policy and plants under consideration for regulation.
  • Piloted a weed risk assessment training workshop to provincial regulatory officials.
  • Worked with Environment Canada to review 129 research project proposals as part of the IAS Partnership Program.
International Cooperation      

Outcome 1: Increased international engagement, cooperation and awareness of invasive species and compliance with policies and regulations.

Outcome 2: International standards will reflect Canadian interests.

Outcome 3: Participation in international standard setting, harmonization of approaches, negotiations and bilateral meetings with key trading partners to mitigate the risk of IAS introduction through trade pathways and maintain access to foreign markets.

  • Informed key international partners (e.g. United States, China and India) of Canada's invasive plants regulatory initiatives and discussed potential risk mitigation measures and cooperative approaches.
  • Participated in panels, working groups and in meetings of international organizations to develop and implement harmonized standards and guidelines on IAS as well as to share information and collaborate on other initiatives related to Plant Health (e.g. aligning CFIA policy on Asian Gypsy Moth with the NAPPO standard;. phase-in of ISPM 15 for wood packaging material moving between the US and Canada; development of NAPPO IAS pathways risk assessment standard).
CFIA's Subtotal 60.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 12.0 ongoing 12.0 7.7    
National Resources Canada

Adapting to a Changing Climate and Hazard Risk Management

Risk Analysis 3.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.6 ongoing 0.6 0.6

Risk Analysis:

Outcome: The capacity to identify and address forest invasive alien species risks and prevent their introduction is increased.

Outputs/Activities: National risk analysis models and risk maps for selected forest invasive alien species are developed to improve understanding of the pathways of forest invasive alien species movement and help to better assess human-assisted introductions and spread of new invasive alien forest pests and their impacts.

Considerable work in 2010-11 to advance pest risk mapping science, analyze pest spread, and assess impacts of major invasive species.

Presentations and peer reviewed articles on improving risk mapping and working around knowledge gaps;

Terrestrial transportation pathways analysis and modeling (Canada/U.S. border crossings and commercial transportation

Analysis of spread of Brown Spruce Longhorn Beetle (BSLB) in Nova Scotia, and Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) in Ontario

Estimating economic and ecological impacts of EAB.

Science and Technology 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 1.0 1.0

Science and Technology:

Outcome 1: Knowledge of forest invasive alien species taxonomy, biology, and ecology is improved.

Outputs/Activities: Scientific research is undertaken to address knowledge gaps in taxonomy, biology, ecology, distribution, and pest-host and forest-pathogen relationships.

Outcome 2: Likelihood of establishment or spread of forest invasive alien species is minimized and their impacts are mitigated.

Outputs/Activities: Detection, diagnostic and surveillance tools and strategies are developed for forest invasive alien species. Response tools and methods are developed and provided to responsible agencies to deal with control and eradication of forest invasive alien species.

Outcome 1:

Examples of work in 2010-11 include research into:

  • Life-cycle and behaviour of Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALHB);
  • Pathology and tree resistance to Sudden Oak Death (notably in Eastern Canadian tree species);
  • Relationships of European Wood Wasp to other co-existing fungi and insects;
  • Biological control agents for EAB;
  • EAB: Overwintering ecology; life-cycle; ash tree chemicals as attractants; pheromones; and
  • BSLB flight behaviour and natural dispersal; biological control agents

Outcome 2:

Examples of work in 2010-11 include:

  • Genetic identification techniques are being developed for insects and fungi that are difficult to identify based on visual examination – required in some instances to distinguish native from alien species, or between different alien species (e.g. Gypsy moth; fungal diseases of White Pine);
  • Generic pheromones are being developed in order to enhance the efficacy of insect survey traps; and
  • A comprehensive review (272 page book) of 510 alien introduced beetle species recorded from Atlantic Canada and Quebec was published in 2010 – it provides baseline information for Eastern Canada; work is underway to complete an ATLAS of introduced species of beetles for all of Canada, including identification tools.
Legislation, Regulation and Policy 1.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.2 ongoing 0.2 0.2

Legislation, Regulation and Policy:

Outcome 1: Decision-making related to forest invasive alien species (FIAS) management by regulatory agencies and other organizations is informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Outputs/Activities: Science and policy expertise on forest invasive alien species prevention, detection and response are provided to regulatory agencies and other federal Departments, Provinces and Territories, Municipalities Industry and First Nations.

Outcome 2: Canadian positions in national and international discussions on phytosanitary trade issues are informed by scientific and policy expertise.

Outputs/Activities: Scientific and policy advice is provided in support to phytosanitary trade negotiations and the development of national and international forest phytosanitary standards.

Outcome 1:

Canadian Forest Service personnel regularly provide science advice and policy expertise to governments and other stakeholders both in Canada and internationally; examples in 2010-11 include:

  • Recommendations on ALHB survey requirements to CFIA, survey priorities for 2010-11, and survey strategy to end ALHB eradication program;
  • ALHB host list to CFIA;
  • Advice to Environment Canada on the Butternut recovery program, and to other government departments and stakeholders (Transport Canada, National Defense, First Nations and regional environment councils in Québec) on protection of Butternut;
  • Branch sampling protocols, via technical notes and technology transfer workshops for arborists and city foresters; and
  • Advice and training on EAB to Canadian Food Inspection Agency staff; City of Ottawa, Governments of Manitoba and Québec, U.S. Government.

Outcome 2:

Canadian Forest Service personnel are actively engaged in international deliberations regarding phytosanitary standards; examples of work in 2010-11 include:

  • Recommendations on wood chip size for ALHB – treated material; and
  • Recommendations to CFIA on International phytosanitary standard 15 (wood packaging).

 

Engaging Canadians 0.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.1 ongoing 0.1 0.1

Engaging Canadians:

Outcome: Scientific Information on FIAS is made available to agencies, researchers and the public.

Outputs/Activities: Application functionality and content of the CanFIAS Database and the Forest Invasive Alien Species Web Portal are enhanced and expanded.

With respect to the CanFIAS database, work in 2010-11 focused on the capture of post-1995 and external information on invasive species from CFS, partners and clients, including: identification of primary record sources; capture or transfer of records; verification; inclusion; quality control; documentation.

Building on previous years' work, specific work in 2010-11 included:

The CanFIAS database (http://ravageursexotiques.gc.ca/db_list_eng.asp) was improved by scanning and including (historical) primary collection information for selected species;

A draft manual in support of CanFIAS for analysis of alien invasions was completed; and

The Exotic Pests web portal (includes CanFIAS database) was promoted at technology transfer events and conferences.

International Cooperation 0.5 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.1 ongoing 0.1 0.1

International Cooperation:

Outcome: International cooperation with phytosanitary organizations and trading partners is facilitated.

Outputs/Activities: Collaboration is fostered through active participation in scientific activities and knowledge transfer in support to international phytosanitary organizations such as the North American Plant Protection Organization and the International Forestry Quarantine Research Group that provides internationally coordinated research analyses to the International Plant Protection Convention's Technical Panel on Forest Quarantine and Commission of Phytosanitary Measures.

Research – NRCan-Canadian Forest Service (CFS) has coordinated international research activities that have provided data critical to the adoption of international standards, e.g. International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPMs) No. 15 the wood packaging standard that significantly reduces risk of invasive pest movement internationally. Scientific refinements to this standard and the development of other regulatory instruments continue to reduce pest risk to Canadian forests. In 2010-11 new treatments for wood pests were proposed by the International Forest Quarantine Research Group (IFQRG) and are under review by international community.

Market Access – China, India: Technical discussion and provision of scientific analyses have addressed Chinese and Indian phytosanitary concerns and opened markets for Canadian wood commodities. Log and lumber shipments to China have increased significantly since a Phytosanitary Arrangement signed in 2009. As a result of work culminating in bilateral meetings in 2011, India now accepts Canadian spruce, pine, fir and western red cedar lumber. NRCan science has contributed to the removal of trade barriers with other countries (e.g. Australia, EU, Turkey, Malaysia, Taiwan, and Korea) and continues to do so as issues arise.

International Phytosanitary Education – NRCan-CFS co-authored a UN-FAO "Guide to the implementation of phytosanitary standards in forestry", published in 2011. The Guide will be used in Canada and around the world to promote awareness in the forestry sector of methods to reduce the international movement of forest pests.

NRCan's Subtotal 10.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 2.0 ongoing 2.0 1.9    
Department of Fisheries and Oceans Science for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Risk Analysis 2.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.4 ongoing 0.4 0.41

Risk analysis for priority species and pathways

Peer-reviewed risk assessment finalized for the ship-mediated pathway (ballast and hull-fouling vectors) in the Great Lakes and Arctic.

Baitfish pathway risk assessment finalized for Ontario.

Biological synopses completed for: Asian Shore Crab, Tench, 'pedicure fish', compound sea squirt, light-bulb sea squirt and European sea squirt. Updated biological synopsis for Bighead and Silver carps (2006+) was also completed.

Center of Expertise for Risk Assessment website updated to provide information on biological risk assessments, framework documents, and biological synopses of high risk aquatic invasive species for internal and external (other countries, government departments, provinces, public and stakeholders) clients.

Prepared a background report in order to develop a socio-economic framework by the end of fiscal year 2011-2012 and began work on the development of the framework.

Completed a case study on the socio-economic impacts of Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS).

Science and Technology 5.1 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.02 ongoing 1.02 0.97 Decision makers are provided with information in order to manage species and pathways in a risk based manner.

Summary of Science research funding for 2005-2010 initiated, this document will provide decision makers with a summary of results.

Ongoing funding for monitoring and science research activities to identify impacts, high risk species and pathways.

Legislation, Regulation and Policy 1.1 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.21 ongoing 0.21 0.20 Development of components of aquatic invasive species regulations

Input solicited from provincial/territorial partners, OGDs and DFO regional staff on a regulatory intent document, outlining potential components of an AIS regulation.

Industry Profile completed for industries potentially impacted by new AIS regulations.

Legal analysis completed on several legal issues associated with the regulatory proposal.

Held a workshop to identify science needs to complete the proposal and implement a potential AIS regulation.

Consultation plan has been drafted for further consultations with stakeholders once the proposal is further refined.

Engaging Canadians 0.4 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 0.09 ongoing 0.09 0.08 Stakeholder and partner are aware of activities that can mitigate the risk of aquatic invasive species

Regular meetings held with provinces to discuss AIS issues though the National Aquatic Invasive Species Committee.

Developed and distributed various communication products such as identification booklets, Signs, posters, fact sheets and other public education materials throughout Canada.

International Cooperation 11.4 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 2.28 ongoing 2.28 2.24

The impact of Sea Lamprey is effectively managed in the Great Lakes

Canada is engaged with international discussion to address the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species.

DFO delivered a full program of sea lamprey assessment and control in 2010-11, including: the lampricide treatment of 51 tributaries and offshore area, as well as 875 HA in the St. Marys River; the assessment of larval populations in 219 tributaries and offshore area; the reconstruction of sea lamprey barriers in two tributaries and the maintenance of barriers in 26 tributaries; and the operation of spawning-phase assessment traps at 22 sites in 19 tributaries.

Lake-wide spawning-phase abundance targets were met in Lake Ontario, were they have been within or near target since the late 1980's, and in Lake Superior for the third consecutive year. A 36% reduction was observed in Lake Erie, while a slight increase was observed in Lake Huron, although the larval population in the St. Marys River, the major sea lamprey producing tributary to Lake Huron, was at its lowest point in the time series (1998-2010). Largely as a result of the Sea Lamprey Control Program, lake trout have been rehabilitated in Lake Superior, and are showing positive signs of recovery in Lake Huron. The program also protects fisheries for other native species and introduced salmonids.

DFO participates in and contributes to various international working groups that focus on Aquatic Invasive Species. Canada coordinates with the United States through the Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force. Canada also participates in aquatic invasive species at the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES - Atlantic) and the North Pacific Marine Science Organization PICES.

DFO's Subtotal 20.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 4.0 ongoing 4.0 3.9    
Environment Canada

Biodiversity - Wildlife and Habitat

Engaging Canadians - Invasive Alien Species Partnership Program 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 1.0 0.02

Completed Invasive Alien Species Partnership Program projects have addressed priorities set out in An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada

Increased contribution of individuals and organizations in activities related to IAS

Only 1 project addressing priorities outlined in An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada was funded in 2010-11

Total participation: 59 person-days, 11 organizations involved

EC's Subtotal 5.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 1.0 ongoing 1.0 0.02    
Total 95.0 (2010-11 to 2014-15) and 19.0 ongoing 19.0 13.52    

Comments on Variances:

CFIA: The expected results for each of the programs are ongoing and involve several different projects and activities. Such activities and projects are in various stages of initiation, development, validation, implementation, and/or re-evaluation. By its nature, the regulatory plant protection mandate of the CFIA involves IAS. As such, it is essential to note that in the past year, some activities carried out as part of the overall plant program are related to IAS, but were not recorded exclusively as IAS work. In 2010-2011, the CFIA achieved the expected results for the specific activities undertaken in proportion to the resources spent on IAS. A dedicated IAS committee–under the Plant Business Line governance structure now in place at the CFIA–will develop and evaluate an annual plan for IAS activities. This will provide more formal governance that, along with internal coding to support the five thematic areas of IAS work, will improve planning, allocation and accuracy of reporting of IAS resources in subsequent years.

NRCan: NRCan essentially achieved its objectives and spent the budgeted amount across all five program themes. A small portion of the operational budget was not spent owing to a combination of factors, including the late approval of the funding (especially impacts field work that was dependent on the funds), some work reduced or combined, and some work progressing more slowly than expected.

DFO: The spending reported does not include all spending on Aquatic Invasive Species within the Department. Currently the department supports a wide range of activities under other areas such as ecosystem science.

Environment Canada: Due to late signing of the TB Submission and associated program restructuring, the program did not have a call for proposals in 2010-2011. Only one IASPP project for $15,500 was funded in 2010-2011.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Wendy Asbil
National Manager, Invasive Alien Species
Office of the Chief Plant Health Officer
Plant Health and Biosecurity Directorate
(613) 773-7236

Environment Canada
Bruno Paris
A/Head, Invasive Alien Species Unit
Canadian Wildlife Service
(819) 953-9939

National Resources Canada
Jacques Gagnon
Director
Science Policy / Science Program Branch / NRCan – Canadian Forest Service
(613) 947-9043

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Patrice Simon
Director
Environment and Biodiversity Science
(613) 990-0289

Top of Page

Canadian Heritage

Horizontal Initiatives


  • 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games - Delivering on our Commitments
  • Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future


Name of Horizontal Initiative: 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games - Delivering on our Commitments

Name of Lead Department(s): Department of Canadian Heritage

Lead Department Program Activity: Sport

Start Date: 2003-04

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $582.865M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The 2010 Games Secretariat monitored and reported on the Government of Canada's contribution to the 2010 Winter Games, which engaged Canadians from across the country, reflected Canadian values and priorities in their planning, delivery, and international profile, and promoted opportunities to advance public policy goals and to make strategic investments that supported long-term tangible economic benefits and sport, social, cultural and environmental legacies for all Canadians (www.pch.gc.ca).

The Government of Canada was a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games. The 2010 Federal Secretariat within the Department of Canadian Heritage worked horizontally to support and promote federal engagement in the planning and delivery of the Games, which included providing high-quality essential federal services as well as capital and legacy funding. Fifteen federal Departments provided services deemed essential for conducting successful Games. Therefore these departments, whether they received incremental funding for this purpose or supported the services from their A-base, were accountable for delivering essential federal services under the Multi-Party Agreement signed in 2002. The 2010 Federal Secretariat worked with its partners and stakeholders to leverage the Games as an opportunity to advance public policy objectives, establish lasting legacies, and derive maximum benefit for all Canadians (www.canada2010.gc.ca).

Canadian Heritage was the lead department for federal participation in support of the 2010 Winter Games with the exception of games security and public safety. In October 2007 the Prime Minister appointed Ward Elcock as the Coordinator for the 2010 Olympic and G8 Security and established an office within the Privy Council Office. As a result of this appointment, the RCMP became the lead coordinating Department to develop a Horizontal RMAF for Games Security and Public Safety collectively with Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), Department of National Defence (DND), Industry Canada (IC), Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), Public Safety Canada (PS), Transport Canada (TC), Health Canada (HC), Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), Canada Post and Privy Council Office (PCO).

Shared Outcome:

There were three levels of shared outcomes as identified below:

Final Outcomes

  • Sport, economic, social and cultural legacies are established for the benefit of all Canadians;
  • Canadian excellence and values are promoted domestically and internationally; and
  • Canada is recognized as a capable and inclusive host.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Pan-Canadian engagement in sport, economic, social and cultural activities related to the 2010 Winter Games;
  • Enhance Canada's domestic and international profile; and
  • Canadians and international participants experience safe and high-quality games.

Immediate Outcomes

  • Leverage 2010 Winter Games to advance existing federal priorities;
  • Positive exposure and heightened recognition of the Government of Canada as a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games; and
  • Successful delivery of mandated essential federal services.

Governance Structure(s):

2010 Federal Games Secretariat
Representative Working Group (RWG)

The 2010 Federal Secretariat, under the leadership of the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage, supported the Framework for Federal Coordination (FFC). The FCC was the primary mechanism for promoting horizontal management of the Winter Games. This governance structure consisted of three levels:

  • A Deputy Ministers and Heads of Agency Coordination Committee that facilitates interdepartmental and intergovernmental consultation and coordination of Games-related issues and commitments;
  • An Assistant Deputy Minister-level Representative Working Group (RWG) that reports on the progress of essential federal service delivery; and,
  • Working-level Issue Clusters that support intergovernmental coordination and information sharing.

In addition, an Essential Federal Services Committee (EFS Committee) was established under the authority of the RWG to support, promote, coordinate and monitor seamless planning of essential federal services.

Performance Highlights:

Following the successful completion of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, efforts turned to bringing Government of Canada activities related to this major event to a close. The 2010 Federal Secretariat was wound up, with responsibility for 2010 Winter Olympic Games transferred to the Sport Canada Branch of Canadian Heritage. As well, the Horizontal Evaluation of the Government of Canada's investment in the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games was completed and a draft report was submitted to Canadian Heritage. The Evaluation Report is expected to be finalized in the 2011-12 fiscal year.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending for
2010-11
Actual Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Results Achieved in
2010-11
Canadian Heritage (lead) Canadians participate and excel in sport 2010 Secretariat Federal $563.24M $2.9M $2.9M

Positive exposure and heightened recognition of the Government of Canada as a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games.

The 2010 Federal Secretariat was wound up, with responsibility for 2010 Winter Olympic files transferred to the Sport Canada Branch of Canadian Heritage.

The Horizontal Evaluation of the Government of Canada's investment in the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games was completed and a draft report was submitted to Canadian Heritage. The Evaluation Report is expected to be finalized in the 2011-12 fiscal year.
Public Health Agency of Canada The health and safety of federal public service employees working on location during the Winter Games as well as the health protection of the public during the Winter Games are ensured.   $2.7M N/A N/A

No expected results were planned for 2010-11.

No expected results were planned for 2010-11.

Health Canada

The health and safety of federal public service employees working on location during the Winter Games are ensured.

Workplace Health

Sustainable Environmental Health
$2.6M
(Health Safety)
N/A N/A

No expected results were planned for 2010-11.

No expected results were planned for 2010-11.

Health Canada

Health Canada evaluates and monitors the safety, quality and efficacy of drugs (human and animal), biologics, medical devices, and natural health products. Health products $0.325M
(Entry of Goods and Individuals into Canada)
N/A N/A

No expected results were planned for 2010-11.

No expected results were planned for 2010-11.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning. Foreign workers and immigrants

N/A
The Temporary Foreign Workers Program (TFWP) has not received funding through this mechanism to support its Olympic Process.

N/A N/A

No expected results were planned for 2010-11.

No expected results were planned for 2010-11.

Environment Canada

Weather and environmental predictions and services reduce risks and contribute to the well-being of Canadians. Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision-making. $9.3M $0.3M N/A

Canadians have greater awareness and understanding of sustainability initiatives associated with the 2010 Games.

Scientific and technical expertise and input to the environmental assessment process including follow-up activities as required.

With regards to sustainability awareness, projects such as the Biodiversity Profiles and the Vancouver Biokit –which provided legacy information on the Vancouver area – and additional funding for the video adaptations to the "Vancouver 2010 Sustainability Journey" were from the 2010-11 budget.

Concerning Sustainability Showcasing, funding was in support of promotion of the Sea-to-Sky Green Guide Map and the Winter Games venues and facilities case studies as well as funding support for the translation of the Athlete's Village Challenge Series ( LEED Green Building overview) into Mandarin for use at the Shanghai Expo.

Canada's natural capital is restored, conserved and enhanced.

Environmental Assessment is integral part of program and policy decision-making.

Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes.

Efficient and effective environmental assessments
$4.1M $0.1M $0.1M
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Healthy and productive aquatic eco-systems. Habitat Management $0.6 M $0.1M N/A

Environmental effects of regulatory decisions are considered in a timely manner before regulatory decisions are made under the Fisheries Act.

Activities in relation to the stated expected result have ceased.

Total $582.865M $3.4M $3.0M     

Comments on Variances:
Fiscal year 2010-11 was the sunset period of this Horizontal Initiative. Therefore, all activities were related to the reporting requirement, since Departments' specific expected results were achieved leading up to and during the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Walter Raschkowan, Canadian Heritage - Sport Canada Branch, (819) 956-8071, walter.raschkowan@pch.gc.ca



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Heritage

Lead Department Program Activity: Official Languages

Start Date: April 1, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $1,110.10 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future (Roadmap) is a Government of Canada policy statement that includes a number of initiatives to strengthen and promote linguistic duality. Fifteen federal institutions have received funds for sectoral programs and activities related to official languages. The Roadmap contributes to the attainment of a strategic outcome for Canadian Heritage (Canadians have a sense of their Canadian identity) and to the Government of Canada's outcome (A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion).

Another key component of the Roadmap is the implementation of an accountability framework and a coordinated government-wide approach to official languages. Implementing the Roadmap is a component of the Official Languages Program, as defined and approved by the Committee of Deputy Ministers on Official Languages in December 2004.

Web site: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/slo-ols/strat-eng.cfm

Shared Outcome:

Three levels of outcomes have been established.

Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in the language of choice.

Three intermediate outcomes:

  • Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English-speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in the language of choice.
  • Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
  • Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.

Eight immediate outcomes:

  • Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
  • Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
  • Improved social and economic development of official-language minority communities (OLMC).
  • Strengthened capacity of language industries.
  • Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
  • Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
  • Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
  • Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.

Governance Structure(s):

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for the implementation of the Roadmap. The Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) (Canadian Heritage) supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. With respect to roles and responsibilities, the OLS is responsible for developing and coordinating the results of the Roadmap. The OLS ensures that all information (financial and non-financial) needed is gathered and that the content of all logic models of the Roadmap's structure is taken into consideration. The OLS is also responsible for the complete implementation and the accountability framework for the Roadmap. This role was given to the OLS by the partners through the development of a Management Framework for the Roadmap, which outlines the activities and results structure, the governance structure, as well as the roles and responsibilities of departments and different interdepartmental committees, while also identifying the relevant operational issues concerning its horizontal implementation. The OLS will also support the governance of the Official Languages Program through various mechanisms and committees: the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages, the Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages Executive Committee, and the Official Languages Program Interdepartmental Coordination Steering Committee.

Performance Highlights:

The year 2010-11 marked the third year of implementation of the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013, and implementation continued in line with the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework released in September 2009. The coordination of implementation activities was facilitated by the formal governance structure currently in place.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending for
2010-11
Actual Spending for
2010-11
Expected Results for
2010-11
Results Achieved in
2010-11
Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in the language of choice.
Intermediate outcome 1: Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English-speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in the language of choice.
Immediate outcome 1.1: Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
Justice Canada Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs

Contraventions Act Fund

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Improved capacity to carry on judicial activities and to deliver extrajudicial services related to federal contraventions in both official languages.
$47.46 M $9.49 M $4.75 M

Signed agreement with Newfoundland-Labrador (NL) with a view to offering extra-judicial services and to undertake judicial activities in both official languages.

Negotiations commenced with Saskatchewan (Saskt.) and Prince-Edward-Island (PEI) in order to enter into an agreement aimed at offering extra-judicial services and undertake judicial activities in both official languages.

Four jurisdictions (British-Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario and Nova Scotia) and one municipality (Mississauga) have entered into an agreement containing language provisions with the Department and, as a result, are fully prepared, under the Official Languages Act to offer judicial and extra judicial services.

The Department has been actively pursuing negotiations with NL in 2010-11 with a view to signing an agreement.

The Department commenced correspondence with Sask. regarding implementation of the Act that would include language provisions.

Ongoing negotiations with PEI to sign a new agreement which will include provisions to increase PEI's capacity to offer judicial and extrajudicial services in both official languages made great strides and an agreement is expected to be signed in 2011-12. The current agreement with the Province signed in 1997 does not contain language rights provisions.

The Department invited Alberta to begin negotiations towards signing an agreement that will contain provisions that will increase Alberta's capacity to offer judicial and extra-judicial services in both official languages.
Justice Canada Internal Services Contraventions Act Fund $1.92 M $0.38 M $0.16 M N/A  N/A
Justice Canada Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs

Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training)

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Increased capacity of partners and the Department to implement solutions relating to access to justice in both official languages.
$38.02 M $9.11 M $5.72 M

Implementation of the pan-Canadian study on justice training needs in both official languages.

Continued judicial awareness and information activities in order to promote increased access to justice services in both official languages.

The Department has been actively working with its partners to ensure sound implementation of the Support Fund including the training component. In 2010-11, the Department funded 50 projects that responded to the needs of official-language minority communities across Canada, namely:

  • Fifteen projects aimed at increasing awareness or providing public legal information.
  • Eight projects to support the ongoing activities of French-speaking jurists associations and their Federation.
  • Twelve projects that provide advance training focusing on legal terminology for bilingual justice professionals.
  • One project that contributes to the development of a curriculum for bilingual students interested in pursuing a career in the field of justice.
  • Eight projects that are aimed at elaborating a recruitment strategy and the promotion of justice-related careers.
  • Six projects that are focused on developing linguistic training tools.
Justice Canada Internal Services Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training) $1.89 M $0.43 M $0.32 M N/A N/A
Immediate Outcome 1.2: Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
Health Canada

Canadian Health System
Official-language minority community development

Training, Networks and Access to Health Services

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Increased number of health professionals to meet health service needs of OLMCs in both official languages.

2) Increased coordination and integration of health services for OLMCs within institutions and communities.

3) Increased partnerships, interaction of networks in provincial, territorial health systems.

4) Increased awareness among stakeholders that networks are a focal point for addressing health concerns of OLMCs.

5) Increased dissemination and uptake of knowledge best practices to address health concerns of OLMCs.

$174.30 M $37.8 M $37.8 M

In 2010-11, Health Canada entered into new funding agreements with two community-based stakeholders (primary funding recipients) under two components of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program. Anticipated outcomes are as follows:

  • Société Santé en français: Three to four new funding agreements under the Official Languages Health Projects component will be initiated in 2010-11 to fund projects aiming to improve the health of French-speaking language minority communities, for a value of $5.5 M.
  • Consortium national de formation en santé: A new funding agreement for the Cultural and French-language training subcomponent of the Support for Training and Retention of Health Professionals component will be initiated in 2010-11 for a value of $1M.

In addition, 19 multi-year funding agreements with community-based stakeholders were initiated in 2009-10 and will all conclude in March 2013, comprising a total investment of $30.2 M in 2010-11. These funds are for:

  • Health Networking: $5.0 M;
  • Training and Retention of Health Professionals: $22.2 M;
  • Official Languages Health Projects for English-speaking minority communities: $3.0 M.

In 2010-11, Health Canada will undertake consultations with official-language minority communities to assess Health Canada's progress in implementing the Official Languages Health Contribution Program and to ascertain community perspectives regarding program renewal in April 2013. Anticipated outcomes are as follows:

  • Official-language minority communities are satisfied with Health Canada's progress in administering the Official Languages Health Contribution Program.
  • Community perspectives are summarized.

1147 new student registrations were accepted in 2010-11 into training programs funded under the coordination of the Consortium national de formation en santé. There were 518 graduates from these same programs for the academic year ending in May/June 2010. A follow-up survey of training graduates from 2008-09 - which was released in 2010-11 - revealed that 86% of graduates surveyed were employed in health professions serving official-language minority communities.

McGill University coordinated language training activities in 2010-11 for some 1325 health professionals in Quebec to improve their ability to serve English-speaking minority communities.

Approximately 70 projects are being launched during 2010-13 in French-speaking minority communities outside Quebec. Examples of projects launched in 2010-11:

  • A three-year project (2010-13) to facilitate the delivery of health care services in French in retirement homes and to provide support to family caregivers in three French-speaking communities of three regions of Newfoundland and Labrador: Avalon, Port-au-Port and Labrador City.
  • Another three-year project (2010-13) to create and distribute public health education and awareness tools for French-speaking and Acadian preschool children in Nova Scotia.

A total of 38 projects have been launched in English-speaking minority communities in Quebec over 2010-2013. Examples of projects launched in 2010-11:

  • A project designed to co-ordinate recruiting efforts of regional stakeholders in order to fill the need for bilingual workers in the Gaspésie-Îles-de-la-Madeleine region.
  • English translation of health information documents in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean.

Further information regarding these projects is available from the Websites of Program recipients:

  • Société Santé en français
  • Community Health and Social Services Network
  • Consortium national de formation en santé
  • McGill University
Immediate Outcome 1.3: Improved social and economic development of Official-Language Minority Communities (OLMC).
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Minority-Language Education

Component: Support to Minority-Language Education.

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Improved access of OLMCs to a quality education in their own language and their environment.

$280.0 M $56.0 M $56.0 M Maintain or increase the offers of Provinces and Territories educational programs and activities that promote access to a minority language education. 13 education agreements with the Provinces and Territories that helped almost 245,000 young Canadians in minority communities study in their language in over 900 schools across Canada and supported the work of 40 minority language school boards and 39 minority language post-secondary institutions in all regions of Canada.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Minority-Language Education

Component: Official-language Monitors

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Improved access of OLMCs to a quality education in their own language and their environment.

$5.2 M $1.04 M $1.04 M Maintain the amount of participants in the Odyssée program which allows students to work as language monitors in minority language classrooms.

Odyssey enabled 274 young Anglophones and Francophones across Canada to work as language monitors in minority language schools.

Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Minority-Language Education

Component: Summer Language Bursaries

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Improved access of OLMCs to a first-rate education in their own language and their milieu.

$1.7 M $0.344 M $0.344 M Support the Destination Clic program to maintain its yearly enrolment. This program helps young francophones outside Québec enrich their mother tongue while discovering new communities in Canada. The Destination Clic program enabled 252 young Francophones from minority language communities to enrich their mother tongue while discovering other Francophone communities in Canada.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Community vitality

Component: Youth Initiatives.

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language, in their environment and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially for youth).

$10.5 M N/A N/A N/A N/A
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Community vitality

Component: Support to Official-language Minority Communities

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Improved capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and improved access to a range of programs and services offered in their language.

$22.5 M $4.5 M

$4.5 M

Create, improve and deliver activities, and services intended for OLMC that promote a sense of belonging. Support to over 400 community organizations, including community centres, community radio and newspapers, youth organizations and parent organizations, in their efforts to promote the development and vitality of official-language minority communities (OLMCs).
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Community vitality

Component: Intergovernmental Cooperation.

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Increased access of OLMCs to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.

$22.5 M $4.5 M $4.5 M Improvement of signed Federal/Provincial/Territorial agreements on services and on approved special projects. In 2010-11, 13 services agreements with the Provinces and Territories were in effect and ten special projects were approved.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Community vitality

Component: Cultural Development Funds

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Increased access to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language (especially in culture).

2) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially in culture).

$14.0 M $3.5 M $3.5 M Continue to support cultural projects that promote a sense of belonging for the OLMC.

In 2010-11, the Cultural Development Fund supported over 30 projects across Canada in various fields of interest.

A meeting with the community was held in October 2010 to evaluate the program's mid-term results and to explore future actions.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Social Development

Strengthening NGOs' means for Early Childhood Development

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

The capacity of NGOs in early childhood in minority environment will be increased.

