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ARCHIVED - 2009-2010 DPRs - Horizontal Initiatives

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Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

AgriInsurance
AgriInvest
AgriRecovery - Agricultural Disaster Relief Program (ADRP)
AgriStability
AgriFlexibility
Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan element of Growing Forward
Growing Forward Program Initiatives Development
Co-operative Development Initiative
The Canadian Rural Partnership


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInsurance (Statutory)

2. Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriInsurance is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, it is only possible to provide an estimate of the total cost of the program. The initial estimate is that it will cost $1,629.4 million over four years (2008-09 to 2011-12).

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriInsurance (formerly known as Production and Crop Insurance) aims to reduce the financial impact on producers of production losses caused by uncontrollable natural perils including drought, flood, wind, frost, excessive rain, heat, snow, uncontrollable disease, insect infestations, and wildlife.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal/Provincial AgriInsurance Agreement.

The program links to the departmental Strategic Outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's Outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

8. Shared Outcome:
To mitigate the financial impacts of production losses by providing effective insurance protection.

9. Governance Structures:

AgriInsurance is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM Program Activity.

AgriInsurance is a provincial-territorial program to which the federal government contributes financially under the Federal/Provincial AgriInsurance Agreement. The program is administered provincially in all provinces. The federal and provincial governments cost-share a portion of the premium costs together with program participants. Governments also fully share the administrative costs of the program (60:40 federal-provincial).

Governance structure includes various national standards outlined in Canada Production Insurance Regulations. Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity
(PA)
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total
Allocation
(from Start
to End Date)
14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
AAFC Business Risk Management AgriInsurance 1,629.4
over four years (2008-09 to
2011-12)
410.8 505.1 Minimize production and asset losses caused by several uncontrollable natural hazards like drought, flood, wind, frost, excessive rain, heat, snow, disease, insect infestations and wildlife Production losses were mitigated with indemnity payments of $930 as 64.5 million acres are covered for a value of $11,900.9
Total 1,629.4 410.8 505.1    

Note: Numbers may not add exactly due to rounding.

18. Comments on Variances:

The increase in grant and contribution payments is a result of the substantial increase in premiums caused by higher grain prices which are reflected in the insurable values.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Planning and development activities are done jointly with the provinces. Therefore, the expected results are the same, but the achieved results will vary by province.

20. Contact information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
Floor 3, Room 241
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
danny.foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2009-10 RPP. They represent amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submissions. However, they do not include any additional amounts that may have been brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2009-10 through the Supplementary Estimates process, due to the timing of the 2009-10 RPP. This program is statutory and demand-driven, therefore, actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriStability, AgriInvest and AgriRecovery. Total allocation and actual spending are reflected net of indirect costs.


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1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriInvest (Statutory)

2. Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriInvest is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, it is only possible to provide an estimate of the total cost of the program. The current estimate is that it will cost $851.4 million over five years (2007-08 to 2011-12).

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriInvest allows producers to self-manage, through producer-government savings accounts, the first 15% of their margin losses for a program year and/or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues. Under the program, annual producer deposits of up to 1.5% of their allowable net sales are matched by government deposits. Government deposits are cost-shared 60:40 by federal and provincial/territorial governments. In combination with the AgriStability program, AgriInvest is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

AgriInvest provides producers with a secure, accessible, predictable, and bankable source of income assistance to address small drops in farm income and manage on-farm risks.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal/Provincial/Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.

The program links to the departmental Strategic Outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's Outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

8. Shared Outcome:

To provide producers with flexibility in how they choose to manage and/or mitigate small income losses through the availability of timely and predictable funds

9. Governance Structures:

The AgriInvest program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM Program Activity. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are shared by the federal government and the provinces and the Yukon Territory on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

For the 2008 program year, the AgriInvest program was delivered by the federal government in all provinces except Quebec. The Federal Government has worked with financial institutions to set up the infrastructure necessary to establish and hold AgriInvest accounts in summer 2010 for the 2009 program year. In Quebec, the AgriInvest program is, and will continue to be, delivered provincially by La Financière agricole du Québec.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity
(PA)
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
AAFC Business Risk Management AgriInvest 851.4 168.9 147.0 Help producers to reduce/mitigate small income losses (losses of up to 15% of their margins relative to their historical margins) Participation in AgriInvest reached 73% of all Canadian producers in its first year 2007-08 (Target: 65%). Reached agreement with financial institutions to take on producer accounts for the 2009 program year.
Total 851.4 168.9 147.0    

Note: Numbers may not add exactly due to rounding.

18. Comments on Variances:

AgriInvest is demand-driven, rather than being funded from a set allocation for each fiscal year. The variance of the year-to-year grant and contribution payments is directly related to both participation and commodity prices, as producer deposits and government contributions are based on a percentage of their income generated from the sale of commodities for a production year.

Participation in the AgriInvest program exceeded its target by 8% in the first year of delivery of the program.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

20. Contact information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
Floor 3, Room 241
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
danny.foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2009-10 RPP. They represent amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submissions. However, they do not include any additional amounts that may have been brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2009-10 through the Supplementary Estimates process, due to the timing of the 2009-10 RPP. This program is statutory and demand-driven, therefore, actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriInsurance, AgriStability and AgriRecovery. Total allocation and actual spending are reflected net of indirect costs. Total allocation does not include funding for the one-time federal-only AgriInvest Kickstart program.


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1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriRecovery - Agricultural Disaster Relief Program (ADRP) (Statutory)

2. Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: December 6, 2007

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2011

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $437.2 million over four years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The AgriRecovery Disaster Relief Framework is one of four core pillars of the BRM suite available to producers under Growing Forward. AgriRecovery provides timely assistance not otherwise provided by other programs to help producers re-establish their income streams and contain the impacts after a natural disaster.

Under AgriRecovery, the ADRP helps focus the coordination effort, providing a process to fast-track authorities for programs. This program is cost-shared on a 60:40 basis between the Government of Canada and the participating provincial and territorial governments. Separate authorities are required for AgriRecovery programming outside the ADRP.

This program links to the departmental Strategic Outcome a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's Outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

8. Shared Outcomes:

The shared outcomes for the ADRP under AgriRecovery include:

  • providing a rapid financial response to assist with the immediate recovery from a disaster situation;
  • helping producers quickly resume business operations after a disaster; and
  • enabling short-term actions to minimize/contain the impacts of the disaster on producers.

9. Governance Structures:

The AgriRecovery Framework, including the ADRP, is a part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agriculture and agri-food policy framework developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture. The program falls under the Business Risk Management Program Activity.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structure for AgriRecovery and the ADRP consists of several working groups and committees, including the Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) BRM Working Group and the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC). These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers, Deputy Ministers and Ministers. Specific to AgriRecovery and the ADRP are FPT Task Teams, which are initiated on a case-by-case basis when an assessment of a disaster is requested to analyse the impacts and, if needed, develop options for an individual disaster assistance program to be brought forward to participating FTP Ministers.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity
(PA)
12. Names of Programs
for Federal Partners
13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending
for 2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
AAFC Business Risk Management Agriculture Disaster
Relief Program (AgriRecovery)
437.2 122.6

(5.2)

(Current year expenditures: 5.6 less Payable-at-Year-End
reversal:
10.8)
Help producers affected by natural disasters with timely assistance for extraordinary costs to help them quickly resume their business operations or take actions to mitigate the impacts of the disaster Six initiatives were put in place under the ADRP to help producers deal with disaster events.
Total 437.2 122.6 (5.2)    

Note: Numbers may not add exactly due to rounding.

18. Comments on Variances:

The actual expenditures in 2009-10 are negative as a result of an accounting adjustment whereby part of a Payable-at-Year-End was reversed which resulted in a credit against the current year expenditures. This corrects the multi-year accounting of expenditures for the program which is in accordance with accepted accounting policies. Notwithstanding the above funding variance, six initiatives were put in place under the ADRP to help producers deal with disaster events. As AgriRecovery is statutory and a demand-driven program, the variance between planned and actual will vary with the occurrence of natural disasters and the number of producers who participate in the program in a given year.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Joint planning and execution (federally and provincially) of the programs that are developed under the AgriRecovery Framework ensure that federal and provincial targets and results are consistently met and reported.

20. Contact information:

Danny Foster
Director General
Business Risk Management Program Development
Farm Financial Programs Branch
Floor 3, Room 241
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
danny.foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2009-10 RPP. They represent amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submissions. However, they do not include any additional amounts that may have been brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2009-10 through the Supplementary Estimates process, due to the timing of the 2009-10 RPP. This program is statutory and demand-driven, therefore, actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriInsurance, AgriInvest and AgriStability. Total allocation and actual spending are reflected net of indirect costs.


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1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriStability (Statutory)

2. Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Business Risk Management (BRM)

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Agreements were signed with the provinces December 19, 2007, to implement the program for the 2007 program year.

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

AgriStability is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire March 31, 2012.

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):

As the program is statutory and demand-driven, it is only possible to provide an estimate of the total cost of the program. The current estimate is that it will cost $3,224 million over five fiscal years (2007-08 to 2011-12).

Included in this total allocation is $12.9 million ($2.5 million for 2009-10 and $10.4 million for 2010-11) for the transfer of delivery from the federal administration of the program to British Columbia and Saskatchewan.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AgriStability is a margin-based program that provides support when producers experience large farm income losses, which result in drops in their margins (eligible farm income, less eligible farm expenses) for a program year of more than 15% relative to their average margins from previous years (i.e., their reference margins). Thus a payment is triggered under the program when producers' program year margins drop below 85% of their reference margins. AgriStability also includes coverage for negative margins, as well as mechanisms to advance to participants a portion of their expected payments during the year when significant declines in incomes are expected (interim payments and Targeted Advance Payments). In combination with the AgriInvest program, it is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines while AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

Authorities for the program include Section 4 of the Farm Income Protection Act, as well as Growing Forward: A Federal-Provincial-Territorial Framework Agreement on Agriculture, Agri-Food and Agri-Based Products Policy and Federal/Provincial/ Territorial Agreement with Respect to AgriStability and AgriInvest.

The program links to the Strategic Outcome of a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk and the Government of Canada's Outcome of Strong Economic Growth.

8. Shared Outcome:

To mitigate the short-term impacts of large income losses

9. Governance Structures:

The AgriStability program is part of the comprehensive Growing Forward agricultural policy framework developed by Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FPT) Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the BRM Program Activity. Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are shared by the federal government and the provinces/territory on a 60:40 basis, respectively.

In Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and Prince Edward Island, the AgriStability program is delivered provincially. The transfer of delivery of the AgriStability program from the federal administration to British Columbia and Saskatchewan began in January 2010. The Department continues to work closely with these two provinces to facilitate the transition. The AgriStability program continues to be administered by the federal government for Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Yukon Territory.

Like the other BRM programs, the governance structures for the program consists of working groups and committees, including the FPT BRM Policy Working Group and FPT Administrators Working Group, as well as the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) which includes FPT and industry representatives. These groups examine BRM policy and program issues and, as requested, develop options to be brought forward to senior management, including FPT Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs), Deputy Ministers and Ministers. NPAC provides advice through FPT ADMs.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity
(PA)
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
AAFC Business Risk Management AgriStability 3,224.0
for the fiscal years 2007-08 to
2011-12
644.1 555.5 Help producers protect their farming operations from large income losses (losses of over 15% of their margins relative to their historical margins) due to circumstances beyond their control In 2007-08, AgriStability payments contributed to the improvement of producers’ current year margins from about 39% of the reference margin to about 72% (Target; 65%). This performance data was collected in 2009-10.
Total 3,224.0 644.1 555.5    

Note: Numbers may not add exactly due to rounding.

18. Comments on Variances:

AgriStability is a demand-driven program rather than being funded from a set allocation for each fiscal year. The variance of the year-to-year grant and contribution payments is directly related to participation and the needs of the agricultural industry. Actual spending is less than planned due to higher revenues earned by producers.

The results for the key AgriStability performance indicator show that the AgriStability payments helped producers protect their margins relative to their historical margins to a level that exceeded the 65% target.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Coordination of program oversight and delivery with the federal government will ensure that the program is delivered consistently and that program objectives and reporting requirements are met.

20. Contact information:

Danny Foster
Director General
BRM Program Development
Floor 3, Room 241
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-2100
danny.foster@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2009-10 RPP. They represent amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submissions. However, they do not include any additional amounts that may have been brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2009-10 through the Supplementary Estimates process, due to the timing of the 2009-10 RPP. This program is statutory and demand-driven, therefore, actual spending could vary. See also the related horizontal initiatives on AgriInsurance, AgriInvest and AgriRecovery. Total allocation and actual spending are reflected net of indirect costs.


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1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: AgriFlexibility (Voted)

2. Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity:

There are five sub-activities for AgriFlexibility within which partners can participate. All are linked to different Program Activities: Environmental Knowledge, Technology, Information and Measurement; On-Farm Action; Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems; Trade and Market Development; and Science, Innovation and Adoption, and Agri-Business Development.

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 21, 2009

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2014

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $485.5 million

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Agricultural Flexibility Fund (AgriFlexibility) is a five-year (2009-14) fund with the objective of helping implement new initiatives, both federally and in partnership with provinces, territories and industry. The purpose is to improve the sector's competitiveness and help the sector adapt to pressures through non-business risk-management measures that will reduce costs of production, improve environmental sustainability, promote innovation and respond to market challenges. The AgriFlexibility Fund is being implemented through federal, industry and cost-shared initiatives with provinces and territories. Funding is provided through contribution agreements and bilateral agreements. This Horizontal Initiative is part of Canada’s Economic Action Plan.

The following initiatives under AgriFlexibility are at various stages of design and implementation: AgriProcessing Initiative (API) and Canada Brand Advocacy Initiative (CBAI).

8. Shared Outcomes:

Producers/partners/industry implement actions to improve their environmental practices

Producers/partners/industry implement actions to reduce their costs of production

Investments to address emerging opportunities and challenges – maintain and improve market access for Canadian food and agricultural products

9. Governance Structure:

Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) questions related to AgriFlexibility are discussed at the FPT Policy ADM Committee. The following is a description of the internal governance.

The Director General AgriFlexibility (DGAF) Committee comprises Directors General from across the Department and is chaired by the Director General of Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate, Farm Financial Programs Branch (FFPB). This Committee reviews proposals and makes a recommendation to one of the Corporate Management Boards: the Policy, Programs and Results Board (PPRB) or Horizontal Management Board (HMB).

PPRB, whose mandate is to guide the development and implementation of cohesive and comprehensive policies, programs and results, is comprised of Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs) from across the Department, chaired by the ADM of Strategic Policy Branch (SPB). HMB, whose mandate is to guide the horizontal management of people, systems and finance, is a board comprised of ADMs from across the Department, chaired by the ADM of Farm Financial Programs Branch. Since these two boards have very similar membership and meet on alternate weeks, either one or the other is used to review AgriFlexibility proposals and make funding recommendations in order to make decisions on proposals in a timely manner.

PPRB/HMB review all proposals, prioritize funding and ensure a consistent policy approach. Agreed-upon proposals are recommended, including funding, to the Deputy Minister. The Committees also review the financial status of the fund and status reports.

Final approval of proposals is granted by the Minister, with a recommendation from the Deputy Minister. Proposals rejected by PPRB/HMB are submitted to the Minister for information.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
AAFC

Trade and Market Development

Science, Innovation and Adoption

Agri-Business Development

AgriFlexibility 485.5 N/A 6.3 Please see table below. Please see table below.
Total 485.5 N/A 6.3    

Notes:

Numbers may not add exactly due to rounding.

Planned spending is reflected as Not Applicable (N/A) as this program had not yet been approved at the time of the 2009-10 RPP. Authorized funding for AgriFlexibility for the 2009-10 year is $63.2 million.

Expected Results and Performance Status of Projects or Initiatives Under Way

Project/Initiative
Under Way
Expected Results Performance
Indicator
Target Performance
Status
API Agri-processors upgrade capacity through modernization of facilities Number of agri-processors that upgrade capacity 3 Two facilities with modernised capacity
CBAI Maintained exports of Canadian products in priority markets through implementation of marketing plans Percentage $ export value of selected products (as measured immediately prior to the threat's impact on exports) that is maintained 75% by March 31, 2011 Too early to report on achievement of target
Pulse Canada project AF0003 Increased consumer demand for pulse based products Increase in pulse retail sales in Canada No target established Project will end in March 2013.  Performance will be assessed at that point. Baseline is available.
Pulse Canada project AF0001 Reduction of cost of transportation Change in costs for shippers of pulses No target established Project will end in March 2013.  Performance will be assessed at that point. Baseline is available.
Canola Council of Canada project AF0009 Cost of production reduced Change in regional yield and acres based on uptake of technology No target established Project will end in March 2013.  Performance will be assessed at that point. Baseline is available.
Pulse Canada project AF0008 Value-chain enhanced Scope of green marketing adoption by the sector No target established Project will end in March 2013.  Performance will be assessed through two surveys that will be conducted at the beginning and the end of the project.  
Saskatchewan Research Council Maintain and improve market access Improve wheat variety identification Market access maintained for existing international wheat markets Project will end in March 2013.  Performance will be assessed at that point. Baseline is available.

18. Comments on Variances:

During this first year, there was a relatively low level of spending. This is due to many factors:

  • Although the program was launched in July 2009, proponents had to consult with their industry, obtain funding and develop good proposals.
  • The Department assessed a wide range of projects. This included several steps:
    • thoroughly assessing proposals that were often complex in nature requiring consultation with experts across the Department and discussions with the proponent;
    • ensuring that not only the basic eligibility criteria of the Fund were met but that the benefit to the overall sector was clearly demonstrated. This resulted in 26% of industry-led proposals being rejected;
    • ensuring that the project did not overlap, duplicate, displace other programs took time and required consultation across the Department and with regions; and
    • drafting a contribution or bilateral agreement for approved proposals involves discussions and agreement on work plans and deliverables that need a further degree of precision by fiscal year given that funds cannot be reprofiled.
  • After the contribution agreement is signed, the proponent needs time to incur expenses that would be reported in 2009-10.
  • Some provinces and territories did not have access to funding to allow them to participate.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

Overall the same results are to be achieved by provincial/territorial and industry partners.

20. Contact information:

Linda Parsons
Director General
Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
Farm Financial Programs Branch
Floor 8, Room 220
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 7
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-1900
linda.parsons@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2009-10 RPP. They represent amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submissions. However, they do not include any additional amounts that may have been brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2009-10 through the Supplementary Estimates process, due to the timing of the 2009-10 RPP. Total allocation, planned and actual spending are reflected net of indirect costs.


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1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Agricultural Regulatory Action Plan Element of Growing Forward

2. Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $94.9 million over five years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation Program Activity targets four specific regulatory issues that were identified by stakeholders, namely: 1) health claims, novel foods and ingredients; 2) the enforcement of food fortification regulations; 3) the continuation of the Minor Use Pesticides program; and 4) veterinary drugs. Initiatives under the Program Activity support the general principles of the Government of Canada's Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation, as they specifically address the development of regulatory frameworks based on the accumulation of sound science, as well as advancing the transparency, timeliness, responsiveness, efficiency, public interest, and government collaboration to minimize regulatory burden for stakeholders.

8. Shared Outcome:

Addressing key regulatory obstacles promotes a competitive and innovative sector, while it protects and advances the public interest

9. Governance Structure:

AAFC and Health Canada (HC) have worked to develop a comprehensive governance structure. HC and AAFC Deputy Ministers (DM) will oversee the governance process. Three levels of governance have been established by way of the Memoranda of Understanding (MOU):

  • An Assistant Deputy Ministers' (ADM) Committee, will oversee the management of the MOUs and will report back to the DMs.
  • Joint Management Committees (JMC), composed of Directors General or equivalent level representatives, will be established to manage the implementation of the MOUs and report semi-annually to the ADM Committee.
  • AAFC and HC will establish working groups for the initiatives in which they are partnering. These working groups will develop business cases, costed work plans, performance objectives and targets, budget and expenditure reports, etc. The working groups will report to their respective JMCs on a regular basis.
($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
AAFC Regulatory Efficiency Facilitation Health claims, novel foods, and ingredients; minor use pesticides; and veterinary drugs 52.4 N/A 10.8 An enhanced regulatory environment which promotes sector innovation, investment and competitive-ness

Sector-impact analysis and input improved four food regulatory policies.

Guidance to the sector helped with priority setting and improved understanding of regulatory processes and requirements.

Data and information were generated for four food regulatory submissions and 65 pesticide minor use regulatory submissions.

Data and information were generated for development of four pesticide risk-reduction tools.

Health Canada

For health claims, novel foods and ingredients, HC's PA is Food and Nutrition

For Minor Use Pesticides, HC's PA is Pesticide Regulation

For veterinary drugs, HC's PA is Health Products

For Food Fortification, HC’s PA is Food and Nutrition

Health claims, novel foods, and ingredients; food fortification; minor use pesticides; and veterinary drugs 42.6 N/A 9.3 M An enhanced regulatory environment which promotes sector innovation, investment and competitive-ness

Evaluated five new health claims, and reviewed three novel-food and 12 food-additive submissions. Published stakeholder guidance documents. Drafted amendments to modernize the Food and Drugs Act.

Registered 170 new pesticide minor uses and 114 new bio-pesticide uses.

Completed prioritized lists of approved veterinary drugs with U.S. Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) requiring Canadian MRLs. Began streamlining generic drug approvals and increasing submission review capacity.

Obtained stakeholder input and established a data-gathering plan towards a regulatory framework for expanded fortification. Examined legal risks / compliance challenges of transitioning fortified foods from the natural health product framework to food.

See also Section 18 – Comments on Variances.

Total 94.9 N/A 20.1    

Notes:

Numbers may not add exactly due to rounding.

Planned spending is reflected as Not Applicable (N/A) as this program had not yet been approved at the time of the 2009-10 RPP. Authorized funding amounts for each section of the program for the 2009-10 year are as follows:

AAFC - Health claims, novel foods and ingredients; minor use pesticides;
and veterinary drugs:
$12.7M
HC - Health claims, novel foods and ingredients; minor use pesticides;
veterinary drugs and food fortification:
$10.6M
2009-10 Authorities Total: $23.3M

18. Comments on Variances:

Resources were earmarked for CFIA to enforce new HC regulations that would permit extended fortification of foods at the discretion of the manufacturer. However, as a result of comments from health and consumer stakeholders, HC subsequently decided not to proceed with the new regulations in the short term. CFIA therefore received no resources. Instead, HC received $0.9 M (under a memorandum of understanding with AAFC) to begin undertaking further consultation and analysis, and to offer industry the opportunity to obtain Temporary Marketing Authorization Letters for foods fortified on a discretionary basis with vitamin and mineral nutrients not currently permitted. This will assist HC in determining the policy and eventual new regulations or permanent authorizations for managing voluntarily fortified foods. HC is also putting in place a system for better monitoring the presence and health impact of voluntarily fortified foods on the Canadian market.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners: Not Applicable

20. Contact information:

Lynn Stewart
Director, Food Regulatory Issues Division
1341 Baseline Road, Tower 5, 2nd Floor, Room 242
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-773-0153
lynn.stewart@agr.gc.ca

Note:

AAFC’s Growing Forward is the new five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Total allocation, planned and actual spending amounts are net of indirect costs.


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1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Growing Forward Program Initiatives Development (Voted)

2. Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2009

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $20.8 million over four years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between AAFC and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) sets out the general terms, roles and responsibilities for the management and funding of the various components of the Canadian Integrated Food Safety Initiative (CIFSI), funded under AAFC's Growing Forward Framework Agreement. The following initiatives are delivered by CFIA, in collaboration with AAFC:

a) The CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support element under the National Food Safety Systems component of the Canadian Integrated Food Safety Initiative (CIFSI): The CFIA-led System Recognition will provide government recognition of on-farm and post-farm food safety systems developed by national (or equivalent) industry organizations. CFIA is continuing to develop and deliver food safety system recognition programs. Under the Scientific and Technical Support element, CFIA is continuing to provide scientific and technical advice to support food safety system development based on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP).

b) National Biosecurity Standards Development: The National Biosecurity Standards Development is allowing CFIA to focus on developing nationally consistent plant and animal biosecurity standards. These standards are being developed with industry, commodity organizations and provinces. Once the biosecurity standards are approved by CFIA, they will become the national biosecurity standard for that particular commodity.

c) Traceability Information Sharing Solution element under the Developing National Traceability Systems component of the CIFSI: The Traceability Information Sharing Solution is exploring potential solutions for accessing and querying traceability information between industry and government partners in a planned, measured and constructive way. The allocation of funding is being used to develop materials necessary to define and document the high level requirements and initial project planning for the national Traceability Information Sharing Solution, which may lead to preliminary project approval. This initiative is being managed through joint leadership between CFIA and AAFC and coordinated through the Traceability Management Office.

d) Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure element under the Developing National Traceability Systems component of the CIFSI: The Traceability Management Office is being established to collaboratively undertake the work relating to the overall government legislative and regulatory infrastructure necessary to put traceability authorities, agreements and protocols in place. The allocation of funding to CFIA is being used to develop the legislative and regulatory infrastructure for the initiative.

8. Shared Outcomes:

This initiative contributes to the following Strategic Outcome of AAFC:

  • a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk.

This initiative contributes to the following Strategic Outcomes of CFIA:

  • public health risks associated with the food supply and transmission of animal diseases to humans are minimized and managed; and
  • a safe and sustainable plant and animal resource base.

9. Governance Structures:

The overall administration of the Memorandum of Understanding for:

  1. AAFC is delegated to:
    Director General - Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
    Director General - Sector Policy Directorate
    Director General - Food Value Chain Bureau

  2. CFIA is delegated to:
    Executive Director - Food Safety and Consumer Protection Directorate
    Executive Director - Animal Health Directorate, Programs
    Executive Director - Plant Health and Biosecurity
    Chief Information Officer - CFIA
    Executive Director - Domestic Policy Directorate

The table below reflects that funding for 2009-10 was allocated to AAFC and then transferred to CFIA.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
AAFC Food Safety and Biosecurity Risk Management Systems CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support N/A – funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA Work performed by CFIA Results reported by CFIA
National Biosecurity Standards Development N/A – funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA Work performed by CFIA Results reported by CFIA
Traceability Information Sharing Solution N/A – funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA Work performed by CFIA Results reported by CFIA
Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure N/A – funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA Work performed by CFIA Results reported by CFIA
Total N/A – funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA N/A – funds transferred to CFIA    

Note: Since CFIA is delivering these programs with funds transferred from AAFC, total allocations, planned spending, actual spending and expected results are reflected in the CFIA table and note below.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
CFIA Food Safety and Nutrition Risks CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support 7.3 N/A 1.7 1) Development and acceptance of the On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program by FPT Food Safety Committee (FSC) and Regulatory ADMs

1a) Completed revisions to the on-farm recognition procedures manual for Phase I- Technical Review

1b) On-farm recognition procedures manual for Phases II and III implementation and assessment to be completed by March 31, 2011

2) Development and acceptance of the Post-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program by FPT FSC and Regulatory ADMs 2) Development of the first draft of the Technical Review Phase 1 completed for post-farm recognition process
3) On-going technical review and assessment of on-farm and post-farm food safety programs for recognition

3) Technical reviews of two national producer organizations (NPOs)completed

Three-18 month reviews conducted and five ongoing

4) Scientific and technical support provided as needed to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders 4) 15 application reviews conducted as submitted by NPOs under the Growing Forward food safety development component of AAFC
CFIA

Animal Health Risks and Production Systems

Plant Health Risks and Production Systems

National Biosecurity Standards Development 9.5 N/A 0.9 1) Review and approval process adopted

1a) Evaluation process of Third Party Submission of National Agri-Commodity Farm Level Biosecurity Standards reviewed and approval process adopted

1b) The guideline has been drafted and completed.

2) Current state of biosecurity within a commodity sector

2a) Five expert groups established for beef, bees, dairy, potato and fur bearing animals

2b) Benchmark tool and national sampling plan developed for beef

3) Biosecurity benchmark report of commodity sector 3) Provincial engagement and contracts secured to deliver questionnaire
4) Production and dissemination of educational and training material 4) Communication products (calendars, posters and handbooks), and planning tools have been developed and disseminated
CFIA Animal Health Risk and Production Systems Traceability Information Sharing Solution 1.1 N/A 1.1 1) Completion
of the Project Charter, Business Case, Business Requirements, Project Plan, and presentation of Treasury Board Submission
1) The initial Project Charter, Business Case, Business Requirements and Project Plan documents completed
2) Completion
of the data dictionary
2) Draft completed
3) Information/Data Architecture developed 3) High-level architecture for a pilot data sharing project to prove data dictionary and data exchange methodologies completed
4) Data and technical standards for information sharing 4) Standards defined
5) Engagement
of industry and government partners
5) Key documents identifying risks and mitigation plans developed and followed.
Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure 3.0 N/A 0.7 1) Establish a National Legislative Framework for Traceability

1a) Completed constitutional analysis of federal authorities for implementing all elements of traceability

1b) The Concept and Consultation Paper for new traceability legislation developed and is under review by senior management and FPT regulatory officials

2) Ongoing amendment and continuous improvement for a regulatory framework for traceability 2) Draft amendments to Health of Animal Regulations establishing a pig identification and movement reporting system completed
3) Develop information sharing agreements with provinces 3) Traceability information sharing agreement was signed with Alberta and negotiations ongoing with Quebec, Manitoba and Ontario
4) Develop a policy framework for traceability 4) Analysis of policy development for key aspects of the new framework such as: information sharing, intended uses of information, and federal authority to regulate the three pillars of traceability (animal ID, premises ID and movement reporting)
5) Initiate Privacy Impact Assessments 5) Privacy Impact Assessment for the data collected by Canadian Cattle Identification Agency under Part XV of Health of Animals Regulations has been completed
Total 20.8 N/A 4.3    

Note: Planned spending is reflected as N/A as this program had not yet been approved at the time of the 2009-10 RPP. Authorized funding amounts for CFIA for each section of the program for the 2009-10 year are as follows:

CFIA System Recognition and Scientific and Technical Support $2.1 million
National Biosecurity Standards Development $2.2 million
Traceability Information Sharing Solution $1.1 million
Traceability Management Office Legislative and Regulatory Infrastructure $0.4 million
2009-10 Authorities Total: $5.8 million

18. Comments on Variances:

Funding transferred to CFIA in November 2009 resulted in 1) contracts being awarded that span fiscal years, 2) delays in projected staffing and 3) work plan delays, all which impacted the Biosecurity and the System Recognition initiatives. Also, the Federal/Provincial /Territorial Food Safety Committee had to re-establish the Food Safety Recognition Working Group. Traceability Management Office initiative expenditure higher than planned because work progressed faster then expected.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners: Not Applicable

20. Contact information:

Linda Parsons
Director General
Agriculture Transformation Programs Directorate
Farm Financial Programs Branch
1341 Baseline Road - Tower 7, Floor 8, Room 220
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0C5
613-773-1900
linda.parsons@agr.gc.ca

Note:

AAFC’s Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaced the Agricultural Policy Framework as of the 2008-09 fiscal year. Total allocation and actual spending amounts are net of indirect costs.


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1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Co-operative Development Initiative (Voted)

2. Name of Lead Departments: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Rural and Co-operative Development

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Original start date under Agricultural Policy Framework (APF): April 1, 2003
Start date under the Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2008

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):

$23.2 million over five years (including in-year transfers)

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Through the Co-operative Development Initiative, the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat provides advice within government on policies and programs affecting co-operatives and builds partnerships within the federal government and with industry, provinces and other key stakeholders in implementing initiatives to support the development of co-operatives. The Secretariat manages a grants and contribution program which includes:

  • providing advisory services and funding innovative co-op projects, delivered by the co-operative sector; and
  • funding research to build knowledge contributing to co-op development.

8. Shared Outcomes:

Access to services across the country creates an enabling environment for co-operative development and growth

More and stronger co-operatives respond to public policy challenges

Canadians are better able to utilize the co-operative model to meet their economic and social needs

9. Governance Structures:

The Co-operatives Secretariat (now integrated in a single Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat) was created as a focal point between Canadian co-operatives and federal departments and agencies. It has instituted mechanisms to raise awareness and inclusion of co-operatives in federal policies and programs. These include dialogue and collaboration with key federal departments, as well as with provincial counterparts and the sector.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity
(PA)
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat (AAFC) Rural and Co-operatives Development Co-operatives development 23.2 N/A 5.4

Innovative co-operative projects are implemented

 

Access to services across the country creates an enabling environment for co operative development and growth

53 co-operative innovative projects implemented


Service access in every part of the country – at varying degrees.

Total 23.2 N/A 5.4    

Notes:

Numbers may not add exactly due to rounding.

Total allocation represents amounts included in approved Treasury Board Submissions and in-year transfers, net of indirect costs. Planned spending is reflected as Not Applicable (N/A) as this program had not yet been approved at the time of the 2009-10 RPP. Authorized funding amounts for each section of the program for the 2009-10 year are as follows:

AAFC – Co-operatives Development $5.4M
2009-10 Authorities Total: $5.4M

18. Comments on Variances: Not Applicable

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

The Co-operative Development Initiative is delivered through third-party organizations i.e., the co-operative sector. In addition to results highlighted above, the use of third-party program delivery has contributed to strengthen the co-op sector’s own national and regional networks’ capacity to support the development of co operatives.

20. Contact information:

Donna Mitchell
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
5th Floor, 560 Rochester Street, Tower 1
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-759-7113
donna.mitchell@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaces APF programming as of 2008-09 through a transitional continuity framework until the new policy and programs are in place in 2009-10. Between the two Frameworks, programming may have been modified to reflect a new strategic direction. Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2009-10 RPP. They represent amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submissions. However, they do not include any additional amounts that may have been brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2009-10 through the Supplementary Estimates process, due to the timing of the 2009-10 RPP. Total allocation, planned and actual spending are reflected net of indirect costs.


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1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada’s Rural Partnership (Voted)

2. Name of Lead Department: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Rural and Co-operative Development

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

Start date under the Growing Forward Framework: April 1, 2008
(Original start date under Agricultural Policy Framework (APF): April 1, 2003)

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $52.1 million over five years (including in-year transfers)

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Canada’s Rural Partnership (CRP) leads an integrated, government-wide approach through which the government aims to co-ordinate its economic, social, environmental, and cultural policies towards the goal of economic and social development and renewal of rural Canada.

8. Shared Outcomes:

Collaboration among rural communities and stakeholders to address barriers and challenges to local development

Information and tools available to rural communities and regions to develop local amenities and other assets

New economic activities implemented in rural Canada

9. Governance Structures:

The CRP is managed by the Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat. It has instituted mechanisms that contribute to raising awareness and inclusion of rural Canada in federal policies and programs. This includes:

  • the Rural Development Network which is a policy-maker forum involving 26 federal departments and agencies;
  • the National Rural Research Network which brings research partners from both academia and government to focus on enhancing knowledge about rural issues to better inform policy making;
  • the Community Information Database, a free web-based resource that provides comprehensive and reliable information on economic, social and demographic factors at the community level to support decision making and action; and
  • the Rural Partnership Development Program which funds activities that encourage collaborative economic activities at the community level.

These efforts are reinforced by Rural Teams in each province and territory comprised of federal representatives and sectoral stakeholders.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity
(PA)
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10

Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat

26 departments and agencies in the Rural Development Network

Rural and Co-operatives Development Rural Development 52.1 N/A 9.7

Regional and national partnering initiatives are in place to respond to barriers to rural development

Rural stakeholders have access to new and updated/adapted rural development information, expertise and tools that help respond to barriers to innovative development

19 rural community initiatives undertaken to engage community partners in identifying issues and/or opportunities for development

Improved Community Information Database (CID) - 18 presentations and training sessions - increase of 15% in visits

10 learning initiatives led by Rural Teams to improve information available for rural communities

Total 52.1 N/A 9.7    

Notes:

Numbers may not add exactly due to rounding.

Total allocation represents amounts included in approved Treasury Board Submissions and in-year transfers, net of indirect costs. Planned spending is reflected as Not Applicable (N/A) as this program had not yet been approved at the time of the 2009-10 RPP. Authorized funding amounts for each section of the program for the 2009-10 year are as follows:

AAFC - Rural Development $10.3M
2009-10 Authorities Total: $10.3M

18. Comments on Variances:

Project funding provided on a cost-shared basis in the first year was lower than expected. The reason was due, in large part, to the economic slow down. Many potential program applicants, generally small organizations with limited resources, faced challenges regarding their matching obligations for program funding.

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners: Not Applicable

20. Contact information:

Donna Mitchell
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat
5th Floor, 560 Rochester Street, Tower 1
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C5
613-759-7113
donna.mitchell@agr.gc.ca

Note:

Growing Forward is the five-year policy framework that replaces APF programming as of 2008-09 through a transitional continuity framework until the new policy and programs are in place in 2009-10. Between the two frameworks, programming may have been modified to reflect a new strategic direction. Planned spending figures are consistent with the 2009-10 RPP. They represent amounts included in Main Estimates and approved TB Submissions. However, they do not include any additional amounts that may have been brought into the Department’s reference levels during 2009-10 through the Supplementary Estimates process, due to the timing of the 2009-10 RPP. Total allocation, planned and actual spending are reflected net of indirect costs.


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Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative

Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership (ACTP)

Name of Lead Department

ACOA

Lead Department Program Activity

Community Development

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative

April 1, 2009

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative

March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)

$9,975,000

Description of the Horizontal Initiative

The ACTP is a nine-member, pan-Atlantic marketing consortium comprising ACOA, the four provincial tourism industry associations, and the provincial departments responsible for tourism in Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. ACTP is dedicated to promoting Atlantic Canada as a leading vacation destination in key American, European and Pacific markets. The 2009-2012 ACTP is a $19.95-million agreement that supports:

  • fully-integrated consumer, trade and media relations marketing strategies based on sound market research, economies of scale, and commonality;
  • funding that is incremental to provincial marketing budgets;
  • the preservation of provincial brand equity;
  • marketing activities being dictated by the marketplace;
  • clear and responsive measurement systems of benefit to all four Atlantic provinces; and
  • end-of-agreement project evaluations.

Additional information on ACTP can be found at: http://www.actp-ptca.ca/index.html.
A memorandum of understanding for the renewal of ACTP was signed on April 1, 2009. This initiative directly supports the Agency’s long-term strategic outcome.

Shared Outcome

The goal of the ACTP exemplifies the strategic outcomes for ACOA's priority of increasing revenues, profits, investment and wages. The ACTP’s outcomes aim to:

  • increase Atlantic Canada’s competitiveness in targeted markets;
  • promote regional co-operation (federal/provincial/industry);
  • promote incremental marketing activities;
  • achieve economies of scale in marketing;
  • raise awareness of Atlantic Canada as a “top-of-mind” destination; and
  • increase tourism arrivals and tourism revenues for the four Atlantic provinces.

The 2009-2012 ACTP is expected to generate $10 in incremental economic activity for every $1 invested in marketing. The three-year revenue target is $190 million in incremental revenues for tourism small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Atlantic Canada.

Governance Structure

The activities of the ACTP are managed by a ten-person management committee, consisting of:

  • the ACOA vice-president responsible for tourism
  • the ACOA director general of Tourism Atlantic
  • the four provincial deputy ministers responsible for tourism
  • the four tourism industry association presidents (or their permanent designates).

Decisions of this management committee are by consensus. Six members constitute a quorum, provided all four provinces are represented with government and industry both present, as well as ACOA. A representative of the Canadian Tourism Commission sits as an ex-officio member of the management committee.
The management committee is responsible for the administration and management of the agreement, allocation of annual budgets on a per market basis, approval of annual program work plans and budgets, and evaluations of program activities. It oversees the work of a marketing committee, develops and oversees a communications policy, and provides program interpretation and dispute resolution.

Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from start to end date) 2009-2010
Planned Spending Actual Spending Results Expected Results Achieved
ACOA Community Development Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership $9.975 million $3.325 million $2.12 million $55.2 million in export revenues $38.6 million in export revenues*

* Source: Evaluation of the 2009-2012 Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership, 2009-2010 Annual Report.

Comments on Variances

In 2009, ACTP implemented a change in policy direction that redirected marketing resources away from mature markets in the New England region of the United States to potentially higher-yield, but developmental, markets in the mid-Atlantic and Pacific U.S. states. During this transitional year, ACTP’s direct-to-consumer advertising investment was less than anticipated, as ACTP completed several key pieces of consumer, travel and media relations research to guide future media buys. Unspent resources will be invested in years two and three.

Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners

$10 in tourism revenues for every $1 invested in marketing.

Contact information

Rob McCloskey
Director General, Tourism Atlantic
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 40
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
C1A 7K2
Telephone: 902-626-2479
E-mail: Rob.McCloskey@acoa-apeca.gc.ca


Name of Horizontal Initiative

International Business Development Agreement (IBDA)

Name of Lead Department

ACOA

Lead Department Program Activity

Enterprise Development

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative

April 11, 2005

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative

March 31, 2011

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)

$8.4 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

In May 1994, ACOA entered into an agreement (Canada/Atlantic Provinces Agreement on International Business Development, also known as IBDA) with the four Atlantic provinces, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and Industry Canada to “undertake specific measures to optimize regional coordination on a pan-Atlantic scale and combine limited resources to coordinate trade-related activities”. With an initial investment in 1994 of $3 million for three years, the agreement was extended in 1997 for an additional three years and $2 million, and in 2000 for $8 million and an additional four years. Funding was cost-shared 70/30 by the federal (through ACOA) and the provincial governments.

In 2005 with $7 million from its International Business Development Program, ACOA entered into a new IBDA with its federal and provincial partners to continue the work done in previous years. The commitment to this IBDA, with the increased funding allocation, attests to both the IBDA’s positive results and its significance for the future of the region’s international business development.
More information can be found on the IBDA home page.

Shared Outcomes

The shared outcomes for the IBDA partners support ACOA’s trade sub-activity, and are

  1. increased number of new exporters;
  2. existing exporters reporting sales to new markets; and
  3. existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets.

Since the original IBDA commenced in 1994, the Agency and its partners have administered over 240 projects involving some 4,500 Atlantic Canadian companies. The IBDA assisted 196 companies to begin exporting, 455 exporters to increase their export sales, and 315 exporters to expand into new markets.

Governance Structure

ACOA is the lead organization for this initiative and houses the secretariat responsible for administering the agreement. A management committee, comprising a representative from each of the partners, is responsible for the planning and management of the agreement’s programs and the evaluation of projects.

Partners

Federal departments and agencies (70% funding):

  • ACOA (lead department)
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (non-funding partner)
  • Industry Canada (non-funding partner)

Provincial governments (30% funding):

  • Business New Brunswick
  • Nova Scotia Business Inc.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development
  • Prince Edward Island Department of Innovation and Advanced Learning
Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from start to end date)
($ millions)
Planned Spending
2009-10
($ millions)
Actual Spending
2009-10
($ millions)
Results Expected Results Achieved
2009-10
5-year agreement (2005-06 through 2009-10) 2009-10
ACOA Enterprise Development International Business Development Program 8.4 1.1 0.9 Increased number of new exporters: 40 8 4
Existing exporters reporting sales to new markets: 75 15 34
Existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets: 150 30 41

Comments on Variances

The IBDP did not receive the expected number of projects aimed at introducing potential exporters to international markets. The program supported more projects that targeted seasoned exporters in increasing their sales in existing markets or entering new markets.

Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)

Not applicable

Contact information

Michel Têtu
Director General, Trade and Investment
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 6051
Moncton, New Brunswick
E1C 9J8
Telephone: 506-851-6496


Name of Horizontal Initiative

Team Canada Atlantic (TCA)

Name of Lead Department

ACOA

Lead Department Program Activity

Enterprise Development (program sub-activity: Trade)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative

April 1999

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative

March 31, 2010 (Will not be renewed under the current format)

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)

$11.14 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

TCA is a partnership of ACOA and the four Atlantic provinces, with support from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Industry Canada, the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT), and Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation.
At the core of the TCA approach is the trade mission, which enables small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) from across Atlantic Canada to meet with potential buyers, agents, distributors and strategic partners in the United States. The mission format features a comprehensive program that equips private sector participants with the knowledge, contacts and advice they require to make the best of their international opportunities before, during and after their ventures abroad. Missions also provide the Government of Canada and the Atlantic provincial governments with crucial opportunities to promote the region as a tremendous location for foreign investment. For further information, see the TCA website at www.teamcanadaatlantic.com.

Shared Outcomes

The objectives of the TCA trade missions are:

  • to increase export-readiness for Atlantic Canadian SMEs;
  • to develop new partnerships/alliances between Atlantic Canadian SMEs and companies in target markets;
  • to increase export sales of Atlantic Canadian SMEs to new and established markets; and
  • to raise awareness in these markets of Atlantic Canada as a profitable business location.

Since its inception, Team Canada Atlantic had completed 15 missions to United States markets, involving 590 companies and more than 3,906 business meetings, and resulting in more than $51 million in actual sales.

Governance Structure

  • The management committee, comprising senior officials of ACOA, DFAIT, and provincial governments, is the decision-making body that directs and oversees the coordination and implementation of the TCA missions.
  • The organizing committee is responsible for organizing the missions, and includes representation from the four provincial trade departments in Atlantic Canada, DFAIT, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), and the TCA Secretariat.
  • The secretariat, housed at ACOA, is responsible for the overall coordination and implementation of the TCA missions.

Partners

  • ACOA
  • DFAIT – non-funding partner
  • AAFC – $7,000/mission
Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Program for Federal Partner Total Allocation (from start to end date)
($ millions)
Planned Spending
2009-10
($ millions)
Actual Spending
2009-10
($ millions)
Results Expected 
2009-10
Results Achieved
2009-10
ACOA Enterprise Development Team Canada Atlantic 11.14 0.0 (G&C)
.01 (O&M)
  No expected results. There was a moratorium on TCA trade missions in 2009-2010. No results were achieved as there was a moratorium on TCA trade missions in 2009-2010.
AAFC Markets and International Team Canada Atlantic .132 0.0  

Comments on Variances (planned spending vs. actual)

After 15 TCA missions to the United States, ACOA is working with federal and provincial partners in the development of a new format that will be streamlined and cost effective, in consideration of current economic conditions. The new concept will be geared toward an “integrated trade” and “global value chains” approach and will offer new tools and approaches that meet the needs of the Atlantic business community, while decreasing government resource commitments (financial and human) and generating results similar to or better than those of past missions.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)

Not applicable

Contact information

Michel Têtu
Director General, Trade and Investment
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
P.O. Box 6051
Moncton, New Brunswick
E1C 9J8
Telephone: 506-851-6496


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Canada Border Services Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Supplementary information on the CBSA's participation in horizontal initiatives can be found on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's Web site at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hidb-bdih/home-accueil-eng.aspx.

