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2008-09
Departmental Performance Report



Transport Canada






Supplementary Information (Tables)






Table of Contents




Table 1: Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue



Respendable Revenue
($ thousands)
Respendable Revenue 1, 3 Actual
2006-07
Actual
2007-08
2008-09
Main
Estimates
Planned
Revenue
Total
Authorities
Actual
 Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs

Air Services Forecasts revenues

221

239

160

160

122

122

Public port revenues from user fees and wharf permits 8,553 8,265 8,219 8,219 8,308 8,308
Airport revenues from user fees and service contracts 4,991 5,230 5,143 5,143 6,083 6,083
Airports Authorities - lease and chattel payments 302,513 295,386 274,544 274,544 275,602 275,602
Research and development 1,406 759 260 260 585 585
Rentals and concessions 6,895 6,632 7,061 7,061 6,799 6,799
Inspection and certification 3 11 0 0 12 12
Sales and training 129 105 112 112 114 114
Miscellaneous 146 76 115 115 193 193
Sub-total 324,857 316,702 295,614 295,614 297,819 297,819
 Transportation Safety and Security

Canadian Aviation Regulation User Fees

8,090

8,362

8,540

8,540

8,211

8,211

Aircraft Maintenance and Flying Services 34,369 35,260 28,005 28,005 33,061 33,061
Marine Safety Regulation User Fees 8,170 8,240 7,647 7,647 8,086 8,086
Revenues from the Registrar of Imported Vehicles Program 4,600 7,460 3,500 3,500 7,461 7,461
Inspections and certifications 1,751 1,307 328 328 1,356 1,356
Lease payments from the Motor Vehicle Test Center 2 257 0 155 155 163 163
Rentals and concessions 981 273 739 739 1,077 1,077
Sales and training 823 783 858 858 830 830
Research and development 1,117 252 0 0 0 0
Miscellaneous 632 84 66 66 172 172
Sub-total 60,790 62,019 49,838 49,838 60,41 60,41
 Sustainable Transportation Development and the Environment

Rentals and concessions

78

184

136

136

170

170

Sales and training 6 0 0 0 0 0
Miscellaneous 13 0 12 12 0 0
Sub-total 97 184 148 148 170 170
Total Respendable Revenue 385,745 378,905 345,600 345,600 358,408 358,408


Non-Respendable Revenue
($ thousands)
Non-Respendable Revenue 3 Actual
2006-07
Actual
2007-08
2008-09
Main
Estimates
Planned
Revenue
Total
Authorities
Actual
 Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs

Non-navigational assets - St. Lawrence Seaway 4

7,461

8,078

     

8,839

Canada Port Authority stipends 12,033 12,826       13,305
Royalties from research and development 23 50       31
Hopper cars (lease, damage settlements and demurrage charges) 12,716 33,332       26,078
Return on investments - Crown Corporations 5 87,865 56,170       30,443
Return on investments - Others 6 70 34       18
Refunds on previous year's expenditures 426 2,358       7,102
Adjustments to previous year's payables 7,234 20,708       7,118
Permits for transportation of explosives 33 54       0
Fines and penalties 898 1,527       1,553
Proceeds from disposal of surplus Crown assets 1,369 3,040       882
Proceeds from sale of real property 6,614 1,059       899
Gift to Crown 7 0 3,000       0
Miscellaneous 545 354       292
Total Non-respendable Revenue 137,287 142,589       96,559

Due to rounding, columns may not add to total shown.

Notes:

  1. For consistency with amounts published in the Public Accounts (Details of Respendable Amounts), the respendable revenue categories include a share of departmental administration's respendable revenue.
  2. Due to an oversight in the revenue recording process for 2007-08, the Motor Vehicle Test Centre revenues ($258,274) were not recorded as respendable revenues.  Corrective measures have been taken to avoid this situation from occurring again in the future.
  3. Revenues are on a modified cash basis and do not necessarily correspond to Public Accounts, Form E, which is prepared on an accrual basis.
  4. Revenues from the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation is in regard to the management of Real Property Operations.
  5. Dividends received from Canada Post Corp. $21.8M, Canada Lands Co. $7.6 million and Royal Canadian Mint  $1.0M.
  6. Remittance from Andrew Ferry on the St. Lawrence Seaway.  The 2005-06 actual revenues included remittances from Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Corp for the proceeds from the disposal of fixed assets ($5.85 million).
  7. The Pearson Airport Authority purchased the Highway 409 lands and subsequently transferred the lands to  the Crown in order to have the permission to build the runway


Table 2: User Fees



Table 2-A: 2008-09 User Fee Reporting - User Fees Act
($ thousands)
A. User Fee Fee Type 1 Fee-setting Authority Date Last Modified B 2008-09 Planning Years
Forecast
Revenue 3
Actual
Revenue 3
Full
Cost 2
Performance
Standards 4
Performance
Result 4
Fiscal
Year
Forecast
Revenue 3
Estimated
Full Cost 2
Aviation Safety - Regulatory Fees
(Note 5)
R

Aeronautics Act
(http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-2/index.html),

Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs)
CARS fees located at:
www.tc.gc.ca/civilaviation/regserv/affairs/cars/menu.htm

and fees in Part I subpart 4
http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/Regserv/Affairs/cars/Part1/Subpart4.htm

July 15, 2000 8,540 8,211
respendable
260,707 http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/servicestandards.htm

1) Service Charter:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/publications/tp14790/menu.htm

2) Aircraft Registration and Leasing Service Levels :
http://www.tc.gc.ca/aviation/activepages/ccarcs/aspscripts/en/levelsearch.asp

3) Ontario Region: results for Services with Fees:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/levelOfServiceWithtFees.htm

4) Other performance results under development

2009-10

8,271

246,186

2010-11 8,173 246,182
2011-12 8,176 246,189
Marine Safety - Regulatory Fees for inspections, surveys, services, etc.
(Note 6)
R Various regulations
(http://www.tc.gc.ca/acts-regulations/acts/2001c26/menu.htm)
under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001
(http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/showtdm/cs/C-10.15)
such as the Board of Steamship Inspection Scale of Fees; Vessels Registry Fees Tariff; etc.)

6 June, 1995
(Overall Fee Increase)

May 1, 2002
(Specific Fees)

7,389

7,708
respendable
94,285 http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/service-standards/menu.htm Progress was made in 2008/09 to include electronic tracking of service standard performance in operational database. A contract was awarded for the integration and update of operational systems, including new fields and reports to capture service standard information. 2009-10

7,258

94,897

2010-11 7,238 95,006
2011-12 7,228 94,946
Marine Safety - Office of Boating Safety - Construction Standard Compliance Labels
(Note 7)
R

Canada Shipping Act /Small Vessel Regulations / TP 1332 incorporated by reference
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C.R.C.-c.1487/

TP 1332:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/MarineSafety/TP/TP1332/menu.htm

1995 210

266
respendable

355 http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/service-standards/fees.htm#OBS_Compliance_Labels Performance results updated annually.In 2008-09, services were rendered within the standard levels in 96% of cases. 2009-10 110 180
2010-11 0 0
2011-12 0 0
Marine Safety - Ship Radio Inspection Program
(Note 8)
R Canada Shipping Act /Ship Radio Inspection Fees Regulations
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C.R.C.-c.1472/

1978

48 113
respendable
962
Department
of Fisheries
and Oceans
(DFO) full
cost share
included
above:352
http://www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/folios/00026/docs/part-4a-2009-eng.pdf Partial performance results are available for 2008/09 DPR. Based on partial information reviewed, services were provided within standard in 79.2 % of the cases. 2009-10 48

962

2010-11 48 962
2011-12 48 962
Department
of Fisheries
and Oceans
(DFO) full
cost share
included
above:352
Airports - Air Services Charges Regulations (ASCR) fees: General Terminal Fees, Landing Fees, Aircraft Parking Charges, Emergency response services charges.
(Note 9)
O

Section 4.4 (2) of the Aeronautics Act
(http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-2/index.html),

and Section 2 of the Ministerial Regulations Authorization Order - Air Services Charges Regulations
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/SOR-85-414/

January 1, 2003

4,913

5,766
respendable
13,478 www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm 2009-10

4,858

11,255
2010-11 4,871 11,255
2011-12 4,864 11,255
Airports - Annual Registration of Mobile Equipment used at Airports
(Note 9)
O Government Property Traffic Act
(http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/showtdm/cs/G-6)
and Airport Traffic Regulations - Part III Section 57 to 60
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/showtdm/cr/C.R.C.-c.886//?showtoc=&instrumentnumber=C.R.C.-c.886

February 24, 2004

<1 3
respendable
8 www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm 2009-10 3 9
2010-11 3 9
2011-12 3 9
Airports - Vehicle Parking Charges
(Note 9)
O

Section 4.4(2) of the Aeronautics Act
(http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-2/index.html)

and Section 2 of the Ministerial Regulations Authorization Order, Airport Vehicle Parking Charges Regulations
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/SOR-87-543/

November 19, 1998

213 298
respendable
1,383 www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm 2009-10 267 1,155
2010-11 267 1,155
2011-12 267 1,155
Ports - Public Port Revenues: Wharfage, Berthage, Storage, Harbour Dues, Utilities and Other Services Charges O

Canada Marine Act
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C-6.7/index.html
Fees at:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/ports/menupublicportfees.htm

Jan. 1, 2004

8,165 8,262
respendable
36,085 http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/ports/standards.htm http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/ports/standards.htm 2009-10

8,221

27,145

2010-11 7,957 26,751
2011-12 7,868 26,992
Access to Information Requests - Fees
(Note 10)
O Access to Information Act and Regulations :
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-1/index.html

1992

6 5
non respendable (CRF)
2,358 Service Standards are included in the Access to information Act, Section 7:
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/showdoc/cs/A-1/bo-ga:s_4-gb:s_6//en - anchorbo-ga:s_4-gb:s_6
Statutory deadlines have been met for 80% of requests. 100% of extension notices were sent within 30 days following the receipt of the request. 100% of transfer notices were sent within 15 days 2009-10 6 2,358
2010-11 6 2,358
2011-12 6 2,358
Sub-Total Regulatory Services (R)

16,187

16,298 356,309   2009-10

15,687

342,225

2010-11 15,459 342,150
2011-12 15,452 342,097
Sub-Total Other Goods and Services (O)

13,297

14,334 53,312   2009-10

13.355

41,922
2010-11 13,104 41,538
2011-12 13,008 41,769
Total

29,484

30,632 409,621   2009-10 29,042 384,147
2010-11 28,563 383,688
2011-12 28,460 383,866

B. Date Last Modified

Subsequent amendments to regulations and/or fee reductions did not trigger the User Fee Act.

C. Other Information 11

In addition to complaint mechanism included in various Acts and Regulations (eg ATIP http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/showdoc/cs/A-1/bo-ga:s_30/20090701/en#anchorbo-ga:s_30), several complaint mechanisms have been developed and implemented for service standards related to user fees at public ports and public port facilities http://www.tc.gc.ca/Programs/Ports/standards.htm, at Transport Canada operated airports http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm, for the Canadian Aviation Regulations (Civil Aviation Issues Reporting System - CAIRS http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/ManagementServices/QA/cairs.htm).

A complaint mechanism policy "Handling of Complaints Related to Marine Safety User Fees and Applicable Service Standards" is now available on the web at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/service-standards/handling-complaints.htm.


Due to rounding, columns may not add to totals shown.

The Internet links in this report may change following publication, since the various websites are updated regularly.

Notes:

  1. The department collects two types of fees: Regulatory Service (R) and Other Goods and Services (O).

  2. Full Costs (Actual and Estimates) are reported on an accrual basis. Represent the full cost of providing service, good, facility or privilege. Full cost is not necessarily the cost attributed to fee-paying clients and a lower cost recovery level may be required based on the economic impact on stakeholders, stakeholders paying capability, the degree to which a price may affect the achievement of public policy objectives, etc.

    Consistent with instructions for the Departmental Performance Report (DPR), Full Costs are calculated according to costing principles identified in the Treasury Board Secretariat's Guide to the Costing, revised in May 2008.

    Full Costs are defined as: "The sum of all costs, direct and indirect, incurred by the government in the supply of a good, service, property, or right or privilege, including: services provided without charge by other departments (e.g., accommodation, legal services); costs financed by separate authorities (e.g., some employee benefits); annualized capital costs; and financing costs for revolving funds as relevant to departments. However, since the primary focus of this guide is full costing for cost recovery, transfer payments have not been included."

  3. The Forecast Revenues identified for the 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 fiscal years were those reported in the Report on Plans and Priorities for 2009-10, unless specifically noted and, are reported on a cash basis as for Actuals.

  4. According to prevailing legal opinion, where the corresponding fee introduction or most recent modification occurred prior to March 31, 2004 the:

    • Performance standard, if provided, may not have received Parliamentary review; and

    • Performance standard, if provided, may not respect all establishment requirements under the User Fee Act (e.g. international comparison; independent complaint address)

    • Performance result, if provided, is not legally subject to the User Fee Act section 5.1 regarding fee reductions for failed performance.

  5. Aviation Safety - Documentation on Services Standards is currently in consultation with the National Working Group and will be published in the Fall 2009. The documentation includes:

    1. Directive on Civil Aviation Service Standards Framework;

    2. Staff Instruction on Civil Aviation Service Standards Improvement Process;

    3. Service Standards Activities List for services with charges and no charges. This document includes a description of services and related service standards. This information will be a focal point for external stakeholders doing business with any Transport Canada Civil Aviation Offices

    4. Efforts are currently under way to monitor the performance within Atlantic Region, based on Ontario Region project pilot for tracking service standards.

    5. The Full Cost base reported in the table above represents the Total Direct and Indirect Beneficiary Costs. Per the last review completed, only 27% of the Full Cost base was considered as direct beneficiary costs i.e. attributable to paying stakeholders. Consistent with public consultations conducted in the past, costs (or a portion of) of services such as monitoring compliance, enforcement of safety operational standards, the establishment of legislation, regulations and standards, etc., were considered benefiting the general taxpayer. Only the costs associated with the issuance of Transport Canada safety documents (certificate, license, permit, etc.) were considered a private benefit attributable to the document recipient.

  6. Marine Safety - Regulatory Fees for inspections, surveys, services, etc. - Per the last regional survey carried out, 34% of the Full Cost base was considered non attributable to paying stakeholders. Consistent with public consultations conducted in the past, costs (or a portion of) of services such as enforcement of safety standards, pollution prevention, etc. were also considered benefiting the general taxpayer.