$4.0 M $0.8 M $0.8 M

Ongoing implementation of the National Framework for Collaboration on Early Childhood Development in Minority Francophone Communities in Canada.

The National Framework for Collaboration is a roadmap to guide the initiatives of national, provincial, territorial and community partners. To ensure implementation of the National Framework, the partners under the Table nationale en développement de la petite enfance have agreed to harmonize their activities.

The National Framework will enable groups interested in early childhood development, stakeholders, parents and, ultimately, children to benefit from a continuum of integrated services.

Intersectoral collaboration in Early Childhood Development (ECD) has improved. Note, for example, the partnerships with the health, justice and education sectors.

ECD partners are in a better position to intervene in their communities and are better equipped to develop common initiatives and action plans. 

Educational tools and products to improve programs for children and families have been developed for use in homes and centre-based settings in OLMCs. These include video clips, a guidebook demonstrating various concepts of Early Childhood and Family Centers and resources for professionals in the areas of physical activity, nutrition and French language development. Research related to models for Early Childhood and Family Centres was produced and was useful in the implementation of several centres put in place in different provinces.

A data collection strategy has been developed to measure the number of French speaking children from 0-6 years, the type of services offered for ECD and the number of interveners in OLMCs. This information helps partners identify the appropriate approach to serving Francophones in OLMCs.

Following consultation with parents in French minority communities, integrated childhood and family initiatives and programs have been implemented. These programs increase the profile of ECD and the importance of introducing and sustaining French use in early childhood.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Skills and Employment

Family Literacy Initiative

2008-2013 Roadmap:

Community stakeholders can act in the area of family literacy, and tools and support are available and used by those members of OLMCs that need them.

$7.5 M $1.8 M $1.8 M

The launch of three research projects on new groups, such as immigrant women, parents of francophone military families and Newfoundland and Labrador's Francophones, to identify specific literacy needs and tools required for these groups.

The development, testing and adaptation of six new family literacy models designed to address the needs of new groups.
The development of two promotional strategies to increase the awareness of literacy partner organizations of new family literacy models for new groups.

Pursue the implementation of a results-based performance measurement framework.

Conception and methodology of three research projects targeting immigrant women, parents of francophone military families and Newfoundland and Labrador's Francophones are being finalized.

Research reports were produced for seven projects designed to identify specific tools and needs in family literacy for various target groups including: exogamous families, seasonal workers, grandparents, fathers, new parents in precarious situations in rural and urban areas, and immigrants.

Five family literacy approaches were developed and/or adapted and tested with five different target groups: newcomers, families with school-age children, new parents, fathers and exogamous families.

The network capacity has increased to better meet the literacy and essential skills development needs of Francophone minority communities.

Two strategies designed to promote and raise awareness of partner organizations were developed and implemented.

An environmental scan to identify the country's French language literacy and essential skills issues was produced.

Literacy and essential skills promotional tools were developed and published.

Promotional activities were organized for Family Literacy Day.

The implementation of the performance measurement framework continues. Progress reports and evaluation forms are being tested.
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Social Development

Child Care Pilot Project

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

New knowledge on child care services for minority Francophone communities.

$13.5 M $2.7 M $1.1 M

A research report will be prepared on the short-term impact of the French-language preschool program on the development and readiness for school of children. The report's results will add to the collective knowledge of what works with respect to early childhood development services.

The project will assess children and survey parents to measure the impact of the French-language preschool program on the development of the children, one year after the end of the program.

A portion of the 2010-11 money could be spent on other projects to better understand issues relating to early childhood development, literacy and/or immigration

A research report has been completed describing the short-term impact of the French-language preschool program on the development and readiness for school of children.

Data collection activities (evaluations of children and surveys of parents) have been undertaken to measure the impacts of the program one year after the end of its delivery.

Production and release of provincial and territorial portraits of official language minorities in Canada by Statistics Canada.

Support for two research projects, one on the economic integration of immigrants and another on developing skills among youth, undertaken by Skills and Employment Branch.
Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Integration

Recruitment and integration of immigrants

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

French-speaking immigrants obtain reinforced services of establishment in OLMCs.

$20.0 M $4.5 M $15.2 M[1]

For 2010-11, CIC will maintain its existing activities in order to foster immigration to Francophone minority communities (FMCs). It will also continue working towards achieving the priorities of the Strategic Plan to Foster Immigration to Francophone Minority Communities.

More specifically, CIC will work towards to:

  • Increasing coordination, cooperation and research activities among main partners
  • Intensifying the promotion and recruitment activities of French-speaking people
  • Supporting targeted recruitment strategies to facilitate the twinning of potential immigrants and labour market needs
  • Strengthening the existing networks, forming new networks and strengthening settlement services in FMCs

CIC continued its consultations with Francophone Minority Communities (FMCs) and stakeholders by holding regular meetings the CIC-FMCs Steering Committee, the Implementation Committee and its working groups to ensure continuity in the implementation of the Strategic Plan.

The CIC-FMCs Steering Committee held its annual meeting on May 10, 2010 and the following three priorities were established for 2010-11:

  • Strengthening of immigration networks in the Provinces and Territories;
  • Economic integration of French-speaking immigrants into FMCs; and
  • Promotion and recruitment.

To facilitate the implementation of the three priorities, the CIC-FMCs Implementation Committee continued to rely on better communication and information-sharing by the various partners, an improved performance measurement and data collection strategy, and research.

A meeting of the Implementation Committee was held on October 4, 2010. Two meetings of the working group on international and economic integration issue were held on December 16, 2010 and on February 16, 2011. The discussions focused primarily on issues in relation to the economic integration of newcomers and their needs. International priorities were also discussed related to the recruitment activities abroad, university recruitment and retention of international students in Canada.

A Working Group on Francophone Immigration, made up of employees from headquarters and regional offices, met monthly to improve communication and address current various priorities, such as ways to improve the data collection mechanisms for the ongoing performance measurement and evaluation of the Recruitment and Integration of Immigrants initiative, and challenges and successes related to the needs of FMCs, as well as funding to Francophone service provider organizations (SPO).

Regional and provincial committees and subcommittees consisting of other federal departments, provinces and Francophone organizations implemented action plans reflecting the goals and objectives of the CIC-FMCs Strategic Plan, as well as identified regional priorities.

CIC commissioned Statistics Canada to prepare a Statistical Portrait of the French speaking Immigrant Population outside Quebec (1991 to 2006). This report, published in March 2010, presents information on the demographic, linguistic, social and economic characteristics of Francophone immigration in FMCs.

CIC is taking part in the research project Economic integration of immigrants in OLMCs being conducted by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC).

CIC is still involved in the CIC-QCGN research project entitled Anglophone communities and the benefit of attracting and retaining immigrant populations in the four regional communities of Quebec - in complement to the research being conducted in the three regions of Quebec on the dimensions of the benefit of attracting and retaining immigrants.

In 2010-11, research reports were drafted on areas where measures are needed to promote the presence of Francophone minorities outside Quebec and the presence of Anglophones in Quebec through immigration and various CIC programs. Roughly ten research activities on official languages were completed at the Department.

The 7th Destination Canada job fair was held in Paris and Brussels in November 2010. Nine provinces and two territories took part in the event. Officers from seven other visa offices (Bucharest, Dakar, Damascus, Rabat, Tunis, Nairobi and Mexico City) shared information on the potential recruitment of French-speaking immigrants from their respective regions with Canadian employers and provincial and territorial representatives. A total of 2,600 participants were selected to attend the event. 364 job profiles covering more than 1,500 openings were posted on the event Website by 68 employers or their authorized representatives.

Also, mini Destination Canada events were held in other Canadian missions in November 2010 in Tunisia and Romania, and four education, employment and international mobility fairs were held in Paris, Brussels and Geneva.

CIC encouraged and supported P&Ts in their participation at Destination Canada. Three liaison trips were organized in eight P&Ts in June and September 2010 and in March 2011.

Two Press trips were also organized in September and October 2011 and one in March 2011.

In 2010-11, CIC collaborated with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) to support post-secondary recruitment of French-speaking foreign students.

CIC signed a memorandum of understanding with the Province of Alberta to fund and support overseas French-speaking student recruitment from Morocco, Senegal, Lebanon, Tunisia, China, France and Cameroon.

The Ontario Region participated in the Salon des études et des carrières in Paris, in January 2011, in order to attract Francophone students to Francophone universities and colleges in Ontario.

In Ontario, CIC provided funding to College Boreal for a project focusing on the attraction and retention of French-speaking foreign students in Northern Ontario. The college has organised job fairs to augment the employment opportunities for foreign students and a number of socio-cultural activities fostering their integration into Canadian CIC signed memoranda of understanding (MOU) with Atlantic Provinces, provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and the Northwest Territories to support Destination Canada activities. In addition, a MOU was signed with the Province of Saskatchewan to support recruitment activities in Mauritius. L'Assemblée communautaire fransaskoise (ACF) also received funding for its participation in Destination Canada.

CIC signs a contribution agreement each year with the Governments of B.C. and Yukon for Francophone immigration recruitment projects. The majority of the funding is used by the Governments of B.C. and Yukon to send representatives of the FMCs to represent their respective jurisdictions and regional employers at Destination Canada.

CIC continued to implement projects to raise awareness among employers and foster the economic integration of French-speaking immigrants.

For instance, CIC organized job fairs for immigrants, and participated with HRSDC in a research project on the economic integration of immigrants in OLMCs.

In the Ontario Region, the RDÉE Ontario was funded for the project La Bonne Affaire, focusing on economic integration of French-speaking immigrants in small and medium-size businesses and through entrepreneurship. Employers have a better awareness of the economic potential of French-speaking immigrants and can offer them employment.

The funds received by the College Boreal in Ontario allowed organizing job fairs to augment the employment opportunities for foreign students and a number of socio-cultural activities fostering their integration into Canadian society.

As a result of consultations between CIC and the Consortium National de Formation en Santé (CNFS) in better preparing French-speaking immigrants working in the health sector for their economic integration to FMCs, discussions are under way for the funding of a study to be conducted by the CNFS in partnership with the Association of Canadian Community Colleges to identify the needs of skilled French-speaking immigrants and the possibility of offering pre-arrival orientation services for this clientele.

Building on the programs already in place to meet the needs of immigrants, CIC concluded nearly 80 contribution agreements with either community organizations or provinces this past year in support of the integration of Francophone immigrants outside Quebec.

Existing and new Réseaux de soutien en immigration francophone (13 in total) received funds through a national call for proposal process to make it possible to pursue a more integrated approach to services (cooperation activities) in order to meet the need of French-speaking immigrants. The Réseaux also increased leadership capacity, as well as coordination and cooperation between the communities, the federal and provincial governments in the area of Francophone immigration.

CIC continued to fund SPOs to deliver new and enhanced settlement and integration services outside Quebec, such as language training, newcomer information, and community transition and employment assistance services to Francophone clients across Canada. SPOs will be reporting on their obligations under the official languages clauses in their agreements.

A total of 121 service points in French are offered by Francophone SPOs in 24 cities across Canada outside Quebec.

CIC funded organizations to deliver settlement services in French in schools and with a point of service in French in various schools, provided a conceptual and practical framework of training and continuing education for teachers of French as a second language, and organized bilingual job fairs for immigrants.

CIC funded a one-stop shop service for French-speaking immigrants in Moncton, Regina, Saskatoon and Winnipeg, in partnership with the Provinces, and recently in Sudbury, where a coordinated delivery of settlement and employment services is provided to French-speaking immigrants.

French LINC on-line courses have also been created for levels 3-7. The delivery of levels 3-4 was piloted in Northern and South-Western Ontario.

Web traffic to the "Francophone immigration outside Quebec" page was monitored in 2010-11 to assess awareness of the new tool that was implemented on this page in 2009-10 to direct newcomers to free settlement services (http://servicesfornewcomers.cic.gc.ca/index.php). The French version of the page received 51,712 visits and the English version received 24,074 visits. A benchmark for Web traffic to the Francophone immigration page was established in 2010-11.

The Francophone immigration outside Quebec page has been revised to ensure that all information and links posted on this page are current. The general mailbox which has been set up to allow visitors to provide feedback on the page content (Immigration.francophone@cic.gc.ca) continues to be monitored for incoming feedback, and page content is revised accordingly.

CIC also continued to address issues important to English-speaking communities in Quebec: the Department continued working with those communities, and supporting them through research projects (i.e., research conducted in the three regions of Quebec regarding the benefit of attracting and retaining immigrants that will help in identifying the issues and the needs of the English-speaking communities).

Canadian Heritage

Official Languages

CTRC Study

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) CRTC report is issued on the availability and quality of broadcasting services to English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada.

2) The findings of the report will inform policy and decision-making on the availability and quality of broadcasting services in English and French linguistic communities in Canada.

Non-monetary N/A N/A N/A N/A
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Community Development

Support to francophone immigration in New-Brunswick

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Enhanced capacity to support francophone immigration in New Brunswick.

$10.0 M $3.52 M $1.24 M Applicant will implement the structure necessary to the project overall.

Twenty-six projects have been funded for a total investment of $1.24M in New Brunswick communities. Funding was mainly invested in four welcome centres for newcomers in northern New Brunswick's francophone regions (Chaleur, Madawaska-Victoria, Restigouche, Acadian Peninsula) and support was also provided to other organizations in the province's large urban centres (Fredericton, Moncton and Saint John) dealing with francophone immigrants. 

The welcome centers provided services to nearly 615 newcomers, and in doing so, enabled close to 670 volunteers to help out with the planning of community activities that have facilitated the settlement process for newcomers in French.

Through these welcome centres, 137 newcomers were able to receive employment assistance services, which helped 89 of them to find a job. 120 of the 137 newcomers were given access to language courses adapted to their needs.

Industry Canada--FedNor

Community, Economic and Regional Development (of Ontario)

Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$4.45 M

$1.95 M

$1.525 M This funding will support an estimated 52 projects that contribute to innovation, diversification and partnerships as well as enhanced support to small businesses in OLMCs. As at June 30, 2011, 49 projects were supported through the EDI. These projects helped organization create partnerships, diversify and innovate and provided increased support for SME in OLMCs.
Industry Canada - Regional Operations Sector Community, Economic and Regional Development Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.

$1.6 M

$0.4 M $367 784 This funding will support research and consultation to enhance greater capacity of OLMCs. In September and October 2010, Dialogue Days with Francophone and Anglophone communities were held. This helped to better understand the OLMC new priorities and needs. Two follow-up committees have been put in place in order to maintain a continuing dialogue with OLMC, to support OLMC capacity building and better coordinate joint initiatives. Six researches and studies supporting OLMC needs have been undertaken. These researches and studies provide solutions to explore in OLMC economic development.

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)

Northern Economy

Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$0.4 M $0.1 M $0.098 M

Funding is expected to be allocated via a proposal-driven process in 2010-11.

This funding is expected to support the social and economic development of official-language minority communities in the territories.
A pan-territorial francophone tourism marketing strategy is being delivered by the Conseil de développement économique des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (CDÉTNO) over a three year period. In 2010-11, CDETNO organized a two day pan-territorial forum bringing together Territorial governments and French economic development agencies to identify new ways to attract francophone tourists to the North.
Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario)  

Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$4.45 M

$1.95 M $510 500 This funding will support an estimate of 50 projects to address specific economic challenges of OLMCs in Southern Ontario by promoting the development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of economic activities, partnerships, and increased support of small- and medium-sized businesses. A total of 22 contribution agreements with community groups to support the economic development of OLMC are in place for a total of $ 861 715. A total of $ 510 500 was spent in 2010-11. One million dollars of the 2010-11 budget was reprofiled in 2011-12.
Canada Economic Development (CED) for Quebec regions

Community Development

Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$10.2 M $3.6 M

$2.5 M

  • Innovation
    2 projects - $ 180k (5%)
  • Support to Small and Medium Enterprises
    10 projects - $ 540k (15%)
  • Partnerships
    6 projects - $ 900k (25%)
  • Diversification 12 projects - $ 1.98 million (55%)

11 EDI projects underway in 2010-11

Result: Increased capacities of SME's and communities: 2 projects which support partnership activities to promote integration of OLMC's and participation in local development.

Result: Develop SME's: 7 projects which support the development/maintenance of OLMC SME's or capacity development.

Result: Community Development: 2 projects supporting OLMC community development.
Western Economic Diversification Canada

Research and Analysis
Community Economic Planning, Development and Adjustment
Business Development and Entrepreneurship Innovation

Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$3.2 M $0.75 M $722 880

Enhanced capacity of OLMCs as reflected by:

  • the number of partnerships created or maintained, and ;
  • project funding leveraged.

Development of francophone enterprises as reflected by:

  • the number of enterprises created, maintained or expanded, and;
  • project funding leveraged.

Development of francophone communities as reflected by:

  • the number of projects, initiatives, or studies that contribute to the diversification or expansion of the economic base of the OLMCs, and;
  • project funding leveraged.

Manitoba (CDEM) initiative to support youth, rural diversification, and business development in the province:

  • Youth: 31 youth related businesses created/ maintained/expanded.
  • Planning: 2 CED planning project completed.
  • New-immigrant: 19 businesses created/ maintained/expanded with 52 jobs created.
  • $8.5 M business investment in rural economy and $9.6 M in urban economy.

Alberta (University of Alberta) initiative to purchase and implement a distance delivery technology to reach a widely dispersed western Canadian Francophone population, creating or maintaining 37 jobs and increasing capacity in the organization. Leveraged an additional $1.5M for other sources.

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Community Development

Economic Development Initiative

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

$6.2 M $2.882 M $1.166 M Projects implementation with the official-language minority community. Twelve projects were approved during the period, therefore committing a total of $1.6M in OLMCs in Atlantic Canada.
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Skills and Employment

Enabling Fund for Official-Language Minority Communities

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Contribute to synergies among Government of Canada programming relevant to OLMCs; Contribution recipients are informed and contribute to knowledge building and program/policy issues; Knowledge shared among federal partners, contribution recipients and OLMCs.

2) Program results are available to inform management and program policy issues.

3) OLMCs' access to Government of Canada programs and services.

4) Collaborative arrangements.

$69.0 M $13.8 M $13.6 M

The governance structure of the National Committees for Economic Development and Employability will be reinforced to strengthen the commitment of community and federal partners.

An interdepartmental research initiative on community economic and human resource development will be implemented to increase knowledge and share best practices.

The program will implement new reporting requirements with recipient organizations to focus on the achievement of tangible outcomes for communities.

The program will implement contribution agreements with 14 official-language minority organizations responsible to enhance community economic and human resource development. The contribution agreements will start on April 1, 2010.

Two meetings of the National Human Resources Development Committee for the English Linguistic Minority of Quebec were held. Federal representatives to these committees also had additional Interdepartmental Government Table Meetings, which allowed for information exchange on issues of common interest.

Federal partners of Anglophone and Francophone Government Tables were consulted on the governance structure of the National Committees. Discussions were also undertaken with community representatives.

The Interdepartmental Research Committee on Economic Development of OLMCs (IRCEDO) was created. IRCCED held three meetings and supported the production and publication of three reports :

  • 1. Successful Programs for Developing Entrepreneurship Skills among Youth
  • 2. Best Approaches for Economically Integrating Immigrants
  • 3.Report on Promoting OLMC participation in the knowledge-based economy

A new reporting template was implemented allowing the Enabling Fund to better track and assess the results achieved by OLMC organizations.

Fourteen agreements were signed with OLMC organizations, including one agreement for each Province and Territory and one with a francophone national umbrella organization for francophone minority communities.

Intermediate Result 2: Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
Immediate Result 2.1: Strengthened capacity of language industries.
Public Works and Governmental Services Canada

Linguistic Management and Services

University Scholarships Program in Translation

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Scholarships help encourage students to pursue post-secondary studies in translation, interpretation and terminology.

$8.0 M $1.95 M $1.631 M Award scholarships to students.

The CLSEP awarded 622 scholarships in translation between April 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011.

Moreover, since the creation of the program, some universities have experienced an increase in registration in translation programs that may lead to a career in translation. In particular, the University of Moncton had an increase of about 50 % in the number of registration in translation programs.
Public Works and Governmental Services Canada

Linguistic Management and Services

Language Industry Initiative

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Funded projects help enhance the capacity, diversity and effectiveness of the language sector.

$10.0 M $3.435 M $3.068 M

Offer compensated internships to students.

Grant contributions to businesses to supervise trainees.

68 internships were offered between April 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011.

Furthermore, the program has contributed to innovation, promotion, and language technologies project initiatives.

National Research Council of Canada Interactive Language Technologies

Languages Technologies Research Centre

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) Collaboration with key partners in the implementation of an R&D strategy responsive to industry needs.

2) Innovative tool prototypes for the support of translation, and the creation and management of multilingual and multicultural content.

$10.0 M $1.9 M $1.89 M

Result 1 - Implementation of a functional R & D strategy to meet the needs of the industry:

  • 3 collaborative agreements and (or) protocols for agreements
  •  2 innovative tools to aid in translation and (or) management of multilingual and multicultural content developed or in the process of development
  • 2 ILT seminars / LTRC / AILIA and 8 presentations at the national level.

Result 2 - 60 citations by peers in the scientific community

  • 1 award of excellence, internal and (or) external awards received by staff of the ITL Group
  • 1 invitation for Canadian and foreign researchers
  • 2 students at post-doctoral, doctoral and (or) master's degree received / formed by the ITL Group

Number of tasks on the editorial boards of journals, number of leadership roles in program committees of international conferences, number of tasks of proofreading articles for journals and scientific conferences.

  • 2 writing scientific journals
  • 1 task management of the committee or sub committee of international program conferences
  • 20 tasks for editing journals and scientific conferences
  • Number of scientific articles, patents, and licensing of research
  • 10 scientific papers
  • 1 Patent Applications
  • 2 Licensing of Research

Result 3 - Number and quality of knowledge transfer and technology

  • 3 collaborative arrangements of R-D: 3 collaborative projects for a total value of $ 600,000
  • 1 business license for a total value of $ 30,000
  • 2 participations in exchange activities with partners and businesses (e.g. LTRC, AILIA, trade shows, etc.):
  • 3 pilot projects with institutional and industrial partners

2 collaborative agreements and memoranda of understanding concluded.

2 technologies transferred to industry (PORTAGE, WeBiText). Ongoing evaluations of 5 prototypes (CATÉGO-NLP, PORTAGE-NLP, TerminoContextuelle, PORTAGE-Parliament, CATÉGO--NVTC)

3 ILT/LTRC seminars and 10 presentations at the national level.

283 citations

1 Best Paper Award at the 2010 Traitement automatique des langues naturelles conference (TLAN-2010) and 1 internal award from the Institute for Information Technology of the National Research Council of Canada.

1 foreign researcher hosted for 2 years.

1 doctoral and 1 bachelor level students hosted.

7 articles edited

1 chair: Multilingualism committee of the COLING 2010 conference on Computational Linguistics

35 reviews

19 papers

2 patent applications

2 new research licences

4 collaboration agreements for a total value of $707,685

2 commercial licences, total value of $35,000 + royalties in the future.

Participating in the AILIA-Technology committee and ACCORD collaborator.
Immediate Result 2.2: Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
Public Works and Governmental Services Canada Linguistic Management and Services

Canada Language Portal

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Canadians have better access to quality language resources in both official languages
$16.0 M $3.44 M $3.44 M

Develop new articles for the Magazine section of the Portal.

Add new writing tools to the Collection section of the Portal.

Conclude agreements with partners to develop the Magazine section of the Portal.

Obtain authorizations given by our partners to establish links to online language resources.

13 articles in each official language

3 tools added (Le Rouleau des prépositions, Les mots du droit and Peck's English Pointers)

6 agreements signed

French : 251 links added, 27 withdrawn

English  : 227 links added, 30 withdrawn
Canada School of Public Service

Official Languages Learning
Language retention services
Development of new technologies, methodologies and products

Expanding Universities' Access to Language Learning

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Increased access to language training products to Canadians through new partnerships with Canadian universities.
$2.5 M $0.93 M $0.87 M
  • Language learning tools meet university learners needs
  • Access and support to language learning products is provided to learners in the selected universities

Three satisfaction surveys were sent to learners (April 2010, August 2010 and January 2011) to assess their satisfaction.

Access was provided to 16 of the School's language learning tools.

Weekly bulletins were sent to learners to provide guidance in the use of the School's tools.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Second Language Education

Component: Support to Second-Language

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

$190.0 M $38.0 M $38.0 M Maintain or increase the offers of Provinces and Territories programs and activities that promote the learning of French and English as a second official language. Maintain or increase the proportion of Canadians who learns French and English as a second official language.

13 education agreements signed with all the Provinces and Territories to support the instruction of English and French as a second language for 2.4 million young Canadians, including over 317,000 students in immersion programs.

Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Second Language Education

Component: Summer Language Bursaries

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.
$38.3 M $7.66 M $7.66 M Ensure the amount of scholarship holders take advantage of the Explore program. This program offers a cultural exchange that helps learners perfect their comprehension of their second official language competencies. The Explore program enabled over 7,900 young Canadians to take part in a summer program to enrich their second official language skills and participate in a cultural exchange.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Second Language Education

Component: Official-language Monitors

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.
$14.8 M $2.96 M $2.96 M Ensure the amount of participants in the Odyssée program is maintained. This program allows students to work as language assistants in second language classrooms across the country. The Odyssey program enabled over 300 young people to work as language monitors in schools across Canada.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Promotion of Linguistic Duality Component: Youth Initiatives

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language.

$2.0 M N/A N/A N/A N/A
Immediate Result 2.3: Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
Canadian Heritage Cultural Industries

National Translation Program for Book Publishing

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.

$5.0 M $1.25 M $800 686

Canadian-owned publishers that benefit from the program select and translate Canadian-authored books in both official languages.

Canadian publishers produce more translations of books by Canadian authors in both official languages.

Funding was allocated to Canadian publishers for eligible translations.

69 translations of Canadian-authored books from one official language to the other were funded.
Canadian Heritage Cultural Industries

Musical Showcase Program for Artists from Official-language Communities

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.

$4.5 M $1.0 M $1.0 M

Music showcases are organized and presented

Artists from OLMCs perform at these Showcases

Artists from OLMCs are exposed to a larger audience

OLMCs have access to more music showcases in their language

236 artists of OLMCs performed in 538 music showcases presented at regional, national and international events, in addition to several touring opportunities. More than 2000 industry professionals were present at the events where the showcases took place.
Intermediate Result 3: Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.
Immediate Result 3.1: Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
Justice Canada Legal Services to Government

Accountability and Coordination Framework

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Support to the ministers with statutory or sectoral responsibilities for Official Languages and to work with them.

$2.18 M $0.44 M $0.44 M

Continue training of DOJ employees in order to increase awareness of language rights.

Production of two framework opinions on key provisions of the Official Languages Act to better equip legal counsel within the legal service units.

The Official Languages Law Section gave 30 presentations on language rights during the 2010/11 fiscal year.

We currently have two framework opinions being drafted. We decided to prioritize the update of Charter-related records (sections 16 to 23). Out of eight records, seven were completed in February 2011.

Justice Canada Internal Services Accountability and Coordination Framework $0.15 M $0.03 M $0.03 M N/A N/A
Canadian Heritage (Official Languages Secretariat) Official Languages

Accountability and Coordination Framework

Results for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

1) The Government of Canada has official languages strategies.

2) The partners are supported in the implementation of their official languages initiatives.

3) The quality of information on results (financial and non-financial) provided by the partners is improved.

4) The results of the research on official languages are communicated to the partners.

5) The Minister of Official Languages is advised on official languages files.

$13.5 M $2.68 M $1.97 M

Support to Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and senior officials in elaborating timely documentation and in insisting on quality assurance of given information and strategic advice.

To facilitate the implementation of the Roadmap by organizing regular meetings of interdepartmental committees of various levels, by consulting with the partners, by coordinating the collection of information for ministerial reports, by sharing timely financial and non-financial information and by preparing the organization of a symposium on research on official languages.

Implementation of the Horizontal Results-based Management Accountability Framework (HRMAF).

Support for the Minister of Official Languages and senior management
The Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) offered strategic advice and direction for policy development and decision-making.

The OLS also coordinated the Ministerial Conference on the Canadian Francophonie held in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, in June 2010, for the federal government and helped drive progress in priority issues, particularly economic development and Francophone immigration.

Facilitating the Roadmap's implementation
The OLS helped to coordinate the federal governments' official languages activities through regular interdepartmental meetings.

The OLS supported the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage in restructuring the horizontal governance model for interdepartmental committees to improve functioning and effectiveness.

In May 2010, the OLS organized a three-day dialogue session in Ottawa to identify the official-languages needs and priorities. The event brought together 165 participants from the community sector and key linguistic-duality organizations, and all of the Roadmap partners.

The OLS organized the Symposium on Official Languages Research, slated for September 1 in Ottawa.

HRMAF implementation
The OLS developed the Official Languages Performance and Information Management System (OLPIMS) to follow-up on the objectives of the federal government's Roadmap partners. The OLS updated the performance measurement strategy.

The annual planning and accountability requirements have been fulfilled.
Immediate Result 3.2: Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.
Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer Human resources management - Establishing Directions

Centre of excellence

Result for the 2008-2013 Roadmap:

Linguistic duality is reinforced in the federal public service.

$17.0 M $3.4 M $3.273 M

Continuous support to the review of policy instruments on human resources management to ensure the instruments on official languages are simplified, modernized and include general principles.

Support to the development and review of policy instruments from other policy centres on all issues pertaining to official languages.

Policy interpretations on horizontal issues.

Monitoring the status of official languages in institutions subject to the Official Languages Act, through risk based annual reviews on official languages.

An assessment of the official languages performance of institutions as part of the Management Accountability Framework (MAF).

An annual report on official languages submitted to Parliament that presents a strategic overview of the Official Languages Program, and is integrated into the Report on the Human Resources Management of the Public Service of Canada.

Preparing for the compliance review of the Regulation based on the next decennial census data (the data will likely be available by December 2012).

Almost 60% of the work has been completed to date. The new set of policies on official languages will include 4 instruments[2]. A draft of these new instruments was prepared. The consultation process is underway.

6 policy instruments from other policy centres were assessed. The guidelines on internal use of social media were distributed.

The interpretation for the implementation of CALDECH and a corresponding analytical grid were sent to the institutions in June 2010.

11 interpretation requests affecting one institution were processed.

73 annual reviews were requested from the institutions and 68 were received (93%).

The status of official languages was assessed under the MAF.

The Annual Report on Official Languages 2008-09 was submitted in October 2010.

The preparatory work is well underway. The overall schedule and detailed list of tasks have been established. The main tools and templates have been developed.

Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer Human resources management - Enabling Infrastructure         Horizontal support to institutions in particular through the advisory committees on official languages, the Network of official languages champions, the annual conference of official languages champions and the annual forum on best practices.

The preparatory work is well underway. The overall schedule and detailed list of tasks have been established. The main tools and templates have been developed.

The Departmental Advisory Committee and the Crown Corporations Advisory Committee on Official Languages have each held 2 meetings and 1 retreat. Average participation rate: 75% for the departments and 46% for the Crown corporations.

A Network of champion's conference was organized. The theme was leadership and working language. The Network also held 6 meetings.

The annual forum on best practices was held under the theme of communities at the heart of official languages.

20 information sessions and workshops were offered to federal institutions.

1 information session was offered to TBS analysts.

2 horizontal requests for advice and information were processed.

76 requests for advice and information affecting a single institution were processed.

10 requests for information from the public were processed.

7 pieces of correspondence were written.

5 Access to Information requests were processed.

A special study on the management of the Official Languages Program in institutions is underway and will be distributed during the next fiscal year.

Improvements were made to the Regulations Management System (RMS) in preparation for the compliance review of the Regulations. More improvements will follow next year.

Corrections were made to the ABCs of Linguistic Profiles at Your Fingertips tool.
Total $1 110.1 M $234.92 M $215.6 M    

Comments on Variances:

ACOA: The variance in planned versus actual spending associated to the Francophone immigration project is largely due to delays in opening the welcome centres, staffing the centres and subsequently delivering activities to newcomers. The cause for the delays in opening was as a result of the time it took to organize the four communities, ensure they had a steering committee in place and engage both the business community and community at-large.