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Canadian Food Inspection Agency

3.2.6 Horizontal Initiatives

3.2.6.1: CFIA-led initiative

Table A: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Program

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) (2003-04 to 2007-08)

Lead Departments Program Activity: Zoonotic Risks (CFIA only)

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-04 (enhanced programming)

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) plus $26.6M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The BSE program protects human and animal health by conducting research and risk assessments regarding BSE and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and minimizing the risk of exposure to infected materials; maintains consumer confidence through assessing the effectiveness of the risk mitigation measures and having measures in place to control any potential outbreaks; and supports market access for cattle, beef and related products through promoting and explaining Canada's BSE program to domestic and international stakeholders.
Health Canada conducts research and risk assessments regarding human exposure to BSE and other TSEs, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) carries out surveillance and research in this area as well. PHAC is specifically responsible for national laboratory-based surveillance and characterization of all human prion diseases, including those attributable to both infectious and non-infectious causes, and mitigation of their public health impacts wherever possible. In addition, PHAC conducts targeted research to improve the speed, accuracy and scope of application of laboratory tests used in diagnosis of human prion diseases; and to better understand their biological basis and range of variation. The CFIA verifies that potentially infected materials (e.g. specified risk materials, or SRM) are being removed from the animal feed chain and the human food chain, monitors products entering and leaving Canada for adherence to Canadian standards or the standards of the importing country, monitors for the prevalence of BSE in the cattle population (through surveillance), verifies that measures to control potential outbreaks are in place, and explains Canada's BSE control measures to domestic and international stakeholders (e.g. through the veterinarians abroad program) in order to maintain confidence in Canada's BSE program. AAFC has been involved in supporting, stabilizing and repositioning Canada's beef and cattle industry, including through the provision of compensation payments to stakeholders impacted by the BSE crisis which started in 2003. In 2003-04, funding was received over five years for measures to secure the future of the Canadian beef industry and additional funding was received in 2004-05 over five years to reposition the Canadian beef and cattle industry to operate on a profitable and sustainable basis. In 2005-06, funding was received over four years for additional measures to address critical pressures facing the ruminant industry. In 2007-08, funding was received on an ongoing basis for the enhanced animal feed ban. In 2008-09, funding was received to extend sunsetting funding while a review of the complete BSE program could be conducted and a comprehensive BSE risk management strategy developed. In 2009-10, funding was received over five years to continue to the core BSE activities other than the feed ban (e.g. SRM removal from the human food chain, BSE surveillance and cattle identification).

Shared Outcome(s):
Contributing to the protection of human and animal health, which supports domestic and international market access for Canadian cattle, beef and beef products.

Governance Structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for the delivery of the BSE Program. In 2008, a summative evaluation of the CFIA's BSE program was conducted, which noted that the governance of the program should be strengthened to enhance coordination and communication regarding BSE-related activities, both internally and with other partner organizations. The CFIA accepted this recommendation and agreed to develop options for an improved governance model to facilitate horizontal dialogue that is consistent with governance models for related horizontal initiatives.

A) CFIA
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA Zoonotic Risks SRM Removal from the Human Food Chain $91.5M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $9.5M $8.4M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10) Safe food. Continue the enforcement and verification of SRM removal by CFIA inspection staff
17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

Federally inspected boning establishments and slaughter establishments continue to be verified on-site and record reviews are performed by CFIA inspection staff to ensure that:

  • Operators are following their written HACCP System related to the removal and control of Specified Risk Material (SRM)
  • Effectiveness of Operator's written HACCP system to meet regulatory requirements related to the removal and control of SRM in boning establishments.

In the 2009-10 fiscal year, a compliance rate of over 99% has been achieved in over 5538 tasks delivered on the enforcement and verification of SRM removal.

Provincially inspected slaughter establishments continue to be verified on-site and record reviews are performed by CFIA inspection staff to ensure that the removal, segregation and disposal of SRM, are carried out to determine the adequacy of Provincial oversight regarding plant controls.

These reviews have been and will continue to be a crucial part in our ongoing efforts to strive for continuous improvements to the consistency and overall quality of our inspection verifications and related activities in non-registered provincial establishments.


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA Zoonotic Risks Import Controls $2.8M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $0.3M $0.6M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Safe animal

  1. Monitoring prevalence of BSE in Canada and assessing the effectiveness of the BSE control measures including the Feed Ban and imports controls
  2. Analyzing options to redesign the BSE surveillance program and consulting with stakeholders to explore further targeting of surveillance.
17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

The Canadian BSE surveillance program continues to be delivered in accordance with national and international / OIE guidelines.

  • CFIA collected 34618 samples during the 2009-10 and triggered, in compliance with the national reimbursement program eligibility criteria, an approximately equivalent number of payments to eligible partners of the program including cattle producers, private veterinarians and dead stock collection operators.
  • TSE Laboratories network completed the testing of 34618 received samples with a detection of one BSE case

The CFIA explored in a joint working group with Alberta government avenues to refine the program by having a more targeted surveillance focussed on sampling high risk category of animals

  • Results of the Alberta BSE surveillance pilot continue to be periodically reviewed.
  • Further analysis to be undertaken regarding the integration of certain factors into the remaining national program.

The CFIA conducted national training for clarification of sampling technique and maintenance of chain of evidence for samples.


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA Zoonotic Risks BSE Surveillance $159.9M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $15.4M $18.2M
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Products imported into Canada meet Canadian standards. The CFIA reviews and updates current import policies and conditions for BSE as required in order to reflect changes to international standards and evolving science.

  1. Update relevant import policies and procedural directives (by priority, minimum 25% per year) to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and CFIA domestic disease control; support market access by maintaining and improving Canada's animal health status and production of safe food, feed, fertilizer from imported animal origin ingredients
  2. CFIA acceptance of OIE BSE disease categorization for trading countries: negligible risk, controlled risk or undetermined risk
  3. Co-partnered risk evaluation on the manufacture process of gelatine from cattle hides sourced from controlled and undetermined risk for BSE countries
17. Results Achieved (2009-10)
  1. Revised BSE import policy (umbrella import policy) officially signed off by Health Canada partners, and Chief Veterinary Officer of CFIA. Submitted this to WTO for comments (2009) and implementation (2010)
  2. Highly processed products directive revised and submitted to WTO. Implemented October 2009
  3. Updated 25 percent of the procedural imports directives for precision and clarity; further updates continuing this year (2010-2011) more specifically combined the 5 different rendered and inedible products directives into one document by commodity type.
  4. All of Terrestrial Animal Health Division, import section activities go towards supporting domestic disease control (EFB, 1997 FB) programs, aligning with international obligations, and advancing scientific knowledge, as well as supporting market access by maintaining Canada's domestic reputation for animal health.

 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA Zoonotic Risks Cattle Identification $29.2M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $2.8M $2.1M
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Safe animals. Continue work on cattle identification enforcement activities, including verification at auctions and federally and provincially inspected abattoirs that cattle are identified with an official ear tag.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

Federal abattoirs operators are routinely verified in order to meet the regulatory requirements for animal identification for cattle are received bearing an approved tag.

In the 2009-10 fiscal year, a compliance rate of over 99% has been achieved in over 1265 tasks delivered at federally inspected abattoirs on cattle identification enforcement activities.

The CFIA inspection staff continues to monitor and enforce the Canadian Livestock Identification program at auctions, dead stock collectors, farms and livestock operations, feedlots, provincial abattoirs, renderers and tag distributors, where:

9758 visits were performed and 1% of visits were reported as in violation (97% of cattle tagged)

The CFIA's animal identification program has performed extensive work on:

  • training material developed for the implementation of compliance verification system (CVS) in the animal identification program;
  • livestock traceability data sharing agreement has been signed between CFIA and Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development
  • enhanced cattle traceability system implementation plan developed

 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA Zoonotic Risks Export Certification $53.2M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $5.7M $3.7M
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Products exported from Canada meet requirements imposed by foreign countries. Continue the provision of export-related certification services to a wide range of affected industries.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

The CFIA remains committed to promote an international regulatory framework to protect Canadian exporters from discriminatory and unnecessary barriers. The CFIA also leads or participates in a number of international and bilateral agreements. Consistent with its international regulatory cooperation framework, the CFIA maintains close relations with key foreign regulatory counterparts.

The CFIA, through on-going discussions with Singapore, has negotiated a partial lift of the ban on importation of Canadian beef and now Canadian boneless beef derived from animals aged less than thirty month can be exported to Singapore. Significant progress has been achieved with Hong Kong with regards to Canadian beef trade and most of restrictions have now been lifted. On-going communication and negotiation of export conditions allows for on-going trade and the potential of new markets for Canadian exporters.


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA Zoonotic Risks Enhanced Feed Ban $241M (2004-05 to 2013-14) plus $26.6M ongoing $26.6M $16.1M
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Safe feed, fertilizer, animals and food. Continue the enforcement of enhanced feed ban restrictions.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

The CFIA began enforcing an initial set of feed ban regulations in 1997. At that time, these new regulatory requirements were integrated into existing inspection programs for feed and feed ingredient manufactured, distributed and used by inedible rendering plants, commercial feed mills and on farms.

In response to the detection of a native-born case of BSE in Canada in 2003, the CFIA received additional funding in 2005-06 and subsequent fiscal years to support implementation and enforcement of an enhanced feed ban regulatory framework that took effect in 2007. The impact of implementing the enhancements principally involved:

  1. Increasing inspection capacity and frequency throughout the feed supply and use chain i.e. at inedible rendering plants, commercial feed mills, feed retail outlets, and farms; and
  2. Implementing and administering a system of control permits and compliance inspection activities at abattoirs, dead stock collectors, landfills and other processing and disposal sites regarding the collection, transport, treatment and disposition of cattle Specified Risk Material (SRM) tissues. As part of the enhanced regulations, SRM must be segregated, identified and appropriately managed until final disposal. CFIA workload increased to include inspection oversight of SRM equipment and facilities, tracking movement at several points in the chain to final disposal or alternative use not historically subject to CFIA inspection.
  3. Removing the fertilizer and supplement chains as possible SRM outlets unless specifically authorized by a permit issued under the Health of Animals Regulations. The permits are issued on a case-by-case basis and include requirements for processing the material (e.g. composting) as well as conditions for its final disposal to mitigate against any potential risks to human, animal health and the environment.

During 2009-10, the CFIA continued to verify compliance with the 2007 regulatory enhancements at rendering plants, commercial feed manufacturers, feed retail outlets, on-farm feed manufacturers and ruminant feeders as well as at meat slaughter and processing establishments, cattle dead stock collectors, transporters and receivers of SRM downers and dead stock and commercial composting and fertilizer manufacturing facilities.

Some of the major achievements are: (Feed inspection - stats to be provided at later date)

  • # of facilities inspected (total and by sector)
  • # of inspections (total and by facility type)
  • # of compliance verification tasks assessed (total and by sector)

(SRM control)

  • Renewed and issued a total of 1804 permits for the control of SRM in Canada
  • Contracted services with engineers and worked with them to evaluate 4 new sites for disposal of SRM in Canada.
  • Developed an ash testing protocol for incinerators permitted to receive and destroy SRM.

 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA Zoonotic Risks Technical Market Access Support $44.1M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $5.0M $1.2M
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Confidence in Canada's animal production and food system, facilitating access to domestic and international markets. Continue the establishment and maintenance of strong relationships with trading partners, and the provision of global leadership and influence regarding international policies and standards development.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

The CFIA continues to play an active and participatory role at the international level. In addition, the CFIA is contributing and influencing international science based disease control standards for BSE, which are critical components of the foundation for safe trade and the maintenance of international market confidence. On a bilateral basis this involves the invitation to trading partners for incoming technical missions to confirm first hand the integrity and implementation of Canada's inspection controls. At the multilateral level, the CFIA is maintaining the official designation as a BSE Controlled Risk country through the evaluation process of the 167 member country World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The CFIA continues to contribute to the discussions at OIE, not only with respect to at the General Session and in revisions to the various Codes, but also with respect to having an OIE BSE reference laboratory as well as CFIA employees on a number of the OIE commissions.


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for CFIA for 2009-10
CFIA Zoonotic Risks Establishment Review $2.3M (2004-05 to 2006-07) - -
Oversupply of Aged Cattle - - -
$2.3M (2004-05 to 2006-07) - - -
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Not Applicable

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

Not Applicable

 
Total Allocation for CFIA (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for CFIA for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for CFIA for 2009-10
$633.5M (2003-04 to 2013-14) plus $26.6M ongoing $65.3M $50.3M

AAFC
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
AAFC Food Safety and Biosecurity Systems (FSBRMS) Facilitating the Disposal of Specified Risk Material (SRM) Initiative $79.9M (2006-07 to 2009-10) $17.5M $13.9M
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Mitigate impact of full Specified Risk Materials removal on industry competitiveness; Enhance infrastructure in place for feed ban regulations.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

Federal Spending under SRM Federal-Provincial Contribution Agreements terminated March 31, 2010. Provincial spending has been extended for 5 provinces past March 31, 2010 to ensure completion of eligible SRM projects is achieved. Over 300 SRM related projects have been undertaken across Canada with funding to support industry competitiveness and enhance infrastructure (such as composting sites and incinerators) to comply with feed ban regulations. Investments have been made in research to seek long-term value-added uses for SRM.


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for CFIA for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for CFIA for 2009-10
AAFC Food Safety and Biosecurity Systems (FSBRMS) Establishment $276.0M (2003-04) - -
Implementation $36.0M (2003-04) - -
Tracking and Tracing Systems $7.8M (2003-04 to 2004-05) - -
Transitional Industry Support Program $934.6M (2003-04) - -
Accelerating implementation of traceability in livestock and meat sources $16.1M (2004-05 to 2006-07) - -
Farm Income Payment Program $999.9M (2004-05 to 2005-06) - -
Cull Animal Program $202.4M (2003-04 to 2005-06) - -
Loan Loss $38.4M (2004-05 to 2008-09) - -
Feeder/Fed Cattle Set-Aside Program $296.3M (2004-05 to 2005-06) - -
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Not Applicable

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

Not Applicable

 
Total Allocation for AAFC (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for AAFC for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for AAFC for 2009-10
$2,887.3M (2003-04 to 2009-10)3 $17.5M $13.9M

3Due to rounding figures may not add to the totals shown.

c) PHAC
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
PHAC

Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

Internal Services

Surveillance and Research for Human TSEs $7.9M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $0.8M $0.8M
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Risks of human TSEs in Canada remain clearly defined and well controlled

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)
  • Continued comprehensive national laboratory-based surveillance for all human prion diseases in Canada.
  • Resolved various potential public health issues related to individual cases of human prion disease, including suspected domestic case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.
  • Renewed mandate and support for external neuropathology reference laboratory.
  • Completed internal validation study on accuracy of cerebrospinal fluid protein markers for diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.
  • Completed external validation study on use of Western immunoblot for detection and typing of pathological human prion proteins in brain tissue.
  • Co-authored publication (led by CFIA) on molecular, biochemical and genetic characteristics of BSE in Canada.
  • Continued work on development of diagnostic markers for BSE in bovine urine.
  • Established linkages with national forum on Chronic Wasting Disease.

 
Total Allocation for PHAC (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for PHAC for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for PHAC for 2009-10
$7.9M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $0.8M $0.8M

c) Health Canada
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
Health Canada

Food and Nutrition

Health Products

Risk Assessment and Targeted Research $62.1M (2004-05 to 2013-14) $6.2M $5.9M
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Health Canada program objectives for BSE and other TSEs are to:

  • i) Protect consumers from exposure to BSE and TSEs;
  • ii) Maintain and improve the safety, quality and availability of safe food and health products by minimizing the risks posed by BSE and TSEs;
  • iii) Continue to reduce the risk of BSE and TSEs to consumers by maintaining and improving scientific capacity, and by diverting tissues of high potential infectivity away from use in food and health products;
  • iv) Partnerships - Engage with the United States and the international community to encourage and facilitate the adoption of equivalent public health protection measures; and
  • v) Review of master files and product licence applications which contain ingredients where the ingredients are sourced from animals and which may be susceptible to TSE.
17. Results Achieved (2009-10)
  • i) Protect consumers
    • Development of SOPs for review of medicinal ingredients and non medicinal ingredients which are at risk of containing prions;
    • Ongoing summative evaluations of BSE1 and 11.
  • ii) Maintain and improve safety
    • Working group developing guidelines and policies for minimizing the risk of TSE in health products.
    • Development of internal guidance to minimize the risk of TSE in NHPs.
  • iii) Maintaining and improving scientific capacity
    • Review of master files and product licence applications which contain ingredients where the ingredients are sourced from animals which are susceptible to TSE.
  • iv) Partnerships / Networking
    • Ongoing work through MOA (Memorandum of Agreement) / LOU (Letter Of Understanding) / Contract : TSE Secretariat and USDA (United States Department of Agriculture);
    • Completed research project "Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) studies in non-human primates and the implications for human health", under signed MOA between the TSE Secretariat, Food Directorate and CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique) France.
    • Completed research project "Detailed analysis of abnormal prion protein (PrPRes ) and infectivity detection in materials from cattle incubating classical or atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in order to achieve a more substantiated specified risk material (SRM) definition.", under signed MOA between the Food Directorate, TSE Secretariat and Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute, Germany.
    • Completed three research projects under LOU between TSE Secretariat and Canadian Food Inspection Agency: "Infectivity studies of blood from elk and deer with clinical CWD"; "Experimental CWD and BSE in domestic cats: comparative oral transmission studies"; and "Data collection to populate the Canadian Animal Surveillance Network (CAHSN) data system with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) surveillance information".
    • Completed research project "Oral Transmission and Tissue Infectivity Study for All Types of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Diagnosed in Canadian Cattle", under LOU between the Food Directorate, TSE Secretariat, and Canadian Food Inspection Agency; and
    • Research project; Assays for infectious prions and PrP-Sc in the milk of scrapie-infected goats.
  • v) Review
    • Continued to review master files and product licence applications which contain ingredients where the ingredients are sourced from animals and which may be susceptible to TSE. As part of the risk assessment, every review requires an assessment for animal sourced ingredients. During this time period, approximately 99 new and generic drug submissions were reviewed along with 531 Notifiable Change Applications. A percentage of these reviews were contracted out for review
  • Other (accountability):
    • Completed development of a joint CFIA-HC-PHAC logic model for BSE III, lead by the Branch and Department to meet the BSE III Treasury Board submission requirements.
    • Ongoing performance evaluation and logic model updating of BSE III started and lead at the Branch and Department level.
    • The BSE evaluation was originally planned to be conducted in 2009-10, but was delayed until 2010-2011 because of the one-year extension of funding. No money was spent.

Health Canada
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
Health Canada   Compliance and Enforcement $1.0M (2003-04 to 2007-08) - -
Health Canada   Product Assessment $6.2M (2003-04 to 2007-08) - -
Health Canada   Tracking and Tracing $3.1M (2003-04 to 2007-08) - -
16. Expected Result (2009-10)

Not Applicable

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

Not Applicable


 
Total Allocation for Health Canada (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for Health Canada for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for Health Canada for 2009-10
$72.4M (2003-04 to 2013-14) $6.2M $5.9M

 
Total Allocation for all Federal Partners Total Planned Spending for all Federal Partners for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for all Federal Partners for 2009-10
$3,601.1M (2003-04 to 2013-14) plus $26.6M ongoing $89.8M $70.9M

18. Comments on Variances:

CFIA: Although funding is approved for specific programs, the Agency has authority to reallocate resources throughout the year. In some program areas, such reallocation will result in a variance between planned and actual spending. While efforts are made to meet the intended program objectives, reallocation occurs to deal with higher priorities. Note that in 2010-11, the Agency will also be seeking approval of a revised Program Activity Architecture which is expected to result in a clearer alignment in 2011-12.

AAFC: Actual spending data denoted above for the Facilitating the Disposal of SRM Initiative includes payments for 2009/10 expenditures made to date and expected payments for 2009/10 expenditures that have not yet been made. This is a demand driven program; administrative costs are relatively constant. The variance between planned and actual spending is attributed to projects that were not completed prior to program expiry.

19. Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

20. Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Colleen Barnes
Executive Director
Domestic Policy Directorate
(613) 773-5901

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada
John Ross
Director
Animal Industry Division
(613) 773-0220

Public Health Agency of Canada
Dr. Michael B. Coulthart
Director
Prion Diseases Program
(204) 789-6026

Health Canada
Geoff Middleton
Manager Accountability
Policy, Planning, International Affairs Directorate (PPIAD)
(613) 954-2039

Table B: National Aquatic Animal Health Program


Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP)

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Lead Departments Program Activity: CFIA: Animal Health Risk and Production Systems DFO: Science for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $59.05M (2005-06 to 2009-10) plus $10.33M ongoing

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The NAAHP will protect Canada's aquatic resource productivity by minimizing the risk of introducing infectious diseases of concern to Canada; by removing non-tariff trade barriers imposed by trade partners because Canada does not meet international trade standards for regulatory disease control measures; and by allowing Canada to apply control measures on imports that pose a risk of disease introduction into Canada. The NAAHP is built on the CFIA's animal health management and legislative framework and on DFO's laboratory infrastructure and aquatic animal health research expertise. The CFIA provides overall program direction under the authority of the Health of Animals Act and the field operations capability for aquaculture surveillance, emergency response measures, export certification and import controls. DFO performs the surveillance and monitoring activities for wild resources, and delivers and oversees the diagnostic and research support responsibilities. Ongoing funding was obtained through an approved Treasury Board submission.

Shared Outcome(s): Sustainable Aquatic Resource Productivity and Internationally Competitive Aquatic Animal Resource Based Industries.

Governance Structure(s): The CFIA is the federal lead for delivery of the NAAHP. Respective federal roles and responsibilities are outlined in a Memorandum of Understanding co-signed with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO). A steering committee was established, consisting of Director General-level officials from both organizations, who are responsible for strategic direction, monitoring and analysis of the program implementation of the NAAHP. The CFIA Director of the Aquatic Animal Health Division and the DFO Director of Aquatic Animal Health Science Branch are also members of the steering committee. Stakeholder input on development of the NAAHP is managed through an Aquatic Animal Health Committee (AAHC), which includes provincial and territorial authorities for aquaculture and wild fisheries resource management, veterinary association representatives, Aboriginal groups and wild and farmed industry stakeholders. Progress with program development and implementation of the NAAHP is reported to the Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers CFIA Committee (CFIA-CCFAM), and to the Agriculture Federal/Provincial/Territorial Regulatory ADM committees.

A) CFIA
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA Animal Health Risks and Production Systems National Aquatic Animal Health Program $32.13M (2005-06 to 2009-10) plus $6.35M ongoing $6.35M $4.35M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Regulatory amendments based on full consultation (FPT, Aboriginal Groups, & WTO); Initiation of discussion on FPT MOUs on Emergency Response & delineation of Domestic Disease Control zones;

Priority policies and procedures required to enforce revised regulations; NAAHP integration into priority IMIT systems (SIMS, AIRS, ICTS, IPS, CEMRS) & linkage to DFO LIMS; and

Training modules for key NAAHP implementation activities.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

In December 2009, changes were proposed in Canada Gazette, Part 1 to the Health of Animals Regulations to require import permitting for aquatic animals and their products that represent a disease risk. The 75-day comment period closed March 7, 2010. Reportable Disease Regulations are expected to coincide with Health of Animals regulatory amendments;

Commenced discussions with FPT on Emergency Response and completed the planning of a Simulation Exercise to be delivered in 2010/2011;

Completed priority policies and procedures required to enforce revised regulations. They include Hazard specific plans and Functional plans, Initial Site Inspection Standard Operating Procedures, Import permit policy framework, Export policy framework and Surveillance framework;

Initiated project and planning requirements for NAAHP integration into IMIT systems and linkage to DFO LIMS for implementation by the end of next fiscal year; and

Completed Five (5) National Training Initiatives Submissions pertaining to overview of the NAAHP, Disease Control and Contingency Planning, Import/Export and Surveillance activities for implementation in 2010/2011.


b) DFO
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) Science for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System (NAAHLS) $26.92M plus $3.98M ongoing $3.98M $4.59M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)
  1. Diagnostic tests validated to OIE requirements
  2. Operational Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
  3. Amendment of the Fish Health Protection Regulations (FHPR)
  4. Capacity for diagnostic testing
17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

Name of Program: National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System (NAAHLS)

  1. Continued to develop and validate diagnostic tests required to support NAAHP program activities. Laboratory standards and tracking systems meet international requirements for audit/challenge of export certificates and/or import controls – International Standards. Priority disease list established collaboratively with CFIA. DFO will complete the validation of all 35 priority diseases by 2013-2014.
  2. Continued development of the LIMS in accordance with the International Standards Organization (ISO) 17025 (17025 is the main standard used by testing and calibration laboratories).
  3. Worked collaboratively with CFIA on a transition framework moving regulatory authority from the FHPR to the amended HAR. This will be a two phase process. Phase One: remove from the authorities for FHPR, International Import /Export to avoid regulatory duplication and overlap with the authorities under amended Health of Animals Regulations (HAR).Phase two: The CFIA led Facility Recognition Program will replace the FHPR. When Phase two is complete the FHPR will be rescinded.
  4. In collaboration with CFIA, continued to establish a network of third party testing laboratories in support of NAAHP program activities.

 
Total Allocation for all Federal Partners Total Planned Spending for all Federal Partners for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for all Federal Partners for 2009-10
$59.05M (2005-06 to 2009-10) plus $10.33M ongoing $10.33M $8.94M

18. Comments on Variances:

CFIA: $1.2M was reallocated to other priorities without affecting NAAHP deliverables for 2009-10, and $0.8M lapsed due to project deliverables that were delayed to 2010-11.

DFO: In 2009-10, DFO internally reallocated additional funding to this initiative in order to deliver on priorities identified in this submission.

19. Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

20. Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Annie R. Champagne
Director
Aquatic Animal Health Division
(613) 221-3779

Department of Fisheries and Oceans
Stephen Stephen
NAAHP Science
(613) 990-0292

Table C: Listeria


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Government Response and Action Plan to the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak.

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA); Health Canada (HC) and Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

Lead Departments Program Activity: CFIA: Food Safety and Nutrition Risks; HC: Food and Nutrition and PHAC: Surveillance and Population Health Assessment

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2009-10

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $75.0M (2009-10 to 2011-12)

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The objective of this horizontal initiative is to respond to each of the 57 recommendations made in the report by the government appointed Independent Investigator, Sheila Weatherill, who reviewed the circumstances leading to the 2008 Listeriosis outbreak in Canada. To respond to each recommendation, the Government focussed on an action plan based on three thematic areas: address immediate food safety risks, enhance surveillance and early detection, and improve Government response to food-borne illness outbreaks in Canada.

To implement the action plan, the three federal organizations – CFIA, HC, PHAC – received a total spending authority of $75 million over three years (CFIA: $46.8 million, PHAC: $17.7 million, and HC: $10.5 million). Each federal organization has identified the resource requirements, strategic outcomes, objectives and implementation plan for each thematic area. Implementation of this horizontal initiative will further enhance Canada's food safety system.

Shared Outcome(s): Address Immediate Food Safety Risks by updating food safety programs and directions to industry, building 24/7 capacity for health risk assessments, increasing the number of Ready to Eat (RTE) meat inspection staff, and improving electronic access for inspection staff.

Enhance Surveillance and Early Detection by upgrading (web-based) national public heath surveillance system, improving detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards, enhancing laboratory testing capacity, and improving laboratory diagnostic tools.

Improve Government Response to Foodborne Illness Outbreaks in Canada by strengthening federal leadership capacity for outbreak response, revising the national Foodborne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol (FIORP), improving risk communication during foodborne emergencies, targeting communications to vulnerable populations, and improving public access to integrated Government of Canada food safety information.

Governance Structure(s): The responsibilities for the implementation of each of the 57 recommendations made by the Independent Investigator are based on the mandates of the CFIA, HC, PHAC. In addition, the Deputy Minister of AAFC chairs a special committee of deputy heads from CFIA, Health Canada and PHAC which provides recommendations to improve the ways the organizations work together to deliver their food safety mandates The CFIA, PHAC, HC, and AAFC work horizontally through a governance structure to implement and to monitor the implementation of all the recommendations.

The governance framework includes an ADM level Committee on Food Safety (ADM-CFS) that is supported by a DG level committee. The ADM-CFS receives support and direction from the AAFC, CFIA, PHAC, and HC deputy heads. Furthermore, each department monitors the implementation of the recommendations through a department specific governance structure that includes inter-branch director level, executive director level, vice-president level, and senior management committees.

A) CFIA
Address Immediate Food Safety Risks
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Internal Services

Hiring of Inspection staff in Ready to Eat Meat Facilities $21.3M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $1.9M $1.2M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Hire additional inspection staff in ready to eat (RTE) meat facilities to deliver new inspection activities.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

The Government has made funds available to hire 170 new full-time inspectors, over three years, dedicated to food safety. Budget 2010 committed an additional $13 million to CFIA to increase inspection capacity for meat and poultry processing facilities. As of June 15, 2010, the CFIA has hired 59 inspectors. The hiring of inspectors will continue on a priority basis.



10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Internal Services

Scientific and technical training programs $11.6M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $3.0M $0.9M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10) Enhance scientific and technical knowledge among RTE meat inspection staff in all federally registered meat establishments.
17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

CFIA has developed and approved a new National Training Plan for meat processing inspectors. The Plan specifies 29 weeks of blended training (self-study, e-learning, coaching, instructor-led) for meat processing inspectors, and focuses on developing a new course curriculum and the continuous training of new and existing inspectors. The first round of inspector training using the new curriculum began in April 2010, and will be completed in the fall. Training plans for meat processing inspectors will continue to be reviewed and evaluated on an annual basis, in keeping with available resources. Moreover, a national assessment of training needs related to the delivery of the CVS has been completed.



10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Internal Services

Enhanced connectivity of Inspectors $3.0M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $1.0M $0.6M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10) Enhance connectivity (e.g. high speed access, cell phones) for CFIA inspectors.
17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

Where possible, the CFIA has increased the use of existing technologies such as laptops, cell phones and faster network connectivity. To make it easier for inspectors, particularly those in remote locations, to access the information they require to do their jobs, new wireless technologies have been evaluated. A pilot project was completed on April 1, 2010 to assess whether this wireless technology could enable inspectors to securely access the CFIA computer network and applications. The CFIA is reviewing the results of the pilot project to determine the impact of proceeding with this new technology and the associated costs.



10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Internal Services

Enhanced Food Safety Program Risk Management $4.6M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $1.0M $0.8M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10) Enhance food safety program risk management through modernization of food safety standards, programs, policies and operational procedures.
17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

The CFIA works to review and update its programs, regulations and directives on an on-going basis. Work is also being conducted in relation to the CFIA's food safety programs delivered in the non-federally registered food sector, under the Government's Food and Consumer Safety Action Plan. Business processes are being streamlined so that manuals, including directives, are updated regularly and changes are implemented efficiently. These business processes are expected to start being phased in by March 2011.



Enhance Surveillance and Early Detection
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Internal Services

Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other food-borne hazards $1.2M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $0.2M $0.7M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other food-borne hazards to provide greater availability and choice of testing methods for the detection of Listeria, and faster turn around time for reporting results.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

CFIA has developed the capacity, through its Pulse-Field Gel Electrophoresis Center, to routinely test and then report virtually immediately to the provincial and federal PulseNet Canada members when its laboratories isolate foodborne bacterial pathogens. In addition, Health Canada is working in collaboration with CFIA to improve and validate detection methods for Listeria and other hazards in food to reduce testing time and enable more rapid response during food safety investigations.



Enhance Surveillance and Early Detection
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Internal Services

Additional Listeria testing $4.1M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $1.3M $0.9M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Conduct additional Listeria testing to contribute to improved decision making.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

Due to the increased volume of samples tested through CFIA's Listeria monitoring program, the Agency now provides food microbiology laboratory services seven days per week. In the past year, CFIA has increased the number of Listeria samples analyzed by its laboratories by approximately sixty percent.



Improve Government Response To Foodborne Illness Outbreaks
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
CFIA

Food Safety and Nutrition Risks

Internal Services

Government of Canada food safety portal $1.0M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $0.2M $0.3M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Develop and maintain a Government of Canada food safety portal to improve public access to integrated Government of Canada food safety information.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

On February 25, 2010, the CFIA launched a Government of Canada online food safety portal website that offers a one-stop approach to food safety and foodborne illness information (www.foodsafety.gc.ca) and has links to HC, PHAC and CFIA websites. To raise awareness of the food safety portal, CFIA sent out a social media news release which enables a wide range of social media book marking and tagging options to be applied to the conventional news release. To promote the food safety portal, and to raise awareness of safe food handling practices and recall procedures, CFIA has prepared an exhibits strategy which will see the Agency participate in six food-related events between May 2010 and March 2011.


 
Total Allocation for CFIA (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for CFIA for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for CFIA for 2009-10
$46.8M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $8.6M $5.4M

b) PHAC
Enhance Surveillance and Early Detection
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
PHAC

Strengthen Public Health Capacity

Knowledge-based information systems $4.5M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $1.5M $0.3M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

National public health tools and platforms.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

PHAC is working on a pan-Canadian surveillance system. It is initiating plans for a pilot implementation of the Panorama system, funded by Canada Health Infoway, in order to test the feasibility of using the system for managing multi-jurisdictional outbreaks of foodborne illnesses. Pilot testing will include an investigation of the feasibility of integration with existing alerting systems such as the Canadian Integrated Outbreak Surveillance Centre (CIOSC).


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
PHAC

Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

Science and Innovation $2.9M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $0.3M $0.2M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Strengthened laboratory diagnostic tools and networking tools.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

Next-generation laboratory methods are being implemented within PulseNet Canada, which is coordinated by PHAC and represents a network between provincial public health laboratories and federal laboratories (including those of PHAC, CFIA and HC). The goal of the network is to share the information relating to genetic fingerprinting tests to allow for real-time identification, communication and response to clusters of foodborne illness. New experimental approaches to characterize bacterial pathogens have been developed within Canada and the PulseNet International member laboratories. These approaches have been evaluated and are now implemented for selected pathogens. In particular, responses to outbreaks related to pathogens E. coli, Salmonella and Listeria have benefited by utilizing these new technologies.


Improve Government Response To Foodborne Illness Outbreaks
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
PHAC

Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Diseases $2.8M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $0.3M $0.5M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Modernize and exercise the FIORP.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

A revised draft of the Foodborne Illness Outbreak Response Protocol (FIORP) was developed by HC, CFIA and PHAC and was shared with the provinces and territories (P/Ts) in February 2010. The revised protocol includes clarified roles and responsibilities of food safety partners, as well as guidelines for information sharing during foodborne illness investigations. P/T health and agriculture ADMs are finalizing their input on the revised FIORP, with a view to endorsing the document in the spring of 2010.


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
PHAC

Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

Emergency Preparedness and Response

Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Diseases

Emergency Response

$2.7M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $0.2M $0.1M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Develop an operational framework that provides procedures and guidance to the Health Portfolio for the coordination and management of foodborne illness emergencies.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

PHAC, in consultation with HC and CFIA, is developing an Incident Command Structure (ICS) to improve coordination and capacity among food safety partners during foodborne illness outbreaks, and is refining and implementing this emergency response mechanism to better prepare and respond to potential foodborne illness outbreaks. Integration with CFIA's Emergency Management System is underway and will be assessed in 2010.


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
PHAC

Strengthen Public Health Capacity

Building Public Health Human Resource Capacity

$3.3M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $0.3M $0.3M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Pilot test a surge capacity model of qualified public health experts.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

PHAC has established a secretariat office to coordinate its surge capacity under the FIORP. The purpose of this office is to ensure that PHAC is positioned to assign qualified individuals needed to effectively manage and respond to multi-jurisdictional outbreaks. The Agency has completed a skills survey of its staff that identifies qualified individuals who could be assigned in these circumstances.


 
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
PHAC

Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Diseases

$1.5M $0.2M $0.1M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)

Develop and implement a multi-faceted risk communications plan.

17. Results Achieved (2009-10)

PHAC is developing a comprehensive risk communications strategy that will guide how the Agency communicates to Canadians during a national foodborne illness outbreak. The strategy includes plans for communicating with the public and at-risk populations using a variety of traditional and innovative formats, including social media networks, the newly launched food safety portal, and audio-video webcasts by the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada. PHAC also collaborates with Health Canada to ensure that the Agency's information for Canadians during a national outbreak flows consistently from Health Canada's pre-outbreak food safety advice.


 
Total Allocation for PHAC (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for CFIA for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for CFIA for 2009-10
$17.7M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $2.8M $1.5M

c) Health Canada
Address Immediate Food Safety Risks
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
HC

Food and Nutrition

Build Health Risk Assessment Capacity

$4.9M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $0.6M $0.6M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)
  • Improved detection method for Listeria developed and validated to decrease the time required for the isolation of L. monocytogenes.
  • Proof of Concept for the lab-on-a-chip platform for the detection of foodborne pathogens, targeting Listeria monocytogenes (results in 48hr instead of current 10 days) for the first application.
  • Establishment of criteria and processes to identify priority microbial methods for validation, by Health Canada and the CFIA.
17. Results Achieved (2009-10)
  • Method developed for detection of L. monocytogenes in 3-5 days instead of 10 days. Method Validation Initiated.
  • Collaboration initiated with the National Research Council of Canada to demonstrate the proof of concept (POC) for the lab-on-a-chip platform.

Enhance Surveillance and Early Detection
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
HC

Food and Nutrition

Improve test detection methods for Listeria and other foodborne hazards

$3.6M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $0.6M $0.4M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10)
  • Begin to set criteria to prioritize and fast track approvals of food safety interventions with proven health benefits.
  • Strengthen health risk assessment capacity to provide 24/7 coverage and enhance surge capacity preparedness.
17. Results Achieved (2009-10)
  • Drafting of guidelines initiated to set criteria to prioritize and fast track approvals of food safety interventions with proven health benefits.
  • Additional FTE's hired to conduct Health Risk Assessments (HRAs) for responding to CFIA.
  • Established 24/7 emergency contact for CFIA to conduct after hours HRAs and enhanced response capacity to address CFIA requests.
  • All HRAs on Food chemical and microbiological safety incidents, conducted at the request of the CFIA were delivered within service standards or shorter.

Improve Government Response To Foodborne Illness Outbreaks
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for 2009-10 15. Actual Spending for 2009-10
HC

Internal Services

Social Marketing Strategy

$2.0M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $0.9M $0.8M
16. Expected Result for (2009-10) Launch targeted food safety risk communications products to begin raising awareness among vulnerable populations.
17. Results Achieved (2009-10) Launched first stage of a marketing campaign targeting those populations that are at greater risk of complications from foodborne illness (older adults, pregnant women and those with weakened immune systems), which included production of web and radio ads, media planning and trafficking, production of booklets, posters, videos, and Web development.

 
Total Allocation for HC (From Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for HC for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for HC for 2009-10
$10.5M (2009-10 to 2011-12) $2.1M $1.8M

Initiative Total:
Total Allocation for all Federal Partners Total Planned Spending for all Federal Partners for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for all Federal Partners for 2009-10
$75.0M $13.5M $8.7M

18. Comments on Variances:

CFIA: Although significant progress was made during the first year on staffing, the CFIA encountered some delays. In addition, there were also delays in the development and delivery of the training. Some of the unspent funds were redistributed to other Agency priorities.

PHAC: The variance between planned spending and actual expenditures is due to delays in securing a service provider for the surveillance system in addition to delays in staffing activities.

Health Canada: Listeriosis funding was received very late in the fiscal year. A new staffing protocol at Health Products and Food Branch of Health Canada (HPFB) made it difficult to hire FTEs to increase both HRA capacity and to further develop Methods.

19. Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

20. Contact information:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Theresa Iuliano
Senior Director
Policy and Strategies Directorate
Policy and Programs Branch
(613) 773-5867

Public Health Agency of Canada
Mark Raizenne
Director General
Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
(613) 948-6883
Mark.Raizenne@phac-aspc.gc.ca

Health Canada
Samuel Godefroy
Director General
Food Directorate
Health Products and Food Branch
(613) 957-1821

Top of Page

Canadian Heritage

Erratum

Please be advised that a change was made to the French version of this document. A missing program for the Immediate Outcome 1.3 was added to the table: Support to francophone immigration in New Brunswick by the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency.

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games – Delivering on our Commitments

Name of Lead Department(s): Department of Canadian Heritage

Lead Department Program Activity: Sport

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2003-2004

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2012

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $580.24M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

To monitor and report on the Government of Canada’s contribution to the 2010 Winter Games, which engage Canadians from across the country; reflect Canadian values and priorities in their planning, delivery, and international profile, and promote opportunities to advance public policy goals and to make strategic investments that support long-term tangible economic benefits, and sport, social, cultural and environmental legacies for all Canadians (www.pch.gc.ca).

The Government of Canada is a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games. The 2010 Federal Secretariat (2010 FS) within the Department of Canadian Heritage works horizontally to support and promote federal engagement in the planning and delivery of the Games, which includes providing high quality essential federal services, as well as capital and legacy funding. Fifteen federal departments are providing services deemed essential for conducting successful Games. These departments, whether receiving incremental funding for this purpose or supporting the services from their A-base, are accountable for delivering essential federal services under the Multiparty Agreement, signed in 2002. The 2010 FS works with its partners and stakeholders to leverage the Games as an opportunity to advance public policy objectives, establish lasting legacies, and derive maximum benefit for all Canadians (www.canada2010.gc.ca).

Canadian Heritage is the lead department for federal participation in support of the 2010 Winter Games with the exception of Games Security and Public Safety. In October 2007, the Prime Minister appointed Ward Elcock as the Coordinator for the 2010 Olympic and G8 Security and established an office within the Privy Council Office (PCO).  As a result of this appointment, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) became the lead coordinating department to develop a Horizontal Results-Based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) for Games Security and Public Safety collectively with Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA); Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC); Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS); Department of National Defence (DND); Industry Canada (IC); Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC); Public Safety Canada (PS); Transport Canada (TC); Health Canada (HC); Canadian Coast Guard (CCG); Canada Post; and PCO. As the lead agency responsible for the development and delivery of the 2010 Winter Games security, the RCMP leads a multi-organisational, Integrated Security Group known as the Vancouver 2010 Integrated Security Unit (V2010 ISU) which has the overall responsibility for coordinating and providing security for the 2010 Winter Games. Departments and agencies responsible to provide security for the 2010 Winter Games report on their achievements under commitments established in the security RMAF through RCMP (reference and link to RCMP Department Performance Report (DPR) on Security) and are not included in this report.

Please note that the $108.3 million originally reported in this DPR is now included in the RCMP DPR. Also on September 17, 2009, $35.54 million in new funding was approved for the 2010 Winter Games and there was a reduction of the First Nations grant from $34.55M to $34M. This grant was fully disbursed in 2008-2009.

Shared Outcome(s) 1:

There are three levels of shared outcomes as identified below:

  • Final Outcomes
    • Sport, economic, social and cultural legacies are established for the benefit of all Canadians;
    • Canadian excellence and values are promoted domestically and internationally; and
    • Canada is recognized as a capable and inclusive host.
  • Intermediate Outcomes
    • Pan-Canadian engagement in sport, economic, social and cultural activities related to the 2010 Winter Games;
    • Enhance Canada’s domestic and international profile; and
    • Canadians and international participants experience safe and high quality games.
  • Immediate Outcomes
    • Leverage 2010 Winter Games to advance existing federal priorities;
    • Positive exposure and heightened recognition of Government of Canada as a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games; and
    • Successful delivery of mandated essential federal services.
Governance Structure(s):

2010 FS

Representative Working Group (RWG)

The 2010 FS, under the leadership of the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage, supports the Framework for Federal Coordination (FFC)—the primary mechanism for promoting horizontal management of the Winter Games. This governance structure consists of:

  • A Deputy Ministers and Heads of Agency Coordination Committee facilitating interdepartmental and intergovernmental consultation and coordination of Games-related issues and commitments.
  • An Assistant Deputy Minister-level RWG reporting on the progress of essential federal service delivery.
  • An Essential Federal Services Committee (EFS Committee) was established in 2007 under the authority of the RWG to support, promote, coordinate and monitor seamless planning of essential federal services.  

Working-level Issue Clusters support intergovernmental coordination and information sharing.

 
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-102
Actual Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Results Achieved in
2009-10
Final outcomes: Sport, economic, social and cultural legacies are established for the benefit of all Canadians; Canada is recognized as a capable and inclusive host
Intermediate outcomes: Pan-Canadian engagement in sport, economic, social and cultural activities related to the 2010 Winter Games; Canadians and international participants experience safe and high quality games
Immediate outcomes: Leverage 2010 Winter Games to advance existing federal priorities; Successful delivery of mandated essential federal services
Service Area: Federal Coordination
A. Canadian Heritage Canadians participate and excel in sport

Sport Hosting Program

2010 FS

$412M

$47.062M

$9.8M Salary and Operations

$10.792M Venue Construction

$26.47M Paralympic Operations

$0M
Operating Trust Legacy Grant

Positive domestic and international exposure.

Canada has established sport, social and cultural legacies.

The 2010 FS provided support to federal government departments, partners and stakeholders to leverage the 2010 Winter Games to advance federal priorities through 35 coordinated initiatives. The 2010 FS provided coordination and regular support to the governance committees part of the FFC in order to support the whole of government approach to the Games. Forty-six federal departments, agencies and Crown corporations (including  departments delivering essential services) were represented at those committees and worked together seamlessly and horizontally on the 2010 Winter Games; a number of enormously complex tasks, touching a vast array of different fields of interest were well-managed over this period; all existing and emerging opportunities available as the Host Country were identified and capitalized upon for the benefit of Canadians; and a legacy of strong partnerships and corporate knowledge was created in order to strengthen future federal investments and activities. The Government of Canada was recognized as a key partner of the 2010 Winter Games as shown by the results of a public opinion research survey conducted prior to the Games in February 2010. In January 2010, the 2010 FS contracted Decima Research to conduct a national omnibus survey of over 2,000 Canadians aimed at gauging Canadians’ overall awareness of the 2010 Winter Games and exploring their perceptions of the economic, social, and cultural benefits associated with Canada’s hosting of these Games.  Previously, two rounds of public opinion research had been conducted on the same topic: in June 2007 and in January 2009. As the results of the pre-Games research demonstrate, for the most part, Canadians believed that the 2010 Winter Games would have positive impacts on the country. 


