Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Symbol of the Government of Canada

ARCHIVED - 2008-2009 DPRs - Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Warning This page has been archived.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived on the Web is for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It has not been altered or updated after the date of archiving. Web pages that are archived on the Web are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats on the "Contact Us" page.




Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada


Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: AgriInsurance Program (Statutory)

Start Date: April 1, 2008
End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The AgriInsurance program is one of four core pillars of the new business risk management (BRM) suite available to producers under Growing Forward.

AgriInsurance (formerly the Production Insurance program), will aim to reduce the financial impact on producers of production losses caused by uncontrollable natural perils.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
For 2008-09 producer participation in AgriInsurance had a targeted participation rate of 70% and for forage 50% as measured by a comparison of crops grown to crops insured.

For the main crop groups (excluding forage), Manitoba has the highest participation rate at 81% followed by Saskatchewan at 71.8%, and Quebec at 67%. The national average was 67% which is lower than the target but considered good based on the wide range of uptake across provinces.

Quebec has the highest participation rate for forage at 73%, while the other provinces range from 0% to 20% bringing the national average participation rate for the forage programs to 18%. Overall, numerous enhancements were made this year and will continue to be made to the AgriInsurance program including improvements for forage, horticulture, potato storage, new crops and available coverage levels.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - - 388.7 548.3 548.3 (159.6)
Total Transfer Payment Program - - 388.7 548.3 548.3 (159.6)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The increase in federal contributions over the planned amount is a result of the substantial increase in premiums caused by the increase in commodity (i.e. grain) prices which are reflected in the insurable values.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No program evaluation was completed for AgriInsurance in 2008-09. There was a program evaluation completed in 2007-08 for Production Insurance (the program that preceded the AgriInsurance Program) and there were no significant findings.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
There was no audit undertaken in 2008-09.

Note:
Production Insurance (the program that preceded the AgriInsurance Program) expenditures were $416.4 million in 2007-2008 and $343.1 million in 2006-2007.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: AgriInvest Program (Statutory)

Start Date: December 19, 2007
Agreements were signed with the provinces to implement the program starting in the 2007 program year.

End Date: March 31, 2012
AgriInvest is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire on this date.

Description: The AgriInvest program is one of four core pillars of the new business risk management (BRM) suite available to producers under Growing Forward.

AgriInvest allows producers to self-manage, through producer-government savings accounts, the first 15 percent of their margin losses for a production year and/or make investments to reduce on-farm risks or increase farm revenues. Under the program, annual producer deposits of up to 1.5 percent of their allowable net sales are matched by government deposits. Government deposits are cost-shared 60:40 by federal and provincial governments. In combination with the AgriStability program, AgriInvest is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines where AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

AgriInvest provides producers with a secure, accessible, predictable and bankable source of income assistance to address small drops in farm income and manage on-farm risks.

Federal AgriInvest Website
AgriInvest in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
As of March 31, 2009, approximately $525 million has been made available to producers to seed their AgriInvest accounts through the federal Kickstart initiative. As of this date, approximately $291 million had been withdrawn and $234 million remained in accounts for producers to access when needed to address small income losses and to invest in their farming operations (see note below).

On March 31, 2009, federal program administrators began mailing out letters notifying participants of their benefits under 2007 AgriInvest, their total account balances and how to access the funding in their accounts.

Work continues toward full implementation of AgriInvest, when producer deposits and government contributions will be held by financial institutions for the 2009 program year.

A Performance Measurement Framework is in place for the new BRM suite, which includes Performance Indicators and Targets. Federal and provincial governments are now working to collect the information necessary for reporting and expect to be ready to report on the performance of the new suite of programs in early 2010.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - 165.6 - 175.7 175.7 (175.7)
Total Contributions - 1.7 159.5 17.7 17.7 141.8
Total Transfer Payment Program - 167.3 159.5 193.4 193.4 (33.9)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
AgriInvest is demand-driven, rather than being funded from a set allocation for each fiscal year. Although the administrative costs of the program remain relatively constant, the variance of the year to year grant and contribution payments is directly related to both participation and commodity prices, as producer deposits and government contributions are based on a percentage of their income generated from the sale of commodities for a production year.

The variance between planned and actual spending for 2008-09 can be largely attributed to the recent increase in the value of grains and oilseeds which resulted in higher than anticipated allowable net sales.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
An evaluation of AgriInvest was not undertaken in 2008-09. It is currently expected that it will be evaluated in 2011-12 in accordance with AAFC's Five-Year Strategic Evaluation Plan (2009-10 to 2013-14), prepared by AAFC's Office of Audit and Evaluation. This program may be evaluated individually or together with a cluster of other Business Risk Management programs.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
An internal audit of AgriInvest was not undertaken in 2008-09. AAFC's office of Audit and Evaluation performs an annual risk assessment exercise to determine its internal audit priorities and considers risks related to this program. This program is not currently included in AAFC's Three Year Risk-Based Audit Plan 2009-10 to 2011-12.

Note:

  1. The Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program was replaced by the AgriStability and AgriInvest programs as of April 1, 2008.
  2. The funds for the one-time federal AgriInvest Kickstart program, as mentioned in the Results Achieved section, are additional to and not included in federal funding numbers for AgriInvest as stated in table above. The Kickstart was a separate federal program intended to help producers transition to the new suite of BRM programs, promote the AgriInvest program and encourage the set up of AgriInvest accounts.

Expenditures for the AgriInvest Kickstart Program in 2007-2008 were:

  • Grants - $484.4 million
  • Contributions - $95.8 million

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Agricultural Disaster Relief Program (ADRP) / AgriRecovery (Statutory)

Start Date: December 6, 2007
Program authorities were obtained to implement the ADRP under the AgriRecovery disaster relief framework beginning with the 2007-08 fiscal year.

End Date: March 31, 2011

Description: The AgriRecovery framework is one of four core pillars of the new business risk management (BRM) suite available to producers under Growing Forward.

AgriRecovery facilitates the process for federal, provincial and territorial governments to provide short-term, timely assistance to help producers quickly re-establish their income stream and contain the long-term impacts after a small to mid-size disaster (disease, pest, weather-related). Programs under AgriRecovery are developed on a case-by-case basis after an assessment is completed and it is determined that there is need for assistance not covered by existing programs, such as AgriInvest, AgriStability and AgriInsurance.

Under AgriRecovery, the ADRP helps focus the coordination effort, providing fast-tracked programs of up to $20 million (up to $122.6 million per fiscal year) to quickly fund initiatives under AgriRecovery. Programming not eligible under the ADRP may still utilize the AgriRecovery framework and funding though a separate Treasury Board submission would be required.

Federal AgriRecovery Website

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
The ADRP has demonstrated its flexibility and its ability to meet the objectives of providing timely assistance to minimize/contain the impacts of disasters on agricultural producers, address disaster-specific costs and losses not covered by other government programs and help farming operations return to business operations more quickly.

During the 2008-09 fiscal year, AgriRecovery/ADRP was utilized by federal and provincial governments to respond to six disasters, including the Duponchelia moth in Ontario, Golden Nematode in Alberta, Bovine Tuberculosis in British Columbia, drought in areas of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and flooding in Manitoba and Prince Edward Island.

A Performance Measurement Framework is in place for the new BRM suite, which includes Performance Indicators and Targets. Federal and provincial governments are now working to collect the information necessary for reporting and expect to be ready to report on the performance of the new suite of programs in early 2010.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - 0.1 - 1.0 1.0 (1.0)
Total Contributions - - 108.4 55.4 55.4 53.0
Total Transfer Payment Program - 0.1 108.4 56.3 56.3 52.1

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Actual spending is approximately one half of the planned spending. This is due to the unpredictable nature of both the occurrence and scope of agricultural disasters.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
An evaluation of AgriRecovery (ADRP) was not undertaken in 2008-09. It is currently expected that it will be evaluated in 2010-11 in accordance with AAFC's Five-Year Strategic Evaluation Plan (2009-10 to 2013-14), prepared by AAFC's Office of Audit and Evaluation.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
An internal audit of AgriRecovery was not undertaken in 2008-09. AAFC's office of Audit and Evaluation performs an annual risk assessment exercise to determine its internal audit priorities and considers risks related to this program. This program is not currently included in AAFC's Three Year Risk-Based Audit Plan 2009-10 to 2011-12.

Note:
The Plum Pox Eradication Program includes two components: survey/research component which accounts for $6.2 million annually; and the financial assistance component which is $2.4 million annually. The annual $2.4 million allocation is sourced from funding available for the AgriRecovery. This amount is reported as part of the costs for that program and is not included in the numbers above.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: AgriStability Program (Statutory)

Start Date: December 19, 2007
Agreements were signed with the provinces to implement the program starting in the 2007 program year.

End Date: March 31, 2012
AgriStability is statutory and ongoing; however, the current policy and program authorities expire on this date.

Description: The AgriStability program is one of four core pillars of the new business risk management (BRM) suite available to producers under Growing Forward.

AgriStability is a margin-based program that provides support when a producer experiences larger farm income losses, which are drops in their margin (eligible farm income, less eligible farm expenses) for the program year of more than 15 percent of the producer's average margin from previous years (i.e., their reference margin). Thus, a payment is triggered under the program when a producer's program year margin drops below 85 percent of their reference margin. AgriStability also includes coverage for negative margins, as well as mechanisms to advance a participant a portion of their expected payment during the year when a significant decline in income is expected (interim payments and Targeted Advance Payments). In combination with the AgriInvest program, it is the successor to the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program. AgriInvest replaces coverage for smaller income declines where AgriStability assists producers in managing larger losses.

Federal AgriStability Website
AgriStability in Alberta (Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (AFSC))
AgriStability in Ontario (Agricorp)
AgriStability in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)
AgriStability on Prince Edward Island (PEI Agricultural Insurance Corporation)

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
AgriStability payments are based on tax information for the program year. Although much of the processing of payments for the first year of AgriStability (2007 program year) was done in the 2008-09 fiscal year, processing will be finalized and performance data will be analyzed in the 2009-10 fiscal year. AAFC tracks, and makes public, applications processed and the percent of applications processed within established service standards.
This information is available at AgriStability Program Statistics Website.

As of March 29, 2009:

For the 2008 AgriStability Program:
45.0% of received and complete 2008 program year applications have been processed. The out going error rate is based on sampling, and as of March 31, 2009 all files for 2008 were being reviewed, so no accuracy rate had been established at that time.

National Delivery: 5,838 complete applications received. Total value of producer payments was $248,527,017 at the end of March 2009.

Federal Delivery: 926 complete applications received. Total value of producer payments was $53,021,050 at the end of March 2009.

For the 2007 AgriStability program:
83.8% of received and complete 2007 program year applications have been processed and the estimated out-going accuracy rate is 96.85% as of the end of March 2009.

National Delivery: 118,910 complete applications received. Total value of producer payments was $554,242,637 at the end of March 2009.

Federal Delivery: 42,883 complete applications received. Total value of producer payments was $165,011,400 at the end of March 2009.

Performance data collected and analyzed in 2008-09 related to the 2006 CAIS program. The program covered 52 percent of Canadian producers (including those in the supply-managed sectors), representing 66 percent of total market revenue. Although this is below the target of 75 percent, it still represents a significant portion of the industry. It is also anticipated that participation will improve under the new suite of BRM programs. 40 percent of participants received a payment under the 2006 CAIS program, which contributed to increasing the margins of participants from 60 percent of their reference margins to 86 percent. This was above the target of 80 percent.

With respect to the processing of 2007 and 2008 AgriStability payments: Where requested by provinces, the Targeted Advance Payments (TAPs) mechanism provided quicker access to these payments for hog and cattle producers ($98 million to 1,713 hog producers for 2007 and $167 million to 3,767 hog and cattle producers for 2008). Changes such as deeper negative margin coverage and an improved inventory valuation method are also expected to benefit those faced with declining incomes and consecutive years of loss. Details of the processing of payments under AgriStability will be provided in 2009-10.

A Performance Measurement Framework is in place for the new BRM suite, which includes Performance Indicators and Targets. Federal and provincial governments are now working to collect the information necessary for reporting and expect to be ready to report on the performance of the new suite of programs in early 2010.


  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - 377.3 655.2 340.5 340.5 314.7
Total Transfer Payment Program - 377.3 655.2 340.5 340.5 314.7

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
AgriStability is demand-driven rather than being funded from a set allocation for each fiscal year. Although the administrative costs remain relatively constant, the variance of the year to year grant and contribution payments is directly related to participation and the needs of the agriculture industry. As such, in good years, the program will cost governments less, while in bad years (i.e., years with dropping commodity prices, disasters, etc.) the costs of the program will be higher.

The variance between planned and actual spending for 2008-09 can be largely attributed to the recent increase in the value of grains and oilseeds (G&O). Historically, G&O has accounted for a significant portion of coverage under CAIS and higher prices in the sector resulted in both reduced participation and a decrease in the number of payments being triggered as margins in the sector increased.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
An evaluation of AgriStability was not undertaken in 2008-09. It is currently expected that it will be evaluated in 2011-12 in accordance with AAFC's Five-Year Strategic Evaluation Plan (2009-10 to 2013-14), prepared by AAFC's Office of Audit and Evaluation. This program may be evaluated individually or together with a cluster of other Business Risk Management programs.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
An internal audit of AgriStability was not undertaken in 2008-09. A Follow-Up Audit of the program is currently planned to begin in 2009-10 and will be conducted jointly with the Office of the Auditor General (OAG) as a follow-up to the OAG's Audit of the similar and now sunsetting Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) Program (May 2007), as well as AAFC's Audit of CAIS, which was completed in June 2008.

Note:

  1. The Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) program was replaced by the AgriStability and AgriInvest programs as of April 1, 2008.
  2. The actual spending amount of $377.3 million reported in 2007-08 pertains to the CAIS Program which preceded Agri-Stability (expenditures also shown below).
Related Program Expenditures:
Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization Inventory Transition Initiative (CITI)
  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
CITI Grants: 431.0 (0.7) 8.4
CITI Contributions: 442.0 - 3.7
CITI Program Expenditures 873.0 (0.7) 12.1

CAIS Program Expenditures 933.3 377.3 -  

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Private Sector Risk Management Partnership (PSRMP) Program (Voted)

Start Date: January 6, 2009
End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The PSRMP Program is designed to facilitate the participation of the private sector financial services industry (FSI) in addressing agricultural risks not presently covered by existing risk management tools. It provides financial and technical assistance to assist non-governmental agricultural organizations in the design, development, and delivery of a business case for the development of new business risk mangement products and services to assist producers in mitigating and responsing to their farm-level business risk management issues.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
In 2008-2009, PSRMP carried forward 12 projects from Agricultural Policy Framework (APF) (no new applications accepted after March 31, 2008) - all projects continued to meet objectives per signed Contribution Agreements.

Project Results Achieved:

  1. Canadian Sheep Federation launched national livestock insurance coverage for Bluetongue Disease in sheep (May 2008);
  2. Pulse Canada launched its western Feed Pea pricing tool (January 2009);
  3. Projects in negotiation with service providers (e.g., Alberta Beef Producers, Western Barley Growers Association, Nova Scotia Egg Producers);
  4. Ontario Livestock and Poultry Council project provided clients with policies, pricing and delivery options for Avian Influenza coverage.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - - - 6.9 5.1 (5.1)
Total Transfer Payment Program - - - 6.9 5.1 (5.1)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
At the time of preparation of the 2008-09 Report on Plans and Priorities, Treasury Board approval for this program had not yet been received and as such, planned spending is shown as zero.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluation was conducted for PSRMP in 2008-09.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
No audit was conducted for PSRMP in 2008-09.

Note:
Expenditures for the PSRMP Program (under APF) were $3.8 million in 2006-2007 and $4.1 million in 2007-2008.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Facilitating the Disposal of Specified Risk Materials (Voted)

Start Date: December 14, 2006
End Date: March 31, 2009 (extended to March 31, 2010)

Description: The federal government continues to provide BSE related assistance to Canada's cattle industry to support its efforts to recover from the impacts of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) first discovered in Canada in May 2003. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has implemented an enhanced feed ban, which is a significant step towards eliminating BSE from the national cattle herd.

This program will help the beef industry mitigate the cost of adapting to the July 12, 2007 enhancements to the feed ban enforced by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. The enhancements regulate the disposal of specified risk material (SRM) and adequate disposal infrastructure is required.

Cost-shared federal-provincial programs are in place and offer $127.5 million in financial assistance to the industry (federal: $76.5 million; provincial: $51 million). The program is administered provincially and federal funds are used to support projects that have been approved through the provincial government process.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
As of March 2009, approximately 259 infrastructure project and research iniatives were approved for a total commitment of $105.1 million to help the beef industry adapt to the enhanced feed ban. Facilities such as federal and provincial abattoirs, SRM rendering plants, research institutions are participating in the program. Furthermore, various technologies are being explored to seek value added options for SRM.


  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 4.4 22.8 38.5 21.0 19.2 19.3
Total Transfer Payment Program 4.4 22.8 38.5 21.0 19.2 19.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The reason for the difference in planned spending versus actual spending is due to the reprofiling of $17.5 million from 2008-09 to 2009-10. The program was extended to support provincial initiatives that required a one-year extension in order to meet the objectives of the program.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluations were conducted in 2008-09 and none are planned.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
No audits have been conducted in 2008-09. No audits are planned other than the standard end of program audit.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments in connection with the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act (AMPA) (Statutory) - Advance Payment Program

Start Date: 1997
End Date: On-going under the AMPA legislation

Description: The Advance Payments Program (APP) guarantees cash advances to eligible producers (2006 amendments to AMPA increased the interest free portion of advances from $50,000 to $100,000, and the maximum advance from $250,000 to $400,000) to enable them to produce and market their agricultural products when market conditions are most ideal.

Amendments also now allow livestock producers the ability to receive an advance under AMPA. In February 2008, amendments to the AMPA allowed for emergency advances for livestock producers to address the needs of the livestock industry during unfavourable competitive circumstances. The amendments allowed for a reduced legislative requirements for emergency advances which are issued up to March 31, 2009.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
The AMPA was amended in 2006 to expand eligibility to the livestock sector, increase loan limits to $400,000, increase interest free loan limit to $100,000, and extend the production period to 18 months.

The AMPA was further amended in February 2008 to improve the delivery of the APP to the livestock sector. These amendments removed the requirement for livestock producers to secure advances with a Business Risk Management (BRM) program such as AgriStability. Advances are now secured using the animals as collateral. The amendments also expanded the circumstances under which an emergency APP advance can be issued to include situations of "severe economic hardship".

For the 2008-09 production period, 61 agreements were signed to deliver the APP with producer organizations and approximately $2.72 billion was issued in advances to approximately 40,539 producers. Of that, $312 million was for emergency advances to hogs and $143 million was for emergency advances to cattle.


  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 10.6 44.1 137.5 37.0 37.0 100.5
Total Transfer Payment Program 10.6 44.1 137.5 37.0 37.0 100.5

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The variance between actual and planned spending is due to many factors. The main cause for the variance is due to lower default payments than originally forecasted, as well as a lower interest rate than anticipated for the fiscal year.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluation of the new APP program was completed during the 2008-09 fiscal year. As per AMPA legislation, a full evalution is to be completed every 5 years.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
Formal audits of participating producer organizations in the APP are completed each fiscal year. The current target for formal audits is 6 producer organizations per fiscal year. Due to contract tendering restraints, AAFC did not get the audits completed in 2008-09, and will be completing a total of 12 formal audits of producer organizations during the 2009-10 campaign.

Note:
Enhanced Spring Credit Advance Program (ESCAP) Expenditures for 2007-2008 - $6.8 million
Spring Credit Advance Payment Program (SCAP) Expenditures for 2007-2008 - $8.9 million

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Cost of Production Benefit (Statutory)*

Start Date: April 1, 2008
End Date: March 31, 2010

Description: The one-time $400 million federal Cost of Production Benefit (COPB) was announced in March 2007 and was intended to partially compensate producers for the decline in incomes experienced over the previous four years due to production costs increasing at a faster rate than output prices.

Under the COPB, payments were made in two installments, with initial payments beginning in June 2007 based on 2.36 percent of participants' average allowable net sales for 2000 to 2004 and final payments beginning in December 2007 based on 0.36 percent of participants' average allowable net sales for 2000 to 2004. The program was delivered by the federal government in all provinces except Quebec.

Websites:
Federal Delivery
AgriInvest in Quebec (La Financière agricole du Québec)

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
With the COPB, AAFC met its objective of increasing participating producers' farm revenue for 2007 by 1 percent based on program and Statistics Canada data.

As of March 2009:

  • Number of Applications Received: 168,172
  • Number of Zero Payments: 3,898
  • Number of Payments: 164,241
  • Applications Remaining to be Processed: 33
  • Total Value of Payments: $359,173,361

The numbers above reflect only where Canada delivers payments (i.e., all provinces except Quebec). An additional $44.7 million was transferred to Quebec to allow the province to make similar payments to its producers.


  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - 353.5 - 8.7 8.7 (8.7)
Total Contributions - 44.7 - (0.0) (0.0) (0.0)
Total Transfer Payment Program - 398.3 - 8.7 8.7 (8.7)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
As a result of an over-estimation of the final payment rate under the COPB, additional funding of approximately $9 million was required to fully meet AAFC's commitments under the program. This funding was sourced from within existing departmental levels.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
An evaluation of the Cost of Production Benefit program was not undertaken in 2008-09. There are currently no existing or planned evaluations for this program.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
An internal audit of the Cost of Production Benefit was not undertaken in 2008-09. AAFC's office of Audit and Evaluation performs an annual risk assessment exercise to determine its internal audit priorities and considers risks related to this program. This program is not currently included in AAFC's Three Year Risk-Based Audit Plan for 2009-10 to 2011-12.

*For the related $100 million Cost of Production Element program, no payments were triggered in 2008-09 primarily due to a strong rise in crop receipts - mainly in the grains and oilseeds sector, for 2008 over 2007.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Control of Diseases in the Hog Industry- Circovirus Initiative (Voted) - Phase I - Circovirus Inoculation Strategy

Start Date: September 27, 2007
End Date: March 31, 2009 (extended to November 30, 2009)

Description: The Circovirus Inoculation Strategy (CIS) is an Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) initiative aimed at providing assistance in minimizing the overall potential effect of the Porcine Circovirus Associated Diseases (PCVAD) on the Canadian hog herd. AAFC is to provide financial assistance towards the identification and mitigation of the virus.

The overarching goal of the Initiative for the Control of Diseases in the Hog Industry, and the specific goal of its CIP element, is to improve the health of the Canadian hog herd, which will help sustain the long-term viability and profitability of the sector. Encouraging producers to increase disease detection and prevention activities will reduce the number of hog mortalities, and result in healthier Canadian hogs going to market.

The funds are provided to producers through the Circovirus Inoculation Program (CIP). The program is being delivered in all provinces directly to producers by the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration (PFRA) of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. It consists of two elements.