As for the variance on planned and actual spending in the delivery of the Economic Development Initiative, the variance is mostly due to delays incurred in certain projects that resulted in extending their completion date as well as incurring forecasted expenses in the 2011-12 financial year instead of the 2010-11 financial year.

Canada Economic Development (CED) for Quebec regions: In the first two years of the initiative, efforts to raise awareness regarding the EDI were to take place with OLMC. These efforts were carried out with various associations representing the OLMC. As a result, there have been more projects submitted to the Agency during the last year considering the time normally required for project requests to be developed by the OLMC and subsequently submitted to us. Having said that, we have, for some time now, noticed that we are reaping greater benefits from our increased contacts with the OLMC.

CIC: The total amount actually spent by CIC in 2010-11 exceeds the funding set out by the Roadmap for the same period. An additional $10.7M was taken from CIC settlement funds for the implementation of official languages initiatives, as specified in CIC's submission to the Treasury Board in relation to the Roadmap.

FedDev Ontario: Given the fact that the Initiative was created prior to the establishment of the Agency, there have been a number of challenges and delays that have impacted the execution of funding agreements and the disbursement of funding.

HRSDC :
Childcare pilot project
All the funding required to carry out the Child Care Pilot Project was spent. In 2009-10, a process was implemented to identify additional research projects. Projects have been identified. Some were carried out in 2010-11, while others began in 2011-12 and will continue in 2012-13.

Enabling Fund
The Enabling Fund renewed 14 contribution agreements with national, provincial and territorial organizations; however, $200,000 in program funding was not spent by one of the recipient organizations.

Industry Canada-FedNor: Some projects started late. The funds will be allocated later in 2011-12.

Industry Canada - Regional Operations Sector: A project with the Institute of Moncton was not financed at their request, due to lack of time on their part.

Justice Canada:
Explanation for the Contraventions Act Fund: Only provinces/territories/municipalities are eligible for funding under the Fund. The Department has been diligently working to negotiate new agreements in 2010-11, namely with Newfoundland-and-Labrador and Prince Edward Island. As staff at the provincial level changed, negotiations were temporarily suspended until such time as new staff was assigned. The Department continues to work to move negotiations forward towards getting the provinces/territories/municipalities to sign contribution agreements, which once accomplished will utilize available funding.

Explanation for the Access to Justice Support Fund: The process to increase awareness on the training component has been longer than anticipated which has reduced the number of anticipated projects. However, departmental efforts to increase awareness of the component in 2010-11 were increased and as a result, it is anticipated that more funding applications will be received in 2011-12.

PCH-OLS: The difference between planned spending and real spending is attributed to the overtime needed to recruit additional resources. The planned staffing level was achieved before fiscal year-end. Recruitment time led to delays in carrying out some activities.

PCH-Cultural industries: The National Translation Program for Book Publishing's annual budget exceeded demand for support for literary translation in 2010-11. To encourage more official-language translations, Canadian Heritage and the Canada Council for the Arts, which administers the program on behalf of the Department, have introduced funding for supplemental activities, including a translation rights fair.

PWGSC - Translation Bureau: Contribution payments for the Language Sector Enhancement Program were not paid in full due to delays in program delivery, primarily due to stakeholders and recipients not being able to process contributions. This resulted in lower than planned expenditures (unused portion of $0.7 million)

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Isabelle Delage, Canadian Heritage - Official Languages Secretariat, (819) 997-0622, isabelle.delage@pch.gc.ca


[1] CIC's planned Roadmap spending for 2010-11 was $4.5M. However, the amount spent was higher than the planned Roadmap spending for 2010-11. An additional $10.7 M in CIC settlement funds was used to implement official languages initiatives, but this is not included in the total amount spent within the Roadmap framework for the 2010-11 fiscal year.

[2] Policy on Official Languages, Directive on the Use of Official Languages in Human Resources Management, Directive on the Use of Official Languages for Communications with and Services to the Public and Directive for Implementing the Official Languages Regulations.

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Department of Finance Canada

Horizontal Initiatives



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime, formerly the National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering

Name of Lead Department(s): Department of Finance Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework

Start Date: June 2000

End Date: 2010–11

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $533.8 (millions)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering was established in 2000 as part of the government's ongoing effort to combat money laundering in Canada. Legislation adopted that year, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act, created a mandatory reporting system for suspicious financial transactions, large cross-border currency transfers, and certain prescribed transactions. The legislation also established the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada to collect and analyze these financial transaction reports and to disclose pertinent information to law enforcement and intelligence agencies. In December 2001, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act was amended to include measures to fight terrorist financing activities and renamed the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act.

The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering was expanded and is now known as Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime. In December 2006, Bill C-25 amended the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act to ensure that Canada's legislation remains consistent with international anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing standards established by the Financial Action Task Force and is responsive to areas of domestic risk. Amendments include enhanced client identification requirements, the creation of a registration regime for money services businesses, and the establishment of an administrative and monetary penalties regime to deal with lesser infractions of the Act.

Shared Outcome(s): To detect and deter money laundering and the financing of terrorist activities and to facilitate the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences

Governance Structure(s): Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime is a horizontal initiative comprising both funded and non-funded partners. The funded partners are the Department of Finance Canada, the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canada Revenue Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The non-funded partners are Public Safety Canada, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada, and Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. An interdepartmental assistant deputy minister-level group and working group, consisting of all partners and led by the Department of Finance Canada, has been established to direct and coordinate the government's efforts to combat money laundering and terrorist financing activities. In addition, the Department of Finance Canada also chairs a Public/Private Sector Advisory Committee. This broad-based advisory committee, comprising both public and private sector representatives, provides general guidance for Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Regime.

Performance Highlights: A 10-Year evaluation of Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime, which included a Management Action Plan, was completed and published on the Department of Finance Canada website.

The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) increased its disclosures to law enforcement and security partners to 769 cases of suspected money laundering, terrorist financing and threats to the security of Canada.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police created five anti-money laundering teams in Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver.

The Canadian Border Services Agency performed more than 1,640 seizures under the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act, totalling over $30 million.

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada laid 6,494 charges for the possession of proceeds of crime and 30 charges for money laundering under the Criminal Code, as well as 31 charges under the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act.

The Canada Revenue Agency's (CRA's) Special Enforcement Program completed 115 audits based on FINTRAC disclosures; total federal income taxes were reassessed at $26,756,939, and total Goods and Services Tax / Harmonized Sales Tax dollars were assessed at $813,069. In addition, CRA's Charities Directorate revoked the registration of three Canadian charities on grounds that included links to terrorism.

Canada continued to play a leadership role in the revision of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF)'s international standards for anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing. As well, Canada recently extended its participation in the FATF-Style Regional Bodies network by becoming an observer of the Grupo de Accion Financiera de Sudamerica, the FATF-Style Regional Body for South America.

Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Department of Finance Canada Financial Sector Policy Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $3.3 $0.3 $0.3

The Department of Finance Canada will provide effective oversight of Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing (AML/ATF) Regime.

The Department will complete the 10-year Treasury Board-mandated evaluation of the AML/ATF Regime to assess its effectiveness and access to continued funding.

The Department will implement the Budget 2009 measure related to counter-measures against illicit financing.

The Department will monitor the financial sector for money laundering and terrorist financing risks as well as other emerging illicit financing risks.

The Department will participate in international forums related to combatting money laundering and terrorist financing such as the G7 Financial Experts meetings, the Financial Action Task Force, the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force, and the Asia Pacific Group on Money Laundering. In addition, the Department will contribute and respond to G20 work on illicit financing.

The Department of Finance Canada continued to address policy and operational issues to ensure the effectiveness of the AML/ATF Regime. The Department also hosted spring and fall meetings of the AML/ATF Regime's Public/Private Sector Advisory Committee.

The Department completed the 10-year evaluation of the AML/ATF Regime and led the interdepartmental working group conducting the evaluation. The evaluation report was published on the Department's website.

The Department continued to implement the Budget 2009 measure related to counter-measures against illicit financing, including legislative amendments promulgated as part of the legislation that implemented Budget 2010, the Jobs and Growth Act.

The Department consulted with provincial gaming authorities on modernizing the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act to explicitly cover online casinos. The Department also met regularly with domestic partners to discuss potential money laundering and terrorist financing risks.

The Department actively participated and undertook a leadership role at plenary and intercessional meetings of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force (CFATF), the Grupo de Accion Financiera de Sudamerica (GAFISUD) and the Asia/Pacific Group on Money Laundering (APG) plenary as well as meetings of the G7 Financial Experts.

As the head of Canada's delegation at international forums relating to anti-money laundering and combatting the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT), the Department:

  • coordinated federal partners' contributions;
  • played a challenge function in FATF, APG, GAFISUD and CFATF mutual evaluation processes, a comprehensive peer review process that is the cornerstone of the global implementation of FATF standards (the FATF 40 Recommendations on money laundering and the 9 Special Recommendations on Terrorist Financing);
  • contributed to the development of FATF policy and standards and the analysis of new AML/CFT trends and typologies;
  • hosted a domestic workshop to feed into international work on incorporating effectiveness into the mutual evaluation process;
  • participated in the FATF International Co-operation Review Group to identify and monitor high-risk jurisdictions;
  • identified and leveraged funds to support capacity building and technical assistance for APG and CFATF as well as training for their individual members; and
  • provided advice and guidance to CFATF member countries on governance and capacity issues.
Department of Justice Canada The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $7.1 $0.1 $0.1 The Criminal Division of the Department of Justice Canada plays an important role in Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing (AML/ATF) Regime. For 2010–11, it is anticipated that the Criminal Division will use the resources it receives to carry out work related to the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), including attending FATF-related international meetings. Resources will also be allocated to ensure the Criminal Division's continued involvement in policy development related to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, the Human Rights Law Section will receive money to deal with any ancillary constitutional issues raised during the prosecutions.

The Department of Justice Canada, including the Criminal Law Policy Division and the Criminal Division of the Litigation Branch, continued to do operational work in support of the AML/ATF Regime. Counsel from the Criminal Division continued to provide legal advice to the Department of Finance Canada and to other participants in the AML/ATF Regime, and attended a number of FATF meetings.

The funds targeted for the Department of Justice Canada within the AML/ATF Regime were used for Regime-related purposes only.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) Addressing criminal issues to contribute to a safer world Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $11.5 $2.3 $3.0

PPSC plays a significant role in Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing (AML/ATF) Regime. For 2010–11, it is anticipated that information provided to law enforcement by the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada  (FINTRAC) will result in a need by law enforcement for more prosecutorial legal advice. It is also anticipated that this information will result in additional charges being laid for money laundering and terrorist financing offences, thus resulting in an increased workload for prosecutors.

PPSC also has responsibilities related to the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (PCMLTFA). The work planned includes applications for production orders and prosecutions for PCMLTFA-related offences.

In addition, resources will be used for the training of law enforcement personnel and prosecutors and for the development and coordination of policy related to AML/ATF.

Finally, PPSC resources will be used to carry out work related to the Financial Action Task Force, as required.

During 2010–11, 6,494 charges for the possession of proceeds of crime and 30 charges for money laundering were laid under the Criminal Code, as well as 31 charges under the PCMLTFA. There were no charges laid related to the terrorism financing provisions of the Criminal Code during this period.

Legal advice was provided by in-house counsel against 41 per cent of the possession of proceeds of crime files, 40 per cent of the money laundering files, and 19 per cent of the PCMLTFA files that these new charges represent.

Finally, PPSC counsel provided both formal and ad hoc training to law enforcement personnel over the course of investigations. Resources were also dedicated to policy development and coordination to ensure consistency across all regions.

The Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) Collection, analysis and dissemination of financial information Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $306.6 $37.5 $36.2

FINTRAC's financial intelligence and case disclosures on money laundering will be widely disseminated to, and used by, law enforcement and intelligence agencies.

FINTRAC will provide enhanced compliance in high-risk-reporting entity sectors.

In 2010–11, FINTRAC disclosed 769 cases of suspected money laundering, terrorist financing, and threats related to the security of Canada to law enforcement and security partners. This represents a significant increase over the 579 cases disclosed in 2009–10 and the 556 cases disclosed in 2008–09.

In 2010–11, the average timeliness of case analysis improved by 18 per cent, decreasing from 68 days to 56 days. This decrease was due to improved business processes and a better understanding of partner needs.

FINTRAC continued to make improvements to its mechanisms for defining and prioritizing partners' intelligence requirements. These enhancements have allowed FINTRAC analysts to better understand and respond to the needs of investigative and intelligence partners and to focus on the cases of highest importance.

FINTRAC also continued to fulfill the needs of various partners and stakeholders in producing and disseminating a wide range of strategic financial intelligence assessments, briefs and reports. These products served to inform government policy and decision makers as well as reporting entities about money laundering and terrorist financing issues, methods, indicators and case studies, which enabled them to better combat money laundering and terrorist financing. One example during the year was the third report in FINTRAC's Typologies and Trends Report series entitled Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing (ML/TF) Typologies and Trends for Canadian Money Services Businesses (MSBs). This report, published in July 2010, will enable MSBs and other reporting entities and partners to recognize and combat money laundering and terrorist financing more effectively.

Examinations continue to be a primary method for FINTRAC to ensure that reporting entities are complying with their obligations under anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing legislation.

During 2010–11, FINTRAC made a number of enhancements to its current examination plan. The aim was to increase its coverage of reporting entities operating in the higher-risk sectors by examining the key market players, representing the majority of the respective sectors' market share, transactions and assets. FINTRAC also completed 684 examinations, of which 376 (55 per cent) were on-site examinations and 308 (45 per cent) were desk examinations.

The Administrative Monetary Penalties (AMPs) program continues to encourage change in non-compliant behaviour. In its second year of implementation, an additional eight AMPs have been publicly named on FINTRAC's website, and one Non-Compliance Disclosure  was submitted to law enforcement.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Money Laundering Units (AML) Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $62.8 $6.9 $5.7

The RCMP will enhance national and international opportunities for the detection and investigation of money laundering activities, including leading national joint cash-smuggling interdiction operations.

The RCMP will develop Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) disclosures, as well as other intelligence, to a point where resources from Integrated Proceeds of Crime units or from elsewhere in the RCMP could be redirected to investigations in order to increase seizures.

The RCMP will review current distribution of resources in the Anti-Money Laundering Program to determine effectiveness, with a view to maximizing available resources.

The RCMP's Crime Branch has an on-site resource from the U.S. Internal Revenue Service's (IRS's) Criminal Investigation section to share intelligence from IRS databases for ongoing RCMP investigations involving U.S. targets and/or Canadians living in the U.S. Files with an international component for 2010 totalled 181.

As part of the Integrated Proceeds of Crime and anti-money laundering (AML) human resource allocation review in 2010, five AML teams have been created in Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver. This model will allow proactive FINTRAC intelligence to develop into large-scale money laundering and proceeds of crime investigations.

Anti-Terrorist Financing Units Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $28.1 $5.2 $3.8

Through the gathering and analysis of financial intelligence, the Anti-Terrorist Financing Team (AFTF) will focus on converting that intelligence into proactive investigations, thus enhancing its ability to detect and deter terrorist financing activities.

The AFTF will continue to work closely with domestic partners to further criminal investigations into terrorist financing and will participate in and contribute to international forums, such as the Financial Action Task Force and international law-enforcement working groups on terrorist financing.

The ATFT supports counter-terrorism strategies related to terrorist financing, financial intelligence gathering, investigations and enforcement. In 2010–11, ATFT supported 30 major investigations.

In 2010-11, ATFT submitted six voluntary information reports to the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre (FINTRAC).

In 2010–11, ATFT received 13 disclosures from FINTRAC.

ATFT continues to provide training to the RCMP and its partner agencies. In 2010–11, two Anti-Terrorist Financing courses were delivered, with 52 candidates receiving training.

ATFT continues to support the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), the Asia/Pacific Group on Money Laundering, and the Middle East and North Africa Financial Action Task Force. Building on existing partnerships with the lead department, the Department of Finance Canada, and its partners, the RCMP has participated at four practitioners' groups and conferences.

The Department of Finance Canada continues to consult with ATFT on FATF-related matters, such as international cooperation, information sharing and related projects.

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Special Enforcement Program (SEP) Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $23.8 $2.2 $2.2

CRA will focus on the following four pillars:

  • Participating in committees and initiatives to manage and enhance Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing (AML/ATF) Regime;
  • Enhancing operational relationships with the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) and other partners in the AML/ATF Regime;
  • Conducting research and analysis; and
  • Contributing to the work of international organizations to enhance cooperation between tax adminis-trations and AML/ATF authorities.

In 2010–11, SEP will continue to thoroughly review all disclosures received from FINTRAC and to select those with potential for audit. The projected number of audits remains at 90, with a projected federal tax recovery of $7 million. However, the complexity of the files resulting from FINTRAC referrals is increasing, and this may lead to a reduction in the number of audits SEP is able to complete in 2011–12.

The results of these audits will be gathered for intelligence purposes to determine whether trends can be established.

CRA has made significant efforts to enhance its operational relationships FINTRAC and other partners in the AML/ATF Regime. During this reporting period, CRA coordinated an information session with FINTRAC, focusing on its operational functions in order to improve the quality of information shared between the two organizations.

CRA continues to explore options to increase its interaction with FINTRAC and its law enforcement partners, particularly the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Meetings at the headquarters level were held to discuss and clarify roles, expectations, impediments and responsibilities to maximize the partnership and the shared goal of addressing the accumulation of illicit wealth in the criminal economy.

CRA received 124 FINTRAC disclosures between April 1, 2010, and March 31, 2011. The majority of the disclosures have been worked on by SEP, which conducts audits, delinquent actions and other enforcement activities on individuals suspected of deriving income from illegal activities.

In 2010–11, SEP completed 115 audits based upon FINTRAC disclosures, with total federal income taxes reassessed in the amount of $26,756,939 and total Goods and Services Tax / Harmonized Sales Tax dollars assessed at $813,069.

Of the 115 audits completed, four cases were referred for consideration of criminal prosecution related to tax evasion.

CRA has begun tracking information from FINTRAC disclosures in order to identify trends in tax non-compliance. This intelligence will be useful for risk assessment of future disclosures and other referrals from law enforcement agencies to CRA.

Charities Directorate Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $11.8 $4.4 $4.4

CRA, under the Income Tax Act, has responsibility for administering the registration system for charities. This recognizes that the existence of a strong regulatory deterrence against terrorist abuse of charities contributes to suppressing the financing of terrorism in Canada and to protecting and preserving the social cohesion and well-being of Canadians.

CRA's regulatory oversight of charities has been strengthened by the enactment of complementary measures under the Charities Registration (Security Information) Act and the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act and by changes to the Income Tax Act that authorize broader information sharing between anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing (AML/ATF) agencies.

Under these authorities, intelligence provided to CRA assists in its mandate to protect the integrity of the registration system for charities, and information disclosed by CRA can be used for investigative purposes.

In 2010–11, CRA will consolidate its capacity to identify and respond to cases involving possible links to terrorism through continuing information technology (IT) development, expanding formal information-sharing arrangements with Regime partners, refining performance measurement and risk management tools, and staffing and training its full complement of program full-time equivalents.

Results delivered in 2010–11 focused on enhancing the suite of IT tools to support analysis and performance measurement; refining risk management tools; and continuing to staff and train the full complement of program full-time equivalents. CRA continued the normal business of reviewing applications for charitable registration, monitoring registered charities, and exchanging information under legal authorities with its partners, in relation to risks of support for terrorist activities. CRA revoked the registration of three Canadian charities on grounds that included their links to terrorism. It also continued to develop and enhance relationships and training with Regime partners, and provide a strong CRA presence in interdepartmental committees addressing cross-cutting policy and review activities relevant to Canada's AML/ATF regime.

Note: The numbers in columns 4 and 5 have been revised from what was originally reported in the 2010–11 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)1 Risk Assessment Program Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $74.6 $2.0 $1.4 The Risk Assessment Program involves identifying high-risk individuals and goods before their arrival at Canada's border by using advance passenger and cargo information from carriers, importers, exporters, and other partners. Once identified, high-risk individuals or goods are flagged for closer examination and possible enforcement action at a Canadian port of entry.

During 2010–11, the CBSA performed more than 1,640 seizures under the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act, totalling over $30 million. Approximately $2.6 million of this total was forfeited to the Crown, and penalties have been assessed in excess of $800,000.

Over 100 seizures have resulted in forfeiture as suspected proceeds of crime or funds for the use of terrorist activities.

Enforcement Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $3.5 $5.4 Border services officers detain, seize or forfeit, and impose penalties on goods and currency that are non-compliant with the Customs Act or other Canadian legislation and regulations, such as the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act. They are also responsible for administrating and enforcing the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.
Conventional Border Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $0.4 $0.2 CBSA is responsible for the development and administration of border-related programs and associated policies, regulations, and procedures.
Recourse Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $0.3 $0.3 A redress process is available to individuals, importers, and carriers for CBSA enforcement-related actions.
Internal Services Canada's Anti- Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime $1.3 $1.3 Internal Services provides program support in areas such as governance and management support (e.g., communications and legal services), resources management services (e.g., information technology, human resources and financial management), and asset management services (e.g., real property and acquisitions).
Total $529.5 $66.3 $64.3    

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11  Total Actual Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010–11
$533.8 $66.3 $64.3
† Certain organizations that are partners in Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime are exempt from reporting; therefore, the figures presented in the table may not sum to the total amount allocated.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact information.

Rachel Grasham
Chief, Financial Crimes Section
Telephone: 613-943-2883


1 The figures reported for CBSA under Planned Spending 2010–11 include 20 per cent for the employee benefits plan (EBP) but not the 13 per cent for Public Works and Government Services accommodation costs.


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Department of Justice Canada

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Anti-Drug Strategy

Name of Lead Department(s): Department of Justice

Lead Department Program Activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

Start Date: 2007-08

End Date: 2011-12 and ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $588.9 M (Total Allocation has been changed from $578.6M to reflect changes to Health Canada amounts).

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Anti-Drug Strategy was launched by the Government of Canada in 2007, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Its goal is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The prevention action plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use, and to develop and implement community-based interventions and initiatives to prevent illicit drug use. The treatment action plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The enforcement action plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

Shared Outcome(s):

  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced impacts of illicit drug use through prevention and treatment efforts; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.

Governance Structure(s):

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section of the Department of Justice Canada.

The Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC), which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources. The ADMSC prepares questions for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by the Department of Public Safety Canada, oversees the implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy and the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The Communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy, including making decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative and ensuring coordination of communication.

Performance Highlights:

For 2010-11, the 12 federal partner departments and agencies involved in the NADS continued to implement the Strategy as planned, with its focus on contributing to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency, and reduce the production and distribution of illicit drugs. Since certain components of the Strategy will sunset in 2012, partners began planning for their renewal and discussing the Strategy's scope in general. In addition, as is required by the accountability structure for the Strategy, an impact evaluation was initiated.

The overall operating environment did not change in 2010-11. Bill S-10, which proposed mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug offences, was not passed by Parliament; therefore, the legislation-related components of the Strategy were not implemented.

The following tables present the performance results for each federal partner's program activities.

Federal Partner: Department of Justice

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
A1 – Justice policies, laws and programs a. Drug Treatment Courts 16.2 3.6 3.6 Link 1 Link 1

b. Youth Justice Fund

(Treatment Action Plan)

6.8 1.6 1.4 Link 2 Link 2
c. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy 1.4 0.3 0.3 Link 3 Link 3
C1 – Internal Services d. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy 1.5 0.3 0.3 Link 4 Link 4
e. National Anti-Drug Strategy 0.3 0.1 0.1 Support programs  
Total 26.2 5.9 5.7    

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court clients.

Link 2:

Overall results:

  • To work collaboratively with interested provinces and territories as well as other stakeholders in order to identify gaps in drug treatment programs for youth in the justice system.
  • To introduce, pilot and evaluate a number of drug treatment options for youth involved in the youth justice system in communities.
  • To share knowledge of the piloted drug treatment programs and promising practices with provinces and territories as well as other interested stakeholders.

Immediate outcomes:

  • Projects on treatment services and program enhancements.
  • Enhanced capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations.
Intermediate outcomes:
  • Increased availability of, and access to, effective treatment services and programs for targeted populations in areas of need.
  • Improved treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency in targeted populations in areas of need.
  • Reduced risk-taking behaviours.

Link 3:

Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

  • exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;
  • maintaining the NADS Governance Structure;
  • taking lead responsibility for performance reporting;
  • implementing the recommendations from the Implementation Evaluation; and
  • starting the process for the renewal of sunsetting components of the Strategy.

Link 4:

Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

  • leading and coordinating all NADS communications activities; and
  • taking lead responsibility for Strategy evaluation.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

Early results collected through the Drug Treatment Court Information System show Drug Treatment Court clients have clean urine screen tests (i.e., no drug use) 62% of the time that they are in the program.

Link 2:

In 2010-11, a total of 17 projects were funded, including 12 through contributions and five through grants. Of these, seven were on-going contribution agreements from previous years; one was deferred from 2009-10 to 2010-11; one was deferred to begin in 2011-12; and three were new pilot projects. The total value of these projects was $1,138,881 in contributions and $149,000 in grants. Of the 17 projects:

  • five were with a provincial government or its designate;
  • one was a project located in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, funded jointly with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada's Homelessness Partnering Strategy; and
  • 11 were with front-line community organizations.

The funded projects covered the following areas: training/education, information sharing, evaluation, and program pilot projects.

The Department of Justice Canada also held a two-day forum with program managers and researchers to explore effective approaches for dealing with youth in conflict with the law with drug abuse issues.

Link 3:

The Department of Justice Canada provided effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment, and enforcement through its work in the following four areas: policy and coordination, the NADS governance structure, communications activities (see Link 4 below), and evaluation and performance reporting (see Link 4 below).

Policy and Coordination:

  • Supported the process for Parliamentary consideration of a Government Bill to address serious drug crimes by proposing minimum penalties;
  • Collaborated with the partner departments to fully implement the action plans developed in response to the Implementation Evaluation and is currently working in partnership with the other departments to conduct the Impact Evaluation which examines the continued relevance, effectiveness, and demonstrated efficiency and economy of the NADS;
  • Implemented a process for renewing sunsetting components of the Strategy, including organizing and hosting a Policy Planning Retreat with the partner departments, and chairing an interdepartmental Ad Hoc Research Working Group to support renewal;
  • Organized and hosted the NADS Speaker Series, with four presentations by scientific researchers and experts in 2010-11; and
  • Oversaw NADS involvement in the development of the Action Plan to implement the new Hemispheric Drug Strategy of the Organization of American States.

Governance:

  • Chaired and provided the secretariat function for the NADS ADM Steering Committee;
  • Chaired and provided the secretariat function for the NADS Policy and Performance Working Group;
  • Participated in meetings of the Prevention and Treatment, and Enforcement Working Groups; and
  • Led the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting and the Communications Working Group.

Link 4:

The Department of Justice Canada provided effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through its work in the following four areas: policy and coordination (see Link 3 above), the NADS governance structure (see Link 3 above), communications activities, and evaluation and performance reporting.

Communication:

  • Organized the NADS Communications Working Group meetings and monthly horizontal meetings between NADS communications advisors;
  • Produced and coordinated media lines and “Qs and As” for the release of various drug-related reports and academic research;
  • Oversaw 16 NADS announcements, one tri-ministerial message, and one tri-ministerial news release (Justice, Health Canada, and Public Safety);
  • Developed and coordinated approvals and the implementation of an overarching NADS Communications Strategy;
  • Released a new “drugsnot4me” prevention campaign ad and Facebook page; and
  • Redesigned and maintained the NADS website.

Evaluation and Reporting:

  • Fully implemented the action plans developed in response to the Implementation Evaluation;
  • Initiated the Impact Evaluation;
  • Chaired the Policy and Performance Working Group's Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting;
  • Produced the NADS Annual Report; and
  • Coordinated the DPR and RPP processes.

Federal Partner: Health Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
3.4.3 Controlled Substances

a. Mass Media Campaign

(Prevention Action Plan)

29.8 7.0 7.2 Link 1 Link 1
3.4.3 Controlled Substances

b. Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF)

(Prevention Action Plan)

59.0 14.0 14.3 Link 2 Link 2
3.4 Substance Use and Abuse

c. Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP)

(Treatment Action Plan)

124.7 30.7 17.3 Link 3 Link 3
4.1.1.2 First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions

d. National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP)

(Treatment Action Plan)

36.0 8.9* 11.1 Link 4 Link 4
3.4.3 Controlled Substances

e. Office of Controlled Substances

(Enforcement Action Plan)

27.2** 5.7** 5.1 Link 5 Link 5

f. Drug Analysis Services (DAS)

(Enforcement Action Plan)

45.0*** 9.5*** 9.5 Link 6 Link 6
3.41 1 1
Total 325.1 75.8 64.5    

All figures listed above include employee benefit plan (EBP) and Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) Accommodation costs.

* Planned Spending was changed from $7.5M to the correct amount of $8.9M.

** Total Allocation was changed from $12.8M to $27.2M and Planned Spending was changed from $3.1M to $5.7M to properly align the resources approved for NADS.

*** Total Allocation was changed from $49.2M to $45.0M and Planned Spending was changed from $2.3M to $9.5M to properly align the resources approved for NADS.

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

The mass media campaign plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit drug use. The mass media campaign's progress and contribution to this outcome will be measured by the change in the level of capacity among targeted populations to prevent illicit drug use and related risk-taking behaviour through post campaign public opinion research conducted with both youth 13-15 years of age and their parents, measured against the baseline surveys that were conducted with parents in 2008 and with youth in 2009. The campaign's success will also be measured through website hits, booklet downloads, calls to 1-800-O-Canada and the number of booklets ordered/shipped; and by evidence of capacity changes for influencing decision-making and behaviours around illicit drug use and associated consequences in targeted populations.

Link 2:

DSCIF plans to enhance the capacity of targeted populations to make informed decisions about illicit drug use. The program's success and progress will be measured by the level/nature of acquired or improved knowledge/skills to avoid illicit drug use within the targeted population, and will be measured by evidence that capacity changes are influencing decision-making and behaviours around illicit drug use and associated consequences in targeted populations.

DSCIF also plans to strengthen community responses to illicit drug issues in targeted areas, and will measure their progress based on the type/nature of ways that community responses have been strengthened in targeted areas. For example, the adoption/integration of evidence-informed/best practices within the targeted areas will indicate the program's contribution to this outcome.

Link 3:

DTFP plans to increase availability of, and access to, effective treatment services and programs for at-risk youth in areas of need. The Program's success and progress will be measured by the type/nature of treatment services and supports that have been made available by end of FY and will be measured by the program/service utilization trends associated with their populations and areas of need.

DTFP will also seek to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency of affected Canadians. The Program's success and progress in this plan will be measured by the extent to which treatment system improvements have been made; perceptions of stakeholders; and, the extent to which uptake/integration of evidence-informed practices has occurred.

Link 4:

The First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) plans to increase availability of, and access to, effective treatment services and programs for Aboriginal populations in areas of need (as determined by regional needs assessments). The progress of this plan will be measured by the nature of new or enhanced services that have been made available through funding in targeted areas and are based on research or best practices. FNIHB also plans to improve treatment systems, programs and services to address illicit drug dependency in Aboriginal populations in areas of need. The progress of this plan will be measured by the proportion of treatment facilities accredited to F/P/T or other appropriate standards of accreditation; the changes in stakeholder/client perceptions regarding the extent to which treatment services have been improved in NADS-supported investment areas; the types of collaborative/partnerships with Aboriginal organizations to improve systems, programs and services; and the extent to which an uptake/integration of evidence-informed practices has occurred. Lastly, FNIHB plans to reduce risk-taking behaviours among clients of treatment programs. The success of this plan will be measured by changes in stakeholder/client perceptions regarding the extent to which clients are make healthy decisions concerning substance use post-Strategy compared to pre-Strategy.

Link 5:

Health Canada plans to increase compliance and reduce risk associated with the diversion of precursor chemicals. The success of this plan will be measured by the level of potential diversion of precursor chemicals and controlled substances (as indicated by Loss and Theft Reports), and by the rates of compliance with policies and regulations.