  7. Marine Safety - Construction Standard Compliance Labels - Following consultations held as part of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 regulatory reform process, Marine Safety has concluded that the Single Vessel Label Program should be discontinued.

    The single vessel label program deals with one-of-a-kind vessels, most often home-built. In order to minimize any inconvenience to pleasure craft owners, the single vessel label program was discontinued in 2008-09 in advance of the upcoming update (2009) to the Small Vessel Regulations. The Regulations were published in Gazette I on April 25, 2009. Publication in Gazette II is expected in the fall with immediate coming into force. From the coming into force of the new Regulations, no fee will be charged for labels during a transition period of one year, therefore reported revenue and cost only cover the period from April 2009 to the fall of 2009. One year after the coming into force of the new Regulations TC will no longer issue compliance labels but will instead monitor and audit manufacturers and importers for compliance with the regulations, compliance labels will be issued by the manufacturers within the self-certification process. See http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/debs/obs/news/discontinuation/menu.htm

    Cost and Revenue Forecasts are nil for 2010/11 and beyond based on the expected repealed date (Fall 2009) for these fees.

  8. Marine Safety - Ship Radio Inspection Program - Revenues from user fees represent the full cost recovery of overtime and travel costs. Full Costs include also the costs for the program manager, a share of internal services costs and amortization costs of ship radio inspection equipment.

  9. Airports User Fees - Exclude revenues and costs from divested and leased airports. Consistent with public consultations conducted in the past, full costs reported above for ASCR do not reflect annualized capital costs ($2.8M 2008/09) in recognition of the fact that smaller airports may not have the necessary critical mass of traffic to fully pay for these large up-front infrastructure costs i.e. start-up costs.

  10. Access to Information Requests - Fees: The Access to Information Act has provisions to waive fees. Cost information based on the Statistical Reports on the Access to Information Act. User Fee financial information includes adjustments to a full cost base in accordance with the TBS Guide to Costing (note 2).

  11. Main achievement in improving service - The Treasury Board Secretariat Policy on Service Standards for External Fees does not include any specific requirement for measuring client satisfaction other than the need for service standards to be developed in consultation with paying and non-paying stakeholders and the reporting of performance.

    Transport Canada in its commitment to provide quality services and client satisfaction, has also implemented dispute mechanisms that apply to services, use of facilities and provision of goods for which User fees are charged. This initiative ensures that stakeholders' concerns & complaints are handled immediately by the various Groups and redress mechanisms undertaken as appropriate. Internet web site links to various Groups' dispute mechanisms are identified under "Other Information" in the two Tables for User Fee Reporting (Table 2-A) and External Fee Reporting (Table 2-B)

Table 2-B: 2008-09 External Fee Reporting: Policy on Service Standards for External Fees 4



A. External Fee Service Standard 1 Performance Results 1 Stakeholder Consultation

Aviation Safety - Regulatory Fees

(Note 2)

http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/servicestandards.htm

1) Service Charter:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/publications/tp14790/menu.htm

2) Aircraft Registration and Leasing Service Levels:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/aviation/activepages/ccarcs/aspscripts/en/levelsearch.asp

3) Ontario Region:

results for Services with Fees:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/levelOfServiceWithtFees.htm

4) Other performance results under development

Consultations with stakeholders were last undertaken in 1997 for all fees and in 2000 and 2004 for specific fees. Fees published in Canada Gazette, in Dec. 1997, June 2000, and Sept. 2004 respectively. The June 2000 and September 2004 Amendments did not trigger the User Fee Act.

The Canadian Aviation Regulation Advisory Committee (CARAC) was consulted in December 2006 to seek agreement on the consultation methodology in the future, which was agreed to. Stakeholders' feedback now sought through the Civil Aviation Issues Reporting System (CAIRS).

In 2008, during the CARAC Plenary Meeting, a progress report was made on the development of the New Service Charter and the intent of TCCA to reaffirm their commitment on service delivery.

Marine Safety - Regulatory Fees for inspections, surveys, services, etc. http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/service-standards/menu.htm Progress was made in 2008/09 to include electronic tracking of service standard performance in operational database. A contract was awarded for the integration and update of operational systems, including new fields and reports to capture service standard information.

Consultation process completed in May 2006; comments received were favourable; no written comments received.

Ongoing feedback via Transport Canada (TC) Website. All proposals for changes are subject to public consultations via TC Website, Canada Gazette and CMAC meetings.

Marine Safety - Office of Boating Safety - Construction Standard Compliance Labels

(Note 3)

http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/service-standards/fees.htm#OBS_Compliance_Labels Performance results updated annually.In 2008-09, services were rendered within the standard levels in 96% of cases.

Consultation process completed in May 2006; comments received were favourable; no written comments received.

Ongoing feedback via TC Website. All proposals for changes are subject to public consultations via TC Website, Canada Gazette and CMAC meetings.

Marine Safety - Ship Radio Inspection program http://www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/folios/00026/docs/part-4a-2009-eng.pdf Partial performance results are available for 2008/09 DPR. Based on partial information reviewed, services were provided within standard in 79.2 % of the cases.

Consultation process completed in May 2006; comments received were favourable; no written comments received.

Ongoing feedback via TC Website. All proposals for changes are subject to public consultations via TC Website, Canada Gazette and CMAC meetings.

Airports - Air Services Charges Regulations (ASCR) fees: General Terminal Fees, Landing Fees, Aircraft Parking Charges, Emergency response services charges. www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm Stakeholder feedback was managed through existing channels at the various sites during Jan/Feb 2006. Stakeholder relationships are important and valued. Stakeholders were also consulted through TC websites. There are no outstanding issues for stakeholders. In 2009/10 stakeholders will continue to be managed through the existing channels at various sites and TC website.
Airports - Annual Registration of Mobile Equipment used at Airports www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm Stakeholder feedback was managed through existing channels at the various sites during Jan/Feb 2006. Stakeholder relationships are important and valued. Stakeholders were also consulted through TC websites. There are no outstanding issues for stakeholders. In 2009/10 stakeholders will continue to be managed through the existing channels at various sites and TC website.
Airports - Vehicle Parking Charges www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm Stakeholder feedback was managed through existing channels at the various sites during Jan/Feb 2006. Stakeholder relationships are important and valued. Stakeholders were also consulted through TC websites. There are no outstanding issues for stakeholders. In 2009/10 stakeholders will continue to be managed through the existing channels at various sites and TC website.
Ports - Public Port Revenues: Wharfage, Berthage, Storage, Harbour Dues, Utilities and Other Services Charges http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/ports/standards.htm http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/ports/standards.htm Last official consultations were completed by letters to the industry in January 2006. Ongoing feedback is possible through TC website. Stakeholder relationships are important and valued. There are no outstanding issues for stakeholders
Access to Information Requests - Fees Service standards are in the Access to information Act, Section 7
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/showdoc/cs/A-1/bo-ga:s_4-gb:s_6//en - anchorbo-ga:s_4-gb:s_6
Statutory deadlines have been met for 80% of requests. 100% of extension notices were sent within 30 days following the receipt of the request. 100% of transfer notices were sent within 15 days. The service standard is established by the Access to Information Act and the Access to Information Regulations. Consultations with stakeholders were undertaken for amendments done in 1986 and 1992.

B. Other Information 4:

In addition to complaint mechanism included in various Acts and Regulations (eg ATIP http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/showdoc/cs/A-1/bo-ga:s_30/20090701/en#anchorbo-ga:s_30), several complaint mechanisms have been developed and implemented for service standards related to user fees at public ports and public port facilities http://www.tc.gc.ca/Programs/Ports/standards.htm, at TC operated airports www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm, for the Canadian Aviation Regulations (Civil Aviation Issues Reporting System - CAIRS) http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/ManagementServices/QA/cairs.htm). A complaint mechanism policy "Handling of Complaints Related to Marine Safety User Fees and Applicable Service Standards" is now available on the web at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/service-standards/handling-complaints.htm.


The Internet links in this report may change following publication, since the various websites are updated regularly.

Notes:

  1. As established pursuant to the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees:

    • service standards may not have received parliamentary review; and

    • service standards may not respect all performance standard establishment requirements under the User Fee Act (e.g. international comparison; independent complaint address).

    • Performance results are not legally subject to section 5.1 of the User Fee Act regarding fee reductions for unachieved performance.

  2. Aviation Safety - Regulatory Fees: Documentation on Services Standards is currently in consultation with the National Working Group and will be published in the Fall 2009. The documentation includes:

    1. Directive on Civil Aviation Service Standards Framework;

    2. Staff Instruction on Civil Aviation Service Standards Improvement Process;

    3. Service Standards Activities List for services with charges and no charges. This document includes a description of services and related service standards. This information will be a focal point for external stakeholders doing business with any Transport Canada Civil Aviation Offices.

    Efforts are currently under way to monitor the performance within Atlantic Region, based on Ontario Region project pilot for tracking service standards.

  3. Marine Safety - Construction Standard Compliance Labels - Following consultations held as part of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 regulatory reform process, Marine Safety has concluded that the Single Vessel Label Program should be discontinued.

    The single vessel label program deals with one-of-a-kind vessels, most often home-built. In order to minimize any inconvenience to pleasure craft owners, the single vessel label program will be discontinued in advance of the upcoming update (2009) to the Small Vessel Regulations. The Regulations were published in Gazette I on April 25. Publication in Gazette II is expected in the fall with immediate coming into force. From the coming into force of the new Regulations, no fee will be charged for labels during a transition period of one year, therefore reported revenue and cost only cover the period from April 2009 to the fall of 2009. One year after the coming into force of the new Regulations TC will no longer issue compliance labels but will instead monitor and audit manufacturers and importers for compliance with the regulations, compliance labels will be issued by the manufacturers within the self-certification process.

    See http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/debs/obs/news/discontinuation/menu.htm for more information.

  4. Main achievement in improving service - The Treasury Board Secretariat Policy on Service Standards for External Fees does not include any specific requirement for measuring client satisfaction other than the need for service standards to be developed in consultation with paying and non-paying stakeholders and the reporting of performance.

    Transport Canada in its commitment to provide quality services and client satisfaction, has also implemented dispute mechanisms that apply to services, use of facilities and provision of goods for which user fees are charged. This initiative ensures that stakeholders' concerns and complaints are handled immediately by the various Groups and redress mechanisms undertaken as appropriate. Internet web site links to various Groups dispute mechanisms are identified under "Other Information" in the two Tables for User fee (Table 2-A) and External Fee reporting (Table 2-B).



Table 5: Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Transport Canada administers a number of transfer payment programs (TPPs). Transfer payments are transfers of money, goods, services or assets made from an appropriation to individuals, organizations or other levels of government, without the federal government directly receiving goods or services in return.

Transport Canada is subject to the revised policy on transfer payments, which requires departments to report on TPPs greater than $5 million.

In 2008-2009, Transport Canada administered the following TPPs where at least $5 million was spent or planned to be spent when the 2008-2009 RPP was published.

The summary of the three-year transfer payment programs plan is available on Transport Canada's website at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/finance/rpp/three_year_plan.htm.

An Efficient Transportation System

  1. Grant to the Province of British Columbia for ferry and coastal freight and passenger services.
  2. Contribution for ferry and coastal passenger and freight services
  3. Contributions to provinces toward highway improvements to enhance overall efficiency and promote safety while encouraging, industrial development and tourism from a regional economic perspective: Outaouais Road Development Agreement
  4. Gateways and Borders Crossing Fund
  5. Airports Capital Assistance Program
  6. Contribution Program for operating, capital and start-up funding requirement for Regional and Remote Passenger Rail Services
  7. Northumberland Strait Crossing subsidy payment under the Northumberland Strait Crossing Act (Statutory)
  8. Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund (TIF)
  9. Port Divestiture Fund
  10. Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program (SHIP)

An environmentally responsible transportation system

  1. Action Plan 2000 for Climate Change - Urban Transportation Showcase Program
  2. ecotransport Strategy

A safe and secure transportation system

  1. Divesture of St. Romuald
  2. Grade Crossing Improvement Contribution Program (approved under Railway Safety Act)
  3. Marine Security Contribution Program
  4. Passenger Rail and Urban Transit Security Contribution Program (Transit - Secure)
  5. Airports Policing Contribution Program
  6. Contribution to NAV Canada to support security for the 2010 Winter Olympic games

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Province of British Columbia for ferry and coastal freight and passenger services.

Start date: 1977

End date: ongoing

Description: The Province of British Columbia (BC) assumes the entire responsibility for the operation of ferry and coastal freight and passenger services.

Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and trade objectives.

Results Achieved: The grant allowed BC ferry service to continue to provide transportation of coastal freight and passengers.


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs
Total Grants 25,309 25,856 26,447 26,439 26,294 153
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 25,309 25,856 26,447 26,439 26,294 153

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The planned spending was based on an estimate of the BC consumer price index. Actual spending reflects the actual consumer price index, which was lower than anticipated.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009. There are currently no plans to do so under the 2009-10 to 2011-2012 fiscal year.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution for ferry and coastal passenger and freight services

Start date: 1941

End date: March 31, 2011

Description: Operating funding for three regional passenger and vehicle ferry services, CTMA Traversier Ltee; Northumberland Ferry Ltd.; and Bay Ferries Ltd.

Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and trade objectives.

Results Achieved: The services continued to provide transportation of freight and passengers in Atlantic Canada and Quebec. In addition, these services continued to support tourism and one continued to provide a link to a remote location.


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 11,493 13,345 11,243 16,181 16,056 ( 4,813 )
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 11,493 13,345 11,243 16,181 16,056 ( 4,813 )

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual spending was more than planned due to unforeseen maintenance costs (traffic decline and increase of fuel costs) as well as a contribution to a pilot project for one of the ferries to operate in winter months.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009. There are currently no plans to do so under the 2009-10 / 2011-2012 fiscal year.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to provinces toward highway improvements to enhance overall efficiency and promote safety while encouraging, industrial development and tourism from a regional economic perspective: Outaouais Road Development Agreement

Start date: January 17, 1972

End date: March 31, 2009

Description: Contributions to the Province of Quebec related to the Outaouais Roads Agreement toward highway improvements made to enhance overall efficiency and promote safety while encouraging regional and industrial development and tourism.

Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and trade objectives.