Under the CIP's diagnostic testing element, eligible applicants are eligible for 50 percent in compensation up to $2,000 per fiscal year and $4,000 over the life of the program. Under the vaccination element, eligible applicants are eligible for 50 percent in compensation to a maximum of $1.00 per piglet and $7.00 per sow, gilt and boar. The maximum assistance over the life of the program is $500,000 per applicant.

Circovirus Inoculation Program Website

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
To date, over 3,500 applications have been approved delivering over $30 million is assistance to Canadian hog producers to detect the disease and inoculate hogs. The program deadline has been extended to August 31, 2009 and applications are still being processed.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - 14.3 10.8 10.8 10.8 -
Total Transfer Payment Program - 14.3 10.8 10.8 10.8 -

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
N/A

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
An evaluation of this initiative was not undertaken in 2008-09. It is currently expected that it will be evaluated in 2010-11 in accordance with AAFC's Five-Year Strategic Evaluation Plan (2009-10 to 2013-14), prepared by AAFC's Office of Audit and Evaluation.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
An internal audit of this initiative was not undertaken in 2008-09. AAFC's office of Audit and Evaluation performs an annual risk assessment exercise to determine its internal audit priorities and considers risks related to this program. This program is not currently included in AAFC's Three Year Risk-Based Audit Plan for 2009-10 to 2011-12.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Cull Breeding Swine Program (Statutory)

Start Date: March 6, 2008
End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The purpose of the Cull Breeding Swine Program program is to assist in restructuring the Canadian swine industry by facilitating a reduction of the breeding herd. This $50 million initiative is a grant to the Canadian Pork Council (CPC). The objective is to reduce the national breeding herd size by up to 10% over and above normal annual reductions.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
Financial assistance is provided to the hog industry to assist producers that wish to downsize or exit the industry. $38 million has been transfered to the CPC in 2007-08 for reimbursement of slaughter and disposal costs and payment of $225 per breeding animal. The Program was amended allowing for the program start date to be reset to August 1, 2007 from November 1, 2007. As of June 10, 2009, 649 claims have been received for a total of 124,370 animals.


  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - 38.0 - 12.0 12.0 (12.0)
Total Contributions - - - - - -
Total Transfer Payment Program - 38.0 - 12.0 12.0 (12.0)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The approval of this grant was received after the preparation of the 2008-09 Report on Plans and Priorities, therefore it was not identified in the planned spending.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
There are no existing or planned evaluations for this program at this time.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
There was no audit completed in 2008-09. An audit of the 2008-09 fiscal year is targeted for the 4th quarter of 2009-10.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Environment (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extended until March 31, 2009)

Description: The purpose of the Environment programs is to support the adoption of management practices on farms across Canada, which are beneficial to the environment and economically sustainable.

Strategic Outcome: Health of the Environment

Results Achieved:

  • Environmental Farm Plans (EFP) - As of March 31, 2009 over 69,300 reviews of EFPs/Equivalent Agri-Environmental Plans (EAEPs) have been completed under the Agricultural Policy Framework (APF). This represents 30% of all farms across Canada. This is compared with over 56,700 reviews of EFPs/EAEPs completed under the APF as of March 31, 2008.
  • National Farm Stewardship Program (NFSP) - approximately 52,400 Best Management Practices (BMP) Projects completed as of March 31, 2009.
  • Greencover Canada - As of March 31, 2009 approximately 9,000 BMP projects, 572,393 acres converted to long-term perennial cover and 230 technical assistance projects were completed.
  • National Water Supply Expansion Program (NWSEP) - Approximately 8,000 projects completed.
  • Agri-Environmental Standards - Developed standards in the areas of water, biodiversity, pesticides and air.
  • Water Quality Surveillance Program (WQSP) - Conducted pilot studies at several test sites.
  • Information Gaps in Water Quality and Nutrients (GAPS) Study on Regulations - Funded 11 R&D projects.
  • Study on Regulations - Released Phase 1 report in February 2006.
  • National Agri-Environmental Health Analysis and Reporting Program (NAHARP) - Released agri-environmental indicator report.
  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Environment            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 97.0 198.8 45.6 93.3 78.2 (32.6)
Total Transfer Payment Program 97.0 198.8 45.6 93.3 78.2 (32.6)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Actual spending is higher than the planned due to delays in program implementation in previous years.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
An evaluation of the Environment Chapter was commenced in 2007-08 but still has not been completed.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
The following OAG Managing Environmental Programming Audit was completed in 2008-09.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Food Safety and Food Quality (FSQ) (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extended until March 31, 2009)

Description: The objective of the program is to assist industry in developing and implementing government-recognized food safety, traceability and quality process control systems throughout the agri-food continuum, in order to:

  • protect human health by reducing exposure to food hazards;
  • increase consumer confidence in the safety and quality of food produced in Canada;
  • increase industry's ability to meet or to exceed market requirements for food safety and food quality; and to
  • provide value-added opportunities through the adoption of food safety and food quality systems.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
One of the key food safety control tools is the On-Farm Food Safety Recognition (OFFSR) Program which is part of a Horizontal Initiative between AAFC, the lead partner, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). This program recognizes food safety systems that have been developed and implemented by national producer organizations that are based on the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) process, a preventive approach to food safety.

During this year, seven national producer organizations were participating in OFFSR program. Two organizations were issued letters from CFIA recognizing completion of a technical review stage of the OFFSR program. Since 2004, eighteen such letters have been issued by CFIA.

During this transitional year, the Canadian Food Safety and Quality program (CFSQP) was continued while new food safety programming under Growing Forward was designed.

CFSQP had three components:

  1. Systems Development
    AAFC contributed $3.8 million to 21 producer and agri-food organizations for systems development projects as follows: 32 Food Safety (HACCP based), 5 Traceability and 1 Food Quality.
     
  2. On-Farm Implementation
    For the On-Farm Implementation component, AAFC contributed $4.4 million to eight national producer organizations to implement on-farm food safety HACCP based systems for different commodity groups such as dairy, cattle, eggs, turkey and sheep, chickens and horticultural crops.
     
  3. Food Safety Initiative
    Seven provinces participating in the Food Safety Initiative received $8.1 million from AAFC to implement food safety practices in more than 330 non-federally registered food processing plants and conduct over 400 food safety seminars. In 2008-09, Quebec joined the initiative.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Food Safety & Food Quality            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 10.5 45.9 24.9 29.7 16.3 8.6
Total Transfer Payment Program 10.5 45.9 24.9 29.7 16.3 8.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The CFSQP is a client driven program. CFSQP projects typically require 3 to 6 years to complete the development and implementation of food safety and traceability systems. The initial planned amount for 2008-09 was $24.9 million. A key challenge was forecasting the client's requirements because 2008-09 was a transitional year. Also some organizations were unable to complete their activities as originally planned due to the complexity of negotiating new agreements at the beginning of the transitional year. During this fiscal year $16.3 million was spent, $3.8 million on Systems Development projects, $4.4 million on On-Farm Implementation projects and $8.1 million on Food Safety Initiatives.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluation was conducted in 2008-09.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
The Canadian Food Safety & Quality Audit Plan provided for nine project-specific compliance audits. Three audits were completed and two are on-going into 2009-10. The findings of the three completed audits are not considered significant in nature and actions have been taken by the clients to implement the recommendations of the audit reports. There are currently no URLs for these three audits. The remaining audits were not conducted as the projects were assessed to be of low risk and therefore the audit expenditures were not warranted.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Advancing Canadian Agriculture and Agri-Food (ACAAF) (Voted) (Grants and Contributions to facilitate adaptation and rural development within the agriculture and agri-food sector)

Start Date: April 1, 2004
End Date: March 31, 2009

Description: The purpose of the ACAAF program is to position Canada's agriculture and agri-food sector at the leading edge to seize new opportunities. It is based on a three-pillar approach, including:

  • Pillar I: Industry-Led Solutions to Emerging Issues;
  • Pillar II: Capturing Market Opportunities By Advancing Research Results;
  • Pillar III: Sharing Information to Advance the Sector.

The ACAAF Program was developed as the successor to the Canadian Adaptation and Rural Development (CARD) II Fund.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
For this last year of ACAAF, 337 new projects were approved and funded. They consisted of 10 new national projects, 265 new Industry Council regional projects and 62 multi-regional collective outcome projects. Most projects were Pillar I initiatives.


  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants 44.3 37.7 30.3 33.0 31.9 (1.6)
Total Contributions 6.2 10.5 3.1 13.7 13.3 (10.2)
Total Transfer Payment Program 50.5 48.2 33.4 46.7 45.2 (11.8)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Planned spending for 2008-09 reflects only the funding presented in the 2008-09 Report on Plans and Priorities. The over expenditures for the last year of the program (2008-09) was due to underspending in the first few years; total program spending still falls within the total five year authority of the program.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
The ACAAF Evaluation, which began during the 2007-08 fiscal year, assessed the relevance, success/progress and cost effectiveness of ACAAF in meeting its objectives. Conclusions were generally favorable and the recommendations following the evaluation have been incorporated in the planning of the successor program, Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program (CAAP).

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
Initially, one National project recipient was to be selected for a compliance audit. However, due to time constraints and unforeseen delays in setting up the contract for the audit, it was decided to forego the compliance audit. Active monitoring of the National project files and financial audits ensured due diligence was met.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Agri-Opportunities Program (New Opportunities for Agriculture Initiatives) (Voted)

Start Date: December 14, 2006
End Date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Agri-Opportunities program is a $134 million program, ending March 2011, that focuses on new innovative value-added agricultural, agri-food and agri-based products, services or processes that are currently not commercially produced or available in Canada and that are ready to be introduced into the marketplace. The program provides repayable contributions for commercialization projects that are expected to increase market opportunities for the Canadian agricultural industry across the value chain and to increase demand for primary agricultural products.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
The Agri-Opportunities program has signed agreements to fund 13 innovative commercialization projects for a total of $31,759,712 helping to accelerate the pace of innovation in Canada.


  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - 2.1 40.8 12.3 9.0 31.9
Total Transfer Payment Program - 2.1 40.8 12.3 9.0 31.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Actual expenditures were less than planned primarily due to the global economic crisis at that time, which was having a serious impact on the Canadian investment climate, particularly the availability of debt and equity financing to companies.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluation was conducted in 2008-09. An evaluation is planned for 2009-10.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
There was no audit conducted this year. An audit is planned for 2010-11.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Agricultural Bioproducts Innovation Program (Voted)

Start Date: December 14, 2006
End Date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Agricultural Bioproducts Innovation Program (ABIP) is an initiative designed to strengthen the capacity of Canadian science providers and industry through the creation of networks for research, technology development, and commercialization of agricultural bioproducts and bioprocesses.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
Nine Networks have been approved for funding under the Agricultural Bioproducts Innovation Program (ABIP). Currently the program is fully subscribed and no new proposals are being accepted. In support of the work to be undertaken by the approved networks, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada has signed nine (9) Contribution Agreements with recipients external to the federal government. In addition, eight (8) Agency Agreements between Recipients and the Recipient Agent, and eight (8) Letters of Understanding (LOUs) with other government departments and agencies have been executed.

AAFC will report on the activities and the execution of the Network Agreements negotiated to deal with governance, intellectual properties and related issues with the parties involved in the nine approved ABIP Networks in the next FY 2009-10.


  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - 0.6 20.7 7.3 7.3 13.4
Total Transfer Payment Program - 0.6 20.7 7.3 7.3 13.4

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The variance of $13.4 million in planned versus actual spending is due to the delay in the development and signing of Network Agreements. This new program is utilizing novel structures and requires appropriate lead time for the development of communication and administration tools and access to resources to ensure that internal and external stakeholders are provided clear, consistent, timely and accurate messages on all aspects of program requirements.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
There was no evaluation undertaken in 2008-09.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
Recipient Auditing: The ABIP Secretariat has adopted a risk-based approach to the selection of contributions for audit. The audit risk of each contribution agreement will be assessed annually. The intent is to audit contributions where the ABIP Secretariat has identified some specific concerns.
There were no audits conducted in 2008-09. The intent for fiscal year 2009-10 is to complete two recipient audits.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Farm Families Options Program (Options) (Voted)

Start Date: June 23, 2006
End Date: March 31, 2010

Description: The Canadian Farm Family Options program is a pilot program that provides short-term financial assistance to low-income farm families and provides eligible clients with access to farm business assessment and training services that could help them increase their long-term on- and off-farm income opportunities. Income payments are issued to eligible applicants based on information for the 2005 and 2006 tax years. Eligible applicants commit to completing a Renewal activity, either a Farm Business Assessment or Canadian Agricultural Skills Service, or an approved equivalent by November 20, 2008.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
The Canadian Farm Family Options Program paid more than $145 million to over 15,000 farm families in its first year (2005 applicants) and more than $76 million to over 9,300 farm families in its second year (2006 applicants). Farmers qualified for Options if their total family income, as submitted to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) in their tax return, fell below $25,000 (below $15,000 for individual farmers). Payments were calculated to bring an individual farmer's total income up to the $15,000 threshold, and a farm family's total income up to the $25,000 threshold.

In total, participants received approximately $221 million, resulting in a total average payment of $17,000. 80.7% or 12,280 of Options participants completed their Renewal requirement (Farm Business Assessment, skills development or equivalent). Of these, 1,898 participated in more than one activity per application, with a total of 14,178 program activities resulting from the Options program. Final payment cheques were mailed to eligible applicants in early August, 2008 and the Options program reached its end on November 20, 2008.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants 145.0 76.0 - - (1.0) 1.0
Total Contributions - 11.2 16.0 14.2 10.3 5.7
Total Transfer Payment Program 145.0 87.2 16.0 14.2 9.3 6.7

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
On May 31, 2007 changes to the Options program were approved by Treasury Board. These changes resulted in the original $550.0 million budget being reduced to $303.3 million. Approval was obtained to reallocate the remaining funding to other initiatives. Actual spending was lower than planned in 2008-09 as funding for year two was only made available to qualified applicants from year one.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
There were no previous evaluations and none conducted in 2008-09. An evaluation of the Options program is to be completed by March 31, 2010.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
There were no previous audits and none conducted in 2008-09. An audit of the Options program is to be completed by March 31, 2010.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Cattlemen's Association Legacy Fund (Statutory)

Start Date: June 27, 2005
End Date: March 31, 2015

Description: The purpose of the Canadian Cattlemen's Association Legacy Fund is to support to the Canadian beef sector to develop markets for beef cattle, beef cattle genetics, beef and beef products in a post-BSE environment. Grants totalling $50 million over 10 years will be provided.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
Industry is struggling to manage the ongoing impact of BSE and simultaneously regain its competive position given the rapid appreciation in the value of the Canadian dollar, increased feed prices and underutilization of packing capacity. Notwithstanding these challenges, Legacy Funds enabled the Beef Information Centre, Canada Beef Export Federation and Canadian Beef Breeds Council to undertake significant market development programs focussed on key Canadian, US and Asian beef markets. In 2008, beef exports totalled $1.35 billion, up from $1.24 billion in 2007. Sales of beef cattle genetics in 2008 were $26.65 million compared to $14.32 million in 2007.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants 4.9 7.0 5.0 7.0 7.0 (2.0)
Total Contributions - - - - - -
Total Transfer Payment Program 4.9 7.0 5.0 7.0 7.0 (2.0)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
In developing the spending profile for the Legacy Fund, annual expenditures were estimated by spreading the available funding over the ten year time frame in equal annual increments. However, funds are allocated based on the requirements outlined in an annual business plan which reflects the priorities of the three marketing groups. As such the funds needed in any particular year will vary depending on the marketing program developed in that year. These forecasts are made even more difficult by challenges in predicting when a market might actually open to imports of Candian beef.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
The contract with CCA requires a mid-term and a final evaluation. A third-party review of the grant and the results achieved to date was conducted for the period September 29, 2005 to June 30, 2008. The review determined that the objectives of the grant have been met and the funds were administered in an efficient and effective manner in accordance with the funding agreement.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
No audits were completed in 2008-09 and none are planned at this time.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: EcoAgriculture Biofuels Capital Initiative (Voted)

Start Date: March 29, 2007
End Date: March 31, 2011

Description: The ecoAgriculture Biofuels Capital initiative (ecoABC) is a four-year, $200 million federal initiative that provides conditionally repayable contributions towards the construction or expansion of biofuel facilities that have equity investments from farmers and use agricultural feedstock. The initiative, which is part of the federal renewable fuels strategy, is providing an opportunity for farmers to benefit from the emerging renewable fuels industry while helping the government to achieve its targets for renewable fuel content in gasoline and diesel fuel.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
EcoABC has six signed contribution agreements totalling $44.5 million. These projects have encouraged private sector investment of $42.0 million by 502 agricultural producers, helping to broaden their economic base beyond the farm gate.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - 0.6 75.0 18.1 17.4 57.6
Total Transfer Payment Program - 0.6 75.0 18.1 17.4 57.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Actual expenditures were less than planned primarily due to the global economic crisis at that time, which was having a serious impact on the Canadian investment climate, particularly the availability of debt and equity financing to emerging industries such as biofuels. Companies were finding it very difficult to secure the financing needed to move forward with their planned biofuels facilities. This in turn slowed the uptake for the EcoABC program which was contingent upon projects being fully financed prior to federal funding approval.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluation was completed in 2008-09. An evaluation is planned for 2009-10.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
No audit was undertaken in 2008-09. An audit is planned for 2011-12.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Plum Pox Eradication Program (PPEP) (Voted)

Start Date: April 19, 2004
End Date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Plum Pox Eradication Program (PPEP) provides funding for activities aimed at eradicating the Plum Pox Virus (PPV) from the Niagara region of Canada while ensuring the viability of the tender fruit industry (peaches, plums, apricots, nectarines). The bulk of the funding supports an extensive survey of tender fruit orchards, research and financial assistance for tender fruit producers whose orchards are affected by the PPV. The program also includes an asset loss compensation component. This seven-year program (2004-05 to 2010-11) is a follow-up of the original three-year program (2001-02 to 2003-04).

The program is jointly funded by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA).

Canadian Food Inspection Agency Website: Plum Pox Virus

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
2008-09 was year five of the seven-year program. Surveillance for the virus continued by the sampling of trees in the quarantine area. Infected trees and trees in infected blocks that met the removal threshold were removed. In 2008, the Plum Pox Virus infection rate has fallen for the third consecutive year. The rate fell from 0.00046% in 2007 to 0.000173% in 2008, a significant decrease.


  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - 6.9 8.6 8.6 8.6 -
Total Business Risk Management - 6.9 8.6 8.6 8.6 -
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 5.5 - - - - -
Total Innovation and Renewal 5.5 - - - - -
Total Transfer Payment Program 5.5 6.9 8.6 8.6 8.6 -

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
N/A

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
An evaluation of the Plum Pox Eradication Program was not undertaken in 2008-09. It is currently expected that it will be evaluated in 2010-11 in accordance with AAFC's Five-Year Strategic Evaluation Plan (2009-10 to 2013-14), prepared by AAFC's Office of Audit and Evaluation.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
An internal audit of the Plum Pox Eradication Program was not undertaken in 2008-09. AAFC's office of Audit and Evaluation performs an annual risk assessment exercise to determine its internal audit priorities and considers risks related to this program. This program is not currently included in AAFC's Three Year Risk-Based Audit Plan for 2009-10 to 2011-12.

Note:
The PPEP includes two components: the survey/research component which accounts for $6.2 million annually, and the financial assistance component which is $2.4 million annually. The annual $2.4 million allocation is sourced from funding available for the AgriRecovery/Agricultural Disaster Relief Program (ADRP).

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Renewal (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extended until March 31, 2009)

Description: Through Renewal programming, AAFC aims to provide producers with the tools and skills they need to make business decisions based on good knowledge. Renewal programming is built on the concept of continuous learning, and is designed to help producers assess their situations and plan for the future during critical transition times. Renewal programs enhance producers' access to information, advice and training, and enables them to pursue on- and off-farm income opportunities.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
Canadian Agricultural Skills Service (CASS) - 697 applications were received in 2008-09.
In 2008-09, more than 2,384 producers across Canada applied to participate in the Canadian Farm Business Advisory Service (CFBAS) and Planning and Assessment for Value-Added Enterprise (PAVE): 1,835 for Farm Business Assessment (FBA), 510 for Specialized Business Planning Services (SBPS), and 39 for PAVE.

To help producers acquire the skills they need to adapt to rapid changes in the industry, AAFC continued to work strategically with the agriculture and agri-food sector in 2008-09 to identify the new skills and learning opportunities needed in a knowledge-intensive economy.

Funding to National Organizations:

  • The Canadian Farm Business Management Council (CFBMC) developed and distributed advanced farm management information and tools for established and beginning farmers;
  • the Canadian 4-H Council (4-H) developed a strong base of skills and knowledge for rural youth, many of whom will become the next generation of Canadian farmers;
  • the Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA) improved the health and safety on Canadian farms;
  • the Canadian Young Farmers' Forum (CYFF) facilitated the exchange of information and best farming practices amongst young and beginning farmers; and
  • the Canadian Outstanding Young Farmers Program (COYFP) recognized young farmers that exemplify excellence in their profession.

In a 2007 Client Impact Survey with 703 participants of Renewal programs, results showed that program participation was a vehicle for change. Respondents reported that the programs strengthened their understanding of their business; reduced stress; improved communications with family, partners and other business partners; enabled participants to consider their original plans and make changes; had a direct impact on their incomes; and contributed toward the achievement of their goals.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 31.6 55.0 3.0 32.5 25.9 (22.9)
Total Transfer Payment Program 31.6 55.0 3.0 32.5 25.9 (22.9)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Actual spending was higher than planned since planned spending only included approved amounts for the 2008-09 Main Estimates. Additional funding was approved later in the year.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
An evaluation of Renewal programs was conducted in 2008-09 but has not been finalized yet. An evaluation of funding to national organizations will be conducted in 2009-10.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
Recipient compliance audits have been undertaken in 2008-09 for the following: The delivery of the Canadian Agricultural Skills Service under the Canada-Manitoba Implementation Agreement and under the Canada-Ontario Implementation Agreement, the Managing Risk Education Program under the Canada Implementation Agreement and the Contribution Agreement for the Agricultural Management Institute between Canada, Ontario and the Agricultural Adaptation Council. Final reports are pending.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Science and Innovation (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extended until March 31, 2009)

Description: The purpose of the Science and Innovation Transfer Payments Program is to accelerate innovation adoption in agriculture. Science and innovation are the cornerstone of efforts to make the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector the world leader in food safety, innovation and environmentally responsible production and to support its future success and prosperity. Advances in agri-food science and technology are accelerating the development of a wide range of new industrial, health and nutritional products obtained from plants, animals and microorganisms.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
The Broker and Agri-Innovation program successfully concluded March 31, 2009 exceeding the target of 10 collaboration partnerships.

Overall 18 Contribution Agreements were signed during 2008-09 in support of establishing agri-innovations partnerships.

The Broker portion of the program funded 15 projects that supported the development of 11 innovation value chains and the creation of 14 strategies.