Health Canada also plans to reduce the health, safety and security risks associated with illicit drug production. The success and progress of this plan will be measured by the size of synthetic drug production disrupted (as indicated by the detailed requests for authorizing disposal of synthetic substances).

Link 6:

Drug Analysis Services (DAS) plans to improve drug enforcement intelligence and evidence. The success and progress of this plan will be measured by the perceptions of stakeholders regarding the benefit and timeliness of DAS contribution to court/police response. DAS also plans to increase safety in dismantling illicit drug operations. The success and progress of this plan will be measured by the number and nature of injuries to law enforcement officers and other first responders during the investigation and dismantling of illegal drug operations, and will also be measured by the level of additional risk to the environment as a result of investigation and dismantling of illegal drug operations.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

Public Opinion Research (POR-08-07) "NADS Youth On-line Baseline Survey" was conducted prior to the December 2009 launch of the youth mass media campaign targeting youth aged 13-15 years. Youth drug awareness, knowledge and perception levels were measured and will be compared to Public Opinion Research (POR-10-13) "NADS Advertising and Recall Tracking Survey" when results are available.

Results of the 2010-11 youth "drugsnot4me" campaign were positive with over 527,000 visits to the website and over 1,000 drug prevention “stories” submitted by youth. Additionally, the campaign's Facebook fan page attracted over 63,000 followers within nine months (launched in July 2010) and the television ads were viewed over 94,000 times on YouTube. The 'drugsnot4me' website consistently ranked among the top ten most visited pages on the Health Canada website.

Link 2:

During 2010-11, 35 new contribution agreements were signed. DSCIF is employing a cluster evaluation approach which clusters projects that have the same primary outcome to better determine the extent to which the DSCIF is achieving its intended outcomes. Results from this approach will be available in 2012-13.

Link 3:

The projects funded across Canada in alignment with the DTFP objectives have shown progress towards meeting the Program's intended outcomes and contributing to strengthening Canada's drug treatment services and systems. The Systems projects began to demonstrate evidence of greater collaboration between service providers, and more importantly, increasing collaboration at the community/municipal level. The recipients viewed the DTFP as a catalyst to introduce new or enhanced services and to enhance their treatment systems.

Of the 29 projects funded to date, many are in the early stages of implementation. However, projects have demonstrated early signs of progress towards results. While treatment projects are in the early stages of implementation, evidence to date indicates significant progress in establishing community partnerships and linkages in support of new and enhanced treatment services, and enhanced collaboration amongst P/Ts on national level activities such as the development, collection and reporting of national treatment indicators. Funded projects have already helped to produce a wider range of services by developing partnerships within the community, expanding hours of service, offering different locations when working with clients, and offering a range of activities to help attract youth to their services.

The DTFP Implementation Evaluation also found that collaboration is beginning to occur with the projects that are most mature. It also provides some early indication of an enhanced capacity to plan and deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations. In addition, partnerships are being formed to provide better services across communities and quite a few projects have started offering services at different times and locations in order to better reach at-risk youth.

Link 4:

During 2010-11, FNIHB's NADS-related investments continued to be consistent with the Treatment Action Plan goal of improving the quality, effectiveness and accessibility of on-reserve addictions services. In particular, NADS funding continued to be invested in:

  • Treatment centre re-profiling/modernization efforts aimed at strengthening and expanding NNADAP services vis-à-vis community needs and recognized service gaps (e.g., women, youth, and families). During 2010-11, nine centres re-oriented or expanded their services to meet population needs per the NADS guidelines. Since 2007, 33 treatment centres have re-focussed programming to be youth-specific (n = 4), offer family treatment (n = 5), and strengthen their capacity to address mental health issues and concurrent disorders (n = 24), including adapting services to the needs of illicit drug users;
  • Improving service quality by supporting treatment centres to become accredited with a recognized body. FNIHB is currently working toward a goal of achieving 100% accreditation by 2013. During 2010-11, six additional treatment centres became involved in the accreditation process. In total, 43 of 58 (74%) treatment centres were accredited in 2010-11, increasing from 37 (64%) in 2009-10;
  • Increasing the number of addictions treatment centre workers certified to 186 of 272 (68%). FNIHB is on course to meet the NADS target of 80% worker certification by 2013. FNIHB is continuing to work towards a goal of increasing the number of qualified addictions workers within the NNADAP system by supporting certified educational opportunities (e.g., training on treating illicit drug use) and providing financial incentives to workers to obtain and retain certification with a recognized national body;
  • Continued progress on the implementation of eight mental wellness teams across Canada (Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Atlantic Regions, including an Inuit-specific pilot in Labrador) in select First Nations and Inuit communities; and
  • Continued development of the NNADAP Renewal Process, an evidence-based review. NNADAP Renewal is an on-going, NADS-supported review of on-reserve addictions services that is being carried out in partnership with First Nations leadership and representative organizations. The aim of the process is to improve the quality, effectiveness and accessibility of on-reserve addictions services (per the NADS guidelines), with particular attention to the needs of youth, women, families and illicit drug users. This review will result in the development of a renewed framework for on-reserve addiction services by summer of 2011. In 2010-11, a draft of this framework was unanimously endorsed by First Nations leadership at the Assembly of First Nations Special Chief's Assembly on December 15, 2010. Implementation of the framework will be guided by the NNADAP Renewal Leadership Team–a national committee with broad, cross-Canada representation from First Nations treatment centres, communities, leadership, research, and a range of other key stakeholders and partners, which met four times during 2010-11.
Link 5:

Health Canada has three tools to measure its performance in preventing the diversion of precursor chemicals and controlled substances for illegal use: loss and theft reports, compliance inspections, and drug disposal requests. Licensed dealers must report incidents involving the loss or theft of controlled substances and precursor chemicals to Health Canada when they occur. In 2010-11, Health Canada received 7,418 loss and thefts reports, which represented a slight increase over the previous year. Reminders of the security requirements for licence holders and follow up visits by inspectors were conducted to monitor compliance to the Regulations. In 2010-11, Health Canada inspected 97% of its Class A licensed dealers and one licence was revoked. In addition, 75 targeted inspections were conducted of growers authorized under the Marihuana Medical Access Program.

Health Canada works with law enforcement partners to disrupt illicit drug production. When a drug is seized, law enforcement officers request Health Canada's authorization to dispose of it. In 2010-11, Health Canada processed 137,020 requests for disposal of seized controlled substances, which represented an increase of 3% over the previous year. This partnership with law enforcement has produced results that would not be possible without the synergy created by the National Anti-Drug Strategy.

Link 6:

DAS contributed to improved drug enforcement intelligence and evidence as the analytical capacity of evidences was increased with new personnel (2 analysts) added to laboratories. More specifically, DAS analyzed 121,346 suspected illicit drug exhibits submitted by enforcement officials, assisted in the shutdown and dismantling of 33 clandestine drug laboratories, and provided expert testimony in court. All certificates of analysis/reports were provided within the 60-day service standard or before the court date. As for the due date, considering the backlog that DAS was facing, rush analyses were undertaken upon the client's court dates so the certificates/reports were issued on time. Thus, to the Services' knowledge, no court cases were lost because of DAS delivery time.

DAS contributed to reduced health, safety and security risks associated with illicit drug production by assisting with the safe shutdown and dismantling of seized clandestine drug laboratories and by providing training to law enforcement officers and first respondents. Thirty-three laboratories were shut down with DAS assistance and 46 training sessions were delivered. The extent to which operations were safely dismantled was assessed by tracking the number and nature of injuries and/or environmental risk caused by unsafe handling of chemicals. There was only one minor injury reported in 2010-11 for clandestine laboratories where DAS provided assistance and no incident associated with dismantlement that would have had an environmental impact was reported to DAS.


Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
1.4 Health and Health Services Advances

Research on Drug Treatment Models

(Treatment Action Plan)

4.0 1.0 0.9 Link 1 Link 1
Total 4.0 1.0 0.9    

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

Improved knowledge translation with respect to treatment and understanding of the consequences of illicit drug use.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

Canadian Institutes of Health and Research (CIHR) have launched three funding opportunities for the purpose of contributing to meet the Intermediate and Long-term Outcomes of the Treatment Action Plan. A continuing increase in the number of applications suggests a higher visibility of the Initiative and a good research capacity in the area of illicit drug research. The funding results of these opportunities increased the total number of grants funded by CIHR for the initiative to 18 (three Research Team Grants (partial funding from the NADS), two Operating Grants, 11 Catalyst Grants, and two Knowledge Synthesis Grants).

CIHR also held a Substance Abuse Treatment and Prevention Initiative Workshop, attended by funded researchers, CIHR staff and federal government researchers and representatives. This workshop allowed researchers to present the results of their studies, and focus groups discussed the strategic direction that should be taken should the Initiative renewal be funded. These discussions also informed CIHR for the elaboration of its next five-year strategic plan.


Federal Partner: Department of Public Safety Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
3. Law Enforcement

a. National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation

(Enforcement Action Plan)

3.92 0.78 0.78 Link 1 Link 1
5. Crime Prevention

b. Crime Prevention Funding and Programming:

(Crime Prevention Action Fund)

(Prevention Action Plan)

20.0 10.6 16.1 Link 2
Link 3
Link 2
Link 3
8. Internal Services*   0.08 0.02 0.02 Link 4 Link 4
Total 24.0 11.4 16.9    

* For improved reporting, the financial table above reports Internal Services program activity (PA) separately, whereas this PA was included under Law Enforcement in the 2010-11 RPP. The total remains unchanged.

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies.

Link 2:

Reduced offending among targeted populations.

Link 3:

Effective evidence-based responses to substance use/abuse and crime-related issues in communities.

Link 4:

Support Services

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

The national coordination of the Enforcement Action Plan (EAP) was accomplished through the following activities:

  • Public Safety Canada led the Enforcement Action Plan Working Group (September 2010) and the EAP sub-working group on Storing and Disposition of Offence-Related Property, in partnership with Health Canada, in response to law enforcement concerns and discussions at the National Coordinating Committee on Organized Crime; and consulted and compiled EAP emerging issues for the NADS Policy Planning Retreat in February 2011.
  • Public Safety Canada hosted a two-day Emerging Issues Workshop in November 2010 for enforcement stakeholders to inform the Strategy; participated in the Synthetic Drug Initiative meetings; and coordinated input and participated in domestic and international fora to advance Canadian supply reduction policy objectives (e.g., United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs (March 2010), Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (November 2010, February 2011), the G8 Ministerial Meeting on Transatlantic Cocaine Trafficking (March 2011), Canada-Mexico security consultations (November 2010), Federal/Provincial/Territorial Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials – Drug Issues Working Group (April 2010, November 2010), Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) – Drug Abuse Committee meetings (May 2010, August 2010, November 2010).
  • Public Safety Canada appeared before the Senate Committee with respect to Bill S-10; advanced the development of guides and manuals in support of the Drug Endangered Children project through an agreement with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP); funded seven research and/or contributions initiatives in support of the Enforcement Action Plan; and supported the Minister of Public Safety through briefings related to emerging policy issues and meetings with stakeholders (e.g., the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, the Canadian Association of Police Boards, and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)) and with international counterparts (e.g., Ambassadors of Mexico, Japan, Paraguay, and Israel; the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, and Secretary of DHS).

Link 2:

Of the 21 NADS projects that have impact evaluations, all have reported positive changes in risk and protective factors that are known to lead to drug-related offending. Actual reductions in offending among the targeted populations are expected to occur in the longer term (5+ years). These results will be available for NADS projects that are part of an impact evaluation, including those that include a one year follow-up on youth after their participation in the program.

Link 3:

In 2010-11, $16.1 million of National Crime Prevention Centre funding has supported 60 active projects in 48 communities across the country, of which 17 were model programs, 30 promising practices, 12 innovative projects, and one knowledge transfer project. The evaluation of these projects contributes to an increasing knowledge base of effective crime prevention and, subsequently, to a broader implementation of evidence-based responses.

Link 4:

Support Services


Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
1.1.2.7

a. Drug and Organized Crime Awareness Services

(Prevention Action Plan)

15.1 3.0 2.0 Link 1
Link 2
Link 1
Link 2
3.5.2 Community and Youth Programs

b. National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program

(Treatment Action Plan)

3.4 0.8 0.5 Link 3 Link 3
1.1.2.9

c. Marijuana and Clandestine Lab Teams/Proceeds of Crime

(Enforcement Action Plan)

91.4 20.4 15.7 Link 4
Link 5
Link 6
Link 4
Link 5
Link 6
Total 109.9 24.2 18.2    

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

Increased awareness of the nature, extent and consequences of substance use/abuse within the school, workplace and Aboriginal communities and among youth, professionals and the general public through partnerships with internal and external departments.

Link 2:

Improved skills/competencies in the delivery of programs.

Link 3:

  • Increased police awareness of risk and protective factors of youth offenders and victims.
  • Increased community satisfaction with RCMP youth-related services.
  • Increased police awareness of community-based youth-serving resources and referral procedures.
  • Increased referrals to youth addictions treatment and intervention programs by police.

Link 4:

Expanded international and national cooperation to enhance our understanding and knowledge of drugs, related trends, and production and diversion methods.

Link 5:

Enhanced ability to detect and respond to the supply of illicit drugs and harmful substances.

Link 6:

Enhanced ability to improve tactical targeting, through an improved intelligence network.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

Throughout fiscal year 2010-2011, the Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Service (DOCAS) gave 4,273 awareness presentations reaching 78,900 youths, 28,377 parents, 5,624 Aboriginal youths, 2,981 Aboriginal parents, and 17,134 professionals. In sum, DOCAS reached out directly to 133,016 Canadians through its presentations on the Kids and Drugs Program, D.A.R.E., Drug Endangered Children, the Aboriginal Shield Program, the Drugs and Sport Program, the Drugs in the Workplace Program, and the Racing Against Drugs Program. In addition to the 4,273 community outreach presentations, a total of 110 DOCAS training sessions were provided to professionals, parents and students that also included the training of 1714 police officers. A total of 4,676 partnerships were established and maintained with other provincial, territorial, municipal, Aboriginal, and non-government partners as well as with other enforcement agencies/detachments. DOCAS coordinators distributed 150,141 publications throughout communities across Canada.

Link 2:

DOCAS continually explores new avenues that will afford it the ability to improve service delivery. Over the past fiscal year, DOCAS improved its service delivery in the following programs:

Kids and Drugs Program

There were 150 new facilitators trained from communities throughout Canada that can deliver the Kids and Drugs Program to parents.

Drug Endangered Children (DEC):

DEC is an early intervention initiative that seeks to stop the cycle of child abuse caused by the exposure to drug activity. It involves a resource guide which has now been translated into French. The guide is part and parcel to the training programs focused toward service delivery personnel, supervisors/managers, protocol partners, and the general public. The resource manual was completely revised with Canadian content. A facilitator guide was also finalized. DOCAS, in collaboration with Zebra Family Services and Alberta Health Services, held a DEC workshop for “train the trainers”, resulting in 24 new individuals accredited in delivering DEC programming. As a result, several subsequent DEC training sessions were held throughout Alberta (i.e., Calgary, Edmonton, Ft. McMurray, Lethbridge and Edson), preparing a total of 152 frontline personnel.

The Aboriginal Shield Program (ASP)

In November 2010, 38 DOCAS personnel, including community champions, were certified as ASP trainers in Edmonton, Alberta. This approach has enabled DOCAS to offer the ASP to a greater number of Aboriginal communities throughout Canada. The ASP reflects the three main Aboriginal cultures in Canada: Inuit, First Nations, and Métis.

Drug Awareness Officer Training (DAOT)

In June 2010, a five-day DAOT course was held in Halifax, Nova Scotia and attended by 31 participants from different police forces. In February 2011, the Quebec City DAOT workshop held in French resulted in the participation of 24 representatives of municipal police services and other enforcement agencies operating in the Greater Québec City area.

Link 3:

National Youth Intervention and Diversion (NYID) workshops were provided to two detachments in 2010-11. The workshops focused on risk and protective factors, police obligations under the Youth Criminal Justice Act to consider alternatives to charging, and the use of a pre-charge youth screening tool (YLS/CMI-SV) to assess the risk of youth offenders to reoffend. Workshops were extended to community agencies as well as local RCMP detachment members. An implementation review was completed in 2010-11 and results indicate that NYID workshops provided an opportunity for members to increase their awareness of community-based youth-serving agencies and referral options.

Early indications are that referrals have increased at NYIDP detachments with a dedicated youth worker to accept referrals from detachment members. The number of referrals by RCMP members at NYIDP detachments is being continuously tracked and changes over time will be more thoroughly assessed during the impact assessment.

Link 4:

Focused enforcement efforts are being used to address the synthetic drug and marihuana grow operation (MGO) problem in Canada. Working groups have been formed internally in order to interface on NADS-funded positions distributed across the organization. An external working group, including the RCMP, Health Canada, Canada Border Services Agency, Environment Canada, Revenue Canada, Public Safety Canada, Department of Justice Canada, Public Prosecution Service of Canada, and Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, has been formed to collaborate on the Synthetic Drug Initiative. This working group meets quarterly and focuses on providing operational support to each other. Initiatives such as Project Catalyst have grown from these quarterly meetings as well as the identification of gaps in policy and drug regulations. Based on this “gap analysis”, a separate working group has been formed, with Public Safety at the helm, which informs Health Canada officials responsible for Policy and Regulatory Affairs so it can consider making changes/additions to the Precursor Control Regulations, Rescheduling Amphetamine Type Stimulants, and updating destruction authorities for seized controlled substances and precursors to act and address the concerns of the RCMP.

The RCMP developed the Marihuana Grow Initiative (MGI) which, to a certain degree, is complementary to the Synthetic Drug Initiative. The MGI provides a roadmap to the Coordinated Marihuana Enforcement Teams (CMETs) and also to community partners, as law enforcement cannot solve this problem alone. It is an initiative based on three key components: enforcement, deterrence, and awareness. This initiative lays down a framework outlining the current issues (e.g., their roots and their evolution), the RCMP’s response to these issues, and its expectations based on performance measures already in place, affording a yardstick as to the success of the initiative.

The RCMP also assisted in international training initiatives through its partnership with Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) and offered two workshops in 2010-11. One training workshop encompassed general drug enforcement investigative techniques and was delivered in Mexico and the Dominican Republic. The other workshop was on synthetic drugs and chemical diversion and was delivered in El Salvador. This training focused on the safe handling and dismantling of clandestine drug laboratories. By conducting such capacity-building workshops in the Americas, the RCMP is effectively empowering foreign law enforcement officials to create opportunities to interdict illicit drugs and synthetic drug precursors destined for Canada.

Link 5:

There were 512 MGO seizures and 59 clandestine laboratory seizures made by the NADS teams in 2010-11. Regarding the MGOs, this resulted in the seizure of 274,798 plants and 304 kg of marihuana bud. For the clandestine lab operations, over 113 kg of methamphetamine and 73.9 kg of MDMA, along with 110,000 tablets of methamphetamine, 182 kg of Red Phosphorous and 43.5 liters of GHB/GBL mix, were seized by the NADS teams as part of their disruptions. Of the 59 clandestine labs dismantled in Canada, 28 were unique to the RCMP-funded teams.

Link 6:

Intelligence gathering about how organized crime groups operate, their sources for production material, their capacity to produce, and their networks (especially those that access international sources outside regulations) dramatically increased the RCMP’s ability to effectively mobilize resources and attain results. For example, the RCMP created an engagement strategy with Chinese authorities through the auspices of Project Steadfast that will afford an enhanced ability to exchange intelligence and information, thereby strengthening joint Chinese-Canadian operations. This relationship and intelligence-sharing opportunity will pay significant dividends in interdicting synthetic drug precursors and laboratory equipment destined for Canada. Negotiations towards a similar strategy are beginning with India, with a more concrete framework anticipated for Fall 2011.

Canada’s participation in the G8 Law Enforcement Projects Sub Group (Project MOLE) on the monitoring of laboratory equipment also assisted in the global prevention of these materials reaching organized crime groups producing synthetic drugs. The RCMP also participated in Project Synergy, a Europol-led project developing intelligence on precursors and laboratory equipment.


Federal Partner: Correctional Service Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
3.0 Community Supervision

Case Preparation and Supervision of provincial Offenders

(Enforcement Action Plan)

23.31 6.41 0.0 Link 1 Link 1
Total 23.31 6.41 0.0    

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

Timely case preparation; rate of offenders successfully reintegrated into the community.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

The program will become effective upon Royal Assent of proposed legislation related to mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug crimes (formerly Bill S-10).


Federal Partner: National Parole Board of Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions 4.4 1.3 0.0 Link 1 Link 1
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability 1.8 0.5 0.0 Link 2 Link 2
Internal Services   1.3 0.4 0.0 Support Programs  
Total 7.51 2.21 0.0    

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

Should the proposed legislation be passed by Parliament and receive Royal Assent this funding will provide the National Parole Board of Canada (NPB) the capacity for effective management of its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. NPB will collect information and report on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated as a result of new legislative provisions (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole).

Link 2:

Should the proposed legislation be passed by Parliament and receive Royal Assent this funding will provide the NPB the capacity for provision of information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings and individuals who seek access to the decision registry in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. In a similar manner, the NPB will report on the extent of involvement of victims and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by NPB.

Effective management of both these responsibilities will contribute to public safety and reinforce public confidence in the justice system.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 11

Link 21


Federal Partner: Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
1.1 Drug, Criminal Code, and terrorism prosecution program

a. Prosecution and prosecution -related services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

8.8 2.7 3.0 Link 1 Link 1

b. Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA

(Enforcement Action Plan)

33.51 TBD1 0.0 Link 2 Link 2
Internal Services

Enforcement Action Plan

1.1 0.2 0.4 Support Programs  
Total 43.4 2.9 3.4    

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) in response to the workload generated by the enhanced RCMP dedicated anti-drug teams and criminal intelligence and technical operations support staff.

Link 2:

Provision of prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations, and prosecution of drug charges under the CDSA resulting from the mandatory minimum penalties, subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

In 2010-11, the ODPP handled 28,275 litigation files dealing with drug production and distribution offences (pursuant to CDSA 5(1), 5(2), 6(1), 6(2), 7(1) and 7(2)). These include new files opened in 2010-11 (n = 14,742) as well as files carried over from previous fiscal years against which time has been recorded (n = 13,533). Of these, 24,438 included distribution offences, whereas 3,837 included production offences. Approximately 7.6% (or 2,158) of the total number of files included both production and distribution offences. Files are handled by staff prosecutors and Crown agents. Actual spending reflects in-house prosecution costs only since agent costs fall under the ODPP’s Drug Prosecution Fund.

Link 2:

The program will become effective upon Royal Assent of proposed legislation related to mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug crimes (formerly Bill S-10).


Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Risk Assessment

Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

4.7 1.2 1.3 Link 1
Link 2
Link 1-7
Enforcement

Border Intelligence, Precursor Chemical Diversion (BIPCD), Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

7.0 1.8 1.5 Link 3
Link 4
Link 5
Internal Services

Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

1.0 0.3 0.3 Link 6
Link 7
Total 12.7 3.3* 3.1    

* This figure includes 20% EBP and 13% PWGSC accommodation costs of $0.3M.

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

Increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illicit drug issues relative to the border.

Link 2:

Laboratory and Scientific Services Directorate (LSSD): Continuation of the original NADS plan with respect to additional sampling, analysis and increased use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry. Safe sampling tools still in development. Pilot tests anticipated in 2010-11.

Link 3:

Increase intelligence support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the strategy.

Link 4:

Improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the Strategy to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting and information-sharing related to illicit drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the Strategy as they relate to the border.

Link 5:

LSSD: Continuation of the original NADS plan with respect to additional sampling, analysis and increased use of mobile laboratory capabilities to assist in the detection of precursor chemicals at the ports of entry. Safe sampling tools still in development. Pilot tests anticipated in 2010-11.

Link 6:

Establish national coordination of efforts, leverage partner networks and activities to support risk assessment and enforcement activities.

Link 7:

Identify best practices domestically and abroad to strengthen border-related operations under the strategy.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

The Intelligence Development and Field Support Division assisted in the development of training for frontline officers in the identification, targeting, and safe sampling of precursor chemicals. It was felt that this has resulted in more effective targeting and an increase in the rates of examination, resulting in higher interdiction rates and subsequently more data for analysis and intelligence development.

Link 2:

The Laboratory and Scientific Services Directorate (LSSD) used the mobile laboratory in five operations, three of which dealt specifically with drug precursors. During these operations, more than 500 samples were analyzed with a number of resulting seizures, controlled deliveries, and two arrests. The Science and Engineering (S&E) Directorate analyzed over 3,200 samples of suspected contraband in which GBL, anthranilic acid, 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(methylamino)methyl] cyclopentanol (ketamine precursor), and 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene (pre-precursor to methamphetamine) were present, among others.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) saw significant amounts of synthetic cannabinoids such as JWH-018, JWH-250, CP47, 497, etc. These continued to be stopped by frontline border services officers and analyzed by the S&E Lab. Piperazines, phenethylamines and other non-controlled substances were also stopped.

In 2010-11, pilot tests occurred in two regions related to sampling tools as a means to see how they worked operationally. Ongoing discussions continue with the program areas regarding the usability of these tools.

Link 3:

The creation of a formalized Intelligence Network provided Intelligence Officers a level of comfort in knowing exactly who to contact when they need to acquire or share information regarding precursor chemicals. The constant flow of communication within CBSA and between partners assisted in the identification of entities involved in the illicit trade and helped provide a national and international snapshot of which organized crime groups operate in which region and in what chemicals.

Link 4:

The NADS has contributed to a stronger relationship between the CBSA, RCMP and international customs organizations by facilitating a flow of communication through Project Catalyst, the Precursor Chemical Workshop, and the formal Precursor Chemical Intelligence Network. These activities contributed to improved intelligence development for all parties, resulting in better identification of entities involved in the criminal importation and export of precursor chemicals and synthetic drugs, leading to higher rates of interdiction, arrests, prosecutions, and the eventual disruption of organized operations.

Link 5:

Same as Link 2 results.

Link 6:

The creation of a formal Precursor Chemical Intelligence Network throughout the CBSA, which includes the identification of domestic and international partners. Stronger partnerships with other law enforcement and other agency partners, both internationally and domestically, through the three-day Precursor Chemical Workshop that included all domestic and many international participants.

Link 7:

A CBSA Headquarters Intelligence-led joint project with the RCMP has been developed over the past year in support of the CBSA Precursor Chemical Diversion Project and the RCMP Synthetic Drug Initiative, both very important but complementary initiatives under the NADS. This national project combined the efforts of CBSA and RCMP intelligence and enforcement sections in identifying, targeting, interdicting, and disrupting criminal organizations involved in the importation of precursor chemicals being used in the manufacture of illicit synthetic drugs meant for both the domestic and international marketplace. One of the purposes of the joint project was to conduct a proof of concept to determine the effectiveness of new CBSA targeting initiatives to identify a new modus operandi used primarily in the commercial stream, in order to intercept and seize illicit goods being imported using this method and to identify the persons and groups involved.


Federal Partner: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
1.2 Diplomacy and Advocacy - International Operations and Programs

Annual Contributions to UNODC and CICAD

(Enforcement Action Plan)

4.5 0.9 0.9 Link 1
Link 2
Link 1
Link 2
Total 4.5 0.9 0.9    

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

Improved capacity of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs and international crime at the global level.

Link 2:

Improved capacity of the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs in the Americas.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

Improved capacity of UNODC to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs and international crime at the global level; and improved capacity of CICAD to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs in the Americas.

Link 2:

DFAIT successfully managed the projects involving the provision of training, equipment, technical and legal expertise resulting in increased capacity of beneficiary states and governments to prevent and combat international crime and drugs. Capacity building activities addressed the supply of illicit drugs and also responded to Canadian policy priorities.


Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
4. Reporting Compliance

Special Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)

4.2 0.8 0.8 Link 1 Link 1
Total 4.2 0.8 0.8    

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

15 audits of MGOs and clandestine laboratories resulting in over $2,500,000 of federal taxes.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

  • 17 audits that incorporated adjustments under the Income Tax Act and Excise Tax Act (GST/HST) and 12 income tax audits for a total of 29 completed compliance actions.
  • The results from the above noted compliance actions were as follows:
    • Total unreported income that was assessed amounted to $9,848,934;
    • Total federal taxes reassessed was $2,365,947; and
    • Total GST/HST reassessed totalled $303,353.

Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
1.7 Specialized Programs and Services

Forensic Accounting Management Group

(Enforcement Action Plan)

1.6 0.4 0.4 Link 1 Link 1
Total 1.6* 0.4** 0.4**    

* This figure includes $101,240 in accommodation premiums.

** This figure includes $39,277 in EBP and $25,530 in accommodation premiums.

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

Increased operational capacity to provide additional forensic accounting services to law enforcement agencies. Forensic accounting services assist law enforcement and prosecution agencies in determining whether the assets of suspects were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Government of Canada to seize the assets and remove the financial incentive for engaging in criminal activities.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

The Forensic Accounting Management Group (FAMG) provided specialized forensic accounting services and analysis to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police on proceeds of crime investigations, including investigations related to the importation, exportation, production, trafficking and possession of controlled drugs and substances.


Federal Partner: Financial Transactions and Analysis Centre of Canada

Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 2010-11 ($ millions)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
2004113 Detection and deterrence of money laundering and terrorist financing

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

(Enforcement Action Plan)

2.5 0.8 0.8 Link 1 Link 1
Total 2.5 0.8* 0.8*    

* Planned and Actual Spending include employee benefit plan figures.

Expected Results for 2010–11:

Link 1:

  • Law enforcement and intelligence agencies receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.
  • Enhanced compliance in high-risk reporting entity sectors.

Results Achieved in 2010–11:

Link 1:

In 2010-11, the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) disclosed a total of 769 cases to law enforcement, including 199 unique cases that related to at least one drug-related offence, a modest increase from the 190 unique drug-related disclosures made in 2009-10. A breakdown between distribution and production of various types of drugs is provided in the following table (please note that the total does not equal 199 as one case can be related to multiple drug offenses):

Drug-Related Disclosures Number of Cases
Distribution - Cocaine

55

Distribution - Hashish (Cannabis Resin)

2

Distribution - Heroin

5

Distribution - Marihuana

30

Distribution - MDMA (Ecstasy)

9

Distribution - Methamphetamine

5

Distribution - Synthetic Drugs

3

Distribution - Khat

1

Distribution - Unspecified

93

Production - Cocaine

2

Production - Hashish (Cannabis Resin)

1

Production - Heroin

1

Production - Marihuana

41

Production - MDMA (Ecstasy)

3

Production - Methamphetamine

4

Production - Synthetic Drugs

3

Production - Opium

1

Production - Unspecified

5

It is important to note that the predicate offences (drug-related) were determined through a manual review of FINTRAC disclosures and that some cases were not identified as drug-related where there was insufficient context provided by investigators or reports to enable the determination of the predicate offence.

FINTRAC’s Financial Analysis and Disclosures Directorate (FADD) is organized into work units that focus on specific regions of the country. This allows FINTRAC to enhance support to law enforcement by improving cooperation, building stronger relationships, and more easily discussing our partners’ priorities. Having a solid understanding of the operational and investigative priorities of our partners allows FADD analysts to focus on cases of the greatest importance to law enforcement, including cases that should have the largest impact. NADS funding is utilized to enhance that support and relationship building with law enforcement, as well as to continue focusing resources on case analysis pertaining to the drug-related priorities of our partners. This approach, and the NADS funding received to date, has been effective as evidenced by the fact that over 25% of FINTRAC case disclosures made in 2010-11 relate to suspicions of money laundering or terrorist financing where the predicate offence is believed to be drug distribution or production.


($ millions)

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11 Total Actual Spending for All Federal Partners for 2010-11
588.9 136.0 115.6

Comments on Variances:

Health Canada

Substance Use and Abuse: The $13.4M variance between the planned spending of $30.7M and actual spending of $17.3M is due to two items. Health Canada is exploring options to retain $10.9M to achieve the desired program objectives over the next two fiscal years. Also, $2.5M was reallocated to the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program and the Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (See Links 2 and 4).