According to the survey,  the most positive impact would be seen on tourism (92%), on national pride (88%) and on Canada’s image abroad (85%).  The survey results related to pride demonstrate that hosting the Games has a meaningful impact on how Canadians feel about the connection they have to their country.  The majority of the respondents (73%) were able to correctly identify the Government of Canada’s role in hosting the 2010 Winter Games (i.e., as a key financial contributor and the provider of services such as security and customs). The complete results of this study were available to the public in August 2010. A post-Games survey of the awareness and overall perception of the impact of the Games was conducted in May 2010 and the results will be available to the public during the fall of 2010.  

Canadians had opportunities to be engaged in outreach events and activities related to the 2010 Winter Games and organized by the 2010 FS.  More than half-a-million people—40% of them from other countries—visited the Canada 2010 website developed by the 2010 FS. The website helped increase awareness and understanding of Canada's 2010 priorities. The website will be archived by Library and Archives of Canada to ensure it remains part of our national memory of the Games.

Through the summer and fall of 2009, the 2010 FS joined a travelling Pavilion for a nine-city tour to talk to Canadians about the 2010 Winter Games. Altogether, approximately 80,000 Canadians were

provided with information related to the Games, the role of the Government of Canada, and the benefits and opportunities of being the Host Country.

All contribution agreements managed by the 2010 FS enabling various organizations to deliver benefits were in place in a timely manner.
 
Sport legacy: In all, five new, state-of-the-art competition venues were built: the Richmond Olympic Oval; Whistler Olympic Park/Whistler Paralympic Park; the Whistler Sliding Centre; Vancouver Olympic Centre/Vancouver Paralympic Centre; and UBC Thunderbird Arena. Four existing facilities were given major upgrades: Cypress Mountain; the Pacific Coliseum; Whistler Creekside; and BC Place. In addition, five new, non-competition venues were constructed, including the Olympic and Paralympic Villages in Vancouver and Whistler; the Whistler Athlete Centre; and two new community centres that served as training facilities during the Games.

The Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia were equal contributors to the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC)’s capital plan to construct or renovate the key 2010 Winter Games venues. 
B. PWGSC   Translation Bureau (new funding) $5.3M $5.3M $3.3M Translation and interpretation services are provided to VANOC in a timely manner

The Translation Bureau provided translation services to help VANOC offer quality communications in both of Canada's official languages.

To provide efficient translation services, the Bureau set up three separate translation centres with their own mandate across the country to work in partnership with VANOC:

  1. The Gatineau Translation Centre was specialized in translating and daily updating some 4500 biographies of athletes and trainers, as well as texts describing the achievements of the Olympic and Paralympic Games teams, all of which were intended for the international press and for publication on the Web.
  2. The Vancouver Translation Centre, located in downtown Vancouver and in VANOC's headquarters, set up two separate teams. The first team was asked to translate documents for internal and external audiences and the second team was dedicated to the media centre.
  3. The Quebec Translation Centre translated a variety of texts for the Games. The Quebec Centre took care of everything falling outside the other centres' range of tasks.

In addition to meeting the professional standards of the Translation Bureau and the language industry, all mutually agreed deadlines were met and 100% of biographies were translated and updated within the agreed-upon timeline.

The Translation Bureau also provided interpretation services for the Paralympic Games and had six on-site official languages interpreters. It was the first time in the history of the Games that official interpretation services were provided at the Paralympic Games. In addition, the Translation Bureau assessed and validated the interpretation infrastructure put in place by VANOC for the duration of the Olympic Games.
Final outcomes: Sport, economic, social and cultural legacies are established for the benefit of all Canadians; Canadian excellence and values are promoted domestically and internationally
Intermediate outcomes: Pan-Canadian engagement in sport, economic, social and cultural activities related to the 2010 Winter Games; Enhance Canada's domestic and international profile
Immediate outcomes: Leverage 2010 Winter Games to advance existing federal priorities; Positive exposure and heightened recognition of Government of Canada as a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games
Service area: Promotion and Participation
C. Canadian Heritage  

1) Celebration and Commemoration Program (CCP)
and  Cultural Spaces Canada (CSC)

 

 

$80.23M

1) $17.05M (celebration sites)

 

1) $9.3M (CCP)

$9.0M
(CSC)

 

1) Canadians have access to information related to 2010 Winter Games related activities;
Canadians have opportunities to participate in 2010 Winter Games related activities

 

 

 

1) Whistler and Vancouver Live Sites: Canadians and all visitors had free access to physical infrastructure at the Whistler and Vancouver Live Sites to share the Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games and artistic experiences. Construction of Live Sites was completed and sites were functional for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games in accordance with the respective contribution agreements. The public had the opportunity to meet athletes, enjoy shows from local, Canadian and international performers, follow media coverage of the competitions and watch the Opening Ceremony on a large screen.  During the Olympic Games, the attendance at the celebration sites in Vancouver was estimated at 550,000 and the attendance at the Whistler celebration site was estimated at 680,000 people.

 

$24.5M (Torch Relays)

 

 

 

$23.3M

 

 

Olympic and Paralympic Torch Relays: The Department of Canadian Heritage, through the CCP, provided grants to 189 celebration communities to support local community celebrations. In addition, the Department also supported 96 youth-oriented projects with an Olympic theme that gave young Canadians an opportunity to express their creativity and energy.
 
The participation in the Olympic and Paralympic Relay celebrations was estimated at approximately 1.5 million people. 1,036 communities were visited (of which 119 were Aboriginal) and played host to the relays. 189 commemorative plaques were presented to the host city mayors as a legacy piece commemorating the official community celebration of the Olympic Torch Relay.

  $0.4M (Cultural Olympiad Digital Edition [CODE])

$0.4M

 

 

 

Canada CODE: CODE was the on-line home of distinctive and engaging digital programming including digital art exhibitions, digital shorts by Canadian filmmakers, as well as a portal through which users could experience live interactive art and cutting-edge music taking place during the Cultural Olympiad. Another initiative of CODE— called “Canada CODE” and a first for Canada and the Olympics—let Canadians take part on-line in a joint creative project by uploading their own photos and stories of their daily lives. The Canada CODE project, supported by the Department of Canadian Heritage, also connected Canadians from coast-to-coast-to coast during the relays. Communities had the opportunity to share their experience and excitement. Approximately 1 million people viewed the Canada CODE content on public screens. Every part of the country participated in the creation of Canada CODE with more than 10,000 contributions from people ages 7 to 78.

  $17.4M (Opening Ceremonies)

$17.4M

 

 

 

Supporting the Opening Ceremonies: The Department of Canadian Heritage supported the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Opening Ceremony which showcased Canadian talent and Canada’s culture and history. The Opening Ceremony was the most-watched television event in Canadian history to date, and drew 13.3 million Canadian viewers.

 

$0.9M
(Victory Medal Ceremonies)
(new funding)

 

$0.2M

 

 

 

Victory Medal Ceremonies: Seven provinces/territories received financial support to ensure French programming and performances at the pre-event of the Victory Medal Ceremonies.  Media coverage and reports received indicate a very high level of enthusiasm, participation and satisfaction from Canadians.

2) Aboriginal Peoples Program

 

2) $0.4M
(Four Host First Nations Coordination)

 

2) $0.4M

 

 

 

2) Aboriginal languages and cultures are shared with the world

Aboriginal people received broadcast of the 2010 Winter Olympics Games in Aboriginal languages

2) 317 Aboriginal youth (24 Inuit, 24 Métis and 269 First Nations) from across Canada participated in cultural and language elements. Number of participants was lower than anticipated due to availability of youth.

The sport events were broadcast in 8 different Aboriginal languages. APTN broadcasted more than 200 hours of the 2010 Winter Games.

3) Canada Pavilion (new funding)

 

3) $10.4M
(new funding)

 

 

3) $9.9M

 

 

3) Canadian and international visitors have access to information on Canadian sport excellence and innovation, and the Government of Canada’s contribution to the Games.  Content and programming will highlight Canada’s tourism opportunities to visitors from all over the world, and reflect Canada’s cultural richness, our country’s two official languages, and our regional diversity.

3) In September 2009, the Minister of State (Sport), announced $10 million for a Canada Pavilion at the 2010 Winter Games.
The Canada Pavilion was open to the public during the Games, starting on February 13 and ending on March 21, 2010. Located in Vancouver’s LiveCity Downtown celebration site, the Pavilion also served as a venue for Government of Canada departments/agencies’ events and activities. Over the course of the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, the Canada Pavilion received a total of 137,163 visitors. Multiple videos, games, exhibits and events supported the Pavilion’s theme of “Excellence in Canadian Sport” in a focused and consistent fashion and portrayed Canada’s regional, cultural and linguistic diversity.

4) Sport Canada
(new funding)

4) $1.75M
(new funding)

 

4) $0.4M

 

4) Athletes' successes are celebrated

 

4) The athlete tribute was held on April 22, 2010 in the House of Commons. Participation:
Olympic athletes: 94
Olympic coaches: 24
Paralympic athletes: 29
Paralympic coaches:13
Sport leaders: 15

 

5) $0.28M Governor General Protocol 5) $0.224M

5) Contribution to a lasting  positive impression of  Canada as a capable host

5) The Governor General, with the Prime Minister, hosted receptions for both domestic and international high level dignitaries attending the Olympic and Paralympic Games Opening Ceremonies.
D. Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC)     $26.0M $7.7M

$9.9M (Includes 2009 + January-March 2010). Note: this total includes additional partnership funding.

Relationships built with key 2010 media partners

 

 

 

 

Continued growth of tourism export revenues for Canada

The advertisement equivalency value from January to June 2009 was $9M.

 $83.3M (print only) for 2009.
 
The advertisement equivalency value for January-March 2010 was $784,262,912. 

Tourism export revenues are provided on an annual basis by Statistics Canada.  The preliminary result from January to December 2009 was $14.2 billion.

E. DFAIT  

Total

Invest in Canada Bureau: Global Business Leaders Initiative

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office of Protocol

$3.41M $1.53M
(new funding)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.88M (new funding)

$1.53M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$0.567M

Increased global awareness of Canada’s brand profile and investment advantages

 

Investment stakeholders in Canada benefit from face-to-face networking and relationship-building opportunities with new and existing investment prospects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Essential protocol services are provided to Heads of State/Government in a timely manner during the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games so that Canada fulfills its international obligations

Contribution to a lasting  positive impression of  Canada as a capable host

Over 100 foreign companies/officials heard testimonials and received marketing material on Canada.  33 top international business executives took part in the program.

The Global Business Leaders’ Day successfully engaged 115 foreign investor prospects, senior executives from multinational companies currently invested in Canada, Canadian business leaders as well as key government leaders. The event which was held in association with the Financial Times (FT) also reached global business executives through seven event notifications placed in the North American edition of the FT newspaper reaching 462,000 influential, elite readers in the US and banner ads on FT.com which generated over 2.5 million impressions. The Global Business Leaders Day was the only investment outreach event that engaged all provincial and territorial investment promotion partners to present a coherent and cohesive Canada Brand to business audiences during the Games. Overall, 47 government dignitaries and officials attended including: three Canadian federal ministers; the Premier of British Columbia; the US Ambassador to Canada; eight provincial ministers responsible for trade, investment, industry, finance, and/or intergovernmental relations; and several deputy ministers from the provinces and territories, C-level executives from regional economic development agencies, and other senior officials.

The Office of the Minister for International Trade held 18 one-on-one meetings with potential investors; created networking opportunities in suites; and reached out to international companies through site visits.

Provinces were engaged through co-operative sharing of contacts engagement at events and cross development of leads/contacts.

Global business leaders were successfully reached through visibility initiatives including:
(a) A high-impact, 8 week campaign targeting business travelers at 12 major international airports in key financial/business capitals around the world.(b) A Banner Program for federal properties in three prominent business locations in Vancouver and five posts abroad. (c) Branding videos (Canada - We Take Care of Business) were screened at Olympic Winter Games venues and at all Invest in Canada business outreach events during Games-time.(d) 25 investment-focused Olympic countdown events were held in 15 priority investor markets engaging over 1,700 business guests, dignitaries and media. 

The National Courtesy Clearance Program processed over 160 clearances, and met all deadlines in a timely manner. A total of 1,579 people were processed during the Olympic and Paralympic Games (39 Heads of State/Government, 2 Vice-Presidents, 1 Premier, 55 Ministers, 4 Deputy Prime Ministers, 1 head of an international organization, 24 other dignitaries during Olympic Games and accompanying delegation members).

DFAIT Protocol fulfilled its international obligations which met the expectations of high level visitors as well as those of VANOC and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) as set out in the “Host City Contract.”

39 Heads of State/Government received courtesy clearances.
13 Heads of State/Government received protocol services under the Protocol mandate.

Two companies were hired through a bidding process (RFP) to provide local transportation and support those needs not offered by either RCMP or VANOC.

The Prime Minister met the United States Vice President, the Netherlands Prime Minister and the Secretary General of the Francophonie. The Minister of National Defence met the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Finland.

The Office of the Minister of International Trade met the President of Estonia, the Prime Minister of Latvia, the Deputy Prime Minister of Russia and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Slovakia. All of those mentioned above were offered modest hospitality.

The Chief of Protocol received positive feedback from the diplomatic community on the services that were rendered during the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Both obligations were met and fulfilled in a timely manner. The Prime Minister and the Governor General jointly hosted receptions for both the domestic and international high level dignitaries attending the Olympic and Paralympic Games Opening Ceremonies. There was excellent collaboration with both British Columbia and Manitoba Protocol, VANOC, the Cities of Vancouver, Whistler and Richmond, the 2010 FS, RCMP, HC and the first ever collaboration with the Four Host First Nations (FHFN) as a full partner.

DFAIT established a strong partnership to deliver seamless coordination of protocol services delivery.

DFAIT eliminated the duplication of duties, maximized resources and established an Operation Centre under one roof.
Final outcomes: Canada is recognized as a capable and inclusive host
Intermediate outcomes: Canadians and international participants experience safe and high quality games

Immediate outcomes: Successful delivery of mandated essential federal services

Service area: Essential Federal Services  
F. Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC)

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning

Foreign workers and immigrants

N/A
The Temporary Foreign Workers Program (TFWP) has not received funding through this mechanism to support its Olympic Process

N/A
The TFWP has not received funding through this mechanism to support its Olympic Process

  HRSDC/Service Canada, in collaboration with CIC/CBSA, will develop an end-to-end process to facilitate the entrance of temporary foreign workers, when warranted, for employers to support the 2010 Games.

An end-to-end process to facilitate the entrance of temporary foreign workers, when warranted, for employers to support the 2010 Games was developed and implemented.

Updates to HRSDC and CIC websites were made in 2009 to reflect policy changes related to the entry of foreign nationals to work in Canada during the 2010 Winter Games.

Service standards:

  • 98.4 % of Primary Workforce Opinion (PWO) applications were approved within 10 business days and 100% of PWO letters were issued within 2 business days.
  • Secondary Workforce Opinion (SWO) applications were processed in a timely manner.

Processing and outreach results as of April 1, 2010:

  • 116 outreach sessions held for 1,672 employers and sponsors;
  • 1,263 PWO applications confirmed for 2,965 positions; and
  • 51 SWO applications confirmed for 241 positions.
G. HC

Reduced health and environmental risks from products and substances, and safer living and working environments

Regions and Programs Branch:

  • Health protection of foreign dignitaries
TB support: $2.6M

TB support:
$1.275M

 

$1.757M

 

 

Response capability and access to health services are of a high standard

 

HC developed a protocol for carrying out an Operational Readiness Assessment for the Physical Emergency Preparedness and Response (PEPR) Vancouver Operation in preparation for the Games. Teams were equipped, completed joint operational exercises were completed (TPOF and GOLD) and training of officers began in the third quarter of   2009-2010. Employee Assistance Services (EAS) had employees and mental health professional on site ready to respond when required/requested. There was no request for EAS’ assistance in BC. EAS successfully delivered support as requested in the National Capital Region (NCR).

Two teams were deployed as per the Concept of Operations.  The teams were deployed with the Vancouver Fire and Rescue Service Hazmat team. PEPR was available to provide input 24/7 to requests. There were no incidents to respond to.

  • Health protection of public servants

 

 

$0.200M

 

 

 

 

$0.304M

 

 

 

 

Internationally Protected Persons (IPPs) health contingency needs are met

 

 

 

The medical and health needs of IPPs and their family members were met at 100%. Enough professionals, equipment, supplies and ambulances were available to meet needs.

 

Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:

  • Health protection of travelling public

 

$0.200M

 

 

 

 

 

$0.180M

 

 

 

 

 

Ensure that all conveyances are meeting recommended public health standards or guidelines

 

Two Environmental Health Officers (EHOs) worked full time in Vancouver Airport to provide assistance to the local team when needed.  The local Environmental Health Manager (EHM) was on-call 24/7. Cleaning and Disinfection Guidance documents were sent to the conveyance operators in November 2009. Conveyance operators were notified individually to contact the EHM directly to report any unusual public health activities. Daily reports were received from the Province through the Provincial Surveillance System. The systems did not pick up any increase of communicable disease (including H1N1) in Canada during the Olympic period.

Health Products and Food Branch:

Import of drugs
$0.325M $0.325M Ensure that all points of entry are meeting recommended public health standards or guidelines HC received 21 applications from 17 different countries for review during the period; 75 applications were reviewed and approved (including applications received in the previous quarter). 10 export applications were received after the Olympics.
H. PHAC     $2.7M $1.5M $1.5M

Ensured standard operating procedures (SOPs), infrastructure and operational capacity for 24/7 activation of the Health Portfolio Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) and Health Portfolio Regional Operation and Coordination Centre (ROCC) in BC

 

 

 

 

 

 

Augmented capacity to respond to the increase in passenger load at ports of entry in Canada.

Federal public health communications strategy during the 2010 Games

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Health Mass Gathering Plan and 2010 Annex

 

Forward Assessment Team on site during the 2010 Games and Health Emergency Response Teams (HERT) ready to be deployed during the 2010 Games

BC/Yukon Regional Office will engage in and monitor activities at numerous levels in the region  to inform all of the Agency's 2010 activities and ensure collaboration of service delivery at the local level

Following the H1N1 response, a series of lessons learned and after action reviews were conducted to identify required changes and augmentations to SOPs and EOC-related documents.  

Based on lessons learned, an Information Management Policy was developed, staff were trained on its use and it was implemented.  Information related to the 2010 Games was stored on TeamWorks and archived following the Games.

Emergency Preparedness and Response (EPR) training was delivered to BC and Winnipeg regional staff as well as NCR staff.

The BC ROCC was activated 24/7 to Level 2 from February 3, 2010 to March 21, 2010 and the Health Portfolio EOC was activated at a Level 2 from February 3, 2010 to March 21, 2010.  The National Microbiological Laboratory Operations Centre (NML OC) was activated 24/7 from January 4, 2010 to March 29, 2010. These activations were preceded by extensive planning, training, collaboration with regional stakeholders and participation in Exercises Bronze, Silver and Gold.

Additional quarantine staff from other Quarantine Stations enabled the program to respond to the additional need of support from stakeholders and the increase in passenger load at ports of entry in BC.

The 2010 Winter Games Communication Framework was developed, as well as detailed media relations, e-communications, health promotion and internal communications plans. Some of the activities in these plans, such as the launch of a portfolio 2010 Winter Games website, development of a speech module/key messages/good news story regarding healthy living, the identification of potential Ministerial opportunities around the Torch Relay, development of messages for staff promoting healthy living, and  provincial partnerships were completed. An evergreen media lines package was developed. PHAC communications support requirements for the Health Portfolio EOC and ROCC were identified and filled.

The Health Portfolio Mass Gathering Public Health Plan for 2010 Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games was successfully approved and implemented during this event.

A $1M PHAC grant to VANOC supported staffing, training and operation of a Mobile Medical Unit which served as an Emergency Room and critical care unit.  Twenty-one physicians, nurses and respiratory therapists from the Agency’s HERT were part of the medical team that staffed the unit for 60 days.

The ROCC served as the hub of the portfolio’s emergency response activities, and acted as an information conduit; monitored portfolio-related events; provided situational awareness to the other operations centres; liaised with key regional contacts such as the BC Centre of Disease Control, Public Safety Canada, Vancouver Coastal Health, and VANOC; and coordinated routine activities.

I. Environment Canada (EC) Weather and environmental predictions and services reduce risks and contribute to the well-being of Canadians Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision-making. $9.3M $2.3M $2.56M Delivery of weather services in support of federal partners, Games operations and for the benefit of the public and visitors to Canada.

All necessary infrastructure and supporting technologies were developed and implemented well before the Opening Ceremonies. Completion of the monitoring network occurred in the third quarter of 2009-2010 and was fully operational including Whistler radar and Squamish Wind Profiler. A secondary network of more scientific, research-oriented instruments operated in tandem with the basic network before and during the Games.

New 2010 public weather services were prototyped using EC’s popular web site http://www.weatheroffice.
ec.gc.ca
including venue forecasts, street level forecasts and weather vignettes for media. Many of the vignettes were made available on YouTube, as were daily weather briefings in both official languages.  Weather support was provided for the cross-Canada Olympic Torch Relay.

More than 99% of weather observations were delivered on time, as the monitoring system in place demonstrated. All forecasts were delivered on time during the 2010 Games. Forecasts were used proactively to alter the Games competition schedule, sometimes days in advance of originally planned events. This is by far the most extensive use of weather forecasts by any Olympic Games.

Routine and specialized weather services were made available to Federal Essential Services agencies both prior to and at Games time including easy access to sophisticated weather modeling and forecasts for security and environmental emergency response.

The futures of most observing systems were ascertained. Most sites will be decommissioned in fiscal year 2010-2011. Negotiations for several legacy agreements for ongoing operations of some of the Olympic weather observing network are underway and will be completed in 2010-2011. Other legacy projects include a Mountain Weather Course, forecast tools, scientific knowledge and data, as well as knowledge sharing with the weather service providers for London 2012 and Sochi 2014, and for EC’s support for the 2015 Pan-American Games. 

Canada's natural capital is restored, conserved and enhanced

Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes.

$2.6M $0.5M $0.49M Promotion of environmental sustainability for the 2010 Winter Games and the establishment of sustainable legacies for Canadians

EC engaged in several events during the fiscal year of 2009-2010 designed to promote overall environmental sustainability and showcase Canadian innovation, technologies and best practices as well as a greater awareness of environmental sustainability initiatives associated with the 2010 Winter Games.
EC also participated in several other interdepartmental committees throughout the year related to environmental footprint reduction.

EC participated in many showcasing/public awareness events (such as EPIC 2009, National Public Service Week (NPSW) Tradeshow, Commuter Challenge, VANOC Sustainability Fair, Governexx, Transportation Fair, Sustainability Challenge, and others).  These events enabled EC to reach a wide audience within the public service as well as the general public.

Several promotional materials and informational products designed to communicate sustainability messaging were created for use at the events – fact sheets, sustainability video supplemental materials, showcasing presentation slides, biodiversity informational products, etc.

Advice was provided through various committees and meetings.

EC’s coordination role expanded from sustainability to assist in the Department’s operational planning during Games time.  This included coordinating and disseminating informational resources, liaising among the various units responsible for EC’s daily operations, and preparing and coordinating briefing materials for senior management.

EC tracked and recorded efforts undertaken by Essential Federal Services departments to reduce their Games-related environmental footprint in support of the Government of Canada’s commitments to the sustainability of the Games.

EC participated as a member of the Technical Committee on Sustainable Events to develop a draft Canadian Standards Association standard for public review.

The 2010 Greening Government Toolkit was launched.  A regional pilot project was designed to assist employees in greening government operations.

An event was hosted for approximately 35 public service employees, representing over 20 departments.
Presentations on the 2010 Greening Government Toolkit were done for the national PWGSC Sustainable Development Strategy committee, 60 employees at INAC’s Dispute Resolution Sector during Environment Week, the FS Open House during NPSW, the Governexx conference as well as departmental lunch and learn events.  EC also worked with a regional interdepartmental group to produce and disseminate a newsletter to approximately 30 departments and agencies in the region promoting the toolkit and resulting success stories. 

EC financially supported and contributed to the creation of the Vancouver 2010 Sustainability Journey.  The VANOC-led initiative developed an animated video to help tell the sustainability story of the Games.  Promotional materials were also created to supplement the Vancouver 2010 Sustainability Journey.  EC produced specially adapted versions (voice-over and text overlay on two separate themes) of the animated “Vancouver 2010 Sustainability Journey” video. Videos were made available to the public via YouTube (www.YouTube.com/Environmentcan).  Specially adapted “Vancouver 2010 Sustainability Journey” videos were featured within the Canada Pavilion during the Games, and were also widely disseminated through federal government channels, shown at Service Canada and others. 

EC partnered with VANOC, the United Nation Environment Programme and other Games partners on a “Do Your Part” video contest aimed towards youth.  The Minister of the Environment also attended and delivered a short speech at the recognition event. 

Public education and outreach materials were developed in an attempt to link the environmental protection efforts made during the 2010 Winter Games venue development to promote 2010, the International Year of Biodiversity.  Six Biodiversity Profiles were created as annexes to the interactive Urban and Nature BioKits developed by EC's Biosphere to highlight the biodiversity found near several of the major 2010 Winter Games venues.  These profiles were created for the Richmond Skating Oval, UBC Thunderbird Arena, Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Village, Cypress Mountain, Whistler Olympic Park, and Whistler Creekside and Sliding Centre.  The Biodiversity Profiles were distributed through Natural Resources Canada's (NRCan) Geological Survey of Canada storefront on Robson Street, and are now posted on the EC BioKit webpage.  The profiles are a precursor to the development of a Vancouver BioKit, to be done during 2010-2011 in conjunction with Canadian Wildlife Service and several potential partners including Metro Vancouver, the Stanley Park Ecological Society, Bird Studies Canada, the Nature Conservancy of Canada, and TransCanada Trail.

Green Guide project development:
The 2010 Green Guide included projects situated in the Metro Vancouver region and the Sea-to-Sky corridor and will showcase leadership in sustainability on Canada's west coast, and specifically in the Metro Vancouver/Sea-to-Sky area. The 2010 Green Guide will provide visitors and residents with an updated, interactive compendium of "best practice" case studies of green buildings and related developments and technology that are both educational and inspirational. The accompanying website was launched: www.seatoskygreenguide.ca.
The bilingual Sea-to-Sky Green Guide map and website were showcased as part of the Sustainable Legacies booth at GLOBE 2010, Canada’s largest international conference and trade show dedicated to the business of the environment.

In the final quarter of fiscal 2009-2010, environmental sustainability of the 2010 Games was promoted through 6 high profile events and activities during and after the Games. There were two IOC Observer Program presentations, two Ministerial announcements (carbon offsetting, youth video contest), the Sustainability Video at the Canada Pavilion, and a booth at GLOBE 2010. The Games resulted in expanded reach and scope due to increases in website traffic and public awareness from these events.

EC partnered with DFAIT, NRCan and TC on a 2010 Sustainability exhibit at GLOBE 2010.  The booth highlighted the Government of Canada’s contributions to the 2010 Winter Games legacies in sustainable building, sustainable transportation, environmental footprint reduction, and environmental awareness and engagement.  Approximately 350 visitors directly engaged with booth staff (they either picked up some of the handout material or spoke with the booth staff).  The booth showcased all the previously developed sustainability products as well as new products developed for the event.

Environmental assessment is integral part of program and policy decision-making.

Efficient and effective environmental assessments

$1.5M $0.1M $0.1M Completion of environmental assessment follow-up activities.

All environmental assessments previously were completed as required.
No follow-up activities were requested during 2009-2010.

J. Fisheries and Oceans Canada  Healthy and productive aquatic eco-systems. Habitat management

$0.6M

$0.1M $0

Environmental assessment work conducted as required.

All environmental assessments were completed as required.
Total $546.24M $143.052M $140.099M    

Comments on Variances: INAC disbursed a $34M First Nations Grant in 2008-2009. This amount is included in the “Total Non-Security Federal Funding Allocation” of $580.24M but it is not included in the totals in column 13 of the body of the report.

Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A.

Contact information: Charles-Antoine Drouin, 819-956-9792


1 The statement of the shared outcomes is further detailed from those announced in the 2009-2010 RPP in order to strengthen the accountability. Since the Horizontal RMAF for Games Security and Public Safety was released in March 2009, the 2010 FS updated the Horizontal Integrated RMAF/RBAF, logic model and performance measurement strategy to reflect the evolving nature of the horizontal initiative; subsequently, the shared outcomes were further clarified.

2 Additional funding was obtained in September 2009, which is not included in the 2009-2010 RPP. Subsequently, two departments which are recipients of incremental funding were included in the horizontal initiative, namely the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) and the Department of Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC).


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future

Name of Lead Department(s): Canadian Heritage

Lead Department Program Activity: Promotion of inter-cultural understanding

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2008

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $1,110.10 M

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future (Roadmap) is a Government of Canada policy statement that includes a number of initiatives to strengthen and promote linguistic duality. Fourteen federal institutions have received funds for sectoral programs and activities related to official languages. The Roadmap contributes to the attainment of a strategic outcome for Canadian Heritage (Canadians have a sense of their Canadian identity) and to the Government of Canada’s outcome (A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion).

Another key component of the Roadmap is the implementation of an accountability framework and a coordinated government-wide approach to official languages. The implementation of the Roadmap is a component of the broader Official Languages Program (OLP), as defined and approved by the Committee of Deputy Ministers on Official Languages in December 2004.

Web site: http://www.pch.gc.ca/slo-ols/

Shared Outcome(s):

Three levels of outcomes have been established.

Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in the language of choice.

Three intermediate outcomes:

  • Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English‑speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in the language of choice.
  • Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
  • Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.

Eight immediate outcomes:

  • Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
  • Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
  • Improved social and economic development of official language minority communities (OLMC).
  • Strengthened capacity of language industries.
  • Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
  • Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
  • Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
  • Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.

Governance Structure(s):

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages is responsible for the implementation of the Roadmap. The Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) (Canadian Heritage) supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages. With respect to roles and responsibilities, the OLS is responsible for developing and coordinating the results of the Roadmap. The OLS ensures that all information (financial and non-financial) needed is gathered and that the content of all logic models of the Roadmap’s structure is taken into consideration. The OLS is also responsible for the complete implementation and the accountability framework for the Roadmap. This role was given to the OLS by the partners through the development of a Management Framework for the Roadmap, which outlines the activities and results structure, the governance structure, as well as the roles and responsibilities of departments and different interdepartmental committees, while also identifying the relevant operational issues concerning its horizontal implementation. The OLS will also support the governance of the Official Languages Program through various mechanisms and committees.

A governance structure has been established; the highest level is the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages (CADMOL). It acts on behalf of all federal departments, agencies and organizations that are partners in the Roadmap in a variety of ways: it supports the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and all ministers who have responsibilities under the Official Languages Act (OLA); it ensures leadership for managing the OLP, and particularly the Roadmap, by making decisions and overseeing the coordination of partners’ actions; it guides the implementation of the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (HRMAF) and oversees the evaluation of the government strategy regarding official languages (the Roadmap). During CADMOL meetings, departments having specific responsibilities under the OLA (for instance, Canadian Heritage, Justice Canada, and the Canada Public Service Agency) report on achievements that are specific to their mandate and describe the challenges and issues related to these responsibilities.

Three interdepartmental committees support CADMOL’s work by providing recommendations. Firstly, the Interdepartmental Policy Committee (IPC) provides an information-sharing forum between partners in order to present a joint approach to strategic issues regarding the OLP. The Interdepartmental Management Committee for the Official Languages Program (IMCOLP) seeks to ensure that interdepartmental coordination of the OLP is formalized and structured, most notably by assessing the implementation of the OLP and strengthening the accountability process. The Coordinating Committee on Official Languages Research (CCOLR) ensures that official languages research is coordinated. The committees may create working groups as needed to complete specific projects. For example, the Working Group on the HRMAF Revision (Working Group) was created in the summer of 2008.

($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Actual Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Results Achieved in
2009-10
Ultimate outcome: Canadians enjoy the benefits of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French; and have access to government services in the language of choice.
Intermediate outcome 1: Enhanced capacity of Canadians (English speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada) to live and work in vibrant communities in the language of choice.
Immediate outcome 1.1: Continued and improved access to justice services in both official languages.
Justice Canada Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs

Contraventions Act Fund


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Improved capacity to carry on judicial activities and to deliver extrajudicial services related to federal contraventions in both official languages.
$47.46 M $9.49 M $5.13 M Continued and increased access to justice in both official languages by the implementation of the Contraventions regime in one province.

The negotiation of agreements is very detailed and requires strong collaboration with provincial and territorial governments.
Negotiations with the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador advanced in 2009-2010. However, given a change of staff in NFL, an agreement was not signed in 2009-2010, but should be in place in fiscal year 2010-2011. 
Negotiations have been ongoing with the Government of Prince Edward Island to amend the current agreement to include new provisions that will increase the PEI’s capacity to offer judicial and extrajudicial services in both official languages.

Of the four provinces that currently receive funding to offer judicial and extrajudicial services (British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Nova Scotia), Nova Scotia increased its scope of activities to include more signage and bilingual personnel.
Justice Canada Internal Services Contraventions Act Fund $1.92 M $0.38 M $0.26 M N/A N/A
Justice Canada Justice, Policy, Legislation and Programs

Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training)


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Increased capacity of partners and the Department to implement solutions relating to access to justice in both official languages.
$38.02 M $6.97 M $4.46 M

Training priorities established following results of the nationwide needs analysis on training needs in both official languages in the area of justice.

Coordination mechanism related to training is created and functional.

Eight financial agreements concluded in terms of core funding from the Support Fund.

30% of financed projects will focus on awareness or knowledge.

35% of projects will have other sources of funding (other than from the Department).

Five projects will fall under the training component.

The Department held an Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Sub-Committee meeting in November 2009. The objective of the meeting was to enable participants to generate ideas for potential partnerships to develop projects in line with the findings of the Canada- wide Analysis of Official Language Training Needs in the area of Justice.


The coordination mechanism related to training is in place and operational (Comité des sages).


The Department continued to provide financial support to the Fédération des associations de juristes d’expression française de common law and its seven member associations.


50% of the projects funded under the Support Fund dealt with issues related to legal information.


75% of the projects funded under the Support Fund were based on partnerships.


The Department funded 33 projects that responded to the needs of official language minority communities of which 14 were related to the new Justice training component under the Access to Justice in Both Official Languages Support Fund.

Justice Canada Internal Services Initiative of support to access to justice in both languages (new component: justice training) $1.89 M $0.44 M $0.21 M N/A N/A
Immediate Outcome 1.2: Continued and improved access to health services in both official languages.
3. Health Canada

Canadian Health System

Training, Networks and Access to Health Services

Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Increased number of health professionals to meet health service needs of OLMCs in both official languages.


2) Increased coordination and integration of health services for OLMCs within institutions and communities.


3) Increased partnerships, interaction of networks in provincial, territorial health systems.


4) Increased awareness among stakeholders that networks are a focal point for addressing health concerns of OLMCs.

5) Increased dissemination and uptake of knowledge best practices to address health concerns of OLMCs.
$174.3 M $34.8 M $36.3 M

Elaborate a baseline study to identify gaps in information, to strengthen the database, to systematically collect baseline information on performance indicators, to serve as a reference point, and to measure change over time.

Elaborate a Program Recipient Guide to provide guidance to program applicants on the nature of program requirements.

Sign new funding agreements with all primary funding recipients.

Performance reporting templates were developed in 2009-2010 in collaboration with recipients of the Official Languages Health Contribution Program. The first draft of the baseline study was completed in June 2010 and will be further revised in 2010-2011 following receipt of reporting template data provided by program recipients for fiscal 2009-2010.


Program Recipient Guides were completed for each of the five program activity areas under the Official Languages Health Contribution Program and provided to program recipients in March 2009. The five program activity areas are :

  1. Health Networking;
  2. Training and Retention of Health Professionals in French-Speaking Communities;
  3. Training and Retention of Health Professionals in English-Speaking Communities;
  4. Cultural and French-Language Training in Francophone Minority Communities; and
  5. Official Languages Health Projects.

23 contribution agreements were launched with educational institutions and community-based organizations for the engagement of new program activities to address program objectives.


965 student registrations in training programs at 11 Francophone colleges and universities outside Québec, sponsored by Consortium national de formation en santé 2009-2010.


Coordination by McGill university in Quebec, of language for training of about 1000 health professionals to effectively serve Anglophone minority communities.


New projects aimed at improving the health and health access of official language minority communities were implemented in 2009-2010. For example, a new French language telehealth site was launched in Manitoba under the sponsorship of the Société Santé en français and an initiative to improve access to health and social services in English in the Estrie region of Quebec was launched through the Community Health and Social Services Network.


Further information regarding these projects is available from the websites of Program recipients:


- Société Santé en français [http://santefrancais.ca/]


- Community Health and Social Services Network [http://www.chssn.org/]


- Consortium national de formation en santé [http://www.cnfs.net/]


McGill University [http://www.mcgill.ca/hssaccess/]

Immediate Outcome 1.3: Improved social and economic development of official language minority communities (OLMC).
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Social Development

Strengthening NGOs’ means for Early Childhood Development


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) The capacity of NGOs in early childhood in minority environment will be increased.
$4.0 M $0.8 M $0.8 M

Develop tools for the implementation of the National Framework for Collaboration on Early Childhood Development to enhance the language and culture of minority Francophone communities in Canada:


- Create a directory of existing training resources for Early Childhood Development in French.


- Take an inventory of existing research in Early Childhood Development in French.


- Develop a mechanism to share information for members of the Table nationale en développement de la petite enfance francophone and their affiliate organizations in communities across Canada.

The following educational tools and products have been developed:
- an analysis of available training programs on early childhood development (EDC)
- a directory of existing ECD research in French
- 2 video clips demonstrating various concepts of early childhood and family centres
- a directory of best networking practices for professionals
- a directory of best practices to promote cultural vitality and identity construction in official language minority communities

The Commission nationale des parents francophones, the recipient of grant funding,developed a framework for data collection and a guide to help its members to elaborate a strategic plan for ECD in their respective regions.    Strategic plans have been completed in each region and plans monitoring progress made in ECD in every province.

Two forums were organized to allow parents and ECD professionals to share information.

  Skills and Employment

Family Literacyi


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Community stakeholders can act in the area of family literacy, and tools and support are available and used by those members of OLMCs that need them.
$7.5 M $1.8 M $1.2 M

Initiate four research projects on the specific literacy needs of new groups such as immigrants, fathers, grand-parents, exogamous families, eligible clients, and on ways of integrating family literacy in other areas such as the workplace, sport, and theatre.

Initiate the development, testing and adaptation of six new family literacy models responding to the needs of new groups.

Initiate the development of four new promotion and awareness models for partner literacy organizations targeting new groups.

Implement a performance and results-based measurement framework.

Five research projects were launched to identify 1) family literacy needs of the specific groups: new parents, grandparents, seasonal workers, exogame family and rights-holder to French education, and 2) ways to integrate family literacy in other areas such as the workplace.

The development, testing and adaptation of three new family literacy models designed to address the needs of new groups have begun.


The development of three promotional strategies to increase the awareness of literacy partner organizations about new family literacy models for specific groups has begun.

A results-based performance measurement framework was developed.
  Internal Services

Child Care Pilot Projectii


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) New knowledge on child care services for minority Francophone communities.
$13.5 M $2.7 M $1.7 M Conduct child assessments and parent and community surveys in order to add to the collective knowledge of what works to help ensure Francophone minority children have the abilities to succeed when they start school.

The second of two years of preschool program delivery and research activities was completed in the six participating minority Francophone communities.

The impacts of the preschool program on the children’s readiness for schooling in French were analyzed.

Research activities to measure the children’s future achievement in school, 12 and 24 months after the end of the preschool program, have started.

  Skills and Employment

Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Contribute to synergies among Government of Canada programming relevant to OLMCs; Contribution recipients are informed and contribute to knowledge building and program/policy issues; Knowledge shared among federal partners, contribution recipients and OLMCs.


2) Program results are available to inform management and program policy issues.


3) OLMCs’ access to Government of Canada programs and services.

4) Collaborative arrangements.
$69.0 M $13.8 M $13.8 M

Sign contribution agreements with 14 organizations responsible for enhancing community economic development and human resources development within official language minority communities.

Sign new memoranda of understanding between Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, other federal departments and community partners involved in activities of both national committees in order to clarify the activities of these two committees.

Produce annual reports that describe activities and results for each of the two national committees.

Fourteen agreements were signed with the delegated organizations in the official languages minority communities, including one for each province and territory and one for the francophone network at the national level (the Réseau de développement économique et d’employabilité RDÉE Canada).


Numerous projects have been developed supporting a range of activities such as planning and partnership development in support of community economic and human resource development.  For instance, RDÉE New Brunswick has begun implementing the provincial-wide knowledge economy strategy for Acadian and Francophone communities through $13M in provincial funding.


The Enabling Fund has enabled communities to leverage resources from other levels of government and from the private and non-profit sectors. Data available from 11 of 14 agreements show that for each dollar invested by the Enabling Fund, five dollars is invested by other partners (85% in funding and 15% in-kind) for a total of more than $46 M in 2009-2010.

There have been three National Committee meetings (two with Québec’s English-speaking minority and one with the Francophone minority communities of Canada) allowing exchanges between community and federal institution representatives on economic and human resources development issues.
Citizenship and Immigration Canada Integration of French-speaking immigrants

Recruitment and integration of immigrants

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:
1) French-speaking immigrants obtain reinforced services of establishment in OLMCs.
$20.0 M $4.5 M

$6.77 M

For 2009–2010, CIC will continue existing activities to foster immigration to Francophone minority communities (FMCs). This period will be used to strengthen implementation of the Strategic plan to Foster Immigration to Francophone Minority Communities.

More specifically, CIC is expecting to:


- Intensify coordination and research activities among key partners (Integration).


- Inform more prospective French-speaking immigrants of immigration opportunities in Francophone Minority communities. (Recruitment and Promotion).


- Strengthen French-speaking immigrant settlement services in FMCs (Integration).

Two committees, which are co‑chaired by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and the community, bring together our federal, provincial and territorial government partners, as well as community representatives.

1) The CIC-Francophone Minority Communities Steering Committee held a meeting on June 1, 2009. The vast majority of participants said that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the subjects covered at the meeting (over 90% were satisfied with most of the criteria). Four annual priorities were confirmed.

2) The Strategic Plan Implementation Committee also held three meetings in 2009‑2010. The three related working groups (international, social, economic) also held a total of three meetings.

One of the major results of this cooperative effort was the adoption of a common definition for community networks.

CIC is in the process of compiling information about programs offered by its partners that support the implementation of the Strategic Plan. This information will be distributed as part of our communication efforts and exchange of best practices (distribution scheduled for 2010‑2011).

As part of the March 2010 National Metropolis Conference, CIC co‑organized a working session on the role of governments, networks and community partners. This session brought together representatives from across the country and provided an opportunity for very productive discussions on best practices and partnership opportunities. The Best Practices Manual on Francophone Immigration in Canada and the Current Research Compendium on Francophone Immigration in Canada were also released at this conference.

Finally, with the help of funding from CIC, Statistics Canada published the Statistical Portrait of the French‑Speaking Immigrant Population Outside Quebec, which describes recent trends in the characteristics of French-speaking immigrants.

With regard to recruitment and promotion, Destination Canada 2009 made it possible for 79 representatives from 10 provinces and two territories and from Francophone organizations, regions and municipalities to meet over 2,200 prospective immigrants. For the first time, officers from visa offices in Abidjan, Bucharest, Damascus, Cairo, Rabat and Tunis attended the preparatory session in order to gather information on the potential for the recruitment of French-speaking immigrants in their respective regions.


CIC also provided funding for 46 information sessions in France and Belgium, four education fairs, and one media tour by six journalists from Europe and one journalist from Africa.


CIC continues to encourage the provinces and territories to designate more French‑speaking nominees under the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP).


CIC’s Francophone immigration website was updated to make information on programs for French-speaking clients more visible and easier to access.


A pilot project with the Réseau de développement économique et d’employabilité (RDÉE Canada) made it possible to develop a database of prospective French-speaking immigrants who could be matched with employers in Francophone minority communities (FMCs). Another initiative with RDÉE Canada involves the study of the needs and capacities of businesses in hiring French-speaking immigrants.


Settlement and integration services in FMCs were strengthened in 2009‑2010, and funding was granted in the form of over one hundred contribution agreements. A total of 121 direct points of service are now available across the country and are offered by Francophone organizations in 24 cities.


CIC began or consolidated the implementation of ten full‑time community networks and two part‑time networks in FMCs across the country in order to solidify and intensify efforts to integrate French-speaking immigrants economically, socially and culturally.


A pilot project in Manitoba made it possible to offer support and integration services for 50 French-speaking refugees during their first four to six weeks in the country. This project will be renewed in 2010‑2011.


With regard to language training, French Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) guidelines for grades 1 to 7 were released in May 2009. The new placement tests are now available to service providers in the regions. The online language training program is currently being developed and will be offered as a pilot project in the fall of 2010.

Finally, projects were also put in place to facilitate the social integration of French-speaking newcomers. Local immigration partnerships, library settlement partnerships and settlement workers in schools ensure the distribution of information and the provision of referral services adapted to the needs of clients.

Industry Canada—FedNor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community, Economic and Regional Development

 

Northern Economy

Economic Development  Initiative


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.

$10.5 M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$2.60 M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$0.89 M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Industry Canada will hold community consultations at the national level with partners.

FedNor: Expected results for 2009-2010 are to develop 30 projects with the planned funding for the same year. The emphasis will be put on community strategic planning and economic and enterprise development initiatives to foster economic development of OLMCs.

 

Industry Canada held two consultations meetings with Anglophone SMEs in Quebec and OLMCs SMEs through CEDEC and RDEE to gather information on issues pertaining to SMEs in OLMCs and Anglophone minority communities. National consultations will be held in September and October 2010. Socio-economic analysis based on 2006 census as well as 3 studies with partners were undertaken to collect data on OLMCs, to better understand their needs. $245,032.15 has been invested while $104,967.85 has lapsed.


Funding has been split between FedNor and FedDev, the newly created regional development agency for Southern Ontario.


FedNor: 39 projects were developed with multi-year funding totaling $1.9M. Of these, 13 projects had cash flows in 2009-2010 for a total of $345,950. Other EDI investment totaled $81,500.


FedDev: 10 projects were funded for a total of $1M on a multi-year basis. A total of $214,467 has been allocated in 2009-2010.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)

Note: Roadmap programming was transferred to CanNor in August 2009

  $0.4 M $0.1M $0.1M

INAC:  Encourage the economic development of OLMCs across the territories and will complement current economic development efforts in these communities.


 

CanNor:  Encourage the economic development of OLMCs across the territories and will complement current economic development efforts in these communities.

CanNor supported the social and economic development of OLMCs via funding for a project led by the Association des Francophones du Nunavut that also included participation of Francophone partners from across the North. This project accounted for the entirety of CanNor’s EDI budget and leveraged an additional $73,000 from other CanNor programs.
     