The Agri-Innovation portion of the program advanced four strategies that were created with support from the Broker portion of the program.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 54.0 73.5 6.9 10.8 9.2 (2.3)
Total Transfer Payment Program 54.0 73.5 6.9 10.8 9.2 (2.3)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The variance between the planned and actual spending is due to an increase in spending of $2.3 million required for additional project activities for recruitment, equipment, and renovations for the Vineland Connections Project at the Vineland Innovation Research Centre.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluation of the Program was carried out in 2008-09. A Chapter evaluation, performed in 2007-08, included the Science and Innovation program. Each recipient submitted a final report which was evaluated before final payment was released.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
A compliance audit for one project was carried out in the 2008-09 fiscal year. The sampled invoices and claims did not show any significant discrepancies during the compliance audit.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Orchards & Vineyards Transition Program (Voted)

Start Date: October 25, 2007
End Date: March 31, 2011

Description: This program funds plant removal which is the very first step towards replanting orchards and vineyards or planting other crops to help producers compete in the changing global markets. The program also responds to the market pressure by funding strategic planning activities which will increase the industry's knowledge and help the industry make decisions. The program operates in British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
Plant Removal: About 1250 applications were approved to remove about 10,180 acres of old tree fruit and grapes from orchards and vineyards in British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

Strategic Planning: $1,736,500 worth of strategic plan projects have been approved across Canada. Industry associations are currently developing the approved strategic plan projects.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - 0.7 15.2 13.4 11.4 3.8
Total Transfer Payment Program - 0.7 15.2 13.4 11.4 3.8

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
While the program uptake met or exceeded forecast demand in most provinces (i.e. British Columbia, Ontario, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia), the uptake in Quebec was much lower than expected. This accounts for the difference between planned and actual spending.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
There was no evaluation conducted in 2008-09. A summative evaluation will be conducted during fiscal year 2010-11.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
No audit was completed in 2008-09. Any recipient audits will be determined based on the audit work plan. The need for an internal audit will be determined by the Office of Audit and Evaluation.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Tobacco Transition Program (TTP) (Voted)

Start Date: February 12, 2009
End Date: March 31, 2010

Description: The Program facilitated the transition of Ontario flue-cured tobacco quota holders wishing to exit the industry.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
The Tobacco Transition Program, (TTP) is now completed. The Ontario Flue-Cured Tobacco Growers' Marketing Board (the delivery agent) replaced the production controls with a licensing system and 1,050 quota holders applied to the TTP. The total program cost was $284,879,885 to retire 99.8% of the quota (271,134,732 pounds of Basic Production Quota) and pay for the administrative costs incurred by the delivery agent.
As of May 1, 2009, all payments had been received by TTP participants.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - - - 287.9 284.9 (284.9)
Total Transfer Payment Program - - - 287.9 284.9 (284.9)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
At the time of preparation of the 2008-09 Report on Plans and Priorities, Treasury Board approval for this program had not yet been received and as such planned spending is shown as zero.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluation was conducted in 2008-09. A summative evaluation will be conducted during fiscal year 2011-12.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
A program implementation audit was conducted in March-April 2009 to ensure that the delivery agent had put in place all the necessary processes to implement the program. The implementation audit found that the delivery agent put in place the necessary processes to ensure that the program would be delivered as per the programs guidelines and that the intent of the program would be upheld. Recipient audits are planned during fiscal year 2009-10. The need for an internal audit will be determined by the Office of Audit and Evaluation.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions in support of Rural Canada and of development in the area of Co-operatives (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extended until March 31, 2009)

Description: The purpose of the programs are to carry out plans for Rural and Cooperative development.

The programming covers the following three initiatives:

  • the renewal and strengthening of the Canadian Rural Partnership which includes the transfer payments program "Models for Rural Development", and "The Partnership Initiative" (formerly the Networking Initiative), both of which focus on approaches to rural development, and building partnerships;
  • the Rural Community Capacity Building Program, which places a focus on tools, services, knowledge, and processes; and
  • the Co-operatives Development Initiative (CDI) ($12.4 million from 2003-04 to 2007-08). In 2006, additional funding was provided to CDI to provide support for co-op development projects to enable farmers to capture new biofuels and other value-added opportunities - Ag-CDI funding (G&Cs): $3.75 million for 2006-07 to 2008-09.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
Rural Development
Funding ($226,000) was provided to complete projects under the Models Program. Fifty projects were funded as part of the Rural Partnership Development Program for a total value of $1.575 million. Project final reports are due by June 30, 2009. Partnership projects brought together an average of 6 partners per project.

Total Contributions under Rural Development: $1.8 million.

Co-operative Development
Under CDI, 35 funded projects were undertaken and completed. There was on-going management of 2 existing contribution agreements for CDI-Advisory Services and Ag-CDI. Under Ag-CDI, 45 value-added agricultural co-operatives were supported.

Total Contributions under Co-operative Development: $4.5 million.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Rural and Cooperatives Secretariat            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 9.1 10.6 5.9 7.4 6.3 (0.4)
Total Transfer Payment Program 9.1 10.6 5.9 7.4 6.3 (0.4)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Planned spending only included amounts approved at the time that the 2008-09 Report on Plans and Priorities was prepared. Additional funding for the program was approved later in the year.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
In October 2008, the Office of Audit and Evaluation completed an Assessment of the Canadian Rural Partnership Program (CRP). This assessment relied on a new Value-for-Money tool created by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Key findings were:

  • CRP has demonstrated good value-for-money in terms of program relevance and performance.
  • CRP is relevant and consistent with government's priority of building strong communities.

Report on the Mid-term Evaluation of the Co-operative Development Initiative
Assessment of the Canadian Rural Partnerships Program

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
No audits were undertaken in 2008-09.

Return to Top of Page
Top of Page

Details on Transfer Payment Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - International (Canadian Agriculture and Food International Program) (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extended until March 31, 2009)

Description: The purpose of the Canadian Agriculture and Food international (CAFI) program is to provide support to industry to gain and expand international recognition for Canada and enhance market opportunities for Canadian agriculture and food products. The program replaces and improves on AAFC's Agri-Food Trade Program (AFTP).

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
In 2008-09, the Canadian Agriculture and Food international (CAFI) program, continued to fund industry activities to improve international markets development and gain recognition for Canada as a leader in supplying high-quality, safe and innovative agriculture, agri-food, beverage and seafood products. The CAFI program provided funding to 49 industry associations - over $22.8 million in support of industry activities including $17.5 million for long-term international strategies and $5.3 million for projects.

In 2008-09, some results achieved included:
The Canadian Aquaculture Industry Alliance developed a booklet "Top 10 Things Consumers Don't Know About Aquaculture" to showcase how the BC industry focuses on environmental issues such as sustainability and protection of wild salmon. To ensure that the booklet was well received by target audiences, focus groups were conducted to develop and fine tune the copy and overall messaging. The booklet was mailed to buyers, distributors, influencers, and Trade Commissioners in key US markets for BC farmed salmon. The booklet was also distributed at the San Francisco Fancy Food Show in January 2009.

The Canadian Bison Association advertised in the Fall 2007 edition of Flavourful, a magazine which highlights Canadian foods for international tables. 7,000 copies of the magazine were printed and circulated to the Canadian Embassies and trade posts based on language requirements. It was printed in English and French, English and Spanish, English and Japanese, and English and Mandarin. 1000 copies were circulated to the Hospitality, Restaurant, and Hotel Associations. Others were circulated to Food writers. Copies of the magazine were also used by marketers and the association to promote bison products in response to inquiries about bison.

The CAFI program is also committed to increasing international recognition of Canada's capabilities as a net exporter of agriculture, agri-food, and seafood products. To this end, the CAFI program supported numerous incoming missions of international delegations interested in learning about the superior capabilities of the Canadian industry first-hand.

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Markets and International            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 22.1 17.9 24.8 22.8 22.3 2.5
Total Transfer Payment Program 22.1 17.9 24.8 22.8 22.3 2.5

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Actual spending was less than planned spending due to the fact that some associations were unable to spend all of their approved funding. All of CAFI's recipients are associations that are undertaking activities in foreign markets and due to the global downturn, some associations were not able to undertake and/or complete some of their activities.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluation of the CAFI Program was done in 2008-09.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
No audits were completed in 2008-09.

Top of Page

Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Transfer Payment Program:

Atlantic Innovation Fund (AIF) - Voted

Start date:

May 10, 2001

End date:

March 31, 2011

Description of Transfer Payment Program:

The AIF focuses on increasing research and development linked to economic development and commercialization objectives in areas that are of strategic importance to the region, in particular, the growth of strategic sectors/clusters. The AIF emphasizes building Atlantic Canada's system of innovation, including components that bridge the gap between research institutions and the marketplace. It encourages synergies among the various components of this system through partnerships, alliances and networks. Furthermore, the AIF supports research and development projects that focus on the areas of natural sciences, applied sciences, and social sciences and humanities, where these are linked explicitly to the development of technology-based products, processes or services, or their commercialization, thereby strengthening the region's system of innovation.

More information on the AIF can be found at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/English/ImLookingFor/ProgramInformation/AtlanticInnovationFund/Pages/
AtlanticInnovationFund.aspx.

Strategic Outcome:

The AIF is linked to the strategic outcome "A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy."

Results Achieved:

ACOA's flagship innovation program, the Atlantic Innovation Fund, focuses on accelerating the development of the knowledge-based industry, and facilitating transition within traditional industries by increasing the region's capacity to carry out leading-edge research and development, contributing to the development of new technology-based economic activity in Atlantic Canada. Clients of the AIF include businesses and institutions such as universities and research institutes. One of the key accomplishments for 2008-2009 was the successful approval of 25 projects, accounting for over $53 million in ACOA assistance. ACOA's assistance of these projects leveraged an additional $52 million from other sources, such as universities and other research institutions, provincial governments, the private sector and national R&D programs.

The AIF facilitates the development of strategic sectors characterized by regional clusters of firms. Sixteen of the 25 approved projects in 2008-2009, accounting for more than $36 million in AIF funding, augment development of IT, life sciences/biotech, and oil and gas/oceans technology clusters and complement the National Research Council's Atlantic Cluster initiative.

ACOA encourages AIF project proponents to seek opportunities for collaboration in such areas as research and development, project management, marketing or commercialization, in order to help maximize the economic benefits and enhance the likelihood of commercialization success. In 2008-2009, there were 61 meaningful partnerships stemming from AIF - funded projects.

Given that the level of privately funded R&D in Atlantic Canada is well below the national average, the AIF has focused on increasing the level of participation by commercial entities in innovation activity. For example, over half (56%) of approved projects in 2008-2009 were from commercial proponents. In addition, 100% of institutional projects approved in 2008-2009 under Round VI had private sector partners (up from 92% in 2007-2008).



($ millions)
Program Activity Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance
Enterprise Development
Total Contributions 59.3 57.0 68.0 58.1 58.1 9.9
Total Program Activity 59.3 57.0 68.0 58.1 58.1 9.9

Comment on Variance:

Actual spending under the AIF was less than planned due to complex contribution agreements being negotiated and signed later than planned, following the approval of projects.

Audit completed or planned:

Audit of the G&C payment system is ongoing, with an expected completion date of December 2009.

 

 

Transfer Payment Program:

Business Development Program (BDP) - Voted

Start date:

June 25, 1995

End date:

March 31, 2010

Description of Transfer Payment Program:

The BDP helps to set up, expand or modernize businesses, and focuses on small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Strategic Outcome:

The BDP is linked to the strategic outcome "A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy."

Results Achieved:

During 2008-2009, to improve productivity and preserve long-term prospect of employment, the BDP invested in 31 projects to establish new businesses and in 125 projects to help companies to expand and/or modernize their facilities. This program continues to focus on innovation, skills development and trade activities to enhance the business environment in Atlantic Canada. The program serves to fill gaps in the financing continuum for SMEs and entrepreneurs in Atlantic Canada.



 ($ millions)
Program Activity Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance
Enterprise Development
Total Grants 0.2 0.2 1.0 0.2 0.2 0.8
Total Contributions 112 97.3 86.7 99.9 99.9 (13.2)
Total for Program Activity 112.2 97.5 87.7 100.1 100.1 (12.4)
Community Development
Total Grants 0.6 0.3 1.0 0.5 0.5 0.5
Total Contributions 25.3 21.4 10.5 23.3 23.3 (12.8)
Total for Program Activity 25.9 21.7 11.5 23.8 23.8 (12.3)
Policy, Advocacy and Coordination
Total Grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Contributions 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 (0.1)
Total for Program Activity 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 (0.1)
Total for Transfer Payment Program 138.7 119.7 99.7 124.5 124.5 (24.8)

Comments on Variances:

An additional $24.8 million was made available for the BDP during the year, mostly as a result of re-profiling of the collection of repayable contributions in prior years, as well as reduced requirements under the Atlantic Innovation Fund and Innovative Communities Fund. The additional financial resources for the BDP were used to accelerate payments for SME projects, easing cash flow challenges during the current economic downturn, and to fund increased demands on Community Development.

Audit completed or planned:

During the year, audits were completed on four components of the BDP: trade, investment, tourism and venture capital. The audits found that, in general, the Agency exercised due diligence in the delivery of these projects; however, all four audits recommended improvements to enhance delivery of the four components.

Audit of the G&C payment system is ongoing, with an expected completion date of December 2009.

 

 

Transfer Payment Program:

Community Futures (CF) Program - Voted

Start date:

May 18, 1995

End date:

October 2, 2010

Description of Transfer Payment Program:

The Community Futures (CF) Program supports community economic development and builds the capacity of communities to realize their full sustainable potential. The program provides financial support to CF organizations (e.g. Community Business Development Corporations in Atlantic Canada) enabling them, in collaboration with other partners and stakeholders, to assess their situation and develop strategies to meet their needs. The CF Program also provides support to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and social enterprises for undertaking appropriate community economic development initiatives.

Strategic Outcome:

The CF Program is linked to the strategic outcome "A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy".

Results Achieved:

In 2008-2009, the 41 Community Business Development Corporations (CBDCs) approved 1,077 loans, which represent an investment of $48.5 million and 892 new jobs in rural communities. The CBDCs also provided 7,578 counselling sessions to clients throughout the Atlantic Canada.

A summative evaluation of the Community Futures Program concluded the following: that there is a continuing need for the CF Program, that Atlantic CBDC activities and objectives closely align with the national CF Program, and that the CF Program aligns well with ACOA’s priorities.



($ millions)
Program Activity Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance
Community Development
Total Contributions 14.2 13.7 12.7 12.4 12.4 0.3
Total Program Activity 14.2 13.7 12.7 12.4 12.4 0.3

Comment on Variance:

The difference between planned spending and actual spending can be explained by normal program administration, having some project costs incurred later than expected.

Audit completed or planned:

Audit of the G&C payment system is ongoing, with an expected completion date of December 2009. Audit of Community Futures Program has an expected completion date of September 2009.

 

 

Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Innovative Communities Fund (ICF) - Voted

Start date:

April 1, 2005

End date:

March 31, 2010

Description of Transfer Payment Program:

The program is designed to make non-repayable contributions to support strategic initiatives that respond to the economic development needs of communities. To effectively address the wide range of challenges and opportunities of regions, communities and sectors, the ICF takes a comprehensive approach to working with communities at various stages along the economic development continuum, while ensuring sustainable economic outcomes.

The ICF has two distinct components. The first component, strategic community capacity, is designed to support non-commercial/non-profit strategic initiatives that target the economic development needs of rural communities. The second, proactive investments, is intended to stimulate transformative change. This component will support proactive identification and implementation of strategic opportunities with local partners. The program is designed to respond to the unique and varying needs of communities. The flexible approach will encourage clear links to sustainable economic development outcomes. A focus on outcomes will ensure that the program has the desired impact on Atlantic Canada’s economy.

Strategic Outcome:

The ICF is linked to the strategic outcome "A competitive Atlantic Canadian economy."

Results Achieved:

During fiscal year 2008-2009, 94 projects were approved under the ICF, of which 80 were funded under the strategic community capacity component and 14 under the proactive investment component. These 94 projects had total project costs of $119.4 million. With an ACOA contribution of $32.2 million, dollars leveraged amounted to $87.2 million.



($ millions)
Program Activity Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance
Community Development
Total Contributions 38.8 46.9 55.5 48.9 48.9 6.6
Total Program Activity 38.8 46.9 55.5 48.9 48.9 6.6

Comment on Variance:

The difference between planned spending and actual spending can be explained by normal program administration, wherein some project costs were incurred later than expected because of unforeseen circumstances in the project.

Audit completed or planned:

Audit of the G&C payment system is ongoing, with an expected completion date of December 2009.

Top of Page

Canada Revenue Agency

Table 5 Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Two transfer payment programs with payments in excess of $5M were administered by the Agency in 2008-2009:

  • Children’s Special Allowance Payments (CSA) (Statutory); and
  • Transfers to Provinces under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006 (Statutory)

Table 5.1 Children’s Special Allowance Payments (CSA) (Statutory)

Start Date: Aug. 28, 1995[Footnote 1] 
End Date: Ongoing
Description of Transfer Payment Program:
Tax-free monthly payments made to agencies and foster parents who are licensed by provincial or federal governments to provide for the care and education of children under the age of 18 who physically reside in Canada and who are not in the care of their parents. CSA payments are equivalent to Canada Child Tax Benefit payments. CSA payments are governed by the Children’s Special Allowances Act which provides that this allowance be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Strategic Outcomes:
Eligible families and individuals receive timely and correct benefit payments
Results Achieved:
Monthly payments were made to 293 agencies and foster parents on behalf of 56,255 children. Payments were issued on schedule, no delays were reported.
Program Activity: Benefit Programs
(in thousands of dollars)
 
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009[Footnote 2]  
 
Actual Spending
Actual Spending
Planned Spending
Total Authorities
Actual Spending
Variance(s) Planned/Actual
Total Grants*
197,768
208,163
219,000
 
 
219,000
Total Contributions
-
-
-
-
-
-
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments**
-
-
-
211,848
211,848
(211,848)
Total
197,768
208,163
219,000
211,848
211,848
7,152
Comment(s) on variance(s): N/A
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): N/A

[Footnote 1] Responsibility for CSA Satutory Vote payment was transferred effective August 28, 1995 from Human Resources and Social Development Canada (P.C. Order 1995-342)
[Footnote 2] Starting in 2008-2009, the CSA Statutory payment was reclassified from a Grant to an Other Transfer Payment
* A grant is an unconditional transfer payment where the government chooses to further policy or program delivery by issuing payments to individuals or organizations. Eligibility criteria and applications received in advance of payment provide sufficient assurance that the objectives of payment will be met, therefore specific conditional agreements with the recipient are not required. The government must list a grant in the Estimates but may withhold the grant(s) if eligibility criteria are not met.
** Other Transfer Payment is a transfer payment based on legislation or an arrangement that normally includes a formula or schedule as one element used to determine the expenditure amount. However, once a payment is made, the recipient may redistribute the funds among several categories of expenditure in the arrangement.

 


Table 5.2 Payments to Provinces under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006 (Statutory)

Start Date: October 12, 2006
End Date: October 12, 2013 with an option for an additional 2 years
Description of Transfer Payment Program:
The export charge, to be levied by Canada on exports of softwood lumber products to the United States, is collected and administered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) with support from the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) on behalf of the provinces. Under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006 (Act), the CRA is responsible for making disbursements to the provinces of a portion of the charge collected over the course of the application of the Softwood Lumber Agreement, 2006. These payments are reduced by several factors: refunds paid to the industry, costs for the administration and implementation of the Agreement and the Act as well as the costs incurred for certain litigation resulting from the Agreement or Act. The Act applies to the following regions: BC Interior, BC Coastal, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. Exports from the remaining provinces and territories are excluded.
Strategic Outcome:
Taxpayers meet their obligations and Canada’s revenue base is protected
Results Achieved:
The first payment covering revenues collected, minus costs for the period between the entry into force on October 12, 2006 and September 30, 2007, was made to the provinces on January 11, 2008. A second payment was made on March 31, 2008 covering the calendar quarter from October 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007. Payments will continue on a quarterly basis until the termination of the Agreement, unless lumber market prices increase to the point where no export charge is applicable for that period.
Program Activity: Taxpayer and Business Assistance
(in thousands of dollars)
 
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009[Footnote 1]  
 
Actual Spending
Actual Spending
Planned Spending
Total Authorities
Actual Spending
Variance(s) Planned/Actual
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments*
603,602
180,495
180,495
(180,495)
Total
603,602
180,495
180,495
(180,495)
Comment(s) on variance(s): N/A
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): N/A

[Footnote 1] There were no Planned Spending amounts shown in the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities.
* Other Transfer Payment is a transfer payment based on legislation or an arrangement that normally includes a formula or schedule as one element used to determine the expenditure amount. However, once a payment is made, the recipient may redistribute the funds among several categories of expenditure in the arrangement.
Top of Page

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

3.2.4 Details on Transfer Payments Programs ($ millions)


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Statutory Compensation Payments

Start date: N/A

End date: N/A

Description of Transfer Payment Program: Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by regulations under the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act.

Strategic Outcome: To compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

Results Achieved: 123 Canadians were compensated for plants ordered destroyed.

Program Activity: Plant Health Risks and Production Systems
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between Planned and Actual Spending 2008-09
Total Grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Contributions 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 2.0 8.1 0.9 11.9 11.9 11.0
Total Plant Health Risks and Production Systems 2.0 8.1 0.9 11.9 11.9 11.0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual compensation payments made to Canadians were $11.0 million higher than the $0.9 million that was earmarked in Planned Spending. This increase is largely attributed to Sudden Oak Death ($9.7M).



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Statutory Compensation Payments

Start date: N/A

End date: N/A

Description of Transfer Payment Program: Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by regulations under the Health of Animals Act and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act.

Strategic Outcome: To compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for animals ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.

Results Achieved: A total of 152 Canadians were compensated for animals ordered destroyed.

Program Activity: Animal Health Risks and Production Systems
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between Planned and Actual Spending (2008-09)
Total Grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Contributions 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 1.8 2.5 0.6 8.6 8.6 8.0
Total Animal Health Risks and Production Systems 1.8 2.5 0.6 8.6 8.6 8.0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual compensation payments made to Canadians were $8.0 million higher than the $0.6 million that was earmarked in Planned Spending. This increase is mainly on account of Chronic Wasting Disease ($5.9M) and Avian Influenza ($1.1M).

Top of Page

Canadian Heritage

Table 3: Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

All these transfer payments programs are voted, which means that each year the Parliament of Canada votes annual Appropriation Act or Acts to grant expenditure authority to the Crown for the departments and agencies. This spending authorization lapses at year-end.

Note: In each Transfer Payment Table, row 15 indicates the amount of funding of grants and contributions for the Program Activity corresponding to each program. This total includes only vote 5--Grants & Contributions (G & Cs). These numbers differ from those indicated for each Program Activity in the Performance Summary of the 2008-2009 Departmental Performance Report (section 1.2.1) because the latter numbers include vote 5 (G & Cs) and vote 1 (Operating expenditures).