First Nations and Inuit Health Mental Health Addictions: Expenditures increased by $2.2M as a result of Regions and Programs Branch's lapsing of NADS funding from DTFP (see Link 3). FNIHB was able to offset a portion of the lapse by using the funds in support of major repairs and maintenance of NNADAP treatment centres.

Department of Public Safety Canada

The planned spending estimate for 2010-11, as reported in the Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP), was based on approved NADS projects. Subsequently, during the fiscal year, additional projects were developed and approved resulting in a higher actual spending than anticipated ($5.5M).

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information:

Gillian Blackell
A/Director General and General Counsel
Youth Justice and Strategic Initiatives Section
Department of Justice Canada
(613) 954-3233
gblackel@justice.gc.ca


1 This funding to implement mandatory minimum penalties (MMPs) for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.


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Environment Canada

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Canadian Group on Earth Observations is a collection of federal departments participating in the international Group on Earth Observations (GEO).

Name of Lead Department(s): Environment Canada is the lead department by virtue of the identification of the ADM of the Meteorological Service of Canada as the GEO Principal.

Lead Department Program Activity: Canadians are equipped to make informed decisions on changing weather, water and climate conditions.

Start Date: July 2003. There are no dedicated funds; however, this initiative is funded from existing resource envelope (A-Base).

End Date: Ongoing.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): Provided through existing resource envelope and in-kind contributions from federal departments.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The GEO is seeking to implement the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), which will allow free and open access to Earth observations for decision- and policy-makers in all countries.  In so doing, users such as Environment Canada and other participating departments will be better able to more accurately predict the future state of planet Earth and better warn citizens of the onset of hazardous conditions.  See the GEO website for more details at http://www.earthobservations.org/.

Shared Outcome(s)

  • Enhancing access to Global Earth Observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements;
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international; and
  • Improving evidence-based decision-making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations.

Governance Structure(s): Coordination is achieved through the ADM Steering Committee, the DG‑level Interdepartmental Coordinating Committee (ICC) and ad hoc working-level committees and task groups.

Performance Highlights:

($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start date to end date) 2010-2011
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
1 Environment Canada PA1 Weather and environmental services for Canadians a. Meteorological Service of Canada Not available $150,000 salary
$75,000 O&M
$38,000 G&C
$25,000 in-kind
$100,000 salary
$50,000 O&M
$88,000 G&C
$50,000 in-kind
See below See below
2 Natural Resources Canada PA1 N/A a. Earth Sciences Sector Not available Not available Not available See below See below
b. Canadian Forest Service Not available Not available Not available See below See below
3 Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada PA1 N/A a. Agri-Environment Services Branch Not available $20,000
In-kind TBD
Not available See below See below
b. Research Branch Not available $20,000
In-kind TBD
Not available See below See below
4 Canadian Space Agency PA1 N/A a. Earth Observations Not available $40,000
In-kind TBD
Not available See below See below
5 Fisheries and Oceans Canada PA1 N/A a. Science and Technology Not available Not available Not available See below See below
6 Health Canada PA1 N/A a. Radiation Not available Not available Not available See below See below
7 Statistics Canada PA1 N/A a. Agriculture Not available Not available Not available See below See below
8 Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada PA1 N/A a Environment Not available Not available Not available See below See below
9 National Defence PA1 N/A a. Meteorology and Oceanography Not available Not available Not available See below See below
Total          

Comments on Variances: In general, Environment Canada expenditures in terms of salary and O&M for GEO were reduced as a result of limited capacity being redirected to other priorities. In terms of grants and contributions, in the past DFAIT made a contribution of $50K to GEO, which the department stopped doing a couple of years ago. Environment Canada has been able to find room in its grants and contributions budget to continue to keep the Canadian contribution at $88K since that time.

Expected Results:

 Environment Canada:

  • Bilateral projects and activities with United States, including international testbeds and research projects
  • Coordination of Canadian inputs and positions for international 2010 GEO Ministerial Summit in China
  • CGEO departments are engaged in Earth observation data issues and policy development

Results Achieved in 2010–2011:

 Environment Canada:

  • The binational Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS), was accepted as an international GEO participating organization to advance monitoring and data sharing of Earth observation data in the Great Lakes Basin
  • Progress was achieved in development and implementation of activities for binational testbed and research projects for better understanding of the water cycle and better predictions of drought, flood and water quality conditions
  • Canada was actively engaged in achieving significant outcomes from the 2010 GEO Ministerial Summit and Plenary meeting in Beijing, China, November 3–5
  • Canada is contributing and leading global initiatives in  areas including forest carbon tracking (FCT), the Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM), the GEO Monitoring and Evaluation Working Group, and the first and second evaluations of GEO and GEOSS progress and results
  • High-level interdepartmental initiatives were established to engage and align Earth observation data issues and policy development in line with Government of Canada Open Data initiatives

Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact Information:

Michael Crowe
Director, Strategic Integration
Meteorological Service of Canada
Environment Canada
141 Laurier Ave. W.,
Ottawa, ON  K1A 0H3
613-943-5580



Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), approved March 2005 (followed from the two-year Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP)).

Name of Lead Department(s): Environment Canada and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Lead Department Program Activity: Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized (EC); Management Policy Development and Oversight (TBS).

Start Date: The FCSAP has been in effect since April 2005. Former two-year FCSAAP program commenced April 2003.

End Date: The FCSAP is expected to continue until 2020. However, the current policy approval ended in March 31, 2011.

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $1,775.5 M (including PWGSC accommodations charges) to March 31, 2011.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) provides a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites having the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2004, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $3.5 billion. Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial departments, the overall program is administered jointly by Environment Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Shared Outcome(s): Reduce federal financial liability and risks to human health and the environment, including fish habitat. Increase public confidence in the overall management of federal real property through the effective risk management or remediation of individual federal contaminated sites.

Governance Structure(s): The Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by the Director Generals’ Committee, the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.

Performance Highlights: Fiscal year 2010–2011 represented the second year of FCSAP accelerated activities under Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP). Along with ongoing assessment and remediation activities undertaken during the year by FCSAP partners, Environment Canada developed, in collaboration with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and 16 other participating federal entities, a proposal seeking program and policy approval for the FCSAP for the next 5 years. Several key program aspects and tools were developed during 2010–2011 to improve decision making, performance measurement and program reporting.

($ dollars) (Totals may not add due to rounding)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start date to end date) 2010-2011
Planned Spending1 Actual Spending1,2 Expected Results Results Achieved
Agriculture and Agri-
FoodCanada
Enterprise Activities Asset Management $5,465,649 1,282,000 1,168,637 See below
Canada Border Services Agency Corporate Management and Direction Infra-
structure and Environment
$1,620,212 $0 $0 NA
Canadian Food Inspection Agency N/A N/A $183,783 $0 $0 NA
Correctional Service Canada Internal Services Facilities/
Asset Management Services
$10,368,090 $4,867,669 $3,215,092 See below
Environ-
ment Canada
Threats to Canadians and their environment from pollution are minimized Asset Remediation and Disposal $48,874,994 $16,213,037 $12,110,733 Custodian
Contamina-
ted Sites
$44,900,126 $6,640,375 $5,804,727 Secretariat and Expert Support
Subtotal $93,775,120 $22,853,412 $17,915,460  
Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Internal Services Contamina-
ted Sites – FCSAP projects
$78,437,194 $22,277,365 $22,202,165 Custodian
FCSAP Expert Support $21,665,285 $3,335,637 $3,336,166 Expert Support
Subtotal $100,102,479 $25,613,002 $25,538,331  
Health Canada First Nations and Inuit Health First Nations and Inuit Health Protection $7,445,162 $536,000 $195,792 Custodian
Contamina-
ted Sites
Healthy Environ-
ments Consumer Safety Branch
$43,721,890 $6,689,725 $6,686,888 Expert Support
Subtotal $51,167,052 $7,225,725 $6,882,680  
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Develop-
ment Canada
Responsible Federal Stewardship Contamina-
ted Sites Management Program
$148,254,393 $48,563,181 $51,706,447 See below
Northern Land and Resources Contamina-
ted Sites
$685,536,311 $139,912,237 $139,617,268 See below.
Subtotal $833,790,704 $188,475,418 $191,323,715  
Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorpo-
rated
Management of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infra-
structure, and properties in the Montréal area
N/A $955,672 $293,000 $0 See below
Marine Atlantic Inc. Corporate Management FCSAP (projects) $120,000 $70,000 $0 See below
National Capital Commission Real Asset Management Land and real asset management $8,600,052 $3,620,000 $3,535,028 See below
National Defence Environ-
mental Protection and Stewardship
A Defence Contamina-
ted Sites Management Plan in which funding is provided to clean up worst sites first
$380,070,345 $61,064,529 $55,943,233 See below
National Research Council of Canada Internal Services Environ-
mental Operations
$4,835,000 $2,455,000 $2,533,151 See below
Natural Resources Canada Corporate Management The provision of relevant and timely policy analysis and advice for decision making on government priorities and departmental responsi-
bilities
$27,915,807 $8,970,000 $9,239,527 See below
Parks Canada Conserve Heritage Resources Active Management and Restoration $38,814,369 $16,589,822 $18,344,878 See below
Public Works and Government Services Canada Federal Accommoda-
tion and Holdings
FCSAP (projects) $26,360,173 $5,203,785 $14,410,745 See below
FCSAP (expert services) $5,450,000 $900,000 $879,824 See below
Subtotal $31,810,173 $6,103,785 $15,290,569  
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Corporate Infra-
structure / Internal Services
FCSAP (projects) $23,100,214 $4,500,500 $3,309,699 See below
Transport Canada Sustainable Transporta-
tion Development and the Environment
Environ-
mental Programs
$150,758,925 $62,266,540 $28,439,600 See below
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Management Policy Development and Oversight Assets and Acquired Services $2,747,200 $480,229 $478,330 See below
Totals for All Federal Partners $1,766,200,846 $416,730,631 $383,157,930  

1Excluding PWGSC accommodations charges.
2Actual Spending: Estimate based on information provided by custodians in summer 2011. Program reporting for 2010–2011 will not be finalized before fall 2011.

Expected Results1 and Results Achieved for each Federal Partner:

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
    • Expected Results:
      • Completion of 34 assessment projects and 11 remediation and risk management projects.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Completion of 25 assessment projects and advancement of 3 remediation projects.
  • Correctional Service Canada
    • Expected Results:
      • Sites being risk-managed: 3
      • Sites being remediated (multi-year): 5
      • Remediations expected to be completed: 3
      • Site assessments: 15
    • Results Achieved:
      • Sites being risk-managed: 0
      • Sites being remediated (multi-year): 5
      • Remediations expected to be completed: 3
      • Site assessments: 82
  • Environment Canada – Custodian
    • Expected Results:
      • Implementation of 9 remediation projects and approximately 42 assessment projects.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Implementation of 17 remediation projects and 46 assessment projects.
  • Environment Canada – Secretariat
    • Expected Results:
      • In cooperation with the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, supports the DG and ADM Steering committees and the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG); manages project selection process; coordinates funding and reporting processes; manages data and program communications; evaluates program performance; and oversees audit and evaluation. In 2010–2011 the Secretariat will also lead the development of the 5-year program renewal proposal.
    • Results Achieved:
      1. Developed a proposal seeking program and policy approval.
      2. Initiated the development of the detailed proposal required to seek funding approval for the next five years of the program.
      3. Prepared annual funding documents for Ministerial approval.
      4. Developed and coordinated the 2010–2011 project submission process.
      5. Provided ongoing Secretariat support to the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the Federal Contaminated Sites Steering Committees.
      6. Implemented the second year of accelerated FCSAP activities under Canada's Economic Action Plan (CEAP).
  • Environment Canada – Expert Support
    • Expected Results:
      • Provides to custodians scientific and technical advice with respect to ecological risks at federal contaminated sites such that the remediation/risk management strategies implemented at these sites will mitigate or reduce these risks; provides supplemental ecological risk assessment tools, as well as a tool to measure ecological risk reduction resulting from remediation/risk management project implementation.
    • Results Achieved:
      1. Provided scientifically sound guidance and expert advice to 19 custodial departments for the management of their sites so that risk to the environment is reduced or minimized.
      2. Reviewed the site classification for more than 160 projects to ensure that remediation/risk management projects are eligible for funding.
      3. Developed and provided training to custodians on the National Classification System and the FCSAP Aquatic Site Classification System to assist in the prioritization of their sites and for making decisions on remediation/risk management of their sites.
      4. Partially developed the Tool for Risk Assessment Validation and the Site Closure Reporting Tool to assist custodians in evaluating the reduction of risk at their sites where remediation/risk management activities are being completed and for closing sites.
      5. Developed a guidance document entitled FCSAP Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) Guidance for use by custodians in conducting ecological risk assessment at their contaminated sites.
      6. Finalized two technical guidance documents (Toxicity Testing and Toxicity Reference Values) to supplement the FCSAP Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance and to be used for toxicity testing and for selecting toxicity reference values when conducting an ERA at contaminated sites.
      7. Developed the Framework for addressing and managing aquatic contaminated sites under FCSA with Fisheries and Oceans Canada to ensure a nationally consistent approach to decision making for assessing and managing aquatic contaminated sites funded by FCSAP.
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) – Custodian
    • Expected Results:
      • 719 baseline assessment projects
      • 674 accelerated assessment projects
      • 117 baseline remediation/risk management projects
      • 37 accelerated remediation/risk management projects
    • Results Achieved:
      • 415 baseline assessment projects
      • 487 accelerated assessment projects
      • 129 baseline remediation/risk management projects
      • 29 accelerated remediation/risk management projects
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) – Expert Support
    • Expected Results:
      • Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the management of federal contaminated sites that may be impacting, or have the potential to impact, fish or fish habitat.
      • Development of guidance material and provision of training on the management of FCSAP Aquatic Sites to custodial organizations (e.g. the Aquatic Sites Classification System and Aquatic Sites Framework).
      • Review of project submissions to ensure that the potential impacts to fish and fish habitat have been appropriately considered.
      • Review and evaluation of FCSAP projects to ascertain if, and to what degree, the risk to fish and fish habitat has been reduced as a result of custodial actions.
    • Results Achieved:
      • DFO Expert Support provided technical and expert advice to custodians on issues and questions related to risks to fish and fish habitat (e.g. on assessment, remediation/risk management and monitoring plans). Further, in collaboration with the Aquatic Sites Working Group, DFO Expert Support co-led the rollout of and provision of training on the FCSAP Aquatic Sites Classification System and the Aquatic Sites Contaminated Sites Management Framework. As well, DFO Science conducted 5 targeted research projects and 2 literature reviews related to the impacts that contaminated sites pose to fish and fish habitat.
  • Health Canada – Custodian
    • Expected Results:
      • To complete remediation at Kasabonika and Moose Factory communities and also undertake remediation at the communities of Lansdowne House and Summer Beaver.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Remediation proceeded at one site: Moose Factory Hospital.
  • Health Canada – Expert Support
    • Expected Results:
      • Service delivery to federal custodial departments with respect to the provision of guidance, training and advice on human health risk assessment and public involvement; peer review of human health risk assessments conducted for federal contaminated sites; participation in interdepartmental regional working groups and input to public involvement plans and remedial action plans on a site-by-site basis; assistance to custodial departments in the application of the Risk Reduction Metric on a site-by-site basis; publication of national guidance documents on the conduct of human health risk assessments at federal sites; support for scientific research to address data gaps on issues that influence exposure at contaminated sites; toxicological evaluations of toxic substances found at federal contaminated sites; development of scientific criteria documents to support new or revised CCME soil quality guidelines that protect human health.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Provided expert advice and training on human health risk assessments, risk management and public involvement to custodial departments under the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP). Conducted site visits and reviewed site related documents submitted under the FCSAP program.
      • HC provided assistance to custodial departments in the application of the Risk Reduction Metric on a site-by-site basis.
      • Developed soil quality guidelines (SQG) and initiated protocol development for indoor dust and sediment.
      • Developed guidance documents - 1) human health risk assessment guidance including preliminary and detailed risk assessment, vapour intrusion, radiological, toxicity reference values (TRVs), peer review checklists, supplemental air guidance, remediation, country foods, amortization, model statement of work for risk assessment; 2) public involvement; and 3) site investigation. Most of the documents are in the final stages of publication.
      • Supported research in the areas of bioaccessability / bioavailability and other studies directly applicable to guideline development, human health risk assessment and risk management of contaminated sites in Canada.
      • Reviewed projects and site submissions in order to determine the eligibility for funding.
  • Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada – Indian and Inuit Affairs
    • Expected Results:
      • The financial liability associated with high- and medium-risk contaminated sites on reserve lands and lands under Indian and Inuit Affairs jurisdiction will be reduced by 15% from April 1, 2010 baseline levels.
    • Results Achieved:
      • The financial liability associated with high- and medium-risk contaminated sites on reserve lands and lands under Indian and Inuit Affairs jurisdiction will be reduced by 9.46% from April 1, 2010 baseline levels.
  • Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada – Northern Affairs
    • Expected Results:
      • Phase I/II environmental site assessment (ESA) activity undertaken at 264 sites.
      • Phase III ESA activity undertaken at 35 sites.
      • Remediation activity undertaken at 89 sites.
      • Ongoing risk management activity and/or long-term monitoring at 9 sites.
      • The completion of 22 priority contaminated sites by fiscal year-end.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Phase I/II environmental site assessment (ESA) activity undertaken at 260 sites.
      • Phase III ESA activity undertaken at 24 sites.
      • Remediation activity undertaken at 21 sites.
      • Ongoing risk management activity and/or long-term monitoring at 9 sites.
      • The completion of 27 priority contaminated sites by fiscal year-end (12 in 2010–2011).
  • Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated
    • Expected Results:
      • Complete remediation/risk management strategy for 1 project.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Remediation strategy was established.
  • Marine Atlantic Inc.
    • Expected Results:
      • To have the environmental site assessment completed and a remediation and risk management plan initiated for 1 project (1 site).
    • Results Achieved:
      • RFP was awarded to have an environmental remedial action plan developed for the Bar Harbor Facility but due to the timeline required to complete the RFP, the project was not initiated in time for the 2010–2011 budget.
  • National Capital Commission
    • Expected Results:
      • Conduct 63 site assessments and 7 remediation projects.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Conducted 28 site assessments and 5 remediation projects.
  • National Defence
    • Expected Results:
      • In 2010–2011, 65 more sites will be under remediation or under risk management and 19 suspected sites will have been assessed and will have completed step 3 of the Federal Approach to Contaminated Sites (10-step process).
      • The Department’s current Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS) includes a target for a contaminated sites year-over-year reduction in liabilities of 7% per year.
    • Results Achieved:
      • In 2010–2011, 32 more sites were under remediation/risk management; 42 suspected sites were assessed, and step 3 of the Federal Approach to Contaminated Sites (10-step process) was completed.
      • The liability reduction in fiscal year 2010–2011 is 16.1%.
  • National Research Council of Canada
    • Expected Results:
      • Completion of soil remediation projects at NRC’s two existing registered contaminated sites and completion of assessment projects at 5 other NRC sites.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Completion of soil remediation projects at 4 NRC contaminated sites and completion of assessment projects at 7 other NRC sites.
  • Natural Resources Canada
    • Expected Results:
      • Remediation and risk management for 2 projects (3 sites).
      • Assessment of approximately 6 sites.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Remediation of 2 contaminated sites (2 projects).
      • Five environmental site assessments and additional groundwater sampling events at 3 individual sites, supplementing historical environmental site assessments.
  • Parks Canada
    • Expected Results:
      • Twenty-five contaminated site assessment projects, comprising 61 sites, are planned for 2010–2011.
      • Fifty contaminated site remediation/risk management projects, comprising 57 sites, are planned for 2010–2011.
    • Results Achieved:
      • A total of 63 contaminated site assessment projects, comprising 137 sites, were undertaken in 2010–2011.
      • Fifty-one contaminated site remediation/risk management projects, comprising 78 sites, were carried out in 2010–2011.
  • Public Works and Government Services Canada – Custodian
    • Expected Results:
      • The reduction of the Department’s financial liability associated with contaminated sites, as well as the reduction of associated risks to human health and the environment.
    • Results Achieved:
      • The Department’s financial liability associated with contaminated sites was reduced, as well as the associated risks to human health and the environment.
  • Public Works and Government Services Canada – Expert Support
    • Expected Results:
      • The development of project management tools and best practices, to assist with successful implementation of remediation projects by custodial departments. thus allowing other departments to achieve their objectives.
      • The collection and sharing of information on innovative technologies to promote their use.
      • Liaison with the environmental industry to ensure that industry members are aware of future federal demand and can build adequate capacity to respond.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Project management tools and best practices were developed to assist with successful implementation of remediation projects by custodial departments, thus allowing other departments to achieve their objectives.
      • Information on innovative technologies was collected and shared with federal custodians to promote their use.
      • Demand forecast reports were shared with the environmental industry to provide awareness of future federal demand so that the private sector could ensure adequate capacity to respond.
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
    • Expected Results:
      • The RCMP plans to complete 23 remediation sites and 6 risk management sites, and to assess 154 sites.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Remediation work was performed at 15 sites and 144 assessments were performed.
  • Transport Canada
    • Expected Results:
      • Transport Canada will undertake 4 accelerated site assessments and 22 accelerated remediation projects in 2010–2011. In addition, 3 baseline site assessments and 15 baseline remediation projects will be undertaken.
    • Results Achieved:
      • Transport Canada undertook 5 accelerated site assessments and 20 accelerated remediation projects in 2010–2011. In addition, 11 baseline assessment and 21 baseline remediation projects were undertaken.
  • Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
    • Expected Results:
      • Ensures consistency with Treasury Board policies on management of federal contaminated sites, reviews financial aspects of proposals, administers the fund, advises Environment Canada on the monitoring of government-wide progress, maintains the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory and coordinates planning for the 2010 Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop, to be held in Montréal, Quebec from May 10–13, 2010.
    • Results Achieved:
      1. Supported the Environment Canada FCSAP Secretariat and custodians to ensure that implementation of the second year of accelerated FCSAP activities under Canada’s Economic Action Plan were consistent with Treasury Board policies on management of federal contaminated sites.
      2. Supported Environment Canada in the development of the proposal for program renewal for presentation to Cabinet and Treasury Board in 2011, including advising on progress achieved in Phase I of FCSAP.
      3. Reviewed financial aspects of proposals and administered the FCSAP fund.
      4. Maintained the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory.
      5. Delivered the May 2010 Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop in Montréal.

1 Expected Results: Note that custodians have flexibility with respect to activities undertaken and often the number of sites actually worked on will vary from what was planned due to unforeseen delays (weather, difficult access to remote locations, etc.) or changes in custodian priorities.

Comments on Variances:

For the program as a whole, $12.4 M was reprofiled or carried forward and $37.8 M was lapsed. See below for details.

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
    • The estimated actual spending for 2010–2011 differs from the planned spending as a result of a minor lapse in project dollars ($2.8 K) resulting from a change in project priorities and projects coming in under budget. The anticipated number of remediation projects had considerable uncertainty and was contingent on results of forthcoming assessment projects. As a result of additional assessment work at one of AAFC's priority sites that identified additional contamination, the majority of remediation funds were redirected from smaller projects to this high-priority project.
  • Correctional Service Canada
    • $1.4 M and $1 M was transferred via Supplementary Estimates (B) to PWGSC and to NRC. Also $2.04 M was carried into 2010–2011 and $1.29 M was carried forward into 2011–2012. $0.5 K was lapsed.
  • Environment Canada
    • Custodian
      • Actual spending for one of the major projects was less than planned. $3.527 M has been reprofiled for this project. Funding and resources were available to carry out more projects than planned. $575 K was lapsed.
    • Secretariat and Expert Support
      • $836 K was lapsed from the program as a result of delays in completion of contracts due in large part to the significant workload of the FCSAP Secretariat during the year in preparing documentation to secure program renewal and work required to support program commitments and reporting under Canada's Economic Action Plan.
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    • Custodian
      • $37.5 K of the variance of $75,200 is attributable to the Employee Benefit Program (EBP) conversion penalty. The remaining $37.7 K was lapsed.
      • The expected results for 2010–2011 originated from the 2009–2010 Treasury Board submission, which was developed at the end of fiscal year 2008–2009. Since these projections, the FCSAP program has changed significantly, including the introduction of the 2-year accelerated Economic Action Plan program, resource allocation and the ability to move FCSAP projects from baseline to accelerated and vice versa. The reason for the decrease in the number of projects is that the projects going forward have higher costs, i.e. assessments scheduled for 2010–2011 have higher costs then the original Treasury Board submission. It is important to note that all FCSAP spending and projects were undertaken in accordance with FCSAP program requirements.
  • Health Canada
    • Discrepancy of $2.8 K surplus (lapsed).
  • Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
    • Responsible Federal Stewardship
      • Total FCSAP Allocations for 2010–2011 were: $52.7 M; Reprofiled from 2009–2010 to 2010–2011: $1.8 M; Cash-managed from 2009–2010 to 2010–2011: $2.3 M; Cash-managed from 2010–2011 to 2011–2012: $711 K: Lapsed: $292 K.
      • The total reduction of our liabilities in dollar amounts surpassed any previous year ($29.6 M); however, due to some changes in our liability calculations that helped make them more robust, we did not meet our percentage decrease. The expected result was determined prior to the 2010–2011 liability exercise, and considering the unexpectedly high increase in our liabilities (from $142 M to $312 M) between the 2009–2010 and the 2010–2011 liability reports, our future expected results will be re-evaluated to be in line with the change in our liabilities and the change in our funding.
    • Northern Land and Resources
      • The NCSP had an additional $16.5 M of reprofiled funds and internal reallocations of $6.7 M. The program expended $139.6 M on projects and program management. $7.5 M has been reprofiled to 2011–2012, and $2.6 M was lapsed by the program.
      • The statement "Remediation activity undertaken at 89 sites" under "Expected Results for 2010–2011" is incorrect. AANDC NAO only has a total of 79 class 1 and 2 sites, 15 of which already had completed remediation activities prior to the 2010–2011 fiscal year, and AANDC NAO was not planning on working on all its remaining class 1 and 2 sites.
  • Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated
    • Financing was taken from regular parliamentary appropriation instead of FCSAP. $205 K was carried forward to 2011–2012. $88 K was lapsed.
  • Marine Atlantic Inc.
    • Due to the timeline required to complete the RFP, the project was not initiated in time for the 2010–2011 budget. $70 K was lapsed.
  • National Capital Commission
    • Objective presented in column B of this document is on 2 years: 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. Expected Results for 2010–2011 were: Conduct 35 site assessments and 5 remediation projects. $85 K was lapsed.
  • National Defence
    • $5.1 M was lapsed. Because of short field season and lack of resources, fewer sites were under remediation/risk management than planned. The increase in sites assessed is due to a collective assessment of suspected sites, which is more efficient. DND is actively engaged in meeting the contaminated sites liabilities reduction target of 7% per year.
  • National Research Council of Canada
    • The number of projects has been increased from 2 to 4 since new assessment work identified two additional contaminated sites requiring remediation and/or risk management (R/RM) work. Funding for this additional R/RM work came from cost savings on the 2 projects that were originally planned.
  • Natural Resources Canada
    • NRCan received a transfer of $4 M via Supplementary Estimates B for completion of remediation projects in fiscal year 2010 from other government departments. Only a small portion of those funds were spent; $3.7 M was lapsed.
  • Parks Canada
    • The $1.8 M variance represents spending from funding available due to Parks Canada’s ability to spend amounts appropriated over a 2-year period.
    • Contaminated site remediation/risk management and assessment activities were undertaken at more sites than initially planned so as to ensure continued site eligibility for FCSAP funding under the renewed program (2011–2012 to 2015–2016).
  • Public Works and Government Services Canada
    • Custodian
      • Additional projects were facilitated via funds transferred from Correctional Service Canada and Transport Canada. $3.2 M was lapsed.
    • Expert Support
      • Consultant billings were less than the original estimates.
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
    • The variance is explained by a total of $1.1 M worth of projects not going through: approximately $726 K of unspent remediation funds and $381 K of unspent assessment funds. $864 K was lapsed.
    • For remediation projects, the majority of the variance is explained by one project being postponed ($450 K) and another for which the remediation strategy was altered to a risk management strategy, thereby reducing cost by $185 K. Numerous other remediation projects have also come in under budget.
    • For assessment projects, $381 K was not spent. Numerous assessment projects were performed under budget. Cost savings were also due to contracting being performed in bulk.
    • A transfer of $250 K of FCSAP funds had been approved for Supplementary Estimates C to the National Research Council. However, the government was dissolved prior to Supplementary Estimates C and the transfer did not take place.
    • Finally, $76.5 K of program management was not spent in 2010–2011 and was carried forward into 2011–2012.
    • The RCMP performed fewer projects than expected due to 1) the extensive reporting requirements for Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP) hindering progress and implementation of projects; and 2) with the increased workload, no additional resources were available.
  • Transport Canada
    • The variance is attributable to more cost-effective remedial options chosen, lower-than-expected tender prices and additional assessment required prior to remediation. More projects were undertaken than initially forecasted. $14 M of FCSAP funding was transferred early to other government departments that needed additional funding. $19.7 M was lapsed.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

Contact Information:

FCSAP Secretariat
Contaminated Sites Division
15th floor, Place Vincent Massey
351 St-Joseph Blvd.
Gatineau, QC, K1A 0H3
819-934-8153



Name of Horizontal Initiative: Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative

Name of Lead Department(s): Environment Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: Delivery of the Canada–Ontario Agreement (COA) Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2010 (Great Lakes Action Plan, Phase V (GLAPV) resources)

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2015 (expiry of GLAPV resources)

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start date to end date): $40 million over 5 years (GLAPV resources, plus departmental resource envelope)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative is Environment Canada’s mechanism for coordinating efforts to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem, and ensure delivery of federal commitments as expressed in the Canada–U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Environment Canada uses the Canada–Ontario Agreement (COA) Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem to engage other federal departments and Ontario in delivering Canada’s Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments.

Environment Canada’s Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative (GLBEI) reflects Budget 2010 investments targeted at continuing the work under the Great Lakes Action Plan to improve the ecological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem. A total of $40 million over five years was allocated in the GLAPV to continue the environmental restoration of key aquatic Great Lakes Areas of Concern. Other federal departments also use resource envelopes to support their efforts towards achieving COA results.

Shared Outcome(s): The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement establishes broad, long-term objectives for Canada and the United States in restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. The COA provides a short-term plan for achieving Canada’s commitments under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Through the COA, federal and provincial agencies are guided by a shared vision of a healthy, prosperous and sustainable Great Lakes Basin ecosystem for present and future generations. The COA also establishes a common purpose and shared goals, results and commitment in four priority areas: restoration of Areas of Concern; reduction of harmful pollutants; achievement of lakes and basin sustainability; and coordination of monitoring, research and information.

Governance Structure(s): Eight federal departments are engaged in delivering GLBEI results under the COA: Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Transport Canada, Infrastructure Canada and Health Canada.

The COA Management Committee is the senior federal/provincial management body responsible for setting priorities, establishing strategies to ensure delivery of the COA, and developing common positions and joint action plans for representing Canadian interests and engaging in cooperative initiatives with United States agencies and the International Joint Commission.

Planning, prioritization and allocation of GLAPV monies is managed through the Great Lakes Division of Environment Canada with the advice of the GLAPV Workplan Review Team. Members of the GLAPV Workplan Review Team consist of representatives from Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada receiving GLAPV funds. The GLAPV Workplan Review Team reviews proposed projects and activities, developing and regularly updating a coordinated federal workplan based on priorities required to support Great Lakes Action Plan implementation.