Results Achieved: Construction has started on Phase 1 of the extension of Highway 5 to prolong the divided highway while studies are underway for Phase 2. Two noise barriers projects - Maloney noise barrier and the St-Raymond noise barrier - were completed in 2008-2009. All of these projects contributed to enhance the safety and the efficiency of the Outaouais road network


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs
Total Grants 14,596 18,998 15,075 11,462 7,340 7,735
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 14,596 18,998 15,075 11,462 7,340 7,735

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The Outaouais Road Agreement is a cost sharing agreement between the federal government and the province of Québec where the federal government funds up to 50% of eligible costs on infrastructure projects covered under this agreement. There is no funding ceiling to this agreement. Transport Canada ensures that expenditures, under this agreement cover only up to 50% of eligible costs.

In 2008-09, delays occurred in the completion of the studies for Phase 2 of Highway 5 due to a narrow right of way established in the 1980's. The project design will most likely result in an encroachment on adjacent federal lands. Further discussions and preparation of alternative options were required to minimize the encroachment.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009. There are currently no plans to do so under the 2009-10 to 2011-2012 fiscal year.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Gateways and Border Crossings Fund (GBCF)

Start date: February 7, 2008 (Treasury Board approval)

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: The GBCF aims to improve the flow of goods and people between Canada and the rest of the world and enhance infrastructure at key locations in order to advance the competitiveness of the Canadian economy.

Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and trade objectives.

Results Achieved: The Report on Plans and Priorities indicates that the GBCF will promote infrastructure and technology investments, such as Intelligent Transportation Systems, that enhance multi-modal integration of major transportation systems, as well as their efficiency, safety, security, and sustainability. In this context, GBCF achieved the following results:

  • The majority of the $2.12 billion GBCF has been committed, and only $105 million (M) remains unencumbered.
  • The federal government signed Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) with the respective provincial jurisdictions and is engaged with the Atlantic Provinces (Atlantic Gateway), Ontario Québec (Continental Gateway and Trade Corridor) in analytical and consultative processes to develop gateway strategies that will ensure informed infrastructure investment decisions in support of international trade and investment. A separate table has been established with the Western Provinces.
  • The GBCF funded several studies and research to analyse the transportation network, identify other issues and opportunities, and look at future trade growth and patterns.
  • Several significant projects have been announced for all three gateways, including projects to improve the Core National Highway System, enhance strategic border crossings, and improve key ports.
  • Three contribution agreements and one MOU were signed in 2008-2009 for a total project commitment from Transport Canada of $154.5M dollars.

($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 0 0 210,960 207,831 4,246 206,714
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 0 0 210,960 207,831 4,246 206,714

Comment(s) on Variance(s): $5M was transferred to Parks Canada in 08/09 through an MOU for a total project commitment of $100M dollars.

Transport Canada had estimated it would spend a total of $210,960,000 in FY 2008-2009, the first year of the GBCF. As the fiscal year progressed, it became clear that such an estimate would not be met. There are several related explanations for this variance.

Treasury Board (TB) approval for the implementation of the GBCF was not received until February 2008, later than originally scheduled. As a result, Transport Canada did not receive the funds for FY 2008-2009 until July 2008.

In a number of cases, for projects that were publicly announced (by the Prime Minister, the Minister of Transport, or other Government of Canada representatives), business cases were not received from the project proponents and thus contribution agreements or MOUs could not be signed in a timely fashion.

The 2008 federal election also precluded the Department from obtaining Treasury Board approval for funding of specific projects throughout much of Fall 2008.

Finally, in several other cases, work by proponents on approved projects slowed down and some of the planned contributions had to be reprofiled to future years.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009. There are currently plans to do so under the 2009-10 to 2011-2012 fiscal year.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Airports Capital Assistance Program

Start date: April 1, 1995

End date: March 31, 2010

Description: Airports Capital Assistance Program (ACAP) assists eligible applicants in financing capital projects related to safety, asset protection and operating cost reduction.

Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and trade objectives.

Results Achieved: In 2008/09, ACAP contributed to 50 safety-related airside projects at 41 eligible airports.


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 36,277 32,306 49,800 51,062 51,062 (1,262)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 36,277 32,306 49,800 51,062 51,062 (1,262)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual spending was more than planned due to multi-year projects that proceeded more quickly than expected.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada conducted an internal audit on ACAP in 2007. A copy of the report is available via the following link: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2006/1577-06-101/menu.htm



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution Program for operating, capital and start-up funding requirement for Regional and Remote Passenger Rail Services

Start date: June 1, 2004

End date: March 31, 2010

Description: Provide operating funding for the regional and remote passenger rail services not provided by VIA Rail, for capital and start-up costs for regional and remote passenger rail services, and to address potential costs of transferring regional services.

Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and trade objectives.

Results Achieved: The contribution program allowed Keewatin Railway Company, Algoma Central Railway, Ontario Northland transportation Commission, and Tshiuetin Rail Transportation to continue to provide safe, reliable and sustainable passenger rail services.


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 13,080 12,437 5,600 16,514 16,514 (10,914)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 13,080 12,437 5,600 16,514 16,514 (10,914)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Funding of $5.6M was provided through the 2008-09 Main Estimates. However, it was not sufficient to maintain the network of regional and remote services and an additional $10.9M was received from Budget 2008 through Supplementary Estimates.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada completed an audit of this contribution program in 2003. The report can be found at the following link: http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/aas-audit-2003-424.htm



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Northumberland Strait Crossing subsidy payment under the Northumberland Strait Crossing Act (Statutory)

Start date: May 31, 1997

End date: April 1, 2032

Description: Subsidy payments are made to bridge operator to honour constitutional obligations to provide a transportation link between Prince Edward Island and the mainland

Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and trade objectives.

Results Achieved: The subsidy payments allowed the bridge operator to continue to provide an efficient year-round transportation service between Prince Edward Island and the mainland.


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs
Total Grants            
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments 54,265 54,897 54,897 56,066 56,066 (1,169)
Total Program Activity(ies) 54,265 54,897 54,897 56,066 56,066 (1,169)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): As per the Northumberland Strait Crossing Act, payments to Northumberland Strait Crossing are $41.9 million, adjusted annually for inflation in accordance with the Consumer Price Index.

The actual spending reflects the actual Consumer Price Index, which was more than originally anticipated.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009. There are currently no plans to do so under the 2009-10 to 2011-2012 fiscal year.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund (TIF)

Start date: October 19, 2006

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: To establish the best transportation network facilitating global supply chains between Asia and North America. Transportation infrastructure investments to address near term capacity problems and build strategically for the future

Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and trade objectives.

Results Achieved: Transport Canada completed two infrastructure projects and four others are under construction. In addition, five Shortsea SHIPping projects and five North Shore Trade Area projects were announced. Three contribution agreements were also signed.


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 8,400 40,403 82,100 101,748 56,592 25,508
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 8,400 40,403 82,100 101,748 56,592 25,508

Comment(s) on Variance(s): A number of the TIF projects that were scheduled to advance this year were either delayed or moved to future years by proponents. In particular, though it is moving well, the South Fraser Perimeter Road did not advance as quickly as planned. Also the slow down in the economy caused a number of the private sector projects to be pushed into future years as the proponent's capital plans had to be readjusted.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Port Divestiture Fund

Start date: April 1, 1996

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: Facilitate the divestiture process by providing a new owner with the resources to take over the port.

Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and trade objectives.

Results Achieved: As of March 31, 2009, Transport Canada had divested 471 of its original 549 ports (86% complete) and has saved taxpayers an estimated $531 million that would otherwise have been spent on the ports.


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 513 16,004 33,000 33,060 384 32,616
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 513 16,004 33,000 33,060 384 32,616

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual spending was less than planned because several significant port divestitures anticipated for 2008-09 were delayed to 2009-10.

Audit completed or planned: Audits of this program were completed in 2001, 2003 and 2004. While the 2001 report has been archived, the 2003 and 2004 reports are available via the following links: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2003/1577-03-026/menu.htm and http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2003/1577-03-020/menu.htm. Transport Canada is currently conducting an audit that was started in 2009.



Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program (SHIP) - Highway Component

Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program - Border Crossing Transportation Initiative and
Transportation Planning and Modal Integration (TPMI) Initiative

Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program - Intelligent Transportation Systems Initiative

Start date: March 29, 2001

End date:

SHIP - Highway Component: extended until March 31, 2009.

SHIP - Border Crossing Transportation Initiative and Planning and Modal Integration (TPMI) Initiative: extended until March 31, 2010.

SHIP - Intelligent Transportation Systems Initiative: extended until March 31, 2010.

Description:

SHIP - Highway Component: Provide federal funding under cost-shared contribution agreements with provincial and territorial governments for highway improvement projects to address the needs of Canada's National Highway System.

SHIP - Border Crossing Transportation Initiative and TPMI Initiative: Provide federal funding under cost-shared contribution agreements with provincial, territorial, municipal governments and other partners to improve the access to land border crossings, mobility, modal integration and transportation efficiency.

SHIP - Intelligent Transportation Systems Initiative: Provide federal funding under cost-shared contribution agreements with provincial, territorial, municipal governments and other partners to enable the undertaking of the deployment of intelligent transportation systems.

Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada's economic growth and trade objectives.

Results Achieved:

Highway Component: As of March 31, 2009, Canada has completed 9 of the 10 Provincial SHIP agreements and all three of the Territorial Agreements. The SHIP program has seen over 70 projects completed across Canada under the $600M program.

Border Crossing Transportation Initiative and Transportation Planning and Modal Integration (TPMI) Initiative: As of March 31, 2009 all of the SHIP Border projects have been completed. Prior to final payment being made by Canada for a project, the recipient must submit a signed affidavit stating the project was completed as per Engineering guidelines. Once the Province of British Columbia submits its final affidavits, the remaining funds in the SHIP Border fund will be released and all funding will be disbursed.

Intelligent Transportation Systems Initiative: As of March 31, 2009, Transport Canada continues to collaborate with stakeholders in advancing the development and deployment of intelligent transportation systems. 23 projects were successfully concluded, including the implementation of 18 road weather information stations along the National Highway System; the implementation of technologies to provide road and traffic information for traveller information systems; and the implementation of technologies to increase efficiencies for commercial vehicles at roadside inspection stations.


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 80,407 19,755 2,287 17,805 15,907 (13,620)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 80,407 19,755 2,287 17,805 15,907 (13,620)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Funding of $2.287M was provided through the 2008-09 Main Estimates. However, subsequent funding was provided through Supplementary Estimates for two components: the SHIP Border Crossing Transportation Initiative and Planning and Modal Integration (TPMI) Initiative, and the SHIP Intelligent Transportation Systems Initiative.

The SHIP Intelligent Transportation Systems Initiative spent less than planned due to the delays associated with the construction of the projects (weather, industry's capacity, timing of activities) and, to a lesser extent, to delays in the provincial and federal approval process of the projects (provincial capital planning and available funding, environmental assessment process, permits, etc) required prior to construction start.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada completed an audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009 that was approved by the Audit and Review Committee in May 2009. Posting of the report on the internet is pending.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Action Plan 2000 for Climate Change - Urban Transportation Showcase Program (UTSP)

Start date: June 21, 2001

End date: March 31 st, 2009

Description: To test and measure the impacts of strategies to reduce urban greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from transportation, so as to lay a foundation for the adoption of effective, integrated GHG reduction strategies in urban centres across Canada by 2010.

Strategic Outcome: An environmentally responsible transportation system that contributes to Canada's sustainable development objectives.

Results Achieved: The showcase component of UTSP, which aims to demonstrate, measure and monitor the effectiveness of a range of integrated urban GHG reduction strategies, began analysis of the final results for the Halifax, Whitehorse, and Toronto showcases. Preliminary results from Halifax show a thirty percent modal shift from cars to the new transit service that will provide a two kiltotonne per year reduction in GHG emissions. In Toronto, there was a reported 17,500 tonne reduction in GHG emissions and the development of a strong regional partnership of organizations, businesses, governments and others dedicated to making commuting more sustainable. Whitehorse final project results include an estimated GHG reduction of ninety tonnes from elements of the project that were measurable; as well, the municipality is now replicating project elements in forthcoming municipal infrastructure work.

Implementation of showcase activities in the following five municipalities, Region of Waterloo, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Gatineau-Montreal, and Quebec City were completed as of March 31, 2009. However, measurement and compiling of results is ongoing for these showcase municipalities. Progress reports indicated that these showcase municipalities are reaching their objectives to change travel behaviour, foster replication, and innovate in the delivering of urban transportation infrastructure and services. All proponents cite the involvement of Transport Canada as a critical factor in implementing the projects.

The second component of UTSP is the Information Network, which focuses on information transfer in order to drive replication of effective sustainable transportation strategies. Results in 2008/2009 for the Information Network include:

  • The development of thirteen case studies and issue papers, as well as four case study updates, that highlight sustainable transportation strategies and issues;
  • Creation of a bike-sharing guide that will aid Canadian municipalities in determining the feasibility of a bike sharing system and how to implement one;
  • Supported two awards programs: The Transportation Association of Canada's Sustainable Urban Transportation Award and The Federation of Canadian Municipalities' Sustainable Transportation Award;
  • Sponsored fifteen sustainable transportation workshops and conference sessions across Canada in collaboration with federal departments, sector associations, and non-profit groups that were attended by over nine hundred targeted stakeholders.
  • Undertook an extensive upgrade to the Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator (UTEC), allowing municipalities to more accurately measure GHG and CAC emissions from transportation projects;
  • Upgraded the UTSP website in order to comply with CLF 2.0 requirements; a major task owing to the fact the website is over four thousand pages in size;
  • Developed and hosted four webinars that shared information with over three hundred transportation practitioners on effective sustainable transportation initiatives;
  • Hosted a workshop for UTSP showcase proponents that enabled information sharing on project implementation; and
  • Produced an annual report that summarized UTSP activities, which is available at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/utsp/

($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies and Programs in support of sustainable transportation Sustainable Transportation Development and the Environment
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 3,841 6,687 5,043 8,383 7,969 ( 2,926 )
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 3,841 6,687 5,043 8,383 7,969 ( 2,926 )

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Supplementary Estimates (A: $527,000; B:$2,195,000; C:$390,912) and internal cash flow of $227,457 were approved after the Main Estimates for a Total Authorities of $8,383,000. This resulted in an adjusted variance or surplus of $414,000 due to one proponent who significantly reduced the scope of its project.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada is currently conducting an audit of the Urban Transportation Showcase Program.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: ecotransport Strategy

Start date: April 1, 2007

End date: March 31st, 2011

Description: The ecotransport Strategy involves a series of initiatives designed to reduce the amount of fuel consumed, improve transportation efficiency and introduce cleaner transportation technologies. Launched as part of the Government's Environmental Agenda, this strategy features the ecomobility program; the ecotechnology for Vehicles Program and the ecoenergy for Personal Vehicles Program; and the ecofreight program. The ecoAUTO Rebate Program was introduced separately but is complementary to the programs for personal vehicles.