Citizenship and Heritage Sector

  • Aboriginal Peoples' Program
  • Building Communities through Arts and Heritage
  • Community Historical Recognition Program
  • Development of Official-Language Communities Program
  • Enhancement of Official Languages
  • Exchanges Canada Program
  • Katimavik Program
  • Multiculturalism Program
  • Museums Assistance Program

Cultural Affairs Sector

  • Arts Presentation Canada
  • Book Publishing Industry Development Program
  • Canada Magazine Fund
  • Canada Music Fund
  • Canada New Media Fund
  • Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program
  • Canadian Culture Online Program
  • Contribution in Support of the Canadian Television Fund
  • Cultural Spaces Canada
  • National Arts Training Contribution Program
  • Publication Assistance Program

International and Intergovernmental Affairs Sector

  • Athlete Assistance Program
  • Hosting Program
  • Sport Support Program
  • TV5

Public and Regional Affairs Sector

  • Celebration and Commemoration Program

Citizenship and Heritage Sector

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Peoples' Program

Start date: 1971-1972

End date: 2009-2010

Description:

For over 30 years, the Department of Canadian Heritage (and its predecessor, the Department of the Secretary of State) has been delivering Aboriginal-specific programs and initiatives that support the full participation of Aboriginal people in Canadian life, and supporting the continuation of Aboriginal living cultures as key elements of the Canadian cultural landscape.

Specifically, these programs:

  • Strengthen Aboriginal cultural identity and languages; and

  • Facilitate the inclusion of Aboriginal people in Canadian society in a manner that recognizes their cultures and fosters their contributions to Canada.

The Aboriginal Peoples' Program is organized around two broad themes:

  • Aboriginal Communities Component supports the efforts of Aboriginal communities to develop innovative and culturally appropriate solutions to the social, cultural, economic and other obstacles that impede community and personal prospects. It focuses specifically on the unique challenges faced by Aboriginal women, youth and urban communities, with the intent of strengthening Aboriginal cultural identity and participation of Aboriginal Peoples in Canadian society.

  • Aboriginal Living Cultures Component supports the preservation and promotion of Aboriginal languages and cultures. Specifically, this component focuses on access to programs and activities that preserve and promote Aboriginal languages and cultures as well as the production and distribution of Aboriginal radio and television programming.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

  • Canada is an inclusive society built on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

Results Achieved:

  • The transfer agreement between the National Association of Friendship Centres (NAFC) and Canadian Heritage provided for operational support (core funding) to 116 friendship centre organizations across Canada. This core funding enables the urban Aboriginal population to be served through a network of Aboriginal Friendship Centres, whose key activities focused on social development and community engagement through over 1,167 programs across Canada.
  • A contribution agreement with the National Association of Friendship Centres to administer Young Canada Works for Aboriginal Urban Youth provided employment in friendship centres across Canada to 237 summer students. These summer jobs enabled the creation of projects in over 95 communities across Canada that focused on cultural development, social development and community engagement.
  • Contribution agreements provided funding for Aboriginal youth to access programming that incorporates Aboriginal values, cultures and traditional practices into programs and activities designed to help these youth make positive life choices and improve their social, economic and personal prospects. Some 230 projects--supported by community youth committees--in communities across Canada provided Aboriginal youth with the opportunity to learn about their heritage, culture and identity, and to build self-confidence and a sense of pride in being an Aboriginal person, leading to better leadership and citizenship skills and ability to fully participate in Canadian society.
  • Grants and contribution agreements with Aboriginal women's organizations gave Aboriginal women access to 45 projects in communities across Canada that focused on cultural development, social development and community engagement, Aboriginal self-government and family violence.
  • A contribution agreement with the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples provided funding for National Aboriginal Day events in the National Capital Region that included an educational activity attended by 1,540 students at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, the Summer Solstice Arts Festival on Victoria Island with 6,500 visitors, and six community events in the National Capital Region that attracted approximately 4,190 people.
  • A contribution agreement with the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation provided funding for 34 scholarships to Aboriginal post-secondary students. Career fairs, which included 90 workshops, were held in Iqaluit and Winnipeg and were attended by up to 1,300 students in Grades 9 through 12.
  • The contribution agreement with the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation supported the production and television broadcast of the National Aboriginal Achievement Awards, which were bestowed to 15 recipients. The awards show was attended by over 2,000 people and broadcast on APTN and the Global Television network.
  • Contribution agreements with 13 Aboriginal communications societies enabled the production and broadcasting of original television and radio programs that included over 21,232 hours of radio programming and 191 hours of television programming in 29 Aboriginal languages in addition to English and French.

Program Activity: Preservation of Canada's Heritage
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 20.2 19.5 18.2 18.4 18.0 0.2
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 20.5 19.8 18.6 18.7 18.3 0.3



Program Activity: Community Development and Capacity Building
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 5.5 0.2 - - - -
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 227.0 234.0 238.9 239.5 230.4 8.5



Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 0.6 0.5 1.3 1.3 0.6 0.7
Total Contributions 39.6 39.4 38.2 38.3 38.8 (0.6)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $0.3M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Aboriginal Peoples' Program (Aboriginal Communities Component) was completed in December 2008: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/assurnc/2008/2008-12-3/ACC-eng.pdf.

An internal audit of the Aboriginal Peoples' Program (Cultural Living Cultures Component) was completed in May 2009: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/assurnc/2009/2009-05/2009-05-eng.pdf.

As per the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan, there are currently no planned audits related to this program; however, the audit plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Building Communities through Arts and Heritage

Start date: 2007-2008

End date: 2011-2012

Description:

The Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program supports local arts and heritage festivals, events and activities that engage Canadians in their local communities through the performing and visual arts and in the expression, celebration and preservation of local heritage.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canada is an inclusive society based on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

Results Achieved:

  • In 2008-2009, a total of $6,826,195 (through 605 grants and 83 contribution agreements) was awarded to festivals and anniversaries held across the country, thus providing Canadians with the opportunity to participate in arts and heritage events and festivals at the community level; offering increased opportunities for local artists to perform within their communities; and increasing citizen exposure to local historical heritage.

  • In terms of policy implementation, solid policy frameworks have been in place for all components and applied on an ongoing basis. Performance data has been collected, analyzed and used for ongoing reporting.

  • In terms of program implementation, a pre-Implementation Assessment process was conducted and found that program management took a reasoned and prudent approach to implementation. The Report also outlined a number of opportunities to strengthen the program's control measures, and significant progress has been made in implementing the recommendations. As for program delivery mechanisms, the following results were achieved:

    • Guidelines, tools and processes were improved based on what was learned in the first year, and training sessions were conducted in the regions and at Headquarters.

    • A formula-based approach was developed and implemented to translate project assessment scores into funding recommendations.

  • In terms of regional coordination and consultations, the following results were achieved:

    • Financial resources were allocated by province and territory to 688 projects across the country.

    • An outreach strategy was developed prior to deadlines for applications and included a factsheet, new Guide and Application Forms and general guidelines in both official languages. Festival organizers were asked to indicate how they intended to reach both the French and English populations of the locality, if both groups were to be present.

    • Working group meetings took place weekly with representatives from each region and national headquarters to discuss regional coordination of program delivery.

Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - 0.7 4.5 5.4 4.4 0.1
Total Contributions - 0.6 2.5 1.6 2.4 0.1
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $0.2M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Citizen Participation Branch is planned for 2010-2011.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Historical Recognition Program

Start date: 2006-2007

End date: 2011-2012

Description:

In 2006-2007, the Community Historical Recognition Program replaced the Acknowledgement, Commemoration and Education Program. It provides funding for eligible community-based projects that (i) commemorate and/or recognize the historical experiences of communities impacted by federally legislated wartime measures and/or immigration restrictions or prohibitions that were applied in Canada, and (ii) promote their respective contributions. It aims to highlight the contributions these communities have made to Canada and educate Canadians about these historical experiences and contributions.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canada is an inclusive society built on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

Results Achieved:

  • The Community Historical Recognition Program established the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund, a $10-million endowment fund to support projects that commemorate and recognize the experiences of ethno-cultural communities affected by the First World War internment. The Fund is managed by the Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko. The Foundation will post calls for proposals, and a multilateral committee representing affected communities will make decisions on projects to be funded. Applicants who wish to propose a project related to the First World War internment can visit the Foundation's website at www.shevchenkofoundation.com.

  • The Community Historical Recognition Program's first call for proposals was launched, resulting in the first project-funding approval under the Program.

  • Community-based advisory committees were established to provide advice on project proposals.

  • Through the approval of funding for projects and the establishment of community-based advisory committees, historical experiences of impacted communities are being recognized and commemorated; information is made available on these experiences.

  • The resulting media attention has contributed to increasing public awareness about the historical experiences of impacted communities and their contributions to Canadian society.

Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - 2.8 2.8 - 2.8
Total Contributions - - 12.4 2.6 - 12.4
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $15.2M is explained as follows:

  • Re-profile of funds to 2009-2010 in the amount of $9.1M.

  • Transfer of $5.0M to Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund.

  • Year-end surplus of $1.1M.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Historical Recognition Program: Ex-Gratia Payments was completed in December 2008: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/assurnc/2008/2008-12/2008-12-eng.pdf.

The responsibility for the Community Historical Recognition Program was transferred from the Minister of Canadian Heritage to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) on October 30, 2008; therefore, there is no planned audit at PCH for this program.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Development of Official-Language Communities Program

Start date: 2003-2004

End date: 2008-2009

Description:

The Development of Official-Language Communities Program fosters the vitality of Canada's English- and French-speaking minority communities and enables them to participate fully in all aspects of Canadian life. Partnerships and agreements with community organizations, provinces, territories, municipalities, and federal departments and agencies enhance minority official-language communities' access to quality education and different programs and services in their language in their communities.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canada is an inclusive society built on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

Results Achieved:

  • General satisfaction with services offered to OLMC in their minority language has improved; the general satisfaction rate is 74%, and six out of ten respondents in the PCH-Decima 2006 survey say they are satisfied. The rate of satisfaction is even higher when it comes to specific services (media and communications--85.7%; health and social services--71.1%; daycare and preschool--70.9%).

  • Also, 31% of members of OLMC say they are delighted that access to services in their language has improved in the last five years. (Less than 15% of Anglophones and less than 8% of Francophone's say services have deteriorated.)

  • Access to services for members of OLMC has improved over the years. The general satisfaction with the improvement of access to services in OLMC members' language in the last five years is 31%.

  • Most of PCH's funding for the development of OLMC granted to provinces and territories--$166M on $233M for 2008-2009, are allocated resources for ministries of Education for the delivery of programs that guarantee education for OLMC in their language.

  • Below-average education amongst the younger generations of Official Language Minorities is lower than that of the majority (15-24 and 25-44 years of age).

  • A little over one person in five (age 15 years and up) living in a minority language situation in Canada has a University diploma (21%). This proportion is slightly higher compared to the Official Language people living in a majority situation.

  • The proportion of the population with a higher level of education is greater in OLMC than for the population of Official Languages living in a majority situation (the minority-majority index is 1.28 for those aged 15-24 years, and 1.19 for those aged 25-44 years).

  • Almost eight out of ten people living in a minority situation say they are satisfied with the services offered in their language, in their region in the Education and post-secondary training sectors.

Program Activity: Community Development and Capacity-Building
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 5.2 7.2 36.8 34.2 7.7 29.1
Total Contributions 216.3 226.7 202.1 205.2 222.7 (20.6)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 227.0 234.0 238.9 239.4 230.4 8.5



Program Activity:Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - - - - 1.7 (1.7)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $6.8M is explained as follows:

  • $8.5M was transferred to the Enhancement of Official Languages Program to adjust for emerging priorities.

  • 2008-2009 actual spending includes $1.7M for Young Canada Works, which was not included in planned spending.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Official Languages Support Programs was completed in December 2008:
http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/assurnc/2008/2008-12-2/OLSP-eng.pdf.

An internal audit of the Official Languages Support Program Branch is planned for 2013-2014. This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings;  reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Enhancement of Official Languages

Start date: 2003-2004

End date: 2008-2009

Description:

The Enhancement of Official Languages program promotes among Canadians a better understanding and appreciation of the benefits of linguistic duality. It achieves this through partnerships and agreements with the provinces and territories, and with non-governmental organizations to support second-language learning and initiatives that foster understanding between Anglophone and Francophone Canadians, and encourage the public to recognize and support linguistic duality as a fundamental value of Canadian society.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canada is an inclusive society built on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

Results Achieved:

  • More than two out of three respondents (68.8%) believe that since French and English are spoken in Canada it helps increase work opportunities.

  • More than six out of ten respondents who live in a minority situation (60.5%) believe that relations between Francophones and Anglophones have improved positively compared to 10 years ago.

  • In 2006, the number of bilingual persons (English-French) reached an all-time high in Canada (5.4 million at the last Census). The rate of bilingualism English-French was 17.4% in 2006.

Program Activity: Promotion of Inter-Cultural Understanding
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 0.2 0.5 5.1 5.1 1.3 3.8
Total Contributions 115.1 117.8 104.7 104.7 118.3 (13.6)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 130.3 118.3 109.8 109.8 119.6 (9.8)



Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.4 1.9 1.5
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of ($8.3M) is explained as follows:

  • $8.5M was received from the Development of Official-Language Communities Program to adjust for emerging priorities.

  • $0.2M was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Official Languages Support Programs was completed in December 2008:
http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/assurnc/2008/2008-12-2/OLSP-eng.pdf.

An internal audit of the Official Languages Support Program Branch is planned for 2013-2014. This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Exchanges Canada Program

Start date: 2000-2001

End date: 2009-2010

Description:

The Exchanges Canada Program enables young Canadians to participate in one-way forums and two-way exchanges with youth from communities across the country. It also enables them to obtain information on opportunities for many different types of exchanges within Canada and abroad.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canada is an inclusive society built on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

Results Achieved:

  • In 2008-2009, the Exchanges Canada Program offered opportunities to approximately 12,900 youth to enhance their knowledge and understanding of Canada; to create linkages with one another; and to enhance their appreciation of the diversity and shared aspects of the Canadian experience. Through participation in forums and group exchanges, youth were enabled to learn about Canada, its history, geography, industry, institutions, communities, cultures, and languages, and to connect with other youth. In addition, summer work student exchanges offered youth opportunities to develop employability skills. Feedback from youth questionnaires showed, for example, that participation in Exchanges Canada's activities helped youth to learn new things about Canada; increase their desire to get involved in their own communities; and enhance knowledge about cultural communities other than their own.

  • Support was provided to youth exchanges and forums through 23 contribution agreements with non-governmental organizations. Exchanges Canada formed strategic alliances with two governmental organizations for youth exchange projects (Parks Canada and the Official Languages Support Program). The Exchanges Canada website provided information on opportunities for youth exchanges in Canada and abroad.

Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 0.1 - 0.1 0.1 - 0.1
Total Contributions 22.4 17.4 17.7 18.2 18.5 (0.8)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of ($0.7M) is explained as follows:

  • Transfers from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Citizen participation Branch is planned for 2010-2011. 

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Katimavik Program

Start date: 1997-1998

End date: 2010-2011

Description:

Through the Katimavik Program, young Canadians are provided with opportunities to create ties with communities and other Canadians, and to improve their employability. The objectives of the Katimavik program are: to contribute substantially to the personal, social and professional development of participants; to promote community service; and to offer a diverse experience, fostering a better understanding of the Canadian reality and linguistic duality. Through a nine-month program comprised of community service, training and group interaction, participants aged 17 to 21 have the opportunity to acquire personal and professional skills by involving themselves in community projects in one French-speaking and two English-speaking regions of Canada.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canada is an inclusive society built on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

Results Achieved:

  • In 2008-2009, the Katimavik Program provided young Canadians with opportunities to enhance their knowledge of Canada and its diversity; to develop their personal, social and professional skills; and to enhance their appreciation of community service. The Program enabled host-community partner organizations to improve their capacity to serve their community. Through their participation in the Katimavik Program, over 930 youth had opportunities to learn more about Canada, including its cultural, linguistic and geographic diversity. A program of community service learning, training and group interaction enabled participants to help approximately 100 community organizations carry out their projects, while the youth gained work experience and enhanced their professional skills.

  • The Katimavik Program is delivered by a not-for-profit organization through support from a contribution agreement.

Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 17.5 18.0 19.8 19.8 19.0 0.8
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $0.8M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Citizen Participation Branch is planned for 2010-2011.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Multiculturalism Program

Start date: 1982-1983

End date: 2009-2010

Description:

The Multiculturalism Program of Canadian Heritage is one important means by which the Government of Canada pursues the three goals of the Multiculturalism Policy: identity, social justice, and civic participation. Funding provided under the Program's terms and conditions supports these goals to achieve the following objectives:

  • Ethno-cultural/racial minorities participate in decision making (civic participation);
  • Communities in the broad public engage in informed dialogue and sustained action to combat racism (anti-racism, anti-hate, cross-cultural understanding); and
  • Public institutions eliminate systemic barriers (institutional change).

The funding priorities are:

  • Economic, social and cultural integration;
  • Mentorship, volunteerism, leadership and civic education; and
  • Inter-cultural understanding and Canadian values.

The responsibility for the Multiculturalism Program was transferred from the Minister of Canadian Heritage to the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism on October 30, 2008. CIC Multiculturalism staff continue to consult and collaborate with PCH staff as appropriate. The Multiculturalism Program is being incorporated into CIC. This will enable CIC to address short- and longer-term integration challenges facing all Canadians, both newcomers and long-established.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canada is an inclusive society built on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

Results Achieved:

Following the publication of new application guidelines in March 2008, 37 projects were approved that address the new priorities. Two examples include:

Somali-Jewish Canadian Mentorship Project (Canadian International Peace Project)

  • An interfaith pilot program in Toronto matching Somali teens who are new to the workforce with community businesses. The program facilitates the creation of internships and mentoring relationships for the teens with professionals from the Jewish community.

  • The project is building long-term community cohesion and helping create a successful cadre of young Somali-Canadian professionals who are assuming greater leadership roles in assisting the development of their own community and contributing to Canadian society at large.

Examining the School Participation Rate of Ethno-Cultural Communities in Ontario (National African Integration and Families Association [NAIFA])

  • A community-based pilot project that has resulted in: i) a needs assessment; ii) resource kits to help address barriers that immigrant parents from African communities face in becoming more involved in the Ontario educational system; and iii) a self-sustaining community support group for parents.

  • This project has resulted in a significant increase in the involvement of African immigrant parents of children at four Toronto schools, resulting in parents being better able to navigate the educational system and to address their concerns and issues.

Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 0.6 0.3 7.3 7.3 0.2 7.1
Total Contributions 8.6 6.8 9.5 9.5 4.0 5.5
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $12.6M is explained as follows:

  • $5.7M was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

  • Year-end surplus of $6.9M.

Audit completed or planned:

The responsibility for the Multiculturalism Program was transferred from the Minister of Canadian Heritage to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) on October 30, 2008; therefore, there is no planned audit at PCH for this program.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Museums Assistance Program

Start date: 1972-1973

End date: 2009-2010

Description:

The Museums Assistance Program is known as Grant/Contribution to Canadian museums and heritage organizations to promote professional management of, and access to, Canada's diverse heritage.

The Program helps current and future generations of Canadians gain access to, and develop a better appreciation of their heritage. The program provides project support to help exhibitions travel around the country, to foster the adoption of best museum management practices, to support Aboriginal peoples in protecting and presenting their heritage, and to improve museum associations' ability to serve their members.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

  • In 2008-2009, the Museums Assistance Program received 146 applications and funded 112 new projects. When multi-year projects are taken into consideration, 176 projects received funding: 83 projects supported the production and circulation of domestic travelling exhibitions and associated interpretive material; 21 projects focused on preserving and presenting Aboriginal cultural heritage; and 72 projects helped museums adopt sound professional policies and practices and heritage service organizations develop resources or services for multiple museums. Total funding provided by the Museums Assistance Program is estimated at $6.1 million.

  • Through the Young Canada Works in Heritage organizations Program, 1,858 summer students and graduate interns found work in heritage organizations in 2008-2009, which represents an increase of 203 summer jobs for youth over last year.

Program Activity: Sustainability of cultural expression and participation
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - -  
Total Contributions 0.5 0.5 - - 0.5 (0.5)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 186.9 184.6 133.0 134.6 101.6 31.4



Program Activity: Access to Canada's Culture
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 1.6 1.2 2.5 2.5 2.0 0.5
Total Contributions 4.7 4.3 4.1 4.1 3.5 0.6
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 115.1 123.5 136.0 135.7 135.3 0.7



Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 3.0 6.6 7.8 7.8 7.9 (0.1)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $0.5M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Young Canada Works Initiative was completed in December 2008: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/assurnc/2008/2008-03/2008-3-eng.pdf.

An internal audit of the Museum Assistance Program is planned for 2009-2010.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.

An internal audit of the Heritage Policies and Programs Branch is planned for 2011-2012.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.


Cultural Affairs Sector


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Arts Presentation Canada

Start date: 2001-2002

End date: 2009-2010

Description:

The program supports arts presenters in the performing arts, arts festivals and their service organizations to help them strengthen their presentation practices by encouraging diverse programming, organizing audience development, diversification and outreach activities, developing initiatives that bring professional artists into contact with residents of their community, and supporting networking and professional development for presenters. It also supports the emergence of presenters and presenter networks for under-served communities or artistic practices. Its objective is to give Canadians direct access to a diversity of artistic experiences.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

  • In 2008-2009, the program provided funding to 278 festivals (46%), 225 performing arts series presenters (38%), 67 organizations presenting both a series and a festival (11%), and 29 presenter support organizations (5%).

  • Arts Presentation Canada (APC) increased access for Canadians to a greater variety of arts experiences. Funded organizations presented a variety of work: music (73% of all funded organizations present some music in their season); dance (48%); theatre (45%); visual arts (26%); literature (15%); and media arts (15%).

  • A 2008 survey of audience members attending APC-funded music presentations provided further evidence of the program's impact with regards to increased variety. Respondents perceived an increase in the number of performances featuring new musicals styles, artists from a variety of geographical and cultural backgrounds and younger/emerging musicians.  Increased programming variety, along with attendance at outreach activities--those that are supported to help audiences get the most out of the work they are seeing--were also noted as improving the likelihood of participants returning to the event in subsequent years.

  • The program has helped organizations expand and diversify their audiences. The percentages of funded organizations that reach out to the following audiences are: 67%--culturally diverse, 72%--young audiences, 32%--Aboriginals, 39%--rural/remote regions and 37%--official language minorities.

  • Over the past three years, APC has contributed annual funding to presenters in nearly 240 communities, of which 60% are rural or remote. It is estimated that these arts organizations coordinate outreach activities and programming in over 450 communities.

  • In addition to helping increase the variety of artistic experiences offered to Canadians, the 2008 Summative Evaluation revealed that APC-funded organizations and events provided economic development spin-off opportunities within their local economy, inspired innovative partnerships and helped create a better quality of life through revitalized and energized communities. For example, the Stan Rogers Folk Festival is located in Canso, Nova Scotia, a coastal fishing community of fewer than 1,000 residents that suffered significant hardship due to the collapse of the Atlantic ground fishery. The festival has changed the landscape of Canso to accommodate the thousands of visitors who swell the town's population to more than four times its normal size at festival time.