($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date) 2010-2011
Planned Spending Actual Spending Expected Results Results Achieved
Environment Canada Sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes COA $40 million GLAPV, plus Departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) $8 million GLAPV, plus Departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) $4.1 million GLAPV, plus $3.0 million, Departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) All COA results, except App. 2-3.2 See below
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems COA

Sea Lamprey Control Program
$437.1K GLAPV, plus Departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) $437.1K GLAPV, plus $6.8 million, Departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) $437.1K GLAPV, plus $6.8 million, Departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) App. 1-2.4; App. 1-2.6; App. 3-1.2; App. 3-1.3; App. 3-1.4; App. 3-3.1; App. 3-3.2; App. 3-4.1; App. 3-4.2; App. 3-5.1; App. 4-1.1; App. 4-2.2 See below
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Health of the environment Growing Forward $57 million for environment and climate change from April 1, 2008, to March 31, 2013 $7.7 million $7.7 million App. 1-1.2; App. 1-2.2; App. 2-2.3; App. 3-1.2; App. 3-1.4; App. 3-2.2; App. 4-1.1; App. 4-2.2 See below
Natural Resources Canada Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources Port Hope Long-term Low-level Radioactive Waste Mgmt. Project Departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) Port Hope
$940K

Harvesting
$32K

Pesticides
$125.5K
Port Hope
$910K

Harvesting
$21K

Pesticides
$117.1K
App. 1-2.3; App. 3-1.4; App. 3-2.4 See below
CFS

Forest harvesting in riparian zones
Ecosystem risk management: Canada understands and mitigates risks to natural resource ecosystems and human health CFS Pesticides Program
Parks Canada Heritage resources conservation

Public appreciation and understanding
COA Departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) $0 $0 App. 3-1.1; App. 3-1.2; App. 3-1.3; App. 3-2.2; App. 3-3.2; App. 3-3.3; App. 4-1.1; App. 4-2.2 See below
Transport Canada Environmental protection and remediation; Canadian Ballast Water Program COA Departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) $955K $955K App. 3-1.3; App. 3-2.1; App. 3-4.1; App. 3-4.2 See below
Infrastructure Canada (INFC) Infrastructure funding programs The Building Canada plan (Building Canada Fund, Provincial/
Territorial Base Fund, and Gas Tax Fund), the Green Infrastructure Fund, as well as sunsetting programs (Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF), Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF).
No COA allocation No COA allocation No COA allocation INFC supports the objectives of the COA with particular emphasis on Appendix items 1-1.1 and App. 1-2.1 See below
Health Canada Healthy environments and consumer safety COA Departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) No departmental resources envelope (permanent plus temporary funding)
COA commitment incorporated in Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) initiatives
$* App. 2-3.2 See below
TOTAL GLAP V
(plus departmental funding)
$8.4 million $4.5 million      

* Activities are supported with funds from Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP).

Results achieved in 2010–2011:

Specific Results by Department:

Environment Canada

Work continued to achieve progress in restoration of Great Lakes Areas of Concern. In delivering its results, the Department

  • Completed environmental restoration in Wheatley Harbour on Lake Erie, which was consequently delisted as an Area of Concern (AOC). The delisting represents a major achievement under Annex 2 of the Canada–U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA), through which Wheatley Harbour had been identified as an AOC in 1987.
  • Implemented all priority actions in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC. The Stage 3 report, which describes the results of monitoring and restoration of beneficial uses, is being produced and a decision is expected in 2011–2012 on whether to delist the AOC or recognize it as an Area in Recovery.
  • Completed the Stage 2 report for the Canadian portion of the Detroit River AOC; the Detroit River Remedial Action Plan (RAP) represents an assessment of the current status of beneficial use impairments in the AOC. The Department conducted an evaluation of the remedial actions to restore beneficial uses that have been undertaken from 1998 to 2008, and formulated recommendations on the remaining remedial actions, their priority, proposed timelines and agency or organization responsible for implementing the remedial actions.
  • Produced a Stage 2 RAP update report for the Niagara River AOC. The report updates the recommendations and delisting criteria presented in the 1995 Stage 2 report and the 2000 Implementation Annex.
  • Accepted the status report on the Jackfish Bay AOC prepared by Lakehead University. The report confirms that, while significant improvement has occurred since the area was originally listed as an AOC, additional time is required for sufficient ecosystem recovery to be detected. A long-term monitoring plan has been developed to track recovery in the Jackfish Bay AOC, which will be implemented in 2011–2012.

Work continued to reduce the release of harmful substances. Environment Canada worked on a variety of activities and projects. In delivering its results, the Department

  • Amended PCB regulations published in 2008 (SOR/2008-273, September 5, 2008) to accelerate the elimination of PCBs in use and storage. Preliminary data indicate that Canada’s challenge goal of a 90% reduction of high-level PCBs in service, from a 1993 baseline, has been met.
  • Collaborated with the United States to reduce uncontrolled combustion sources such as burn barrels, and launched the new Open Burning of Garbage website (http://www.ec.gc.ca/gdd-mw/default.asp?lang=En&n=684B44DD-1) that includes an overview of issues associated with the open burning of garbage and gives links for further information; and produced a new brochure that informs the public of the hazards of open garbage burning.
  • Released the Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy (GLBTS) 2008–2009 Biennial Progress Report, which documents progress achieved and actions taken to reduce the use and release of GLBTS Level 1 substances. The report highlights the activities of a new group focused on emerging substances of concern, and presents environmental trend data of Strategy substances collected by Great Lakes monitoring and surveillance programs.

Work continued to achieve a better understanding of, and to report on the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem status and trends. Environment Canada worked collaboratively with universities and other government and non-governmental agencies on many projects with the following results:

  • Published annual Lakewide Management Plan reports for each of the Canadian Great Lakes.
  • Reviewed and revised the state of the Great Lakes ecosystem assessment framework and indicators.
  • Completed the final draft of the Lake Superior Aquatic Invasive Species Complete Prevention Plan following public workshops that were held throughout the basin to promote the plan and gather input. The purpose of the plan is to prevent new aquatic invasive species from entering, and becoming established in Lake Superior.
  • Finalized the international Lake Huron Biodiversity Conservation Strategy for following a two-year conservation action planning process that engaged more than 100 agencies and organizations around the Lake Huron watershed. The Strategy identifies conservation features that represent the biodiversity of Lake Huron, ranks critical threats, and recommends strategies and opportunities for implementation.
  • Completed the final draft of the Lake Erie Binational Nutrient Management Strategy. The Strategy identifies priority watersheds and defines goals, objectives, targets, indicators, monitoring and research required to limit further eutrophication and improve current conditions in Lake Erie.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Work continued to conduct science, enhance fish habitats and control the negative impacts of established invasive species. In delivering its results, the department

  • Provided monitoring and science to support delisting Areas of Concern, including the Bay of Quinte, Toronto Harbour, Hamilton Harbour, Detroit River and St. Clair River. Results include developed indices of biotic integrity and habitat productivity for nearshore fish populations. The department also developed fish habitat classification and supply models to measure the success of habitat restorations, continued long-term assessment of lower trophic levels and food web statuses, and developed ecosystem models.
  • Delivered an integrated program of Sea Lamprey management in the Great Lakes in collaboration with the US Fish and Wildlife Services, under the direction of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Results include successful lampricide treatments in tributaries and connection channels in lakes Ontario, Erie, Huron and Superior to suppress invasive Sea Lampreys and to protect and restore native fishes. The department achieved suppression targets for abundances of adult Sea Lampreys in lakes Ontario and Superior. The department also continued research and development of new alternative Sea Lamprey control methods including field trials of Sea Lamprey pheromones.
  • Carried out risk assessments of potential aquatic invasive species; evaluated the impact of aquatic invasive species on Great Lakes ecosystems; and monitored ballast water management establishing their effectiveness in eliminating importation of new species through this vector.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Work continued to improve beneficial agriculture management practices with the involvement of the Great Lakes farming community in numerous projects. In delivering its results, the department

  • delivered, under an agreement with Ontario, the Canada–Ontario Environmental Farm Plan and Canada–Ontario Farm Stewardship Program to farmers, which resulted in province-wide implementation of 673 environmental farm plans and 1800 on-farm beneficial management practice projects in 2010–2011.

Natural Resources Canada

Work continued towards the achievement of the sustainable development of Canada’s energy, forestry and mineral metals resources within the Great Lakes Basin. Results included

  • Enhanced policies and practices to mitigate forestry impacts on creeks and rivers.
  • Enhanced accuracy of pesticide applications on forests to reduce impacts on aquatic organisms.
  • Completion of detailed designs for the remediation of sites, including Port Hope Harbour, and for the new long-term waste management facility to manage the Port Hope area’s historic low-level radioactive wastes.

Parks Canada

Delivers national parks programs and the National Marine Conservation Areas Program, and works to develop and maintain a viable protected areas network in the Great Lakes Basin that is relevant to Canadians. Projects included

  • State of the park reports for Bruce Peninsula National Park and Fathom Five National Marine Park.
  • Parks Canada information and messages at tourist information centres along the north shore of Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area.
  • Monitoring of coastal streams in Pukaskwa National Park.

Transport Canada

Work continued to ensure compliance with the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 regulations related to the ecosystem health of the Great Lakes. Transport Canada undertook a wide variety of inspection, monitoring and training programs, and

  • Boarded vessels entering the Great Lakes to ensure compliance with ballast water regulations.
  • Carried out biological analysis and evaluation of vessels targeted in the Joint Boarding Program.
  • Supported Canadian firms interested in the development of ballast water technology programs compliant with the International Marine Organization’s Ballast Water Discharge Standards.

Infrastructure Canada

Work continued toward providing funding to eligible infrastructure projects in support of federal objectives such as a cleaner environment, which includes improved wastewater treatment.

Federal funding has been announced for numerous wastewater projects that directly support the delisting of Areas of Concern as identified by COA and in communities located in and around the Great Lakes watershed. In 2009–2010, a total of $264.6 million in federal funding was announced, through the Building Canada Fund –Major Infrastructure Component and the Green Infrastructure Fund, in support of 9 projects located in communities near the Great Lakes. Of this amount, $173.5 million will go toward the upgrade of 4 sewage treatment plants to help rehabilitate the St. Lawrence River, Hamilton Harbour and the Nipigon Bay Areas of Concern in particular. In 2010–2011, Infrastructure Canada focused on moving all of these projects toward final approvals and negotiating contribution agreements.

Since the launch of the Building Canada Plan in 2007, Infrastructure Canada has committed over $890 million toward more than 575 water and wastewater projects that will improve the ecosystem health of rivers and lakes in the Great Lakes watershed.

Health Canada

Work continued to enhance environmental health knowledge within the Great Lakes Basin that can be integrated into policies to address risks to human health by all levels of government.

  • The department supported and facilitated the development of environmental public health networks in the Great Lakes Basin.
  • The Great Lakes Public Health Network (GLPHN) supported a Risk Communication Workshop hosted by University of Toronto and Public Health Ontario staff from federal, provincial and municipal governments in February 2011 in Toronto, Ontario.
  • The department developed the Health Science Framework to guide and facilitate health science research activities specifically for Great Lakes Basin populations.

Comments on Variances:

Environment Canada: Dedicated Great Lakes funding (GLAPV) is received only by Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, which also each contribute resources from their departmental resource envelope (permanent plus temporary funding) towards achieving results under the COA. All other partners (federal and provincial) to the COA achieve COA results via departmental funding.

Natural Resources Canada: Actual spending in 2010–2011 was slightly less than planned as a result of a minor delay in approval of expenditure authority under the Port Hope Long-term Low-level Radioactive Waste Management Project. The variance explanation in both Canadian Forest Services (CFS) programs (pesticides, and forest harvesting in riparian zones) is that there was less resource envelope money allocated to these programs than requested.

Parks Canada: Figures for planned and actual spending are not available as Parks Canada financial coding systems are not designed to separate out Great Lakes-specific activities.

Health Canada: Health Canada supports work for the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative through the joint Environment Canada–Health Canada Chemicals Management Plan. Specific resource figures are not available as this spending is not tracked separately in Health Canada's financial system.

Infrastructure Canada: Federal infrastructure funding programs do not include an allocation specific to the COA.

Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

Contact information:

Linda Robertson
Great Lakes Environment Office
Environment Canada
416-739-5808

Appendix – COA Results Statements

PRIORITY 1 – AREAS OF CONCERN

Result 1.1 – Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial or municipal wastewater to achieve delisting targets in Nipigon Bay and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.2 – Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources to meet delisting criteria in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC.

Result 1.3 – Contaminated sediment management strategies developed for the Wheatley Harbour AOC and implemented in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC.

Result 1.4 – Plans in place and being implemented to rehabilitate fish and wildlife habitats and populations to meet delisting targets in the Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.5 – Informed, effective collaboration amongst government, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in Nipigon Bay, Jackfish Bay, Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.6 – Environmental monitoring and reporting to document improvements and track environmental recovery.

Result 2.1 – Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from municipal sewage treatment plants, combined sewer overflows, urban stormwater and industrial wastewater towards delisting targets in St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region, and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.2 – Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources towards achieving remedial action plan (RAP) delisting criteria in St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, and Toronto and Region AOCs.

Result 2.3 – Progress made in developing sediment management strategies to reduce ecological and human health risk from contaminated sediments in Thunder Bay, Peninsula Harbour, St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Port Hope and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.4 – Long-term management plans being developed and priority actions for delisting being implemented for rehabilitation and protection of fish and wildlife habitats and populations in the St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region, and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.5 – Informed, effective collaboration amongst government, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in AOCs.

Result 2.6 – Identify monitoring needs, undertake required studies and evaluate results to assess environmental recovery and support remediation strategies in AOCs.

PRIORITY 2 - HARMFUL POLLUTANTS

Result 1.1 – Reduction in releases of Tier 1 substances beyond the 2005 achievements towards the goal of virtual elimination.

Result 2.1 – Reduction in releases of criteria air pollutants.

Result 2.2 – Coordinated activities to reduce releases from municipal wastewater.

Result 2.3 – Develop and initiate a program for the sound management of chemical substances in the Great Lakes Basin.

Result 3.1 – Improved understanding of the sources, fate and impacts of harmful pollutants in the Great Lakes Basin.

Result 3.2 – Human health risks from harmful pollutants are understood and addressed in the Great Lakes Basin.

PRIORITY 3 – GREAT LAKES AND GREAT LAKES BASIN SUSTAINABILITY

Result 1.1 – Increased awareness and appreciation of the Great Lakes and their contributions to social, economic and environmental well-being.

Result 1.2 – Increased stewardship actions that work towards a balance between human well-being and prosperity, and healthy aquatic ecosystems.

Result 1.3 - Sustainable use of land, water and other natural resources to provide benefits from the Great Lakes now and in the future.

Result 1.4 – Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and resources.

Result 2.1 – Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial and municipal wastewater, combined sewer overflows and urban stormwater sources consistent with actions specified in binational Lakewide Management Plans (LaMPs) and binational lake action plans.

Result 2.2 – Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural sources by undertaking actions specified in the binational Lakewide Management Plans and binational lake action plans.

Result 2.3 – Identification of contaminated sediment and development of sediment management plans to reduce the release and impact of sediment-bound contaminants on the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem.

Result 2.4 – Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes water quality.

Result 3.1 – Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and habitats are protected, restored and sustained consistent with binational Great Lakes planning.

Result 3.2 – Progress on rehabilitation of Great Lakes native species to restore the health of aquatic ecosystems, consistent with binational Great Lakes planning.

Result 3.3 – Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, habitats and species.

Result 4.1 – Implementation of the National Action Plan to Address the Threat of Aquatic Invasive Species in the Great Lakes.

Result 4.2 – Enhanced knowledge about the harmful impacts of aquatic invasive species on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, food webs and species.

Result 5.1 – The impacts of climate change on the Great Lakes ecosystem composition, structure and function, including biodiversity (organisms and their habitat), water quality and quantity, human health and safety (including access to clean drinking water), social well-being and economic prosperity are understood by governments and the Great Lakes community.

Result 6.1 – The potential risks to Great Lakes drinking water intakes are identified and assessed, and early actions to address risks are undertaken.

Result 6.2 – Develop knowledge and understanding of water quality and quantity issues of concern to the Great Lakes as drinking water sources.

PRIORITY 4 - COORDINATION OF MONITORING, RESEARCH AND INFORMATION

Result 1.1 – Responsive and comprehensive monitoring and research programs.

Result 2.1 – Improved reporting on environmental conditions, changes and progress.

Result 2.2 – Increased sharing of data and information among governments, organizations and basin residents.




Clean Air Agenda

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Lead Department Program Activity 3.2 -  Climate Change and Clean Air
Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Transport Canada, Health Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, National Research Council Canada, Industry Canada

Start Date
April 1, 2007
End Date March 31, 2011
Total Federal Funding Allocation $ 2.57 billion

Description

Through the Clean Air Agenda (CAA), the Government of Canada has been working towards making tangible improvements in Canada's environment by addressing the challenges of climate change and air pollution. Since 2007, the CAA has been supporting

  • regulatory initiatives in the industrial, transportation, consumer and commercial sectors; and,
  • a range of complementary program measures, such as the ecoACTION programming to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, ways to improve indoor air quality, approaches for adapting to the impacts of climate change, and engagement at the international level.
The CAA is managed through a horizontal management, accountability and reporting framework. This framework facilitates comprehensive and systematic review of planning for and reporting on the financial and non-financial performance of CAA programming. Progress towards the CAA outcomes has been reported publically through this horizontal framework since 2007.

Shared Outcomes

The 44 programs of the CAA are organized within seven themes: clean air regulatory agenda (CARA), clean energy, clean transportation, indoor air quality, international actions, adaptation, and management and accountability.

The shared outcomes for these programs are:

  • The health, economic and environmental benefits for Canadians have been realized;
  • The risks to the health of Canadians and the environment resulting from exposure to air pollution have been reduced; and,
  • The risks to communities, infrastructure and to the health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change have been reduced.

The Government of Canada remains committed to a reduction of 17 per cent from 2005 levels in Canada's total GHG emissions by the year 2020.

Governance Structure(s)

The horizontal management, accountability and reporting framework is led by Environment Canada (EC) and governed by 9 Deputy Ministers, 18 Assistant Deputy Ministers and Chief Financial Officers, seven Director General Theme Leads, and Director General Management Committees for the seven themes of the CAA.

The Clean Air Agenda Results Management Secretariat (CAARMS) supports the CAA governance and EC in facilitating collaboration and overseeing the accountabilities and responsibilities concerning the horizontal management of this Agenda.

2010-11 Agenda Performance Summary

CAA programming continued to reduce GHGs and air pollutants and address the challenges of climate change and air pollution with a view to building a clean and healthy environment for all Canadians.

CARA advanced the development and implementation of regulatory frameworks to manage air pollution and GHG emissions through significant policy work, analysis, consultation, as well as extensive scientific activities. Over 2010-11, Canada’s work was re-oriented towards the development of sector-by-sector regulations aligned with the United States (U.S.) when appropriate. Key advances were made in a number of sectors with the publication of the three transportation regulations for new vehicles and engines, and with proposed draft regulations that will limit greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired electricity generating units.  The Automotive Refinishing Regulations and the Architectural Coatings Regulations came into effect in 2010. Once these regulations are fully implemented they are expected to result in a 40% and a 28% annual reduction of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) emissions respectively from the targeted products categories.  

Scientific activities continue to inform the development of critical standards, science assessments, air emissions policies, regulations, agreements and obligations. Also, the Government’s internationally renowned scientists were invited to assume leadership roles in the development of international reports on air pollution and with the World Meteorological Organization.  

On air pollution, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment agreed to move forward with the finalization of a new collaborative air quality management approach, based on the Comprehensive Air Management System (CAMS) framework which will, when implemented, represent the first systematic national approach to managing air quality.

As a result of Clean Energy programs, Canadians are adopting more energy efficient and renewable energy products and services and benefitting from strengthened infrastructure. This has been achieved through energy efficient retrofits for homes, small buildings and industrial facilities, and through increased use of renewable energy technologies. As of March 31, 2011, 31 projects under ecoENERGY programming for Aboriginal and Northern communities were fully commissioned and are achieving GHG reductions.

Scientific research over 2010-11 generated knowledge essential to achieving Canada’s climate change goals by informing codes, standards and regulations to facilitate the adoption of new technologies. Activities were in the areas of cleaner fossil fuels, cleaner transportation, energy efficiency in residential, commercial and institutional buildings, improved industrial processes, carbon capture and storage and bioenergy.

Overall the results achieved from clean energy activities have ultimately reduced GHG emissions and Criteria Air Contaminants. Collectively, Natural Resources Canada’s programs under the Clean Energy Theme reduced GHG emissions by an estimated 9.3 megatonnes in 2010-11.

Clean Transportation programming continued to address the challenges of pollution and GHG emissions from the movement of people and goods in Canada. Information essential to regulating emissions, and coordinating and harmonizing regulations across different jurisdictions was developed in partnership with vehicle manufacturers, industry associations, government departments and other stakeholders. To support transport sector regulatory initiatives, programming also focussed on changing the behaviour of consumers and industry by tackling two key barriers to reducing pollution from transportation, that is, the lack of information, knowledge and engagement of consumers and industry, and, the costs and risks  associated with technology uptake. Memoranda of Understanding with the rail and aviation sectors have reported encouraging results in reducing GHG emission intensity and improving average annual fuel efficiency respectively.

The focus of the last year of the CAA four year mandate for Clean Transportation was to complete projects and program activities, measure their impacts, and gather information about results and case studies to provide to industry and other stakeholders. A number of incentive programs were completed to retire over 70,000 high-polluting vehicles, demonstrate clean freight transportation technology including shore power technology and energy saving technology for passenger cars, light trucks, heavy trucks and rail transportation, provide training on fuel-efficient driving practices and provide municipalities with tools to support transportation demand management in urban areas.

Canada’s participation in United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change meetings and other multilateral and bilateral processes was supported over 2010-11 which enabled Canada’s clean air objectives to be advanced internationally. Public-private partnership clean technology projects delivered environmental benefits (in particular, GHG reductions) and economic benefits to Canadian companies, and accelerated clean technology development and deployment across a range of industrial sectors. Collaboration and knowledge sharing were undertaken with the U.S. by coordinating clean energy technology research and development to reduce GHG emissions. Canada also hosted the annual meeting of the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Committee during which the Committee agreed to a path forward on a Particulate Matter Annex. Canada and the U.S. will also implement a number of activities in 2011-12 to mark the 20th anniversary of the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement.

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) programming launched a public education campaign to inform Canadians about the health risks that may be present in their homes from radon gas, so that they may better protect their health. To date, 90% of federal buildings in known areas of high radon potential have been measured, which is expected to improve awareness by the public, property managers and governments of the health risks and causes of reduced IAQ, and strategies to improve it. Measurements of both aerial radiation and soil radon gas were made, which will allow researchers to map potential areas of radon and lower the risk of exposure to Canadians. Comprehensive field studies were performed that gathered data on different residential ventilation rates, a wide range of IAQ parameters, and the health of asthmatic Canadians living in these homes. These studies were performed to confirm the relationship between residential IAQ, installed ventilation technologies, and occupants’ health. Protocols were developed to assess the efficacy of methods to improve IAQ. A balanced, multi-stakeholder Canadian Committee on Indoor Air Quality and Buildings is working to raise public awareness of IAQ issues, and provide solutions through targeted best practice information suitable for practitioners, and building and home owners.

Adaptation Theme programming fulfilled or exceeded many of the expected results for 2010-11. These included Aboriginal and northern communities assessing climate change risk information, and developing adaptation plans. The Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) was fully implemented in six provinces replacing the outdated Air Quality Index (AQI), thus increasing awareness and understanding among health professionals. Climate research activities led to the development and operation of global and regional climate models, and the development of a substantial suite of new climate change scenarios based on both Canadian and other climate models to inform adaptation planning and decision-making. Pilot projects related to heat and infectious disease were undertaken to anticipate and address the impacts of climate change on the health of Canadians. Collaboration through six Regional Adaptation Collaboratives and the creation of a national integration group has enhanced communication and joint work on key regional adaptation issues.

The horizontal management of the CAA continued to support the accountability of the federal government to parliamentarians and Canadians for expenditures and activities of the Clean Air Agenda, as well as to support decision-makers in determining the path forward for clean air and climate change programming.

2010-11 Agenda Lessons Learned

Over 2010-11, programs of the Clean Air Agenda faced key challenges that were similar to the challenges faced in previous years. These were:

  • The state of the economy and its continued effect on many stakeholders’ uptake of a number of programming opportunities; and,
  • The continued need to provide flexibility to support alignment with the evolving approaches of the U.S., where appropriate, in order for Canada to establish a broad approach to climate change.
Total Funding Approved under the CAA (to March 31, 2011)

Total Planned Spending
in 2010-11

Total Actual Spending
in 2010-11

2010-11 Actual Spending Reported within Economic Action Plan (EAP)

$  2,417,538,077 $  867,151,782 $  787,851,989 $  351,366,517

Contact information: Paula Brand, Executive Director, Environment Canada, (819) 997-3729 Paula.Brand@ec.gc.ca

CAA Theme-Level Reporting

Clean Air Regulatory Agenda

Clean Energy

Clean Transportation

Indoor Air Quality

Adaptation

International Actions

Management and Accountability

 

Theme: Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA)

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Health Canada

Summary by Department

Federal Partner Name # Programs
for Federal Partners

Funding Approved
under CAA

(to March 31, 2011)

Planned Spending
2010-11

Actual Spending 2010-11
Environment Canada 8 $ 273,246,244 $ 101,371,032 $ 62,216,068
Transport Canada 1 $ 19,170,216 $ 4,769,514 $ 2,917,011
Natural Resources Canada 2 $ 35,200,000 $ 9,566,000 $ 7,992,054
Health Canada 2 $ 88,800,000 $ 27,500,000 $ 23,642,844
Total 13 $ 416,416,460 $ 143,206,546 $ 96,767,977

2010-11 Expected Results

Theme: Clean Air Regulatory Agenda - 2010-11 Expected Results

2010-11 Theme Performance Summary

In support of the reduction of air emissions, progress was made towards the development and implementation of regulatory frameworks to manage air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.  Preparatory work for a North American cap and trade system was completed; however, due to a shift in United States (U.S.) climate policy toward a regulatory approach, Canada’s work was re-oriented toward development of sector-by-sector regulations aligned with the U.S., and analysis (quantitative and qualitative) focuses on sector concerns and key competitiveness issues. Analysis was also undertaken to support Canada's position and views on climate change and related issues at a number of international meetings and venues. This includes, among others, support for the Copenhagen Accord negotiations, the G8 Leaders Summit, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Ministerial Council Meeting, and the Arctic Council Task Force on Short-lived Climate Forcers.

Long-term projections for GHGs and air pollutants were developed to serve as a reference point for analysing the government’s climate change initiatives and Clean Air Agenda as they evolved since early 2010. This included economic analysis for the announced Passenger Automobile and Light Truck Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations, and for the proposed regulation for coal-fired electricity generation units that is expected to be published in Canada Gazette in 2011 and come into force on July 1, 2015.

Significant policy work and consultations were undertaken to support the development of regulations for the transport and electricity sectors, and to take steps to address emissions from other major industrial sectors. This involved extensive engagement with stakeholders, including provinces and territories, for example through the Federal / Provincial / Territorial Working Group on Domestic Climate change.  As a result of this engagement, an Agreement in Principle on efforts to address climate change was signed with British Columbia, and discussions were initiated on an Agreement in Principle with Quebec. Ongoing engagement also took place with the provincial members of the Western Climate Initiative (ON, QC, BC) participating in meetings on the development of the Western Climate Initiative cap and trade system.

Policy work was also undertaken related to Short-Lived Climate Forcers, including black carbon, to support Canada’s engagement in various international fora on this issue, including under the Arctic Council and the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. The former included the development of a national black carbon emissions inventory.

In October 2010, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) reviewed a proposal, produced over two years through a multi-stakeholder process, for a Comprehensive Air Management System. Ministers agreed to move forward with a new Air Quality Management System (AQMS) based on this report and asked officials to finalize the key elements of the system in 2011, including Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) for particulate matter and ozone and associated trigger levels, airsheds and air zones delineation, and base-level industrial emissions requirements for key sectors. Implementation of the system will begin in 2013.

Scientific activities continued to inform the development of critical standards, science assessments, indicators, air emissions policies, regulations, targets/limits, objectives, guidelines, inventories, agreements and obligations.  Air quality science informed the finalization of major elements of the new AQMS including the decision-making process leading to the new CAAQs; improved prediction capability; assessed the change in ambient concentrations of smog resulting from biodiesel use in Canada; enhanced the understanding of new particulate matter formation and transformation pathways to help prioritize future regulations; quantified the contribution of mercury emissions from other countries to Canada to support international negotiations; and demonstrated via the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement’s 2010 biennial progress report that both countries have reduced emissions of ground-level ozone precursors and acid rain-causing compounds in line with commitments made under the Agreement. 

Also, the Government’s internationally renowned scientists were invited to assume leadership roles in the development of the 2010 Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution Assessment Report and, the World Meteorological Organization’s 2011 Global Assessment of Precipitation Chemistry and Deposition.

In support of a more efficient and cleaner transportation sector, the Government made significant progress through the publication of three new emissions regulations from new vehicles and engines aligned with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards: Marine Spark-Ignition Engine, Vessel and Off-Road Recreational Vehicle Emission Regulations, and Passenger Automobile and Light Truck Greenhouse Gas Emission Regulations. Environment Canada continued to administer its five regulations for vehicles and engines that are currently in effect. Stakeholder consultations on the development of regulations to reduce air emissions from small inshore vessels (e.g. harbour craft, ferries, tugs) and large ships operating in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway System and from ships operating in Canada’s jurisdiction and Canadian ships overseas were carried out. These proposed regulations will implement new International Maritime Organization (IMO) standards for air pollutant emissions from ships, including the North American Emission Control Area. Participation at the IMO continued to advance, global measures to reduce GHG emissions from marine vessels.

Work also took place to monitor the development of the new U.S. labelling regulations for new light-duty vehicles and analysis was undertaken to develop a harmonized approach in Canada.

The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Government of Canada and the Railway Association of Canada expired December 31, 2010.  Through the MOU, the industry has decreased its GHG emission intensity by 23.3% in 2008 compared with the 1990 baseline. The Government of Canada and the Railway Association of Canada are continuing to collaborate in advancing industry efforts to reduce emissions and in reporting on results achieved under the MOU. The 2009 Locomotive Emissions Monitoring Report will be released in 2011.

In support of safer and energy efficient consumer products, the manufacturing, import prohibitions associated with the Automotive Refinishing Regulations and the Architectural Coatings Regulations came into effect in 2010. The sales prohibitions came into effect in 2010 for the Automotive Refinishing Regulations and will begin in 2012 for the Architectural Coatings Regulations. Once these regulations are fully implemented they are expected to result in a 40% and 28% annual reduction of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) emissions respectively from the targeted product categories.

Analysis and consultations were completed to support the publication of amendments to the Energy Efficiency Regulations in the fall of 2011, and all CARA efficiency regulations are estimated to be in effect by June 2012. Also, market transformation program impacts (ENERGY STAR) are expected to be met as awareness of the program by the public and its use by participants remains high.

In support of improving air quality in Canadian households and buildings, 9,000 participants were recruited for the cross-Canada 2011-12 radon survey. The Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) program increased both the scientific understanding and the public awareness of the health risks of indoor air pollutants through risk assessments, research and public outreach. A Geographic Information System-based procedure for the mapping of indoor radon potential has been used to create a radon potential map of southern Ontario. Scientific assessments were completed for three priority indoor air contaminants and a proposed Residential Indoor Air Quality Guideline for Toluene was published. 

A multi-city and multi-year project to assess the IAQ in Canadian homes and to identify the major sources of contaminants was completed. While analysis is still on-going for certain cities, results from these projects have already been used in risk assessments and have been made available through scientific journals, presentations at conferences and in technical reports. 

This year also saw significant public outreach, as indoor air quality, including radon, was included as a major focus for First Nations public awareness campaigns.  In combination with the targeted radon outreach program, there has been an increase in radon awareness exceeding the target of 25% and a significant increase in the distribution of radon outreach materials.

In support of more accurate reporting, as well as easier compliance on air emissions, the National Inventory Report for GHGs to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change was submitted and was also used to support domestic decisions and actions on climate change policy; Canada’s 2009 air pollutant emissions inventory data and historical trends were published; and, the 2009 GHG emissions information from large industrial and institutional facilities under its Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reporting Program (GHGRP) was collected and published. The GHGRP collected the emissions data through the department's newly launched Single Window Reporting (SWR) system, which was facilitated through bilateral agreements with provinces.  Furthermore, the expanded version of the SWR system for the Greenhouse Gas and the and National Pollutant Release Inventory reporting was publicly launched in the Spring. 