  • The ecomobility program is a $10 million initiative that seeks to work with municipalities to help cut urban-passenger transportation emissions by encouraging commuters to choose public transit or other sustainable transportation options. Working with cities across Canada, this initiative will help develop programs, services and products that improve sustainable transportation options in urban areas.
  • The ecotechnology for Vehicles Program includes in-depth testing and showcasing of advanced technologies vehicles in order to raise awareness and foster important new partnerships with the automotive industry and encourage the introduction of a broader range of environmental technologies in Canada. The ecoenergy for Personal Vehicles Program, delivered by NRCan will provide fuel consumption information and decision-making tools to encourage consumers to purchase fuel-efficient vehicles that are currently available in the market. Together these two programs have a combined funding of $36 million.
  • The ecofreight program, with $61 million in funding, features new steps to reduce the environmental and health effects of freight transportation through technology and will be delivered by Transport Canada and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). These steps include addressing regulatory barriers, reducing fuel use and emissions, establishing a Freight Technology Demonstration Fund, providing cost-shared funding for the purchase and installation of proven technologies, building industry partnerships, and supporting up to four pilot projects to demonstrate the installation and use of shore-based power for marine vessels in Canadian ports.
  • The ecoAUTO Rebate Program is a $264 million program to provide performance-based rebates to consumers who purchase fuel-efficient vehicles. It requires eligible vehicles to meet a performance standard or fuel consumption rating. This is intended as an interim measure to increase consumer purchases of more efficient advanced technology vehicles before the new fuel-efficiency standards take effect with model year 2011.

Strategic Outcome: An environmentally responsible transportation system that contributes to Canada's sustainable development objectives.

Results Achieved *: Financial incentives and assistance were provided to members of the transport sector to increase uptake of emission-reducing technologies. In 2008-2009, over 116,000 ecoAUTO Rebate applications were processed, and almost $120 million was distributed to eligible applicants. Six projects, which will receive funding of about $2 million, continue to be implemented under the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund, and an additional nine projects for $3.5 million in funding were selected in January, 2009 and are underway. The two rounds of funding under the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund have allowed an uptake of 1254 pieces of emerging technology equipment across four modes of transportation. Similarly, fifteen projects with funding of $3.7 million are underway under the Freight Technology Incentives Program, and an additional 17 projects, with funding of $3.8 million, were selected in February, 2009. The two rounds of funding under the Freight Technology Incentives Program have allowed an uptake of 1654 pieces of proven technology equipment. Under the ecomobility Program, 14 projects worth $3 million were selected, of which three contribution agreements were signed in 2008-2009 and the remainder are under negotiation; proposals for a second round of funding were received on May 1, 2009. Following a competitive process, the Port Metro Vancouver was awarded $3 million in funding (including $2M under the Marine Shore Power Program and $1M under the Western Economic Diversification) to implement marine shore power at Canada Place - the first such initiative in Canada and the third in the world.

* The financial and non-financial results includes Transport Canada's program only


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Programs in support of Sustainable Development Sustainable Development and the Environment
Total Grants 0 71,342 100,200 168,758 119,864 (19,664)
Total Contributions 0 0 11,569 11,669 5,805 5,764
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 0 71,342 111,769 180,427 125,669 (13,900)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Supplementary Estimates of $75,558,000 and other authorities of $7,000,000 were approved for a ‘Total Authorities' of $168,758,000 resulting in an adjusted variance of $48,894,000 due to lower application intake due in part, to a downturn in the economy resulting in fewer automobile purchases. Variance was due to downturn in the economy resulted in fewer automobile purchases and lower ecoAuto rebate applications.

Supplementary Estimates of $4,660,820 and other authorities of $1,103,000 were approved for a ‘Total Authorities' of 11,669,000 resulting in an adjusted variance of $1,203,749. Variance was due to time required to establish programs' structure (staffing, developing guidelines and forms, initiating outreach activities); delays in acquiring vehicle technology to be tested; and late reprofiling not reflected in the above.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009. There are currently no plans to do so under the 2009-10 to 2011-2012 fiscal year.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Divestiture of St-Romuald

Start date:

End date: March 31, 2009

Description: Divestiture of St-Romuald Marine Emergency Duties Training Assets to the Province of Quebec.

Strategic Outcome: A safe and secure transportation system that contributes to Canada's social development and security objectives.

Results Achieved: Lump-sum contribution of $6,300,000 was provided to the province of Quebec, allowing it to continue to provide Marine Emergency Duties training in French in the foreseeable future. Seafarers wishing to be trained in the French language will receive the necessary training to obtain a recognized level of proficiency in marine emergency duties practices and procedures, thereby contributing to the safety on our waters. The program will also attract and qualify Canadian seafarers thereby increasing the number of francophone seafarers in the Canadian marine industry.

The divestiture will allow the Department to focus on the policy and regulatory framework while the Province assumes responsibility for the continued provision of MED training in the French language for the next 25 years.


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity   Transportation Safety and Security
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 0 0 0 6,300 6,300 (6,300)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 0 0 0 6,300 6,300 (6,300)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): No funding was provided through the 2008-09 Main Estimates. However, Transport Canada subsequently received funding of $6.3M in fiscal year 2008-09 through Supplementary Estimates to support the St-Romuald Contribution Program.

Note: In December 2008, the Minister provided an approval in principle to continue consultations with the Province of Quebec on the divestitutre of St-Romuald within the context of a supplemented offer of contribution not to exceed $6.3M for the divestiture of St-Romuald training facility and related assets in fiscal year 2008-09. Although the province of Quebec signed an agreement in principle on March 27, 2009 for $6.3M, the signature on the final agreement is pending.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grade Crossing Improvement Contribution Program (approved under Railway Safety Act)

Start date: 1989

End date: Ongoing

Description: Payments made to railway companies and municipalities to improve the safety at public road/railway grade crossings.

Strategic Outcome: A safe and secure transportation system that contributes to Canada's social development and security objectives.

Results Achieved: Since 1989, over $100 million has been spent by Transport Canada to fund improvements at public road/railway grade crossings across Canada, under federal jurisdiction. It is conservatively estimated that the program is responsible for 53% of the reduction in collisions at grade crossings.

In 2008-09, 143 grade crossing improvement projects were funded through this program to enhance the safety of Canada's road/railway system. Examples of project improvements included the installation of flashing lights, bells and gates; the interconnection of crossing signals to nearby highway traffic signals; the modification of operating circuits within automatic warning systems; the improvement of roadway alignment or grades.


($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system Transportation Safety and Security
Total Grants 140 155 300 120 120 180
Total Contributions 3,505 7,280 7,145 7,325 7,315 (170)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 3,645 7,435 7,445 7,445 7,435 10

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual spending of grants was less than planned primarily due to a decrease in the number of applications received under the grant program to close crossings and the remainder was transferred to the contribution program to improve crossings.

Actual spending of contributions was more than planned primarily due to an increase in the number of projects funded and the remainder was due to cash flow management.

Audit completed or planned: An audit of the Grade Crossing Review Program was completed in November 2001. The report has been archived. There are currently no plans to do an audit during the 2009-10 to 2011-2012 fiscal years.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Marine Security Contribution Program

Start date: December 1, 2004

End date: November 30, 2009

Description: Financial assistance to aid in the speedy implementation of security measures and to help offset the costs of operators who would not have the financial capacity to cover security costs without significantly affecting operating costs.

Strategic Outcome: A safe and secure transportation system that contributes to Canada's social development and security objectives

Results Achieved:

  • Transport Canada has continued to provide financial contributions towards marine security enhancements
  • All funded projects are inspected by Transport Canada Regional Security Inspectors to verify that projects have been completed
  • The program has contribution agreements that have been signed or are pending totalling $103.1M.

($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system Transportation Safety and Security
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 12,559 30,806 28,046 15,300 7,826 20,220
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 12,559 30,806 28,046 15,300 7,826 20,220

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Transport Canada received $28M through the Main Estimates. However, due to program requirements funding was re-profiled to 2009-2010. In addition, $2.5 million was part of the department's Strategic Review commitments. Actual spending reflects total authorities provided.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada is currently conducting an audit of the Marine Security Contribution Program. The final report is scheduled to be released in 2009.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Passenger Rail and Urban Transit Security Contribution Program (Transit - Secure)

Start date: June 22, 2006

End date: March 31, 2009

Description: The program is designed to enhance the security of Canada's passenger rail and urban transit system by providing incentives to operators of passenger rail and urban transit services to implement new and enhanced security measures rapidly.

Strategic Outcome: A safe and secure transportation system that contributes to Canada's social development and security objectives.

Results Achieved:

  • Passenger rail and urban transit security in Canada was enhanced through the completion of 130 security projects. This program helped passenger rail and urban transit operators make improvements to the security of their operations (e.g. enhanced physical security and access controls, employee training, public awareness campaigns and increased domain awareness).
  • In completing these projects, passenger rail and urban transit operators made extensive use of guidelines, technical advice (from Transport Canada Security Inspectors) and best practices (as shared at Surface and Intermodal Security Conferences) made available through the program.
  • Security enhancements undertaken by this program have enhanced the ability of Canadian passenger rail and urban transit operators to prevent, mitigate, respond to and recover from terrorist attacks.

($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system Transportation Safety and Security
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 0 8,077 61,400 69,400 58,894 2,506
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 0 8,077 61,400 69,400 58,894 2,506

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Total spending was less than planned primarily because operators had some significant difficulties (e.g. securing heritage approvals, Ottawa bus strike, labour shortages) in completing projects, running up to the program completion date. Most of these challenges were successfully addressed by operators and projects were completed, however, they did result in under expenditures.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada conducted an Audit of Rail and Urban Transit Security Contribution in 2008-2009 that was approved by the Audit and Review Committee in May 2009. Posting of the report on the internet is pending.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Airports Policing Contribution Program

Start date: April 2008

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Program was established in 2002 under the responsibility of the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA). In 2007, a decision was made to transfer the program to Transport Canada. The program was created to assist eligible, designated airports in financing the heightened cost of security-related policing in accordance with Transport Canada's regulated security measures.

Strategic Outcome: A safe and secure transportation system that contributes to Canada's social development and security objectives

Results Achieved:

  • Performance data from airports indicates an effective armed police officer response to alarms at screening checkpoints and restricted area access points.
  • The 2008-09 data will be used as a reference point for future assessments.

($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system Transportation Safety and Security
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 0 0 15,645 15,621 14,216 1,429
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 0 0 15,645 15,621 14,216 1,429

Comment(s) on Variance(s): When the program was transferred from the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority to Transport Canada in 2008-09, the original funding allocation of $14,307,960 was maintained. A re-examination of the funding allocation was envisioned to assess how best to distribute the remaining $1,337,400 that was lapsed annually. However, this did not occur because the remaining amount was cut in the Budget 2009 announcement to phase out the program to certain recipients. The remaining variance is due to eligible costs for some recipients being lower than expected.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009. There are currently no plans to do so under the 2009-10 to 2011-2012 fiscal year.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution to NAV Canada to support security for the 2010 Winter Olympic games

Start date: June 23, 2008

End date: June 30, 2010

Description: NAV Canada Olympic Security Contribution Program provides financial assistance to NAV Canada for systems and services to ensure the safe movement of security aircraft in the Sea-to-Sky corridor and to ensure aviation domain awareness and control of restricted airspace during the 2010 Winter Olympics.

Strategic Outcome: A safe and secure transportation system that contributes to Canada's social development and security objectives

Results Achieved:

  • Installation of Multi-lateration equipment in the Sea-to-Sky corridor
  • Provision and installation of new Vancouver area control centre (ACC) controlled VHF radio frequencies to allow for communications capability in the Sea-to-Sky corridor
  • Provision and installation of Aviation Security Operations Command Centre positions and related data feeds at the RCMP Integrated Security Unit
  • Provision and installation of new ACC controlled VHF radio frequencies to allow for communications capability around the Vancouver Airport with civilian and DND aircrafts

($ thousands) Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Between
Planned &
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Program Activity Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system Transportation Safety and Security
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 0 0 0 6,600 6,600 (6,600)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 0 0 0 6,600 6,600 (6,600)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): No funding was provided through the 2008-09 Main Estimates. However, Transport Canada subsequently received funding of $6.6M in fiscal year 2008-09 through Supplementary Estimates to support the Program.

Audit completed or planned: Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2008-2009.



Table 7: Horizontal Initiatives

Name of Horizontal Initiative: ecotransport Strategy

Name of lead department(s): Transport Canada (TC)

Lead department program activity: Clean Air from Transportation

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2007-2008

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: 2010-2011*
(*ecomobility and Marine Shore Power programs were extended to 2011-2012)

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $461.6 million*
(*As of 2012, total allocation will be $463 million due to a $1.4 million allocation for a one-year extension of the ecomobility ($1.1 million) and Marine Shore Power programs ($0.3))

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The ecotransport Strategy involves a series of initiatives designed to reduce the amount of fuel consumed, improve transportation efficiency and introduce cleaner transportation technologies. Launched as part of the Government’s Clean Air Agenda, this strategy features the ecomobility program; the ecotechnology for Vehicles Program; the ecoenergy for Personal Vehicles Program (Natural Resources Canada); and the ecofreight programs which include Natural Resources Canada’s (NRCan’s) ecoenergy for Fleet Program. The ecoauto Rebate Program and the Environment Canada’s (EC’s) Vehicle Scrappage program were introduced separately but are complementary to the programs for personal vehicles (see http://www.ecoaction.gc.ca/ecotransport/index-eng.cfm).