Program Activity: Access to Canada's Culture
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - 3.1 10.5 10.5 5.8 4.7
Total Contributions 22.1 20.2 17.9 17.3 24.1 (6.2)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 115.1 123.5 136.0 135.7 135.3 0.7
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of ($1.5M) is explained as follows:

  • Transfers from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Arts Policy Branch is planned for 2011-2012.

This planned audit is a branch audit and not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Book Publishing Industry Development Program

Start date: 1980-1981

End date: 2010-2011

Description:

The Book Publishing Industry Development Program (BPIDP) supports the activities of Canadian book publishers and other sectors of the book industry in order to ensure choice of and access to Canadian-authored books, which reflect Canada's cultural diversity and linguistic duality both at home and abroad. The BPIDP aims to meet that objective by fostering a strong, viable Canadian book industry that publishes and promotes Canadian-authored books.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

In 2008-2009, BPIDP helped to further the Department's goal of supporting the creation and dissemination of Canadian cultural expression through contributions to over 300 organizations in the Canadian book industry for publishing, marketing, professional development, internships, technology-driven collective projects and other activities.

This investment helped contribute to:

  • A strong, representative domestic book industry: BPIDP continues to support a broad range of industry activities across the country, including 235 Canadian-owned publishers in more than 75 Canadian towns and cities who directly employ over 3,000 Canadians.

  • A diverse range of Canadian-authored content created: publishers supported by BPIDP in 2008-2009 produced 5,325 new titles by more than 3,500 Canadian writers, including nearly 1,000 first-time authors.

  • Readers accessing Canadian content: publishers realized $350 million in book sales in Canada and $103 million in export sales for a total of $453 million. This represents a 6% inflation-adjusted increase over the last five years, indicating that Canadian and international readers continue to seek out and consume Canadian books in strong and growing numbers.

Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 26.2 27.1 27.0 27.0 26.5 0.5
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 320.8 304.1 311.4 319.4 318.2 (6.8)



Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 7.7 2.9 4.0 3.0 3.0 1.0
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 186.9 184.6 133.0 134.6 101.6 31.4



Program Activity: Access to Canada's Culture
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 3.0 6.9 6.7 6.7 6.7 -
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 115.1 123.5 136.0 135.7 135.3 0.7
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $1.5M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Book Publishing Industry Development Program was completed in June 2008: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/assurnc/2008/2008-02/2008-02-eng.pdf.

An internal audit of the Book Publishing Industry Development Program is planned for 2013-2014.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Magazine Fund

Start date: 1999-2000

End date: 2010-2011

Description:

The Canada Magazine Fund (CMF) supports Canadian magazine publishers and not-for-profit organizations representing periodical publishers to: maintain Canadian editorial content in Canadian magazines, increase Canadians' access to Canadian magazines; enhance the quality and diversity of Canadian magazines; and strengthen the infrastructure of the Canadian magazine industry. The fund achieves these goals by providing formula funding for magazines to support and enhance their editorial content, supporting business development projects for small magazine publishers, and helping the development of the periodical industry as a whole.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

In 2008-2009, the CMF contributed $10.5 million to the Department's goal of supporting the creation of Canadian cultural content and almost $3.2 million to support the sustainability of cultural expression.

The CMF helped contribute to:

  • Strengthened industry infrastructure and capacity: in 2008-2009, the CMF provided funding to 75 projects that dealt with professional development, promotion and marketing, newsstand sales building, research and technology development. These projects helped individual publishers grow their business and improve their capacity, and also supported association-based projects that contribute to the long-term viability of the Canadian periodicals industry.

  • A diverse range of Canadian-authored content created: publishers supported by the Support for Editorial Component in 2008-2009 produced approximately 113,000 pages of Canadian content in 196 titles.

Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 11.0 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.5 0.2
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 320.8 304.1 311.4 319.4 318.2 (6.8)



Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 4.6 3.9 4.7 4.7 3.8 0.9
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 186.9 184.6 133.0 134.6 101.6 31.4
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $1.1M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Canada Magazine Fund program is planned for 2012-2013.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.

An internal audit of the Cultural Industries Branch is planned for 2010-2011. This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Music Fund

Start date: 2001-2002

End date: 2009-2010

Description:

The Canada Music Fund offers a comprehensive range of both innovative and proven funding components designed to support diversity, capacity and excellence in the music industry at every level, from creators to audiences. Activities supported include song-writing development, demo and CD production, video and musical DVD production, marketing, touring, distribution, public awareness, industry training, workshops, conferences, awards shows, showcasing, archiving, preservation, providing access and industry infrastructure development.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

The Canadian music industry has experienced sharp declines in sales this decade, largely due to the Internet and rapidly changing consumer behaviour.

Despite this decline, Canadians continue to purchase and access more Canadian music. Since the inception of the CMF, the market share of Canadian artist albums sold in Canada increased from 16.0% in 2001 to 26.5% in 2007, with the market share of artists who received federal support at some point in their careers jumping from 6.1% to 13%1.

In 2008-2009, the CMF continued to support the production of and access to a diverse range of Canadian music:

  • Production support was provided to over 350 albums by Canadian artists through the New Musical Works (NMW) and Canadian Musical Diversity components.

  • Over 900 projects received marketing, touring or showcasing funding through NMW.

  • The 22 recipients of the 2008-2009 Music Entrepreneur Component (MEC)--Aid to Canadian Sound Recording Firms released 144 albums by Canadian artists in the past year.

  • MEC funding continues to assist established Canadian sound recording firms in the transition to the Internet and the development of international markets:
    • While MEC recipients' CD sales declined 24% over the previous year, their full-length album download and single track sales increased by 31% and 91% respectively;

    • Digital sales now represent over 22% of MEC recipients' total sales, up from 6% in 2005-2006; and

    • 28% of all CD sales by MEC recipients are garnered internationally, up from 22% in 2005-2006.

1 PCH manipulation of Nielsen SoundScan top 2000 charts


Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 11.5 10.8 9.1 9.1 11.6 (2.5)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 320.8 304.1 311.4 319.4 318.2 (6.8)



Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 9.4 10.3 11.5 11.5 10.4 1.1
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 186.9 184.6 133.0 134.6 101.6 31.4



Program Activity: Preservation of Canada's Heritage
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 -
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 20.5 19.8 18.6 18.7 18.3 0.3



Program Activity: Access to Canada's Culture
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 2.1 2.4 1.8 2.3 2.8 (1.0)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 115.1 123.5 136.0 135.7 135.3 0.7
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of ($2.4M) is explained as follows:

  • Transfers from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Cultural Industries Branch is planned for 2010-2011.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada New Media Fund

Start date: 2000-2001

End date: 2008-2009

Description:

The Canada New Media Fund (CNMF) administered by Telefilm Canada supports the development, production, marketing and distribution of high-quality, original, interactive, Canadian new media cultural products in both official languages that are intended for the general public.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

Canadian Heritage transferred $14.5 million to Telefilm Canada for the CNMF, of which $12.3 million supported 147 projects.

  • $11.6 million supported 123 content creation projects (Product Assistance component).

  • $0.7 million supported 24 projects that facilitated the competitiveness of the Canada interactive media sector (Sectoral Assistance component).

The CNMF supported a broad range of products that attract different types and sizes of audiences.

Results are available for those products and websites that were completed in 2008-2009.

Through various digital platforms, Canadians have access to more innovative interactive products developed by Canadian companies. Some of these products have attracted broad audiences, particularly those associated with television programming. Examples include:

  • Cornemuse.com, created by Telefiction Productions,provides a bilingual magic and stimulating environment where 3- to 5-year-old children can develop relationships with their favourite characters by playing games that are educational and highly interactive. Its average hits per month were 9.7 million in 2008-2009.

  • Aces of the Galaxy, produced by Artech, received an 8/10 rating from OXM, the official Xbox 360 magazine in the UK.

A majority of the projects reported more modest traffic statistics, which can be expected from websites that often target niche audiences, such as Se donner le mot produced by ECP Nouveaux médias inc. The interactive website offers a total of 20 hours of interactive games, animated by two famous Quebec humorists. This website received 652,000 visits from October to December 2008.

The CNMF Sectoral Assistance component supports activities designed to increase the competitiveness of the Canadian interactive media sector. These activities gave interactive media companies access to workshops, internships, conferences and other networking events. For example, The Great Canadian Video Game Competition was a pilot Telefilm initiative to elevate the commercial profile of Canadian-owned gaming companies and help the industry grow.

The program was a resounding success. Created with industry support and input, the Competition was a first-of-its-kind initiative that took place in three rounds that mirrored traditional industry financing. In September 2008 the final winner was announced: MindHabits (Montréal, QC) received up to half a million dollars from Telefilm--and each public dollar was matched by private investors. Since its PC launch, the stress-relief game Trainer has received international accolades from the Wall Street Journal, the National Review of Medicine, and the Scientist. The game is available in English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian and Russian. The PC Retail and Nintendo DS Versions are expected on the market soon and MindHabits has already secured international distribution deals.


Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 14.0 11.5 14.2 14.2 14.5 (0.3)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 320.8 304.1 311.4 319.4 318.2 (6.8)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of ($0.3M) is explained as follows:

  • Transfers from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Canada New Media Fund Program is planned for 2012-2013.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program

Start date: 2001-2002

End date: 2009-2010

Description:

The Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program (CAHSP) is designed to strengthen organizational effectiveness, build operational and financial capacity within the arts and heritage sectors, and ensure that those organizations operate in communities that value their existence, see them as key assets, and support them. There are six components: Stabilization Projects, Capacity Building, Endowment Incentives, Limited Support to Endangered Arts Organizations, Networking, and Cultural Capitals of Canada.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

Enhanced long-term sustainability of Canadian arts and heritage organizations in communities. This helped achieve the Department's strategic outcome in that Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

As a result of the departmental participation in the 2008 Strategic Review Exercise, it was determined that the Stabilization component will not be renewed as of 2009-2010, and the budgets for the Capacity Building and Limited Support to Endangered Arts Organizations components have been reduced for 2009-2010. 

The 2008-2009 Summative Evaluation did, however, provide evidence of an ongoing need for a program such as CAHSP to help organizations to improve their effectiveness and management and to identify funding sources to enable them to face new challenges. Developing the organizational health of these organizations requires additional effort and continuous attention.

Capacity Building
In 2008-2009, the Capacity Building component of the CAHSP provided support totalling $5,023,473 to 156 projects--104 of which were with arts organizations and 52 with heritage organizations. Types of projects supported included business, strategic and human resources plans, new financing and ticketing systems, employee training and audience development strategies.

Endowment Incentives
In 2008-2009, 80 applications received funding totalling $14.8 million. The matching incentive of the Department was $0.72 for every dollar donated by the private sector. The Endowment Incentives component saw decreases from the previous year of 18% in the number of applications and 25% in donations received. The global economic downturn may explain these declines. However, the number of funding applications from provinces where a similar incentive program is available remains generally higher. Since the launch of the component, the federal government's contribution of $88.6 million has leveraged $123.6 million in donations from the private sector, for a total of $212.5 million invested in arts organizations' endowment funds. In addition, the results of the Summative Evaluation confirm the program's importance for its ability to attract private donations and diversify the organizations' funding sources.

Cultural Capitals of Canada (CCC)
In 2008-2009, five communities were designated Cultural Capitals of Canada (CCC); total contributions approved amounted to $4.25 million. Since 2002-2003, there have been a total of 140 eligible applications to the program and 34 CCC designations have been awarded, for a total of $21 million.

A Summative Evaluation was completed in 2008-2009 to assess the relevance and impact of CCC. The evaluation confirmed the findings of the 2007-2008 survey in terms of the positive impact CCC designations have had on communities, including the manner in which these designations brought together many stakeholders who had not previously worked together.

Findings of the evaluation also confirmed CCC's positive impact in terms of incorporating culture into municipal planning and strengthening relationships between local municipal governments and arts and heritage organizations.

Networking Initiatives Component
The total funding approved through the Networking Initiatives component of CAHSP amounted to $258,819 (Creative City Network and Les Arts et la Ville) during the 2008-2009 fiscal year.

A Summative Evaluation included the Networking Initiatives component and confirmed its success in supporting local cultural involvement.

In 2008-2009, both networks continued to provide members with the support and resources required to further municipal involvement and investment in cultural development.


Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 15.4 16.3 16.9 16.9 15.9 1.0
Total Contributions 4.9 3.8 5.3 5.3 3.5 1.8
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 186.9 184.6 133.0 134.6 101.6 31.4



Program Activity: Access to Canada's Culture
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 3.2 5.7 4.9 4.9 4.9 -
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 115.1 123.5 136.0 135.7 135.3 0.7



Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 0.2 - - - - -
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $2.8M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Arts Policy Branch is planned for 2011-2012.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Culture Online Program

Start date: 2001-2002

End date: 2009-2010

Description:

Canadian Culture Online Program (CCOP) includes three sub-components: Access and Content, Research and Development, and New Media Sector Development. The objectives of the program are to provide Canadians access to and participation in interactive digital resources that reflect our diverse heritage, cultures, languages, and history, and to ensure that the program contributes to a supportive environment for the new media sector in Canada.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

In 2008-2009, the CCOP provided $12.1 million in funding for 54 projects, including:

  • $9 million in support of 49 access and content creation projects (Gateway Fund and Partnerships Fund) that allow Canadians of all ages to access content that reflects our diverse cultures and heritage; and

  • $3.1 million in support of five research and development projects and initiatives (New Media Research Networks Fund and New Media R&D Initiative) that are developing leading-edge technological tools to create, manage, and distribute Canadian digital cultural content.

The CCOP supported a broad range of projects in both official languages, all of which attract different audiences.

The following results are for websites and research projects completed in 2008-2009.

The trilingual online magazine Bulgarian-Canadian Culture Synergy is a virtual multidisciplinary art centre that features and promotes Canadian talent of Bulgarian origin and enables artists to connect with both Canadian and international audiences. Since its launch in October 2008, it has had over 3,000 visits per month.

Inland Journey--A Cultural Journey Between the Squamish to Lil'wat Nations is an online exhibition that showcases objects, photographs, audio and video relevant to the history of the Squamish and Lil'Wat Nations. This online exhibition will be a world-class offering of the Squamish Lil'Wat Cultural Centre in Whistler, BC--a hallmark attraction at the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

Support for interactive media research and development projects helped create a stimulating environment conducive to creating and distributing even more dynamic cultural content. Thematic research networks and partnerships have brought 28 Canadian research institutions and interactive media organizations to collaborate on developing 26 innovative tools.

Note: Resources allocated for New Media Sector Development were transferred to Telefilm Canada in 2008-2009. For results, see Sectoral Assistance component in Table 3: Details of Transfer Payment Programs: Canada New Media Fund.


Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 0.6 - 0.8 0.8 - 0.8
Total Contributions 5.0 3.6 4.5 4.0 4.1 0.4
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 186.9 184.6 133.0 134.6 101.6 31.4



Program Activity: Access to Canada's Culture
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 9.5 7.5 6.1 8.1 9.0 (2.9)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 115.1 123.5 136.0 135.7 135.3 0.7
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of ($1.7M) is explained as follows:

  • Transfers from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

As per the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan, there are currently no planned audits related to this program; however, the audit plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution in Support of the Canadian Television Fund

Start date: 1996-1997

End date: 2008-2009

Description:

The Canadian Television Fund (CTF) supports the creation and broadcast of high-quality prime-time Canadian programs in both official languages and in Aboriginal languages, and builds audiences for these programs. The CTF supports dramas, youth and children's programs, documentaries, variety shows, and performing arts. It also supports Aboriginal and Francophone productions in minority situations.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

In 2008-2009, the CTF invested over $275 million in Canadian productions, which generated over 2,000 hew hours of Canadian programming*. Since its inception in 1996, the CTF has invested more than $2.7 billion, which generated the production of 27,000 hours of Canadian programs.

* Data is not final until the release of the CTF annual report (Summer 2009).


Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 120.0 120.0 120.0 120.0 120.0 -
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 320.8 304.1 311.4 319.4 318.2 (6.8)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

  • No variance

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Canadian Television Fund Program is planned for 2012-2013. The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.

An internal audit of the Cultural Industries Branch is planned for 2010-2011. This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Cultural Spaces Canada

Start date: 2001-2002

End date: 2009-2010

Description:

The program supports the construction, renovation and improvement of not-for-profit facilities dedicated to arts and heritage. As a complement to other infrastructure programs such as the "Building Canada Fund", Cultural Spaces Canada specifically contributes to the improvement of the physical conditions that foster creativity and artistic innovation.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

Since its inception in 2001-2002, the Cultural Spaces Canada (CSC) program has supported over 728 projects in more than 257 communities across Canada through contributions totalling $212,019,236. In 2008-2009, the CSC program contributed to 93 infrastructure improvement projects across the country and committed $30,144,357. These included funding to 41 construction and major renovation projects; 49 projects devoted specifically to the purchase and installation of specialized equipment; and three projects assisting organizations with the costs of a feasibility study for the creation or renovation of an arts or heritage facility.

These projects improve infrastructure to allow for greater creativity, access and artistic innovation. For instance, a $700,000 contribution from CSC was approved in 2008-2009 for significant renovations and equipment purchases for Montreal's "Les Ateliers créatifs Centre-Sud" to convert a former industrial building into high-quality spaces available for rent by artists and cultural organizations. This project ensures that artists and cultural organizations are able to maintain their presence in a central area of Montreal already recognized as a creative district. In addition, the project created spaces suited to the specific needs of professional artists from different disciplines (i.e., visual arts, media arts) and paid special attention to emerging artists as well as artists from culturally diverse communities.

Also in 2008-2009, assistance was provided to the Yukon Arts Centre, a key arts organization in the Yukon. CSC contributed $57,700 toward the purchase of a state-of-the-art digital audio mixing console, new amplifiers and high-quality video playback equipment. This will allow the Yukon Arts Centre to present larger ensembles, improve the quality of its sound and support touring artists and groups with sophisticated technical requirements who would not otherwise be able perform at this facility. Video components will allow the Yukon Arts Centre to exhibit installations using video by senior Canadian artists and by emerging, young and Aboriginal artists, giving audiences access to those experiences.


Program Activity: Access to Canada's Culture
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 0.3 0.4 4.1 3.0 0.5 3.6
Total Contributions 19.8 22.9 27.4 26.3 28.7 (1.3)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 115.1 123.5 136.0 135.7 135.3 0.7
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $2.3M is explained as follows:

  • $1.0M was included in CSC's planned spending and should have been included in the Building Communities through Arts and Heritage Program.

  • A re-profile of $1.3M to future years has been requested (approval pending).

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Arts Policy Branch is planned for 2011-2012.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: National Arts Training Contribution Program

Start date: 1997-1998

End date: 2012-2013

Description:

The National Arts Training Contribution Program (NATCP) is designed to assist independent Canadian not-for-profit organizations that specialize in training Canadians who seek a professional career in the arts.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

  • Since the inception of the program, from 1997-1998 through 2008-2009 the NATCP has disbursed a total of $164M in operating funding to national training schools in various artistic disciplines. In 2008-2009, $18.4M in funding was provided to 37 organizations in a wide variety of artistic disciplines.

  • A Summative Evaluation of the Program completed in May 2007 found a need for continued federal support in national arts training, and that the Program is meeting its overall objective to provide arts training of the highest calibre. The evaluation also found that the NATCP has an "invaluable" and "significant" impact on Canadians' access to high-quality artistic and cultural products. This speaks to the Program's ultimate outcome: that Canadians and the world benefit from high-quality artistic achievements by Canadian artists trained in Canada.

  • Key results for NATCP are that graduates of funded institutions have professional careers and are recognized for their excellence in Canada and internationally. Annual surveys of these institutions show that there are approximately 1,200 graduates per year--with another 2,200 participating in shorter-term workshops--and 80% are working professionally (of whom 20% also work internationally). The surveys show that nearly 50% of graduates of NATCP-funded institutions receive an award in their first three years after graduation; the Summative Evaluation revealed that they are more likely to receive honours, distinctions and awards than graduates of unfunded institutions.

  • The 2007 Summative Evaluation also found that NATCP graduates are more likely to earn a living wholly by the practice of their art within three years, compared to their peers from unfunded schools, who are more likely to seek work not related to their art.

  • Results of a preliminary 2009 public opinion research survey revealed that the majority of professional Canadian performing arts organizations surveyed had hired individuals from at least one NATCP-funded institution in the last five years, and that graduates of NATCP-funded performing arts programs were highly assessed by employers in all aspects of their training. The highest ratings came in the areas of technical expertise in their discipline (89%), professionalism and career readiness (88%), and performance qualifications and experience (87%). The results of the survey will be only available in 2009--2010. The research confirmed that NATCP-funded training institutions are recognized by Canadian performing arts employers as being among the leaders in their field.

Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 17.0 19.4 16.7 16.7 18.4 (1.7)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 186.9 184.6 133.0 134.6 101.6 31.4
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of ($1.7M) is explained as follows:

  • Transfers from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the National Arts and Training Contribution Program was completed in February 2009: http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/assurnc/2009/2009-01/2009-01-eng.pdf.

An internal audit of the Arts Policy Branch is planned for 2011-2012.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Publication Assistance Program

Start date: 1996-1997

End date: 2009-2010

Description:

The Publication Assistance Program (PAP) is delivered in partnership with the Canada Post Corporation and decreases costs to eligible Canadian periodicals of mailing copies to Canadian readers. Assistance is provided to more than 800 publishers of almost 1,200 different Canadian periodicals, supporting the delivery of 210 million eligible copies of periodicals. These include: general or special-interest paid circulation magazines, non-daily community newspapers, unpaid request circulation periodicals, and religious, scholarly, Aboriginal, ethno-cultural, farm, and official language minority periodicals.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

In 2008-2009, the PAP contributed to the Department's goal to improve accessibility to Canadian cultural works by providing postal subsidies to 1,130 Canadian magazines and non-daily newspapers. These grants totalled over $59 million, of which Canada Post contributed $13.6M, representing an average of about 65% of the recipients' total mailing costs. This investment supported the distribution of over 183 million copies of periodicals to Canadians.


Program Activity: Access to Canada's Culture
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 45.4 45.4 45.4 45.4 45.4 -
Total Contributions - - - - - -
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 115.1 123.5 136.0 135.7 135.3 0.7
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

  • No variance

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Publications Assistance Program is planned for 2009-2010.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.

An internal audit of the Cultural Industries Branch is planned for 2010-2011.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.


International and Intergovernmental Affairs Sector


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Athlete Assistance Program

Start date: 1971

End date: 2010-2011

Description:

The Athlete Assistance Program (AAP) contributes to the pursuit of excellence through its support for improved Canadian athlete performances at major international sporting events, enabling athletes to combine their sport and academic or working careers while training intensively in pursuit of world-class performances. To this end, the Program identifies and supports athletes already at or having the potential to be in the top 16 in the world in their sport.

The Program has three specific objectives:

  • To financially support Canadian athletes identified by National Sport Organizations through criteria established by Sport Canada as performing at or having the greatest potential to achieve top 16 results at Olympic/Paralympic Games and World Championships;

  • To assist Canada's carded athletes* in preparing to engage in full- or part-time career activities;

  • To enable Canada's carded athletes to participate in year-round national training and competition regimes to further their athletic goals.