A request for proposals, based on the Offset System rules, for offsetting GHG emissions resulting from federal participation in the Vancouver Winter Games and the G8/G20 Summits was developed. Much of the design of a domestic credit tracking system was completed, but it has yet to be implemented. 

Work was completed on bringing Canada’s Kyoto Protocol National Registry into compliance with international data exchange standards.

2010-11 Theme Lessons Learned

The key challenges facing Canada in establishing a broad approach to climate change is the need to remain flexible enough to respond to changing priorities, and keeping pace with international and U.S. policy and regulatory developments. Despite significant shifts in U.S. climate policy, from a cap and trade to a regulatory approach, preparatory work for either approach was successfully undertaken. The Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group on Domestic Climate Change provided a useful forum to work with provinces and territories in developing federal policy, and will be a useful venue for consultation going forward.

Canada experienced a number of challenges with respect to managing the coordination and communication amongst a number of key players in many of its Clean Air Regulatory Agenda activities. The main challenges experienced during the reporting period included the need to:

  • reconcile divergent stakeholder opinions;
  • actively engage the U.S. EPA on future regulatory changes in order to maintain Canada’s alignment with U.S. regulations and standards;
  • better collaborate with partners and programs, such as the Chemicals Management Plan, Consumer Product Safety and the National Research Council, to better address cross-cutting issues under the indoor air program; and,
  • clearly communicate partners’ needs from the outset of the development cycle  for the SWR system associated with business requirements of provincial partners in order to eliminate unnecessary delays.

There remain some challenges in moving forward with the Comprehensive Air Management System, such as concerns about potential for administrative burden in implementation, competitiveness impacts on the industry, development of emission limits and validation for all key sectors.

A lengthy consultation process to inform the development of the new U.S. GHG label for light-duty vehicles caused delays in Canada's plan to move forward with a harmonized voluntary label in 2010-11.  The U.S. finalized its new label in May 2011, paving the way for Canada to proceed with updates to its label that align with upgrades introduced in the U.S.

Theme Financial Summary

Federal Partner Programs Funding Approved under CAA Planned Spending
2010-11
Actual Spending
2010-11
Environment Canada
Industrial Sector Regulatory Actions $ 85,924,181 $ 32,046,428 $ 21,632,154
Transport Sector Regulatory Actions $ 31,474,967 $ 11,847,484 $ 6,893,031
Consumer and Commercial Products Regulatory Actions $ 12,000,000 $ 3,363,020 $ 2,050,763
Science in Support of Regulatory Activities and Accountability $ 47,985,868 $ 17,803,315 $ 14,666,748
Emissions Reporting $ 54,573,952 $ 20,473,744 $ 11,623,762
Emissions Trading $ 24,901,559 $ 11,402,242 $ 3,368,622
Enforcement Advice and Reporting on Progress $ 7,000,000 $ 1,741,960 $ 630,680
Policy Development, Analysis and Coordination $ 9,385,717 $ 2,692,839 $ 1,350,308
Subtotal $ 273,246,244 $ 101,371,032 $ 62,216,068
 
Transport Canada
Transport Sector Regulatory Actions $ 19,170,216 $ 4,769,514 $ 2,917,011
Subtotal $ 19,170,216 $ 4,769,514 $ 2,917,011
 
Natural Resources Canada
Transport Sector Regulatory Actions $ 3,200,000 $ 400,000 $ 332,872
Consumer and Commercial Products Regulatory Actions $ 32,000,000 $ 9,166,000 $ 7,659,182
Subtotal $ 35,200,000 $ 9,566,000 $ 7,992,054
 
Health Canada
Indoor Air Quality Management Actions $ 17,500,000 $ 4,500,000 $ 3,584,996
Science in Support of Regulatory Activities and Accountability $ 71,300,000 $ 23,000,000 $ 20,057,848
Subtotal $ 88,800,000 $ 27,500,000 $ 23,642,844
Total Theme $ 416,416,460 $ 143,206,546 $ 96,767,977

 

Theme: Clean Energy

Lead Department

Natural Resources Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Summary by Department

Federal Partner Name # Programs for Federal Partners Funding Approved
under CAA

(to March 31, 2011)
Planned Spending
2010-11
Actual Spending 2010-11
Natural Resources Canada 7 $ 1,336,242,000 $ 590,127,394 $ 573,290,098
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada 1 $ 15,000,000 $ 3,750,000 $ 3,726,082
Total 8 $ 1,351,242,000 $ 593,877,394 $ 577,016,180

2010-11 Expected Results

Theme: Clean Energy - 2010-11 Expected Results

2010-11 Theme Performance Summary

Natural Resources Canada

Programs under the Clean Energy Theme continued to surpass expectations and achieve concrete benefits for Canadians in 2010-11. These benefits include increased energy efficiency, renewable energy production and facilitation of emerging technologies. Tangible reductions of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) and Criteria Air Contaminants (CAC) have also been realized from clean energy activities.

As a result of Clean Energy programs, Canadians are adopting energy efficient products and services.

During the four-year program period ending March 31, 2011, the ecoENERGY Retrofit program received over 510,000 grant applications against a program target of supporting 520,000 grants for energy efficient retrofits for homes. In addition, in the 2010-11 fiscal year, 483 contribution agreements for small and medium organizations were signed, providing financial support to retrofit smaller buildings and industrial facilities.

ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses enabled consumer choice in energy efficient housing by administering the labelling of approximately 15,900 new houses and issuing approximately 369,000 labels for existing houses according to their energy performance. These results exceeded the expected achievements for 2010-11 (10,000 new and 125,000 existing houses). Over the 4-year program period, almost 350 commercial buildings received energy labels as part of a pilot energy management labelling and benchmarking program, and approximately 1,600 building owners, managers, operators, designers and builders received energy management training. As well, the National Energy Code for Buildings 2011 code was updated and formally approved by the Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes.

Industry managers have also been engaged on energy efficiency: In 2010-11, approximately 1,000 industrial energy managers were trained under the ecoENERGY for Industry program. Furthermore, 208 new companies registered their commitment to improved energy efficiency and became Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation leaders. In addition, 9 energy assessments to identify opportunities for energy efficiency in companies were funded.

As a result of Clean Energy programs, Canadians are adopting renewable energy products and services and benefitting from strengthened infrastructure.

In 2010-11, 39 projects were commissioned (i.e., in operation) and eligible to receive the production incentive under ecoENERGY for Renewable Power. This represents 1,504 megawatts (MW) of renewable power capacity and commitments of $453 million over 10 years, meeting the 2010-11 target of 1,500 MW. Over the 4-year period ending March 31, 2011, 104 renewable power projects have signed contribution agreements, representing almost 4500 MW of capacity and federal commitments of about $1.4 billion over 14 years.

ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat increased the use of renewable thermal energy technologies in Canada in 2010-11.Under the Residential Pilot Incentive, 9 contribution agreements with collaborators to run residential solar water programs were active and 591 solar water heating systems were installed in residential systems under these agreements, providing $560,000 in funding. In total over the life of the program, 14 contribution agreements were signed, surpassing the program target to support at least 8 residential pilot projects, and a total of 1154 residential solar water systems were installed. As well, 523 commercial systems were installed in 2010-11, providing $8.9 million in funding and leading to a total of 1268 commercial systems over the life of the program and surpassing the program target of 700 systems.

As a result of Clean Energy programs, research has been supported that will generate knowledge essential to achieving Canada’s climate change goals.

Under the ecoENERGY Technology Initiative, scientific research in the 2010-11 fiscal year has been used to inform codes, standards and regulations facilitating the adoption of new technology. Activities were in the areas of cleaner fossil fuels, cleaner transportation, energy efficiency in residential, commercial and institutional buildings, improved industrial processes, carbon capture and storage, and bioenergy. For instance, the program supported the provision of on-going information and expert advice to Environment Canada on energy policy and technology to develop regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act to limit greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. Another example is the Biomass Inventory and Mapping Analysis Tool, which was further developed and improved, and continues to be used by a wide variety of stakeholders to aid in decision-making. Modelling and simulation capabilities are a third example – these were used to develop five case studies on the integration of distributed generation that will have a significant impact on how renewable energies will be integrated onto the electricity grid. 

The Policy, Communications, Monitoring and Reporting program supported Natural Resources Canada's (NRCan) 2010-11 clean energy achievements with timely and strategic advice provided to senior management on clean energy, environment and forest carbon issues.  The program also led accurate reporting on NRCan’s Clean Energy activities through the CAA and other government reports, and contributed to the development of NRCan’s next suite of clean energy programs in Budget 2011. It provided forest-carbon related information for reporting in Canada's 2011 National Inventory Report to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Furthermore in 2010-11, the program increased awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs with responses to 95 media calls related to the ecoENERGY initiatives, organization of 124 announcements related to clean energy programming, and the production of marketing and outreach material to support the ecoENERGY initiatives.

Finally, the results achieved under the Clean Energy Theme have ultimately reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities. Collectively, Natural Resources Canada’s programs under the Clean Energy Theme reduced GHG emissions by an estimated 9.3 megatonnes (Mt) in 2010-11.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

In 2010-11, the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program funded 47 projects in 42 communities, totalling $2.5 million. The program was fully subscribed by November 2010. The funded projects can be broken down as follows:

  • 12 Community Energy Planning (4-yr total: 25)
  • 18 Energy Efficiency (4-yr total: 41)
  • 17 Renewable Energy (4-yr total: 57)

The program has achieved its goal to support projects within Aboriginal and northern communities which will result in an estimated 1.3 Mt GHG reduction over a 20-year period once projects have been commissioned. As of March 31, 2011, a total of 31 projects have been fully commissioned and are currently achieving GHG reductions.

2010-11 Theme Lessons Learned

Natural Resources Canada

Risks, challenges and lessons learned through programs promoting energy efficiency in buildings, houses and industrial sectors:

  • Program uptake can be greatly impacted by the economy and by other incentive programs offered provincially or by utilities;
  • Contribution agreements may not be suited for low value incentives or for some small and medium-sized businesses due to administrative requirements that are needed to ensure due diligence with financial management;
  • During the economic downturn, some smaller urban centres or remote locations did not yield the expected number of industrial workshop attendees, despite increased staff efforts. The reduced participation did not allow for the full complement of scheduled workshops to be delivered. This compelled the program to concentrate on larger centers and traditional industrial locations in order to deliver the targeted number of workshops with a viable number of attendees; and,
  • Participants of the pilot energy management labelling and benchmarking project felt that the most important lesson learned was the understanding as to the amount of time and effort needed for benchmarking. The data collection process during the pilot project provided useful insights into the availability of data for facilities in each participant’s commercial building portfolio and allowed pilot project participants to conclude that there is room for improvement in existing energy and building data management processes.

Risks, challenges and lessons learned through programs encouraging the deployment of renewable energy technologies:

  • While ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat surpassed its program target to support at least 8 residential pilot projects under the Residential Pilot Incentive activity (in total, 14 contribution agreements were signed), the program fell short of the estimate it provided for the 2010-11 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities that it would support the installation of 3,000 residential systems (the program supported the installation of 591 residential solar water systems in 2010-11). The shortfall was due to regulatory issues with respect to deployment of solar water heaters in the residential sector and changes in builders’ priorities.  The program was able to address the regulatory issues and was still able to meet its primary objective, which was to test different approaches to deliver solar thermal programs to the residential sector.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Risks, challenges and lessons learned through the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program:

  • Since the program does not enter into multi-year funding arrangements with proponents and applicants must reapply on an annual basis, there is a risk that the funds sent to a proponent are not spent within the fiscal year that they are received. This is being addressed through the Departmental financial management system;
  • Emission reduction calculations are a challenge as commission dates are frequently beyond the program life of four years, especially for projects with higher emission reductions. The program has attempted to mitigate this risk by having a third party technical review completed for the GHG calculations; and,
  • Other program risks include the oversubscription of the program, which may result in the program missing opportunities to fund good projects that could potentially lead to high emission reductions, as well as a lack of awareness of the program, which may disadvantage some communities. The latter is being addressed through regional collaboration.

Theme Financial Summary

Federal Partner Programs Funding Approved under CAA Planned Spending
2010-11
Actual Spending
2010-11
Natural Resources Canada
ecoEnergy for Buildings and Houses $ 61,000,000 $ 13,608,000 $ 13,532,259
ecoEnergy Retrofit $ 801,000,000 $ 385,999,100 $ 382,885,119
ecoEnergy for Industry $ 18,000,000 $ 3,616,000 $ 3,481,757
ecoEnergy for Renewable Power $ 228,000,000 $ 90,660,000 $ 90,152,716
ecoEnergy for Renewable Heat $ 34,430,000 $ 11,480,000 $ 11,468,619
ecoEnergy Technology Initiative $ 169,252,000 $ 78,624,294 $ 66,411,774
Policy, Communications, Monitoring and Reporting $ 24,560,000 $ 6,140,000 $ 5,357,854
Subtotal $ 1,336,242,000 $ 590,127,394 $ 573,290,098
 
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
ecoEnergy for Aboriginal and Northern Communities $ 15,000,000 $ 3,750,000 $ 3,726,082
Subtotal $ 15,000,000 $ 3,750,000 $ 3,726,082
Total Theme $ 1,351,242,000 $ 593,877,394 $ 577,016,180

2010-2011 Theme Actual Spending within Economic Action Plan
$ 351,366,517

 

Theme: Clean Transportation

Lead Department

Transport Canada

Federal Theme Partners Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Summary by Department

Federal Partner Name # Programs for Federal Partners Funding Approved under CAA
(to March 31, 2011)
Planned Spending 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11
Transport Canada 9 $ 315,300,000 $ 16,603,011 $ 12,155,856
Natural Resources Canada 2 $ 43,000,000 $ 9,760,000 $ 9,476,059
Environment Canada 1 $ 90,800,000 $ 41,388,000 $ 30,247,496
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada 1 $ 11,300,000 $ 0 $ 0
Total 13 $ 460,400,000 $ 67,751,011 $ 51,879,411

2010-11 Expected Results

Theme: Clean Transportation - 2010-11 Expected Results

2010-11 Theme Performance Summary

During their fourth and final year of operation, Clean Transportation programs continued to address the challenges of pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the movement of people and goods in Canada.

Programs provided information essential to the development of informed regulations and to the coordination and harmonization of regulations across different jurisdictions. Programs also supplemented regulations and helped to ensure their success by tackling two key barriers to reducing pollution from transportation: the lack of information, knowledge and engagement on the part of consumers and industry, and the costs and risks associated with uptake of new technologies. In 2010-11, the focus was on completing the projects and program activities, measuring their impact, and gathering information about results and making this available to industry and other stakeholders.

To help inform the regulatory process, the ecoTechnology for Vehicles program worked in partnership with vehicle manufacturers, industry associations, government departments and other stakeholders to test and evaluate emerging vehicle technologies in accordance with the test procedures developed by standard testing bodies and important regulatory agencies like the Society of Automotive Engineers. 

Under the National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry two studies were commissioned examining the performance and potential safety implications of emerging add-on aerodynamic devices in the trucking industry. This includes the “Truck Trailer Side Skirts” study, which reports on commercially available designs, their construction materials and mounting methods; cost; whether there are any side effects on vehicle safety such as on brake cooling; and their ability to provide side underrun protection to vulnerable road users such as cyclists.

Addressing the lack of information and improving knowledge is essential to change the behaviour of consumers and industry. A number of programs addressed this objective.

The ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles program contributed to reduced emissions from personal vehicles by providing training on fuel-efficient driving practices to approximately 580,000 new drivers.  Additionally, fuel efficient driving instruction was delivered to 10,500 experienced drivers.  As a result of activities undertaken by the ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles program since its launch in 2007, Canadians have reduced their annual GHG emissions by 0.21 megatonnes (Mt).  Additionally, a Memorandum of Understanding signed in 2005 with Automobile Manufacturers achieved a GHG reduction of between 3.1 Mt and 3.4 Mt.

The ecoENERGY for Fleets program contributed to reduced emissions from trucking by providing training in fuel-efficient driving practices to over 8000 drivers. To elicit the engagement of stakeholders, the ecoENERGY for Fleets program concluded agreements with the trucking industry under which over 500 tractors and trailers were retrofitted with fuel-efficient components.

Under the ecoFREIGHT Partnership program, Memoranda of Understanding continued to be implemented with the aviation and rail industries. In the aviation industry, annual average fuel efficiency improvements between 1990 and 2009 were 1.9%, surpassing the Memorandum of Understanding-established target of 1.1%. The rail industry GHG emission intensity similarly decreased by 23.3% by 2008 compared with the 1990 baseline. Finally, under the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund and the Freight Technology Incentive Program, over 30 different information sharing products were developed including webinars, technology case studies, and success stories. These products are available on the programs' web site to inform stakeholders on the benefits of green freight technologies. In addition one newsletter was developed and directly distributed to over 800 freight industry stakeholders to further stimulate technology adoption.

Under the Vehicle Scrappage program incentives were provided to eligible recipients that led to the retirement of over 70,000 old, high-polluting vehicles.

The costs and risks associated with new technologies are important barriers to capital turnover, particularly during a period of economic recession. In 2010-11, a number of Clean Transportation programs continued to be implemented in order to assist in reducing such risks. The Freight Technology Demonstration and Freight Technology Incentives programs completed their sponsorship of 40 projects with $25 million in value covering a wide range of best practices and technology applications such as aerodynamics, electrification, engine innovation and best operating practices. The Marine Shore Power program completed its second tranche of funding with the provision of $645,000 to the Prince Rupert Port Authority to demonstrate shore power technology for container ships at Fairview Terminal. The ecoMobility program continued to provide funding to 13 projects in 12 communities across Canada and developed several information and social marketing tools needed to support Transportation Demand Management project implementation across Canada.

Finally, international harmonization and cooperation is essential to emissions reduction. Transport Canada continued its presence at international fora under the ecoFREIGHT Partnerships programs, contributing to the development of international environmental standards, practices, and guidelines, and sharing of information and best practices within organizations such as the International Civil Aviation organization, the International Maritime Organization, and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, among others.

Theme Financial Summary

Federal Partner Programs Funding Approved under CAA Planned Spending
2010-11
Actual Spending
2010-11
Transport Canada
ecoMobility $ 8,200,000 $ 2,814,000 $ 2,321,320
ecoTechnology for Vehicles $ 14,100,000 $ 2,693,000 $ 2,569,757
National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry $ 5,400,000 $ 1,855,000 $ 840,560
Freight Technology Demonstration Fund $ 9,300,000 $ 2,339,655 $ 1,996,141
Freight Technology Incentives Program $ 9,350,000 $ 2,609,856 $ 1,596,093
ecoFreight Partnerships $ 6,550,000 $ 1,452,000 $ 967,885
Marine Shore Power Program $ 5,700,000 $ 1,841,500 $ 1,054,144
Analytical and Policy Support $ 4,000,000 $ 998,000 $ 809,956
ecoAUTO Rebate Program $ 252,700,000 $ 0 $ 0
Subtotal $ 315,300,000 $ 16,603,011 $ 12,155,856
 
Natural Resources Canada
ecoENERGY or Personal Vehicles $ 21,000,000 $ 4,632,275 $ 4,665,288
ecoENERGY for Fleets $ 22,000,000 $ 5,127,725 $ 4,810,771
Subtotal $ 43,000,000 $ 9,760,000 $ 9,476,059
 
Environment Canada
Vehicle Scrappage Program $ 90,800,000 $ 41,388,000 $ 30,247,496
Subtotal $ 90,800,000 $ 41,388,000 $ 30,247,496
 
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
ecoAUTO Rebate Program $ 11,300,000 $ 0 $ 0
Subtotal $ 11,300,000 $ 0 $ 0
Total Theme $ 460,400,000 $ 67,751,011 $ 51,879,411

 

Theme: Indoor Air Quality

Lead Department

Health Canada

Federal Theme Partners National Research Council Canada

Summary by Department

Federal Partner Name # Programs
for Federal Partners
Funding Approved
under CAA

(to March 31, 2011)
Planned Spending
2010-11
Actual Spending 2010-11
Health Canada 1 $ 15,000,000 $ 4,100,000 $ 3,819,144
National Research Council Canada 1 $ 8,000,000 $ 2,000,000 $ 1,998,495
Total 2 $ 23,000,000 $ 6,100,000 $ 5,817,639

2010-11 Expected Results

Theme: Indoor Air Quality - 2010-11 Expected Results

2010-11 Theme Performance Summary

Radon Strategy

A radon educational toolkit was completed and distributed to stakeholders, and a resource kit for health professionals was completed and mailed to family doctors, oncologists, respirologists and other healthcare providers across Canada. The purpose of these kits is to provide stakeholders with a variety of information which can be used to develop regional or community-focused outreach programs and activities. In addition, a radon fact sheet for smokers was developed and will be distributed in 2011-12.

In an effort to reduce environmental health risks, Health Canada launched the Hazard Check guide and public education campaign in March 2010, which included radon as one of the key risks targeted by increased awareness efforts.    

Aerial radiation surveys were performed in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba to assess the levels of uranium and other naturally-occurring radioactivity. At least 35% of Canada’s geographic area is now available for use in radon potential maps. Soil gas radon measurements were made in three major population centres in Ontario (Kingston and the Greater Toronto Area) and Quebec (Montreal) for use in the mapping of radon potential. 

Approximately 6,000 federal buildings were tested for radon in 2010-11, which exceeded the target of 5,000. The total number of federal buildings now tested over the four years of the project is approximately 9,000 or ~ 90% of federal buildings in known areas of high radon potential.

Health Canada and the National Environmental Health Association Radon Proficiency Program have developed Canadian-specific certification exams in both official languages, as well as a training curriculum which addresses radon within the Canadian context.

Indoor Air Research and Development Initiative

A field study on ventilation, Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and respiratory health has been performed and is 92% complete. With valuable input from the Indoor Air Research Laboratory, all interventions (introducing HRV, heat recovery ventilator, and ERV, energy recovery ventilator, systems) have been completed to improve ventilation. The Institut national de santé publique du Québec and the National Research Council Canada (NRC) have created databases for chemical, biological, physical, environmental, behavioural and medical results obtained from the field study, which will be analyzed to determine the relationships between ventilation scenarios and technologies, IAQ and health.

The following three IAQ solutions and technologies have been prioritized out of 50 potential candidate solutions: portable air cleaners, HRV and commercial air duct cleaning. Three evaluation protocols regarding these technologies have been developed under the guidance of a multi-stakeholder Technical Advisory Committee, and the performance of these solutions has been evaluated.

The Canadian Committee on Indoor Air Quality in Buildings met regularly, and an Executive Committee was established to guide this committee. The work of the committee has led to a survey on ‘Building Managers’ Knowledge of IA and Improvement Strategies’, as well as to a guidance document on ‘Sampling Strategies and Protocols for Organic Compounds in Buildings’.

2010-11 Theme Lessons Learned

It is unlikely that all federal buildings (~20,000) will have been tested by the funding completion date (end of 2012-13) for federal building testing. To further engage federal departments and organizations, Health Canda has provided information on the requirements under the Canadian Occupational Health and Safety Regulations to federal departments. In cases where departments have a large building stock and have developed a multi-year testing plan, provisions have been made for continued radon detector support beyond 2012-13, in order to ensure that the maximum number of buildings is completed.

Field studies with human subjects, especially from parts of vulnerable populations, are difficult to perform and often take more time than planned. There is a risk of participants dropping out and the study not having sufficient population to be statistically meaningful. To mitigate this risk and ensure timely completion, NRC continuously recruited participants and ensured participants met inclusion criteria. 

Involvement of stakeholder committee provides valuable input, but consensus-based decisions require much time and many revisions of the projected deliverables. To ensure timely outputs, stakeholders were engaged by NRC and were provided with clear objectives and timelines.

Theme Financial Summary

Federal Partner Programs Funding Approved under CAA Planned Spending
2010-11
Actual Spending
2010-11
Health Canada
Radon Strategy $ 15,000,000 $ 4,100,000 $ 3,819,144
Subtotal $ 15,000,000 $ 4,100,000 $ 3,819,144
 
National Research Council Canada
Indoor Air Research and Development Initiative $ 8,000,000 $ 2,000,000 $ 1,998,495
Subtotal $ 8,000,000 $ 2,000,000 $ 1,998,495
Total Theme $ 23,000,000 $ 6,100,000 $ 5,817,639

 

Theme: Adaptation

Lead Department

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Health Canada, Environment Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada

Summary by Department

Federal Partner Name # Programs for Federal Partners Funding Approved
under CAA

(to March 31, 2011)
Planned Spending
2010-11
Actual Spending 2010-11
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada 1 $ 14,000,000 $ 6,050,000 $ 5,978,661
Natural Resources Canada 1 $ 23,655,000 $ 10,564,323 $ 9,881,683
Health Canada 3 $ 23,600,000 $ 7,100,000 $ 6,757,117
Environment Canada 2 $ 36,300,000 $ 10,418,627 $ 9,904,657
Public Health Agency of Canada 1 $ 6,750,000 $ 2,544,210 $ 2,728,000
Total 8 $ 104,305,000 $ 36,677,160 $ 35,250,118

2010-11 Expected Results

Theme: Adaptation - 2010-11 Expected Results

2010-11 Theme Performance Summary

The Adaptation Theme has met or exceeded many of its expectations for 2010-11. 

Working directly with partners at the community, regional and national level, the theme was able to increase capacity to conduct science and encourage greater collaboration. Fifty-two Aboriginal and northern communities, traditional territories, settlement areas and Territorial governments and First Nations South of 60° were funded to complete 36 projects looking at climate change impacts and adaptation in Aboriginal and northern communities. Of the 36 projects, 16 focused on assessing climate risks and building adaptive capacity, 10 involved sharing climate change risk information to strengthen local decision making and adaptation planning, and 10 involved the development and use of adaptation plans. An additional 16 projects were funded to address the health impacts of climate change in the North. The projects focused on increasing understanding and developing adaptation options for community-based ice monitoring, surveillance and communication networks, land, water and ice safety, drinking water and food security and safety, and traditional medicine. Each year the number of projects funded and conducted has increased and many have included youth and Elders working together to gain knowledge.

Bilateral meetings were held with each territory to develop a framework on federal/territorial collaborations around climate change adaptation within territorial boundaries. Preliminary discussions are expected to begin to decide which projects will be included in this framework to deliver on territorial priorities. A PanArctic Results Workshop was also held in February 2011 and brought all communities funded to assess and plan for climate change and health impacts in the North together to showcase their results and share their knowledge and experiences with other communities, Aboriginal leaders and organizations, government, academia and Members of Parliament.

Communities were also supported in better understanding the health impacts of climate change through pilot processes and the dissemination of information products. Four community-based, pilot, heat alert and response systems were completed. Table top exercises were held in all four communities to assist public health practitioners and emergency planners in developing their systems (http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/pubs/climat/adapt_bulletin-adapt3/index-eng.php). Broad dissemination to medical officers of health and public health and emergency management officials is planned for:  “Heat Alert and Response Systems to Protect Health: Best Practices Guidebook” (Fall 2011);  “Extreme Heat Events Guidelines: Technical Guide for Health Care Workers” and associated fact sheets (http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/pubs/climat/index-eng.php) (Summer 2011); and,  “Communicating the Health Risks of Extreme Heat Events: Toolkit for Public Health and Emergency Management Officials” and associated heat-health brochures (http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/pubs/climat/heat-chaleur/index-eng.php) (Spring 2011). A series of workshops was also completed to support efforts to link urban planning with heat adaptation and mitigation.

Focusing on infectious disease, four geographically distinct pilot sites across Canada (Saint John, NB; Niagara, ON; Canmore-Cochrane, AB; Comox Valley Regional District, BC) addressed the health impacts of climate change in their regions. In addition, five universities (McGill University, Université de Montréal, University of Saskatchewan, University of Victoria, and York University) were solicited to conduct targeted research in vector-borne or water-borne infectious disease. Studies included: modelling West Nile virus transmission to predict and map future risk; development of multi-criteria decision analysis tools to assess and proactively manage vector-borne zoonosis (e.g. WNv and Lyme) risk at the community level; study of climate variables (precipitation, temperature) and landscape as predictors of mosquito vector populations to create the real time warning system for West Nile virus; and identification of the relationships between climate and existing and new water-borne pathogens and predicting future risk with a changing climate.

Partnerships have been established across Canada to enhance decision-making on adaptation issues. Six Regional Adaptation Collaboratives (RAC), covering all regions of Canada, have attracted 120 partners from municipalities, NGOs, Aboriginal organizations, academia and the private sector as well as 40 provincial and territorial agencies and departments, enhancing communication and joint work on 17 key regional adaptation issues. Collaboration is also taking place nationally through the creation of an integration group which allows RAC leaders to share experiences and expertise. An unplanned outcome from this activity has been an increase in adaptation-related activities both inside and outside of governments. Information has been disseminated and training delivered to further benefit adaptation planning. Four decision-support tools, 3 infrastructure case studies, and 23 reports were released increasing the availability of tools and information for use in planning adaptation. Engineers Canada delivered 6 workshops on the infrastructure risk assessment protocol bringing the number of people trained in its use to 345. The planners delivered two training workshops and are already noting an increase in application of climate change information in planners’ work.

There has also been progress in increasing the availability of adaptation and air quality information through the wider use of the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) and development and dissemination of climate change scenarios. By March 31, 2011, the AQHI was fully implemented across Canada in six provinces (NFLD, PEI, NS, MN, SK and BC) where the older, out of date provincial Air Quality Index (AQI) was dropped in favour of the AQHI. Successful negotiations with New Brunswick have led to the decision to move forward with province-wide implementation for Spring 2012. Alberta is planning to begin a phased approach towards full province-wide implementation beginning in June 2011. Quebec has completed its pilot of the AQHI in three locations and is evaluating next steps towards implementation. To date, the AQHI is available to approximately 17.5 million Canadians in 49 locations across Canada. Promotion of the AQHI has been extensive through a number of partners including: the Weather Network, the University of British Columbia, the Asthma Society, provincial Lung Associations and the College of Family Physicians of Canada. As of March 2011, 392 participants had enrolled and 160 participants had completed an e-learning course to raise awareness and understanding of the AQHI among health professionals. To view the public on-line website of the AQHI, please see www.airhealth.ca.

The development and dissemination of climate change projections and scenarios has strengthened the ability of all partners to conduct adaptation science. New climate change simulations and projections for Canada and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, to be released in 2014, continued to be in production using the internationally competitive Canadian global climate model. A new regional climate model used to downscale global climate change projections was developed, with testing and evaluation underway. Global and regional climate model output continued to be disseminated to users via the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma) data server and research results were widely disseminated via the CCCma website (http://www.cccma.ec.gc.ca/) and through peer-reviewed publications. A substantial suite of new climate change scenarios were also developed based on both Canadian and other climate models that are being delivered via the Canadian Climate Change Scenarios Network (http://cccsn.ca/) website. Further, legally required climatic design information has been updated in cooperation with the Canadian Standards Association for the development of new codes and standards for Canadian infrastructure.

2010-11 Theme Lessons Learned

Interest in Adaptation Theme programs has increased significantly over the three years of funding. Some funding programs were oversubscribed in the final year, and delivery of the funding in a timely and consistent manner has been challenging. Multi-year funding would provide long-term stability for proponents and allow projects to start earlier in the fiscal year. Ensuring ongoing support and implementation of partnerships and pilot studies was also a challenge. Programs provided support through departmental sharing of expertise and information with pilot communities and stakeholders, which enhanced the impact of projects. Local ownership and the development of sustainability plans were promoted to encourage continuation of programs. Early engagement was found to be key and a commitment to improving outreach and knowledge transfer is an ongoing need as communities and partners deal with competing priorities. Programs strived to be flexible to accommodate regional needs and variabilities, while maintaining national consistency.