  • The ecomobility program is a $9.3 million initiative that seeks to work with municipalities to help cut urban-passenger transportation emissions by encouraging commuters to choose public transit or other sustainable transportation options. Working with cities across Canada, this initiative will help develop programs, services and products that improve sustainable transportation options in urban areas. This program was extended by one year to 2012.
  • The ecotechnology for Vehicles Program ($14.1 million) includes in-depth testing and showcasing of advanced technologies for vehicles in order to raise awareness and foster important new partnerships with the automotive industry and encourage the introduction of a broader range of environmental technologies in Canada. The ecoenergy for Personal Vehicles Program ($21 million), delivered by NRCan, will provide fuel consumption information and decision-making tools to encourage consumers to purchase fuel-efficient vehicles that are currently available in the market.
  • The ecofreight programs, with $58.7 million in funding, features new steps to reduce the environmental and health effects of freight transportation through technology and will be delivered by TC ($36.7 million) and NRCan ($22 million). These programs include the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund ($9.3 million), providing cost-shared funding of demonstrations to test and measure new freight transportation technologies in real-world conditions; the Freight Technology Incentive Programs ($9.4 million), providing cost-shared funding to help recipients to purchase and install proven emission-reducing technologies; the ecoFreight Partnership Program ($6.6 million), building industry partnerships; the Marine Shore Power Program, extended by one year to 2012 ($6 million), demonstrating the installation and use of shore-based power for marine vessels in Canadian ports; the National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry ($5.4 million), identifying regulatory barriers and solutions in collaboration with provinces and territories, so that the Canadian trucking industry can embrace emissions-reducing technologies; and the ecoEnergy for Fleets programs ($22 million), aiming to reduce fuel use and emissions in commercial and institutional fleets via training, sharing of best practices, anti-idling campaigns, technical analysis to look for potential improvements and other technology opportunities.
  • The ecoauto Rebate Program (ending in March 2009) provides performance-based rebates to consumers who purchase fuel-efficient vehicles. It requires eligible vehicles to meet a performance standard or fuel consumption rating. To be eligible for a grant, vehicles must be purchased by December 31, 2008, and applications must be received by March 31, 2009. However, any applications received before March 31, 2009, but not yet processed by that date, will be processed early in fiscal year 2009/2010 under the 2008/2009 fiscal authority. TC will also implement and complete surveys, which will be comprised of completed surveys of Canadian consumers and dealers. The Program files and the survey information will provide accurate data on consumers’ and dealers’ awareness and acceptance of alternative fuel-efficient vehicles and on the Program’s effectiveness.
  • EC’s Scrappage Program is a national program of $92 million over four years, intended to promote the accelerated scrappage of older vehicles.

Shared outcome(s): The overall objective of the ecotransport Strategy is to reduce energy use and emissions in the transportation sector. All the specific measures envisioned in the strategy are expected to contribute to reduced fuel consumption and, as a result, the personal vehicle fleet as well as the freight sector will use less energy. Other measures will help to reduce the demand for personal transportation and encourage modal shifts to more sustainable transportation options. The strategy will lead to reduced greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants that contribute to smog, thus protecting the environment and the health of Canadians.

Governance structure(s): Under the ecotransport Strategy, each of the three departments implicated (TC, NRCan and EC) will manage their respective programs in accordance with defined governance structures for the individual programs concerned. Each program is subject to a Results-based Management Accountability Framework (RMAF), which includes committee structures, risk management strategies, and provisions for performance measurement, information management, auditing, evaluation and reporting. In addition, a broader Horizontal Management Accountability and Reporting Framework (HMARF) for the Clean Air Agenda was developed and encompasses, among others, all regulatory and program initiatives for clean transportation, including those of the ecotransport Strategy. The HMARF includes governance structures; financial, measurement, risks and information management strategies; and lines of reporting.

($ thousands)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2007-11
1. Transport Canada 1 Clean Air from Transportation a) eco-MOBILITY

9,300*

*Includes
1.1 million
allocated
to
2011-12
due to
program
extension.

2,803

Feasibility studies, municipal tools and resources for implementing Transportation demand management (TDM), pilot TDM projects, training materials and learning workshops; and

Reduce GHG emissions and reduced air pollutants due to modal shifts towards public transportation, higher occupancy of personal vehicles, and active transportation – all of which are less emissions intensive travel choices.

Clean Air from Transportation b) eco-
technology for Vehicles
14,100 5,512

Evaluate and showcase near and long term advanced technologies in the Canadian vehicle market, including more efficient and cleaner gasoline and diesel engines, electric, solar, hydrogen fuel cells, biodiesel etc, as well as individual advanced technology components; and

Reduce emissions of GHGs and air pollutants as advanced technologies gain market penetration over time.

Clean Air from Transportation c) National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry 5,400 2,153

Environmental benefits are reflected in the anticipated technology take-up from activities under the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund and the Freight Technology Incentive Program

Clean Air from Transportation d) Freight Technology Demonstration Fund 9,300 3,718

Support technology demonstrations across all transportation modes and stimulate technology take-up in the four freight modes according to the modal distribution of the projects; and

Reduce emissions of GHGs and air pollutants as advanced technologies gain market penetration over time.

Clean Air from Transportation e) Freight Technology Incentives Program 9,350 4,110

Provide cost-shared funding to companies and non-profit organizations in freight transportation to help them to purchase and install proven emission-reducing technologies; and

Reduce in emissions of GHGs and air pollutants as advanced technologies gain market penetration over time.

Clean Air from Transportation f) eco-FREIGHT Partnerships 6,550 1,860

Build and maintain partnerships within the transportation sector to reduce emissions from freight transportation through fast and flexible voluntary actions that can support the regulatory framework; and

Support agreements with industry in all freight modes.

Clean Air from Transportation g) Marine Shore Power

6,000*

*Includes
0.3 million
allocated
to
2011-2012
due to
program
extension

1,406

Demonstrate the use of shore-based power for marine vessels in Canadian ports to reduce air pollution from idling ship engines in some of Canada’s largest urban centres; and

Reduce air pollutants in the downtown areas of major port cities.

Clean Air from Transportation h) ecoauto Rebate Program 2

264,000

includes
11.3 million
for
Service
Canada
operational
requirements

2,243

includes
300,000
for
Service
Canada
operational
requirements

Provide consumer rebates to encourage the purchase of fuel-efficient vehicles;

Couple with a Green Levy to discourage the purchase of fuel-inefficient vehicles (administered by Finance Canada and Canada Revenue Agency); and

Reduce fuel consumption, commensurate with GHG emission reductions

Clean Air from Transportation i) Analytical and Policy Support 4,000 1 1,194  
2. Natural Resources Canada Clean Energy a) eco-ENERGY for Personal Vehicles 21,000 6,050

Provide information to consumers on fuel consumption and decision-making tools such as vehicle labels, guides and information, and undertake partnerships, to encourage more fuel efficient buying, driving and maintenance practices;

Administer the GHG Memorandum of Understanding with the vehicle industry; and

Reduce fuel consumption with associated reductions in GHG emissions. Air pollutant emissions will also be reduced.

Clean Energy b) eco-ENERGY for Fleets 22,000 7,159

Provide training to professional drivers representing the heavy truck, transit, intercity motor-coach, school bus, urban light and medium vehicle drivers and off-road machinery including mining, construction and farm tractors;

Expect fleets to take actions to reduce fuel use/emissions;

Expect truck stops to participate in annual idle-free truck stop campaigns; and

Expect reductions in fuel consumption with associated reductions in GHG emissions. Air pollutant emissions will also be reduced.

3. Environment Canada Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are reduced a) Scrappage 92,000 41,923

National program over four years, intended to promote the accelerated scrappage of older vehicles.

Total

463,000*
*Includes
a
$1.4 million
allocated to
2011-2012
for a
one-year
extension
of the
ecomobility
($1.1 million)
and Marine
Shore Power
programs
($0.3)

$80,130   

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact information: Alain Paquet, Manager, Performance Measurement Unit, Environmental Program, TC : 613- 990-5394


1 As part of ecotransport strategy, $4 million is allocated to analytical and policy capability in support of Transport Canada’s ecotransport strategy programs with the exception of the ecoauto Rebate program.

2 Transport Canada is responsible for the overall objectives of the program while Service Canada is responsible for the program delivery.


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Marine Security

Name of lead department(s): Transport Canada

Lead department program activity: Marine Security

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: Budget 2001

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: Ongoing

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): Not Applicable

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Marine Security is a horizontal initiative that is linked to the Government’s key priority of “A Safe and Secure Canada”. Its aim is to improve the security of Canada’s marine domain, including territorial waters, and inland waterways, and at Canadian ports. Elements of this initiative include:

  • Increased domain awareness, surveillance and tracking of marine traffic;
  • Improved co-ordination and cooperation on marine security, including the development of Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOCs);
  • Security clearance program for marine sector employees;
  • Implementing new detection equipment in Canadian ports to monitor containers;
  • Additional resources for emergency and law enforcement response capacity in the marine domain; and
  • International initiatives, which will ensure that Canada will meet current international standards and obligations, including those being developed by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

Shared outcome(s): The following are planned shared outcomes and activities in marine security.

Key areas include:

  • Domain awareness – Canada’s surveillance and awareness efforts within marine areas;
  • Responsiveness – Enforcement efforts in cooperation with all relevant police forces and security agencies;
  • Safeguarding – Efforts to enhance the physical security of marine infrastructure of other critical infrastructure in or around marine areas; and
  • Collaboration – Efforts in support of all other activities to ensure that the various federal and provincial departments, agencies and police forces and other groups with a responsibility for marine security.

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;
  • Increased on-water presence;
  • Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;
  • Increased capability to respond to marine threats;
  • Increased stakeholder awareness and understanding;
  • Increased stakeholder ability to meet marine security requirements; and
  • Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Effective domain awareness;
  • Rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents;
  • Security-conscious culture among stakeholders;
  • Stakeholder compliance with security regulations; and,
  • Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

Ultimate Outcomes:

  • An effective and efficient marine security system;
  • High public confidence in Canada’s marine security system; and
  • A marine security system that facilitates the efficient and legitimate flow of people and goods.

Strategic Outcome:

  • A marine system that contributes to the security, safety and prosperity of Canadians and of our allies.

Governance structure(s): The Government of Canada created the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group (IMSWG), chaired by Transport Canada, to identify and coordinate federal actions in support of Canada’s objectives with regard to public security and anti-terrorism in the marine domain as well as its international marine security obligations. Under the guidance of the IMSWG, key departments are responsible for the following:

Transport Canada

Leads the Government’s initiatives in marine security enhancements, including:

  • Policy coordination;
  • Chairing the IMSWG;
  • Regulatory development in support of marine security initiatives;
  • Marine Security Oversight and Enforcement Program;
  • Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program;
  • Marine Security Contribution Program; and
  • Participation in the Marine Security Operations Centres.

Department of Fisheries and Oceans/Canadian Coast Guard

Contributor to the enhancement of the level of domain awareness within the Canadian exclusive economic zone (EEZ) through increased surveillance activities and the implementation of shore-based automatic identification system (AIS) infrastructure and the development of a long-range vessel tracking capability. As well, increased its level of on-water capability for providing platform support to respond to marine security incidents.

Also participates in the Marine Security Operations Centres.

Public Safety Canada

Public Safety Canada (PS) is Canada’s lead department for public safety. PS coordinates efforts with portfolio agencies, federal partners, other levels of government (including international allies) and stakeholders in building national policies and programs dealing with national security, emergency management, law enforcement, corrections, crime prevention and border integrity. This includes, for example, the development and implementation of marine-based counter-terrorism exercises.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

CBSA’s mandate is to manage the nation’s borders at ports of entry by administering and enforcing the domestic laws that govern trade and travel, as well as international agreements and conventions. The work of the CBSA includes identifying and interdicting high-risk individuals and goods, working with law enforcement agencies to maintain border integrity and engaging in enforcement activities, which include seizure of goods, arrests, detentions, investigations, hearings and removals.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

The RCMP is responsible for enforcing federal statutes, leading national security and organized crime investigations across Canada both on land and waterside and for maintaining border integrity between ports of entry.

Department of National Defence

Contributes to enhanced domain awareness of the strategic high-traffic coastal area. Leads the Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOCs) on the coasts and participates in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway MSOC.

($ thousands)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation (from Start to End Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
1. Transport Canada Marine Security a) Marine Security Coordination Fund 16,200 2,000

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;

Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;

Security-conscious culture among stakeholders; and

Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

b) Oversight and Enforcement 54,070 11,553

Enhanced security procedures at ports, marine facilities and Canadian Vessels;

Increased stakeholder awareness and understanding;

Stakeholder compliance with security regulations; and

Security-conscious culture among stakeholders.

c) Marine Security Policy and Interdepartmental Coordination 5,000 1,000

Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;

Security-conscious culture among stakeholders;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and

Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

d) Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program 11,800 2,000

Increased stakeholder awareness and understanding;

Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities; and

Stakeholder compliance with security regulations.

e) Marine Security Contribution Program 115,000 12,500

Increased ability to meet marine security requirements;

Enhanced security measures at ports and marine facilities;

Security-conscious culture among stakeholders; and

Stakeholder compliance with security regulations.

f) Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (design team) New
funding
1,900

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;

Effective domain awareness; and

Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

2. Department of Fisheries and Oceans Safe and Accessible Waterways a) Increased On-Water Patrols 10,000
(annually
and
ongoing)
10,000

Increased on-water presence; and

Effective domain awareness.

b) Automatic Identification System and Long Range Identification and Tracking 27,500 12,000

Increased volume of vessel traffic data;

Increased awareness; and

Effective domain awareness.

c) Great Lakes/ St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (Design Team) $1,060
(funding
sunsets
on
March 31,
2008)
$400

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;

Effective domain awareness; and

Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces and municipalities.

d) Marine Security Enforcement Teams 18,000 4,500

Increased on-water presence;

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased capability to respond to marine threats;

Effective domain awareness; and

Rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents.

e) Construction of Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels 68,500 4,000

CCG will procure MSPV vessels;

RCMP will report on the enforcement results of the MSET program.

f) Increased Surveillance Flights 7,000
(annually
and
ongoing)
7,000

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment; and

Effective domain awareness.

3. Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) Enforcement a) Radiation Detection Equipment Initiative 31,670
(over
5 years)
5,420

Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities.

b) Passenger and Crew Screening Initiative 34,900 7,224

Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities.

c) Cruise Ship Inspections 2,350
annually
2,350

Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities.

4. Public Safety Policing and Law Enforcement a) Marine-Based Counter-terrorism Exercises (sometimes referred to as scenario based training)

200
ongoing

$1,000
to date

200

Improved understanding of roles and responsibilities; contribution to the development of robust interdepartmental procedures and thereby enhanced interdepartmental coordination for Port Domain Awareness and Emergency / Consequence Management

b) Great Lakes / St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (Design Team) 1,600 308

Overall policy coordination for the implementation and direction of the permanent Great Lakes / St. Lawrence Marine Security Operations Centre.