*Athletes who are approved for funding and are financially supported through the AAP are referred to as "carded" athletes. AAP support is referred to as "carding."

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

  • Sport Canada supported the continued meaningful offset of incremental costs of training and competition for Canada's carded athletes. In 2008-2009, Sport Canada provided over $26,5M in AAP grants and funded over 1,770 carded athletes.

  • Sport Canada continued to provide Canada's carded athletes opportunities to prepare for future career activities, through access to education and training. In 2008-2009, Sport Canada provided tuition support for 662 current and former carded athletes.

  • Sport Canada has contributed to the opportunity for an increased number of athletes to advance through the carding system. In 2008-2009, 293 (16.6%) athletes progressed to or maintained the international standard of the carding system. In 2007-2008, this number was 310 (17.7%). This variance of 1% is not significant and reflects a stable situation.

  • Sport Canada worked to improve performance of Canadian athletes at the highest level of competition. In summer sports, Canada ranked 16th in the world based on 59 medals won during the rolling four-year period of 2005-2008. This compares with 53 medals won from 2004-2007, a 17th place ranking. For winter sports, Canada ranked 2nd in the world based on 101 medals won during the rolling four-year period of 2005-2008. This compares with 94 medals won during the 2004-2007 period--also a 2nd place ranking*. In the case of Paralympic sports, World Championships are generally held only once every four years, in even-numbered years between Paralympic Games. Thus, as 2008 was primarily a non-World Championship year for Paralympic sports, no international ranking was conducted.

* Data based on Sport Canada's Annual Olympic Ranking Index of Nations. The Index is based on results per nation across all Olympic events at Olympic Games and World Championships, over a four-year time frame. The Index is produced annually at the end of each calendar year, once the Olympic Games and/or World Championships of that year have been completed. Results are aggregated with those of the three previous years to produce a comprehensive four-year cycle of results across all Olympic events. For summer sports, this represents approximately 1,000 events over a four-year period; for winter sports, almost 300 events.


Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 25.3 25.3 26.7 26.7 26.5 0.2
Total Contributions - - - - - -
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 320.8 304.1 311.4 319.4 318.2 (6.8)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $0.2M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Sport Canada Branch is planned for 2009-2010 and again in 2013-2014.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Hosting Program

Start date: 1967

End date: 2010-2011

Description:

The Hosting Program aims to enhance the development of sport excellence and the international profile of sport organizations by assisting sport organizations to host the Canada Games and international sport events in Canada. These events are expected to produce significant sport, economic, social and cultural benefits.

The Program offers Canada at-large a planned and coordinated approach to realizing direct and significant benefits from bidding and hosting projects in the areas of sport development in terms of economic, social, cultural and community impacts, across a broad range of government priorities.

The objectives of the Program are to:

  • Strengthen the sport excellence and sport development impacts of bidding and hosting the Canada Games and targeted international sport events;

  • Increase access and equity for designated under-represented groups through contributions to international bidding and hosting events; and

  • Strengthen the associated economic, social, cultural and community impacts of supported bidding and hosting projects, in keeping with the Government of Canada interests and priorities.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

  • Sport Canada worked to increase sport excellence and development impacts from realized planned events. Based on the first 47 reports received (of 64), the Hosting Program has provided opportunities for 2,692 Canadian athletes to participate in international sport events. In 2007-2008, this number was 847.

  • Sport Canada worked to increase opportunities for Aboriginal Peoples and athletes with a disability to participate in planned events. Based on the first 47 reports (of 64), the Hosting Program has provided opportunities for 729 Canadian athletes with a disability to participate in international sport events. In 2007-2008, this number was 397.

  • Sport Canada worked to increase economic, social, and cultural and community impacts supporting Government of Canada priorities from realized planned events. As an example, the 2008 Arctic Winter Games, to which Sport Canada contributed $400K, generated approximately $13M in economic activity for the Northwest Territories, of which $10.3M occurred in Yellowknife. These expenditures generated $3.7M in wages and salaries in the Territory through the support of 59 jobs, of which 49 were in Yellowknife. The total net economic activity (GDP) generated by the event was $4.9M through the Territory, with $3.5M occurring in Yellowknife.

  • Also, Sport Canada contributed $3.5M to the 2008 North American Indigenous Games, which attracted more than 12,000 athletes, cultural participants and spectators to the Cowichan Valley, spending a combined total of $5.5M. This spending, in combination with the operational expenditures of the organizing committee and others--which totalled $9.9M--resulted in a net increase in economic activity of $18.1M throughout the Province, of which $10M occurred in the Cowichan Valley. The total economic activity supported by the event was $34.3M, supporting $12.7M in wages and salaries throughout the Province. In the Cowichan Valley, a total $8.3M in wages and salaries and 254 jobs were supported by the event. Note that Sport Canada contributed an additional $0.9M for the transportation needs of Aboriginal athletes attending the Games.

(Source: Canadian Sport Tourism Alliance)


Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 20.3 8.9 16.8 16.8 12.5 4.3
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 320.8 304.1 311.4 319.4 318.2 (6.8)



Program Activity:Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 106.2 108.7 57.5 61.1 29.8 27.7
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 186.9 184.6 133.0 134.6 101.6 31.4



Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - 1.2 1.0 1.0 2.2 (1.2)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $30.8M is explained as follows:

  • $1.9M was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

  • Re-profile of funds to 2009-2010 in the amount of $17.5M.

  • A re-profile of $11.4M to future years has been requested (approval pending).

Audit completed or planned:

An internal program audit of the Sport Hosting Program is planned for 2009-2010.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.

An internal branch audit of the Sports Canada Branch is planned for 2009-2010 and again in 2013-2014.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Sport Support Program

Start date: 1961

End date: 2010-2011

Description:

The Sport Support Program is the primary funding vehicle for initiatives associated with the delivery of the Canadian Sport Policy. Funding is aimed at: developing athletes and coaches at the highest international levels; providing sound technically based sport programming for all athletes; increasing the number of Canadians from all segments of society involved in sport; and advancing Canadian interests and values in Canada and abroad. This funding is provided to eligible organizations in support of programming that supports the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy.

The specific objectives of the Program are to:

  • Increase the opportunities to participate in quality sport activities for all Canadians, including under-represented groups;

  • Increase the capacity of the Canadian sport system to systematically achieve world-class results at the highest international competitions;

  • Contribute to the provision of technical sport leadership within the Canadian sport system; and

  • Advance Canadian interests, values and ethics in sport at home and abroad.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

  • Sport Canada continued to provide sport programs and services to the Canadian sport system by supporting National Sport Organizations (NSOs) and Multisport Service Organizations (MSOs).  In 2008-2009, Sport Canada supported 56 NSOs, 15 MSOs, seven Canadian Sport Centres and seven other non-governmental organizations.

  • Sport Canada worked to increase opportunities for sport participation among all Canadians, including targeted under-represented groups. Sport Canada funded Sport Participation Development Initiatives - for persons with and without a disability - for 44 NSOs and 3 MSOs. Sport Canada funded Sport Participation Projects for five MSOs, one of which included an aboriginal project, and five other non-government organizations. In addition, Sport Canada negotiated bilateral agreements on a matching-funds basis with all 13 provincial/territorial governments to advance the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy.  These agreements support grassroots projects to improve sport participation opportunities for children and youth, Aboriginal Peoples and under-represented groups.  Agreements in place in 2008-09 included 13 "Generic" agreements, 12 Aboriginal sport agreements and 11 agreements to support team travel to the North American Indigenous Games (NAIG). In total, Sport Canada provided $6M in funding for the Generic, Aboriginal and NAIG team travel bilateral agreements.

  • A revised set of national accountability standards for 2006-2012 was introduced in 2006-2007, and NSOs receiving Sport Canada funding will be monitored annually with respect to their compliance with these standards. The "first priority" standards that were expected to be fully met A revised set of national accountability standards for 2006-2012 was introduced in 2006-2007 and NSOs receiving Sport Canada funding will be monitored annually with respect to their compliance with these standards. The "first priority" standards which were expected to be fully met by the end of the 2007-08 fiscal year address the following subjects: multi-year planning; official languages services; bilingual website; harassment and abuse; bilingual communication with national teams; national teams - harassment and abuse awareness; and national teams - athlete/coach leadership.  In 2006-2007, the first year of monitoring, 93% of NSOs had at least partially met all seven "first priority" standards, while 51% of NSOs had fully met at least five of those seven standards. In 2007-08, the second year of monitoring, 99% of 45 NSOs had at least partially met all seven "first priority" standards and 88% had fully met at least five of the seven standards. In 2008-2009, 55 of 56 NSOs had at least partially met all seven "first priority" standards and 47 of 56 had fully met at least five of the seven standards.

  • Sport Canada has worked to increase the number of NSOs with a sport-specific Long-Term Athlete Development Model in place. There are now 28 NSOs that have completed their Model. This is up from 2005-06 when only one NSO had completed their LTAD model and 2007-2008 when 12 where completed.

  • Sport Canada worked with partners to increase the number of NSOs that have implemented the revised National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP).  In 2008-2009, 14 NSOs were in conditional approvals and 13 in final approvals in the implementation of the new NCCP level. There are now 64 NSOs that have implemented a new NCCP level. Sport Canada worked with partners to increase the number of coaches participating in the NCCP. Between April 1 and August 31, 2008, 40,265 coaches participated in one of the 2,990 NCCP workshops.

  • Sport Canada worked to advance Canadian interests, values and ethics in sport at home and abroad. In 2008-2009, 3,951 doping tests were conducted by the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport. Some 2,878 of those tests were conducted by CCES as part of the Canadian Anti-Doping Program. In 2008-2009, 17 Canadian athletes were sanctioned for anti-doping violations.

  • Sport Canada worked to further expand and strengthen program and policy collaboration within the federal government and with P/T governments and the sport community. In 2008-2009, Sport Canada continued its multi-year bilateral agreements with all 13 provincial/territorial governments to increase sport participation levels as expressed in the Canadian Sport Policy. Furthermore, two additional F-P/T bilateral agreements were negotiated, bringing the number of agreements in place to 12 that encourage and support greater participation of Aboriginal Peoples in sport. In a new initiative, 11 F-P/T bilateral agreements were signed to provide travel support for teams participating in the 2008 North American Indigenous Games.

Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 92.6 90.0 86.9 94.9 96.2 (9.3)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 320.8 304.1 311.4 319.4 318.2 (6.8)



Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 1.4 0.9 - - 1.1 (1.1)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 186.9 184.6 133.0 134.6 101.6 31.4



Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - 12.3 14.6 13.7 14.6 -
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of ($10.4M) is explained as follows:

  • $2.4M was transferred from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

  • $8.0M was received through 2008-2009 Supplementary Estimates (B) and was not included in the planned spending.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of the Sport Canada Branch is planned for 2009-2010 and again in 2013-2014.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: TV5

Start date: 1990-1991

End date: 2012-2013

Description:

Contribute to the international profile of Canadian French-language television programs by participating in TV5MONDE and providing Canadians with a window onto the international Francophonie by participating in TV5 Quebec-Canada.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Results Achieved:

  • The TV5 program achieves tangible results in: the promotion of Canadian cultural content on the TV5MONDE airwaves; contribution to the cultural expansion of the international Francophonie; Canadian audiovisual production; and Canadians' access to the international and Canadian Francophonie with TV5 Quebec Canada.

  • This year, there was a slight increase in the percentage of Canadian programming broadcast on TV5MONDE, rising from an average of about 6.8 % in 2007 to about 7.2% in 2008. This enables Canada to showcase Canadian programming on the international stage.

  • Programming broadcast over TV5 Quebec Canada includes a large component of programming from TV5's European and African partners that is not available over the Canadian French-language networks. Broadcasting these programs on TV5 Quebec Canada provides the Canadian public access to the international Francophonie, enhancing their awareness of its cultural diversity. The network must also broadcast a minimum of 15% of Canadian content. This has also helped enhance the profile of Canadian French-language television productions in Canada.

  • In February 2009, TV5 Quebec Canada also announced the establishment of Fonds TV5 to support digital creation--this will promote the production of French-language video vignettes intended for the new digital platforms. Up to $200,000 will be allocated to the funding and monitoring of projects. This initiative is designed to encourage emerging talent in new media production as well as Francophone culture throughout Canada, since 20% of the projects approved will originate outside Quebec.

Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 4.1 4.7 4.9 4.4 4.4 0.5
Total Contributions 3.0 3.0 2.5 2.5 2.6 (0.1)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 186.9 184.6 133.0 134.6 101.6 31.4
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of $0.4M is explained as follows:

  • Transfers to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

Audit completed or planned:

An internal audit of TV5 grants and contributions is planned for 2012-2013.

The planned internal audit is based on the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan. The plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.

An internal audit of the International Affairs Branch is planned for 2011-2012.

This planned audit is a branch audit, not a program audit. The program is part of the branch but may or may not be included as part of the planned branch audit. There will be no program-specific report findings; reporting will be on the overall branch.


Public and Regional Affairs Sector


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Celebration and Commemoration Program

Start date: 2003-2004

End date: 2012-2013

Description:

The Celebration and Commemoration Program is a theme-based, integrated, and dynamic approach to celebrating and commemorating Canada and Canadians. The program provides continuity and consistency across the diverse celebratory and commemorative activities initiated by federal partners and other orders of government every year. The Celebration and Commemoration Program includes two components:  Celebrate Canada! and Commemorate Canada!

The objectives of the Celebration and Commemoration Program are to:

  • Provide access to celebrations across Canada to enable all Canadians to appreciate Canada's cultural, ethnic, linguistic and geographic diversity;

  • Provide access to all Canadians to commemorations of national significance to recognize Canada's notable people, places, symbols, anniversaries and accomplishments;

  • Create opportunities for all Canadians to participate in national celebrations and commemorations that contribute to building pride and a sense of belonging to Canada.

Strategic Outcome:

  • Canada is an inclusive society built on inter-cultural understanding and citizen participation.

Results Achieved:

  • Provision of financial support to over 1,600 projects across Canada and the participation of over 10 million people in more than 3,700 Celebrate Canada events across the country.

  • Participation of over 12,000 youth (aged 5-18) in the 2008 Canada Day Poster Challenge.

  • Development of a strategic alliance with the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Federal Secretariat to position the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games as a key theme for the 2009 Canada Day Poster Challenge.

  • Reconvening of the Interdepartmental Commemoration Committee and a renewal of strategic alliances with 28 federal government organizations, contributing to a more coordinated federal approach to the planning of major national commemorations.

  • Increased awareness by Canadians of the 400th anniversary of Québec City. Survey results indicate that 60% of Canadians were aware in March 2009 that 2008 was the 400th anniversary of Québec City, compared to 37% in June 2007. In addition, 84% of survey respondents indicated that the activities surrounding the celebration of this event improved their knowledge of Canadian history.

Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants 2.1 2.2 5.4 6.2 3.6 1.8
Total Contributions 11.6 19.3 23.3 36.5 42.2 (18.9)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 149.7 133.6 174.1 187.0 178.6 (4.5)
Total TPP 1,150.3 1,117.9 1,121.9 1,144.7 1,102.0 19.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Overall variance of ($17.1M) is explained as follows:

  • Transfers in the amount of $4.8M from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.

  • Additional funding received through Supplementary Estimates in the amount of $12.3M.

Audit completed or planned:

As per the current 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 risk-based, rolling multi-year audit plan, there are currently no planned audits related to this program; however, the audit plan is revised annually based on departmental needs and emerging priorities. As such, the content of this plan could evolve and be subject to change.

Top of Page

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Table 5: Transfer Payment Programs1

1. Grants for Research Projects and Personnel Support

Start date: October 2000

End date: N/A

Description:
CIHR provides a wide array of funding programs under this transfer payment program. This includes grants which provide support for the direct costs of health research projects and awards that provide support to individual health researchers and trainees. Infrastructure grants help create optimum environments for the conduct of health research. This includes funding for researcher networking and collaborative activities and grants to selected organizations such as the Canadian Council on Animal Care that facilitate the ethical conduct of research.

Strategic Outcomes:
1.0 Advances in Health Knowledge, 2.0 People and Research Capacity, 3.0 Knowledge Translation and Commercialization.

Results Achieved:

  1. CIHR grants helped maintain a strong and diverse health research base, programs continue to demonstrate strong application pressure and an increase in the average cost of research projects was accommodated through internal reallocation of funding.
  2. CIHR invested a significant portion of its grants budget to fund health research in areas of importance to Canadians, including funding clinical research, pandemic preparedness, HIV/AIDS, cancer, regenerative medicine and Hepatitis C.
  3. CIHR supported in excess of 13,000 researchers and trainees in all domains of health research.
  4. CIHR worked in partnership with small and medium enterprises as well as multi-national pharmaceutical companies to support pre-competitive R&D programs; CIHR provided Research Synthesis grants, which helped researchers translate research findings into new products and services or policies and procedures for the benefit of Canadians.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $ 776.6 $ 826.3 $ 849.3 $ 879.3 $ 879.0 $ 0.3
Total Contributions $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ -
Total Other types of transfer payments $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ -
Total Program Activity(ies) $ 776.6 $ 826.3 $ 849.3 $ 879.3 $ 879.0 $ 0.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance between authorities and actual spending is not significant.

Audit completed or planned:

  1. Audit of the Financial Administration of Open Operating Grants. (Completed November 2008)
  2. Audit of the Non-Financial Administration of Open Operating Grants (Completed March 2009)
  3. Audit of Salary and Training Awards (Planned 2009-10)
  4. Audit of a Research-Related Activity Program (Planned 2011-12)

2. Canada Graduate Scholarships

Start date: 2003-04

End date: N/A

Description:
The Canada Graduate Scholarships (CGS) Program provides financial support to develop future researchers at both the Masters and Doctoral levels. The CGS is a tri-council program with CIHR responsible for administering that portion of the program that is directed at students pursuing health related studies.

Strategic Outcome: 2.0 People and Research Capacity

Results Achieved:
In 2008-09 CIHR funded over 900 outstanding Master's and Doctoral students through the CGS Program. With the creation of these awards in Budget 2003, and with recent additional investments in the CGS Master's and Doctoral awards in Budgets 2007 and 2009, the federal government has ensured that Canada can offer world-class support that will help to attract and retain the best research students in Canada.


Program Activities: 2.1 Researchers and Trainees
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $ 10.1 $ 13.9 $ 18.9 $ 19.2 $ 18.7 $ 0.5
Total Contributions $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ -
Total Other types of transfer payments $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ -
Total Program Activity(ies) $ 10.1 $ 13.9 $ 18.9 $ 19.2 $ 18.7 $ 0.5

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance between authorities and actual spending is not significant.

Audit completed or planned: N/A

3. Institute Support Grants

Start date: October 2000

End date: N/A

Description:
The Institute Support Grant (ISG) Program provides funding to select Canadian academic institutions, including universities and teaching hospitals, to assist them in hosting the 13 Institutes of CIHR. The Institutes help CIHR maintain strong ties to Canada's research communities and to understand their needs. Each CIHR-appointed Institute Scientific Director is among the top scientists in his/her field and helps CIHR define its strategic health research priorities and develop research partnerships with other interested parties.

Strategic Outcome: 2.0 People and Research Capacity

Results Achieved:
In 2008-09 CIHR provided each of its 13 virtual Institutes with a $1M grant, paid to the Institutes' host institutions for the establishment and management of an Institute Office, from which the CIHR-appointed Scientific Director along with host institution-based staff plans and executes the operations and activities of their Institute. These activities include facilitating and developing national research networks linking the Institutes' respective research communities.

Program Activities: 2.3 National and International Partnerships


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $ 13.0 $ 13.0 $ 13.0 $ 13.0 $ 13.0 $ -
Total Contributions $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ -
Total Other types of transfer payments $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ -
Total Program Activity(ies) $ 13.0 $ 13.0 $ 13.0 $ 13.0 $ 13.0 $ -

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned:
N/A


  1. the amounts only include grant programs where expenditures exceed $5 million
Top of Page

Canadian International Development Agency

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Actual
Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
2008-2009
Total Authorities
2008-2009
Actual Spending
2008-2009
Variance(s)
Countries of Concentration
Total Grants   205.56 191.40 172.74 172.68 18.72
Total Contributions   486.74 697.26 688.01 687.78 9.48
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 0.00 692.30 888.66 860.75 860.46 28.20
Fragile States and Countries Experiencing Humanitarian Crisis
Total Grants   473.81 488.88 697.10 696.86 -207.98
Total Contributions   96.72 71.94 126.66 126.63 -54.69
Total Other Types   110.00       0.00
Total Program Activity 0.00 680.53 560.82 823.76 823.49 (262.67)
Selected Countries and Regions
Total Grants   94.03 144.96 123.43 123.38 21.58
Total Contributions   279.73 375.69 254.42 251.24 124.45
Total Other Types            
Total Program Activity 0.00 373.76 520.65 377.85 374.62 146.03
Multilateral, International and Canadian Institutions
Total Grants   576.17 442.90 624.42 612.21 -169.31
Total Contributions   216.69 219.88 239.36 239.29 -19.41
Total Other Types   301.85 269.86 238.55 238.55 31.31
Total Program Activity 0.00 1,094.71 932.64 1,102.33 1,090.05 -157.41
Engaging Canadian Citizens
Total Grants   13.00 7.51 1.13 1.13 6.38
Total Contributions   31.58 53.96 19.86 19.65 34.31
Total Other Types            
Total Program Activity 0.00 44.58 61.47 20.99 20.78 40.69
Geographic Programs
Total Grants 545.11         0.00
Total Contributions 857.71         0.00
Total Other Types 40.00          
Total Program Activity 1,442.82 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Multilateral Programs
Total Grants 673.49         0.00
Total Contributions 14.50         0.00
Total Other Types of TPs 358.28          
Total Program Activity 1,046.27 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Canadian Partnership
Total Grants 19.28         0.00
Total Contributions 228.75         0.00
Total Other Types            
Total Program Activity 248.03 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Policy Coherence
Total Grants 5.30         0.00
Total Contributions 8.95         0.00
Total Other Types            
Total Program Activity 14.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Engaging Canadians
Total Grants 5.05         0.00
Total Contributions 21.58         0.00
Total Other Types            
Total Program Activity 26.63 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 2,778.00 2,885.88 2,964.24 3,185.68 3,169.40 205.16

CIDA grants, contributions and other transfer payments actual spending of $3,169 million accounts for 88.4% of CIDA's 2008-09 Total Actual Spending, excluding non-budgetary expenditures. The variance between the total Authorities and the Actual Spending is $16.3 million (2007-2008: $43 million): from the Grants and Contributions Budget, $1.2 million was not spent and a further $15.1 million represent Treasury Board frozen allotments.

Top of Page

Canadian Space Agency

3.3.6) Details on Transfer Payments Programs (TPPs)


Contribution to European Space Agency (ESA)

Start Date: January 1, 2000 End Date: December 31, 2009

Description:

Enhance Canadian industry's technological base and provide access to European markets for value added products and services in the field of Earth Observation (EO) and Telecommunications, allow the participation of Canadian academia and make possible the demonstration of Canadian space technologies in European Science and Exploration missions.