Canada Economic Development (CED) for Quebec regions Community Development

Economic Development  Initiative


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.
$10.2 M $2.0 M

$1.02 M

CED will put in place the Economic Development Initiative for English communities of Quebec. The priority will be put on projects, such as local planning, entrepreneurship, creation and development of SME, tourism, integration of targeted groups and attractive funding in order to create an economic environment which helps and attracts the development of enterprises in OLMCs, especially for young people

10 EDI projects underway in 2009-2010

Result 1 - Increased capacities of SMEs and communities: 5 projects: 3 projects which support capacity development and economic diversification and 2 projects which support partnership activities to promote integration of OLMCs and participation in local development.

Result 2 - Develop OLMC SMEs: 5 projects which support the development / maintenance of OLMC SMEs or capacity development


Result 3 - OLMC Community Development: there are currently no projects underway supporting OLMC development

Western Economic Diversification Canada

Research and Analysis; Community Economic Planning, Development and Adjustment; Business Development and Entrepreneur-ship;        Innovation

Economic Development  Initiative


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.
$3.2 M $0.8 M $0.68 M

Improved understanding of Western Canadian economic issues, challenges, opportunities and priorities.

Communities have increased economic opportunities and capacity to respond to challenges.

Strong SMEs in Western Canada with improved capacity to remain competitive in the global marketplace.

A stronger knowledge-based economy.

Manitoba (CEDEM) initiative to support youth, rural diversification, and business development:
-Youth: 31 youth related businesses created/ maintained/expanded.
- Planning: 2 CED planning project completed.
- New-immigrant: 19 businesses created/ maintained/expanded with 52 jobs created.
- $8.5 M business investment in rural economy and $9.6 M in urban economy.

Place de la Francophonie 2010: 24 SMEs and NPOs participation in international event for the promotion of francophone tourism and agri-food industries, encouraged cultural tourism, and strengthened OLMC economic development.

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Community Development

Economic Development  Initiative


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Development of new expertise through innovation, diversification of activities as well as partnerships and increased support of small businesses.

2) Greater understanding of the economic issues of OLMCs.
$6.2 M $1.8 M $0.35 M

Number of partnerships in Atlantic Canada with groups representing OLMCs (10).

Number of projects approved (10).

Twenty partnerships were created with groups representing OLMCs in Atlantic Canada

Six projects were approved.

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency Community Development

Support to francophone immigration in New-Brunswick


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Enhanced capacity to support francophone immigration in New Brunswick.
$10.0 M $2.7 M $0.66 M

Number of immigration centres opened in OLMCs (2).

Number of immigration awareness sessions to business owners (4).

One center was opened in the Acadian Peninsula.

Twenty-eight awareness sessions were offered to business owners.

Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Minority Language Education –  
Component: Support to Minority Language Education.


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Increased access of OLMCs to quality education in their language in their milieu.
$280.0 M $56.0 M $56.0 M

Renew the Multilateral Protocol with the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC) and various agreements containing action plans with the provinces and territories concerning minority  language education

Renewal of 13 various agreements on minority language education with provinces and territories and multilateral Protocol with the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC).


All agreements were signed and effective by March 31, 2009.

These agreements have allowed provinces and territories to offer educational programs and activities that promote access to a minority language education to 215 000 students.
  Official Languages

Minority Language Education –
Component: Official-language Monitors


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Improved access of OLMCs to a quality education in their language and milieu.

$5.2 M $1.04 M $1.04 M

Implementation of an agreement with the CMEC for the delivery of the Odyssee (Monitors) program to support learning in minority area classrooms.

The amount of participants in the Odyssee program was maintained with 108 participants.

Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Minority Language Education –
Component: Summer Language Bursaries

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Improved access of OLMCs to a first-rate education in their language in their milieu.

$1.72 M $0.34 M $0.34 M

Implementation of an agreement with the CMEC for the delivery of Destination Clic (Bursary) program for young francophone’s of OLMC’s.

This program helps almost 185 young francophone’s outside Quebec to enrich their first language while discovering new communities in Canada.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Community vitality –
Component: Youth Initiatives.


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially for youth).
$10.5 M $10.5 M $10.5 M

Grants and contributions for the implementation of youth projects and activities in different areas, which allows the use of the language of the minority.

Implementation of youth projects and activities that allow and promote the use of the language of the minority.

Note: The Official Languages Support Programs Branch was unable to conduct the survey planned for 2009 that would allow to measure the capacity for OLMC’s to live in their own language in their milieu. The OLSP is currently reviewing its performance measurement strategy.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Community vitality –
Component:  Support to Official-language Minority Communities


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) proved capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and improved access to a range of programs and services offered in their language.
$22.5 M (including admin. cost) $4.5 M $4.5 M Grants and contributions for the creation, improvement and delivery of activities and services to support life environments fostering the use of the language in minority area.

Investment indicated in the Road Map has permitted the improvement of programs to create, improve and deliver activities and services intended for OLMC that promote a sense of belonging, such as investments in organizations that support French language culture and minority community medias. 

Note: The Official Languages Support Programs Branch was unable to conduct the survey planned for 2009 that would allow to measure the capacity for OLMC’s to live in their own language in their milieu. The OLSP is currently reviewing its performance measurement strategy.

Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Community vitality –Component: Intergovernmental Cooperation.


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Inreased access of OLMCs to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.
$22.5 M $4.5 M $4.5 M Implementation of agreements with provincial and territorial governments for the delivery of provincial and territorial services in the language of the minority.

Renewal of 8 various agreements on minority-language education with provinces and territories.


The renewals of all agreements were signed and effective by March 31, 2009.


Note: The Official Languages Support Programs Branch was unable to conduct the survey planned for 2009 that would allow to measure the capacity for OLMC’s to live in their own language in their milieu. The OLSP is currently reviewing its performance measurement strategy.

Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Community vitality –Component: Cultural Development Funds


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Increased access to provincial, territorial and municipal services in the minority language.

2) Increased capacity of OLMCs to live in their own language in their milieu and increased access to a range of programs and services delivered in their language (especially in culture).
$14.0 M $3.5 M $3.5 M Grants and contributions for the implementation of services, activities and cultural products fostering the development of cultural vitality in OLMCs.

Investment indicated in the Road Map has permitted the implementation of 79 projects (services, activities and cultural products) fostering the development of cultural vitality in OLMC’s.

Note: The Official Languages Support Programs Branch was unable to conduct the survey planned for 2009 that would allow to measure the capacity for OLMC’s to live in their own language in their milieu. The OLSP is currently reviewing its performance measurement strategy.

Intermediate Result 2: Increased proportion of Canadians who are aware of the benefits and have the necessary tools to appreciate linguistic duality.
Immediate Result 2.1: Strengthened capacity of language industries.
Public Works and Government Services Canada

Linguistic Management & Services

Language Industry Initiative


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Funded projects help enhance the capacity, diversity and effectiveness of the language sector.
$10.0 M $1.68 M $0.44 M

Launch of the Language Industry Initiative in Spring 2009.

In July 2009, the Canadian Language Sector Enhancement Program of Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) proceeded with a call for proposals of projects that aim to provide support for the development of a skilled labour force and to strengthen the capacity of the Canadian language sector.

Following the call for proposals, PWGSC signed in 2009-2010 eight contribution agreements for a three-year period to support the promotion of the language industry, the integration of language technologies and innovative projects which will aim to strengthen the capacity of the Canadian language sector.
Public Works and Government Services Canada Linguistic Management & Services

University Scholarships Program in Translation


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Scholarships help encourage students to pursue post-secondary studies in translation, interpretation and terminology.
$8.0 M $1.45 M $0.67 M Launch of the University Scholarships Program in Translation in Fall 2009.

In July 2009, the Canadian Language Sector Enhancement Program of Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) proceeded with a call for proposals of projects that aim to provide support for the development of a skilled labour force and to strengthen the capacity of the Canadian language sector.

Following the call for proposals, PWGSC signed in 2009-2010 five contribution agreements for a three-year period to allocate university scholarships and student internships in translation to support the development of a skilled labour force.
National Research Council of Canada Information Technologies

Languages Technologies Research Centre


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) Collaboration with key partners in the implementation of an R&D strategy responsive to industry needs.


2) Innovative tool prototypes for the support of translation, and the creation and management of multilingual and multicultural content.

2) Transfer of knowledge and technology.
$10.0 M $2.0 M $2.07 M

Immediate result: Transfer of knowledge and technology. Implementation of a machine translation system PORTAGE in the Translation Bureau (Public Works and Government Services Canada) and, at least, in a translation firm of the private sector. Negotiation of a commercial license for machine translation technology, PORTAGE.

Immediate result: Innovative tool prototypes for the support of translation, and the creation and management of multilingual and multicultural content; running-in of the machine translation system PORTAGE.

Immediate result: Collaboration with key partners in elaborating an R&D strategy responsive to industry needs; signature of at least two agreements of cooperation with Canadian translation firms, a governmental firm and a firm of the private sector.

Negotiations continued with the Translation Bureau (BtB) concerning the use of the PORTAGE statistical machine translation system at the BtB. A large Canadian private sector translation bureau conducted trials of PORTAGE; the positive results of the trials led this translation bureau to acquire a commercial licence for PORTAGE at the beginning of 2010-2011. A prototype of the Terminoweb terminology research tool was deployed at the School of Translation and Interpretation of the University of Ottawa.

Tuning of PORTAGE: improvements in the quality of the machine translations were demonstrated by the excellent results obtained in the NIST 2009 international competition. A process to estimate the confidence in the quality of a translation was developed to better integrate PORTAGE in operational environments. Terminoweb 2.0 was developed and made available on the Web. BICAT, a categorizer that can take advantage of the existence of a document in multiple languages was developed.

Five collaborations with Canadian firms were signed (total value of $443K): three concerning PORTAGE (one with a translation bureau and two with language technology companies), one concerning Terminoweb, and one concerning automatic categorization. A Memorandum of Understanding was signed with the BtB.
Immediate Result 2.2: Improved knowledge and use of both official languages.
Public Works and Government Services Canada Linguistic Management & Services

Language Portal of Canada

Result for 2008–2013 Roadmap: 1) Canadians have better access to quality language resources in both official languages.
$16.0 M $4.48 M $4.48 M

Launch of the Language Portal of Canada in Fall 2009.

Public Works and Government Services Canada developed the Language Portal of Canada, which provides all Canadians with free access to a wide range of writing resources and tools, including TERMIUM, the terminology and linguistic databank of the Government of Canada. The Portal was officially launched on October 8th, 2009 and is now accessible by all Internet users.

The Translation Bureau professionals add new content and update daily the Portal by creating new additions and revising existing content. In 2009-2010, 392 articles and headlines, 358 flash quizzes and 8 articles from contributors have been published on the Portal. Three partnership agreements with external partners have also been signed for the development of linguistic resources to add new content to the Portal.

Moreover, the Discover section of the Portal contains over 1000 hyperlinks that refer to Anglophone and Francophone minority communities, the Canadian language training, Canadian tools and language-related works, and resources and articles from the provinces and dealing with the situation of languages in Canada.
Canada School of Public Service

Foundational learning

Official Languages Learning


Language retention services


Development of new technologies, methodologies and products

Expanding Universities’  Access to Language Learning


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Increased access to language training products to Canadians through new partnerships with Canadian universities.
$2.5 M $0.9 M $0.68 M New partnerships with Canadian universities. 10 new partnerships have been established with Canadian universities
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Second Language Education –
Component: Support to Second Language


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.

$190.0 M $38.0 M $38.0 M

Renew the Multilateral Protocol with the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC) and various agreements containing action plans with the provinces and territories concerning second language learning

Renewal of 13 various agreements concerning second language education with provinces and territories and multilateral Protocol with the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC).


The renewal of all agreements were signed and effective  by March 31, 2009

These investments and agreements have allowed the provinces and territories to improve their programs and activities that promote the learning of French and English as a second official language for 2.5 million students.
Canadian Heritage

Official Languages

Second Language Education – 
Component:
Official Language Monitors


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.
$14.8 M $2.96 M $2.96 M Implementation of an agreement with the CMEC for Odyssee (Monitor) program delivery to support learning in second-language classrooms. The Odyssee program is maintained. This program allowed for 240 students to participate.
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Second Language Education –
Component: Summer Language Bursaries


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) More Canadians have a practical knowledge of both official languages.
$38.3 M $7.66 M $7.66 M Implementation of an agreement with the CMEC for the delivery of the Explore program delivery for second-language bursaries. 7,767 scholarship holders took advantage of the Explore program. This program offers a cultural exchange that help learners perfect their comprehension of their second official language.
Canadian Heritage

Official Languages

Promotion of Linguistic Duality – Component: Youth Initiatives


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap

1) More young Canadians have a practical knowledge of their second language.
$2.0 M $2.0 M $2.0 M Grants and contributions for the implementation of youth projects and activities in different areas, which allows the use of the second language and the exposure to second language.

Implementation of youth projects and activities that promote the use of the second-language and exposure to it.

Immediate Result 2.3: Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
Canadian Heritage

Official Languages

Broadcasting Policy and Programs

CTRC Study


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) CRTC report is issued on the availability and quality of broadcasting services to English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada.

2) The findings of the report will inform policy and decision-making on the availability and quality of broadcasting services in English and French linguistic communities in Canada.
Non- monetary N/A N/A CRTC report on availability and quality of English- and French-language services in the linguistic minority communities in Canada completed by March 31, 2009.

1) As part of the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality, the government issued an order in council under section 15 of the Broadcasting Act requesting that the CRTC examine the availability and quality of English- and French‑language broadcasting services in Anglophone and Francophone minority communities in Canada, and that it propose measures to encourage and facilitate access to the widest range of these services.

On March 30, 2009, following a public process, the CRTC published the Report to the Governor in Council on English‑ and French‑Language Broadcasting Services in English and French Linguistic Minority Communities in Canada.


2) In its report, the CRTC concluded that official‑language minority communities have appropriate access to television services, that the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and community radio stations play a most important role in official-language minority communities, that community reflection in the programming of the services available in the Canadian broadcasting system can be improved, and that in the medium and long term, new media represent the best solution for ensuring access to a maximum number of services and for allowing a better reflection of official‑language minority communities within the Canadian broadcasting system.

The government took note of the conclusions and recommendations in the CRTC’s report and will consider them in its commitment to promote both of Canada’s official languages and access to high‑quality broadcasting services in English and in French for all Canadians
Canadian Heritage Cultural Industries

Musical Showcase Program for Artists from Official-language Communities

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
$4.5 M $1.0 M $1.0 M

Funding agreements are in place with partners who organize showcases and finance the artists.

 

Music showcases are organized and presented.


Artists from OLMCs perform at these showcases.

Funding agreements signed with FACTOR and Musicaction, the third-party administrators responsible for delivering the funds to organize music showcases for artists coming from OLMC.


More than 500 music showcases were organized during regional, national and international events.

233 artists of OLMC performed at these showcases.
Canadian Heritage Cultural Industries

National Translation Program for Book Publishing

Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Improved access to cultural expressions of both linguistic groups.
$5.0 M $0.75 M $0.75 M

Funding is allocated to book publishers for eligible translations.
Canadian publishers produce translations of Canadian-authored books in both official languages.

Funding was allocated to book publishers for eligible translations.

 

61 translations of Canadian-authored books in both official languages by Canadian publishers were funded.

Intermediate Result 3: Strengthening capacity of the Government of Canada relating to official languages.
Immediate Result 3.1: Reinforced coordination for the Official Languages Program (OLP).
Justice Canada Legal Services to Government

Accountability and Coordination Framework


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

1) Support to ministers with statutory or sectoral responsibilities for official languages and to work with them.
$2.18 M $0.44 M $0.46 M

Client-focused service delivery. 
Effective management of legal risks.

Legal opinion and advice services for federal institutions:
-42 formal opinions;
-80 email and oral opinions;
-3 framework opinions on horizontal issues.

Monitoring of media, court decisions and parliamentary activities.
Conferences and training sessions:
-1 major conference organized (on the 40th anniversary of the OLA);
-23 presentations on specific issues;
- 2 courses offered.

Tools distributed: Annotated Federal Laws, 8 Charter Checklists (sections 16 to 23), Legal Awareness Program – Official Languages Act, 4 summary reports on language rights cases, 1 memo on Picard decision to Official Language Network, 5 articles on Nguyen, Via Rail and Picard decisions in Justice publications.


Analysis of the Caldech decision and active member of the working group established to develop a legal risk strategy to implement the decision.

  Internal Services Accountability and Coordination Framework $0.15 M $0.03 M $0.03 M N/A N/A
Canadian Heritage Official Languages

Accountability and Coordination Framework


Results for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:


1) The Government of Canada has official languages strategies.


2) The partners are supported in the implementation of their official languages initiatives.


3) The results of the research on official languages are communicated to the partners.


4) The Minister of Official Languages is advised on official languages files.

5) The quality of information on results (financial and non-financial) provided by the partners is improved.
$13.5 M $2.8 M $2.12 M

Support to Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and senior officials in elaborating timely documentation and in insisting on quality assurance of given information and strategic advice.

Update of the Accountability and Coordination Framework on Official Languages in collaboration with partners (synthesis of the documentation, quality of information, utility of the documentation for partners).

To facilitate the implementation of the Roadmap by organizing regular meetings of interdepartmental committees of various levels, by consulting with the partners, by coordinating the collection of information for ministerial reports, by sharing timely financial and non-financial information and by preparing the organization of a symposium on research on official languages.


Implementation of the Horizontal Results-based Management Accountability Framework (HRMAF).

Support for the Minister of Official Languages and the senior managers
The Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) coordinated the Ministerial Conference on the Canadian Francophonie (MCCF) held in September 2009. For the MCCF, the OLS developed the documentation directing strategic discussions between the Minister of Official Languages and the provincial and territorial ministers at the MCCF.

Update of the Accountability and Coordination Framework
In collaboration with the other Roadmap partners, the OLS updated the Accountability and Coordination Framework. The Framework was approved on January 28, 2010 by the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages. The document as well as a communication strategy are currently in the approval process.

 

 

Coordination of the committees
As part of the Roadmap’s implementation of the Horizontal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (HRMAF), the OLS continued to coordinate meetings for the CADMOL and its support committees (IPC, IMCOLP and CCOLR).
In order to focus on more strategic discussions and act more like a steering committee, the CADMOL entrusted its support committees (IPC, CCOLR, IMCOLP) with the role of achieving some of its priorities, such as developing the HRMAF public document, reviewing the Accountability and Coordination Framework and language clauses, following up on language litigation such as CALDECH, Via Rail, the Caron case, etc.

Coordination of the interdepartmental committees ensures that the Roadmap is implemented effectively.

The significance of the Roadmap’s implementation and the Government of Canada’s commitment to the official languages were key themes of the 40th anniversary celebration of the Official Languages Act in 2009.

Development of the HRMAF public document
In collaboration with the Roadmap’s partners, the OLS developed the HRMAF public document, which presents the structure of the Roadmap’s activities, results and governance, as well as the strategies established to measure, assess and account for results throughout the horizontal initiative’s life cycle.

Following the publication of the Roadmap’s HRMAF by the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages, a communication strategy was established to ensure better dissemination that, more specifically, targeted the leading representatives of official-language minority communities (OLMCs), the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, the official language parliamentary committees, and all Canadians.
Immediate Result 3.2: Reinforced linguistic duality in federal public service.
Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer 3

Policy Direction. Partnerships and Integration Program


Integrity and Sustainability Program

Centre of excellence


Result for the 2008–2013 Roadmap:

Linguistic duality is reinforced in the federal public service.
$17.0 M $3.4 M $2.76 M

Simplified, updated and restructured official languages policy instruments to allow deputy heads to better discharge their responsibilities regarding the implementation of the Official Languages Act.

An interpretation service for policy instruments made available to institutions subject to the Official Languages Act.

Support reviewing the policy instruments of other policy centres for everything regarding official languages.

Support, opinion and advice provided to institutions subject to the Official Languages Act to better assist them in applying the provisions of the relevant policy instruments.

Information sessions and workshops offered to federal institutions to help them to better understand the requirements of the Act and of the policy instruments.

Awareness-raising activities with institutions’ senior management in need of additional support.

The 130 or so requirements contained in official languages policy instruments have been reviewed in depth and undergone a risk analysis using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Smart Rules Charter.

8 policy instruments from other policy centres were commented on. Moreover, guidelines on social media were drafted and should be disseminated soon.

38 requests for individualized interpretation were handled.

3 horizontal interpretations were carried out. They included an interpretation for the application of the Supreme Court’s CALDECH decision.

This function was combined with the function for providing simplified policy instruments.

This function was not renewed under the reorganization that took place in 2009.

11 information sessions and workshops were offered to federal institutions. A forum on good practices was also organized.

This function is not part of the renewed functions in 2009.

  Strategic Services Program        

Renewed method of cooperation with champions to encourage stronger leadership on official languages.

Renewed method of cooperation with advisory committees to suggest ideas and encourage them to take shared initiatives to improve the overall official languages performance of institutions.

The method of co-operation was renewed. A conference of the network of champions was organized.

The method of co-operation was renewed. Advisory committees are more independent and institutions are playing a more active role in the committees’ work. 2 meetings of the DACOL and 2 meeting of the CCACOL were held.

  Integrity and Sustainability Program        

Monitoring of official languages management practices and controls in the context of conducting risk-based official languages annual reports.

An assessment of the state of official languages in the institutions that make up the core public administration in the context of the Management Accountability Framework (MAF).

An Annual Report on Official Languages presented to Parliament that gives a strategic picture of the Program in the institutions subject to the Official Languages Act while focusing on a specific theme for the year.

The method used for the annual reports on official languages exercise was completely rethought in order to base it on better risk management. Official languages management practices and control in institutions were reviewed in 2009–2010 using this new method. 77 annual reports were requested from institutions and 72 were received.

Official languages were evaluated in the context of the MAF.

The structure and content of the Annual Report were completely rethought to provide a strategic picture of the Program in institutions. The 2007–2008 report was the first to be written according to this new methodology. The 2007–2008 annual report was tabled in October 2009.

Total $1,108.4 M $235.61 M $220.79 M    

Comments on Variances:

ACOA:
EDI: Project approvals amount to $2,110,725.  However, delays in implementing projects have resulted in $348,639.00 being claimed in 2009-2010.
FRANCOPHONE IMMIGRATION: The proponent placed emphasis on holding awareness sessions directed at the communities where welcoming centers are to be opened.  Thus only one center was opened in 2009-2010 and claims for funding were therefore fewer than expected.
CED: TBS and Finance have agreed to transfer in 2010-2011 the amount of $ 1 100 000 in grants and contributions.
CIC:   Please take note that CIC’s actual spending for 2009-2010 is higher than the planned spending for the same period. In fact, an additional 2.5 million dollars (10 million dollars for four years) was taken from the department’s settlement funds for the implementation of official languages initiatives, as specified in CIC’s submission to the Treasury Board in relation to the Roadmap.
CSPS: • The Roadmap TB submission was approved at Treasure Board in December 2008 under condition (see attached). For this reason, as long as the conditions stated in the letter of decision were not fulfilled, the funds to implement the Roadmap initiatives could not be released. 
• Heritage Canada and its partners have worked to develop a more detailed management framework fulfilling the Minister's requirements.  A new presentation to Treasury Board was made in April 2009.  This time, the submission was approved and the funds were released.
• Once the funds were received for the pilot project with universities (and the other projects of the Roadmap), the staffing process started and employees joined the project in June 2009.
• A request for proposal was posted for universities to apply and a selection was made in August 2009.
 The Official announcement and launch of the pilot project was made by the Parliamentary secretary, Andrew Saxton, on October 14, 2009 at Simon Fraser University.  Up till that date, the information about the selected universities was under embargo.  This is only once the official announcement was made the School could start discussions with the universities.
• Some universities faced some difficulties to recruit students due to short deadline to proceed to the selection of the students, to familiarize them with the project and also due to administrative challenges in their organization.  Therefore, some universities became active in the initiative not in January, but in February or March 2010; one will even begin in September 2010.  The students gradually joined the pilot-project (the majority between, end of January and end of March). Due to this situation and a matter of volume the Public Service Commission and the Learning plan service of the School could not administer all the tests before the end of the fiscal year 2009-2010.  A part of the money allocated to these tasks was not spent. The tests will continue in 2010-2011. 
• For the reasons stated above, the School spent $681,401 on a budget of $ 900, 000 for the 2009-2010 fiscal year, a difference of $ 218, 599.
• However, the Canada School of Public Service expect to spend the funds that were not spent in 2009-2010 during the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 fiscal years.
Health Canada: In 2009-2010, $2,000,000 in additional funding was provided to the 11 member institutions making up the Consortium national de formation en santé to promote its activities/programs and recruit students, to expand the scope of distance learning, to strengthen clinical training through the purchase of medical equipment and to strengthen continuous learning by recruiting teaching personnel.  In addition, some program recipients did not spend the entire contribution to which they were entitled in 2009-2010, which brought the actual spending to $36,300,000.
Industry Canada: Discrepancy is due to the creation of the Agency in August 2009. The new agency was not able to make decisions as quickly as needed. The Agency needed more time to ensure a proper implementation’s process of the programme. Thus, 1 million has been postponed to 2010-2011.
Concerning FedNor, many projects are funded on a multi-annual basis. The funds have also been postponed to 2010-2011.
Justice Canada:
CONTRAVENTIONS: The province of Newfoundland and Labrador did not sign an agreement in 2009-2010 as anticipated.
The province of Prince Edward Island did not sign an agreement in 2009-2010.
The Department has been approached by Alberta and Saskatchewan to begin discussions on the manner in which to implement a Contraventions agreement. No agreement has yet been signed.
OFFICIAL LANGUAGES: There were fewer projects than anticipated related to the training component that were received and approved in fiscal year 2009-2010.
Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer:
Centre of Excellence: In 2009-2010, the operations of the Official Languages Centre of Excellence have been aligned with the new regime for human resources management, established in response to the findings of the horizontal review of human resources management functions and to the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on the Public Service.
PWGSC:
Language Industry Initiative: Of the total authorized expenditure for 2009-2010, $800,000 was deferred to 2010-2011.
University Scholarships Program in Translation: Of the total authorized expenditure for 2009-2010, $700,000 was deferred to 2010-2011 and 2011-2012.
Western Economic Diversification Canada: Grant and Contribution (Gs&Cs) discrepancy relates to unspent amount, based on the disbursement information originating from processed claims, as opposed to EDI allocated amount for this period.
PCH (OLS):The days of dialogue and the development phase of the Official Languages Performance and Information Management System (OLPIMS) will be postponed to 2010-2011, which explain the difference between planned spending and actual spending for 2009-2010.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact information: Kirk Giroux (819-997-0622)

 

1 Family Literacy Initiative: As of April 19th, 2010, 11 projects have been approved totalling $2.61M since 2008.  In fact, many of the projects approved were to be realized in multiple phases: research phases undertaken to identify the needs of the francophone minority communities and develop models or programs pertinent to the different target groups.  It will be followed by pilot testing of literacy models or programs adapted to this clientele.  The Office of Literacy and Essential Skills expects that all available funding will be engaged in the near future and that the total funding will be spent before March 31st, 2013.

2 Child Care Pilot Project: All funds allocated for the ongoing Child Care Pilot Project were spent.  A process to identify additional research projects for future years was begun during 2009-2010, but did not identify any projects that could have started during 2009-2010.

3 In February 2009, the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer has been created. It aggregates the Canada Public Service Agency and some parts of Treasury Board Secretariat related to compensation and human resources.


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Department of Finance

Horizontal Initiatives


Name of horizontal initiative: Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime—formerly the National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering (NICML)

Name of lead department: Department of Finance Canada

Lead department program activity: Economic and Fiscal Policy Framework

Start date of the horizontal initiative: June 2000

End date of the horizontal initiative: 2009–10

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $455,408 (thousands)

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement): The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering (NICML) was formally established in 2000 as part of the government’s ongoing effort to combat money laundering in Canada. Legislation adopted that year, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act (PCMLA), created a mandatory reporting system for suspicious financial transactions, large cross-border currency transfers, and certain prescribed transactions. The legislation also established the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) to collect and analyze these financial transaction reports and to disclose pertinent information to law enforcement and intelligence agencies. In December 2001, the PCMLA was amended to include measures to fight terrorist financing activities and renamed the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (PCMLTFA).

The NICML was expanded and is now known as Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime. In December 2006, Bill C-25 amended the PCMLTFA to ensure Canada’s legislation remains consistent with international anti–money laundering and anti–terrorist financing standards as set out by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and is responsive to areas of domestic risk. Amendments included enhanced client identification requirements, the creation of a registration regime for money services businesses, and the establishment of an administrative and monetary penalties regime to deal with lesser infractions of the Act.

Shared outcomes: To detect and deter money laundering and the financing of terrorist activities and to facilitate the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences.

Governance structure: Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime is a horizontal initiative comprised of both funded and non-funded partners. The funded partners include the Department of Finance Canada, the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC), FINTRAC, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP); non-funded partners include Public Safety Canada (PS), the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI), and Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. An interdepartmental ADM-level group and working group, consisting of all partners and led by the Department of Finance Canada, has been established to direct and coordinate the government’s efforts to combat money laundering and terrorist financing activities. In addition, the Department of Finance Canada also chairs a Public/Private Sector Advisory Committee. This is a broad-based advisory committee that includes both public and private sector representatives to provide general guidance for Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing policy.

($ thousands)
Federal Partner Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Federal Partner's Program Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009–10
Actual Spending for
2009–10
Expected Results for
2009–10
Results Achieved in
2009–10
Department of Finance Canada Financial Sector Policy Canada’s
Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime
2,700 300 295 Effective oversight of Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime (the Regime). The Department of Finance Canada continued to address policy and operational issues to ensure Canada has an effective Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime. The Department also hosted a spring and fall meeting of the Public/Private Sector Advisory Committee and one ADM-level meeting.
Undertake a 10-year Treasury Board–mandated evaluation of the Regime to assess effectiveness and access to continued funding. Initiated the 10-Year Evaluation of the Regime and led the interdepartmental working group for the evaluation. The evaluation will be completed in 2010–11.
Monitor the financial sector for money laundering and terrorist financing risks and other emerging illicit financing risks. Developed and tabled amendments to the PCMLTFA related to counter-measures to tackle illicit financing and making tax evasion a predicate offence for money laundering. Final publication of new regulations on Credit Union Centrals was also completed.
Participate in international forums related to combating money laundering and terrorist financing, in particular the G7 Financial Experts meetings, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force (CFATF), and the Asia Pacific Group (APG) on Money Laundering. The Department actively participated and undertook a leadership role at the FATF, CFATF, and APG plenary and intercessional meetings and the G7 Financial Experts meetings.

As the head of Canada’s delegation at international anti–money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) forums, the Department:
– coordinated federal partners’ contributions;
– played a challenge function in the FATF, APG, and CFATF mutual evaluation processes, a comprehensive peer review process that is the cornerstone of the global implementation of FATF Standards
(the 40 + 9 Recommendations);
– contributed to the development of FATF policy and standards and the analysis of new AML/CFT trends and typologies;
– engaged in the FATF International Co-operation Review Group (ICRG) to identify and monitor high-risk jurisdictions, including chairing the Americas Regional Review group;
– identified and leveraged funds to support capacity building and technical assistance for the APG and CFATF as well as training for their individual members; and
– provided advice and guidance to CFATF member countries on the implementation of the FATF 40 + 9 Recommendations and on governance and capacity issues.
Department of Justice Canada The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime 7,000 100 100 The Criminal Division of the Department of Justice Canada plays a significant role in the Regime. For 2009–10, it is anticipated that the Criminal Division will use the resources it receives to carry out work related to the FATF, including attending FATF-related international meetings. Resources will also be allocated to ensure the Criminal Division’s continued involvement in policy development relating to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, the Human Rights Law Section will receive money to deal with any ancillary constitutional issue raised during the prosecutions. In 2009–10, the Department of Justice Canada contributed to domestic policy development related to money laundering by regularly providing legal advice in this area and through its participation on departmental committees addressing terrorist financing. Justice Canada also contributed to FATF-related policy issues through extensive input on FATF evaluations and reports as well as its attendance and active participation at FATF plenary meetings and participation in the FATF project on confiscation.
Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) Addressing criminal issues to contribute to a safer world for Canada Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime 9,200 2,300 3,028 PPSC plays a significant role in the Regime. For 2009–10, it is anticipated that information provided to law enforcement by FINTRAC will result in more prosecutorial legal advice being provided to law enforcement. It will also result in additional charges being laid for money laundering and terrorist financing offences and, consequently, an increased workload for prosecutors. PPSC also has responsibilities related to the PCMLTFA. The planned work includes applications for Production Orders, increases in border seizure and forfeiture work associated with suspected proceeds of crime, and prosecutions related to infractions of the Act. In addition, resources will be used to provide training to law enforcement personnel and prosecutors and for the development and coordination of policy as it relates to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, PPSC resources will be used to carry out work related to the FATF, including attending the FATF international meeting. New Regime-related charges laid over the course of 2009–10 included 5,910 charges for the possession of proceeds of crime, 40 money laundering charges under the provisions of the Criminal Code, and 47 charges under the PCMLTFA. (There were no charges laid related to the terrorist financing provisions of the Criminal Code during this period.)

For these new Regime-related charges, provision of legal advice was recorded by in-house counsel against 54% of the possession of proceeds of crime files, 47% of the money laundering files, and 28% of the PCMLTFA files. Contrary to previous years, PPSC did not obtain any production orders under section 60 of the PCMLTFA.

Finally, over the course of 2009–10, PPSC counsel provided both formal and ad hoc training to law enforcement personnel over the course of investigations. Resources were also dedicated to policy development and coordination to ensure consistency across all regions.
Financial Transactions Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) Collection, analysis, and dissemination of financial information Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime 269,085 37,500 40,315 FINTRAC produces technology-driven financial intelligence analysis and case disclosures, which are widely used by law enforcement and intelligence agencies, with a program that fosters compliance by the reporting entities. In 2009–10, FINTRAC disclosed 579 cases of suspected money laundering, terrorist financing, and threats to the security of Canada to law enforcement and security partners. This represents a continued increase in the number of cases—a slight increase compared to the 556 cases disclosed in 2008–09 and a significant increase over the 210 cases disclosed in 2007–08. In 2009–10, the average timeliness of case analysis improved by 17%, going from 82 days to 68 days. This was achieved with increasingly positive feedback from law enforcement and security partners on the usefulness, relevance, and timeliness of case disclosures.

FINTRAC also continued to fulfill the needs of various partners and stakeholders in producing and disseminating a wide range of strategic financial intelligence assessments, briefs, and reports. These products served to inform government policy and decision makers as well as reporting entities about money laundering and terrorist financing issues, methods, indicators, and case studies, which enabled them to better combat money laundering and terrorist financing.

In order to increase the coverage rate of compliance assessments, FINTRAC began conducting desk examinations in tandem with onsite examinations of reporting entities’ level of compliance with their obligations under the PCMLTFA. As a result, FINTRAC completed 691 examinations by fiscal year end, an increase of 52% over the previous year, of which 327 (47%) were onsite examinations and 364 (53%) were desk examinations.

In 2009–10, FINTRAC completed the successful implementation of the administrative monetary penalties (AMP) regime. In its first year, 14 AMPs have been issued, and of these, 7 were publicly named on the FINTRAC website. The 2009–10 fiscal year was also the first full year of operation for the money services businesses (MSB) registry. During the fiscal year, an additional 223 MSBs registered with FINTRAC, bringing the total entities registered to 954.
Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)   Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime 57,008 7,727 7,745 CBSA Border Services Officers are responsible for the enforcement of the cross-border currency reporting program, which includes conducting searches, questioning individuals, and seizing non-reported or falsely reported currency and suspected proceeds of crime. In addition, FINTRAC discloses information to CBSA Immigration, which plays a key role in denying the use of Canadian territory to criminals and persons who pose security threats to Canada.

CBSA is responsible for administering Part 2 of the PCMLTFA, “Reporting of Currency and Monetary Instruments.” The Cross-Border Currency Reporting (CBCR) Program requires that travellers report the importation and exportation of currency and monetary instruments equal to or greater than CAD$10,000. Part 2 also provides for the enforcement element of the CBCR Program, which includes conducting searches, questioning individuals, and seizing non-reported or falsely reported currency and suspected proceeds of crime.
During 2009–10, CBSA performed more than 2,480 seizures under the PCMLTFA, totalling over $40 million. Approximately $8 million of this total was forfeited to the Crown and penalties have been assessed in excess of $1 million. Over 200 seizures have resulted in forfeiture as suspected proceeds of crime or funds for the use of terrorist activities.
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Charities Directorate Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime 7,429 4,976 3,631 CRA has responsibility for administering the registration system for charities under the Income Tax Act. This recognizes that the existence of a strong regulatory deterrence against terrorist abuse of charities contributes to suppressing the financing of terrorism in Canada and to protecting and preserving the social cohesion and well-being of Canadians.

CRA’s regulatory oversight of charities has been strengthened by the enactment of complementary measures under the Charities Registration (Security Information) Act and the PCMLTFA and by changes to the Income Tax Act authorizing broader information sharing between Regime agencies. Under these authorities, intelligence provided to CRA assists in its mandate to protect the integrity of the registration system for charities, and information disclosed by the CRA can be used for investigative purposes.

For 2009–10, it is anticipated that CRA will use the resources it receives to strengthen capacity to identify and respond to cases involving possible links to terrorism through investments in facilities, IT development, and an increase in ongoing, direct program full-time equivalents (FTEs).
Results delivered in 2009–10 focused on the following:
– facilities development (projects delivered on time and on budget);
– procuring and implementing technological tools and systems to enhance analytical and enforcement capabilities;
– redesigning our organizational structure;
– staffing for skill sets needed to respond to current and future operational needs and to attract seasoned, job-ready intelligence officers and newly graduated professionals in intelligence; and
– staff training.

The normal business of reviewing applications for charitable registration, monitoring of registered charities, and exchanging information under legal authorities with Regime partners, in relation to risks of support for terrorist activities, continued throughout. The Charities Directorate also continued to develop and enhance relationships and training with Regime partners, improve access to intelligence information, and provide a strong CRA presence in interdepartmental committees addressing cross-cutting policy and review activities relevant to Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime.
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Special Enforcement Program Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime 21,568 2,200 2,413 CRA is focusing on the following four pillars:
– participating in committees and initiatives to manage and enhance the Regime;
– enhancing our operational relationship with FINTRAC and other partners in the Regime;
– conducting research and analysis; and
– contributing to the work of international organizations to enhance cooperation between tax administrations and anti–money laundering and anti–terrorist financing authorities by participating in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Sub-Group on Tax Crime and Money Laundering.

All disclosures received from FINTRAC are thoroughly reviewed and those with potential are selected for audit by the Special Enforcement Program. The projected number of audits is 90, with a projected federal tax recovery of $7,000,000.
Total number of audits completed: 108

Total earned by tax audits: $16,812,471

Cases referred for investigation: 8

Cases accepted by investigation: 3
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Money Laundering Units Money Laundering Units Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime 55,898 6,872 3,657 Enhanced national and international opportunities for the detection and investigation of money laundering activities. Project Mercury was a joint anti–cash smuggling operation that took place from April 19 to 22, 2010. Participants in the operation included CBSA, members of the RCMP Integrated Proceeds of Crime (IPOC) Units, RCMP Integrated National Security Enforcement Teams (INSET), and FINTRAC. Both inbound and outbound flights were targeted at five international airports: Ottawa, Montréal, Toronto, Vancouver, and Calgary.
Development of FINTRAC disclosures, as well as other intelligence, to a point where resources from Integrated Proceeds of Crime Units or elsewhere in the RCMP could then be directed toward investigations in an effort to increase seizures. There have been 25 seizures linked to FINTRAC disclosures in 2009, with a value of $4,997,754.
The resource level in Canada’s three major urban centres (Vancouver, Toronto, and Montréal) was increased in 2007 and continues to positively impact the investigative capacity in those centres to conduct investigations on leads related to Canada’s anti–money laundering regime. The “Big Three” (Vancouver, Toronto, and Montréal) currently have six major money laundering investigations open in 2009.
RCMP, Anti–Terrorist Financing Team) Special Initiatives Canada’s Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime 22,937 5,158 5,579 Through the gathering and analysis of financial intelligence, the Anti–Terrorist Financing Team (ATFT) will focus on converting that intelligence into proactive investigations, thus enhancing its ability to detect and deter terrorist financing activities. ATFT continues to provide support to six project status investigations of terrorist financing across Canada, has initiated two new investigations, and continues to assist in a number of requests for information received from domestic and international agencies.

ATFT, in conjunction with CBSA, CSIS, FINTRAC, and RCMP Proceeds of Crime took part in two proactive law enforcement efforts code-named Atlas and Mercury. Proceeds of crime, money laundering, and terrorist financing enforcement agencies from the RCMP and CBSA took part in these three-day cash courier interdiction actions held concurrently at selected international airports.

An investigation in British Columbia by the National Security Financial Investigation Unit led to the conviction of a subject for terrorist financing. Project Needle nears completion with the disruption of a Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) terrorist financing and procurement cell. The US has convicted and sentenced three of the six Canadians for terrorist financing and procurement charges. Two other Canadians have been ordered extradited and one other subject awaits extradition to the US to face the same charges.

In November 2009, a major project investigation concluded with the arrest of 30 individuals in Montréal for credit card fraud, counterfeiting government identification such as passports and visas, and facilitating illegal immigration. ATFT members formed part of the investigation team because of national security concerns and links to terrorism, movement of terrorists across international borders, and terrorist financing. No charges were laid pursuant to section 83 of the Criminal Code.

Forfeiture hearings are ongoing regarding money and property seized pursuant to two investigations of the World Tamil Movement.

ATFT continues to provide training to the RCMP and partner agencies. Financial investigative members from the various INSETs and selected partner agency representatives from CSIS, CRA, FINTRAC, and the UK attended and presented at the fall 2009 course and the February 2010 course. The next course is slated for the fall of 2010 in Vancouver.

ATFT continues to support FATF, the APG, and the Middle East and North Africa Financial Action Task Force (MENAFATF). ATFT members joined the Canadian delegation to MENAFATF for the first time this past year. ATFT members assisted in training provided to the Royal Malaysian Police and to the African Union. ATFT continues its membership in the Bi-Lateral Working Group on Terrorist Financing with the FBI and CSIS, meeting each quarter. ATFT is also a founding member of the International Working Group on Terrorist Financing, which meets yearly. Two members of ATFT attended the annual conference in Australia in May 2010.

ATFT is now tasked with providing due diligence checks for prospective foreign investors under the revised Investment Canada Act, which now includes national security provisions.
Totals 453,1251 67,133 66,763    
1. Certain partners in the Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime are exempt from reporting; therefore, the figures presented in the table may not sum to the total amount allocated.

Comments on variance:

PPSC: Actual spending exceeds planned spending by approximately $0.7 million. Variance is due to the significant increase in the number of charges related to proceeds of crime.

FINTRAC: The planned spending amount did not include the additional Treasury Board–approved funding that was received over the 2009–10 fiscal year. Among the additional resources received are the Strategic Review Reinvestments, NICML re-profiled funds from 2008–09, Treasury Board adjustments for Paylist Requirements (Vote 30), and Employee Benefits Plan year-end adjustments.

CRA, Charities Directorate: Variance is due to classification and staffing processes that have taken longer than anticipated and are continuing in 2010–11.

RCMP, Money Laundering Units: Variance is due to reduced budget allocation and vacancy rates across the program. Similar constraints are expected for 2010–11.

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners: Not applicable

Contact information:

Rachel Grasham
Chief, Financial Crimes Section
Phone: 613-943-2883


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Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of Lead Department(s): Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 2, 2005; operationalized September 18, 2006

End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $1,134.9 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Funded from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, the GPSF fills a funding gap by providing dedicated resources for activities that are necessary for a timely response with respect to countries in or at risk of crisis, but that are not properly the responsibility of the Department of National Defence (DND) and are outside Canada's traditional official development assistance program. Examples of these activities are supporting peace operations and peace processes, supporting justice and security system reform, enhancing transitional justice and reconciliation, and improving the peace enforcement and peace operations capacities of military and police forces in Africa and the Americas. Major recipients of funding are Afghanistan, Sudan and Haiti.

The GPSF is both a responsive and a directive program, established to provide timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges. DFAIT works closely with a range of other government departments including the Canadian International Development Agency, Public Safety Canada, the RCMP, DND, the Correctional Service of Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency and Justice Canada. Along with other assistance, these partnerships provide critical expertise in the area of justice and security system reform to the civilian components of UN peace operations.

Shared Outcome(s):

  • Safer and more secure environments conducive to stabilization, recovery and long-term reconstruction.

  • Greater protection of rights and safety of individuals and populations.

  • Improved global and regional response to crisis situations.

Governance Structure(s):

The GPSF is managed by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) in the context of a whole-of-government approach coordinated through the START Advisory Board. Led by the Director General of START and comprising senior officials from across government, the START Advisory Board is responsible for establishing, within the framework of individual departmental authorities, whole-of-government strategic policy as well as priority setting and direction with respect to fragile states and complex emergencies. It is also responsible for providing a platform for information exchange to ensure that program-related activities are complementary and avoid duplication. The START Secretariat is located in the Programs and Departmental Security Branch of DFAIT and is accountable to DFAIT, which is responsible for the financial, human and physical resource services for START.


($ millions)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation
(from start to end date)
Planned Spending
2009-10
Actual Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
Results Achieved in
2009-10
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) PA 2: Diplomacy and Advocacy Global Peace and Security Program; Global Peace Operations Program; Glyn Berry Program for Peace and Security   91.8 86.4 Improved Canadian contribution to peace and security and the safety and well-being of beneficiaries living in targeted areas Strengthened contribution to peace and security through the development of a strategic policy framework for dealing with conflict and fragility, new and dedicated mechanisms for deploying Canadian civilian experts and international justice officials and demonstrated international leadership responding to the Haiti earthquake crisis.
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) PA 1: Federal and International Operations Canadian Police Arrangement and International Police Peacekeeping (IPP) 63.7 11.4 12.5 Implementation of RCMP international police peacekeeping projects Deployed an average of 182 police officers to 8 international missions to provide mentoring, training and advice, mainly in Afghanistan, Haiti and Sudan.
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) PA 1: Geographic Programs n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) n/a Delivery of international assistance under the CCC/DFAIT MOU See note 6.5 13.4 Logistical support to Sudan peace operations (UNAMID) n/a
Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) PA 1: Security Afghanistan border; Canada's support to the Middle East Peace Process; and Stabilization and Reconstruction in Haiti See note n/a 0.2 Strengthened customs capacity along the Afghan border Provided training and mentoring to Afghan border officials.
Department of Justice PA 1: Justice policies, laws and programs n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Department of National Defence (DND) PA 1: Contribute to Canada and the international community Operations in Afghanistan See note 10.4 8.5 Support to implementation of projects in Kandahar Provided operational support on project implementation, monitoring and financial management.
Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) PA 1: Correctional Interventions Operations in Afghanistan and Stabilization and Reconstruction in Haiti See note 2.0 2.9 Supported the deployment of correction advisers to the provincial reconstruction team in Afghanistan Deployed an average of 14 correctional officers to Afghanistan and Haiti to provide mentoring, training and advice.
Total       111.7 123.9    

Note: Allocations from the GPSF are determined on an annual basis; therefore, there is no planned amount from the start to the end of the program.