Theme Financial Summary

Federal Partner Programs Funding Approved under CAA Planned Spending
2010-11
Actual Spending
2010-11
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Assist Northerners in Assessing Key Vulnerabilities and Opportunities $ 14,000,000 $ 6,050,000 $ 5,978,661
Subtotal $ 14,000,000 $ 6,050,000 $ 5,978,661
 
Natural Resources Canada
Innovative Risk Management Tools / Regional Adaptation Action Partnerships $ 23,655,000 $10,564,323 $ 9,881,683
Subtotal $ 23,655,000 $ 10,564,323 $ 9,881,683
 
Health Canada
National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program $ 8,700,000 $ 2,200,000 $ 1,635,999
Climate Change and Health Adaptation in Northern/Inuit Communities $ 7,000,000 $ 2,150,000 $ 2,162,693
Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System to Protect the Health of Canadians $ 7,900,000 $ 2,750,000 $ 2,958,425
Subtotal $ 23,600,000 $ 7,100,000 $ 6,757,117
 
Environment Canada
National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program $ 21,300,000 $ 5,800,000 $ 5,750,940
Improved Climate Change Scenarios $ 15,000,000 $ 4,618,627 $ 4,153,717
Subtotal $ 36,300,000 $ 10,418,627 $ 9,904,657
 
Public Health Agency of Canada
Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System to Protect the Health of Canadians $ 6,750,000 $ 2,544,210 $ 2,728,000
Subtotal $ 6,750,000 $ 2,544,210 $ 2,728,000
Total Theme $ 104,305,000 $ 36,677,160 $ 35,250,118

 

Theme: International Actions

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Industry Canada

Summary by Department

Federal Partner Name # Programs for Federal Partners Funding Approved under CAA
(to March 31, 2011)
Planned Spending 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11
Environment Canada 5 $ 39,831,067 $ 13,418,671 $ 15,393,666
Natural Resources Canada 3 $ 7,838,650 $ 2,304,000 $ 2,154,707
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade 3 $ 9,264,900 $ 2,527,000 $ 2,405,648
Industry Canada 1 $ 240,000 $ 40,000 $ 22,665
Total 12 $ 57,174,617 $ 18,289,671 $ 19,976,686

2010-11 Expected Results

Theme: International Actions - 2010-11 Expected Results

2010-11 Theme Achieved Results

Canada has met all current financial and other obligations under international climate change treaties and agreements; dues were paid to United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC); and Canada complied with all reporting requirements. Environment Canada (EC), Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) and, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) constructively engaged in five UNFCCC negotiating meetings to advance Canada’s objectives and advocated Canada’s objectives at other multilateral processes such as the G8, G20, Major Economies Forum, la Francophonie, Clean Energy Ministerial and Arctic Council. Environment Canada strengthened bilateral policy and project-based cooperation with key countries (in particular, China and Mexico), and engaged with key domestic constituencies (Provinces/Territories, national Aboriginal organizations and civil society) regarding Canada’s UN negotiation objectives and positions. In December 2010, Canada adopted the UNFCCC’s Cancun Agreements, which meets Canada’s objectives for a comprehensive range of issues.

In this final of four years, EC, working with DFAIT, Industry Canada and NRCAN, invested nearly $8M in Canadian public-private partnership clean technology projects under the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate, the Global Methane Initiative, and the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership. This resulted in a total 4-year investment of nearly $16M which leveraged over $115M in investments from the private sector and other governments. The projects delivered environmental benefits (in particular, greenhouse gas reductions), economic benefits to Canadian companies and accelerated clean technology development and deployment across a range of industrial sectors, including zero energy buildings, renewable energy, landfill gas, power generation and oil & gas.

Preliminary analysis of the proposed United States (U.S.) approach to reducing emissions of particulate matter (PM) precursors on Canada’s air quality were completed and Canada continued to engage Canadian  stakeholders to help finalize elements of Canada’s proposed Air Quality Management System.  Canada hosted the annual meeting of the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Committee in November 2010, during which the Committee agreed to a path forward on a PM Annex. Canada and the U.S. will also implement a number of activities in 2011-12 to mark the 20th anniversary of the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement. 

Environment Canada, NRCan and DFAIT’s Clean Energy Dialogue (CED) program increased collaboration and knowledge sharing with the US by coordinating clean energy technology research and development to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Theme Financial Summary

Federal Partner Programs Funding Approved under CAA Planned Spending
2010-11
Actual Spending
2010-11
Environment Canada
International Obligations $ 2,892,000 $ 623,000 $ 989,621
International Participation and Negotiations $ 11,400,000 $ 2,700,000 $ 4,227,408
Asia-Pacific Partnership $ 18,882,664 $ 7,308,166 $ 8,163,023
PM Annex $ 2,200,000 $ 550,000 $ 153,079
Clean Energy Dialogue $ 4,456,403 $ 2,237,505 $ 1,860,535
Subtotal $ 39,831,067 $ 13,418,671 $ 15,393,666
 
Natural Resources Canada
International Participation and Negotiations $ 5,200,000 $ 1,200,000 $ 1,118,586
Asia-Pacific Partnership $ 877,300 $ 181,800 $ 181,800
Clean Energy Dialogue $ 1,761,350 $ 922,200 $ 854,321
Subtotal $ 7,838,650 $ 2,304,000 $ 2,154,707
 
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
International Obligations $ 1,908,000 $ 477,000 $ 477,000
International Participation and Negotiations $ 6,400,000 $ 1,450,000 $ 1,370,879
Clean Energy Dialogue $ 956,900 $ 600,000 $ 557,769
Subtotal $ 9,264,900 $ 2,527,000 $ 2,405,648
 
Industry Canada
Asia-Pacific Partnership $ 240,000 $ 40,000 $ 22,665
Subtotal $ 240,000 $ 40,000 $ 22,665
Total Theme $ 57,174,617 $ 18,289,671 $ 19,976,686

 

Theme: Management and Accountability

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Summary by Department

Federal Partner Name # Programs for Federal Partners Funding Approved under CAA
(to March 31, 2011)
Planned Spending 2010-11 Actual Spending 2010-11
Environment Canada 1 $ 5,000,000 $ 1,250,000 $ 1,143,978
Total 1 $ 5,000,000 $ 1,250,000 $ 1,143,978

2010-11 Expected Results

Theme: Management and Accountability - 2010-11 Expected Results

2010-11 Theme Performance Summary

Improved accountability of the federal government to parliamentarians and Canadians for Clean Air Agenda (CAA) expenditures and activities was supported through the engagement of CAA partner departments and agencies in the development of horizontal performance reports by the Clean Air Agenda Results Management Secretariat (CAARMS).

The evaluation of the Management and Accountability (M&A) Theme concluded that the Theme “brought coherence to the horizontal reporting of CAA activities and results and has emerged as a strong success story, in large part because of the CAARMS. Central agency representatives said that it was a key model to follow for reporting on horizontal initiatives.”

Through the Clean Air Agenda - Horizontal Management, Accountability and Reporting Framework, the M&A Theme provided integrated performance data (financial and non-financial) on CAA Themes and programs for the 2007-11 mandate to CAA partner departments. The evaluation of the CAA noted as a best practice: “the approach of the CAARMS to ensure effective financial and performance data collection, compilation and reporting (acknowledged by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat to be a model of reporting on a horizontal initiative)”. This data assisted the CAA governance and decision-makers in planning for the renewal of CAA funding post 2011.

Central agencies were assisted with their responsibilities for ongoing horizontal governance and accountability of federal management of environmental investments through analyses of the 2007-11 data developed by CAARMS.  

2010-11 Theme Lessons Learned

In developing forward looking proposals for the Horizontal Management, Accountability and Reporting Framework, the M&A Theme turned its focus to finding more efficient and effective ways to integrate with existing processes (e.g., existing Assistant Deputy Minister committees) with a view to improving policy linkages and reducing administrative burdens on participating departments while supporting ongoing transparency of the federal management of clean air.

Theme Financial Summary

Federal Partner Programs Funding Approved under CAA Planned Spending
2010-11
Actual Spending
2010-11
Environment Canada
Management and Accountability $ 5,000,000 $ 1,250,000 $ 1,143,978
Subtotal $ 5,000,000 $ 1,250,000 $ 1,143,978
Total Theme $ 5,000,000 $ 1,250,000 $ 1,143,978

 

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Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


FINTRAC is involved in the following horizontal initiatives as a partner:

  1. Anti-Money Laundering / Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime (AML/ATF)
  2. Public Security and Anti-Terrorism Initiative (PSAT)
  3. National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS)

Supplementary information on horizontal initiatives can be found at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hidb-bdih/home-accueil-eng.aspx.


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Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Horizontal Initiatives


Health of the Oceans (HOTO)

Lead department: Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Strategic Outcome: Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems

Program Activity: Oceans Management

Start Date: April 1, 2007

End Date: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $61.5 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Building on the achievements of the Oceans Action Plan, the Health of the Oceans Initiative is a five-year, $61.5 million commitment by five departments — Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), Transport Canada, Environment Canada, Parks Canada and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada — to improve the health of the ocean environment. For its part, DFO will receive $23.2 million to support its protection and conservation work. Key DFO initiatives include establishing six new Marine Protected Areas (MPA) under the Oceans Act, advancing a national MPA network, conducting scientific research to support designation of the new MPAs, creating four new national Oceans Centres of Expertise, and enhancing spill-response capacity and emergency planning in the Arctic Ocean. For a complete list, see the table below. DFO will co-ordinate the entire Health of the Oceans initiative. This will include bi-annual performance monitoring, the preparation of summary annual reports and preparation for a final summative evaluation.

Shared Outcome(s):

  • Four new Oceans Centres of Expertise
  • Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy: finalization of planning guidelines for federal MPA network
  • Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy: preparation of a status report of federal MPA
  • Federal-Provincial-Territorial Marine Protected Areas network (2012)
  • Marine Protected Areas establishment
  • Collaboration with the World Wildlife Fund-Canada
  • Delivery of a suite of indicators to assess and monitor Arctic ecosystems
  • Integrated Oceans Management and Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) assessment tools linkage

Governance Structure(s): This initiative is subject to interdepartmental government through the Assistant Deputy Ministers Interdepartmental Committee on Oceans, supported by a shadow Director General Committee. This Governance structure reviews the initiatives on a regular basis including review and approval of annual reports to Ministers on the progress of this initiative.

Performance Highlights: The Oceans Directorate at DFO monitors the HOTO initiative biannually and develops tools and processes to capture and report performance information. The monitoring and reporting process assesses progress against work plans and thus provides an opportunity for adaptive functions during the projects life cycle. The collaborative governance structure contributes to facilitated information access and exchange and leads to better informed decisions relating to program planning and management. An annual performance summary is prepared for submission to TBS.


Federal Partner / Program Activity Name of Program
for Federal Partner
Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending 2010–11 Actual Spending 2010–11 Expected Results
for 2010-11
Results Achieved
in 2010-11
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Oceans Management Federal Marine Protected Areas Strategy Implement-ation in DFO 1250.0 250.0 234.71 Advance the creation by 2012 of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada's oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management framework. • Compiled federal data for completion of a national inventory of MPAs and for inclusion in the Conservation Areas Reporting and Tracking System (housed at EC). The data for inclusion in a 2010 "Spotlight on Marine Protected Areas in Canada" report was analyzed, co-produced with PCA and EC, and launched on Oceans Day (June 8th). DFO also participated in the development of an associated online mapping platform for display and reporting on MPAs in Canada, to make more information on MPAs and MPA networks available to Canadians (EC lead).
• Initiated production of MPA and MPA network communications materials such as a booklet for industry, a benefits & costs and common Q & A fact sheets, to increase awareness and understanding of, and participation in, MPA network planning and management.
• Presented Canada's approach to MPA network planning at the California and the World's Ocean conference in San Fransisco in September 2010. DFO participated in ICES-NAMPAN Working Group meeting to develop international guidance on designing Marine Protected Areas to mitigate and adapt to the effects of Climate Change. The department also worked with US and Mexican colleagues to plan next activities of NAMPA, the North American Marine Protected Areas program under the Convention on International Cooperation.
Development of a Federal-Provincial-Territorial MPA Network 2,500.0 650.0 215.52 Significant progress in planning and advancement of a National (federal-provincial-territorial) Marine Protected Area Network in Canada's three oceans. For 2010-11, further alignment with the Federal Network, and considerable engagement/
consultation with other jurisdictions and oceans stakeholders.
• Completed the national inventory of MPAs, in collaboration with federal/provincial/territorial (FPT) colleagues. The MPA inventory, an expansion of the Canadian Council on Ecological Areas (CCEA)'s Conservation Areas Reporting and Tracking System (CARTS) (housed at EC), provides a snapshot of existing FPT MPAs that have potential to contribute to MPA network planning.
• Worked with colleagues in Science to initiate a work plan for a 2-phase process (discussion paper followed by expert workshop) for developing indicators and protocols to test effectiveness of MPA networks through monitoring programs.
• Major efforts went into engagement of stakeholders on the draft National Framework. There was also a web-based period of public review. As a result of these efforts, the National Framework was well received when presented at the International Marine Management Congress in Victoria in May 2011 and the document is now on track for approval by the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers (CCFAM) in the fall of 2011.
Arctic Council – Ecosystem Projects 1,000.0 225.0 214.63 Continued work towards the development of a State of the Arctic Basin Report and use of common ecosystem monitoring strategies in shared and boundary waters by 2012. Canada's continued participation in expert workshops and major conferences on ecosystem approach for advancing EBM concepts and approaches, promoting Canada's leadership in EBM applied to the Arctic, and sharing information and practices with other circumpolar countries, including the US. A suite of indicators for monitoring and assessing ecosystem status and trends, socio-economic aspects and governance structures in place in Arctic. • Formal review of the working map of Arctic large marine ecosystems (LMEs) including LMEs located within and adjacent to Canadian Arctic waters. This working map supports the work of a number of the Council initiatives including summary documents outlining the state and condition of biodiversity within the LME.
• Produced geospatial data layers needed to inform an oil and gas decision support tool. Supported the completion of a socio economic overview and assessment of the Beaufort Area.
• To address a recommendation of the Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment which calls for "Arctic states to take into account the special characteristics of the Arctic Marine environment, explore the need for internationally designated areas for the purpose of environmental protection in regions of the Arctic Ocean", background documents were prepared to support drafting of the first two versions of the AOR report, and to inform two peer-review processes designed to identify Ecologically and Biologically Significant areas in all Canadian Arctic marine waters.
Oceans Centres of Expertise (Coastal, Corals, Data Integration, TEK) 3,000.0 600.0 589.64 Four national centres of expertise have been established within the regions of DFO. Through 2010-11, development and implementation of common tools and approaches in the five LOMAs will continue to protect deep sea corals and sponge reefs, incorporate traditional knowledge, develop state of the oceans reports and accelerate progress in addressing coastal management issues. Cold Water Corals and Sponge Reefs

• Published a Status Report on Coral and Sponge Conservation in Canada.
• Completed a Communications Strategy
• Established a GCPedia page which displays information on the CoE's projects as well as the activities of the National Working Group.
• Provided a detailed review of the Pacific Region's Coral and Sponge Conservation Strategy

COE in Traditional Ecological Knowledge (CETEK): led a one and a half day workshop. The workshop objectives were to review the proposed elements of draft national TEK strategy for the way DFO uses TK for integrated management; to develop a set of applications for incorporating TK into integrated ocean management plans and to inform the development of national guidelines for TEK.

State of the Oceans Reporting: Sub-groups prepared tables of content for each regional LOMA report. 12 reports were published to serve as background and supplementary material to the 5 regional LOMA reports. Each region has met with stakeholders.

Center of Expertise in Coastal Management (CECM)

• Initiated reviews of effectiveness of legislations related to managing cumulative environmental effects, and existing coastal management legislation for a policy gap analysis.
• Production of a series of key manuscripts and guidelines for the CECM Tool kit (ecosystem-based risk analysis frameworks, tools and approaches) was initiated.
CECM participated in various workshops and meetings to present progress on its work

Collaboration with World Wildlife Fund (WWF) 213.0 42.6 42.6 Greater contribution by environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGOs), such as the WWF, to the Health of the Oceans, with an emphasis on joint initiatives between WWG-Canada and DFO in the Newfoundland and Labrador region. Activities in 2010-11 will be targeted towards advancing ecosystem-based management in the Placentia Bay/Grand Banks LOMA, the development of a Cold Water Coral Conservation Strategy for the Newfoundland and Labrador region, and the identification/pursuit of collaborative projects with provincial government, aboriginal groups, stakeholders and other ENGOs.

DFO's Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) Region and WWF-Canada have been working together on a number of issues that have served to enhance collaboration between both organizations, the results of which contribute towards delivering Health of the Oceans. WWF participates in the following activities:

• development and identification of conservation priorities associated with the Placentia Bay/Grand Banks Large Oceans Management Area (PB/GB LOMA), as well as development of a risk assessment;
• planning process of the PB/GB Integrated Management Plan;
MPA planning and selection process for the Area of Interest (AOI)
• cod recovery planning and monitoring of the implementation of the recovery plan;
• development and subsequent implementation of a Cold Water Coral Conservation Strategy; encounter protocol framework for corals and sponges; promoting research gaps and opportunities with respect to corals and sponges.
Gulf of Maine (at DFO) 750.0 147.5 150.95 This initiative builds on the existing successful trans-boundary collaboration and management of Groundfish stocks through the CA-US Steering Committee, and the excellent cooperation between states and provinces through the Gulf of Maine Council. Based on DFO's national standard, a literature review and project work plan for a joint CA-US Bay of Fundy/Gulf of Maine Ecosystem Overview and Assessment Report was developed as part of the 2005 Oceans Action Plan. Through 2010-11, transboundary, multi-jurisdicational governance structures will be advanced. Further discussions regarding the possible mechanisms/
structure for developing a collaborative Canada/US management model for the Gulf of Maine.
The final ecosystem and overview report has been completed in partnership with the National Marine Fisheries Service (US). The State of the Gulf of Maine Report was released on June 8, 2010 in Portland, Maine in partnership with the Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment. In addition to the context document, an additional 5 theme papers were produced and released in 2010-11. Ongoing dialogue with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through the Gulf of Maine Council resulted in the creation of a Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Working Group which was co-chaired by DFO and NOAA.
Marine Protected Areas Establishment 5,250.0 937.5 1,097.56 Six new MPAs will be designated by 2012 and a national monitoring and reporting system will be implemented for all Oceans Act MPAs. Through 2010-11, public and stakeholder consultation will continue to advance six proposed areas of interest toward designation in 2011-12. • All regions have identified their proposed Areas of Interest (AOI); there are 6 AOIs continuing through the designation process.
• In June 2010, the Laurentian Channel was announced as an Area of Interest (AOI) for potential designation as an MPA, in the Newfoundland and Labrador region.
• In September 2010, Paulatuk (Darnley Bay) was announced as an AOI in the Central and Arctic region for potential designation as an MPA.
• Regions are pursuing preparatory work towards consultations and identification of conservation objectives.
Integrated Management and Canadian Environmental Assessment Act Assessment Tools Linkages 1,450.0 425.0 394.77 Integrated management carried out under the Health of the Oceans initiative will be bridged with other tools, such as project environmental assessment conducted under the authority of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. Work on the Regional Strategic Environmental Assessment Pilot Projects as well as training and education on pathways of effect models will continue. • Examined and analyzed marine spatial planning as a tool through which to manage and reduce cumulative environmental effects and provide increased guidance to marine users. Necessitates collaboration with World Wildlife Fund, and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration.
• Developed guidance regarding the application of risk analysis in the coastal and marine environment as a means through which to further identify priority areas and issues requiring management attention (including development of a risk characterization methodology ).
• Discussions with CEAA on the adoption DFO ecosystem-based management tools as a framework for regional environmental assessment.
• Co-chaired with the Surveyor General of Canada an inter-departmental steering committee and organized two workshops in support of the development of a business case for the establishment of a marine cadastre for Canada.
Science for Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems Ecosystem Science Support and Advice on Health of the Oceans 5,500.0 1,100.0 1,100.0 Science advice on Marine Protected Areas and on priority sector-specific impacts and mitigation, as outlined by the Oceans programs, will be provided. Specific projects will be developed through the Canadian Science Advisory process. Sound scientific footing was provided for a number of the HOTO initiatives including the identification of conservation objectives and boundary delineation for areas of interest and the development of indicators and monitoring protocols. The Science Directorate also assesses potential environmental impacts and ecological risks posed by specific ocean activities, which constitute Sector Impact Advisory Assessments.
Canadian Coast Guard Spill Capacity and Emergency Response Strategy 2,260.0 134.18 632.19 Canada's spill response capacity in the Arctic assessed, and equipment and systems to respond to the unique risks prepared. The procurement of remaining systems and equipment required to complete the project will take place in 2010-11. Funding allocated through HOTO enabled the Canadian Coast Guard to add/replace equipment at 10 existing depots and outfit nine additional sites and for the communities to have the necessary equipment and systems to enhance their containment /protection ability or reduce the logistical lead time for a response to an environmental risk. Delivery of the kits to the remote Arctic communities was completed in fiscal year 2010-11.
Environment Canada
Biodiversity and Corporate services Federal Marine Protected Areas Strategy – Implement-ation in EC 1,250.0 250.0 226.110 Advance the creation by 2012 of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada's oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management framework.

In collaboration with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and Parks Canada (PC):
• Finalized the compilation for the inventory of existing federal, provincial, and territorial marine protected areas. EC also expanded on the Canadian Council on Ecological Areas' (CCEA) Conservation Areas Reporting and Tracking System (CARTS) to create one central database for all marine protected areas in Canada - CARTS Marine.
• Published the Spotlight Report on World Oceans Day, June 8th, 2010. The Spotlight Report describes progress made in Canada on the establishment of marine protected areas in Canada's three oceans and Great Lakes.
• Compiled and updated identified migratory bird key habitat sites (in Hudson Bay Complex). This work ensured a significant advance in EC marine conservation interests for consideration in the Nunavut land use planning process.

Marine Wildlife Areas Establishment 2,000.0 507.0 211.711 Both the National Wildlife Area at Sable Island and Marine Wildlife Area at Scott Islands will be ready for designation by 2012, and a contribution will have been made to the Federal Marine Protected Area Network building process.

Sable Island: A recommendation to the Minister was made for designation of Sable Island as a National Park under the Canada National Parks Act. This decision was made public in May.
Scott Islands: A traditional knowledge and use study for the proposed MWA has been completed, and spatial information has been compiled and analyzed to inform the development of a recommended boundary option. Key ecological drivers and information for the development of conservation objectives and proposed boundary for the MWA were identified. Significant progress has also been made towards initiating the socio-economic study, engagement with stakeholders, consultations with First Nations and discussions with partner agencies.

Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision making and Corporate services Sable Island Weather Station 4,000.0 800.0 799.7 The risk of loss of life or property due to weather events is reduced for mariners, Canadian citizens and the international community, by producing more accurate weather forecasts and warnings using data from the Sable Island Weather Station.
The understanding of upper atmospheric conditions and the flow of airborne pollutants and greenhouse gases is improved, by enabling scientific research through the continued existence of the Sable Island Weather Station infrastructure.
The unique and fragile ecosystem of Sable Island is conserved by protecting it from human degradation.
Funds provided through this initiative ensure that continued maintenance and repairs of facilities and infrastructure have been carried out to ensure functionality of the weather station for a continued 24/7 human presence throughout the year. On-going support was once again provided by Environment Canada Meteorological Service of Canada staff to operate upper air and surface weather programs, as well as atmospheric and other scientific research programs. Emergency and safety services were offered to local operators such as Department of National Defence, Department of Fisheries and Oceans (including Canadian Coast Guard) and the offshore petroleum industry.
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes and Corporate services Gulf of Maine (at EC) 751.0 148.0 148.0 Increased support for the Gulf of Maine Council and implementation of the joint Canada-US five-year action plan that includes implementation of regional strategies for adaptation to climate change, indicators development, education and engagement and joint monitoring for toxic contaminants in the trans-boundary ecosystem.

Support towards the Implementation of the Action Plan: Support for the Gulf of Maine Council's Secretariat is conducted via conference calls, email list serves and updates on the GoMC website. EC also led the establishment of a Canadian GoMC Steering Committee to ensure a coordinated Canadian response to GoMC activities.
Gulfwatch: Chemical Contaminant Monitoring Program: Samples were collected from around the Gulf of Maine and analyzed for selected parameters. Sampling data from previous years was also reviewed, synthesized and sent to GoMC IT to be uploaded on the Gulfwatch website
(http://www.gulfof
maine.org /gulfwatch/
).
Ecosystem Indicator Partnership (ESIP): Indicator data for water quality, habitat/land areas and climate change were compiled and delivered to GoMC IT for incorporation into the on-line ESIP Indicator Reporting Tool (http://www.gulfof
maine.org/esip/
).
Climate Change Network (CCN): Background reports on possible effects of extreme precipitation and other climate change impacts on stream flow and water quality in the Gulf of Maine were produced.
Outreach: Developped a communications strategy aimed at more effectively engaging both internal and external audiences. Fact sheets were released and distributed, an on-line edition of the Gulf of Maine Times was produced and published and a symposium report from the Regional Association for Research on the Gulf of Maine (RARGOM) Science Symposium 2009 was printed. Presentations were also made at events.

Parks Canada Agency
Heritage Places Establishment Federal Marine Protected Area Strategy Implement-ation in Parks Canada 1,250.0 361.0 325.312 Advance the creation by 2012 of a Federal Network of Marine Protected Areas that contributes to the health of Canada's oceans, established and managed within an integrated oceans management framework. By 2010-11, the Education and Outreach Strategy will be finalized. Development of communications products will continue. • Regional analysis and research studies were completed for the Bay of Fundy, the Arctic Basin, Arctic Archipelago and Queen Maud Gulf marine regions to identify Parks Canada's representative marine areas for those regions. PCA also completed additional research in the James Bay marine region to better understand representative elements of a study area for a promising national marine conservation area candidate.
• Planned/realised World Oceans Day activities, including a video project; special public events at the Canadian Museum of Nature, a special evening event on Parliament Hill for Parliamentarians, the launch of the Oceans Portal and the publication of "Spotlight on Marine protected areas in Canada".
• Participated in the development of the federal/provincial/territorial MPA Inventory; and co-produced the publication "Spotlight on Canada's MPAs" report, launched by DFO's Minister on Oceans Day.
• Completed the 25 minutes documentary Emerald Sea video project on Pacific marine environments and the role of MPAs to be shown on BC ferries and by the Vancouver Aquarium. In 2010-2011, the video was finalized and education materials are now underway.
National Marine Conservation Area in Lancaster Sound 5,000.0 1,250.0 Information
not
available
By 2012, achieve a full understanding of the feasibility of establishing a National Marine Conservation Area in Lancaster Sound with the support of Inuit, Nunavut and key sectoral stakeholders, leading to the conservation of a significant representative component of Canada's marine environment and a clear demonstration of Arctic sovereignty in the Northwest Passage. In December 2010, the federal ministers of Environment, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, Natural Resources, and Health jointly announced the Government of Canada's position on a proposed boundary for the NMCA, as a starting point for consultations with local communities and other interests. Work is underway to update a previous mineral and energy resources assessment of the area that had been conducted in the late 1980's; final decisions regarding a boundary will also be informed by that work and by a thorough assessment of the area's ecological value. While consultations take place, no exploration or development of petroleum resources will occur within the proposed boundaries. Once approved as a designated NMCA, the region will remain protected from industrial development, regardless of the resource potential. A Parks Canada-Government of Nunavut- Qikiqtani Inuit Association project steering committee was appointed early in 2011 and has been overseeing next steps, including terms of reference to guide the consultations and other matters.
Transport Canada
Transportation Safety and Security and Internal Services Enforcement of Ballast Water Regulations 4,500.0 966.5 966.5 Enforcement of regulations that minimize the risk of harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens from being introduced through ship ballast water to waters under Canadian jurisdiction. • Provided inspectors with the equipment required to verify compliance with regulations, developed tools to assess risk of ballast water drawn from specific ports and treatment options for ballast water.
• Updated the ballast water enforcement program and held a national work group comprised of Regional inspectors in Ottawa and Toronto. New ballast water test equipment for inspectors was purchased.
• Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations were pre-published in the Canada Gazette Part I, on December 18, 2010. They will bring the current regulations under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.
• Updated the national ballast water database with the backlog of reporting forms from vessels. This data is used by both inspectors for enforcement and scientists for their work in invasive species.
• Evaluated if regulations have sufficiently reduced risk of harmful introductions to Canada's northern ports with a biological sampling program in Churchill.
• Inspectors screened all ballast water reports received from inbound vessels and action was taken to bring any vessels into compliance with the regulations.
Pollution Prevention - Surveillance 13,000.0 3,180.6 3,177.6 Enforcement of Canada's pollution prevention regulations in the Pacific, Arctic, East Coast Waters, the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the St. Lawrence Estuary. TC completed a total of 2,505.8 productive patrol hours nationally for 2010-2011 as the three NASP aircraft conducted surveillance in the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario, Newfoundland and Labrador, the Pacific Northwest Region and British Columbia, with an additional 246.8 patrol hours in the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon Response Operations. 84 spills in total were detected this year. Evidence gathered with the recently acquired maritime surveillance system has been used to prepare and pursue prosecutions, fines and pleas from marine polluters. Increased surveillance also results in more responses to search and rescue incidents.
Pollution Prevention – Dash 7 Outfitting 5,000.0 0 0 Project completed in 2009-10. Enforcement of Canada's pollution prevention regulations in the Pacific, Arctic, East Coast Waters, the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the St. Lawrence Estuary. Modernization of the current Dash 7 surveillance aircraft to a standard equal to the Dash 8 surveillance aircraft dedicated for use on the East and West Coast. Component completed.
Arctic International Marine Shipping Assessment 550.0 0 0 Project completed in 2009-10. An assessment of projected shipping activities and the associated environmental, social and economic impacts and risks as reduced sea ice may lead to increased marine transport in the Arctic. Component completed.
Pollution Prevention – Ship Waste Reduction Strategy 800.0 200.0 180.713 Adequate reception facilities for wastes; appropriate legislation and standards.

Due to numerous requests from the marine industry, an additional contract was awarded to Alion Science and Technology to include a new section in the Vessel Waste Technology Study addressing residual air emissions. The Vessel Waste Technology Study was completed late in March.

During the development of the Vessel Waste Technology Study, the Canadian Marine Advisory Council's (CMAC) Environment Standing Committee was actively and fully engaged in 10 meetings to consult on the study's content. Four meetings were held at the Standing Committee's National CMAC meeting in Ottawa and six outreach meetings were held in Vancouver and Halifax.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Northern land Resources Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment/ Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment from land-based sources of pollution 175.0 0 0 Project completed in 2008-09. An expanded arctic regional program of action on land-based sources of pollution; a greater understanding of Aboriginal Arctic marine resource use; and a greater understanding of the social, economic and environmental impacts from changing shipping patterns on northern and aboriginal communities Component completed.
Total 61,449.0 12,174.8  


Contact Information:


Wayne Moore
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
200 Kent Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0E6
Telephone: 613-990-0001
Email: Wayne.Moore@dfo-mpo.gc.ca


1 Funds reallocated to other Oceans priorities that were under-funded. There was also a 10% cut across the board on O&M funds for the DFO Oceans Program.

2 Funds reallocated to other Oceans priorities that were under-funded. There was also a 10% cut across the board on O&M funds for the DFO Oceans Program.

3 There was a 10% cut across all O&M funds for the Oceans Program.

4 There was a 10% cut across all O&M funds for the Oceans Program.

5 An additional $3.4K is allocated to this component from other sources to balance the O&M envelope which is in deficit after taxes are paid.

6 Expenditures for this project exceeded funds allocated through HOTO. The balance of funds was obtained from other sources of funding.

7 There was a 10% cut across all O&M funds for the Oceans Program.

8 Funds from previous fiscal year transferred to 2010-11.

9 Due to delays incurred in previous fiscal years but the ability to carry forward funds, the project was completed.

10 The variance of funds was allocated to other priorities.

11 A portion of funds were used for other priorities. The remainder of the funds lapsed because of Sable Island being designated as a National Park under Parks Canada Agency.

12 Delays were incurred and resulted in having to move some projects into the next fiscal year. Parks Canada has requested a carry forward for the balance of funds.

13 The balance of funds lapsed due to a derelict vessel study which could not be completed.

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Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Horizontal Initiatives




Name of Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of Lead Department(s): Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: Dipl