Strategic Outcome:

Canada's presence in space meets the needs of Canadians for scientific knowledge, space technology and information.

Expected Results (Program Activity Level)

Space Based Earth Observation:

The benefits of activities involved in Earth Observation from space serve Canadian users in the fields of environment, resource and land-use management, and security and sovereignty.

Space Science and Exploration:

Participation in Canadian and international missions expands the scientific knowledge base made available to Canadian academia and R&D communities in the areas of astronomy, space exploration and solar-terrestrial relations, as well as in physical and life sciences.

Satellite Communications:

State-of-the-art systems and applications are developed to satisfy the needs of the Canadian government and population in order to ensure that Canada remains a world leader in satellite communications.

Generic Space Activities in support of EO, SE and SC:

Canada's industrial technological capabilities can meet the needs of future space missions and activities.

Expected Accomplishments:

Successful development and demonstration of advanced technologies, systems, components, or studies provided for in the contracts awarded by ESA to Canadian firms under the following EO programs: EOEP, GMES Service Element, and GMES Space Component.

Successful development and demonstration of advanced technologies, systems, components, or studies provided for in the contracts awarded by ESA to Canadian firms under the following Telecommunications programs: ARTES 1, 3, 4, 5, 8 and GalileoSat.

Growing utilization of data obtained from ESA on markets and Earth Observation and Telecommunications technologies as strategic information for government departments, agencies and industries in Canada.

Demonstration of space-qualified technologies and products developed by Canadian firms for the space exploration markets via our participation to Europe's space exploration program Aurora.

Development of new alliances and/or strengthening of established alliances between Canadian and European companies, to diversify Canada's international space partnerships and complement its long-standing relationship with the U.S.

Actual Accomplishments:

Several technologies and skills have been developed and improved through the participation of Canadian companies in ESA programs. Some businesses have integrated these technologies into products, allowing them to sell these products in other than European markets. In addition to generating revenues, the development and improvement of space technologies also created or maintained specialized jobs. In addition, specialized skills were created in the areas of space hardware, ground segment, and space technology applications.

The program served to boost the visibility of Canada in European markets. Canadian contractors see the ESA Contribution program as a means of cultivating business relationships. The program also fosters regional development and access to other markets by virtue of the successes of companies in Europe. Furthermore, Canada expanded its knowledge and technology in fields such as weather and ice movement forecasting, Earth Observation data, satellite communications technologies, environmental monitoring and security.



($ in millions)

Actual Spending 2006-2007

Actual Spending 2007-2008

Planned Spending 2008-2009

Total Authorities 2008-2009

Actual Spending 2008-2009

Variance between Planned vs. Actual

Space Based Earth Observation 9.9 7.3 9.9 7.6 7.4 2.4
Space Science and Exploration 5.8 6.9 5.8 8.5 8.2 (2.4)
Satellite Communications 11.0 13.7 12.5 11.2 10.9 (1.6)
Generic Space Activities in support of EO, SE & SC 8.7 7.3 8.1 8.9 8.3 (0.2)
Total Contributions 35.5 35.2 36.3 36.3 34.9 1.4
Total Program Activities 35.5 35.2 36.3 36.3 34.9 1.4

Notes:

  • Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown.
  • This table details contribution programs with funding in excess of $5 million per annum.

Comments on Variances:

Several factors explain the year-to year fluctuations in spending as well as the yearly variation between program activities under Canada/ European Space Agency (ESA) programs: the budgetary cycle of ESA differs from the one of Canada, the cash flow requirements of ESA programs which Canada is participating in (the budget requirements vary with the project's delivery phase), the slippage in the disbursements for Canada/ESA programs (the programs and associated contracts to industry are delivered by ESA; hence, CSA has no control on actual project implementation), the potential cost increases in development programs, as well as the inflation rate and exchange rate fluctuations.

Consequently, the positive variance of $1.4 million in 2008-2009 mainly corresponds to the risk funds re-profiled to future years arising from the sound management of this Program. The variances are in accordance with the objectives and terms and conditions of the 2000-2009 Canada/ESA Cooperation Agreement.

Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to the Last Audit and/or Evaluation:

Canada is well thought of by Europeans, as the 28 years of cooperation between ESA and Canada clearly demonstrate. Canadian companies have made a significant contribution to the many technologies developed in the areas of Earth Observation and Satellite Communications.

Several businesses have developed business relationships with Europe thanks to the Agreement, and all stakeholders in the program agree that these relationships could continue, provided that Canada maintains its financial contribution to ESA. Canadian businesses have cultivated alliances with each other to benefit from or facilitate access to European markets through ESA programs under the Agreement.

The program helps diversify and open markets and contributes to the achievement of objectives under the Canadian Space Strategy respecting Earth Observation and Satellite Communications. However, it does not lead to the transfer of technologies as much as to the exchange of information on technologies.

Small and medium-sized companies have difficulty taking part in ESA programs and require greater support, not only to access these markets, but also to develop expertise so that they can continue doing business in these markets after their initial participation in ESA programs.

Source: Evaluation of the Canada/ESA Cooperation Agreement
http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/publications/er-0405-0202.asp




CASSIOPE Mission

Start Date: November 1, 2003 End Date: March 31, 2012

Description:

Support the integration of two payloads on a single generic Canadian small satellite bus the CASCADE telecommunications Ka-Band component and the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) scientific instrument.

Strategic Outcome:

Canada's presence in space meets the needs of Canadians for scientific knowledge, space technology and information.

Expected Results (Program Activity Level)

Space Based Earth Observation:

The benefits of activities involved in Earth Observation from space serve Canadian users in the fields of environment, resource and land-use management, and security and sovereignty.

Space Science and Exploration:

Participation in Canadian and international missions expands the scientific knowledge base made available to Canadian academia and R&D communities in the areas of astronomy, space exploration and solar-terrestrial relations, as well as in physical and life sciences.

Satellite Communications:

State-of-the-art systems and applications are developed to satisfy the needs of the Canadian government and population in order to ensure that Canada remains a world leader in satellite communications.

Generic Space Activities in support of EO, SE and SC:

Canada's industrial technological capabilities can meet the needs of future space missions and activities.

Expected Accomplishments:

Development and demonstration of the CASCADE Ka-Band telecommunications payload designed and built by Canadian companies. CASCADE is the precursor of communication satellite constellations that will help position the Canadian industry on the international market as a supplier of advanced components and a service provider.

Development of a small Canadian scientific satellite, the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP), which will probe the upper atmosphere and ionosphere region where solar variability influences global change in various time scales.

Development of a generic Canadian small satellite bus that could also be used for future Canadian missions.

Actual Accomplishments:

Completed manufacture, assembly and integration of the Cascade payload. Completed manufacture, assembly and integration of ePOP instruments, data handling units and booms. Completed manufacture, test and integration of the generic small satellite bus. Started the environment testing of the spacecraft at DFL.



($ in millions)

Actual Spending 2006-2007

Actual Spending 2007-2008

Planned Spending 2008-2009

Total Authorities 2008-2009

Actual Spending 2008-2009

Variance between Planned vs. Actual

Space Science and Exploration 2.3 1.7 0.7 0.7 0.5 0.2
Satellite Communications 16.2 7.0 6.0 6.0 3.6 2.4
Total Contributions 18.5 8.7 6.7 6.7 4.1 2.6
Total Program Activities 18.5 8.7 6.7 6.7 4.1 2.6

Notes:

  • Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown.
  • This table details contribution programs with funding in excess of $5 million per annum.

Comments on Variances:

CASSIOPE: CASSIOPE: Program delays due to problems with the development of critical component (DSU) and the move of the launch date from November 2008 to November 2009 due to delays in the development of the Falcon launch vehicle. After detailed reviews of all the mission components, the schedule and milestones were modified to fit the new program schedule and launch date and the cash flow projections were adjusted accordingly.

ePOP: The delays for ePOP were necessitated by the extension of the CASSIOPE schedule and slippage of the launch date, which are beyond the control of the University of Calgary. The schedule extension will require the University of Calgary to stretch instrument test to fit the extended CASSIOPE schedule and maintain the project development teams at the universities and in industry for a longer period. The integration of ePOP with the CASSIOPE spacecraft is MacDonald, Dettwiller and Associates's responsibility, and was performed at Bristol in Winnipeg and at the David Florida Lab in Ottawa. Synchronization of all program elements and activities, including the ePOP payload integration and test, is critical for success.

Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to the Last Audit and/or Evaluation:

The CSA program management office proactively manages technical aspects of the CASSIOPE contribution program. Effective management mechanisms and practices are implemented to ensure progress towards achieving expected technical results at the technology demonstration phase. The risk management mechanisms ensure that technical risks are effectively monitored and mitigated or reduced for all program elements.

The CSA disposes of sufficient authority and resources to ensure effective management of technical aspects of the CASSIOPE contribution program. The existing management mechanisms and practices provide the CSA with high level expertise in satellite communications and ensure effective coordination with the Communications Research Centre. They also ensure effective coordination between the CSA and each of the two recipients, as well as between the two contribution recipients.

Source: http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/pdf/ar-0607-0102.pdf

Top of Page

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Table 5 : Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


      2008–2009
Program Activity
($ Millions)
Actual Spending
2006-2007
Actual Spending
2007-2008
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual Spending
Integration Program – Grants          
Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord [a] 193.9 198.2 216.0 226.0 226.0
Institute for Canadian Citizenship 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total Grants 196.9 198.2 216.0 226.0 226.0
 

Canada’s Role in International Migration and Protection – Contributions

Migration Policy Development 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.7
International Organization for Migration 1.1 1.1 2.0 1.6 1.4
Integration Program – Contributions          
Host Program [b] 5.0 8.1 14.5 15.6 15.6
Immigrant Settlement and Adaptation Program [c] 70.2 115.1 192.9 192.9 181.2
Resettlement Assistance Program [d] 44.1 52.9 49.6 51.6 51.6
Contributions to Provinces [a] 82.8 97.6 134.6 134.6 134.6
Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada [e] 122.3 152.7 274.8 254.1 172.2
Total Contributions 325.9 427.8 668.7 651.1 557.3
Total Transfer Payments [f] 522.8 626.0 884.7 877.1 783.3

[a] The grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord and contributions to provinces recognize the importance of settlement services that respond to the growing need to help immigrants integrate.

[b] Host funds are used to match newcomers with Canadian volunteers—individuals and groups—who help them settle in and integrate.

[c] The Immigrant Settlement and Adaptation Program provides funds for services such as orientation, paraprofessional counselling, translation, job-finding help, and Enhanced Language Training.

[d] The Resettlement Assistance Program helps pay for temporary accommodations, clothing, household effects, and living expenses for up to one year for indigent Convention refugees.

[e] The Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada Program provides funds for basic language training in both of Canada’s official languages to help adult immigrants integrate socially, culturally, economically, and politically.

[f] Total Authorities decreased from Planned Spending by $7.6 million, due to transfers to the operating vote. Actual expenditures were lower than Total Authorities by $93.8 million. This lapse is mainly attributable to lower spending on the Canada-Ontario Immigration Agreement.

Top of Page

Department of Finance Canada

Table 2: Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Debt Payments on Behalf of Poor Countries to International Organizations

Compensation to Canadian Agencies or Entities Established by an Act of Parliament for Reduction of Debts of Debtor Countries

Payments to the International Development Association

Payment to Nova Scotia in respect of the Crown Share Adjustment Payment regarding amounts relating to previous years up to March 31, 2008

Fiscal Equalization (Part I—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Territorial Formula Financing (Part I.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Canada Health Transfer (Part V.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Canada Social Transfer (Part V.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Payment to Ontario (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Statutory Subsidies (Constitution Act, 1867; Constitution Act, 1982; and other statutory authorities)

Youth Allowances Recovery (Federal-Provincial Fiscal Revision Act, 1964)

Alternative Payments for Standing Programs (Part VI—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Payment to British Columbia (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Payment to Northwest Territories (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Clean Air and Climate Change Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Patient Wait Times Guarantee Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Transitional Payments (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Child Care Spaces (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Human Papillomavirus Immunization Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Incentive for Provinces to Eliminate Taxes on Capital (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Public Transit Capital Trust 2008

Police Officers Recruitment Fund

Saskatchewan Carbon Capture and Storage Demonstration Trust

Payment to Nova Scotia for Carbon Storage

Canada Social Transfer Transition Protection Payment to Saskatchewan


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Debt Payments on Behalf of Poor Countries to International Organizations

Start date: 2005–06

End date: Ongoing

Description: Payments for Canada’s commitment to the G8-led Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Responsible administration of financial obligations under the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $45,605 $50,490 $51,200 $151,200 $149,280 $(98,020)
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $45,605 $50,490 $51,200 $151,200 $149,280 $(98,020)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance between Actual and Planned Spending is attributable to an increase of $98 million in Vote 5, Grants and contributions, arising from an accelerated payment to the World Bank and African Development Fund to better help these institutions deliver debt relief to low-income, heavily indebted countries. The variance between Actual Spending and Total Authorities arose because of an alternative process for making the $2 million payment to the World Bank for membership in the Debt Management Facility. Payment was made through the International Assistance Envelope inter-pool flexibility mechanism between the Department and the Canadian International Development Agency.

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Compensation to Canadian Agencies or Entities Established by an Act of Parliament for Reduction of Debts of Debtor Countries

Start date: 1991–92

End date: Ongoing

Description: Compensation to Export Development Canada (EDC) and the Canadian Wheat Board (CWB) for reduction of debts of debtor countries

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments to the EDC and the CWB to compensate for debt relief to debtor countries


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $203,405 $231 $300,600 $251,600 $172,111 $128,489
Total Contributions $66,587 $42,646 $23,000 $22,910 $16,152 $6,848
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $269,992 $42,877 $323,600 $274,510 $188,263 $135,337

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance between Actual and Planned Spending is attributable to the Republic of Congo and the Ivory Coast not receiving anticipated debt-relief payments because they did not achieve the required debt-relief targets. In addition, debt-relief payments to Haiti, Iraq, and Poland were lower than anticipated because of fluctuations in exchange and interest rates.

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments to the International Development Association

Start date: 1960–61

End date: Ongoing

Description: Encashment of demand notes to allow the International Development Association (IDA) to disburse concessional financing for development projects and programs in the world’s poorest countries

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Financial obligations to the IDA were responsibly administrated. The results of IDA operations are detailed in the report on operations under the Breton Woods and Related Agreements Act that is tabled annually in Parliament.


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $318,270 $318,270 $318,280 $318,280 $318,280 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $318,270 $318,270 $318,280 $318,280 $318,280 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payment to Nova Scotia in respect of the Crown Share Adjustment Payment regarding amounts relating to previous years up to March 31, 2008

Start date: 2008–09

End date: 2008–09

Description: On July 13, 2008, Canada signed an agreement with the Province of Nova Scotia to settle that province’s claim in respect of Crown share. Under this agreement, a payment of $234.4 million was made to Nova Scotia in September 2008 relating to previous years up to March 31, 2008.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet terms of the agreement between the Province of Nova Scotia and the Government of Canada


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $234,400 $234,400 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Fiscal Equalization (Part I—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 1957

End date: Ongoing

Description: Equalization payments are made to provincial governments in fulfillment of the constitutional commitment to ensure provincial governments have sufficient revenues to provide reasonably comparable levels of public services at reasonably comparable levels of taxation. The new Equalization formula, based on a higher 10‑province standard, brings less prosperous provinces up to the national average fiscal capacity. Equalization payments are unconditional. In 2008–09, five provinces will receive payments under this program.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements for financial support to Canadian provinces to assist them in providing public services


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $11,535,064 $12,924,677 $13,619,924 $13,462,236 $13,462,236 $157,688
Total Program Activity(ies) $11,535,064 $12,924,677 $13,619,924 $13,462,236 $13,462,236 $157,688

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance between Actual and Planned Spending is attributable to the Newfoundland and Labrador re-estimate under their Equalization formula. No variance between Actual and Total Authorities.

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Territorial Formula Financing (Part I.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 1985

End date: Ongoing

Description: Territorial Formula Financing payments are made to all territorial governments to provide the resources they need to deliver services comparable to those delivered by provincial governments, taking into account the high costs and unique challenges in the North.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements for financial support to Canadian territories to assist them in providing public services


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $2,118,264 $2,221,297 $2,312,939 $2,312,939 $2,312,939 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $2,118,264 $2,221,297 $2,312,939 $2,312,939 $2,312,939 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Health Transfer (Part V.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 2004

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Canada Health Transfer (CHT) provides equal per-capita support for health care, a shared national priority, through cash and tax point transfers to provincial and territorial governments. The CHT supports the government’s commitment to maintain the national criteria and conditions of the Canada Health Act (comprehensiveness, universality, portability, accessibility, and public administration and the prohibitions against user fees and extra-billing) as well as the 2000, 2003, and 2004 Health Accords.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements for financial support to Canadian provinces and territories to assist them in providing health care services reflecting the principles of the Canada Health Act


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $20,139,876 $21,474,272 $22,629,304 $22,759,015 $22,759,015 $(129,711)
Total Program Activity(ies) $20,139,876 $21,474,272 $22,629,304 $22,759,015 $22,759,015 $(129,711)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance between Actual and Planned Spending is attributable to prior year adjustments arising from the Estimates cycle as well as deductions made under the Canada Health Act. No variance between Actual and Total Authorities.

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Social Transfer (Part V.1—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act)

Start date: 2004

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Canada Social Transfer (CST) provides equal per capita cash as well as tax point transfers to provincial and territorial governments to assist them in financing shared national priorities—social programs, post‑secondary education, and programs for children. The CST gives provinces and territories the flexibility to allocate payments among supported areas according to their own priorities and supports the government’s commitment to prohibit minimum residency requirements for social assistance.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements for financial support to Canadian provinces and territories to assist them in providing programs and services related to post-secondary education, social assistance and social services, and programs for children


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $8,500,000 $9,590,219 $10,557,729 $10,567,868 $10,567,868 $(10,139)
Total Program Activity(ies) $8,500,000 $9,590,219 $10,557,729 $10,567,868 $10,567,868 $(10,139)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance between Actual and Planned Spending is attributable to prior year adjustments arising from the Estimates cycle as well as a revised estimate of 2008–09 requirements made in October 2008. No variance between Actual and Total Authorities.

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payment to Ontario (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Start date: 2006–07

End date: 2007–08

Description: Direct payments are made to the Government of Ontario to assist the province in the transition to a single corporate tax administration, in respect of the Canada–Ontario Agreement.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Effective management of payments to provinces, territories, and Aboriginal governments


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $250,000 $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $250,000 $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Statutory Subsidies (Constitution Act, 1867; Constitution Act, 1982; and other statutory authorities)

Start date: 1867

End date: Ongoing

Description: The statutory subsidies provide a source of funding to provinces in accordance with terms of entry into Confederation.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements for financial support to provinces


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $31,821 $31,822 $32,000 $31,968 $31,968 $32
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Allowances Recovery (Federal-Provincial Revision Act, 1964)

Start date: 1964

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Youth Allowances Recovery is a recovery from the Province of Quebec for an additional tax point transfer (three points) above and beyond the Canada Health Transfer and Canada Social Transfer tax point transfer. In the 1960s, Quebec chose to use the federal government’s contracting-out arrangements for certain federal-provincial programs. Quebec continues to receive the value of these tax points through its own income tax system and reimburses the Government of Canada for the discontinued programs for which it receives tax point transfers. Taken together, the Alternative Payments for Standing Programs and the Youth Allowances Recovery are known as the Quebec Abatement and ensure all provinces are treated similarly.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate recoveries from the Province of Quebec that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $(706,788) $(943,805) $(717,374) $(332,659) $(332,659) $(384,715)
Total Program Activity(ies) $(706,788) $(943,805) $(717,374) $(332,659) $(332,659) $(384,715)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance between Actual and Planned Spending is attributable to prior year adjustments arising from the Estimates cycle as well as a revised estimate of 2008–09 requirements made in February 2009. The $611 million reduced recovery from 2007–08 is a result of Quebec making a payment in 2007–08 toward its 2008–09 obligation as well as changes in the value of tax points used to calculate the recovery. No variance between Actual and Total Authorities.

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Alternative Payments for Standing Programs (Part VI—Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act

Start date: 1977

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Alternative Payments for Standing Programs is a recovery from the Province of Quebec for an additional tax point transfer (13.5 points) above and beyond the Canada Health Transfer and Canada Social Transfer tax point transfer. In the 1960s, Quebec chose to use the federal government’s contracting-out arrangements for certain federal-provincial programs. Quebec continues to receive the value of these tax points through its own income tax system in lieu of cash, while other provinces receive the corresponding amounts in cash. Taken together, the Alternative Payments for Standing Programs and the Youth Allowances Recovery are known as the Quebec Abatement and ensure all provinces are treated similarly.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate recoveries from the Province of Quebec that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $(3,177,016) $(2,719,889) $(3,256,839) $(2,973,912) $(2,973,912) $(282,927)
Total Program Activity(ies) $(3,177,016) $(2,719,889) $(3,256,839) $(2,973,912) $(2,973,912) $(282,927)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance between Actual and Planned Spending is attributable to prior year adjustments arising from the Estimates cycle as well as a revised estimate of 2008–09 requirements made in February 2009. No variance between Actual and Total Authorities.