Comment on Variance: Canadian Commercial Corporation: At the outset of fiscal year 2009-2010, the GPSF allocated $6.5 million of its programming fund to projects implemented through CCC. Actual GPSF expenditures via CCC for fiscal year 2009-2010 were $13.43 million. Since the GPSF responds to crises, it is difficult to predict the choice of implementing partners at the beginning of the fiscal year. For example, the earthquake in Haiti shifted programming priorities to supplying equipment to assist with the relief effort. As CCC has established expertise in supply arrangements, the GPSF worked with the Corporation as an implementing partner for these activities.

Results to Be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): n/a

Contact information:
Elissa Golberg
Director General, START Secretariat
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
Tel.: 613-665-6689
Fax: 613-944-5911
Email: elissa.golberg@international.gc.ca

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Department of Justice Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Anti-Drug Strategy

2. Name of lead department: Department of Justice

3. Lead department program activity: Justice policies, laws and programs

4. Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-08

5. End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2011-12 and ongoing

6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $579.8 millions

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Anti-Drug Strategy was launched by the Government of Canada in 2007, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Its goal is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The prevention action plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use, and supports efforts to develop and implement community-based interventions & initiatives to prevent illicit drug use. The treatment action plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The enforcement action plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

8. Shared outcomes:

  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced impacts of illicit drug use through prevention and treatment efforts; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.

9. Governance structure:

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Youth Justice, and Strategic Initiatives and Law Reform Section of the Department of Justice Canada.

The Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC), which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources.  The ADMSC prepares questions for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by the Department of Public Safety Canada, oversees the implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy and the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The Communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy including, making decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative and ensuring coordination of communication activities.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partner: Department of Justice
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
> 15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
A1 - Justice policies, laws and programs a. Drug Treatment Courts $16.2 $3.6 $3.6 Link 1 Link 1
b. Youth Justice Fund

(Treatment Action Plan)
$6.8 $1.6 $1.4 Link 2 Link 2
c. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.4 $0.3 $0.2 Link 3 Link 3
C1 - Internal Services d. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy $1.5 $0.3 $0.4 Link 4 Link 4
e. National Anti-Drug Strategy $0.3 $0.1 $0.1    
Total: $26.2 $5.9 $5.7    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1: Reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court clients.

Link 2:
Overall results:

  • To work collaboratively with interested provinces and territories as well as other stakeholders in order to identify gaps in drug treatment programs for youth in the justice system.
  • To introduce, pilot and evaluate a number of drug treatment options for youth involved in the youth justice system in communities.
  • To share knowledge of the piloted drug treatment programs and promising practices with provinces and territories as well as other interested stakeholders.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Projects on Treatment Services & Program Enhancements.
  • Enhanced capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations.

Link 3:
Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

  • Exercising overarching responsibility for policy and coordination.
  • Maintaining the NADS Governance Structure.

Link 4:
Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

  • Leading and coordinating all NADS communications activities.
  • Taking lead responsibility for accountability - evaluation and performance reporting.

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • 6 funding agreements signed for 2010-2012 under the Drug Treatment Court Funding Program (DTCFP).
  • DTCFP Terms and Conditions renewed.
  • Drug Treatment Court Information System implemented and preliminary results analyzed.
  • Given the current lack of consistent data collection, it is difficult to determine, at this stage, if the DTC FP has had an influence on reduced drug substances relapse among drug treatment court clients.

Link 2:
In In 2009-2010, a total of 39 projects were funded-22 through contributions and 17 through grants. Of these, 4 were on-going contribution agreements from previous years. The total value of these projects was $1,099,896 in contributions and $181,222 in grants. Of the 39 projects:

  • 9 were with a provincial government or their designate;
  • 9 were with municipal or provincial police forces; and
  • 21 were with front-line community organizations.

Funded projects covered the following areas: Public Legal Education/Information, Training/Education, Information Sharing, Evaluation, and Program pilot projects.

Link 3:

The Department of Justice provided effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through its work in the following four areas: policy and coordination, the NADS Governance Structure, communications activities, and evaluation and performance reporting.

Policy and Coordination:

  • Supported the process for Parliamentary consideration of a Government Bill to address serious drug crimes;
  • Collaborated with partner departments to conduct the Implementation Evaluation and to develop an agreed-upon management response, including action plans for follow-up on the three recommendations flowing out of the evaluation.
  • Initiated a Strategy renewal process;
  • Organized and hosted the NADS Speaker Series;
  • Oversaw NADS involvement in the development of new Hemispheric Drug Strategy at the Organization of American States; and
  • Participated in meetings and workshops of the United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs.

Governance:

  • Chaired and provided the secretariat function for the NADS, ADM Steering Committee;
  • Chaired and provided the secretariat function for the NADS Policy and Performance Working Group;
  • Participated in meetings of the Prevention and Treatment, and Enforcement Working Groups; and
  • Participated in the revision of the Terms of Reference for the Prevention and Treatment Working Group.

Link 4:

The Department of Justice provided effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through its work in the following four areas: policy and coordination, the NADS Governance Structure, communications activities, and evaluation and performance reporting.

Communication:

  • Organized the NADS Communications Working Group meetings and numerous horizontal meetings between NADS communications advisors;
  • Produced and coordinated media lines for the release of various drug related reports;
  • Oversaw 12 NADS announcements, one tri-ministerial message and one message from the Minister of Health; and
  • Maintained the NADS website.

Evaluation and Reporting:

  • Completed the NADS implementation evaluation;
  • Completed a cost-effectiveness feasibility study;
  • Produced the NADS Annual Report;
  • Signed bi-lateral Memoranda of understanding with NADS partners to formalize each partner's commitment to NADS performance measurement and evaluation activities;
  • Coordinated the DPR and RPP processes; and
  • Chaired the Policy and Performance Working Group's Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting.
10. Federal Partner: Health Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
3.4.3 Controlled Substances a. Mass Media Campaign
(Prevention Action Plan)
$29.8 $6.0 $5.6 Link 1 Link 1
3.4.3 Controlled Substances b. Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF)
(Prevention Action Plan)
$59.0 $11.3 $10.5 Link 2 Link 2
3.4 Substance Use and Abuse c. Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP)

(Treatment Action Plan)
$124.7 $30.8 $10.7 Link 3 Link 3
4.1.1.2 First Nations and Inuit Mental Health and Addictions d. National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP)

(Treatment Action Plan)
$35.5 $7.9 $6.6 Link 4 Link 4
3.4.3 Controlled Substances e. Office of Controlled Substances

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$14.4 $3.0 $2.1 Link 5 Link 5
f. Drug Analysis Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$49.2 $9.4 $9.2 Link 6 Link 6
$3.4 [1] [1] [1]
Total: $316 $68.4 $44.7    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • Increased awareness & understanding of illicit drugs & their negative consequences

Link 2:

  • Increased awareness & understanding of illicit drugs & their negative consequences
  • Enhanced uptake of knowledge in communities to address illicit drug use & its negative consequences

Link 3:

  • Improved collaboration on responses & knowledge of treatment issues
  • Enhanced capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations
  • Enhanced F/PT commitments to improve treatment systems in targeted areas of need

Link 4:

  • Enhanced capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations

Link 5:

  • Increased capacity to control & monitor controlled substances & precursor chemicals

Link 6:

  • Increased capacity to gather, analyze/share intelligence & analyse evidence
  • Increased awareness of illicit drug & precursor chemical issues for enforcement officials

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1:

Public Opinion Research (POR-08-07) NADS Youth On-line Baseline survey was conducted prior to the December 2009 launch of the youth mass media campaign targeting youth ages 13-15. Youth drug awareness, knowledge and perception levels were measured and will be compared to Public Opinion Research (POR-09-23) NADS Return to Sample Survey when results are available in FY 2010-11.

Link 2:

To date, Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF) is funding 25 projects that target increased awareness/understanding of healthy lifestyle choices and of illicit drugs and their negative consequences and 30 projects focused on acquiring/improving capacity (knowledge and skills) to avoid illicit drug use.

The majority of DSCIF funded projects have started dissemination planning and sharing of information in order to ensure findings and lessons learned from their projects are made available to appropriate audiences. Projects have also taken steps to produce information tools or resources for the public and developed knowledge exchange mechanisms.

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA) - "A Drug Prevention Strategy for Canada's Youth" focused on developing Canadian standards for the design and delivery of prevention programs, sustainable partnerships, and a media/youth consortium.

Link 3:

The Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP) launched 13 drug treatment systems-enhancement projects and eight treatment services projects by March 31, 2010, under NADS. While treatment projects are in the early stages of implementation, evidence to date indicates significant progress in establishing community partnerships and linkages in support of new and enhanced treatment services, and enhanced collaboration amongst P/Ts on national level activities such as the development, collection and reporting of national treatment indicators.

In 2009-10, 8 projects invested in new staff hires, orientation and training activities in order to deliver new treatment services. Funded projects have already helped to produce a wider range of services by developing partnerships within the community, expanding hours of service, offering different locations when working with clients and offering a range of activities to help attract youth to their services.

Link 4:

During 2009/10, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) NADS-related investments continued to enhance capacity to plan/ deliver a range of treatment services and programs for targets populations by improving the quality, effectiveness and accessibility of on-reserve addiction services. In particular, NADS dollars continued to be invested in:

  • Treatment centre re-profiling/modernization efforts aimed at strengthening and expanding the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) services vis-à-vis community needs and recognized service gaps (e.g., women, youth, and families) in First Nations communities.
  • Enhanced funding to treatment centres to become accredited with a recognized accreditation body. 40 of 57 (or 68%) treatment centres had completed or were engaged in the accreditation process by the end of 2009/10.
  • Workforce development initiatives aimed at strengthening the quality and effectiveness of addiction services through increasing the number of qualified addictions workers on-reserve by supporting certified educationalopportunities (e.g., training on treating illicit drug use) and providing financial incentives to workers to obtain and retain certification with a recognized national body.
  • Developed and implemented eight Mental Wellness Teams (MWT) pilots across Canada in First Nations and Inuit communities. MWTs are community driven, multidisciplinary teams which combine community, clinical and cultural approaches to wellness.
  • Continued work on the NNADAP Renewal Process (evidence-based review), particularly the development of a renewed framework for on-reserve addiction services, will provide valuable guidance, based on research data and significant engagement with First Nations, with respect to improving service delivery quality, effectiveness and accessibility.

Link 5:

Increased capacity to control & monitor controlled substances & precursor chemicals by hiring 2 staff. Tools continue to be developed to facilitate training of inspectors (e-learning). In 2009-2010 completed 171 inspections under Precursor Regulations and 1170 Loss and Theft Reports received.A total of 129,806 authorizations for disposal of seized controlled substances were processed. This is an increase from 2008-09, when 110 inspections under PCR and 1419 Loss and Theft Reports were received. In the previous FY, a total of 126,812 authorizations for disposal of seized controlled substances were processed.

Link 6:

Health Canada's Drug Analysis Service (DAS) has contributed to increased capacity to gather, analyze/share intelligence and analyze evidence by analysing 95,924 suspected illicit drug exhibits and by providing personnel to assist enforcement officials in the shutdown and dismantling of 34 clandestine drug laboratories (583 DAS person days were spent on clandestine laboratory investigations in 2009-2010). The average time to respond to analysis requests was 56 days in 2009-2010, which surpassed the performance target of 60 days. This is an improvement from 90 days in 2007-2008 and 59 days in 2008-2009.

DAS contributed to increased awareness of illicit drug and precursor chemical issues by providing 37 training sessions to 1,027 participants, predominantly police officers. 73% of training survey respondents reported an increase in the awareness of hazards and dangers related to chemicals encountered at clandestine drug laboratories, 64% reported an increase in awareness of safe procedures to dismantle a clandestine laboratory, and 82% reported an increase in awareness of drug trends in Canada.

10. Federal Partner: Canadian Institutes of Health Research
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
1.2 Strategic Priority Research Research on Drug Treatment Model

(Treatment Action Plan)
$4.0 $1.0 $0.3 Link 1 Link 1
Total: $4.0 $1.0 $0.3    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:
Improved collaboration on responses & knowledge of treatment issues

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1:
CIHR has contributed to improving collaboration on responses to and knowledge of treatment issues by funding two ongoing grants launched in 2008. These grants are focusing on conducting collaborative research on how to strengthen state-of-the-science prevention and treatment of illicit drugs, and are focusing on developing long-term therapies aimed at reversing neuronal modifications of methamphetamine (Crystal meth) in the brain. Upon completion of these collaborative researchers between the applicants, CIHR and its Institutes involved in the program (Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction in partnership with the Institute of Human Development, Child and Youth Health and the Institute of Gender and Healt), will share their knowledge with the Strategy. This knowledge will consist of the final reports provided by the grantees.

CIHR also launched two Requests for Application in 2009 on treatment of illicit drugs.

10. Federal Partner: Department of Public Safety Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
3. Law Enforcement a. National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.0 $0.8 $0.8 Link 1 Link 1
5. Crime Prevention b. Crime Prevention Funding and Programming: (Crime Prevention Action Fund)

(Prevention Action Plan)
$20.0 $5.0 $8.5 Link 2 Link 2
Total: $24.0 $5.8 $9.3    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • Safer communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies.

Link 2:

  • Enhanced support for targeted at-risk populations.
  • Enhanced knowledge in communities to address illicit drug use and its negative consequences.

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • National Coordination of Enforcement Action Plan, specifically, led the Enforcement Action Plan Working Group (June 2009, March 2010). Participated and shared knowledge and information with stakeholders through domestic and international forum to further the Enforcement Action Plan (e.g., FPT Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials, Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police Drug Abuse Committee, Steering Committee and Working Group on Drug Impaired Driving, United National Commission on Narcotic Drugs (March 2010), Inter-American Drug Abuse Commission (November 2009 and February 2010), which included active participation in the development of a hemispheric strategy and action plan in the Americas, as well as other security consultations (e.g., Canada-Columbia), Organization of American States Gang Strategy, and the North American Leaders Summit). Funded seven (7) research and other initiatives in support of the Enforcement Action Plan. Supported the Minister of Public Safety, through briefings to respond to emerging issues related to the Enforcement Action Plan.

Link 2:

  • Surpassed expected number of funded projects to support the NADS objectives, hence enhanced support for targeted at-risk populations anticipated.
  • Completed small pilot study to ascertain scope and quality of NADS outcomes as per NADS RMAF (a mining exercise of project final activity/evaluation reports). This pilot alerts us to some gaps and challenges we will face in collecting NADS outcome data. A strategy to address this will be devised in fiscal 10-11
10. Federal Partner: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
1.1.2.7 a. Drug and Organized Crime Awareness Services

(Prevention Action Plan)
$15.1 $3.0 $1.9 Link 1 Link 1
3.5.2 Community and Youth Programs b. National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program

(Treatment Action Plan)
$3.4 $0.7 $0.5 Link 2 Link 2
1.1.2.9 c. Marijuana and Clandestine Lab Teams/Proceeds of Crime

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$91.4 $17.3 $11.2 Link 3 Link 3
Total: $109.9 $21.0 $13.6    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • Increased awareness & understanding of illicit drugs & their negative consequences by youth targeted through DOCAS programming.

Link 2:

  • Implementation sites underway in participating RCMP Divisions.
  • RCMP Divisional representatives selected to assist in local program delivery and data collection.

Link 3:

  • Increased capacity for the enforcement of illicit drug producers & distributors, in particular, through the dismantling of marihuana and synthetic drug operations.
  • Increased capacity to gather, analyze and/or share intelligence& analyse evidence, through additional resources in Criminal Intelligence.
  • Change in the level of MGO or Clan Labs investigated and/or disrupted.
  • Continue to maintain the integration, collaboration and capacity between sectors, law enforcement agencies, governments, communities and international partners to address the illicit importation and/or exportation, production and distribution related to MGOs or SDOs.
  • Increase awareness of illicit drug & precursor chemical issues among enforcement officials and first responders.

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1:
Due to the deployment of most of DOCAS members to the Olympics and funding cutbacks, a decrease in the amount of presentations, training and publications distributed can be observed. A total of 3068 awareness presentations were given targeting 124,981 people which includes youth, parents, aboriginal youth, aboriginal parents and professionals.

A total of 117 DOCAS training sessions were provided to professionals, parents and students during this fiscal year.

A total of 6391 partnerships were established and maintained with other provincial, territorial, municipal, aboriginal, and non government partners as well as with other enforcement agencies/ detachments.

DOCAS coordinators distributed 212,016 publications within communities across Canada.

  • Kids & Drugs program:
    There were 246 new facilitators trained from communities throughout Canada that can deliver the Kids and Drugs Program to parents. Internationally, the Canadian embassy from Caracas Venezuela requested a DOCAS expert to travel to Venezuela to participate in a week long prevention initiative which included presentations, discussions, panels, and a facilitated workshop on our Kids & Drugs program. The Canadian Embassy in Venezuela has translated our K & D parent's guide to prevention booklet in Spanish to share with their experts in prevention in Venezuela.
  • D.A.R.E.:
    A total of 3069 D.A.R.E. classes were conducted (each D.A.R.E. class consists of 10 lessons), as well as 10 presentations to 208 parents. The program reached 68,882 students in 1386 schools and of those, 6503 of the students were Aboriginal.
  • Drug Endangered Children (DEC):
    DEC is an early intervention initiative that seeks to stop the cycle of child abuse caused by the exposure to drug activity. It involves a resource guide which has been translated in French and training programs for service delivery personnel, supervisors/ managers, protocol partners and the general public. The resource manual has been completely revised with Canadian content. A facilitator guide is being created with pilot sites to be delivered in the fall of 2010
  • The Aboriginal Shield Program (ASP):
    The ASP is progressing very well, twenty five (25) representatives representing ten Aboriginal communities across Canada were trained back in November 2009 and taught the program upon their arrival to their respective communities. Even though the program is still at the pilot stage, DOCAS randomly selected a sample of pre and post test for the purpose of this report and results showed an increased of knowledge of subject at hand of 39%. The ASP reflects the main three Aboriginal cultures in Canada: Inuit, First Nations and Métis. The parent newsletter has also been translated in Inuit to provide them with information about the program.
  • Drugs and Sport:
    The prevention concept was delivered to 2569 amateur and professional athletes. A total of 2424 Drugs and Sport publications were disseminated.
  • Drugs in the Workplace:
    A total of 113 prevention presentations were delivered to industries and business across Canada.
  • Drug Awareness Officer Training (DAOT):
    One five day Drug Awareness Officer Training (DAOT) course was scheduled to be held in the fall of 2009 however due to budget cuts, it has been rescheduled for June 2010.

Synthetic Drug Initiative (SDI):

  • In August 2009, in order to further address the synthetic drug situation in Canada, the RCMP launched the national SDI based on three pillars: (1) prevention, (2) deterrence, and (3) enforcement. Synthetic drugs have been identified as a National Tactical Priority.
  • E-Aware Project: E-Aware is a project based on a true story of a young woman who died after consuming MDMA (Ecstasy). A poster and a web site outlining her story and information about chemical drugs have been developed. This project was rolled out in the fall of 2009, 20,000 posters entitled “The agony of Ecstasy” have been distributed nationally. These posters are designed to direct people to a newly created website containing information and resources for parents and youth. The promotion of this initiative linked many partners such as Health Canada, CASH, Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) and Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA). During the first month of the promotional campaign, the E-Aware website was visited 2,444 times and 12,572 pages were viewed.
  • Clandestine laboratories video: An educational video was designed to create awareness regarding the presence of clandestine drug laboratories in every day neighborhoods, and the dangers resulting from these labs. Clandestine Drug Labs DVD presentation contains a 14 minute (English) and a 22 minute (French) video intended for a high school or an adult audience. DOCAS developed a presentation guide to be used when presenting the DVD in order to maximize the learning and retention of information from audiences.

Link 2:

  • Three pilot sites implemented, including community consultation, development of referral protocols, and RCMP workshop on YCJA, risk/protective factors and risk screening
  • 75 youth formally screened for risk using risk screening tool
  • Community partnerships enhanced at pilot sites
  • Preliminary data collection protocols developed for recording attributes of screened youth
  • Post-implementation assessment initiated

Link 3:

  • As a result of having dedicated analysts, a Synthetic Drug Baseline report has been developed and disseminated. In consultation with Criminal Intelligence Services Canada (CISC), processes (including a template) were developed to gather more information on synthetic drug lab seizures across Canada.
  • The number of investigations continues to rise and grow in complexity; therefore highly coordinated responses are essential. Resources have been strategically allocated based on intelligence to priority areas where they are needed.
  • To enhance capacity, a working group was formed with government partners including Health Canada (regulatory matters), the Canada Border Services Agency (border security), Environment Canada (drug lab waste issues), the Department of Justice and the Public Prosecution Service of Canada (legislative matters), Public Safety, and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.
  • Several external working group meetings have been held to address critical issues, including: (1) regulatory issues within the Precursor Control Regulations, (2) diversion of precursor chemicals, and (3) relationships with foreign countries, which have been a source for the precursors. As a result of these workings groups, the RCMP's partnerships with government agencies have been enhanced and strengthened.
10. Federal Partner: Correctional Service Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
3.0 Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of provincial Offenders

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$23.3 [2] [2] [2] Link 1 Link 1
Total: $23.3 [2] [2] [2]    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • Timely case preparation; rate of offenders successfully reintegrated into the community (if legislation regarding mandatory minimum penalties for serious drug offences is passed)

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1: N/A [2]

10. Federal Partner: National Parole Board of Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.4 [3] [3] Link 1 N/A
Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$1.8 [3] [3] Link 2 N/A
Internal Services Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$1.3 [3] [3]    
Total: $7.5 [3] [3] [3]    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:
Should the proposed legislation receive Royal Assent identified funding will provide the NPB the capacity for effective management of its legislated responsibilities for parole decision-making for offenders in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. NPB will collect information and report on workloads and outcomes of parole for provincial offenders incarcerated as a result of new legislative provisions (e.g., the number and proportion of offenders who successfully complete their parole).

Link 2:

  • Should the proposed legislation receive Royal Assent identified funding will provide the NPB the capacity for provision of information and assistance to victims of crimes, observers at hearing and individuals who seek access to decision registry in relation to the requirements of the new legislation. In a similar manner, NPB will report on the extent of involvement of victims, and observers in conditional release processes and the level of satisfaction of these individuals with the information and assistance provided by NPB.

Effective management of both these responsibilities will contribute to public safety and reinforce public confidence in the justice system.

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1: N/A [3]

Link 2: N/A [3]

10. Federal Partner: Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
1.1 Prosecution of drug, organized crime and Criminal Code offences a. Prosecution and prosecution-related services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$8.6 $1.6 $1.5 Link 1 Link 1
b. Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA

(Minimum Mandatory Penalties)
$33.5 [4] [4] [4] Link 2 Link 2
2.1. Internal Services Enforcement Action Plan $1.3 $0.2 $0.2    
Total: $43.4 $1.8 $1.7    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as prosecution of drug offences under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) in response to the workload generated by the enhanced RCMP dedicated anti-drug teams and criminal intelligence and technical operations support staff.

Link 2:

  • Provision of prosecution-related advice and litigation support during police investigations, and prosecution of drug charges under the CDSA resulting from the Minimum Mandatory Penalties, subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1: In 2009-10, the ODPP handled 20,520 prosecution files dealing with drug production and distribution offences (pursuant to CDSA 5(1), 5(2), 6(1), 6(2), 7(1) and 7(2)). Of these, 18,287 included distribution offences, whereas 2,233 included production offences. Approximately 13.6% of the total number of files included both production and distribution offences.

Link 2: N/A [4]

10. Federal Partner: Canada Border Services Agency
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
Risk Assessment Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.7 $2.0 >$1.6 Link 1 Link 1
Enforcement Border Intelligence, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$7.0 $0.1 $0.3 Link 2 Link 2
Internal Services Intelligence Development & Field Support Division, Organized Crime & Contraband Section, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$1.0 $0.2 $0.2>    
Total: $12.7 $2.3 $2.1    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • The resources will be focused on intelligence gathering, information sharing, enforcement activities, assessment capabilities and laboratory support and services.

Link 2:

  • The resources will be focused on intelligence gathering, information sharing, enforcement activities, assessment capabilities and laboratory support and services.

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1: CBSA designed and developed first mobile laboratory to be used in operations related to chemicals and potential precursor chemicals. The mobile laboratory was also used at the 2010 Olympics for the determination of suspect goods where it assisted in the seizure/identification of cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, gamma-butyrolactone (GBL - precursor to the date rape drug GHB), and anabolic steroids.

CBSA continues to see significant amounts of GBL (notable seizure using the mobile lab at Tellier - 69 barrels) and has seen increased samples of uncontrolled drug “pre-precursors”, including NPP the most common material used in the illicit manufacture of fentanyl and 2-chlorophenyl cyclopentylketone (three steps from ketamine). There were also interceptions of 2C-H, a substance used to manufacture 2C-B (or other phenethylamines).

Link 2:Criminal Investigations Division (CID) continues to work with internal and external partners on this initiative to support and complement enforcement efforts. CID continues to investigate referrals for offences against the Customs Act in relation to the illegal import and export of precursor chemicals.

10. Federal Partner: Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
1.2 Diplomacy and Advocacy - International Operations and Programs Annual Contributions to UNODC and CICAD

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.5 $0.9 $0.9 Link 1 Link 1
Total: $4.5 $0.9 $0.9    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • Improved capacity of UNODC to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs and international crime at the global level.
  • Improved capacity of CICAD to fulfill its mandate in the fight against drugs in the Americas.

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • DFAIT successfully managed the projects involving the provision of training, equipment, technical and legal expertise resulting in increased capacity of beneficiary states and governments to prevent and combat international crime and drugs.
  • Capacity building activities addressed both the supply of and demand for illicit drugs and also responded to Canadian policy priorities.
10. Federal Partner: Canada Revenue Agency
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
4 Reporting Compliance Special Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$4.2 $0.8 $0.8 Link 1 Link 1
Total: $4.2 $0.8 $0.8    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • 15 audits of targets involved in marijuana grow operations or illicit drugs generating approximately $750,000 in federal tax

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • 15 audits of targets involved in marijuana grow operations or illicit drugs generating approximately $1,170,000 in federal tax
10. Federal Partner: Public Works and Government Services Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
1.7 Specialized Programs and Services Forensic Accounting Management Group

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$1.6 $0.2 $0.2 Link 1 Link 1
Total: $1.6 $0.2 $0.2    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:
To remove financial incentive for engaging in criminal activity

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1:
The Forensic Accounting Management Group provides specialized forensic accounting analysis on RCMP-led NADS investigations. The analysis is critical in determining whether the assets of the suspects were derived from criminal activities, thus allowing the Government of Canada to seize these assets and thereby remove the financial incentive for engaging in criminal activities

10. Federal Partner: Financial Transactions and Analysis Centre of Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-10
15. Actual Spending for
2009-10
16. Expected Results for
2009-10
17. Results Achieved in
2009-10
2004113 Detection and deterrence of money laundering and terrorist financing Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

(Enforcement Action Plan)
$2.5 $0.5 $0.5 Link 1 Link 1
Total: $2.5 $0.5 $0.5    

16. Expected Results for 2009-10:

Link 1:

  • Enhanced support to Law enforcement.
  • Development of financial intelligence.
  • Ensuring compliance in high-risk reporting sectors.

17. Results Achieved in 2009-10:

Link 1:
FINTRAC continues to increase its capacity to analyze information it receives to create financial intelligence that is relevant to drug-related cases and strengthen the communication with law enforcement and intelligence partners. In 2009-2010, FINTRAC disclosed a total of 579 cases to law enforcement, including 190 unique cases that related to at least one drug-related offence; a modest increase from the 174[1] unique drug-related disclosures made in 2008-09. A breakdown between distribution and production of various types of drugs is provided in the following table (please note that the total does not equal 190 as one case can be related to multiple drug offenses):

Drug-Related Disclosures Number of Cases
Distribution - Cocaine 57
Distribution - Hashish (Cannabis Resin) 3
Distribution - Heroin 12
Distribution - Marihuana 49
Distribution - MDMA (Ecstasy) 8
Distribution - Methamphetamine 5
Distribution - Synthetic Drugs 2
Distribution - Opium 5
Distribution - Unspecified 70
Production - Marihuana 44
Production - MDMA (Ecstasy) 3
Production - Methamphetamine 4

It is important to note that the predicate offences (drug-related) were determined through a manual review of FINTRAC disclosures and that some cases were not identified as drug-related where there was insufficient context provided by investigators or reports to enable the determination of the predicate offence. Some cases may relate to more than one predicate offence.

Ensuring compliance enhances the data quality of incoming financial transaction reports, and limits opportunities for money laundering by identifying reporting entities that are non-compliant. FINTRAC's risk based approach to ensuring compliance makes certain that it focuses on high-risk reporting entities as well as high-risk reporting sectors. In 2009-10 FINTRAC made a fundamental change in the way it manages its compliance operations; mainly moving away from an outreach and awareness focus to a focus based on compliance enforcement. Therefore, in 2009-10 the number of compliance examinations conducted increased to 691, an increase of over 50% from 2008-09.

Total Allocation For All Federal Partners (from Start to End Date) Total Planned Spending for All Federal Partners for 2009-10 Total Actual Spending for All Federal Partners for 2009-10
$579.8 $108.6 $79.8

18. Comments on variances:

Health Canada:

  • Mass Media Campaign - Actual Spending is an estimated since all invoices for FY 2009-10 have not yet been received.
  • Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF) - Due to process delays and project lapses, $800K of the allocated G&Cs were not spent in 2009-10.
  • Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP) - In response to the slow rate of implementation, a request to re-profile $15.4M from 2009-10 to subsequent years was approved by Treasury Board. The re-profiling of these funds has enabled the program to maintain a sufficient resource base to meet its objectives. Additionally $2.5M was converted from the DTFP G's & C's buget to other Health Canada O&M dollars. This was done and approved in the Supplementary Estimates B in FY 09/10 and detailed as a internal reallocation of resources. The remaining variance was a result of internal adjustments.
    A financial review demonstrated that spending in 2009-2010 was significantly lower than anticipated as many P/Ts experienced delays in completing their planning and development phases, and ministerial funding recommendations and/or negotiations of contribution agreements. A one year extension of the treatment services component enabled the Program to subsequently request Treasury Board approval to re-profile a portion of DTFP contributions funds into 2012-2013 (approval received). The one-year extension and subsequent funding re-profile will maximize the outcomes of the DTFP as well as honour the federal government's commitment to provide P/Ts with $55 million over a five year time frame (includes $10M over five years for the Vancouver Downtown Eastside project).
  • Drug Analysis Services (DAS) - Original allocation as per RMAF is $62.4M. Variance is a result of internal reallocation to support DAS activities (research, policy, regulatory development).
  • National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) - Operational lapses are attributable to the need to provide more time to support consultative processes at the regional and community level as well as lower rates of addictions worker certification than initially planned. Planning has taken place at national and regional levels that will mitigate future lapses and ensure that targets for certification are achieved.
  • Office of Controlled Substances (OCS) - The NADS funds has allowed OCS to increase their capacity for existing and continued daily operational requirements which continues to increase. Therefore, the impact of NADS is anticipated to be hard to assess independent of the other programs in the Enforcement Action Plan, and independent of the remainder of OCS' activities. The variance is due to FTE`s not fully staffed and Disposal fund not entirely spent due to lack of consistent awareness across law enforcement which makes disposal commitments hard to predict.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research:

  • The $0.7M surplus in 2009-10 is due to difficulties in recruiting peer reviewers for the second competition. Therefore, the peer review committee was delayed to 2010-11, therefore also delaying the grant start date.

Public Safety Canada:

  • There were many more projects identified as meeting the NADS objective compared to what was originally estimated. Most of our projects funded by the NCPC are targeting Youth at Risk population which by their nature involve the consumption of illicit drugs.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police:

  • In fiscal year 2009-10, the RCMP, like many other departments, contributed a portion of its funding to help support the Government's Economic Action Plan to stimulate the economy. Depending on the resource flexibility available within each program, these restraints measures may have delayed the ability of specific initiatives to fully ramp up this year. Further, due to other pressures and priorities such as the Olympics, there was a decrease in the number of presentations, training and publications that were able to be distributed. There were also difficulties and delays in staffing vacant positions.

19. Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): N/A

20. Contact information:

Catherine Latimer
General Counsel and Director General
Youth Justice, and Strategic Initiatives and Law Reform Section
(613) 957-9623
clatimer@justice.gc.ca

[1] This funding to implement Mandatory Minimum Penalties (MMPs) for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.

[2] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.

[3] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.

[4] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation being passed by Parliament and receiving Royal Assent.

1FINTRAC's 2008-09 NADS Enforcement Action Plan reported that there were 232 drug-related case disclosures made to law enforcement in 2008-09. Unfortunately, the figure of 232 did not represent “unique” case disclosures but rather instances of suspected drug production or distribution within FINTRAC case disclosures. The correct number of “unique drug-related case disclosures” for 2008-09 was 174.

Top of Page

Environment Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

  1. Canadian Group on Earth Observations
  2. Implementation of the Species at Risk Act
  3. Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative
  4. The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan
  5. Clean Air Agenda

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canadian Group on Earth Observations (CGEO)

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Environment Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Weather and environmental predictions and services reduce risks and contribute to the well being of Canadians.

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: July 2003

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): No new funds—annual multi-departmental contributions

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Interdepartmental coordination of Canada's participation in the international Group on Earth Observations (GEO) to advance coordinated, comprehensive and sustained Earth observations in Canada. The initiative is funded through annual interdepartmental transfers and in-kind contributions.

8. Shared Outcome(s):

  • Enhancing access to global Earth observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international
  • Improving evidence-based decision making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations

9. Governance Structure(s):

  • Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADM) Steering Committee (Chair: Assistant Deputy Minister for the Meteorological Service of Canada)
  • Directors General (DG) Interdepartmental Coordination Committee
($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-2010
15. Actual Spending for
2009-2010
16. Expected Results for
2009-2010
17. Results Achieved in
2009-2010
Environment Canada Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions.

Canadian Group on Earth Observations (CGEO) established to: a) coordinate Canada’s participation in the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO); b) advance coordinated, comprehensive and sustained Earth observations in Canada. Transfers and in-kind contributions. A small interdepartmental secretariat is funded through annual inter-departmental transfers and in-kind contributions.
Weather and Environmental Monitoring Not available $145K salary

$75K O&M

$88K G&C
$180K salary

$46K O&M

$88K G&C
The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) leverages interdepartmental and global partnerships and efforts in science, monitoring, prediction and service to improve access to Earth observations for better-informed decisions leading to societal benefits for all Canadians. - Active interdepartmental engagement in participation in GEO Plenary in Washington.

- Hosted Coastal Zones Forum and Community of Practice day at Canadian Embassy following GEO Plenary in Washington.

- Hosted International GEO Workshop on Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in Kananaskis, Alberta, including training of representatives from developing countries.

- Interdepartmental team engaged to continue the development of the Federal Earth Observation Strategy.

- Progress made with CGEO working committees (Soil Moisture Way Forward proposal prepared, Communities of Practice active).

- CGEO actively engaged in GEOSS in the Americas.

- Bilateral activities with the US.

- Active participation of Canadian experts in GEO tasks and activities, committees, working groups and task forces.
Natural Resources Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Earth Sciences Sector Not available   0.2 FTE in-kind

$50K O&M in-kind
  As above
Canadian Group on Earth Observations Canadian Forest Service Not available   0.3 FTE in-kind

$10K O&M in-kind
   
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Science and Technology Not available 35K O&M $15K O&M

.75 FTE in kind

$75K O&M in-kind
  As above
Canadian Group on Earth Observations Agri-Environment Services Branch Not available   $20K O&M

.75 FTE

$75K O&M in-kind
   
Canadian Space Agency Canadian Group on Earth Observations Earth Observations Not available 40K O&M $40K O&M

.5 FTE in kind

$50K O&M in-kind
  As above
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Science and Technology Not available   .3 FTE in kind

$30K O&M in-kind
  As above
Health Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Radiation Not available 5K O&M $5K O&M

.3 FTE in kind

$30K O&M in-kind
  As above
Statistics Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Agriculture Not available   .5 FTE in kind

$50K O&M in-kind
  As above
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Environment Not available   .1 FTE in kind

$10K O&M in-kind
  As above
Canadian International Development Agency Canadian Group on Earth Observations   Not available 100K O&M $98K O&M   As above
Total     $180K Salary

$224K O&M

$88K G&C

3.7 FTE in kind

$380K O&M in-kind
   

18. Comments on Variances:

19. Results to be achieved by non-federal partners: Not applicable

20. Contact information:
Michael Crowe,
Director
Strategic Integration, Meteorological Service of Canada
Environment Canada
141 Laurier Ave W.
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0H3
613-943-5580

 

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Implementation of the Species at Risk Act

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Environment Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Biodiversity is conserved and protected

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2000

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing (some sunsetting resources ending in 2011–2012)

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): Ongoing resources plus a total of $125 million (from 2007–2008 to 2011–2012) in sunsetting resources across departments

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): This horizontal initiative supports the development and implementation of the National Strategy for the Protection of Species at Risk and the Species at Risk Act (SARA) that came fully into force in June 2004. Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada are the departments/agency responsible for the protection of species at risk under federal jurisdiction. They all received funds from Treasury Board in 2000 for the "Implementation of the National Strategy for the Protection of Species at Risk and their Critical Habitat", in 2003 for the "Implementation of the Act respecting the protection of wildlife species at risk in Canada" and in 2007 for "Delivering results under the Species at Risk Act ".

8. Shared Outcome(s):

  • Implementation of SARA
  • Protection of species at risk
  • Protection of biodiversity

9. Governance Structure(s):

  • Formal Governance Structure:
    • Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) - federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for wildlife
  • Federal officials committees:
    • Deputy Ministers (DM) Committee - DMs from Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada responsible for species at risk
    • Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADM) Committee – ADMs from Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada responsible for species at risk
    • Director General (DG) Operations Committee – DGs from Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada Agency responsible for species at risk
  • Supporting and Advisory Structures:
    • Species at Risk Advisory Council (SARAC) – Committee established to facilitate consultation with industry and environmental groups
    • Canadian Wildlife Directors Committee (CWDC) – federal, provincial and territorial directors responsible for wildlife
    • National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk (NACOSAR) – NACOSAR is comprised of 6 representatives of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada, whose role is to provide advice to the minister on the administration of the act and provide advice and recommendations to CESCC.
($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-2010
15. Actual Spending for
2009-2010
16. Expected Results for
2009-2010
17. Results Achieved in
2009-2010
1. Environment Canada PA1 – Biodiversity and Wildlife Program Lead PA a – Environment Canada Species at Risk Program Ongoing (Some sunsetting resources ending in 2011–2012 $59,900,000 $47,763,000 General administration of SARA, including production of the Annual Report to Parliament. Preparation for and participation in Parliamentary five-year review of SARA and as required, Minister's Roundtable Administration of SARA, including production of the Annual Report to Parliament. Prepared for and participated in Parliamentary five-year review of SARA
2. Fisheries and Oceans Canada PA1 – Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems Lead PA a – Fisheries and Oceans Canada Species at Risk Program   $26,000,000 $21,829,940 Respond to recommendations from the SARA Minister's Round Table (SARA s.127) A report from the Round Table, outlining the Minister’s response to the recommendations received, was posted on the Species at Risk Public Registry on July 7, 2009
3. Parks Canada PA2 – Heritage Resources Conservation Lead PA a – Parks Canada Species at Risk Program   $14,100,000 $18,370,800 Finalization and implementation of policies Completed first draft of the Federal Policy Suite and conducted public consultations

Analytical work to support departmental operational guidance on the identification of critical habitat and the issuance of permits under SARA

Progress made on the development of guidance documents
Continued implementation of the SARA evaluation action plan Near completion of the SARA evaluation action plan
Ongoing administration of contribution funding programs, including: Habitat Stewardship Program (HSP), Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk (AFSAR), Interdepartmental Recovery Fund (IRF) HSP, AFSAR, and IRF programs administered and funding provided
Preparation of COSEWIC Assessments Ministerial response statements to COSEWIC Assessments prepared
Continued work to finalize bilateral agreements with provinces and territories Continued work to finalize bilateral agreements with provinces and territories and administrative agreements with other federal departments, including interdepartmental Memorandum of Understanding with National Defence
Consultations on listing and recovery strategies Consultations were undertaken on proposed additions to Schedule 1, listing and recovery strategies including critical habitat

Consultations also took place on management plans and actions plans
Regulatory initiatives, as required, including addition of species to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk Regulatory initiatives completed with Governor in Council Orders to add species to the List of Wildlife Species at Risk
Preparation of recovery strategies Recovery strategies, management plans, and actions plans were posted on the SAR public registry

Revised guidance material was developed on the preparation of recovery strategies to better reflect SARA requirements
Development of outreach material, including SARA enforcement and compliance promotion Material for Outreach developed and used for SARA enforcement and compliance promotion

Production and implementation of the Parks Canada -Prevention Guidelines promoting compliance through awareness and understanding of SAR and their habitat

Trained law enforcement officers
Responding to legal challenges Responded to legal challenges
Also responded to court’s decision on Sage Grouse (identifying critical habitat) and collaborated in developing materials and submissions for Killer Whale and Nooksack Dace court cases.
Other results Evaluation and analysis of DFO data to support the preparation of species status reports by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC)

Development of a preliminary model for risk based approach to formulating departmental recommendations on the listing of species under SARA

Implemented recovery actions and restoration initiatives to help recover species at risk
Total Ongoing $100,000,000 $87,963,740    

18. Comments on Variances:

  • From EC: The amount lapsed is due to a lag in staffing vacant positions and a shift of SARA funds to support complementary wildlife program activities. Progress has been made in staffing new positions but more work is required to complete staffing appointments. The shift of A-based SARA funds to support complementary activities in other wildlife programs, including protected areas and migratory bird programs, was also necessary this fiscal year.

    From DFO: Variance is primarily due to temporary re-allocation of resources to other departmental priorities.

    From PC : Funds carried forward from 2008–2009 have been allocated to appropriate national parks and national historic sites with significant species at risk for action on the ground initiatives (recovery activities and restoration) and for completion of legal requirements in the delivery of recovery strategies.

19. Results achieved by non-federal partners:

  • Assessment and reassessment of species, sub-species and populations by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC)
  • In addition to the federal government’s achievements, there was development of recovery strategies by provinces and territories, and with involvement of experts from academia and non-governmental organizations
  • Protection of important or critical habitat through the Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk, which supports the participation of Aboriginal peoples in the protection and recovery of species at risk , including efforts to protect critical habitat
  • Stewardship activities for the protection of species at risk habitat were carried out by public and private sector partners, and by other government departments and agencies, with funding from the Habitat Stewardship Program and the Interdepartmental Recovery Fund

20. Contact information:

Mary Taylor
Director
Conservation Service Delivery and Permitting Division
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
819-953-9097
Mary.Taylor@ec.gc.ca

Susan Humphrey
Regional Director
Ontario Region
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
416-739-5882
Susan.Humphrey@ec.gc.ca

 

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Environment Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Ecosystems Initiatives Program

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: April 1, 2005 (Great Lakes Action Plan [GLAP] IV resources)

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2010 (expiry of GLAP IV resources)

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $40 million over five years (GLAP IV resources, plus departmental A-base)

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative (GLBEI) is Environment Canada’s mechanism for coordinating efforts to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem, and ensure delivery of federal commitments as expressed in the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Environment Canada uses the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem (COA) to engage other federal departments and Ontario in delivering Canada’s Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments.

The GLBEI reflects Budget 2005 investments targeted at continuing the work under the Great Lakes Action Plan to improve the ecological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. A total of $40 million over five years was allocated in GLAP IV to continue the environmental restoration of key aquatic Great Lakes Areas of Concern. Federal departments also use A-base resources to support their efforts towards achieving COA results.

8. Shared Outcome(s): The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement establishes broad, long-term objectives for Canada and the United States in restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. COA provides a short-term plan for achieving Canada’s Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments. Through the COA, federal and provincial agencies are guided by a shared vision of a healthy, prosperous and sustainable Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem for present and future generations. The COA also establishes a common purpose and shared goals, results and commitment in four priority areas: restoration of Areas of Concern; reduction of harmful pollutants; achievement of lake and basin sustainability; and coordination of monitoring, research and information.

9. Governance Structure(s): Eight federal departments are engaged in delivering GLBEI results under the COA: Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Transport Canada, Infrastructure Canada and Health Canada.

The COA Management Committee is the senior federal-provincial management body responsible for setting priorities, establishing strategies to ensure delivery of the COA, and developing common positions and joint action plans for representing Canadian interests and engaging in cooperative initiatives with the United States agencies and the International Joint Commission.