Improved domain awareness in the Great Lakes / St. Lawrence Seaway region by implementation of a permanent facility.

4. Department of National Defence Generate and Sustain Integrated Forces – Generate and Sustain Forces Capable of Maritime Effects – Operational Units a) Coastal Marine Security Operations Centres 165,000 22,450

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and

Effective domain awareness.

b) Interdepart-mental Maritime Integrated Command Control and Communication

10,000

+7,000
recurring
O&M
yearly

135

(for
definition
phase)

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security; and

Effective domain awareness.

Conduct Operations – Domestic and Continental Operations – Conduct Ongoing Operations and Services to Canadians c) Increased On-Water Presence/ Coordination (Marlant and JTF(P))

5,000

Annual
recurring
amount

5,000

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased on-water presence; and

Effective domain awareness.

6. Royal Canadian Mounted Police Marine Security a) National Ports Project 1,029 1,029 Safeguarding
b) National Port Enforcement Teams (NPET) 4,440 4,440

NPET are integrated, intelligence-led, and conduct federal-statute investigations applicable to Canadian ports; and

The enforcement objective is to prevent, detect and interdict organized criminal activity, contraband, and people who may pose a threat to the safety and security of Canada and other countries.

c) Marine Security Emergency Response Team Training 560 560

Increased capability to respond to marine threats; and

Rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents.

d) Marine Security Emergency Response Teams

Re-profiled funding carried forward to 2007-2008

5,630

 

0

5,630

 

0

Increased capability to respond to marine threats; and

Rapid and effective response to marine threats and incidents.

Forensic Identification e) Marine Transportation Clearance Program 180 180 Improved security measures at ports and marine facilities.
Marine Security f) Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (interim)

2,491

Note:
Interim
funding
ended
March 31,
2008.
Permanent
funding
has been
approved
as of fall
2008-09

2,491

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased cooperation between government departments and agencies involved with marine security;

Effective domain awareness; and

Increased collaboration: internationally, industry partners, multilateral organizations, provinces, and municipalities.

g) National Waterside Security Coordination Team 839 839

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment; and

Effective domain awareness.

h) Marine Security Enforcement Teams

7,432

(recurring)

7,432

Increased on-water presence;

Increased surveillance and awareness of marine security environment;

Increased capability to respond to marine security threats;

Effective domain awareness; and

Rapid and effective response to marine threats.

Total 600,000+  134,541   

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not applicable

Contact information: Shannon Lenahan, Chief Planning and Resource Management — Marine Security, Transport Canada; 613- 949-0600; shannon.lenahan@tc.gc.ca


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative

Name of lead department(s): Transport Canada

Lead department program activity: Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs

Start date of the Horizontal Initiative: October 19, 2006

End date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2014

Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $ 1.01 billion

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative (APGCI) is intended to strengthen Canada’s competitive position in global commerce. It is an integrated package of investment and policy measures that will advance the capacity and efficiency of the Asia Pacific Gateway and Corridor into North America. It reflects the Government of Canada’s undertaking to work in partnership with provincial governments; private sector leaders and other stakeholders to further develop and exploit the geographic advantage and strong transportation system of Canada’s west coast. The initiative seeks to establish Canada’s Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor as the best transportation network facilitating global supply chains between North America and Asia.

Shared outcome(s): The following are planned shared outcomes and activities for the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative.

Key areas include:

  • Gateway capacity - Strategic infrastructure investments and network improvements;
  • Competitiveness – Increase Canada’s share of Asia-Pacific commerce;
  • Efficiency and reliability – improve goods movement throughout supply chains;
  • Security and border efficiency – establishing a secure and efficient transportation network linking Canadian and North American markets; and
  • Integrative policy frameworks and regulations that address new approaches to governance.

Ultimate Outcome:

  • Boost Canada’s commerce with the Asia-Pacific region;
  • Increase the Gateway’s share of North American-bound container imports from Asia;
  • Improve the efficiency and reliability of the Gateway for Canadian and North American exports; and
  • Ensure travel routes are safe, open to through traffic and minimize environmental impacts.

Governance structure(s): The Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Pacific Gateway is the champion for this initiative, with support in this effort provided by Transport Canada. The Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities is accountable for the management of resources in the Asia Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund. These two ministers are jointly responsible for the APGCI.

The APGCI is horizontal initiative and its development and implementation involve a number of other key federal departments/agencies. While each is ultimately accountable for its own programs/activities and associated resources from the APGCI fund, the implicated federal departments/agencies are also responsible for contributing to the overarching objectives of the initiative. All federal partners are accountable for the day-to-day management of their respective component of the APGCI. Furthermore, each department/agency is expected to provide regular updates to the two lead ministers, via a Director General level Interdepartmental Steering Committee on the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative.

An overall Horizontal Performance Framework has been prepared in collaboration with all the departments /agencies involved in the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative. This framework will provide a sound, coordinated and ongoing performance measurement and evaluation strategy to assess the overall process in implementing the initiative. Partner departments and their role in the initiative are as follow:

Transport Canada

Transport Canada (TC), as the lead department, reports to the Minister for the Pacific Gateway and to the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. TC’s Policy Group is responsible for the on-going coordination, management, integration and strategic development and implementation of the Initiative overall. Other federal departments and agencies, the four western provinces and stakeholders from the private sector are consulted and involved in building consensus on decisions related to the Initiative.

TC is also responsible for the management of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund (TIF), whose primary objective is to address capacity challenges facing the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor. The projects funded under TIF will enhance the competitiveness, efficiency and capacity of Canada’s multi-modal transportation network and will be focused specifically on the movement of international commerce between the Asia-Pacific region and North America.

While transportation infrastructure is at its core, the initiative also focuses on interconnected issues that impact on the further development and exploitation of the Asia Pacific Gateway and Corridor. As part of a fast track planning and consultative process to inform and the development of long-term strategic directions for this initiative, TC is engaged in a number of non infrastructure / competitiveness measures, including:

  • Policy renewal agenda to examine policy issues that directly impact the efficiency of the transportation infrastructure that defines the Gateway and Corridor, or its exploitation;
  • Security review to assess issues related specifically to the Gateway’s reputation and performance;
  • Roundtable events across western provinces and an international conference to advance understanding of the long-term challenges and opportunities of the gateway by tapping into Canadian and international academic expertise;
  • The integration of the three major ports in British Columbia Lower Mainland to improve efficiency and capacity;
  • Support for the establishment of the Lower Mainland Trucking Forum to reach recommendations, on a consensus basis, on methods for improving the efficiency of trucking operations at Vancouver ports; and
  • Studies directly related to the Gateway operations and efficiency, to better understand and improve the multi-modal infrastructure network and increase the productivity of the full supply chain.

Foreign Affairs and International Trade

The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) Pacific Gateway International Marketing Group is responsible for the ongoing development and implementation of an international marketing strategy in co ordination with all stakeholders. The objective is to promote greater use of the Gateway as Asia-Pacific travel and supply chain route of choice for North American and Asia-Pacific importers, exporters, investors and transportation companies.

This strategy, developed in consultation with stakeholders, includes targeted communication products, outgoing and incoming missions, and showcasing the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor’s advantages at key trade, investment and technology shows, conferences and seminars in Canada, Asia-Pacific, Europe and North America.

Key DFAIT missions abroad are actively engaged in advancing Canada as the gateway and corridor of choice through dialogue with transportation companies, producers, exporters and/or importers in each of their respective regions to showcase the strengths of the Canadian transportation network. These missions encourage investment and technology transfer, play an advocacy role on key APGCI issues such as security and border efficiency, provide intelligence back to Canada to support policy development and help determine what messages resonate in their markets.

DFAIT has established a core group of Trade Commissioners from Asia-Pacific and North American missions who understand the gateway and the opportunities it presents for Canada's economy and are, thereby, able to support the government's objective of establishing Canada as the gateway and corridor of choice between North America and Asia-Pacific.

Canada Border Services Agency

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) is responsible for the implementation of a marine container inspection operation located at the Port of Prince Rupert. The marine container inspection operation will allow CBSA to develop operations to ensure containers arriving from other countries are properly inspected by means of effective processes and state of the art technology.

CBSA’s marine container inspection operation plays a vital and strategic role, integrated within the overall Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative.

Parks Canada Agency

Parks Canada is responsible for the maintenance and recapitalization of highways that pass through national parks, including the Trans Canada Highway (TCH). The TCH is a major pan-Canadian highway that connects the west coast and its Asia-Pacific linkages to the rest of Canada, especially markets in the western provinces.

Parks Canada is in the process of four-laning (twinning) a ten km section of the congested TCH through the Banff National Park of Canada that will result in improved capacity and efficiency. The funding provided by the APGCI will help ensure the timely completion of this section of highway upgrading and hence support the initiative’s objective of improving the movement of goods through the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor.

Western Economic Diversification Canada

Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD) was responsible for two elements of the first phase of the APGCI; a business opportunities and awareness raising initiative entitled “Seizing the Gateway Opportunity: Western Canada and the Asia Pacific Challenge”, and funding dredging work on the Fraser River to maintain a competitive shipping channel.

As part of “Seizing the Gateway Opportunity”, WD supported: research on successful gateway economies and how best to capitalize on the long-term value added economic opportunities presented by rise of the Asia Pacific market; case studies of successful Canadian SMEs in the Asia-Pacific market; a Canadian presence at the China International Fair for Investment and Trade; a study tour of Western Canadian innovation capabilities by Trade Commissioners from Canadian Posts in Asia-Pacific; and an assessment of community level needs in Saskatchewan and Manitoba for doing business in and with Asia.

WD was provided a $4 million grant over two years to the Fraser River Port Authority to support dredging activities on the Fraser River shipping channel. This funding provided the Fraser River Port Authority with the capacity to maintain its existing business and position itself to attract new business, thereby taking advantage of the Asia Pacific Gateway opportunities. This temporary measure enabled the port to accommodate the increasingly large shipping vessels, until a long-term solution is developed that would provide for self-sustaining access to port facilities.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) is responsible for the APGC Skills Table. Modeled on the Sector Council Program, the APGC Skills Table has been established in March 2008 to help address the skills and labour pressure issues related to the APGCI. The development of the APGC Skills Table follows a one-year consultative and planning process designed to inform APGCI’s future policy direction and investment decisions.

HRSDC was provided $3M over 4 years to fund projects prioritized by the APGC Skills Table. These funds will support projects in priority areas identified by the APGC Skills Table. HRSDC is providing an additional $2M to support the establishment and operation of the Skills Table (total federal investment is $5M). The Skills Table acts as a clearinghouse, ensuring sharing of data, projects, timetables, strategies, recruitment and retention practices, and related ideas. It provides a focused forum to identify, coordinate and leverage investments to address APGC-related skills issues.

($ thousands)
Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity (PA) Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total Allocation Date) Planned Spending for
2009-10
Expected Results for
2009-10
1. Transport Canada Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative Transportation Infrastructure Fund(TIF) 900,150 224,605 Advancement of key strategic APGCI multi-modal infrastructure projects with public and private sector partners
Coordination, Management 6,500 1,300 Continued inter-departmental coordination and management of the APGCI

Fast Track Process

2,300

0

N/A (completed in 2007-08)
Competitiveness Investment 12,650 5,521

Identification of opportunities to attract value-added activities and investments in sectors complementary to the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor

Deepened international partnerships

Launch of the Public Engagement program

2. Foreign Affairs and international Trade International Commerce - Managing and delivering commerce services and advice to Canadian business Marketing the APGCI 7,000 2,000 Increased awareness and usage of Canada’s Pacific Gateway the APGCI among stakeholders in the Asian and North American stakeholders
3. Canada Border Services Agency   Marine Container Inspection Operation at Port of Prince Rupert 28,000 5,000 Completed implementation of the Marine Container Inspection Program
4. Parks Canada Agency Throughway management Banff Trans Canada Highway Twinning 37,000 5,000 Completed twinning of three kilometres of the Banff Trans Canada Highway
5. Western Economic Diversification Business development and entrepreneur-ship Seizing the Gateway opportunity 400 0 N/A (completed in 2007-08)

Dredging the Fraser River

4,000

0

N/A (completed in 2007-08)
6. Human Resources and Skill Development Asia Pacific Gateway and Corridor Skills Table Skills and Labour Pressure 3,000 943 Several projects designed to address skills pressures in Gateway sectors will be launched.
Total 1,001,000  244,369   

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

Contact information: Stéphanie Arbez, Policy Advisor, Transport Canada; 990-2251; Stephanie.Arbez@tc.gc.ca



Table 8: Sustainable Development Strategy


Transport Canada's Sustainable Development Strategy 2007-2009 responds to key issues and focuses on areas where the department can make a real difference towards achieving sustainable transportation. In the Sustainable Development Strategy, Transport Canada outlines the sustainable development commitments, targets and performance measures the department will use to measure the success. The department's commitments align with broader Federal Sustainable Development Goals as well as the Greening Government Operations Goals.


Federal Sustainable Development Goals Greening Government Operations Goals

Goal 1 - Water - Clean and secure water for people, marine and freshwater ecosystems

Goal 2 - Clean Air - Clean air for people to breathe and ecosystems to function well

Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Goal 4 - Sustainable Communities - Communities enjoy a prosperous economy, a vibrant and equitable society, and a healthy environment for current and future generations

Goal 5 - Sustainable development and use of natural resources

Goal 6 - Strengthen federal governance and decision making to support sustainable development.

Building Energy: To be a leader in the reduction of greenhouse gas and other air emissions through the optimization of energy efficiency and conservation, and the implementation of renewable energy technologies.

Vehicle Fleet: To be a leader in fleet management, so that planning, acquiring, managing and disposing of vehicles minimize negative effects on the environment.

Green Procurement: To be a leader by integrating environmental performance considerations into procurement including planning, acquisition, use and disposal.


Note: The following table provides an overview of the department's achievements for the 2008-2009 period only. To view Transport Canada's Sustainable Development Strategy in its entirety, please visit: http://www.tc.gc.ca/pol/en/acs/sd/sds0709/menu.htm.

SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 1.3 - Green Commute

Federal SD Goals: 3 & 4


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Deliver three commuter options workshops per year to interested public and private employers.

The number of workshops delivered and their outcomes.

One workshop delivered in 2008-2009 in cooperation with the City of Kingston. The workshop received a very positive evaluation from attendees.