Planning, prioritization and allocation of GLAP IV monies is managed through the federal Great Lakes Executive Committee, which involves the eight federal signatories to COA. The role of the Committee is to approve strategic directions and priorities for GLAP IV work activities, and to coordinate federal positions, strategies and initiatives in support of binational activities and discussions.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-2010
15. Actual Spending for
2009-2010
16. Expected Results for
2009-2010

(See Appendix at end of document for COA Results Statements)
17. Results Achieved in
2009-2010
Environment Canada Ecosystems Initiatives Program COA $37.5 million GLAPIV, plus departmental A-base $2.4 million GLAPIV, plus $2.1 million departmental A-base $4.9 million GLAPIV, plus $3.3 million departmental A-base All COA Results, except Ann. 2–3.2  See below.
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems COA $2.5 million GLAPIV, plus departmental A-base $445,000 GLAPIV, plus $5.164 million departmental A-base $437,100  GLAPIV, plus $5.45 million departmental A-base Ann. 1-2.4; Ann. 1-2.6; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-3.1; Ann. 3-3.2; Ann. 3-4.1; Ann. 3-4.2; Ann. 3-5.1; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2. See below.
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Health of the environment Growing Forward $57 million for environment and climate change from April 1, 2008 to March 31, 2013 $8–10 million $11 million Ann. 1-1.2; Ann.1-2.2; Ann. 2-2.3; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-2.2; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2 See below.
Natural Resources Canada Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources Port Hope Long term Low-level Radioactive Waste Mgmt. Project Departmental A-base and C-base $675,000 $545,000 Ann. 1-2.3; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-2.4 See below.
CFS Forest Harvesting in Riparian Zones
Ecosystem risk management: Canada understands and mitigates risks to natural resource ecosystems and human health CFS Pesticides Program
Parks Canada Conserve heritage resources COA Departmental A-base $0 $0 Ann. 3-1.1; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-2.2; Ann. 3-3.2; Ann. 3-3.3; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2. See below.
Transport Canada Environmental Protection and Remediation; the Canadian Ballast Water Program COA Departmental A-base $507,000 $507,000 Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-2.1; Ann. 3-4.1; Ann. 3-4.2 See below.
Infrastructure Canada Infrastructure funding programs The building Canada plan (Building Canada Fund, Provincial-Territorial Base Fund, and Gas Tax Fund), the Green Infrastructure Fund, as well as sunsetting programs (Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund, Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund). No COA allocation No COA allocation No COA allocation INFC supports the objectives of the COA with particular emphasis on Annex items Ann. 1-1.1; Ann. 1-2.1. See below.
Health Canada Healthy environments and consumer safety COA Departmental A-base No A-base funding.  COA commitment incorporated in CMP initiatives. $*** Ann. 2-3.2 See below.
TOTAL GLAPIV

(plus departmental funding)
$19.291-21.291 million $26.1391 million      

*For Infrastructure Canada, exact figures are not available.  Projects that are to be funded may be determined through a competitive, merit-based process, through joint federal-provincial discussions, or the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities may accept an Annual Capital Plan describing these.

**Infrastructure Canada is committed to attaining the objectives of the COA with particular emphasis on Annex items Ann. 1.2-1; Ann. 3-6.1; however, INFC employs its own project selection process to ensure that projects selected for funding meet specific eligibility criteria.

***Great Lakes Public Health Network (GLPHN) activities such as webinars and workshops are supported with funds from Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP)

17. Results Achieved in 2009–2010:
Specific Results by Department:

Environment Canada

Work continued to achieve progress in restoration of Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs), including the following:

  • Environmental restoration is now complete in the Wheatley Harbour AOC—a major achievement. The originally impaired beneficial uses, related to fish and wildlife populations, water quality, sediment impacts and habitat, have been restored. The Stage 3 Report documenting these achievements was reviewed and accepted by the International Joint Commission, and then finalized and released. A formal event to announce Canada’s decision to delist the AOC and celebrate this achievement took place in Wheatley Harbour in April 2010.
  • All priority actions have been implemented in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC. A draft Stage 3 Report is being prepared and will describe the results of monitoring to confirm the restoration of beneficial uses. Community consultations are ongoing and a decision is expected in 2010–2011 on whether to delist the Area of Concern or recognize it as an Area in Recovery.
  • The Great Lakes Sustainability Fund supported studies leading to improved water quality through improved management of municipal wastewater. These projects focused on the reduction of solids, nutrients and bacteria from wet weather flows (combined sewer overflows and stormwater) in the St. Mary’s River, Bay of Quinte, Niagara River and Toronto Region AOCs.

Work continued to achieve a better understanding of the state and trends in the Great Lakes Ecosystem. Environment Canada worked with universities and other government agencies on many water and wildlife research projects, including:

  • Finalized and distributed: The State of the Great Lakes 2009 Highlights and Technical reports, and the Nearshore Areas of the Great Lakes report.
  • Consistent with the National Action Plan, the Lake Superior Lakewide Management Plan partners drafted a binational Aquatic Invasive Species Complete Prevention Plan.
  • Supported community projects in the eastern Georgian Bay Littoral Biosphere Reserve, Nottawasaga Valley and the Bayfield North Gullies through the Lake Huron-Georgian Bay Watershed – A Canadian Framework for Community Action, part of the Lake Huron Binational Partnership.
  • Collaborated with partner agencies in fieldwork and data collection on Lake Erie under the binational Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative. The Lake Erie Lakewide Management Plan (LaMP) State of Nutrient Science Report was completed, as were draft phosphorus targets. These will facilitate development of the Lake Erie Binational Nutrient Management Strategy.
  • Completed the Lake Ontario Biodiversity Conservation Strategy to protect 24 significant coastal shorelines and watersheds across Lake Ontario.

Work continued to reduce the release of harmful substances (Annex 2). Environment Canada worked on a variety of activities and projects, including:

  • Achieved progress towards development of a Canadian framework to identify and prioritize substances of emerging concern in the Great Lakes.
  • Outreach activities to citizens in Thunder Bay were continued and offered to other Lake Superior north shore communities on the safe disposal of unused and expired pharmaceutical products.
  • A national wastewater monitoring program was initiated in support of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan to improve understanding of the occurrence and fate of emerging contaminants in municipal wastewater treatment processes and to determine if control measures are needed to prevent these substances from entering the municipal wastewater system. This program included five wastewater treatment plants discharging directly into the Great Lakes or a Great Lakes tributary.
  • Achieved progress towards reaching the Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy’s PCB challenge goals, primarily through implementation of the new Canadian PCB Regulations (SOR/2008-273, September 5, 2008).
  • Continued to monitor levels of dioxins in the environment, maintained its release inventory, collaborated with the U.S. to reduce uncontrolled combustion sources such as burn barrels, and launched a modeling study to better understand the transboundary impacts associated with releases of dioxins/furans from North American and global sources.
  • Made available its report on the testing of newer U.S. EPA certified woodstoves, which confirmed that these have lower benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) emission factors than predicted.
  • Released, with the U.S. EPA, the Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy December 2008 Status Report, summarizing binational efforts to address Level 1 substances and progress made to broaden the Strategy’s scope to encompass substances of emerging concern.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Work continued to conduct science, enhance fish habitats and control the negative impacts of established invasive species. Projects included:

  • Conducted field trials of sea lamprey pheromones and trapping to control the spawning of sea lamprey populations.
  • Constructed and maintained barriers to block the migration of sea lampreys
  • Developed indices of Biotic Integrity and Habitat Productivity to evaluate the diversity and biomass components of productive capacity of nearshore fish populations in Hamilton Harbour and the Bay of Quinte.
  • Developed fish habitat classification and supply models to measure the success of habitat restorations in Hamilton Harbour, Toronto Harbour and the Bay of Quinte.
  • Continued long-term assessment of food web status in the Bay of Quinte and Hamilton Harbour.
  • Supported restoration of fish habitat by working with other agencies on integrated initiatives.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Work continued to improve beneficial agriculture management practices with involvement of the Great Lakes farming community in numerous projects, including:

  • Under agreement with Ontario, delivered the Canada-Ontario Environmental Farm Plan and Canada-Ontario Farm Stewardship Programs to farmers, which resulted in province-wide implementation of 1200 Environmental Farm Plans and 1800 on-farm Beneficial Management Practice projects in 2009–2010.

Natural Resources Canada

Work continued towards the achievement of sustainable development of Canada’s energy, forestry and mineral metals resources within the Great Lakes Basin, including:

  • Enhanced policies and practices to mitigate forestry impacts on creeks and rivers.
  • Enhanced accuracy of pesticide applications to forests to reduce impacts on aquatic organisms.
  • Led the design of the waste management facilities to manage Port Hope area historic low-level radioactive wastes, following anticipated licensing decisions by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission in 2009 and 2011.

Parks Canada

Delivers the National Parks and National Marine Conservation Areas Programs and works to develop and maintain a viable protected areas network in the Great Lakes Basin that is relevant to Canadians. Projects included:

  • Worked with the Canadian Wildlife Service and others to plan and implement actions to protect and rehabilitate Great Lakes waterfowl, shore and marsh birds, wetlands and associated habitats.
  • Worked with the Fisheries and Oceans Canada to support the rehabilitation of Lake Superior native species.

Transport Canada

Work continued to ensure compliance with Canada Shipping Act, 2001 regulations related to the ecosystem health of the Great Lakes. Transport Canada undertook a wide variety of inspection, monitoring and training programs, including such projects as:

  • Boarded vessels entering the Great Lakes to ensure compliance with ballast water regulations.
  • Carried out biological analysis and evaluation of vessels targeted in the Joint Boarding Program.
  • Supported Canadian firms interested in the development of ballast water technology programs compliant with the International Maritime Organization’s Ballast Water Discharge Standards.

Infrastructure Canada

Work continued towards providing funding to eligible infrastructure projects in support of a cleaner environment, including improved wastewater treatment, among other objectives. Under the Communities Component of the Building Canada Fund, as well as through the Infrastructure Stimulus Fund, federal funding has been announced for numerous wastewater infrastructure projects located in communities near the Great Lakes.

In 2009–2010, under the Major Infrastructure Component of the Building Canada Fund, as well as the Green Infrastructure Fund, a total of $264.6 million in federal funding was announced in support of nine projects located in communities near the Great Lakes.

Health Canada

Work continued to enhance environmental health knowledge within the Great Lakes Basin that can be integrated into policies to address risks to human health by all levels of government. Projects included:

  • Supported and facilitated the development of environmental public health networks in the Great Lakes Basin.
  • The Great Lakes Public Health Network (GLPHN) organized an environmental health surveillance workshop for staff from federal, provincial, and municipal governments in February 2010 in Toronto, Ontario.
  • Implemented activities to address substances identified under Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan that are of concern within the Great Lakes Basin.
  • Developed a Health Science Framework to guide and facilitate health science research activities specifically for Great Lakes Basin populations.

18. Comments on Variances:

ENVIRONMENT CANADA: Dedicated Great Lakes funding (GLAPIV) is received only by Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, who also each contribute departmental A-base resources towards achieving results under COA. All other partners to COA (federal and provincial) achieve COA results via departmental funding.

NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA: Actual spending is less than planned for 2009–2010 as result of delays in approval of contracting authority for the Port Hope Long-Term Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Project.

PARKS CANADA: Figures for planned and actual spending are not available as Parks Canada financial coding systems are not designed to separate out Great Lakes-specific activities.

HEALTH CANADA: Health Canada supports work for the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative through the joint Environment Canada/Health Canada Chemicals Management Plan. Specific resource figures are not available as this spending is not tracked separately in Health Canada's financial system.

INFRASTRUCTURE CANADA: Federal infrastructure funding programs do not include an allocation specific to COA.

19. Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

20. Contact information:
Jennifer McKay
Manager, Great Lakes Environment Office
Environment Canada
416-739-5712

Appendix – COA Results Statements

PRIORITY 1 – AREAS OF CONCERN

Result 1.1 – Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial or municipal wastewater to achieve delisting targets in Nipigon Bay and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.2 – Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources to meet delisting criteria in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC.

Result 1.3 – Contaminated sediment management strategies developed for the Wheatley Harbour AOC and implemented in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC.

Result 1.4 – Plans in place and being implemented to rehabilitate fish and wildlife habitats and populations to meet delisting targets in the Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.5 – Informed, effective collaboration among government, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in Nipigon Bay, Jackfish Bay, Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.6 – Environmental monitoring and reporting to document improvements and track environmental recovery.

Result 2.1 – Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from municipal sewage treatment plants, combined sewer overflows, urban stormwater and industrial wastewater towards delisting targets in St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region, and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.2 – Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources towards achieving Remedial Action Plan (RAP) delisting criteria in St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, and Toronto and Region AOCs.

Result 2.3 – Progress made in developing sediment management strategies to reduce ecological and human health risk from contaminated sediments in Thunder Bay, Peninsula Harbour, St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Port Hope and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.4 – Long-term management plans being developed and priority actions for delisting being implemented for rehabilitation and protection of fish and wildlife habitats and populations in St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region, and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.5 – Informed, effective collaboration amongst government, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in AOCs.

Result 2.6 – Identify monitoring needs, undertake required studies and evaluate results to assess environmental recovery and support remediation strategies in AOCs.

PRIORITY 2 - HARMFUL POLLUTANTS

Result 1.1 - Reduction in releases of Tier 1 substances beyond the 2005 achievements towards the goal of virtual elimination.

Result 2.1 - Reduction in releases of Criteria Air Pollutants.

Result 2.2 - Coordinated activities to reduce releases from municipal wastewater.

Result 2.3 - Develop and initiate a program for the Sound Management of Chemical Substances in the Great Lakes Basin.

Result 3.1 - Improved understanding of the sources, fate and impacts of harmful pollutants in the Great Lakes Basin.

Result 3.2 - Human Health risks from harmful pollutants are understood and addressed in the Great Lakes Basin

PRIORITY 3 - LAKE AND BASIN SUSTAINABILITY

Result 1.1 - Increased awareness and appreciation of the Great Lakes and their contributions to social, economic and environmental well-being.

Result 1.2 - Increased stewardship actions that work towards a balance between human well-being and prosperity, and healthy aquatic ecosystems.

Result 1.3 - Sustainable use of land, water and other natural resources to provide benefits from the Great Lakes now and in the future.

Result 1.4 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and resources

Result 2.1 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial and municipal wastewater, combined sewer overflows and urban stormwater sources consistent with actions specified in binational Lakewide Management Plans (LaMPs) and binational lake action plans.

Result 2.2 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural sources by undertaking actions specified in the binational Lakewide Management Plans and binational lake action plans.

Result 2.3 - Identification of contaminated sediment and development of sediment management plans to reduce the release and impact of sediment-bound contaminants on the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem.

Result 2.4 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes water quality.

Result 3.1 - Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and habitats are protected, restored and sustained consistent with binational Great Lakes planning.

Result 3.2 - Progress on rehabilitation of Great Lakes native species to restore the health of aquatic ecosystems, consistent with binational Great Lakes planning.

Result 3.3 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, habitats and species.

Result 4.1 - Implementation of the National Action Plan to Address the Threat of Aquatic Invasive Species in the Great Lakes.

Result 4.2: Enhanced knowledge about the harmful impacts of aquatic invasive species on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, food webs and species.

Result 5.1 - The impacts of climate change on the Great Lakes ecosystem composition, structure, and function, including biodiversity (organisms and their habitat), water quality and quantity, human health and safety (including access to clean drinking water), social well-being and economic prosperity, are understood by governments and the Great Lakes community.

Result 6.1 - The potential risks to Great Lakes drinking water intakes are identified and assessed, and early actions to address risks are undertaken

Result 6.2 - Develop knowledge and understanding of water quality and quantity issues of concern to the Great Lakes as drinking water sources.

PRIORITY 4 - COORDINATION OF MONITORING, RESEARCH AND INFORMATION

Result 1.1 – Responsive and comprehensive monitoring and research programs.

Result 2.1 – Improved reporting on environmental conditions, changes and progress

Result 2.2 – Increased sharing of data and information among governments, organizations and Basin residents.

 

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), approved March 2005 (which succeeded the two-year Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan [FCSAAP]).

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Environment Canada and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

3. Lead Department Program Activity: Canadians and their environment are protected from the effects of pollution and waste (Environment Canada); Management Policy Development and Oversight (Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat)

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAP has been in effect since April 2005. Former two-year FCSAAP commenced April 2003.

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: FCSAP is expected to continue until 2020. However, the current policy approval ends March 31, 2011.

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $1,775.5 million (including Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodations charges) to March 31, 2011

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) provides a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites having the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2004, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $3.5 billion. Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial departments, the overall program is administered jointly by Environment Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

8. Shared Outcome(s): Reduce federal financial liability and risks to human health and the environment, including fish habitat. Increase public confidence in the overall management of federal real property through the effective risk management or remediation of individual federal contaminated sites.

9. Governance Structure(s): Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by a Director Generals’ Committee, the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (at Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.

($ millions)
10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) 14. Planned Spending for
2009-2010
15. Actual Spending for
2009-2010
16. Expected Results for
2009-2010
17. Results Achieved in
2009-2010
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Enterprise Activities Asset Management $5,465,649 $877,000 $810,595 See below. See below.
Canada Border Services Agency Corporate Management and Direction Infrastructure and Environment $1,620,212 $264,507 $247,879 See below. See below.
Canadian Food Inspection Agency NA NA $183,783 $0 $0 NA NA
Correctional Service Canada Internal Services Facilities/Asset Management Services $10,368,090 $2,817,669 $895,361 See below. See below.
Environment Canada Chemical Management Program Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are assessed $49,161,086 $6,506,004 $5,269,327 See below. See below.
Risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are managed $44,900,126 $6,640,375 $5,463,939 See below. See below.
Subtotal     $94,061,213 $13,146,379 $10,733,266    
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Internal Services Asset Management Services $78,437,194 $22,277,365 $21,858,939 See below. See below.
Healthy and Productive Aquatic Ecosystems Habitat Management $21,665,285 $3,335,637 $3,163,138 See below. See below.
Subtotal     $100,102,479 $25,613,002 $25,022,077    
Health Canada First Nations and Inuit Health First Nations and Inuit Health Protection $7,445,162* $719,429 $323,829 See below. See below.
Contaminated Sites Healthy Environments, Consumer Safety Branch $43,721,890 $4,182,151 $4,276,806 See below. See below.
Subtotal     $51,167,052 $4,901,580 $4,600,635    
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Responsible Federal Stewardship Contaminated Sites Remediation $148,254,393 $48,873,812 $36,810,343 See below. See below.
Northern Land and Resources Contaminated Sites $685,536,311 $132,343,029 $112,120,853 See below. See below.
Subtotal     $833,790,704 $181,216,841 $148,931,196    
Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated Management of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infrastructure, and properties in the Montréal area NA $955,672 $358,938 $94,552 See below. See below.
Marine Atlantic Inc. Corporate Management FCSAP (projects) $120,000 $50,000 $29,148 See below. See below.
National Capital Commission Real Asset Management Land and real asset management $8,600,052 $2,295,000 $2,295,000 See below. See below.
National Defence Contribute to Canada and the international community Contribute to the international community in accordance with Canadian Interests and Values $380,070,345 $57,133,697 $62,030,559 See below. See below.
National Research Council Canada Internal Services Environmental Operations $4,835,000 $2,380,000 $2,564,082 See below. See below.
Natural Resources Canada Corporate Management The provision of relevant and timely policy analysis and advice for decision making on government priorities and departmental responsibilities $27,915,807 $17,650,000 $6,871,047 See below. See below.
Parks Canada Conserve Heritage Resources Active Management and Restoration $38,814,369 $11,653,802 $10,577,140 See below. See below.
Public Works and Government Services Canada Federal Accommodation & Holdings FCSAP (projects) $26,360,173 $8,535,964 $8,414,143 See below. See below.
FCSAP (expert services) $5,450,000 $900,000 $816,334 See below. See below.
Subtotal     $31,810,173 $9,435,964 $9,230,477    
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Corporate Infrastructure   $23,100,214 $5,797,330 $4,974,127 See below. See below.
Transport Canada Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in Support of Sustainable Development Environmental Programs $150,768,925 $30,628,840 $21,200,981 See below. See below.
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Management Policy Development and Oversight Assets and Acquired Services $2,747,200 $480,229 $479,039 See below. See below.
All Federal Partners
(excluding PWGSC accommodations)
$1,766,496,939 $366,700,778 $311,587,161    

16. Expected Results for 2009–2010:

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada: Remediation / risk management for 1 project (1 site)

Canada Border Services Agency: Remediation / risk management for 1 project (1 site)

Correctional Service Canada: Remediation / risk management for 2 projects (2 sites)

Environment Canada (Custodian): Remediation / risk management for 4 projects (154 sites); assessment of approximately 445 sites

Environment Canada (Secretariat and Expert Support):

  • Secretariat: Supports the Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering committee and Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG), administers non-financial aspects of the program, including management of project selection process, and development and maintenance of secure website and reporting
  • Expert Support: Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments and the FCSAP Secretariat with respect to the ecological risk evaluation of federal contaminated sites; provision of ecological risk assessment training and guidance

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Custodian): Remediation / risk management for 74 projects (108 sites); assessment of approximately 1014 sites

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Expert Support): Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the risk management of federal contaminated sites; participation in the project submission process, including review of information provided by custodians; and technical tool development.

Health Canada (Custodian): Remediation / risk management for 7 projects (7 sites)

Health Canada (Expert Support): Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the human health risk management of federal contaminated sites; provision of human health risk assessment training and guidance; participation in the project submission process, including review of human health related information provided by custodians

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (Indian and Inuit Affairs): Remediation / risk management for 37 projects (83 sites); assessment of approximately 2,797 sites

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (Northern Affairs): Remediation / risk management for 27 projects (30 sites); assessment of approximately 55 sites

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated: Remediation / risk management for 1 project (1 site)

Marine Atlantic Inc.: Assessment of 1 site

National Capital Commission: Remediation / risk management for 3 projects (3 sites)

National Defence: Remediation / risk management for 42 projects (95 sites); assessment of approximately 44 sites

National Research Council of Canada: Remediation / risk management for 2 projects (2 sites); assessment of approximately 3 sites

Natural Resources Canada: Remediation / risk management for 1 project (6 sites); assessment of approximately 16 sites

Parks Canada: Remediation / risk management for 6 projects (7 sites); assessment of approximately 10 sites

Public Works and Government Services Canada (Custodian): Remediation / risk management for 10 projects (10 sites); assessment of approximately 20 sites

Public Works and Government Services Canada (Expert Support): Development of project management tools, dissemination of information on innovative technologies and technologies used at individual projects

Royal Canadian Mounted Police: Remediation / risk management for 4 projects (4 sites); assessment of approximately 2 sites

Transport Canada: Remediation / risk management for 15 projects (15 sites); assessment of approximately 4 sites

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat: Ensures consistency with Treasury Board policies on management of federal contaminated sites, reviews financial aspects of proposals, administers fund and advises Environment Canada on monitoring of government-wide progress

17. Results Achieved in 2009–2010:

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada: Remediation / risk management for 5 sites; assessments at 18 properties (32 sites).

Canada Border Services Agency: Soil and groundwater contamination at Port of Entry at Pleasant Camp, BC, has been significantly reduced by the in situ remediation system.   Remediation “returns” declined significantly in 2009–2010 as the contamination plume contracted as predicted.  Active in situ remediation was discontinued and the extent of the remaining contamination was quantified through a detailed site assessment.  The site will be monitored as part of an ongoing risk management plan.

Correctional Service Canada: Remediation / risk management for 3 sites; assessment of 15 sites.

Environment Canada (Custodian): Remediation / risk management for 9 projects (58 sites); assessment of 46 properties (198 sites).

Environment Canada (Secretariat and Expert Support):

Secretariat:

  1. Prepared annual funding documents for ministerial approval;
  2. Developed and coordinated the 2000–2010 project submission process;
  3. Provided ongoing secretariat support to the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the Federal Contaminated Sites Steering Committees;
  4. Implemented the first year of accelerated FCSAP activities under Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP); and
  5. Undertook the development of the proposal for program renewal, for presentation to Cabinet in the fall of 2010–2011.

Expert Support:

  1. Provided scientifically sound guidance and expert advice to 19 custodial departments for the management of their sites so that risk to the environment is eliminated or minimized;
  2. Reviewed the eligibility requirements for more than 230 projects/sites to ensure that remediation / risk management projects are eligible for funding;
  3. Developed and provided national training to custodians on the review of ecological risk assessment reports and on quality assurance / quality control (QA/QC) measures that apply to contaminated sites;
  4. Completed or almost completed supplemental guidance documents on the ecological risk assessment of contaminated sites; and
  5. Developed, in collaboration with DFO, the FCSAP classification system for contaminated aquatic sites and a framework for addressing and managing these sites.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Custodian): Remediation / risk management for 167 projects (224 sites); assessment of 1547 sites.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Expert Support):

  1. Provided expert advice and guidance on remediation / risk management options on approximately 97 projects;
  2. Provided advice to ensure sustainability of local fish resource for approximately 261 projects;
  3. Provided input to the supplemental guidance documents on the ecological risk assessment of contaminated sites;
  4. Developed the FCSAP Aquatic Sites Classification System (ASCS) and developed and provided national training to the National Expert Support Team, Custodians and other stakeholders on the ASCS to ensure nationally consistent usage; and
  5. Developed a framework for addressing and managing aquatic contaminated sites under the FCSAP.

Health Canada (Custodian): Health Canada completed 3 Environmental Site Assessments (ESA) at 3 sites in BC and worked on 1 remediation project in Ontario and 2 in Manitoba.

Health Canada (Expert Support):

  1. The Contaminated  Sites Division (CSD) of Health Canada provided expert advice and training  on human health risk assessments , risk management and public involvement to custodial departments under the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP).
  2. Developed soil quality guidelines (SQG) and initiated protocol development for indoor dust and sediment.
  3. Developed guidance documents: (1) human health risk assessment guidance including preliminary and detailed risk assessment, vapour intrusion, Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs), peer review checklist, supplemental air guidance,  model statement of work for risk assessment;  (2)  public involvement; and (3) site investigation. 
  4. Supported research in the areas of bioaccessibility/bioavailability and other studies directly applicable to guideline development, human health risk assessment and risk management of contaminated sites in Canada.
  5. Reviewed projects and site submissions in order to determine the eligibility for funding.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (Indian and Inuit Affairs): Remediation for 160 sites; assessment of 111 sites.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (Northern Affairs):  In 2009–2010, a Phase I site assessment was completed at 155 sites in the NWT.  In addition, 21 sites completed both Phase I and II assessments in Nunavut.  Finally, 16 sites completed Phase II/III assessments in 2009–2010.  Therefore, the Program completed some form of assessment at 191 sites (155 on sites that have never been assessed before and 36 more rigorous assessments) in 2009–2010.  In 2009–2010, 20 projects were considered to be in the remediation phase (step 8 or 9 of the FCSAP 10-step process).

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated: Completed site geotechnical and hydrogeological assessments and started the preparation of the detailed specifications (to be completed in 2010–2011)

Marine Atlantic Inc.: Completed an updated Phase I & Phase III ESA for the Bar Harbor (Maine) Ferry Terminal Site

National Capital Commission: Remediation / risk management for 5 projects (8 sites); assessment of 40 sites.

National Defence: Remediation / risk management for 60 projects (79 sites) and work completed on 9 sites; assessment of 54 projects (111 sites) and work completed on 31 sites.

National Research Council Canada: Remediation / risk management for 2 projects (2 sites); assessment of 5 sites

Natural Resources Canada: Remediation / risk management for 1 project (6 sites); assessment of 14 sites and 1 risk assessment.

Parks Canada: Remediation / risk management for 29 projects (41 sites); assessment of 46 projects (74 sites).

Public Works and Government Services Canada (Custodian): 34 environmental site assessments completed and 7 remediation / risk management projects completed.

Public Works and Government Services Canada (Expert Support): Assisted in the initial development of the Risk Reduction Indicator Tool and the Site Closure Process in association with Environment Canada Expert Support; delivered 5 training sessions at the Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop; participated and engaged external service providers at Remtech; assisted in the organization, technical paper review, and acted as co-chair for the Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop; annual maintenance of the Guidance and Orientation for the Selection of Technologies (GOST) and delivered 7 regional training sessions related to this tool; prepared innovative technology profiles, case studies, and developed associated marketing materials; development of FCSAP Demand Forecast for FY2010–2012; engagement in IRWGs and CSMWG; conducted consultations with key federal custodians on FCSAP Project Management tools and templates; continued development of the Sustainable Evaluation Tool with Environment Canada Expert Support and Sediment Costing Tool; Supported Environment Canada’s Expert Support by assisting in the development of the training material and retaining a consultant, to deliver a series of quality assurance / quality control (QA/QC) workshops; coordinated with other federal custodians in collective staffing processes.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police: Remediation / risk management for 9 projects (10 sites); assessment of 240 sites. 

The results achieved are much greater than the expected results. The projects planned in 2009–2010 RPP were done at the end of 2008–2009 and preceded Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP). Once CEAP went ahead and accelerated funding became available, many more assessment and remediation projects went ahead than were originally planned for in 2009–2010 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Transport Canada: in 2009–2010, Transport Canada undertook 26 remediation / risk management projects, of which 10 were accelerated under CEAP.  Similarly, 48 environmental site assessment projects were undertaken, of which 33 were accelerated.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat:

  1. Supported the Environment Canada FCSAP Secretariat and custodians to ensure that development and implementation of the first year of accelerated FCSAP activities under Canada’s Economic Action Plan were consistent with Treasury Board policies on management of federal contaminated sites.
  2. Supported Environment Canada in the development of the proposal for program renewal, for presentation to Cabinet in the fall of 2010–2011.
  3. Reviewed financial aspects of proposals and administered the FCSAP fund.
  4. Administered the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory.
  5. Coordinated planning for the May 2010 Federal Contaminated Sites National Workshop.

18. Comments on Variances:

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada: Project expenditures were lower than the estimated costs.  There were delays in staffing an employee for FCSAP contaminated sites program management.

Canada Border Services Agency:

Correctional Service Canada: Variance between CSC's planned and actual spending is $1,922,308. $250,000 was transferred to NRC in Supplementary Estimates B.  $1,500,000 was carried forward to next fiscal year; $172,308 was lapsed. The main factor explaining the variance is that further assessments of potentially contaminated sites showed that the sites were much less contaminated than expected, resulting in lower remediation expenditures.

Environment Canada (Custodian): Variance between EC's planned and actual spending for2009–2010 is $1,236,677 of which $500,000 was transferred to Parks Canada in Supplementary Estimates C.  The remaining variance of $736,677 can be attributed to northern and remote projects which were not carried out as planned due to unforeseen travel, timing, and weather issues. There were also other Environment Canada projects for which the actual costs were less than the planned budget.

Environment Canada (Secretariat and Expert Support): $1,176,436 was lapsed from the program as a result of staffing delays and delays in completion of contracts due in part to unforeseen work required to support program commitments under Canada’s Economic Action Plan.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Custodian): The actual expenditures for 2009–2010 differ from the approved amount for 2009–2010 as a result of a minor lapse in project dollars and salary. The minor lapse in project dollars is the result of projects coming in under budget, while the minor lapse in salary is the result of being unable to staff positions at the beginning of the fiscal year.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (Expert Support): DFO-ES spent 95% of allocated funding, lapsing $172,499 in fiscal year 2009–2010. 

Health Canada (Custodian): Projects: The completion of four remediation projects in Ontario did not proceed as planned as the First Nation communities did not sign Contribution Agreements for this work. The remediation projects were not priorities for the First Nation communities in 2009. One remediation project was to be completed when a new fuel tank system was to be installed. The installation was delayed and did not occur in 2009, and thus the remediation project was delayed as well.

*Funding: The department decided not to access $921,600 through a $1.8 million allocation Governor General’s Warrant, instead utilizing $617,272 in Health Canada (Non-FCSAP) Funds. This brings the Total Allocated FCSAP Funds (Start to End Date) in Column 13 to $6,746,051 ($7,445,162 minus $617,272).

Health Canada (Expert Support): The variance of $94,655 was cash-managed internally.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (Indian and Inuit Affairs): $10,075,158 was re-profiled and $1,988,311 was cash-managed as a result of a few high value remediation projects not proceeding as planned. The reasons were health and safety concerns on one major site, an unexpected election on another reserve, and conflicts of interest between INAC, the consulting firm and the First Nation.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (Northern Affairs): The department’s program had$112,120,853 of expenditures.  A surplus of, $16,500,000 was re-profiled to 2010–2011 and $2,025,560 was requested for late re-profile; approval for the latter from Treasury Board and the Department of Finance is pending.  In addition, the department lapsed $1,776,616.

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated: There were delays caused by the required additional investigation recommended by the consultant preparing the detailed specifications.  The unexpended budget was re-profiled to 2010-2011.

Marine Atlantic Inc.: Project was submitted for tender and the consultants were able to complete the assessment within (below) the actual estimated budget.

National Defence:  Increases in the “Planned Spending for 2009–2010” can be attributed to the extra $5 million transferred to National Defence (DND) from Natural Resources Canada (NRCan).  For project management (PM) funds and assessment funds; $896,862 of the $1 million and $5,630,915 of the $6 million were spent, respectively.  All remediation / risk management (R/RM) funds were spent, including the additional $5 million and remaining assessment funds, for a total of $55,502,782 ($50,133,697 planned + $5,000,000 extra from NRCan + $369,085 remaining assessment funds).  Therefore, the total spent is $62,030,559 ($896,862 PM + $5,630,915 Assessment + $55,502,782 R/RM).   

Increases in the number of projects and changes in the number of sites listed in “Expected Results for 2009–2010” can be attributed to the re-structuring of projects and related sites, as well as an increase in available funding (i.e., NRCan transfer of $5 million to DND) that allowed for additional work to be completed.  Similarly, the number of sites reported included only those sites in which work was conducted or completed in 2009–2010.

National Research Council of Canada: NRC received $250,000 from CSC which was put toward remediation / risk management; $65,918 was lapsed.

Natural Resources Canada: $5,000,000 was transferred to the National Defence contaminated sites program and $5,778,953 was lapsed.

Parks Canada: PC received an extra $2,374,785 transferred from Environment Canada ($500,000), Transport Canada ($1,200,000) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police ($674,785) in Supplementary Estimates C. An additional $1,091,210 was carried forward from 2008–2009 and $586,500 from previous multi-year submissions increased PC’s 2009–2010 planned spending to $15,706,297.  PC carried forward $5,129,157 due to late staffing, project costs being less than anticipated and projects not carried out as planned due to unforeseen issues. 

Public Works and Government Services Canada (Custodian): 99% of budget was expended. One percent variance due to the late cancellation of an assessment  project.

Public Works and Government Services Canada (Expert Support): $83,666 was lapsed.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police: Where planned spending for 2009–2010 for the RCMP was $5,797,330, the actual spending was $4,974,127.  The variance $823,203 can be explained by the following: two transfers to Parks Canada totalling $674,785 (one of $50,000 and the other of $624,785), a carry forward of program management funds of $130,200 and $18,218 in lapsed funds.

Transport Canada: $1,200,000 was transferred to Parks Canada through Supplementary Estimates;  $600,753 of accelerated funds was lapsed;  $7,627,106 of baseline funds will be requested to be re-profiled from 2009–2010 to 2011–2012.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat: TBS spent 99% of allocated funding, lapsing $1,190 in fiscal year 2009–2010. 

19. Results achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable):

20. Contact information: FCSAP Secretariat, Contaminated Sites Division, 15th floor, Place Vincent Massey, 351 St. Joseph Blvd., Gatineau, QC  K1A 0H3  819‑934-8153


Clean Air Agenda

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Lead Department Program Activity
3.3 - Clean Air Program
Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Transport Canada, Health Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, National Research Council of Canada, Industry Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Start Date
April 1, 2007
End Date March 31, 2011

Description


Through the Clean Air Agenda (CAA), the Government of Canada has been working towards making tangible improvements in Canada's environment by addressing the challenges of climate change and air pollution1. Since 2007, the CAA has been supporting:

  • Regulatory initiatives in the industrial, transportation, consumer and commercial sectors; and
  • A range of complementary program measures designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve indoor air quality, mitigate the impacts of climate change, and engage at the international level.

The CAA is managed through a horizontal management, accountability and reporting framework. This framework facilitates comprehensive and systematic review of planning for and reporting on the financial and non-financial performance of CAA programming. Progress towards the CAA outcomes has been reported publically through this horizontal framework since 2007.

Since 2007, the CAA initial funding of $1.9 Billion has increased to $2.57 Billion. This funding is subject to renewal as of March 31, 2011 and subject to Government decisions to extend or enhance funding. The outcomes of these decisions will, therefore, be reflected in future budget exercises.

At the end of the third year (March 31, 2010) of its four year mandate, the cumulative actual spending for the first three years was $1,340.4 million2 against the cumulative planned spending of $1,553.8 million for the same period. Total planned spending for all federal partners in 2010-2011 is reported as $951.3 million3.

Spending

_______________________________

Notes:

1 Announcement of Canada’s emissions target under the Copenhagen Accord (February 1, 2009): http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=714D9AAE-1&news=EAF552A3-D287-4AC0-ACB8-A6FEA697ACD6
2 2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010 Clean Air Agenda Horizontal Performance Report available at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/index-eng.asp
3 2010-2011 Clean Air Agenda Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities available at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/index-eng.asp

Shared Outcomes

The 45 programs of the CAA are organized within eight themes: clean air regulatory agenda, clean energy, clean transportation, indoor air quality, international actions, adaptation, partnerships, and management and accountability. The shared outcomes are:

  • the health, economic and environmental benefits for Canadians have been realized;
  • the risks to the health of Canadians and the environment resulting from exposure to air pollution have been reduced; and
  • the risks to communities, infrastructure and to the health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change have been reduced.

2009-2010 Achieved Results

For consolidated results of the CAA, please refer to Canada’s Performance Report 2009-2010 on the TBS website: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/home-accueil-eng.aspx

For more detailed information on CAA results achieved in 2009-2010, the following reports detail results achieved at the Theme and Program Level.

2009-2010 Risks and Challenges

In moving the objectives of the Clean Air Agenda forward, the key challenges over 2009-2010 faced by CAA programming, included:   

  • Establishing for Canada a broad approach to climate change that remains flexible enough to align to the approach that will be followed in the US. This required undertaking foundational preparations for a number of possible policy approaches.
  • Working with the impacts of the economic downturn which posed a challenge to some incentive programs (such as those in Clean Energy and Clean Transportation) as industrial participants were not in a position to take advantage of federal initiatives.
Total Funding Approved under the CAA Total Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Total Actual Spending in 2009-2010

Actual Spending in 2009-2010
Reported within Economic Action Plan (EAP)

$2,572,940,366* $709,765,617 $640,313,053

$231,653,448 (ecoENERGY Retrofit Program)

*$18.5 million is included in total CAA approved funding to support Clean Air Regulatory programming and is forecast as planned spending in 2011-2012.

Contact information: Karen Turcotte, Executive Director, Clean Air Agenda Results Management Secretariat, Environment Canada, (819) 953-5842 Karen.Turcotte@ec.gc.ca

CLEAN AIR REGULATORY AGENDA THEME

CLEAN ENERGY THEME

CLEAN TRANSPORTATION THEME

INDOOR AIR QUALITY THEME

INTERNATIONAL ACTIONS THEME

ADAPTATION THEME

PARTNERSHIPS THEME

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY THEME

 

Theme: Clean Air Agenda Regulatory Agenda (CARA)

Lead Department

Environment Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Health Canada

Expected Results from Theme's Programming

Immediate Outcomes

  • Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHG) to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.
  • Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle regulations to reduce fuel consumption and GHGs beginning in 2011 and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.
  • Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.
  • Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.
  • Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Canada 's emissions have been reduced from 2005 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors
  • for targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3, Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides, and
  • for GHGs (as CO2 equivalent)

Final Outcomes

  • Human health and environmental quality are improved
    • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and GHGs.

2009-2010 Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_Theme

2009-2010 Achieved Results

In support of the reduction of air emissions, progress was made with respect to advancing approaches to reducing GHG emissions from industrial sectors in the context of a North American cap-and-trade system, including the development of harmonization policy and support to decision-making through sound analysis and consultation. Also, a draft set of rules and guidance for Canada’s Offset System was published in June 2009.

Extensive economic analysis of Canada’s domestic and international climate change approaches was undertaken. Domestically, economic impact analyses of approaches to reduce emissions in selected sectors were undertaken to support key policy decisions and to support the development of Regulatory Assessment Impact Statements. With respect to international issues, analysis focused on the impacts of harmonizing with the United States (U.S.) approach and the impacts of adopting various international proposals which emerged prior to the Copenhagen climate change conference. Analysis of alternative options for a North American cap-and-trade regime was also undertaken.

Environment Canada (EC) has been working closely with provinces and territories as our approach to reducing GHG emissions continues to be developed. Agreements in Principle on climate change have been signed with Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan and British Columbia. Environment Canada has launched an Assistant Deputy Minister level working group to ensure federal, provincial and territorial coordination on domestic climate change approaches. EC led an extensive process with other federal departments, provinces, industry, and non-governmental organizations from a wide range of industrial activity sectors over several months, entailing an unprecedented level of collaboration with other levels of government and stakeholders to develop an integrated approach to improving air quality. A proposal for a Comprehensive Air Management System was finalized and submitted to federal, provincial and territorial Ministers for consideration.

In support of regulatory actions, scientific assessments of air pollutants, air quality, GHGs and climate change were undertaken extensively. These activities described emissions sources and trends, atmospheric concentrations of air pollutants and GHGs, their impacts on the environment and human health and the forecasted benefits of regulatory actions to reduce air emissions. These assessments are the means by which the Government can determine whether the actions it and others have taken have been effective in reducing the risk to humans and their environment from air emissions. Furthermore, EC has expanded its monitoring activities, continued upgrade to data management and monitoring systems, enhanced its analytical capacity and improved its capacity for air modelling forecasting. (Refer: Canada’s 2008 Greenhouse Gas Inventory: A Summary of Trends: 1990–2008: p. 1. http://www.ec.gc.ca/ges-ghg/0590640B-87F7-449A-AA8F-D5674A7BAC57/2010 Annual Summary of Trends.pdf)

In support of a more efficient and cleaner transportation sector, the Government of Canada completed stakeholder consultations on regulations for marine engines, off-road recreational vehicles, heavy-duty on-road and off-road diesel engines. Proposed regulations are being updated to maintain harmonization with the U.S.

Implementation of the vehicle and engine emission regulation has been ongoing, including emissions testing. The Government worked closely with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and Enforcement on regulatory administration activities to avoid duplication.

Notice of intent to develop GHG emission regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 for light-duty vehicles was published during the year.

The Government continued to support the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Railway Association of Canada on emission reductions in the rail sector. The MOU, in force from 2006 to 2010, has delivered substantial reductions in air pollutant emissions. In 2008, there was an improvement of 23.3% in the GHG emission intensity of total freight train operations, compared with the 1990 baseline.

In support of safer and energy efficient consumer product, two regulations controlling Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) concentrations in automotive refinishing products and architectural coatings were finalized and will contribute to reduction in the formation of ground-level ozone and smog in Canada. Consultations and analysis was undertaken to inform the identification of the next group of consumer and commercial products to target for VOC reductions and inclusion in the longer term Federal Agenda for VOC reductions.

In support of improving air quality in Canadian households and buildings, 9,000 participants were recruited for the cross-Canada radon survey in 2009-2010. Kits were shipped out to the participants including instructions, a questionnaire and a radon detector and approximately 75% were returned after the 3 month testing period. The analysis of the radon detectors will be done by the National Radon Laboratory, along with analysis for the federal building testing projects.

Over 60 radon stakeholder engagements with Non-Governmental Organizations, the health professional, real estate and building industry, other departments and levels of government and the public were completed. Web traffic on the Health Canada (HC) radon pages increased by more than 50% and over 200,000 radon brochures were distributed across Canada. Radon information is available at all Service Canada centres across Canada.

HC is working to establish a certification program for radon measurement and mitigation service providers working in Canada. This program will ensure radon services provided to Canadian homeowners are of high quality and that providers of those services are properly trained. As part of this program, HC is working with the National Environmental Health Association National Radon Proficiency Program (NEHA-NRPP). A memorandum of agreement was established in 2009 to allow the Standards Council of Canada to begin assessment of NEHA-NRPP as a first step to having them accredited as a certifying body for the Canadian radon certification program.

In support of more accurate reporting, as well as easier compliance on air emissions: In 2009-2010, the 2007 national emissions inventory for air pollutants was published and data for 2008 was compiled; the 2008 facility level emissions for air pollutants compiled through the National Pollutant Releases Inventory was published; the compliant 2008 national emission summaries for air pollutants to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe under the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution was submitted; and overall, existing institutional capacity to deliver an enhanced monitoring, accounting and reporting system to produce a UN compliant national GHG inventory system and national inventory report was maintained.

A single window reporting system was developed and launched to gather data for reporting GHG emissions. This tool is currently being considered as an option for gathering information on GHGs in cooperation with provinces and territories. EC has put in place a federal-provincial-territorial working group under the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment to discuss this initiative, to avoid duplication and lead to greater harmonization.

Canada has met the requirements of the Kyoto Protocol for the establishment of a national registry by launching the Canada’s Kyoto Protocol National Registry in February 2010. This registry connects directly to the International Transaction Log operated by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Secretariat and will allow Canada to participate in the international carbon market via its government accounts. General information on the National Registry was published under the EC internet website.

2009-2010 Successes

A proposal for a Comprehensive Air Management System was developed through a collaborative, multi-stakeholder process. Provinces, Territories, and stakeholders from a wide range of industrial activity sectors were involved in the effort to develop the air pollutant framework.

Canada has met the requirements of the Kyoto Protocol for the establishment of a national registry and can participate in the international carbon market via its government accounts by the launched of Canada’s Kyoto Protocol National Registry.

Improvements were made to air quality models that will help inform regulatory activities. In addition, the new EC air quality forecast model became operational in November 2009. This model brings new technology to EC's numerical prediction operations, with Canada being the first country to adopt a meteorological model with embedded chemistry as part of its operational suite. It is the next generation of model that will support the efforts to address smog issues in Canada.

A significant number of papers have been prepared, presented, and published in peer-reviewed journals and at scientific conferences on CARA research and measurement activities demonstrating the creditability and relevance of the scientific information in support of air pollutant and GHGs emissions activities.

Finalized and implemented regulations to limit VOC concentrations in automotive refinishing products and architectural coatings that will contribute to reduction in the formation of ground-level ozone and smog in Canada.

2009-2010 Risks and Challenges

The key challenge facing Canada in establishing a broad approach to climate change is the need to remain flexible enough and have analysis to be prepared to align to the approach that will ultimately be followed in the U.S. Various pieces of legislation setting out different economy-wide approaches, including for cap-and-trade, have been released. In the absence of the final passage of any of these, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is also proceeding with sector-specific GHG regulations. Canada will only adopt a cap-and-trade regime if the U.S. signals that it will do the same. This position on harmonization applies equally to regulation. Canada has already completed much of the extensive foundational analysis and consultation work required to prepare for both of those options.

Managing the coordination and communication amongst a number of key players on a very tight timeline is challenging on most of the CARA activities.

Theme's total funding approved under the CAA Theme's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Theme's Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 434,865,749
$ 132,926,327 $ 96,156,461

 

Program: Industrial Sector Regulatory Actions

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_1

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Progress was made in 2009-2010 in continuing to implement approaches to managing air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from transport, industry and other sources. The Government of Canada aligned its national GHG reduction target (17% below 2005 levels by 2020) with that of the US and inscribed it in the Copenhagen Accord.

Progress was made with respect to advancing approaches to reducing GHG emissions from industrial sectors in the context of a North American cap-and-trade system:

  • A draft set of rules and guidance for Canada’s Offset System published in June 2009
  • A single window reporting system was developed and launched to gather data for reporting GHG emissions;
  • Canada’s National Registry, a requirement under the Kyoto Protocol, which connects directly to the International Transaction Log operated by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change secretariat, was launched in March 2010.