By 2008-2009, work with federal partners to amend existing policies to enable reduction of single occupancy vehicle trips. Examples include parking and accommodation policy. The number of federal policies reviewed and/or amended. No policies were evaluated. Progress was made in the reduction of single occupant vehicle trips through the introduction of a ride-matching website developed in cooperation with the City of Ottawa and the continued expansion of the Transit Pass Program in the National Capital Region.

SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 1.4 - Explore Use of Economic Measures

Federal SD Goals: 2, 3 & 6


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Work with partners to explore the use of market incentives to increase the production and purchase of environmentally friendly motor vehicles, ongoing between 2007-2008 and 2009-2010.

Number of consultations conducted.

Consulted with the Canadian Trucking Alliance on their enviroTruck proposal and with the automotive industry regarding development of threshold criteria for 2008 model year vehicles for the ecoAUTO Rebate Program.

Consult with stakeholders about design options and administration/ implementation issues ongoing between 2007-2008 and 2009-2010.   Consultations with industry stakeholders from marine, rail and aviation sectors were on-going.

SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 2.1 - Skills Development in the Transportation Sector


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

From 2007-2008 to 2009-2010, work in cooperation with stakeholders in the public and private sectors to raise the profile of the transportation sector careers, and to act as a catalyst for the exchange of ideas, expertise, and experience in transportation skills development.

Number of jurisdictions that agree to distribute compendium electronically to stakeholders.

Distributed materials from the Council of Deputy Ministers of Transport and Highway Safety's Policy and Planning Support Committee Skills Development Task Force to a number of key stakeholders (Council's Policy and Planning Support Committee; Motor Carrier Passenger Council of Canada; Canadian Trucking Human Resources Council; Transportation Association of Canada's Education and, Human Resources Council).

Ongoing cooperation with federal-provincial-territorial jurisdictions to produce tools (including a compendium) for the transportation stakeholders to use in identifying and implementing strategic responses to skills development challenges.

Number of provincial/territorial jurisdictions in regular dialogue with Transport Canada regarding transportation skills development issues.

Number of teleconference/ meetings with federal/provincial/ territorial jurisdictions to discuss skills development issues.

Through meetings and teleconferences, Transport Canada is in regular contact with federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions on skills development issues through a variety of fora, including:

  • The Policy Planning Support Committee of the Deputy Ministers Responsible for Transport and Highway Safety;
  • The Transportation Association of Canada;
  • The Western Transportation Advisory Council; and
  • Various Gateway and Corridor skills development initiatives, such as the Asia Pacific Gateway and Corridor Skills Table.

SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 2.2 - Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation

Federal SD Goals: 3


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Subject to the availability of funds, and depending upon the recommendations of the preliminary assessment, increase the understanding and knowledge of the occurrence of permafrost and of the thermal regime in order to assess the vulnerability of the landing strip (Kuujuuaq Airport) to forecasted climatic changes over the next 20 years, 2008-2009.

Usefulness of study results in understanding climate change impacts and adaptation. (Subject to funding).

The Kuujjuaq landing strip has been instrumented and soil samples have been analyzed.


SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 3.1 - Intelligent Transportation Systems

Federal SD Goals: 3


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Work with partners to build on the successes of previous investments in intelligent transportation systems.

Number of deployment projects funded.

35 active projects, of which 23 were completed. 26 ongoing projects, of which 25 were completed.

Funding to be provided for research, development and deployment projects in each of fiscal years 2007-2008, 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. Number of R&D projects fundedNumber of agreements signed with partners. 13 new agreements were signed, including amendments to existing agreements to add new project work.

SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 3.2 - Promote Shortsea Shipping


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Raise the profile of shortsea shipping in North America, ongoing between 2007-2008 and 2009-2010.

Enhance understanding of the viability of shortsea shipping, its benefits, and barriers to implementation, ongoing between 2007-2008 and 2009-2010.

Targeted shortsea shipping initiatives.


 

 



Five shortsea shipping projects were selected for federal contributions under the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative.

Hosted, in collaboration with Atlantic provinces, a Regional Shortsea Shipping Working Session.

Launched an invitation for expressions of interest for shortsea shipping projects under the Atlantic Gateway Initiative.

 

  Completion of studies in key areas of policy, markets, trade, urban transportation and sustainability.

“Study on Potential Hub-and-Spoke Container Transhipment Operations in Eastern Canada for Marine Movements of Freight (Shortsea Shipping) completed.

Evaluation of Environmental and Social Impacts and Benefits of Shortsea Shipping in Canada completed.


SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 3.5 - Quebec City - Windsor Corridor Modal Choice Study


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Complete a study of the Quebec City - Windsor Corridor by 2008-2009. This will involve developing models to analyze the impact of potential policy decisions on freight and passenger modal choice decisions in the Quebec-Windsor Corridor.

Development and calibration of passenger modal choice model by 2008-2009.

Expert recognition of quality of model from within and outside government (robustness of estimates, predictive capacity, etc.).

Work of the freight modal choice freight modelling was completed. Report is in progress.

Data gathering for the passenger modelling is being obtained through the High-Speed Rail feasibility study. Econometric modelling will be done during 2009-2010.


SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 4.1 - Promote Advanced Technology Vehicles

Federal SD Goals: 2 & 3


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Evaluate the performance of advanced technology vehicles on an annual basis.

Number and type of vehicles and technologies tested with results presented in various report formats.

The EcoTechnology for Vehicles Program acquired, evaluated and presented results on 14 advanced vehicle technologies and developed 50 technology articles, 5 videos, 18 technical bulletins, 15 animations and several print publications to inform Canadians about clean vehicle technologies.

Conduct activities to raise public awareness on an annual basis that also allows program information to be disseminated. Number and type of activities attended throughout the year. Attended 19 events and provided in-depth information to over 50,000 Canadians via its web site and outreach activities. Participated in various industry consultations, work groups, conferences and seminars.

SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 4.2 - Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption

Federal SD Goals: 2 & 3


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Collect, verify and report on fuel consumption of new vehicles, on an annual basis.


Timely data collection from all manufacturers.

As of March 31, 2009, all but one manufacturer had reported the required data for 2008 model year. Processed 2009 model year data and worked with motor vehicle manufacturers to correct issues with the data.

Audit and verification of data. The Fuel Consumption Program completed compliance testing on 34 vehicles as part of its confirmatory audit test program.
Annual reporting of results. Annual reporting for Fuel Consumption Program results will be available with the Fall 2009 release of the Vehicle Programs Division's 2008-2009 Annual Report.
Maintenance of the Vehicles Fuel Economy Information System database, on an ongoing basis.   The Vehicles Fuel Economy Information System application was redesigned and includes an online interface, which allows manufacturers to submit and correct data more efficiently.

SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 4.3 - Reduction of Emissions from the Rail Industry

Federal SD Goals: 2 & 3


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Work with the Railway Association of Canada and Environment Canada to fully implement the commitments negotiated under the Memorandum of Understanding, between 2006 2007 and 2009-2010.

Reductions in emissions achieved due to the Memorandum of Understanding.

Continued to work with the Railway Association of Canada and Environment Canada. Rail industry is making good progress towards the 2010 targets for Class I Freight, Regional/Short Lines, Intercity and Commuter rail operations. Total emissions of sulphur oxides decreased significantly by 60.2 per cent and total nitrogen oxide emissions from all rail operations decreased by 6.9 per cent.


SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 5.1 - Promote Best Practices for Environmental Management in the Transport Sector

Federal SD Goals: 1, 2 & 3


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Increase harmonization of international emission reduction efforts through Transport Canada participation in international forums such as International Civil Aviation Organization, International Maritime Organization, etc. by 2008 2009.

 

 


With the U.S. Government, under the National Academy of Sciences' Transportation Research Board, participate on the Airports Cooperative Research Panel to study and assess environmental impacts from airport activities and develop mitigative strategies by 2008/2009.

Harmonization of international reduction efforts as evidenced by the ratification of international regulations of emission reductions and codes of practices and guidelines endorsed by international bodies.

 

 

 

Published findings of Airports Cooperative Research Panels .

Work is continuing on international emission reduction efforts through the International Civil Aviation Organization as Transport Canada is an active member. Continued work to address greenhouse gas emissions from international aviation at the Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection and the Group of International Aviation and Climate Change of the International Civil Aviation Organization.

The second phase of the Airport Air Quality Guidance is complete with two additional chapters proposed for development in 2009-2010.

Continued participation on the Airports Cooperative Research Panel. Several reports have been published and available to the public including the ‘Guidebook on Preparing Airport Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventories' and the ‘Deicing Planning Guidelines and Practices for Stormwater Management Systems.


SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 5.2 - Marine Sector Pollution Control

Federal SD Goals: 1


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Further Examination of Sulphur Emission Control AreaDevelop an inventory of sulphur emissions from ships, by 2008 2009.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further Examination of Sulphur Emission Control AreaSulphur emission levels.

 






 

 

 

 

 



Emission Control Area: Canada, along with the U.S., made an application to the International Maritime Organization for the development of an Emission Control Area on both the east and the west coasts of Canada. Current sulphur levels in fuel on average is 1.7 per cent for domestic ships and 2.3 per cent for foreign.

 

 

 

 

Ballast Water Management
To assist in the development and approval of shipboard treatment systems capable of meeting international performance standards by 2008-2009.
Ballast Water Management
Number of systems developed and approved.
Ballast Water Management: Efforts continue in working with the shipping industry to reach this goal. No systems approved in Canada yet, 6 under development, about 40 under development around the world. International Maritime Organization has approved about 7 systems, one has Administration approval (Alfa Laval, Norway).

Hazardous and Noxious Substances spill response regime
Develop the legislative structure required to put a Hazardous and Noxious Substances regime in place together with the necessary regulations and standards starting in 2007-2008.

Create the required Hazardous and Noxious Substances response mechanism to provide a nationally consistent method of responding to, and managing the response to marine Hazardous and Noxious Substances incidents and spills from ships and during the loading and unloading of ships at chemical handling facilities starting in 2007 2008.

Hazardous and Noxious Substances spill response regime
Number of regulations and standards developed.

Effectiveness of national Hazardous and Noxious Substances incident response framework.

Hazardous and Noxious Substances spill response regime
Internal consultations underway to evaluate legislative requirements and legal implications of development of a Hazardous and Noxious Substances spill response regime.

Final report on Hazardous and Noxious Substances Trade and Traffic in Canada expected later in 2009.

On-going assessment of international chemical spill response regime amongst States that have ratified the International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation, 1990 (OPRC) - Protocol on Preparedness, Response and Co-operation to Pollution Incidents by Hazardous and Noxious Substances, 2000 (HNS Protocol).

Hazardous and Noxious Substances Discussion Document finalized in 2008-2009. However, updates are needed to reflect recent changes with regards to statistical information and to propose new options for implementing a Hazardous and Noxious Substances regime.

Ship Waste Management
Finalize a program to improve the provision of shore side waste reception in ports by 2008-2009.
Ship Waste Management
Improvements to waste reception at ports.
Ship Waste Management
Improvements to waste reception at ports ongoing. Terms of reference have been developed for a comprehensive technology study.

National Aerial Surveillance Program
Continue to increase the effectiveness of the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP) by increasing the frequency of patrols and expanding surveillance to areas not normally patrolled, such as the Arctic.

Improve capability for observing, detecting and reporting illegal discharges and identifying the vessels that are responsible for polluting Canada's marine environment. By 2007-2008, Transport Canada's modernized Moncton-based Dash 8 aircraft will be fully operational with trained crews and by 2008-2009, an identical capability will be implemented on the West Coast.

National Aerial Surveillance Program
Number of pollution patrol hours flown in each Region - per month, per year.

 


 


Number of ship source pollution incidents and number of mystery spills detected - per mission, per month, per year.

Number of vessels visually observed and number identified by the aircraft's Automatic Identification System - per hour, per mission, per month, per year.

Number of prosecutions resulting from NASP pollution patrols - per year.

National Aerial Surveillance Program
2,341 patrol hours (629 missions) conducted versus target of 2,500 patrol hours (93.6 per cent). Includes 304 pollution patrol hours in the Arctic; 1564 in Atlantic Region (Newfoundland, Maritimes, Quebec and Ontario); and 472 in Pacific Region. Unplanned long aircraft maintenance periods impacted on patrol hours.

National Aerial Surveillance Program reported 183 pollution sightings: 164 classified as mystery spills and 19 as ship source spills.

 

National Aerial Surveillance Program reported visually observing 9,947 vessels and 76,767 using Automatic Identification System.

 


Evidence gathered using the MSS6000 system aboard the National Aerial Surveillance Program aircraft have lead to one successful prosecution (M/V Alida Gorthon) and three Administrative Monetary Penalties.


SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 6.1 - Transportation Data and Information

Federal SD Goals: 6


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Conduct, on a regular basis, assessments to identify the most important data gaps with regards to transportation activity and energy use for all modes, between 2006 2007 and 2009-2010.

Identification of the major data gaps and development of a strategy to address them.

Developing a data strategy to address high priority data gaps at the federal, provincial, regional or local level.


SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 6.2 - Understanding Economic, Social and Environmental Costs of Transport

Federal SD Goals: 6


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Transport Canada will lead the development of an environmental analytical framework, by 2008-2009 to estimate the impact of various transportation-related environmental policies and instruments. This initiative includes the evaluation of the costs of the following emissions: clean air (CO, PM2.5, PM10, NOX, VOCs, O3, SO2), GHGs and noise. The emphasis is on human health impacts.

To have a synthesis report made available to the public by 2008 2009.

Better sense of priorities in assessing the relative importance of each cost element.

Release of synthesis report.

Released synthesis report entitled “Estimates of the Full Cost of Transportation in Canada.

Background report entitled “Evaluation of Total Cost of Air Pollution Due to Transportation in Canada was released.


SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 6.3 - Funding for Sustainable Development Initiatives


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

In 2006-2007, Transport Canada will establish an internal sustainable development strategy fund of up to $ 1million/year for three years for innovative projects that make significant contributions to sustainable transportation. Approved projects will be considered SDS commitments.

Beginning in 2006-2007, select projects for funding on an annual basis in accordance with established criteria.

Implement approved projects, beginning in 2007-2008.

Number of projects funded and total investment.

Results of specific projects, including relevant improvements to environmental quality.

Total spending for the SDS Fund in 2008/09 was $700K of the $1 million allocated.

Approved 13 innovative projects, of which, 3 were unable to proceed due to unforeseen circumstances. The 10 remaining projects were successful in a number of different areas related to transportation.