While much analysis on a North American cap-and-trade system has been conducted, a key point guiding Canada’s approach to climate change is that the North American economy is integrated to the point where harmonizing and aligning a range of principles, policies, regulations and standards makes sense. For that reason, Canada will only adopt a cap-and-trade regime if the U.S. signals that it will do the same. This position on harmonization applies equally to regulation. Canada has already completed much of the extensive foundational analysis and consultation work required to prepare for both of those options.

Environment Canada (EC) has also been working closely with provinces and territories as our approach to reducing GHG emissions continues to be developed. Agreements in Principle on climate change have been signed with Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan and British Columbia.

This past fall, renewed consultations with the provinces were undertaken through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment to identify guiding principles to support the development of a single window system for reporting on GHGs. A list of guiding principles was finalized in January 2010 and is used to develop bi-lateral agreements with Provinces.

The federal government completed its work with representatives from provinces, industry and non-governmental organizations to develop a proposal for a new air management framework to reduce air pollutant emissions. The Comprehensive Air Management System (CAMS) proposes national ambient air quality standards, national industrial emission requirements and air pollution management that takes into consideration local and regional air quality. As such, it provides a good foundation for moving forward. By including an element focused on improving local and regional air quality, CAMS directly addresses a shortcoming identified by stakeholders in the governments proposed approach announced in the Turning the Corner Plan (April 2007). The proposed CAMS framework was submitted for consideration to the federal, provincial and territorial Ministers.

The 2007 status report on the Notice requiring the preparation and implementation of Pollution Prevention Plans from base metals smelters and refineries and zinc plants was published in May 2009. It demonstrates that the implementation of pollution prevention plans is reducing releases of air pollutants from the sector, and that most facilities are expected to meet their 2008 targets.

The Particulate Matter combustion survey for wood products sector was completed in collaborations with the industry. It leads to re-assessment of the Air Pollutant Emissions Inventory for PM, PM10 and PM2.5 and serves as basis to evaluate future regulatory actions for the wood products sector.

The funding for Regulatory Capacity Development and Management Systems supported the delivery of training for the EC community of regulators as part of the department’s strategy to implement the Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulations. This resulted in enhanced capacity and promoted knowledge development for federal regulators.


Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 91,846,667 $ 31,160,570 $ 17,978,917

 

Program: Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_2a

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Consultations with stakeholders were completed on final regulations for marine spark-ignition engines and off-road recreational vehicles. Proposed regulations are being updated to maintain harmonization with the United States.

Consultations were held on the draft amendments to regulations for heavy-duty on-road and off-road diesel engines.

On-going implementation for vehicle and engine emission regulations. This includes the administration of statutory obligations under CEPA 1999 such as registering and tracking temporary importation declarations and registering Notices of Defect. EC is working closely with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and Enforcement on regulatory administration activities to avoid duplication.

EC conducted over 100 emissions tests on 89 vehicles and engines resulting in over 50 referrals to Enforcement. EC also collaborated with the US EPA in testing vehicles and engines and in sharing results.

EC officials participated in meetings of the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations and of its working group on pollution and energy in support of the United Nation’s “Agreement Concerning the Establishing of Global Technical Regulations for Wheeled Vehicles, Equipment and Parts which can be fitted and/or used on Wheeled Vehicles”, to which Canada is a signatory.

The Clean Air Regulatory Agenda set out that Transport Canada would develop fuel consumption regulations for cars and light trucks under the Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act. In March 2009, EC was tasked to develop greenhouse gas emission regulations under Canadian Environmental Protection Act 1999. The department announced the development of regulations in April 2009 and a Notice of Intent was published in the Canada Gazette, Part I.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 31,474,967 $ 10,897,521
$ 7,072,653

 

Program: Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_2b

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Rail)
Continued to support the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Railway Association of Canada on emission reductions in the rail sector. The MOU, in force from 2006 to 2010, has delivered substantial reductions in air pollutant emissions. In 2008, there was an improvement of 23.3% in the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensity of total freight train operations, compared with the 1990 baseline.

TC supported preparation of the annual Locomotive Emissions Monitoring report for 2008. The 2008 report is expected to be released in mid 2010. Furthermore, the department continued work on the development of locomotive emission regulations for 2011 under the Railway Safety Act.

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Ships)
TC continued technical consultations to develop regulations under the Canada Shipping Act 2001 to implement stricter standards for air pollutant emissions.

The department supported the development of a North American Emission Control Area, in collaboration with the United States and France, including presenting the proposal at the International Maritime Organization. In addition, the department continued its participation at the International Maritime Organization to advance uniform, global measures to reduce GHGs from marine vessels.

Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Motor Vehicles)
Responsibility for the development of air emission regulations for light-duty vehicles was transferred to Environment Canada effective April 1, 2009. In 2009-2010, TC launched two initiatives to improve data and modeling:

  • Development of a comprehensive on-road vehicle fleet database to facilitate policy analysis, using primary information from existing data sources; and
  • Development of the TC Transportation Energy Use and Emissions Model , which covers all modes of transportation. The model now includes a light-duty vehicles choice module that was developed in order to analyze non-regulatory initiatives for new vehicles, such as economic incentives.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 19,170,216
$ 3,715,603 $ 2,263,577

 

Program: Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_2c

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

In April, 2009, the Government of Canada changed its regulatory approach for light duty vehicles from that of using the Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act to using the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA), 1999. Transfer of the regulations under CEPA in 2009 was considered the preferred approach as the emphasis shifted from fuel consumption to tailpipe emissions, an approach that was more in line with domestic policy goals. This decision resulted in responsibility for these regulations being transferred from Transport Canada to Environment Canada (EC).

In 2009-2010, Natural Resources Canada reviewed the labelling requirements for new vehicles under a regulatory regime and developed and presented options for EC to consider. Draft regulations were published by EC in the Canada Gazette, Part I, in April 2010, but did not include specific labelling provisions.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 3,200,000
$ 400,000 $ 344,628

 

Program: Consumer and Commercial Products Regulatory

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_3a

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Two regulations controlling Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) concentrations in automotive refinishing products and architectural coatings were finalized in Canada Gazette II, and will contribute to reduction in the formation of ground-level ozone and smog in Canada. The third regulation that will limit emissions from products was published as a proposal in Canada Gazette I in 2008 and will be finalized in 2010-2011.

Other categories of consumer and commercial products were analyzed for inclusion in the longer term Federal Agenda for VOC reductions. Consultations on this approach were held in March 2010 which will inform the identification of the next group of consumer and commercial products to target for VOC reductions.

Participated in the update of the Canadian Standard Association performance standards for wood burning appliances and completed technical studies to improve the Department’s understanding of this industry.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 12,000,000
$ 3,260,000 $ 2,232,712

 

Program: Consumer and Commercial Products Regulatory

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_3b

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

  • Implementation of Amendment 10 was monitored with particular attention paid to the requirements concerning home heating systems and light bulb labelling requirements.
  • Consultation with the light industry and stakeholders continued with respect to the coming into force of the light bulb standard in 2012.
  • Analyses and consultation with respect to Amendment 11 were completed and pre- publication is expected in June 2010.
  • Compliance and monitoring activities were continued for all products subject to standards, and regulated and voluntary labels.
  • ENERGY STAR registrations of participating companies reached over 1100; an increase of 10% over the previous reporting period.
  • Major product demonstrations occurred in the areas of street lighting, general area outdoor lighting and adaptive control for street lighting. A major review of standards that could be implemented in North American jurisdictions was conducted and 40 additional standards for the period up to 2020 were identified. Results were communicated to provinces and utilities and coordinated planning efforts continue.
  • In September 2009, amendments increasing the scope and flexibility of the Energy Efficiency Act came into force.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 32,000,000
$ 7,550,000 $ 7,578,076

 

Program: Indoor Air Quality Management Actions

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1.2, 3.1.6

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_4

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Indoor Air Quality Management Actions

Biological and chemical contaminants

Further understanding of the health impacts of exposure to indoor air contaminants (released from household products, building materials, combustion appliances, or entering the home from outside) is vital given that Canadians spend 90% of their time indoors.  Few tools are available to public health practitioners for guiding interventions aimed at improving indoor air quality and reducing negative health impacts. Specific key activities carried out in 2009-2010 to meet these objectives include:

  • Exposure studies investigating the levels and sources of indoor air contaminants in Canadian homes were conducted in Halifax and Edmonton which will be used, alongside data from previous residential studies conducted in other Canadian cities, to develop a national picture of Canadians' exposure to indoor pollutants and will inform the assessment of the need for management actions.
  • Testing program for formaldehyde levels in 800 homes was provided to homeowners who had installed a banned urea-formaldehyde foam insulation product.  Targeted information materials on health risks and recommended actions to reduce levels of formaldehyde were developed for homeowners.
  • Health Canada (HC) provided advice, based on expertise developed through conducting recent indoor exposure and monitoring studies and developing health risk assessments, to the World Health Organization (WHO) European working group on indoor air quality guidelines and multi-departmental committees on indoor air quality. This ongoing knowledge exchange will lead to: increased harmonization of standards and guideline development; minimization of duplication of effort to assess particular substances; and, provides the opportunity to assess the applicability of the WHO guidelines to the Canadian situation.
  • Health risk assessments and guideline development, including consideration of actions to reduce exposure, were undertaken for the following indoor air contaminants:
    • carbon monoxide and ozone - final guidelines completed;
    • toluene - proposed guideline completed;
    • fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, benzene, and naphthalene - assessments initiated;
    • Legionella and house dust mites – assessments initiated; and,
    • CO2 as an indicator of ventilation efficiency – initiated.
  • Content and messaging on indoor air pollutants, including mould and carbon monoxide was included as a key focus of HC’s new HazardCheck and First Nations Environmental Health Guide public awareness campaigns. 

Radon Strategy

In 2009-2010 the National Radon Laboratory built, maintained and managed the inventory, shipping, deployment and analysis of the radon detectors for the cross-Canada radon survey and federal building testing projects. The laboratory built and shipped 35,000 and analyzed 25,000 detectors in 2009-2010.

In 2009-2010 approximately 9000 participants were recruited for the cross-Canada radon survey. HC shipped out 9000 kits to the participants including instructions, a questionnaire and a radon detector. Approximately 75% were returned after the 3 month testing period.

In 2009-2010 HC completed over 60 radon stakeholder engagements with Non-Governmental Organizations, the health professional, real estate and building industry, other departments and levels of government and the public. Web traffic on the HC radon pages increased by more than 50% and over 200,000 radon brochures were distributed across Canada. Radon information is available at all Service Canada centres across Canada.

 A Canadian Certification program was initiated by HC for the certification of radon measurement and mitigation professionals, laboratories performing radon analysis and radon instrumentation.  The development of the Canadian program is expected to be completed by the end of 2010. Canada’s certification program is being developed in partnership with National Environment Health Association, National Radon Safety Board and the Standards Council of Canada.

  • Progress to date:
    • Canadian measurement and mitigation exams are both completed;
    • Course curriculum for measurement and mitigation is in development; and,
    • Engagement of Canadian training organizations to encourage course development and availability is underway.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 17,500,000 $ 5,478,000 $ 6,425,899

 

Program: Science in Support of Regulatory Activities and Accountability

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_5a

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Due to the delay in the peer-review process, the Summary for Policy-Makers of the Canadian Smog Assessment will be published in the summer of 2010. This assessment is the scientific underpinning of the development of the new National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter and ozone. It is also an Environment Canada (EC) deliverable to the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment. The Canadian Smog Assessment will be published in 2011.

Particulate Matter and Ozone ambient air maps were produced using 2001-2007 data from the National Air Pollution Surveillance network, Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring network and United States networks. 

EC expanded acid deposition monitoring and completed a large scale lake survey in western Canada to assess the sensitivity of this region to acid deposition and to determine the capacity of the lakes to withstand inputs of acid causing pollutants without harm to the ecosystem. (i.e., determine the critical loads). These critical load values define the Government of Canada target value for acid causing emissions; a value that should not be exceeded in western Canada.

In order to better define the air quality, human health and environmental impacts of domestic and international emissions, the National Air Pollution Surveillance network (an EC led federal-provincial monitoring network that focuses on urban air quality) continued to upgrade data management and monitoring systems, and enhanced analytical capacity; and the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring (CAPMoN) network (monitoring air quality at rural and background locations) continued to add new sites and additional analytical capacity.  These air quality networks provide information that is essential for “setting-the-baseline” to describe effectiveness of regulations and to evaluate the impact of past regulatory and policy decisions.

EC’s ability to measure air pollutants at high elevation has expanded in order to quantify transboundary contributions to Canada’s air quality from North American and global sources. 

Our understanding of population exposure to criteria air pollutants in South-Western Ontario continued to increase resulting in improvements to air quality models which allow for more accurate air quality forecasts and greater confidence for policy application.

EC completed a suite of food web (a network of organisms that are related through their role as prey or predator), waterbird and habitat studies assessing the levels and effects of acid-causing pollutants and mercury at sites located downwind of large, point-source emitters and background sites in order to "set-the-baseline" to assess the efficacy of proposed domestic and international acid-causing pollutants and mercury regulations.  

Improvements were made to the air quality models (AURAMS and GEM-MACH), specifically, these improvements increased the resolution of the models so that they could better address local emissions, introduced improvements in our understanding of chemical and physical interactions of pollutants in the atmosphere and improved our assessment of the impact of intercontinental transport of pollutants, which will help inform regulatory activities. A new prototype based on AURAMS was developed to assess impact of climate change on ozone and particle pollution in the context of the Canadian regulatory framework.

The improved Global Atmospheric Mercury Model was used to assess the impact of a range of regulatory options to address mercury release from coal-fired power plants and products from both domestic and international emitters on levels of mercury deposited in Canada.  This work supported domestic regulatory development and the development of Canada's position at the upcoming negotiations for a legally-binding mercury agreement under United Nations Environment Programme.

EC launched the 2012 Canadian Mercury Science Assessment which will be the first comprehensive national description of mercury in the Canadian environment.  The assessment is intended to inform decision-making by policy-makers and research managers and establish a baseline against which the effectiveness of domestic and international policy-making can be assessed. 

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 47,985,868 $ 16,913,673 $ 13,315,524

 

Program: Science in Support of Regulatory Activities and Accountability

Department

Health Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.1.2

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_5b

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

In 2009-2010 Health Canada (HC) conducted research and health risk assessments to better understand the impacts of air quality on the health of Canadians. By providing a better understanding of the sources and magnitude of the health effects of air pollution, this work will help in developing regulations that more effectively protect the health of Canadians, including vulnerable populations. Additionally, economic analysis of the social costs of air pollution, and consultation with industry and Non-Governmental Organizations, will help ensure that regulations are developed in a cost-effective manner, and that they provide net benefits to the quality of life of Canadians.  Specific key activities carried out in 2009-2010 to meet these objectives include the following:

  • HC collaborated with Environment Canada (EC), provinces/territories, industry and NGOs in the ongoing development of a national air quality management system.  Through these discussions, HC has been contributing to the development of industrial air pollution emission reduction targets, and national air quality objectives. As part of this process, HC developed a methodology to help set national air quality objectives for particulate matter (PM) and ozone based on the additional proportion of the Canadian population who would derive health benefits. HC is working with partners to determine appropriate levels for the objectives.
  • HC completed a thorough review of the health impacts of PM and ground level ozone.  Results of this review were summarised for inclusion in the Canadian Smog Assessment to be available in 2010. The assessment will provide Canadians and policy makers with a better understanding of the impacts of smog on human health in order to take action to reduce exposure.
  • Risk assessments of carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide were initiated. Once completed, these assessments will provide the health basis for revisions to existing ambient air quality guidelines, objectives, and standards.
  • HC initiated an assessment of the human health impacts associated with the production, transportation, storage and use of different biodiesel blends. In addition, through participation in an interdepartmental working group, and in collaboration with industry, HC continued to investigate the potential health impacts of different vehicle fuel additives and fuel characteristics. This ongoing work will help ensure that Canadian fuel standards work in harmony with US standards and that any possible health impacts are considered as new products are brought forward for introduction into the Canadian market.
  • Emerging greenhouse gas mitigation technologies were prioritized for assessment in consultation with governments, industry and academia. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) and the use of biomass in power generation were identified as key processes and assessments of these technologies have been initiated.  A review of CCS technologies applied to coal-fired power generation and their associated air pollutant emission factors was completed. An analysis of resulting air pollutant emissions and human exposures is underway. A review of biomass technologies used in Canada and development of associated emission factors for air pollutants was completed.
  • HC conducted a number of studies to determine the exposure of Canadians to different air pollutants, from different sources, and to study their impacts on human health. This longer-term work, often taking three to four years to complete, provides the basis for considering the need for management actions on individual pollutants and industrial sectors to improve the health of Canadians such as children and those with cardio-vascular or respiratory illnesses. These studies included:
    • A published science assessment of the human health impacts of airborne manganese.
    • A study in Windsor, Ontario, which determined that vehicle emissions are the primary source of human exposure to air pollution in the region.
    • A study in the Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia, which determined that 50% of all particulate matter in the region comes from wood smoke.
    • A traffic study in Toronto that found a positive relationship between long term cumulative exposure to pollution from vehicles, and the exacerbation of asthma in children.
    • A study in Montreal to estimate the impacts of emissions from oil refineries on the respiratory health of children continued. Other sector specific studies were initiated to assess the health impacts of emissions from the pulp & paper, electrical power generation, aluminum, iron & steel, and cement sectors.
    • A cohort study was set up which will use remote sensing to study the relationship between exposure to common smog pollutants (PM and ozone) and the incidence of cancer and premature mortality. An additional study is ongoing to investigate the relationship between particulate matter exposure and effects on the respiratory, cardiovascular, and nervous systems.
    • Based on findings of a possible association between appendicitis and air pollution, new research was initiated to look at the possible relationship between air pollution exposure and a broad range of health problems such as migraines, stroke, Chrohn’s disease, and serious skin conditions.
  • Economic studies were conducted to determine how illnesses caused by air pollution impact quality of life.  Studies included literature reviews on the economic costs of asthma development, and mould exposure. This research on socio-economic impacts will help ensure that air quality regulations are developed and implemented in a cost-effective manner.
  • HC applied the air quality benefits assessment tool (AQBAT) to assess the potential health and economic impacts of a number of proposed air quality regulations. The modelling tool was also updated to include more current economic and health research results. HC also used the Air Health Indicator (AHI) tool in order to track spatial and temporal changes in air quality and related health impacts. An AHI has been developed for ozone and for particulate matter, and refinement of the methodology used in the AHI is ongoing. 
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 71,300,000 $ 24,304,600 $ 20,751,732

 

Program: Emissions Reporting

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_6

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

The Greenhouse Gas National Inventory Report for 2007 was submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Secretariat in April 2009.

Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP) system was enhanced and migrated from Statistics Canada to Environment Canada (EC). In addition, Section 46 GHGRP data was published on the EC website in December 2009.

An internet-based information gathering tool was built to support electronic information gathering on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Canada. This tool is currently being considered as an option for gathering information on GHGs in cooperation with provinces and territories. This past fall, renewed consultations with the provinces were undertaken through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment to identify guiding principles to support the development of a single window system for reporting on GHGs.  A list of guiding principles was finalized in January 2010 and is used to develop bi-lateral agreements with Provinces. The use of a single window for submitting information on emissions will contribute towards reducing the reporting and data management burden on industry and government.

EC published the 2007 national emissions inventory for air pollutants and compiled 2008 data; and also published the 2008 facility level emissions for air pollutants compiled through the National Pollutant Releases Inventory.

The department submitted the compliant 2008 national emission summaries for air pollutants to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe as required by the reporting obligations ratified by Canada under the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. Overall, existing institutional capacity to deliver an enhanced monitoring, accounting and reporting system to produce a United Nations compliant national GHG inventory system and national inventory report was maintained.

Improved emission inventories, trends, and projections for air pollutants obtained through technical studies, emission estimation model improvements, and measurements.

Developed quantification, reporting and verification protocols for estimating air pollutant emissions from the aluminum, power generation and steel manufacturing sectors; and developed tools to accelerate the processing and the creation of the emission data files for the air quality models.

Collected facility-level emissions through an enhanced on-line application as part of the single window reporting system.

In close collaboration with sector experts, programs and enforcement services, the quality of the data reported under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act Section 71, Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Notice has been assessed for each implicated industrial sectors notice.

A Common Secured Protected B network infrastructure to manage, provide access, use and manipulate in a secure manner, the confidential information collected for CARA is currently under development.

Comparative analysis of quantification reporting and verification requirements specified in various North American mandatory GHG reporting programs (i.e., United States Environmental Protection Act Mandatory Reporting Rule, Western Climate Initiative, Alberta and other provinces) is on going.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 57,800,202 $ 16,325,127 $ 12,255,442

 

Program: Emissions Trading

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_7

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Trading Program Development

  • Environment Canada (EC) provided policy advice regarding greenhouse gases (GHGs) based on emerging United States policy and our assessment of potential implications for Canada. In addition, analytical and consultative preparatory work required for a national or linked North American GHG cap and trade system was done, primarily including the publication of draft rules for Canada’s Offset System for GHGs. This work also included policy analysis and consultation on potential compliance mechanisms for the regulatory framework, including a technology fund and pre-certified investment concepts.

Canada 's Kyoto Protocol (KP) National Registry

  • The Registry went into full production (i.e., "went live") with the International Transaction Log (ITL) in February 2010. Canada issued its first commitment period Assigned Amount Units and deposited them in the Government of Canada holding account in the national registry.  Canada paid its ITL fees for the 2009 and 2010 calendar years.
  • EC published a web page on its internet site providing general information on the National Registry, as well as account holder and transaction information as required by the KP.

Domestic Credit Tracking System (DCTS)

  • Because of the delay in implementing a Canadian GHG emissions trading system and the Offsets System, sufficient time was available in 2009-2010 to go beyond a “manual DCTS” and develop an on-line database tracking system for tradable GHG compliance units, such as allowances and Offset Credits. Thus, the department completed the design phase of the DCTS with the production of a functional specification, list of requirements and sample web site screen shots.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 32,656,213 $ 8,486,395 $ 3,387,888

 

Program: Enforcement advice and Reporting on Progress

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_8

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Receptor modelling study was conducted for two rural sites in Ontario and Quebec (Simcoe and Saint Anicet). The comparisons of urban and rural areas provide important information on the spatial variation of PM2.5 sources and the contributions of local and regional scale sources. Overall result of this research should support development of more effective control strategies for ambient pollutants.

In October 2009, Environment Canada hosted a national Particulate Matter (PM) Measurement meeting that was attended by over 30 participants representing 12 different Canadian and international monitoring jurisdictions. The meeting provided an update on progress towards transitioning the PM2.5 network to instruments that meet the National Air Pollution Surveillance Network-Canada-Wide Standard (NAPS-CWS) performance criterion for PM2.5, and provided recommendations for a national method for transforming data from instruments that do not meet this criterion.  As a follow-up, it was also recommended that an ad hoc group (NAPS agencies) develop transformation methods for consideration by NAPS and the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment in the near future.

The program did not proceed with the other planned initiatives due to a reorientation of government policy, engaging instead in policy and support activities to develop the basis for an accountable comprehensive national approach to air emissions reduction.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 7,000,000 $ 1,742,000 $ 886,797

 

Program: Policy Development, Analysis and Coordination

Department

Environment Canada

Departmental Program Activity

3.3 Clean Air Program

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CARA_9

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

In terms of policy development, progress was also made in completing much of the analytical and consultative preparatory work required for a North American cap and trade system.

Preliminary policy analysis was undertaken on equivalency agreements and the potential for agreements to be based on equivalency of environmental outcomes.  Additional analysis examined existing control programs (regulations, permitting/approval processes, voluntary measures) in a number of provinces.

Analytical support to overall policy development produced several key deliverables.

  • An energy, emissions and economic baseline was developed to serve as a reference point for the analysis of proposed climate change policy and approaches. This baseline provided a consistent benchmark for the analysis of policy options.
  • The emissions and economic impacts of approaches to reduce emissions in selected industries (e.g., oil and gas, and electricity generation) and end-use sectors (e.g., passenger vehicles) were examined.  Analysis was also undertaken to support the Government’s revised goal of 17% below 2005 by 2020.

Analysis of alternative options for a North American cap-and-trade regime was also undertaken.

Economic profiles for key industrial sectors were developed (Pipelines; Pulp and Paper; Chemical; Petroleum Refining; Cement; Lime & Gypsum; Iron and Steel; Aluminum and Smelting; Iron Ore, Potash and Other Mining; Conventional Oil and Gas; Electricity Generation; Oil Sands).

Economic analysis was provided to support the development of Regulatory Assessment Impact Statements for biofuels and passenger cars and light-duty trucks.

As part of the joint work to develop an alternative framework for managing air quality, consultations with all provinces and territories via the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment committees and Non-Governmental Organizations via the Canadian Environmental Network raised awareness of three elements of the alternative framework and the detailed options under consideration. The proposed framework includes a foundation of industrial emission requirements for sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter. Analysis was undertaken to estimate the potential benefits from implementing the preliminary emission targets relative to the targets proposed under the 2007 framework.

Canada participated in the North American Air Working Group of the Committee for Environmental Cooperation.

Canada has continued to engage the United States on national and regional levels on the transboundary movement of air pollution.

Internationally, Canada has made progress in participating in negotiations on amendments to the 1999 Gothenburg Protocol.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 10,078,576 $ 2,692,838 $ 1,662,616

 

 

Theme: Clean Energy

Lead Department

Natural Resources Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Indian and Northern Affairs

Expected Results from Theme's Programming

Immediate Outcomes

  • Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CACs).
  • Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
  • Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.
  • Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

Final Outcomes

  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

2009-2010 Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CE_Theme

2009-2010 Achieved Results

Programs under the Clean Energy Theme continued to surpass expectations in 2009-2010. Investments achieved concrete benefits for Canadians by continuing to increase energy efficiency and renewable energy production, and by promoting emerging technologies. These achievements have resulted in tangible GHG reductions across the country. 

Immediate Outcomes

As detailed in the program reports, the Clean Energy Theme experienced unprecedented demand for its products and services:

  • 49 new contribution agreements were signed under the ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program, half of the program’s 3-year total of 98.
  • More than 1000 industrial energy managers, more than 6,500 professionals in the building and housing industries, and more than 1900 representatives from small and medium organizations participated in information sessions, workshops and training regarding energy efficiency this year.
  • 30 renewable energy, energy efficiency and community energy planning workshops were supported in 29 Aboriginal and northern communities, more than in years past.
  • More than 86,000 calls were made to Service Canada regarding the ecoENERGY Retrofit Program, and the program has processed more than 12,000 emails received through contact websites.
  • Domestic and international stakeholders benefitted from products developed in whole or in part by the Clean Energy Theme, including a wind technology roadmap, an Off-Grid Communities Framework, information on emerging technologies, building and housing codes, the Carbon Budget Model, energy models, energy efficiency training tools, and others. 
  • The Theme contributed to such Government of Canada reports as “Canada’s 5th National Communication on Climate Change: 2010,” “Canada’s National Inventory Report 1990-2008,” and “A Climate Change Plan for the Purposes of the Kyoto Protocol Implementation Act, 2009.”
  • It supported its 2009-2010 achievements with strategic policy advice, analytical products and communications support to Natural Resources Canada and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada senior officials and Ministers to support their decision-making, and by accurately reporting on Clean Energy activities through the HMARF and other government reports. 

Intermediate Outcomes

Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHG and air pollutant emissions:

  • As a result of the Clean Energy programs, Canadians are purchasing more energy efficient products for their homes. More than 275,000 homeowners have received grants under the ecoENERGY Retrofit – Homes program as of the end of 2009-2010, and the energy-efficient upgrades they have made will reduce their annual energy consumption by 22%.  The total as of the end of 2008-2009 was 94,000.
  • The way buildings and houses are marketed is changing.  More than half a million new and existing homes have been rated and labelled for energy efficiency under the ecoENERGY programs, which will help to steer the Canadian housing market toward increased efficiency.  As well, 77% of new LEED-certified (Leadership in Energy Efficient Design) buildings have been certified using the ecoENERGY for Building and Houses program’s Design Validation methodology.
  • Federal Clean Energy programs are working collaboratively with provincial and territorial governments.  All but one territory fully or partially match federal home retrofit grant contributions, facilitating the adoption of energy efficient products by homeowners. As well, six provinces have announced changes to their housing codes that will make them more energy efficient.
  • Business owners have also been engaged on energy efficiency. This year, small and medium organization signed 517 contribution agreements for energy efficient upgrades, and more than 6,000 building industry professionals participated in training on energy efficient tools and practices.  As well, a survey has shown that most participants in the Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC) use the network and the CIPEC tools to implement energy efficiency measures. More than 2,200 companies are registered CIPEC Leaders; 321 joined in 2009-2010, the most yet in a single year under the ecoENERGY for Industry program. 
  • Aboriginal and northern communities have been active on clean energy too.  Support from the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program has helped 10 projects be successfully commissioned. These projects are helping to increase renewable energy production and increase energy efficiency in Aboriginal and northern communities. 

Adoption of renewable energy projects and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs:

  • The ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program saw 26 of its projects commissioned this year, which has increased the renewable energy capacity in Canada by 1042.6 megawatts (MW) and will receive approximately $338 million in federal support. Overall, 55 of the 98 projects with contribution agreements under the program have been commissioned to date. These 55 represent an increase in Canadian renewable energy capacity of more than 2,600 MW, and the installations have produced 8.2 terawatts (TWh) of renewable electricity to date.
  • Interest in the ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat program remained very high in 2009-2010. The program supported the installation of 283 solar thermal systems in the institutional, commercial and industrial sectors, more than in years previous and greatly exceeding the planned target of 175. In the residential sector, 466 systems were installed this year, bringing the program total up to 563. In addition, a national survey this year indicated that the geoexchange industry grew by 65% in 2009 compared to 2007.
  • The ecoENERGY Technology Initiative supported the demonstration of hydrogen fuel cells, with 20 fuel cell buses operating in Vancouver’s Olympic Village during the 2010 Winter Olympics. These buses are expected to operate for up to 20 years.
  • The renewable programs met all their Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities commitments except for one: delays in the commissioning of some projects supported by the ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program resulted in less than 3,000 MW commissioned in total. The delayed projects are expected to be commissioned in 2010-2011 instead.

Final Outcomes

The Clean Energy programs have resulted in tangible reductions of GHG emissions. 

  • The ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses, Retrofit, and Industry programs collectively reduced emissions by an estimated 3.22 megatonnes (Mt) in 2009-2010.
  • In 2009-2010, commissioned projects in the ecoENERGY for Renewable Power and Heat programs resulted in 2.94 Mt of GHG reductions.

2009-2010 Successes

Programs in the Clean Energy Theme continued to be highly visible and popular in 2009-2010.

  • The ecoENERGY Retrofit – Homes program has now reached one in twenty existing households and is accessible in all regions of Canada, with an average energy savings of 22% and 3 tonnes per house.  Demand for the program was so strong that the budget was increased five-fold before intake was completed in March 2010. The Small and Medium Organizations component of the program was initially targeting 800 projects over 4 years, but that target has been exceeded after only 3 years with 848 projects approved to date as of March 31, 2010.
  • In 2009, the United States recognized the success of the ecoENERGY for Industry program’s CIPEC industry-government partnership model. It received the American Council for Energy-Efficient Economy award for Champion of Energy Efficiency in Industry.
  • Interest in the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program continues to build, evidenced through inquiries received from Aboriginal and northern communities, federal programs, provincial and territorial governments, industry and utilities. It is expected that the Program will be fully subscribed by November 2010.
  • Scientific research this year under the ecoENERGY Technology Initiative has been used to inform codes, standards and regulations facilitating the adoption of new technology. One such example is the changes to be incorporate in the Canadian Electrical Code, that will reduce the risk of investing in wind energy generation.
  • The Clean Energy programs were featured in several major government reports released in 2009-2010. These included “Canada’s 5th National Communication on Climate Change: 2010” and “A Climate Change Plan for the Purposes of the Kyoto Protocol Implementation Act, 2009.”
  • Senior officials from Canadian provinces and from major GHG emitting countries (US, Russia, China and Brazil) were briefed on Canada’s approach to forest carbon monitoring. As well, the Clean Energy theme assisted Russia to successfully undertake national-scale analyses (>700 million hectares) using a Canadian modelling tool.

2009-2010 Risks and Challenges

  • Complementary programs in provinces have helped to increase the visibility and reach of federal Clean Energy initiatives, but this increased interest can pose a challenge for the program resources. This has been the experience of the Retrofit-Homes and Aboriginal and Northern Communities programs. 
  • The completion of the pre-retrofit evaluation phase of the ecoENERGY Retrofit – Homes program has made the retention of the energy advisor network a challenge. Advisors are needed to ensure that homeowners have access to post-retrofit assessments until March 31, 2011.
  • The economic downturn posed a challenge to some Clean Energy programs, as some industrial participants were not in a position to take advantage of federal incentives. In the case of the ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat program, however, complementary provincial programs and an increase to the maximum federal incentive per project helped to keep demand strong. 
Theme's total funding approved under the CAA Theme's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Theme's Actual Spending in 2009-2010 2009-2010 Theme Actual Spending Reported within the Economic Action Plan (EAP)
$ 1,462,000,000 $ 446,255,606 $ 433,767,156

$ 231,653,448 (ecoENERGY Retrofit Program)

 

Program: ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CE_1

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

The ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses program supports code development, rating, labelling and training to encourage the construction and retrofit of energy efficient houses and buildings. The program was launched in 2007-2008.

Immediate Outcomes

Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CACs).

  • Over 25 provincial/territorial/municipal and utilities and other industry stakeholders offer complementary new and existing housing programs that build on the core tools developed at Natural Resources Canada.
  • As of the end of 2009-2010 six provinces have announced changes to their housing codes to achieve the EnerGuide Rating System 80 level by 2012.  
  • The Buildings component supported making the Model National Energy Code for Buildings 2011 25% more stringent than the 1997 reference document with 11 of the 13 provinces and territories participating in the process.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • In 2009-2010 over 529,000 existing homes and 12,000 new homes were rated and labelled. Labelling provides potential home buyers with information regarding the energy efficiency rating of a house. Providing this information makes energy efficient homes relatively more visible and attractive, and steers the market toward increased efficiency. The number of homes labelled annually has steadily increased over the course of the program, given that 180,000 existing and 11,500 new homes were rated and labelled in 2008-2009.
  • Seven pilot benchmarking/labelling projects are currently underway with organizations across Canada. Since the launch of the program, 359 labels have been issued as part of the pilot program. 
  • A program for commissioning and re-commissioning commercial/institutional buildings to ensure that buildings operate in an energy efficient manner was discussed at the Energy and Mines Ministers meeting in 2009.
  • Energy efficient practices for buildings and homes were promoted via 147 communications and marketing products, including trade/association publications websites, communiqués, HeadsUP Newsletters, and brochures.
  • In 2009-2010, more than 1700 building professionals took part in technical support workshops and over 4700 housing professionals, builders, and energy advisors were trained on software tools and energy efficiency techniques. This greatly exceeds the program goal of 3500 professionals trained per year. 
  • In 2009-2010, the program delivered 285 workshops to building and housing professionals (exceeding a program target of 205 workshops for the year). 

Final Outcomes

Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

  • Since program inception, an estimated 1.07 megatonnes of GHGs were reduced as the result of this program.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 61,000,000 $ 16,533,000 $16,308,095

 

Program: ecoENERGY Retrofit

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CE_2

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

The ecoENERGY Retrofit Initiative provides grants to homeowners (Homes component) and transfer payments to owners of small and medium organizations (SMO component) for energy efficiency retrofits. The program was launched in 2007-2008.

Immediate Outcomes

Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CACs).

  • At the end of 2009-2010, agreements had been signed with nine provinces, two territories and 8 utilities for the sharing of information and administrative support tools in order to enable a single point of entry for homeowners wanting information to participate in joint or collaborative initiatives.
  • All regions of Canada, except one territory, have full or partially matching programs that provide homeowners with seamless access to both orders of government support for home retrofits.

Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • As of March 31st, 2010, more than 275,000 homeowners received grants under the ecoENERGY Retrofit-Homes program by completing a pre-retrofit evaluation and thus received recommendations specific to their home on how to reduce energy consumption and which new technologies could be incorporated in their retrofit plans.

Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • As of the end of 2009-2010, approximately 25% of Retrofit-Homes participants installed renewable energy technologies and/or water conservation equipment. This is an improvement on the approximately 20% of Retrofit-Homes participants who installed water conservation equipment and/or renewable energy technologies in 2008-2009.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • In 2009-2010 alone, over 86,000 calls were responded to by Service Canada, in addition to an unrecorded number of emails to various contact websites, of which 12,000 have been processed. By comparison, over 48,000 calls were received in 2008-2009.
  • In 2009-2010, over 1900 participants attended SMO info sessions.

Intermediate Outcomes

Adoption of energy efficiency products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • As of the end of 2009-2010, over 275,000 homeowners received grants in support of energy efficiency upgrades that will reduce their annual energy consumption by 22% and corresponding CO2 emissions by 3 tonnes per house per year. Grants averaged $1,390 per household in 2009-2010, compared to an average of $1,305 over the life of the program.
  • 517 contribution agreements were signed in 2009-2010 with SMOs in support of energy efficiency upgrades. (SMOs have fewer than 500 employees or less than 20,000 square metres in their buildings.) Last year, the program signed 279 agreements with SMOs.

Final Outcomes

Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

  • As of the end of 2009-2010, the ecoENERGY Retrofit program has resulted in an estimated 1.05 Megatonnes of GHG savings (0.90 Mt from Retrofit-Homes; 0.156 Mt from Retrofit-SMO).
Total Funding Approved under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010 Actual Spending in 2009-2010 within Economic Action Plan (EAP)
$ 805,000,000 $ 291,897,900 $ 290,045,555 $231,653,448

 

Program: ecoENERGY for Industry

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CE_3

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

The ecoENERGY for Industry program provides information and tools to encourage the accelerated deployment of energy-saving investments by industry. The program was launched in 2007-2008.

Immediate Outcomes

Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of Greenhouses Gases (GHGs) and Criteria Air Contaminants (CACs).

  • In fiscal year 2009-2010, 321 new companies registered their commitment to improved energy efficiency and became Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC) leaders. In comparison, 191 and 156 companies joined CIPEC in 2008-2009 and 2007-2008 respectively. Over 2,200 companies are registered CIPEC Leaders.
  • 35 network meeting were held in 2009-2010, and 77 meetings were held in 2008-2009. In both years, the target of 30 network meetings was exceeded.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • In fiscal year 2009-2010, 1,060 industrial energy managers attended "Dollars to $ense" workshops. By comparison, 760 industrial energy managers attended Dollars to $ense workshops in 2008-2009. These workshops provide information on finding and realizing energy savings. Attending workshops is one facet of CIPEC participation.
  • Three benchmarking studies, technical guides and other tools were developed in 2009-2010, leading to improved energy efficiency in Canadian Industry, reaching the yearly target. Six tools were created in 2008-2009.

Intermediate Outcomes

Adoption of energy efficiency products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs

  • A survey of the 156 new CIPEC Leaders from 2007-2008, the first year of the ecoENERGY Industry program, indicated that:
    • Of the new Corporate members that registered their corporate energy efficiency commitments, 83% have energy reduction targets;
    • 83% of the respondents indicated an increase in level of awareness and knowledge of energy savings opportunities and practices in their companies as a result of the CIPEC tools and services; and
    • 74% of the respondents indicated CIPEC tools and services resulted in the implementation of energy efficiency measures by their companies.
  • Five advanced energy assessment studies (Process Integration and Computational Fluid Dynamics studies) were funded in 2009-2010 with the objective of identifying energy-saving opportunities. To date, 24 of these energy assessment studies have been completed. The target for the program by the end of March 2011 is 36 studies. Industry feedback shows that these studies identify energy savings of 10-25%.
  • The program funded 3 data and analysis studies in 2009-2010: an Impact Attribution Study, Upstream Oil and Gas Study, and Electricity Generation Study.

Final Outcomes

Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.

  • Since program inception, ecoENERGY for Industry has led to an estimated 1.1 Megatonnes of GHG savings, which falls in the target range of 0.4-1.7 Mt GHGs. The lower end of the target range includes only those industries which are not slated for GHG regulations. The upper end of the target range includes all industries.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 18,000,000 $ 4,300,000 $ 4,348,323

 

Program: ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CE_5

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

The ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat program provides incentives and training and supports standards development to promote the increased use of renewable energy technologies in space heating and cooling and water heating applications in buildings.

Immediate Outcomes

Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CACs).

  • 3 contribution agreements for residential pilot projects were signed in 2009-2010. Combined with the 11 signed in 2008-2009, the Program had 14 contribution agreements in place at the end of 2009-2010, surpassing the planned target of 8 contribution agreements. If all of the committed systems are installed, it will result in 6,100 solar domestic water heaters by the end of 2010-2011. However, due to regulatory issues and the impact of the changes to the ecoENERGY Retrofit – Houses program, discussed below, the residential pilot incentive is now expected to see the installation of only 3000 systems by the end of the program on March 31, 2011.
  • In the industrial/commercial/institutional (ICI) sectors, 252 contribution agreements were signed in 2009-2010. Combined with those signed previously, 831 contribution agreements have been signed and these will lead to the installation of 972 systems, surpassing the Program target of 700 systems. Note that some contribution agreements cover more than one system.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • New versions of the Canada Standards Association (CSA) F379 and F383 standards were published in 2008-2009. In 2009-2010, amended versions of CSA F379 and F383 were developed, but publication of the amended standards will be in 2010-2011. Significant development of a new version of F378 took place in 2009-2010 and publication in 2010-2011 is expected. F379 is a CSA standard for packaged solar domestic hot water equipment testing and F383 details how the systems should be installed.
  • Since program inception, agreements have been signed with 9 companies for the certification of domestic solar water heating systems. These agreements are intended to defray the costs for these certifications and encourage growth within the industry. Two of these systems were certified in 2009-2010, meeting the planned target and bringing the total to 5 certified systems. Also, one of the previously certified systems added a double-wall heat exchanger model to their certification listing. In certain jurisdictions in Canada, British Columbia for one, building inspectors require double-wall heat exchangers.
  • Enerpool and Watsun software design tools were upgraded, meeting the planned target. Upgrading of the Swift software is nearing completion. These tools provide system designers with realistic predictions of performance of solar thermal systems prior to purchase and construction, and allow the impact of design choices to be evaluated in advance. In this way, the tools lead to the application of better performing, more cost-effective systems.
  • Three occupational standards for designers and installers were developed and published in 2009-2010. These standards form the basis for the development of quality solar thermal, photovoltaic and geoexchange training and certification programs.

Intermediate Outcomes

Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • 283 solar thermal systems were installed in the ICI sectors in 2009-2010 (155 solar air systems and 128 solar water systems). This is compared to 259 (178 solar air, 81 solar water) systems were installed in 2008-2009, and 195 (171 solar air, 24 solar water) systems installed in 2007-2008.
  • The planned target of 175 systems was met.
  • 466 systems were installed as part of the residential pilot projects in 2009-2010. An additional 97 were installed in 2008-2009 bring the total to 563 systems.
  • An annual national survey was completed for the solar thermal and geoexchange industries. This survey indicated a growth of 65% for the geoexchange industry in 2009 over 2007.

Final Outcomes

Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities

  • The systems installed under the program in 2009-2010 are expected to result in energy savings of 90,278 gigajoules (GJ)/year, which translates to 8.56 kilotonnes (Kt) of GHG reductions per year. In 2008-2009 a different mix of energy sources displaced (natural gas, propane or electricity) resulted in that year’s energy saving of 91,018 GJ yield 5.5 Kt of GHG reductions.
  • This exceeds the planned target of 0.09 petajoules (90,000 GJ) worth of energy savings and a reduction of approximately 5 Kt of GHG emissions.
  • By comparison, the systems installed under the program in 2008-2009 and 2007-2008 are expected to result in annual savings of 91,018 GJ of energy and 5.5 Kt of GHGs, and 52,236 GJ of energy 3.3 kt of GHGs respectively.
  • To date, the program is estimated to save an estimated 233,532 GJ of energy and 17.36 kt of GHGs per year.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 36,000,000 $ 8,090,000 $ 6,849,640

 

Program: ecoENERGY for Renewable Power

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CE_4

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

The ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program provides power production incentives to support emerging renewable energy sources (e.g., wind, hydro, solar, biomass). Projects supported through this program include, for example, wind energy projects larger than 1 megawatts (MW). Incentives continue up to 2021.

Immediate Outcomes

Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CACs).

  • 20 new notices of application were registered between April 1, 2009 and March 31, 2010, for a total of 239 registered projects under the program to date. By comparison, the program received 68 notices of application in 2008-2009.
  • 49 new contribution agreements with power production companies were signed during the year, representing projects that will generate 1,660 MW of new renewable power capacity in Canada and 5,032 gigawatt hours (GWh) per year of additional production. In 2008-2009, the program signed 40 contribution agreements. As of the end of 2009-2010, the program had signed contribution agreements with 98 proponents in total.

Intermediate Outcomes

Increased production of clean electricity from renewable sources such as wind, biomass, hydro and solar energy resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • 26 projects were commissioned in 2009-2010. These have increased the renewable energy capacity in Canada by 1042.6 MW and will receive approximately $338 million in support under the ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program, thereby exceeding the planned target. Projects commissioned in 2008-2009 represented 849 MW of capacity.
  • The 26 projects commissioned this year are expected to generate approximately 3.4 terawatt hours (TWh) of electricity annually.
  • Overall, 55 of the program’s 98 projects with signed agreements have been commissioned as of the end of 2009-2010, representing 2634.6 MW in generating capacity. These commissioned projects have generated 8.2 TWh of low-impact renewable energy since program inception (includes full yearly production from 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 and partial production in fiscal year 2009-2010).
  • The program has committed approximately $821 million of incentive support to its 55 commissioned projects. The 98 signed contribution agreements represent an anticipated $1.346 billion of federal funding.

Final Outcomes

Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean electricity production

  • The 26 projects commissioned this year are expected to avoid 1.58 megatonnes (Mt) of CO2 equivalent annually during each of the ten years they will receive the incentive.
  • The expected GHG reduction from all 55 commissioned projects during 2009-2010 was 2.92 Mt of CO2 equivalent, based on annual production from projects commissioned in 2007-2008 and 2008-2009, and partial production of projects commissioned in 2009-2010. When all 55 commissioned projects are producing for a full year, the expected annual GHG emission reductions will be about 3.83 Mt/year or 38.3 Mt over 10 years.
  • Once all 98 projects are commissioned, the expected GHG emission reductions will be about 6.27 Mt per year. This would be in line with the program target to reduce GHG emissions by 6 - 6.7 Mt per year by 2012.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$276,000,000 $67,214,000 $59,076,622

 

Program: ecoENERGY Technology Initiative

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CE_6

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

The ecoENERGY for Technology Initiative (ecoETI) supports the research, development and demonstration of clean energy technologies (e.g., carbon capture and storage (CCS), hydrogen, and biomass).

Immediate Outcomes

Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CACs).

  • ecoETI has completed all calls for proposals and its funds are fully committed. Contribution agreements for eight carbon capture and storage projects (in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan) have been signed, and all projects are now underway in the engineering and storage characterization stage.

Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • Significant progress in broad range of research and development projects to reduce technical (and other) risks in the areas of low emission industrial processes, energy efficient built environment, clean transportation systems, distributed power generation, sustainable bioenergy, and clean coal and CCS. For example:
    • Commencement of front-end engineering studies and demonstrations of integrated carbon capture and storage projects in partnership with the private sector and provincial agencies. The Capital Power FEED (Front End Engineering Design) project is complete.
    • Completion of a successful wind technology roadmap that will set out guidelines for future federal involvement in the technical development of wind energy in Canada, including utility offshore wind systems.
    • Progress has been achieved on production of inventories of existing, new, and opportunity forest and agriculture biomass resources, in a single database (GIS-based web portal).
    • Demonstration and integration of pre-commercial hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and infrastructure for successful vehicle demonstration fleet, including 20 fuel cell Olympic Village hydrogen buses now in regular service which are expected to operate for up to 20 years.
    • Development of tools, improved process design, bench scale testing, and partner site validation to reduce the energy/emissions footprint for industry and 13 projects are now underway.
    • Seven Bitumen Oil and Gas projects – related primarily to tailings technologies, water management, extraction processes, and air emissions – are progressing as scheduled and are expected to be completed in 2010‑2011.
    • Successful determination of thermodynamic parameters governing hydrocarbon partitioning, and quantification of naphtha in the tailings fractions progressing towards improvement of solvent recovery systems in oil sands operations and consequently improved air quality through reduced loss of Volitile Organic Compounds to the atmosphere.
    • Progress has begun on implementation of partnerships with municipalities, builders and developers covering elements of planning and construction of highly energy efficient buildings and communities through the successful negotiation of the ecoEquilibrium Communities initiative with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. Projects will cover early stage community planning as well as building construction projects.
    • Produced many science and technology publications, reports and workshops, targeted at stakeholders operating at the next stage of the innovation continuum.
    • Development of Community Energy Solutions Roadmap on behalf of the Demand Side Management Working Group of the Council of Energy Ministers. Roadmap was released in Fall 2009.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 226,440,000 $ 48,172,706 $ 48,166,167

 

Program: Policy, Communications, Monitoring and Reporting

Department

Natural Resources Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Energy

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/#CE_7

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Immediate Outcomes

Policy
Policy and monitoring that supports greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CACs).

  • Provided timely strategic advice, information, analysis of policy options and recommendations to the Minister and senior officials on climate change and clean air issues in support of policy and program development and decision making.
  • Provided high-quality advice and recommendations that influenced refinements to the Regulatory Framework for Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions.
  • Continued to provide policy and economic analysis and advice on carbon capture and storage (CCS). Also facilitated collaboration among CCS stakeholders such as Natural Resource Canada (NRCan) officials, other federal departments, provincial governments, non-governmental organizations, and CCS project proponents.
  • Worked closely with Environment Canada (EC) and other federal departments and agencies on climate change modelling activities; reference case development on GHG emissions, and energy production and consumption; and sectoral economic assessments for the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda.
  • Coordinated and led departmental input to major Government of Canada reports, including “Canada’s 5th National Report on Climate Change” and “A Climate Change Plan for the Purposes of the Kyoto Protocol Implementation Act.”
  • Led horizontal reporting for NRCan’s Clean Air Agenda programs.
  • Prepared a new projection of Canada's energy demand and supply to 2030 titled “Canada's Energy Outlook to 2030: The Reference Case 2010.” The report has benefited from extensive consultations with different sectors of NRCan, other federal departments, provincial and territorial government, some utilities and major industry associations.
  • Continued to enhance NRCan's modelling capacity (MAPLE-C).

Strategic Communications
Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • 96 announcements including ministerial events related to ecoENERGY programming were organized. Drafted 63 sets of speaking notes to support these events.
  • Production of a series of fact sheets on CCS.
  • Responded to 112 media calls related to the ecoENERGY Initiatives.
  • Development of web information to communicate energy conservation tips to the general public.
  • Effective issues management including pro-active issues identification and planning and implementation of appropriate communications responses.
  • Production of marketing and outreach material to support the expansion of the ecoENERGY Retrofit-Homes initiative.

Forest Policy and Monitoring
Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.

  • Strong interest continued in use of the Carbon Budget Model (CBM-CFS3) with total downloads of the model since it first became available rising to over 675 from 500 in 2008-2009, and the number of countries involved rising from 42 to 45.
  • Three workshops on the model in 2009-2010 were attended by 57 trainees from 5 countries (Canada, Mexico, Italy, Spain, and South Korea). Interest in these training workshops has become exceptionally high in Canada, with all seats booked within days of announcement, mostly by Canadian forest industry participants.
  • Joint projects continued with Russia and Mexico on using the model, and new projects were initiated with Italy, South Korea, and Australia (Tasmania).
  • Invited keynote presentations were given at international carbon workshops in Japan, China, and Korea as well as invited presentations at Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) experts meetings in Brazil and Japan.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • Eleven high impact publications in scientific literature.
  • Canadian Forest Service (CFS) science and policy experts engaged stakeholders directly to encourage forest sector GHG mitigation action by giving numerous presentations and participating in meetings across Canada and internationally. As a result, interest in forest sector mitigation actions and awareness of the challenges and opportunities involved was greatly enhanced.
  • CFS scientists engaged the scientific community across Canada, in the United States, and around the world by taking on an increasingly leadership role in organizations, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the Global Network for Forest Science Cooperation, the International Boreal Forest Research Association, the International Energy Agency, Canadian Carbon Program, North American Carbon Program, and others. All provinces and territories were engaged to improve understanding of forest carbon, improve carbon monitoring and reporting, and to build capacity at the provincial/territorial level.

Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions.

  • Continued discussion and joint technical policy analysis with provinces and territories through the federal/provincial/territorial National Forest Sinks Committee, including initiation of a multi-year workplan to assess the potential and policy options related reducing emissions and increasing removals in Canada’s managed forest.
  • Analysis on-going to inform Canada’s negotiating position on rules for post-2012 international accounting for forests. Canadian leadership in developing improved accounting rules for the Land use, land-use change and forestry sector to incent greater mitigation activity was acknowledged both informally by negotiating teams from other United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) parties and indirectly by them having adopted Canadian approaches in their own analyses.
  • Provision of forest-related information on areas and GHG emissions and removals for 1990‑2008 to Environment Canada for inclusion in the 2010 National GHG inventory submission to the UNFCCC and Canada’s first national reporting accounting under the Kyoto Protocol (for the year 2008).
  • Canada’s National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System development continued, including ongoing migration toward state of the art data management and computing system architecture and improved protocols for exchange of data and information between CFS, EC, and Agriculture and Agri-Foods Canada to ensure the business needs of all three departments are met.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 24,560,000 $ 6,298,000 $ 5,169,053

 

Program: ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities

Department

Indian and Northern Affairs

Departmental Program Activity

Community Infrastructure

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CE_8

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program continues to provide support to Aboriginal and Northern communities working on clean energy projects, including the approximately 150 remote communities that rely on diesel power generation. Through funding agreements, the program equips Aboriginal and northern communities with the knowledge and tools to increase the energy efficiency of community infrastructure, to access renewable energy opportunities and to implement cost effective renewable energy projects. The 30 renewable energy, energy efficiency and community energy planning projects supported by the program in 2009-2010 will help to reduce the communities’ reliance on diesel fuel, lower their energy costs, contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CAC) in Canada, and most importantly, assume a role in improving the health of their members. Not only does the Program promote environmentally sustainable communities, but it provides funding to enable Aboriginal and northern communities to access economic development opportunities that will directly benefit their communities.

Immediate Outcomes

Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of (GHG and CACs.

  • In 2009-2010, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) provided $2.57 million in contributions to 30 renewable energy, energy efficiency and community energy planning projects within 29 of the approximately 650 Aboriginal and northern communities within Canada. By comparison, the program provided $2.69 million in contributions for 25 projects in 24 communities in 2008-2009. The 30 funded projects include 17 Renewable Energy projects, 7 Energy Efficiency projects, and 6 Community Energy Planning projects.
  • Funding contributions were provided for a range of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects. Examples of projects receiving funding include the installation of photovoltaic systems, waste heat recovery systems, and ground source heat pumps; wind energy and hydro generation projects.
  • As of March 31, 2010, a total of 76 projects in 64 Aboriginal and northern communities had received $7.3 million in federal funding through the Program. The 76 funded projects include 13 community energy planning projects, 14 energy efficiency projects, and 49 renewable energy projects.

Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use.

  • The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program continues to gain momentum. Since the beginning of the Program on April 1, 2007, the number of funding applications received has steadily increased: 24 applications in 2007-2008, 34 applications in 2008-2009, and 53 applications in 2009-2010. It is anticipated that the Program will again receive in excess of 50 applications during 2010-2011 and it is expected that the Program will be fully subscribed by November 2010.
  • In 2009-2010, 30 out of the 53 applications received were approved and received funding. These projects provided the resources for 29 communities, including 11 off-grid, to equip them with the knowledge and tools to increase energy efficiency and to access renewable energy opportunities within their communities. Since April 1, 2007, a total of 64 Aboriginal and northern communities have benefited from 76 projects funded by the program.
  • Interest in the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program continues to build, evidenced through inquiries received from Aboriginal and northern communities, federal programs, provincial and territorial governments, industry and utilities. It is anticipated that with rising global fuel costs and the associated energy sustainability challenges faced by Aboriginal and northern communities, the need for this type of programming will continue beyond March 31, 2011.
  • An Off-Grid Communities Framework was developed in 2009-2010, which will assist INAC to facilitate the implementation of future renewable energy and energy efficiency projects within the over 150 off-grid Aboriginal and northern communities. Departmental and National Off-Grid Communities working groups were established to discuss the challenges being faced by off-grid communities across Canada and collaborate on solutions to address the challenges. INAC co-chairs the National Off-Grid Communities Working Group with the Government of British Columbia and the National Research Council of Canada (NRC). Members of the working group include various sectors within INAC (headquarters and regional offices), federal departments and agencies (Natural Resources Canada, Industry Canada, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, Public Works and Government Services Canada), provincial and territorial governments, as well as Aboriginal and northern community members.
  • INAC’s Ontario regional office has developed a detailed workplan to address the large number of First Nations actively pursuing energy projects. First Nation interest in clean energy projects is due in part to the Ontario Green Energy Act which facilitates Aboriginal involvement and/or ownership in renewable energy projects. INAC’s funding provides critical early stage funding that allows First Nations to pursue environmentally beneficial energy projects.

Intermediate Outcomes

Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs. Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.

  • Of the renewable energy and energy efficiency projects funded since April 1, 2007, 10 have been successfully commissioned to date and it is anticipated that another 13 projects will be fully commissioned by the program end date of March 31, 2011. It is anticipated that the commissioned projects will result in reductions of GHG emissions of 0.001 Megatonnes (MT) during 2009 and another 0.009 Mt during 2010. These projects include renewable energy installations and energy efficiencies that are being incorporated into community infrastructure, such as recreational complexes, arenas, community centres, district heating and smart metering.

Final Outcomes

  • It is projected that the renewable energy and energy efficiency projects supported by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program in 2009-2010 will result in a reduction of 1.481 Mt CO2 (over a 20-year period) once the projects are commissioned. Since April 1, 2007, the total anticipated reduction of GHG emissions by projects funded by the program is 4.196 Mt (over a 20-year period). Once commissioned, these projects will create new sources of renewable power and reduce the reliance of Aboriginal and northern communities on fossil fuels and therefore result in a decrease of GHG emissions.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 15,000,000 $ 3,750,000 $ 3,803,701

 

Theme: Clean Transportation

Lead Department

Transport Canada

Federal Theme Partners

Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Expected Results from Theme's Programming

Immediate Outcomes

  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CACs);
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gases (GHG) or criteria air ccntaminants (CAC) or release of toxic substances.

Intermediate Outcomes

  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.

Final Outcomes

  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.

2009-2010 Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CT_Theme

2009-2010 Achieved Results

In 2009-2010, the Clean Transportation programs continued to address the challenges of pollution and GHG emissions from the movement of goods and people in Canada and they are on track to reduce emissions by almost 2.4 Megatonnes in 2012. The progress occurred despite the economic recession, which reduced the financial capacity of program stakeholders such as industry, municipal governments and non-governmental organizations. The Clean Transportation Theme focused on reducing financial and information barriers to the uptake of clean technologies and best practices.

Harmonization of regulations and standards also play an important role in reducing emissions. The Clean Transportation Theme programs contributed to the development of international environmental standards, practices and guidelines under the auspices of the International Marine Organization and the International Civil Aviation Organization. In addition, significant foundational work supported the implementation of heavy truck speed limiter regulations in two provinces.

More specifically, the Clean Transportation Theme programs have achieved significant results that are grouped under the following five outcome categories:

Informed positions on policies and programs

  • With the federal/provincial/territorial Sustainable Transportation Task Force, a national data strategy was launched to further develop the knowledge base of the transportation sector.
  • Two modules were added to the Transportation Energy Use and Emissions Model to enable the analysis of program and regulatory initiatives to improve light-duty passenger vehicle fuel efficiency and to assess the proposed regulation of railway emissions.
  • The goal to complete research studies on opportunities to reduce emissions from the trucking sector was met. Studies were completed on real-life experiences with idle-reduction options, the use of aerodynamic devices for heavy-duty trucks and the heavy-duty truck tires (examining tire traction in winter conditions and the purchasing process used by companies).
  • The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles program helped inform the development of new practices and codes and standards for advanced technology vehicles. For example, the program promoted the development of codes and standards to measure the exhaust emissions and fuel economy of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; developed Canadian performance data for battery electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid and clean diesel technologies to inform the development of regulations; and conducted a study on low-rolling resistance tires to inform the work of governments, tire manufacturers, industry and other stakeholders.

Increased uptake of emission-reducing technologies

  • The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles program tested and evaluated the environmental and safety performance of eight different advanced technology vehicles.
  • The implementation of new regulations in Ontario and Quebec to mandate the activation of heavy-duty trucks speed limiter (max 105km/h) was completed;
  • To date $6.5 million (M) was contributed to freight transportation organizations through the Freight Technology Incentive program to help them purchase and install proven emission-reducing technologies. Over 180 applications were received for the second round of funding, representing a three-fold increase from the first round and a significant expansion in the range of technologies to be addressed by the program.
  • The Port Metro Vancouver project to demonstrate shore-based power which allows cruise ships to shut down their electric generator engines was completed and results are being measured and documented.

Increased participation by the target audience in emission-reducing activities

  • The Vehicle Scrappage program provided incentives to consumers to retire 64,000 old, high-polluting vehicles of model year 1995 and earlier, resulting in a reduction of 2900 tonnes of smog-forming pollutants. This exceeded the target of 50,000 vehicles. The incentive cost to the Canadian government is about 7% of the equivalent cost to the United States government for a similar program that ran from July to August 2009. Fifty-seven per cent of the program participants said that the program prompted them to get rid of their vehicle sooner than they otherwise would have.
  • The ecoAUTO Rebate Program ended after the 2008 model year. The analysis conducted, based on existing surveys, indicates that during the ecoAUTO Rebate Program implementation period, Canadians became aware that there is a link between personal vehicle use and the environment, and that increasing the number of fuel‑efficient vehicles on the road will help both the environment and reduce their fuel costs.
  • The ecoENERGY for Fleets program exceeded its target by signing collaborative agreements under which the trucking industry will retrofit over 500 tractors and trailers with fuel efficient components to demonstrate their use in Canada. This is expected to save nearly 3 million litres of fuel and 7,000 tonnes of GHG emissions annually.

Increased capacity by the target audience to undertake emission-reducing initiatives

  • The ecoMobility program delivered several learning events and activities that reached at least 850 municipal practitioners of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) to improve their ability to implement and measure the effectiveness of TDM policies and programs.
  • Environment Canada developed a national Code of Practice for responsible recycling of vehicles, with audits to ensure compliance. It also held training sessions for vehicle recyclers across Canada, and implemented an on-line training tool.
  • The ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles program exceeded its target by providing in-class training on fuel efficient driving practices to over 350,000 new drivers. It also published the 2010 Energuide for Vehicles fuel consumption guide and the Most Fuel Efficient Vehicles List. The program funded nine proposals out of 36 received, and distributed $1.7 million to enable recipients to deliver outreach activities aimed at increasing consumers’ awareness and adoption of energy efficient practices. Of the 580,000 drivers who have received training since the inception of this program, 290,000 are expected to actively use fuel efficient driving techniques to save more than 17 million litres of fuel and 40,000 tonnes of GHGs.
  • The ecoENERGY for Fleets program exceeded its targets by training nearly 14,000 transportation professionals on fuel efficient driving, maintenance and business practices. This is expected to save nearly 45 million litres of fuel and 100,000 tonnes of GHG emissions annually. The program provided training at 88 workshops and by providing access to decision-support and information sources, such as the aerodynamics guide On the Road to a Fuel Efficient Truck, the program website (which received 47,000 hits), and two idle reduction campaigns. In addition, the program completed funding agreements that will allow 11 fleets to demonstrate and adopt fuel efficient fleet technologies with a total contribution of $1.6 M.

Increased awareness, knowledge and acceptance of energy efficient transportation technologies and best practices

  • The Freight Technology Demonstration Fund contributed $4.1 million towards the purchase, installation and demonstration of new and under utilized emission-reducing technologies in the freight industry. The ecoFREIGHT programs have also allowed an indirect uptake of technology from recipients who have extended the demonstrated technologies to a bigger part of their fleet.
  • The ecoFreight Partnerships program sponsored three events to facilitate the transfer of information and knowledge about emissions reduction technologies and practices to the freight industry: the Supply Chain and Logistics (SCL) Association seven-city briefing tour, Globe’s 2010 Low Carbon Shipping Session and the Strategy Institute’s Lean and Green Supply Chain Strategies Summit. In addition, this program sponsored the Green Supply Chain Award and the ecoFREIGHT Transportation Award, presented at SCL’s Annual Conference and at Globe 2010 respectively, to recognize outstanding industry efforts.
  • The ecoFREIGHT Partnerships program published on its website information and decision tools for freight shippers and forwarders. Visitors to the website increased from 12,932 in 2008 to 26,649 in 2009.
  • The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles program had showcase exhibits at 22 major events to increase public awareness about advanced technology vehicles and to offer ride and drive opportunities.

A theme-level program evaluation started in 2009-2010 and is continuing in 2010-2011. It will address issues of relevance, performance and cost-effectiveness.

2009-2010 Successes

Light Duty Vehicle and Urban Transportation Programs

  • In accordance with a Memorandum of Understanding with the ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles Program, the Province of Ontario incorporated fuel efficiency as part of the province's mandatory driver training curriculum in 2009-2010. As a result, over 150,000 new drivers will be educated regarding fuel efficiency each year, using materials developed by ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles.
  • In 2009-2010, the Vehicle Scrappage program activities led to the retirement of over 64,000 old, high-polluting vehicles.
  • The ecoMobility program has succeeded in supporting modal shifts by establishing a strong and active network of TDM practitioners across Canada, to complement the investments made during the 2009-2010 in public transit through federal infrastructure funding.
  • The test results of the ecoTechnology for Vehicle program were essential in ensuring that Canadian-specific cold weather climate issues were addressed in the development of electric vehicle (EV) energy consumption and range test procedures by the Society of Automotive Engineers’ (SAE J1634) Committee. These procedures will be essential in determining Canadian energy label values for EVs, and how an EV’s range is communicated to Canadian consumers.

Freight Transportation Programs

  • Since 2008, the Freight Technology Incentives Program, the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund, the Marine Shore Power Program and the ecoEnergy for Fleets program have supported industry in the purchase of over 3,100 emission-reducing pieces of equipment in the transportation sector.
  • The ecoENERGY for Fleets program has put in place four MOUs with provinces and territories, and is negotiating with five more. Under these agreements, the province or territory will incorporate knowledge of fuel efficient driving techniques as a requirement in commercial driver licensing for novice drivers and the ecoENERGY for Fleets program will provide the necessary educational and information materials.
  • During 2009-2010, Ontario and Quebec, representing 60% of trucking activity in Canada, implemented heavy-duty truck speed limiter regulations for all trucks operating within their jurisdictions.

2009-2010 Risks and Challenges

  • The economic recession is having broad effects on the uptake of programs. It has reduced the funds that freight companies are currently able to invest in new fuel efficient technologies, particularly where there is significant financial or technological risk. It has reduced the availability of leveraged investments from traditional program stakeholders such as municipal governments, and non-governmental organizations which have either reduced their outreach activities or ceased operations altogether.
  • With respect to the National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry, there remain a number of provinces that do not support mandatory implementation of regulations requiring speed limiting devices. The federal government’s ability to foster full national implementation is thus constrained.
  • While the emissions benefits of marine shore power are being demonstrated, the complexity of such projects, including the need to establish a cost-effective relationship with electricity suppliers to support the technology and to establish a sustainable business case has limited the number of ports who are in a position to test out the technology within the timelines of the Marine Shore Power Program.
Theme's total funding approved under the CAA Theme's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Theme's Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 463,000,000 $ 70,528,017 $ 52,992,779

 

Program: ecoMOBILITY

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CT_1

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

As the ecoMOBILITY program enters its fourth year, it has become a well-established program with relationships with its target audience including provinces, municipalities and other organizations. These people provide valuable information to the program on the information gaps and barriers affecting their ability to implement Transportation Demand Management (TDM) projects. In response to this feedback, the program has identified the activities that will be undertaken until the end of the program.

Financial support

In 2009-2010, under the EcoMOBILITY program, 12 municipalities and regional transportation authorities had a contribution agreement in place for 13 projects to implement TDM projects across Canada. One approved project’s Contribution Agreement remains to be signed in 2010-11. The total contribution for those projects is $3 million (M) under the Program, which has leveraged an additional $6 M from other partners.

The funding provided for these projects contributed to reach the program’s immediate outcome to increase capacity by the target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gas (GHG) or criteria air contaminant (CAC) toxic substances and an increase in the number of program activities underway. The contribution component of the program supported the implementation and performance measurement of TDM projects to increase the use of sustainable transportation options such as transit, carpools, cycling and walking and reduced travel through telework. Through the program, the government is helping find ways to meet transportation needs while protecting the environment.

Partnerships and Networks

The ecoMOBILITY Program also developed a number of tools to support Green TDM project implementation, including the Canadian TDM Measurement Guidelines, a guide on Transportation Options for Small and Rural Communities, a Bike Sharing Guide and the document Workplace Travel Plans: Guidance for Canadian Employers.

A number of learning events and activities were organized or sponsored by the ecoMOBILITY program for municipal TDM practitioners and decision-makers. These events increased the participants’ knowledge to foster ongoing implementation and measurement of TDM policies and programs. Such events included:

  • 8 webinars in both official languages between June 2009 and March 2010;
  • 2 sessions sponsored at conferences : Social Marketing at Moving Minds Workshop at Transportation Association of Canada Conference (October 2009) and Implementing Sustainable Transportation Projects: New Guides for Municipalities at Federation of Canadian Municipalities Sustainable Communities Conference (February 2010);
  • Fourteen new cases studies and issue papers;
  • 2 national meetings to advance the practice of TDM; and,
  • Workshop for funding recipients in March 2010 to share results and knowledge of Green TDM.

The webinars attracted a significant attendance and the program received good feedback in post-event surveys on the information that was shared during those events.

The tools developed and the learning events organized contributed to an immediate outcome of increased awareness, knowledge and acceptance of energy efficient transportation technologies and best practices and an increas in capacity to undertake TDM initiatives.

The direct reach of the ecoMOBILITY learning events listed above was 850 TDM practitioners, which exceeds the target participation of 200 practioners. In post-events surveys, these people reported being more knowledgeable of TDM as well as more aware of sustainable transportation options such as car sharing, public transit, active transportation, alternative transportation to single occupancy cars as a result of the events.

An expanded, more proactive approach to knowledge dissemination will be implemented 2010-2011, building on this experience. For example, a number of sessions focusing on ecoMOBILITY products will be organized at major conferences and a newsletter will be sent out to a comprehensive distribution list of over 2000 practioners to promote new resources and upcoming learning events. The program will expand its reach to a broader audience.

The tools developed and the learning events organized contributed to an immediate outcome of increased awareness, knowledge and acceptance of energy efficient transportation technologies and best practices and an increase in capacity to undertake TDM initiatives.

Intermediate Outcomes

The knowledge and increased capacity regarding Green TDM services, policies and programs from the above activities has laid a foundation for an increase among Canadian municipalities in the implementation of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption and GHG or CAC emissions. The extent of this impact will be measured in 2011-2012.

Long-term Outcomes

It is too early in the program to provide information on the reduction of GHG and CAC emissions from program activities. The data required to assess results from the funded projects is currently being gathered by the funding recipients and will start to become available in 2010-2011.

An impact measurement strategy has been designed and will be completed in 2011-2012 to allow the program to roll-up the direct and indirect emission reductions achieved through the program. The program is expected to reduce emissions by 0.112 megatonne in 2012.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 9,300,000 $ 2,878,067 $ 2,778,578

 

Program: ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities (HRPP) at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CT_2

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Information and decision support

The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles (eTV) program has conducted tests and evaluations on 20 different advanced vehicle technologies (AVTs), 8 of them in 2009-2010 (exceeding the expectation of testing 5), in order to contribute to an immediate outcome of increased knowledge of energy efficient transportation technologies and informed positions on policies, and programs influencing transportation technologies. Test and evaluation results have increased knowledge of the performance of emerging vehicle technologies in Canada, helping to inform the development of fuel consumption and emissions standards, programs and policies in Canada. Results have also increased Canadians knowledge about advanced vehicle technologies through several outreach and educational activities.

These AVTs were selected from an assessment process to choose the technologies that have the greatest potential to reduce fuel consumption, greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), and criteria air contaminants (CAC), but also have the potential to be technically viable in Canada. Priority technologies were identified based on technology scans conducted by the program’s engineering staff and discussions with industry associations, manufacturers, government departments, and other stakeholders, in keeping with the technology areas outlined in the HRPP. More information about this strategic evaluation process can be found on the program website at www.tc.gc.ca/eTV - Biennial Report.

During 2009-2010, eTV also completed two studies to address potential barriers to the introduction of advanced vehicle technologies into the market, GHG or CAC. The study on low rolling resistance (LRR) tires will help to inform the work of the Government of Canada, tire manufacturers, industry and other stakeholders to reduce the regulatory barriers in the event that LRR tire regulations are considered in Canada. The program also worked with industry to identify and mitigate potential regulatory barriers to Fuel-cell vehicles, in anticipation of their commercialization, in a joint study with the National Research Council’s Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation and the Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association. The study evaluated risks posed by the unintended venting of hydrogen from a light-duty vehicle within enclosed parking facilities.

Training and education

Consistent with the program’s 2009-2010 performance commitments, eTV delivered or contributed to 22 major public awareness raising events across Canada through hands-on demonstrations, information dissemination and ride and drive opportunities. The program continued to develop its extensive public website, providing Canadians with access to educational articles, videos, technical sheets and detailed test results. Using these outreach tools, eTV interacted with over 50,000 Canadians in 2009-2010 (more then 110,000 since the inception of the program) in its key target audience to increase their knowledge of the performance and environmental benefits of AVTs. The program’s education and training objectives were furthered in 2009-2010 through unique partnerships with educational institutions, including the Canadian Science and Technology Museum Corporation, to develop blended learning tools that integrate clean transportation and AVTs technologies into the secondary school curriculum. eTV also supported knowledge building with respect to AVTs in the automotive sector by disseminating test results at academic conferences, industry association meetings, colloquia, interdepartmental committees and other venues.

To evaluate the impact of eTV’s public outreach activities to increase public awareness about AVTs, the program utilized an exit feedback form that was distributed to visitors at eTV public outreach events. In 2009-2010, over 1000 visitors completed the feedback form. Results demonstrate that eTV has successfully and consistently increased knowledge of AVTs for more than 70% of attendees.

These training and education activities have contributed to its immediate outcome of increased awareness, knowledge and acceptance of energy efficient transportation technologies and best practices.

Partnerships and Networks

The eTV program activities have contributed to an immediate outcome of increased penetration of AVTs in Canada by identifying, and where possible, mitigating market barriers to AVTs at the consumer, codes & standards, regulatory, or vehicle/infrastructure interface level by:

  • Working in partnership with industry, power utilities and within the department to mitigate regulatory barriers to facilitate the largest deployment and demonstration of battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in Canada. Results of this project will help proactively identify technical, consumer, regulatory and codes & standards barriers to battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in Canada, in advance of their commercialization in 2011-2012. Based on the results of demonstrations such as this, eTV will work in partnership with stakeholder to implement proactive measures to address identified barriers in 2010-2011.
  • Developing Canadian-specific performance data for AVTs to inform the development of best practices, codes, standards and regulations. For example, eTV’s exploratory study on low-rolling resistance (LRR) tires will help to inform the work of the Government of Canada, tire manufacturers, industry and other stakeholders in the event that LRR tire regulations are considered in Canada.
  • Identifying and mitigating consumer barriers to clean diesel, hydrogen and fuel cell and battery electric vehicle technologies as demonstrated by consumer feedback that had performance and reliability concerns about these technologies. Through the program’s educational and outreach activities, these consumer barriers were dispelled using eTV’s evaluation and test results.

Long Term Outcomes

The program’s activities will contribute to an intermediate outcome of increased use of technologies to reduce energy consumption and an ultimate outcome of reduced energy consumption and emissions.

The program is monitoring and evaluating the increase in AVTs in Canada using the department’s Vehicle Fuel Economy Information System (VFEIS), which captures Canadian motor vehicle fuel consumption and engine technology information, reported by automobile manufacturers and importers.

Final GHG reductions will be estimated in 2010-2011 using a methodology that includes analysing market sales data, and tracking the increased penetration of relevant advanced vehicle technologies. GHG and criteria air contaminants reductions will be derived using fuel efficiency data provided by the Canadian Fuel Consumption Guide, driving profiles available from the Canadian Transportation Survey and the department’s VFEIS.

The program is expected to reduce GHG emissions by 0.201 megatonnes in 2012.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 14,100,000
$ 4,313,030 $ 3,281,752

 

Program: National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CT_3

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Information and Decision Support

Two provinces, Ontario and Quebec, implemented heavy truck speed limiter regulations in 2009. The Department completed significant foundational work under the National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry through a series of studies to support this initiative. Other provinces are considering speed limiter legislation; however no decision has been taken at this time on whether to proceed.

This supported the programs immediate and intermediate outcomes as a harmonized regulatory approach has been accepted by two neighbouring provinces (representing a large portion of trucking activity in Canada). In addition, a common approach was adopted for the removal of regulatory barriers as the same maximum speed limiter setting (105 kilometres per hour) as adopted by Ontario and Quebec and both provinces followed a uniform approach with respect to speed limiter enforcement policy and equipment.

Transport Canada also contributed to speed limiter compliance efforts of various enforcement authorities through the acquisition of technology to verify roadside compliance (e.g., hand-held readers to interface with truck computer to verify setting). Extensive consultations were undertaken to facilitate this process and encourage a harmonized approach with respect to the use of this technology.

Financial Support

The program made funding available to the provinces and territories but this financial support was not required.

Long Term Outcomes

In addition, studies were completed relating to the assessment and testing of emerging environmental technologies to verify their environmental performance and compliance with regulatory requirements for on-road operation. For example, the program assessed the fuel efficiency improvements and regulatory compliance with safety standards of rear trailer fairings (boat tails) for on-road by Canadian fleets. A study was also completed investigating the feasibility of requiring protective side guards on large trucks and trailers operating in Canada, including the potential environmental benefits of flush-mounted side fairings.

This work may assist in removing barriers to the increased uptake of technologies that reduce trucking energy consumption and greenhouse gases (GHG). The impact of these technologies on GHG emissions will be estimated in the context of the ecoFreight demonstration fund and incentives program to avoid overlap or double-counts issues.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 5,400,000 $ 2,153,000 $ 545,862

 

Program: Freight Technology Demonstration Fund

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/inst/doe/st-ts05-eng.asp#CT_4

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Financial Support

In 2009-2010 the programs continued to fund and monitor the results of the 12 projects selected under the two rounds of project selection. These projects are eligible for up to $4 million (M) in funding towards the purchase, installation and demonstration of the effectiveness of new and underused emission-reducing technologies in the freight industry. This contribution has leveraged investments of $14 M from the proponents and their partners.

The selected portfolio of projects for both rounds of funding supports a mix of technologies and best practices such as: innovative port crane technologies, ultra low emitting Genset locomotives technology, route and mode optimization software, hybrid electric and advanced electric delivery vehicles, bundled advanced truck technologies (i.e., aerodynamic truck technologies, advanced auxiliary power technologies for trucks, advanced tire technologies, etc.) and driver training programs. Every Canadian region is represented in the selected portfolio.

Partnerships and Networks

The program provided information on technology so as to foster the broader uptake of clean transportation technologies and practices in Canada.

Among the key outputs of the Program were case studies distilled from the comprehensive reports provided by the successful project proponents.  The case studies presented the technology demonstration objectives and results relative to the barriers identified.  As projects concluded, case studies were generated and used for dissemination to decision-makers in the freight transportation industry to encourage them to invest in the most promising of these technologies.  To-date 24 case studies from technology projects supported by Transport Canada (TC) have been published on TC’s ecoFREIGHT website detailing. This information was also disseminated at targeted sessions at freight industry conferences, annual general meetings and trade shows. The Freight Technology Demonstration Fund programs participated at the Globe 2010 event, the Atlantic truck show, the green marine event and the Supply Chain and Logistic Association/Canadian Industrial Transportation Association 2009 conference.

The demonstration and commercialization of new technologies in the freight industry can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants without inhibiting economic growth. Yet significant barriers to the wide-spread adoption of emissions-reducing technologies exist, including the cost to industry of technology trials, the risk to their financial bottom line in a highly competitive industry, concern about the impacts of new technologies on costly equipment and capital, the lack of an established track record for new technologies, and the lack of independent and “real world” information on technologies options.

The focus of the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund was in 2009-2010 to help industry invest in projects to demonstrate technologies that will both reduce emissions and lower operating costs over time, with robust measurement protocols in place so as to document the environmental and economic performance of the technologies. More specifically, the program supported greater awareness and support within the Canadian freight transportation industry, and stimulated industry efforts to test and apply more innovative approaches.

Intermediate Outcomes

In 2009-2010, the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund activities have addressed both financial and information-based barriers to the use of transportation technologies and practices that reduce energy consumption and emissions. In addition, program results provided valuable information for the development of positions on policies and programs influencing transportation and will eventually play a role in the support of heavy-duty vehicle regulations.

Longer Term Outcomes

The Program is expected to reduce GHG emissions by 1.37 megatonnes in 2012.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 9,300,000
$ 3,429,651 $ 1,039,811

 

Program: Freight Technology Incentives Program

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/inst/doe/st-ts05-eng.asp#CT_5

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Financial Support

Of the 32 projects selected to receive a total of $7.5 million in funding through rounds one and two of the incentives program, 28 are underway with contribution agreements in place and final reports expected in 2010-2011. Four selected projects have not gone forward due to the economic recession.

The selected portfolio of projects for both rounds of funding supports a mix of technologies that include: ultra low emitting Genset locomotives technology, alternative fuel for baggage tractors, bundled advanced truck technologies (i.e. aerodynamic truck technologies, auxiliary power technologies for trucks, wide based tire technologies and long combination vehicle options for trucks). Every Canadian region is represented in the selected portfolio.

Each recipient reports data on the implementation and performance of the selected technology, such data includes fuel use, time of operation, workload and distance travelled to, ultimately, enable them to calculate greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria air contaminants emissions reductions.

The implementation of proven technologies in the freight industry can reduce both GHG emissions and air pollutants without inhibiting economic growth. Yet significant barriers to the wide-spread adoption of emissions-reducing technologies exist, including the cost to industry of technology trials.

The main activity of the Freight Technology Incentives program was to provide financial support to accelerate the purchasing and installing of proven technologies by freight transportation carriers. This greater adoption of technologies and best practices by the freight transportation industry is essential to a reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants from the transportation sector and an improved efficiency in the transportation industry.

Intermediate Outcomes

In 2009-2010, the Freight Technology Incentives Program Fund activities addressed costs barriers to the use of transportation technologies that reduce energy consumption and emissions. In addition, program results provided valuable information for the development of positions on policies and programs influencing transportation and will eventually play a role in the support of heavy-duty vehicle regulations.

Longer Term Outcomes

The program is expected to reduce GHG emissions by 1.37 megatonnes in 2012.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 9,350,000
$ 4,525,179 $ 2,205,550

 

Program: ecoFREIGHT Partnerships

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CT_6

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

In 2009-2010, the Program continued to contribute to the ecoFreight initiative’s environmental objectives, which are expected to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 1.37 megatonnes in 2012. Examples of achieved results include:

Partnerships and networks: national freight industry:

  • The ecoFREIGHT Partnerships Program worked with key players in the freight transportation sector to reduce emissions from freight transportation activities.
  • ecoFREIGHT Partnerships contributed financially to the Canadian Industrial Transportation Association’s (CITA) Core Survey Report for a fourth consecutive year. This survey reports on environmental considerations by CITA members in their decision-making process. Continued support and involvement with this survey has allowed the program to record industry trends towards environmental concerns. Sufficient data is now available to analyze the trends and inform Transport Canada (TC) on how and where it could influence the industry.
  • ecoFREIGHT Partnerships worked with industry leaders using established communication networks to transfer knowledge and information on freight related emissions by sponsoring and supporting events such as: the Supply Chain and Logistic Association of Canada’s (SCL) Breakfast Briefing Tour 2009 which showcased the results of an Industry Canada led study on logistics and supply chain management; Globe 2010’s Low Carbon Shipping Session which consisted of a panel of experts highlighting and sharing what their respective companies are doing in order to reduce the environmental impacts associated with their transportation activities; and the Strategy Institute’s Lean and Green Supply Chain Strategies Summit which explored the benefits, environmental and financial, of greening the supply chain.
  • The ecoFreight Program worked with organizations and associations to recognize industry leaders who have improved their environmental performance. As such, the Program sponsored the Green Supply Chain Award and the ecoFREIGHT Transportation Award presented at the SCL’s Annual Conference and at Globe 2010, respectively. The recognition of industry leaders and their accomplishments helps to encourage other stakeholders to follow in their steps.
  • The results and knowledge gained from all the ecoFreight Program’s projects (Freight Technology Demonstration Fund, Freight Technology Incentives Program and Marine Shore Power) will be the subject of a case study that will be posted early in the 2010-2011 fiscal year on the ecoFREIGHT Partnerships website. Web trend analysis of the website showed a constant increase in visits: from 5,614 visits in 2007-2008 to 23,753 in 2008-2009 and 32,881 in 2009-2010.

Guidelines and Agreements: Transportation Industry

  • Support for the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Railway Association of Canada on emission reductions in the rail sector continued. The railways have delivered substantial reductions in air pollutant emissions since 2006. In 2008, there was an improvement of 23.3% in the GHG intensity of total freight train operations, compared with the 1990 baseline. Transport Canada supported preparation of the annual Locomotive Emissions Monitoring report for 2008. The 2008 report is expected to be released in early 2010-2011 (June).
  • Support for the MOU with the Air Transport Association of Canada on emission reductions in the aviation sector continued. The Canadian aviation industry has surpassed the MOU-established target of 1.1 percent annual average fuel efficiency improvement. The total annual average fuel efficiency improvement achieved by 2008 for passenger and cargo operations was 1.9 percent, as compared to the 1990 baseline. The 2008 Canadian Aviation Industry Report on Emissions Reductions is expected to be released in early 2010-2011 (May).
  • TC participated in various expert conferences and events with the aviation and rail industries. Specific conferences / events included:
    • Meetings of the International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) Committee on Aviation Environment Protection (CAEP). Voluntary agreements were a topic of discussion at the eighth meeting of CAEP, which was held in Montreal on February 12, 2010. TC took the opportunity to share lessons learned and successful practices related to the current MOU with the aviation industry.
    • 2009 Rail-Government Interface organized by the Railway Association of Canada, held in Ottawa on May 12, 2009. Key themes of discussion included sharing information on successful practices to enhance sustainability and environmental performance in line with the current voluntary agreement.
    • 2009 Railroad Environmental Conference, held at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on October 27-29, 2009. This conference included expert participation from industry, government and academia in North America. A key theme was sharing information and lessons learned on leveraging partnerships to drive industry improvement through regulatory and non-regulatory channels.

International Partnerships:

  • During 2009-2010, TC had an increased presence at international fora and committees, resulting in: more informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation decision-making in Canada; fostering of key relationships with other nations; and, the sharing of information and best practices related to the reduction of emissions and the overall improvement of the environmental footprint from the transportation sector. TC also had integral input into the development of negotiating positions, measures, standards, regulations, action plans, Declarations and outcome statements (e.g., United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Conference of the Parties 15, high level meetings of ICAO and the International Maritime Organization (IMO)).
  • TC also contributed financially and in-kind towards significant pieces of research related to transportation and environment.

Efficiency Program for Freight Shippers and Forwarders:

  • TC initiated discussions with the United States Environmental Protection Agency to share information on a shipper's footprint calculator and possible future Canadian applications.
  • The ecoFREIGHT Program has developed Success Stories highlighting efforts by 3 companies who have taken measures to reduce the environmental footprint of their supply chain. These success stories will be published on the ecoFREIGHT website.
  • TC sponsored and facilitated a session on Low Carbon Shipping at the GLOBE 2010 international conference that attracted policy makers and business people from around the world. The session examined initiatives and options for shippers to select the best environmentally-friendly options for shipping their goods, and profiled companies on the leading edge of environmental performance.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 6,550,000 $1,856,980 $ 1,072,725

 

Program: Marine Shore Power Program

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CT_7

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

Port and terminal operators are facing pressure from adjacent communities to clean up their operations and improve their air quality performance. Marine shore power enables ships to turn off their auxiliary diesel engines and reduce their emissions while docked and connect to the city’s electrical grid using specially designed equipment to power the ship's load (e.g., lighting, air conditioning, communication equipment, etc.).

Financial Support

In the first round of application, the program undertook to contribute funding to the Port Metro Vancouver for the Canada Place project. In 2009-2010 the program provided funding and continued to monitor the results of this project in collaboration with Port Metro Vancouver.

The Canada Place cruise ship shore power project is the third cruise ship shore power project in the world and the first of its kind in Canada. The Port Metro Vancouver installed shore power infrastructure at the east and west berths of the Canada Place Cruise Ship Terminal in Vancouver harbour. The total cost of this project is $9 million with up to $2 million (M) provided by Marine Shore Power program. Port Metro Vancouver has partnered with Holland America, Princess Cruises and BC Hydro for this endeavour. Transport Canada, Western Diversification Canada and British Columbia Ministry of Transportation are financial contributors to this major initiative.

A second call for proposals completed in 2009-2010 and a second shore power project was identified for funding. This project, specifically designed for container ships, compliments the other Marine Shore Power Program project, which was designed for the cruise ships. In addition to the important environmental benefits, the project will also help the proponent’s port to remain economically competitive with other port facilities offering similar shore power service. The project proponent is currently completing the financial plan for the project, at which time it will be announced and launched.

Partnerships and Networks

An important role of the program is to provide information on marine shore power technology to other Canadian ports so as to allow them to develop a business case for the implementation of this technology. In 2009-2010, the program should ongoing project information at events to enable the transfer of knowledge including through freight industry conferences, trade shows or workshops. In 2009-2010 the Marine Shore Power Program participated at the Globe 2010 event and the Green Marine event.

The main barriers to the implementation of marine shore power in Canadian ports include the initial cost of these installations for the port and terminal operators, the lack of experience in Canada with this technology, and the lack of a proven business case for the shore power in the marine industry. The Marine Shore Power Program projects are demonstrating how this technology can be implemented and the results achieved and are providing the information to mitigate these barriers.

Longer Term Outcomes

The Marine Shore Power Program reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an expected by 4000 tonnes in 2012.

Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 6,000,000 $ 1,405,110 $ 758,562

 

Program: Analytical and Policy Support

Department

Transport Canada

Departmental Program Activity

2.1 Clean Air from Transportation

2009-2010 Program's Expected Achievements

See the 2009-2010 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2009-2010/CT_8

2009-2010 Program's Achieved Results

In 2009-2010, Transport Canada (TC) achieved the following results:

  • Updated a comprehensive list of transportation greenhouse gas (GHG) emission indicators for all modes using 2005 data, including: activity, energy intensity, GHG intensity, total fuel consumption and GHG emissions. This is the first time the data has been updated since these indicators were developed in the late 1990’s in the context of the work of the National Climate Change Strategy’s Transportation Table. These indicators provide comparable modal GHG indicators to properly analyze the environmental impacts of various transportation-related policies to inform decision-making. Discussions regarding a collaborative initiative with the United States (U.S.) government to develop comparable Canada/U.S. indicators are ongoing.
  • Launched a collaborative effort in the context of the federal/provincial/territorial Sustainable Transportation Task Force to develop a comprehensive data strategy. High priority projects include improving data to support the development of fuel consumption or emission regulations.
  • Continued to work on the development of the TC Transportation Energy Use and Emissions Model (TCTEEM), which covers road, rail, and air transportation. The model now includes a light-duty vehicle module that was developed to analyze non-regulatory initiatives for new vehicles, such as economic incentives. In addition, a scoping study was implemented to conceptualize a marine emissions module. Finally, TC added a new rail emissions module to the model. These modules enhance TC's ability to assess regulatory and non-regulatory options to reduce GHG emissions.
  • Launched an initiative to develop and maintain an up-to-date comprehensive light‑duty vehicle fleet database using provincial vehicle registry and fuel consumption data that will facilitate regulatory and non-regulatory policy analysis as it relates to energy use and GHGs.
Total Funding Approved Under the CAA Program's Planned Spending in 2009-2010 Program’s Actual Spending in 2009-2010
$ 4,000,000 $ 985,000 $ 709,228

 

Program: ecoAUTO Rebate Program

Department