SDS Departmental Goals: Commitment 7.1 - Transport Canada Environmental Management System

Federal SD Goals: 1, 3, 4, 5 & 6
Greening Government Operations Goals: Building Energy, Vehicle Fleet & Green Procurement


Expected Results 2008-09 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-09

Conformance with the environmental management system framework (see Appendix B of the sustainable development strategy) by 2009-2010.

Level of conformance with the environmental management system framework.

  • 17 per cent reduction (from the 1998-1999 baseline) in greenhouse gas emissions from Transport Canada's operations (2007/08).
  • Transport Canada has reported using 7683L of E85 fuel in 2007-2008. Although other ratios of ethanol blended fuel are available in Canada no data is available as to the specific amount purchased by Transport Canada.
  • 22 per cent of Transport Canada known contaminated sites have been remediated and an additional 23 per cent are under risk management, 11 per cent require no action.
  • Transport Canada complies with provincial and municipal requirements regarding recycling in facilities. Programs are in place at all regional and all headquarters facilities.
  • Transport Canada maintains a full inventory of Ozone Depleting Substances equipment and is working on a strategy to reduce or eliminate equipment containing Ozone Depleting Substances.
  • Work continues to ensure safe drinking water at all Transport Canada owned and operated facilities. Drinking water management plans have been developed and are in place for all Transport Canada airport facilities.
  • Transport Canada has developed a checklist, guidance document and template for facilities to determine if an E2 plan is required. Currently Transport Canada has E2 plans for 54 facilities across Canada.
  • Transport Canada collects information annually on actions taken to purchase greener goods and services through the Corporate Services Group.
  • Transport Canada has reviewed the draft wastewater guidelines from Environment Canada and is currently waiting for the guidelines to be finalized. Once the guidelines are in place Transport Canada will work to ensure full compliance at all facilities.

From Words to Work (Part 7)


All commitments in this section contribute to Federal SD Goal 6

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will develop and obtain senior management approval of an ISO-compliant Sustainable Development Policy Statement, by 2008-2009.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
Sustainable Development Policy Statement is in progress.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will highlight key 2007-2009 SDS commitments, targets and indicators in the department's annual Report on Plans and Priorities.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
Transport Canada's Reports on Plans and Priorities include a detailed table that highlights all Sustainable Development Strategy commitments for the planning period.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada recognizes that the support of the department's senior management is critical. The department will undertake to ensure that the accountability accords of those senior managers responsible for implementing specific actions in the strategy reflect their respective 2007-2009 SDS commitments.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
A performance measure related to sustainable development was included in the guidance document issued to executives to aid in the completion of their performance accords. As such, the majority of senior management accords contained a performance measure related to sustainable development. Of the 167 senior management performance accords reviewed, approximately 75 (45 percent) reported results against the sustainable development performance measure.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will continue to hold regular meetings (for the 2007 2008 and 2009-2010 period) of the department's internal Sustainable Development Strategy Committee to oversee and coordinate implementation of the strategy, and to provide a forum for sharing sustainable development information and best practices across departmental groups and regions.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
As the 2007-2009 Sustainable Development Strategy is in an implementation phase, regular meetings of the Sustainable Development Strategy Committee were not necessary. Transport Canada created an internal Director-General level Committee on Environmental Issues that serves to support the sharing of information.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will undertake a review of training and competency needs for staff involved in the implementation of sustainable development commitments and objectives, by 2008-2009. The department will develop and implement a training plan to ensure that Transport Canada sustainable development training courses (including the department's Sustainable Development Capacity Course) are available as required.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
The Sustainable Development Capacity Course was offered once during 2008-2009, with 14 participants attending.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will also join with other government departments and the Canada School of Public Service to design and deliver Government of Canada Sustainable Development training material. Delivery to begin in 2007-2008.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
Transport Canada contributed $2,000 toward the development of this interdepartmental course offering. Three sessions were offered to federal employees in 2008-2009.

SDS Departmental Goal:
The department will undertake efforts to increase employee awareness and understanding of sustainable transportation as well as the department's environment and sustainable development programs and activities. This will include learning events and sustainable transportation articles in departmental newsletters on an ongoing basis.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
Several initiatives undertaken to increase employee awareness, including: an Environmental Programs Open House which included displays and electronic presentations promoting their programs; an Environment Week booth; a battery collection station; articles on the Transport Canada intranet; and a newly created Sustainable Development Speaker's Corner that held two events.

SDS Departmental Goal:
A status report on sustainable development commitments, targets and performance measures will be included in the department's annual Departmental Performance Report.

SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
Transport Canada's Departmental Performance Reports include a separate table that provides detailed performance information and progress against Sustainable Development Strategy targets for the reporting period.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will produce an annual SDS Progress Report, supplemental to the departmental performance report. The results of this report will be presented annually to Transport Canada's senior management committee.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
Progress Reports for 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 are under development.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will conduct a review of its sustainable development strategy every three years - the next taking place in 2008-2009.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
The new Federal Sustainable Development Act has changed the timelines associated with departmental Sustainable Development Strategies.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will engage its external National Advisory Group, beginning in 2008-2009, to provide strategic direction on the department's sustainable development priorities, review progress of strategy implementation, and make recommendations pertaining to review findings.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2008-2009:
The new Federal Sustainable Development Act has changed the requirements and process associated with departmental Sustainable Development Strategies.



Table 9: Green Procurement

The Policy on Green Procurement effective April 1, 2006, established environmental performance considerations as a key factor in procurement decisions that occur throughout the life cycle of assets and acquired services. The objective of the Policy on Green Procurement is to advance the protection of the environment and support sustainable development by integrating environment performance considerations into the procurement decision-making process. Deputy heads are accountable to ensure that the objectives of the Policy are realized and are required to report on green procurement performance through the annual RPP and the DPR.

Supplementary information on green procurement can be found at http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/ecologisation-greening/index-eng.html.

Meeting Policy Requirements

Has the department incorporated environmental performance considerations in its procurement decision-making processes?


In progress

Summary of initiatives to incorporate environmental performance considerations in procurement decision-making processes:

A national bulletin is being prepared for distribution to all managers in Transport Canada regarding the procurement of greener office supplies and the availability of on-line training in green procurement.

Every year, an investment planning exercise presents an opportunity to review short and long term plans for the procurement of fleet motor vehicles. A framework and strategy is prepared and approved at the highest department level. The plan focuses on alternative fuel vehicles as well as maximizing return on investment for this commodity.

The Department has implemented an aggressive strategy to deal with printers and photocopiers replacing such devices with multi-functional units - a pilot project was delivered successfully and PWGSC is now tendering to supply the remaining floors in Place de Ville Tower C as the next phase.

Results achieved:

At this stage it is difficult to report actual and hard results but the departmental focus on environmental considerations remains a top priority and maintains a very high profile in decision-making.

Contributions to facilitate government-wide implementation of green procurement:

N/A

Green Procurement Targets

Has the department established green procurement targets?


No

Are these green procurement targets the same as those identified in your Sustainable Development Strategy (Table 8)?


No

Summary of green procurement targets:

N/A

Results achieved:

N/A



Table 10: Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits


Response to Parliamentary Committees
No recommendations were received.


Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

1) 2008 May OAG report.

Chapter 3-Oversight of Air Transportation Safety-Transport Canada

The objective of this audit was to determine the extent to which Transport Canada is effectively managing the transition to a safety oversight approach based on safety management systems (SMS). The Department agrees with all of the recommendations found in the audit. The report may be found at the following link: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_200805_03_e_30699.html#hd3a

2) Chapter 6-Conservation of Federal Official Residences

The objective of this audit was to determine whether the federal government has adopted the management practices required for the conservation of its official residences. This audit was carried out at the same time as the quinquennial special examination of the National Capital Commission that we conducted in 2007. The National Capital Commission published the report on that special examination in November 2007. Examination work was carried out at Transport Canada, but there were no recommendations made to the department. The report may be found at the following link: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_200805_06_e_30702.html

3) Chapter 8-Special Examinations of Crown Corporations-An Overview

This chapter provides an overview of the special examination practice drawn from the special examinations carried out between December 2002 and February 2008 and the impact of legislative and other changes since December 2000 when the OAG last reported to Parliament on the special examination practice. Finally, summaries of the key findings are provided of the 11 special examinations reported since January 2006. The following Crown Corporations under Transport Canada's portfolio were examined:

  • The Atlantic Pilotage Authority
  • Blue Water Bridge Authority
  • Canada Lands Company Limited
  • Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  • National Capital Commission

The report may be found at the following link: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_200805_08_e_30704.html

4) 2009 March Status Report of the Auditor General of Canada

Chapter 1-National Security: Intelligence and Information Sharing

This status report examined the progress made since 2004 by 14 departments and agencies in their management and sharing of intelligence information, including the interoperability of their systems to support information sharing.Transport Canada agrees with the recommendations directed at the department. The report may be found at the following link: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_200903_01_e_32288.html

5) Chapter 2-The Governor in Council Appointment Process

The chapter examined the federal government's process for making Governor in Council appointments to Crown corporations, small federal entities, and the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada. It examined the extent of progress made in implementing recommendations on the appointment process from our 2000 and 2005 reports on Crown corporation governance. The following entities under Transport Canada's portfolio were included in the audit:

  • Atlantic Pilotage Authority Canada
  • Blue Water Bridge Authority
  • Canada Lands Company Limited
  • Canada Post Corporation
  • Canadian Air Transport Security Authority
  • Great Lakes Pilotage Authority Canada
  • Laurentian Pilotage Authority Canada
  • Marine Atlantic Inc.
  • National Capital Commission
  • Pacific Pilotage Authority Canada
  • Parc Downsview Park Inc.
  • Ridley Terminals Inc.
  • Royal Canadian Mint
  • The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited
  • Via Rail Canada Inc.
  • Canadian Transportation Agency
  • Ship-source Oil Pollution Fund
  • Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada
  • Transportation Safety Board of Canada

There were no recommendations made to the department. The report may be found at the following link: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_200903_02_e_32289.html

6) 2008 December Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development

Chapter 1-Managing Air Emissions

The CESD examined a Pollution Prevention Plan implemented under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) to manage acrylonitrile, a substance used to manufacture synthetic rubber and other products. The audit examined how Environment Canada manages regulations governing gasoline and diesel fuel content, as well as regulations that limit the flow of gasoline during refuelling of vehicles at the pump. It also looked at the Clean Air and Climate Change Trust Fund and the Public Transit Tax Credit, two economic measures intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Both were included in the government's Climate Change Plan, issued in response to the Kyoto Protocol Implementation Act. Finally, it examined three of the federal government's voluntary agreements, two of which involved Transport Canada with industry associations that were intended to reduce emissions that contribute to smog and climate change. Although there were two recommendations directed at the department, the voluntary agreements examined meet many of the requirements. The report can be found at the following link: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_cesd_200812_01_e_31818.html

Chapter 5-Annual Report on Environmental Petitions

The Commissioner reports annually on the quantity, nature, and status of petitions received and on the timeliness of departmental responses. This chapter contains this year's annual report on petitions. Between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008 Transport Canada received eleven petitions, all of which were responded to 100% on-time, with no extensions. The report may be found at the following link: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_cesd_200812_05_e_31822.html



External Audits (Note: These refer to other external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages)

Public Service Commission

1) Government-wide audit of executive (EX) appointments (October, 2008)

The audit focused on executive appointments made within the first year of implementation of the PSEA, from January to December 2006, and included 100% of appointment processes of executives at levels four and five (which includes assistant deputy ministers), and 50% of executives at levels one to three (which includes directors and directors general).

Transport Canada was highlighted as a noteworthy practice as having had well-developed human resources plans in 2006, which it used in the appointment process. Out of eight appointments, the department had only two non-advertised, neither of which had been acting. The report may be found at the following link: http://www.psc-cfp.gc.ca/adt-vrf/rprt/2008/ex/index-eng.htm#toc1



Table 11: Internal Audits and Evaluations

Table 11a: Internal Audits (current reporting period)



Name of Internal Audit Audit Type Status Completion Date Electronic Link to Report
Audit of Environmental Programs - ecoTransport Strategy Transfer Payments Although this audit was identified in the 2007-2008 risk-based audit plan, we update our plan on an annual basis and have since identified other audits of higher relevance.    
Audit of Environmental Programs - excluding the ecoTransport Strategy Transfer Payments Transport Canada is currently conducting an audit of the UTSP.    
Audit of Transportation Security Clearance Program Core Controls Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit as the OAG conducted an external audit on Intelligence and Information Sharing that already covered security clearance issues. The OAG tabled its audit on March 31, 2009. http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/
internet/English/
parl_oag_200903_01_e_32288.html
Audit of Contracting Practices   Although these audits were identified in our 2007-2008 risk-based audit plan, we update our plan on an annual basis and have since identified other audits of higher relevance.    
Audit of Road Safety Contribution Programs      
Audit of Hospitality Expenditures      

Table 11b: Evaluations (current reporting period)



Name of Evaluation Program Activity Completion Date Electronic Link to Report

Air Cargo Security Program

Aviation Security

07/05/2009

http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/des-reports-150.htm
Marine Safety Marine Safety In progress: expected completion date: 2009/10  
Aviation and Other, Non Marine, Security Initiatives Under the Public Security and Anti Terrorism Strategy      
Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (Environment Canada Lead) Environmental Stewardship of Transportation 06/03/2009 http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/des-reports-150.htm
Transport of Dangerous Goods and Road Safety Transportation of Dangerous Goods In progress - expected completion date: 2009/10 http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/des-reports-150.htm
Canadian Business Aviation Association* Aviation Safety In progress - expected completion date: 2009/10 http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/des-reports-150.htm
Grant to International Civil Aviation Organization for Asia Pacific Aviation Safety In progress - expected completion date: 2009/10 http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/des-reports-150.htm
Urban Transportation Showcase Program Clean Air Transportation 16/04/2009 http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/des-reports-150.htm
Airports Capital Assistance Program, including Havre Saint-Pierre Airport, Mont Joli Airport, Thompson Airport Aviation Safety In progress - expected completion date: 2009/10 http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/des-reports-150.htm
Airports Operation and Maintenance Subsidy Program Transportation Infrastructure 18/03/2009 http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/des-reports-150.htm
National Airports System Transportation Infrastructure In progress - expected completion date: 2009/10 http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/des-reports-150.htm

5. Electronic Link to Internal Evaluation Reports:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/corporate-services/des-reports-150.htm