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payment to British Columbia (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Start date: 2006–07

End date: 2007–08

Description: A one-time payment to support sustainable land and resource management development in the Great Bear Rainforest on the central coast of British Columbia

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements for financial support to British Columbia


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $30,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $30,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payment to Northwest Territories (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Start date: 2006–07

End date: 2007–08

Description: To provide for an adjustment to the Government of the Northwest Territories for the portion of the corporate income tax refund paid out by the territory to date. Funding is accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid in 2007–08, once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements for financial support to the Northwest Territories


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $54,400 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $54,400 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Clean Air and Climate Change Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Start date: 2006–07

End date: 2007–08

Description: A one-time payment to provide support to provinces and territories for projects designed to achieve reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants. Funding is accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid into a third-party trust in 2007–08, once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent. Funding is notionally allocated over three years (2007–08 to 2009–10), and provinces and territories have the flexibility to draw down funds according to their respective needs and priorities over the lifespan of the trust.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements for financial support to provinces and territories


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $1,518,925 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $1,518,925 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: : Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Patient Wait Times Guarantee Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Start date: 2006–07

End date: 2007–08

Description: A one‑time payment to provide support to provinces and territories for development of patient wait times guarantees in at least one of the five identified priority areas (cancer treatment, heart procedures, diagnostic imaging, joint replacement, and sight restoration). Funding is accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid into a third-party trust in 2007–08, once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent. Funding is notionally allocated over three years (2007–08 to 2009–10), and provinces and territories have the flexibility to draw down funds according to their respective needs and priorities over the lifespan of the trust.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements for financial support to provinces and territories


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $612,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $612,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transitional Payments (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Start date: 2006–07

End date: 2007–08

Description: One-time transitional payments for outstanding commitments to Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan for training and for post-secondary education. Funding is accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid into a third-party trust in 2007–08, once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent. Funding is notionally allocated over three years (2007–08 to 2009–10), and provinces have the flexibility to draw down funds according to their respective needs and priorities over the lifespan of the trust.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all legislative requirements for financial support to Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $614,038 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $614,038 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Child Care Spaces (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Start date: 2006–07

End date: 2007–08

Description: A one-time payment to provide support to provinces and territories for the creation of child care spaces through a direct payment for 2007–08; funding will be included in the Canada Social Transfer beginning in 2008–09.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements for financial support to provinces and territories


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $250,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $250,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Human Papillomavirus Immunization Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Start date: 2006–07

End date: 2007–08

Description: A one-time payment to provide support to provinces and territories to launch a national human papillomavirus vaccine program to protect women and girls from cervical cancer. Funding is accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid into a third-party trust in 2007–08, once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent. Funding is notionally allocated over three years (2007–08 to 2009–10), and provinces and territories have the flexibility to draw down funds according to their respective needs and priorities over the lifespan of the trust.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements for financial support to provinces and territories


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $300,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $300,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: Audit of the Management of Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Incentive for Provinces to Eliminate Taxes on Capital (Budget Implementation Act, 2007)

Start date: 2008–09

End date: 2010–11

Description: Financial incentive to encourage provinces to accelerate the elimination of provincial capital taxes or restructure an existing capital tax on financial institutions into a minimum tax

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Increased competitiveness of Canadian businesses by strengthening Canada’s business tax advantage


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $170,000 $170,000 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $0 $0 $170,000 $170,000 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Public Transit Capital Trust 2008

Start date: 2007–08

End date: 2008–09

Description: The Public Transit Capital Trust 2008 was put in place to support provinces and territories in the establishment of public transit infrastructure. Funding is notionally allocated over two years (2008–09 to 2009–10) and was distributed on an equal per capita basis among provinces and territories.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate administration of payment to provinces and territories for targeted support


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $500,000 $500,000 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $0 $0 $500,000 $500,000 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Police Officers Recruitment Fund

Start date: 2007–08

End date: 2008–09

Description: The Police Officers Recruitment Fund was established to support provinces and territories in recruiting 2,500 new front-line police officers. Funding is notionally allocated over five years (2008–09 to 2013–14) and was distributed proportionally among provinces and territories.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate administration of payments to provinces and territories for targeted support


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $400,000 $400,000 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $0 $0 $400,000 $400,000 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Saskatchewan Carbon Capture and Storage Demonstration Trust

Start date: 2007–08

End date: 2008–09

Description: The Saskatchewan Carbon Capture and Storage Demonstration Trust was put in place to support Saskatchewan in the establishment of a full-scale commercial demonstration of carbon capture and storage in the coal-fired electricity sector. Funding is notionally allocated over four years (2008–09 to 2012–13).

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate administration of the payments to provinces and territories for targeted support


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $240,000 $240,000 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $0 $0 $240,000 $240,000 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Social Transfer Transition Protection Payment to Saskatchewan

Start date: 2008–09

End date: 2008–09

Description: A one-time payment to Saskatchewan to protect the province against declines in its Canada Social Transfer (CST) cash payment for 2008–09 to 2012–13, relative to what it would have received in 2007–08 when the CST was moved to equal per capita cash plus its relative share of $250 million for child care. This additional $250 support for child care was provided outside the CST in 2007–08 and was rolled into the CST for 2008–09 and subsequent years.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payment to Saskatchewan that meets the legislative and regulatory requirements


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $31,204 $31,204 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $0 $0 $31,204 $31,204 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: None


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payment to Nova Scotia for Carbon Storage

Start date: 2007–08

End date: N/A

Description: Budget 2008 provided $5 million in 2007–08 that, along with complementary investment by the province, will support geological research examining the potential for carbon storage in the province.

Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians

Results Achieved: Timely and accurate administration of the payments to provinces and territories for targeted support


Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Contributions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total Other types of transfer payments $0 $0 $0 $5,000 $5,000 $0
Total Program Activity(ies) $0 $0 $0 $5,000 $5,000 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: None

Top of Page

Department of Justice Canada

Table 3: Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Legal Aid Systems (Voted)

Start date: August 17, 1971

End date: March 31, 2012 (ongoing)

Description: The objective of the federal Legal Aid Program is to contribute to sustaining a national system of justice, that helps to ensure that economically disadvantaged persons have access to the justice system, through contribution funding in support of criminal, youth criminal justice and immigration and refugee legal aid services provided by the provinces (funding for criminal and civil legal aid in the territories is provided through the Access to Justice Agreements).

Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results Achieved: Provinces were enabled to provide legal aid services to eligible persons involved in serious criminal, youth criminal justice, and immigration and refugee matters.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Contributions $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $0
Total Program Activity $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $119,827,507 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

N/A

Audit completed or planned:

N/A



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Public Security and Anti-terrorism - Legal Aid (Voted)

Start date: September 24, 2002

End date: March 31, 2012 (ongoing)

Description: Through this program, the Department currently provides contributions to legal aid delivery entities to cover costs for persons eligible for legal aid and charged under the federal government’s anti-terrorism legislation.

Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results Achieved: In fiscal year 2008-09, 19 cases were funded through contribution agreements with either provinces or their legal aid delivery entities.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Contributions $1,121,100 $3,959,663 $2,000,000 $5,033,048 $4,260,000 $-2,260,000
Total Program Activity $1,121,100 $3,959,663 $2,000,000 $5,033,048 $4,260,000 $-2,260,000

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance in spending is attributable to the difficulty in estimating the cost of funding defence of individuals charged as a result of Canada’s anti-terrorism initiative, given the nature of judicial proceedings, e.g. complexity of the issues, the evidence and the number of judicial proceedings.

Audit completed or planned: N/A


Note: No table was prepared for this program in the Report on Plans and Priorities for 2008-2009 because the Planned Spending and the Total Authorities were both under $5,000,000. Internal transfers totalling $3,033,048 have increased the Total Authorities over the $5,000,000 threshold.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Justice Services Funding Program (Voted)

Start date: April 2, 1984

End date: March 31, 2011 (ongoing)

Description: The overall objective of this Program is to support the policy directions of the Youth Justice Initiative. The specific objectives of the individual agreements are to support and promote an appropriate range of programs and services that: encourage accountability measures for unlawful behaviour that are proportionate and timely; encourage the effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons into their communities; target the formal court process to the most serious offences; and target detention and custody to the most serious offences.

Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results Achieved: The contribution agreements support a sustainable youth justice system that is capable of innovations and supports federal youth justice priorities.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Contributions $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $0
Total Program Activity $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $177,302,415 $0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: N/A



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Victims Fund (Victims of Crime Initiative and Federal Victims Strategy)

Start date: VCI April 1, 2005
FVS April 1, 2007

End date: VCI March 31, 2010
FVS March 31, 2011

Description: The Victims Fund is a grants and contributions fund with broad terms and conditions designed to raise awareness and enhance services and assistance to victims of crime. The Victims Fund is administered by the Policy Centre for Victim Issues and provides support to victims of crime as well as to governmental and non-governmental organizations to implement a wide range of victim focused projects and activities.

Strategic Outcome: Strategic Outcome 1: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values Sub sub-activity A1.2.5 (expected result in the PAA is that the experience of victims in the justice system is improved)

Results Achieved: In 2008/09 the Victims Fund:

  1. Provided funding to 303 victims and 81 support persons to attend National Parole Board hearings, totalling $249,310.
  2. Provided funding to 13 Canadians victimized, totalling $200,323.
  3. Provided resources to provincial and territorial governments to meet the needs of under-served victims of crime in their jurisdiction and/or support victims to attend sentencing hearing to submit their Victim Impact Statement, with 11 contribution agreements signed, totalling $1,139,150.
  4. Provided funding to provincial and territorial governments to implement legislation to benefit victims or to advance the Canadian Statement of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime, with 14 contribution agreements signed, totalling $815,391.
  5. Provided for 96 projects and activities funded included training events, evaluation of programs, research, networking, and National Victims of Crime Awareness Week events totalling $1,112,168.

Victims Fund recipients report reduced financial hardship, increased willingness to participate in the criminal justice process, and an overall improved experience for victims of crime in the criminal justice process as a result of funding available.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Grants $343,023 $239,788 $850,000 $850,000 $398,752 $451,248
Total Contributions $1,908,150 $2,426,494 $7,800,000 $7,333,238 $3,100,934 $4,699,066
Total Program Activity $2,251,173 $2,666,282 $8,650,000 $8,183,238 $3,499,686 $5,150,314

Comment(s) on Variance(s): In 2007/08 the Victims Fund was significantly increased from $2M to $7.75M.

In 2008/09, the second year of the enhanced resource levels, the Victims Fund was not fully taken up. However, requests for funding from the Victims Fund by NGOs, provincial and territorial governments and victims of crime has been steadily increasing each year.

In 2008/2009 some provinces implemented new policies regarding signing authority or requested re-negotiation of the text in the standard clauses of the contribution agreement leading to some delays in funding. A related issue is the infrastructure limitations within provincial and territorial governments which impacted their ability to use the Fund resources available. Through 2008/2009 the PCVI worked closely with provincial and territorial partners to simplify the required application and reporting requirements related to the Fund and will continue to do so.

There is a significant allocation of resources in the Victims Fund to support Canadians victimized abroad. While only 13 victims contacted Justice Canada for assistance, resulting in approved agreements representing less than 20% of the resources available, the number of requests and awareness of the Fund are increasing as more outreach is undertaken. Current resource levels in this component of the Fund allow the Department to respond to the unpredictable nature and demand for assistance.

Audit completed or planned: N/A



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program (voted)

Start date: April 1st, 2002

End date: March 31, 2013 (ongoing)

Description: The overall objective of this Program is to financially assist the provinces and territories in providing the specialized services required for the implementation of the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision (IRCS) sentence (paragraph 42(2)(r) and subsection 42(7) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA)) and other sentencing options applicable under the YCJA to serious violent youth offenders with mental health problems. It is expected that these services will reduce the likelihood of further violence in those convicted of the most serious violent offences.

Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results Achieved: Provinces and Territories have the financial capacity to implement sentencing options that involve specialized treatment services to address the mental health issues of serious violent youth offenders.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Contributions $3,424,450 $4,039,250 $11,048,000 $10,629,441 $9,028,126 $2,019,874
Total Program Activity $3,424,450 $4,039,250 $11,048,000 $10,629,441 $9,028,126 $2,019,874

Comment(s) on Variance(s): While the number of IRCS orders issued by the courts has remained stable, funding requests for other exceptional cases under this Program have come more slowly than expected.

Audit completed or planned: N/A



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Implementation of Official languages Requirements in respect of the Contraventions Act (Contraventions Act Fund – (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2008

End date: March 31, 2013

Description: The Contraventions Act provides for the identification of federal offences that are to be considered “contraventions” and the establishment of a scheme to prosecute these contraventions. In 2001, the Federal Court was asked to clarify the extent to which judicial and extra-judicial language rights requirements were applicable in the context of the Contraventions Act. The Court concluded that while the federal government is authorized to use the offence scheme of a province or territory in respect of federal contraventions, it must comply with all language rights requirements that would be applicable in the context of a federal prosecution scheme. More specifically, the Court stated that any level of government that processes federal contraventions is, in fact, acting on behalf of the Government of Canada. Following the Federal Court decision, the Department of Justice proceeded to modify existing Contraventions Act agreements to include new provisions to address language rights requirements identified in the decision. Such provisions are now also an integral part of all new agreements with other provinces. To support this process, the Department of Justice established the Contraventions Act Fund.

Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results Achieved: Four provinces (British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario and Nova Scotia) are fully prepared to offer trials dealing with federal contraventions in a manner consistent with language rights protected in sections 530 and 530.1 of the Criminal Code. The same four provinces have also taken measures to actively offer extra-judicial services in both official languages in all court locations covered by Part IV of the Official Languages Act. Negotiations are underway with the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. It is anticipated that this agreement will be in place for fiscal year 2009-2010.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Contributions $2,613,100 $2,779,800 $9,094,900 $5,078,100 $4,289,100 $4,805,800
Total Program Activity $2,613,100 $2,779,800 $9,094,900 $5,078,100 $4,289,100 $4,805,800

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The actual spending was lower than anticipated for the following reasons:
The province of Prince Edward Island did not sign an agreement in 2008-2009.
The province of Newfoundland and Labrador did not sign the agreement in 2008-2009 as anticipated.
The contribution to be paid to Ontario was held back until the province's financial report is filed and verified.

Audit completed or planned: N/A



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Access to Justice Services Agreements – the Territories (Voted)

Start date: 1996

End date: March 31st 2012 (ongoing)

Description: The goal of the Access to Justice Services Agreements (AJAs) is to integrate federal government funding support to Canada’s three territories for access to justice services (that is, both criminal and civil legal aid, Aboriginal Courtwork, and Public Legal Education and Information) through ongoing contribution agreements that allow the territories the flexibility needed to provide these services in a challenging environment (vast distances, harsh climate, cultural/linguistic differences). The overarching goal of federal support for Aboriginal Courtwork services is to facilitate and enhance access to justice by assisting Aboriginal people involved in the criminal justice system to obtain fair, just, equitable and culturally sensitive treatment. With regard to legal aid services in the territories, the federal goal is to enable the territories to provide legal aid services to economically disadvantaged persons involved in serious criminal, youth criminal justice and civil matters.. And, with respect to public legal education and information, the goal is to assist the territories in providing members of the public with the legal information they need to make informed decisions and participate effectively in the justice system.

Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results Achieved: Territories are enabled to provide access to justice services (legal aid, Aboriginal Courtwork and public legal education and information). Contribution funding agreements have been extended with all three territories for one-year, 2009-2010. Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s). The Legal Aid Program’s evaluation for the current five-year period is planned to be completed early in fiscal year 2011-12. The 2008 Aboriginal Courtwork Program Summative Evaluation report indicates that there is a strong and continuing need for the ACW Program; the ACW Program has been successful in achieving its intended outcomes.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Contributions $4,856,593 $5,156,593 $4,856,593 $5,368,593 $5,368,593 $-512,000
Total Program Activity $4,856,593 $5,156,593 $4,856,593 $5,368,593 $5,368,593 $-512,000

Comment(s) on Variance(s): As indicated in the footnote below, additional resources were provided to address severe pressures faced by the territories in delivering access to justice services.

Audit completed or planned: N/A


Note: No table was prepared for this program in the Report on Plans and Priorities for 2008-2009 because the Planned Spending and the Total Authorities were both under $5,000,000. Two internal transfers totalling $512,000 have increased the Total Authorities over the $5,000,000 threshold.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Child-centered Family Justice Fund (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2008

End date: March 31, 2009

Description: The Child-centred Family Justice Fund (CCFJF) is a key component of the Child-centred Family Law Strategy (CCFL Strategy). While the federal government does not provide direct services to separated and divorced parents since the provinces and territories are responsible for the administration of justice, the Department of Justice is committed to assisting and promoting the development, expansion and maintenance of such services through the CCFJF. The CCFL Strategy ended in March 31, 2008. Budget 2008 provided for a one-year renewal at status quo levels.

Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.

Results Achieved: Programs are developed and implemented in response to identified needs and gaps and are integrated with Government priorities and commitments.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s)
.
A Summative Evaluation of the CCFL Strategy was completed in 2007-2008 and has been posted on the Department of Justice web site.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Grants $29,950 $0 $0 $7,600 $7,600 $-7,600
Total Contributions $16,170,761 $16,250,027 $0 $15,992,400 $15,992,391 $-15,992,391
Total Program Activity $16,200,711 $16,250,027 $0 $16,000,000 $15,999,991 $-15,999,991

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The Planned Spending for this transfer payment program for 2008-2009 is NIL because the funds were received through the Second Supplementary Estimates.
The amounts of Grants and Contributions received through the Second Supplementary Estimates were $50,000 and $15,950,000 respectively.
An amount of $42,400 was internally transferred from Grants to Contributions.

Audit completed or planned: N/A


Note: No table was prepared for this program in the Report on Plans and Priorities for 2008-2009 because the fund was received through the Second Supplementary Estimates.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Courtwork Program (Voted)

Start date: 1978-1979

End date: March 31st 2013 (ongoing)

Description: The objective of the Aboriginal Courtwork Program (ACW) is to improve access to justice by helping Aboriginal people involved in the criminal justice system obtain fair, just, equitable and culturally-sensitive treatment. It is the only ongoing justice program available to all Aboriginal people (adult and youth) regardless of status and residency. The Program provides Aboriginal persons charged with an offence with timely and accurate information on their rights, obligations, roles and responsibilities at the earliest possible stage of the criminal justice process. Services also include referring clients to appropriate legal and social resources in their community. Aboriginal Courtworkers serve as a “bridge” between criminal justice officials and Aboriginal people and communities, by providing information, cultural context, liaison and promoting communications and understanding.

Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

Results Achieved: The 2008 Aboriginal Courtwork Program Summative Evaluation report indicates that there is a strong and continuing need for the ACW Program; the ACW Program has been successful in achieving its intended outcomes. According to the results of the recent national survey of Aboriginal accused, 90% of clients are satisfied with the information they received from courtworkers. The number of Aboriginal people charged with an offence who received culturally sensitive services from an Aboriginal Courtworker in 2007/2008 based on data received to date (not including the territories): 48,761 adults (male and female) /10,048 youth (male and female) *The data for 2008/2009 is not available until December 31, 2009. Five-year contribution funding agreements are in place with all participating provinces until March 31, 2013.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Contributions $4,836,363 $4,836,363 $4,836,363 $5,361,363 $5,320,708 $-484,345
Total Program Activity $4,836,363 $4,836,363 $4,836,363 $5,361,363 $5,320,708 $-484,345

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The ACW Program expanded its terms and conditions in February 2008, to include a new component, "Projects in support of ACW Program", to support activities such as: specialized training, national data requirements and database development. The costs associated with the new component exceeded the forecasted budget that was based on the regular operations of the ACW program.

Audit completed or planned: N/A


Note: No table was prepared for this program in the Report on Plans and Priorities for 2008-2009 because the Planned Spending and the Total Authorities were both under $5,000,000. An internal transfer of $450,000 has increased the Total Authorities over the $5,000,000 threshold. Also, a transfer of $75,000 from Vote 1 to Vote 5 was approved through the First Supplementary Estimates.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Justice Strategy (Voted)

Start date: 1991-1992 as Aboriginal Justice Initiative

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS) enables Aboriginal communities to have increased involvement in the local administration of justice and, as such, provides timely and effective alternatives to mainstream justice processes in appropriate circumstances. AJS programs are also aimed at reducing the rates of victimization, crime and incarceration among Aboriginal people in communities operating AJS programs, and helping the mainstream justice system become more responsive and sensitive to the needs and culture of Aboriginal communities.

Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

Results Achieved: In 2008-2009, the AJS supported 104 community-based justice programs serving approximately 400 Aboriginal communities across Canada, along with 22 capacity-building projects. A 2006 recidivism study showed that Aboriginal offenders, who had enrolled in and completed the offered community-based programs, were half as likely to re-offend as those who did not enrol in or complete these programs.

Accurate data on the number of clients served by the AJS programs is not yet available. A national data base is being developed to collect comprehensive data on the number of clients and types of programs/projects/services that are available to clients.

Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Grants $4,000 $96,996 $0 $29,105 $13,105 $-13,105
Total Contributions $7,287,586 $9,586,445 $12,500,000 $12,020,895 $11,706,919 $793,081
Total Program Activity $7,291,586 $9,683,441 $12,500,000 $12,050,000 $11,720,024 $779,976

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Actual spending was lower than anticipated for the following reasons:

  • Ongoing complex negotiations with communities and Provincial/Territorial partners led to delays in funding agreements being finalized on time.
  • Allocation of capacity building funds was delayed, leading to shortened timelines in negotiating agreements, which affected the ability of AJS recipients to complete activities in 08-09.
  • Delays in negotiating agreements in a timely manner were due to organizational challenges.
  • Some AJS recipients were unable to undertake the full extent of proposed community-based initiatives due to capacity and training needs (lack of proper tools and technology, insufficient infrastructure), as well as other delays (organizational instability and high levels of staff turnover) which affected timelines and implementation of projects.

Audit completed or planned: N/A



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Justice Fund (Voted)

Start date: 1999-2000

End date: March 31, 2010

Description: The overall objective of funding under the Youth Justice Fund is to encourage a fairer and more effective youth justice system. Funding is available for non-governmental organizations, youth justice stakeholders, Aboriginal organizations and provinces/territories to help promote and implement alternative approaches to youth justice practices. Priorities are set annually based on identified gaps and emerging federal youth justice policies and priorities. Additional resources have been provided to the Youth Justice Fund for two new on-going priorities - Youth Crime Prevention (Guns, Gangs and Drugs) and Youth Justice Anti-Drug Treatment Component (NADS).

Strategic Outcome: A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values

Results Achieved: Youth Crime Prevention Strategy with a focus on Guns, Gangs and Drugs

  • A total of 22 projects targeting youth involved in gun, gang and drug activities were supported in 2008-2009. From the 22 projects, seven (7) projects were funded through grants and fifteen (15) through contributions. It is to be noted that of the 22 projects, eighteen (18) on-going projects were also funded in 2008-2009, including two (2) grants and ten (10) contributions.
  • The total value of projects with a focus on guns, gangs and drugs for 2008-2009 was $1,839,594 ($193,969 in grants and $1,645,595 in contributions).
  • From all the projects that received funding, two (2) were national projects and the other ones were for organizations established in the provinces of Manitoba, Ontario, Nova Scotia, British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Alberta.
  • These projects included projects that have emphasized on responding to youth in conflict with the law and involved or at-risk of being involved in gun, gang and drug activities in order to promote the making of “smart choices” through community-based educational, cultural, sporting and vocational opportunities focusing in the following areas:
    • on particular target populations including aboriginal youth, Black Canadian youth, and also gender basis mix;
    • creating awareness of youth gang recruitment and prevention strategies;
    • identifying service gaps and best practices; and
    • developing program responses.

Main Fund: Cities and Community Partnerships; Innovative Programming; and Public Legal Education and Information Components

  • A total of 18 projects were funded in 2008-2009 to enable greater citizen/community participation in the youth justice system and encourage partnerships among youth justice partners and other funders and/or community organizations in order to provide support to youth involved in the criminal justice system. Of the 18 projects, 8 (eight) projects were funded through contributions and 10 (ten) through grants. It is to be noted that of the 18 projects, 8(eight)
  • The total value of projects with a focus on cities and community partnerships, innovation programming and public legal education and information for 2008-2009 was $ 800,772 ($ 697,261 in contributions and $103,511 in grants).
  • From all the projects that received funding, six (6) were national projects and the others were for organizations established in the provinces of Ontario, British Columbia, and the Yukon.
  • These projects target interventions at various points in the youth justice system for successful rehabilitation and reintegration of young offenders back into their communities through information sharing and education and project specific programs and services. The projects included support services during the front end of the criminal justice system such as alternative pre-trail options, court liaison services to offer support for youth, and support for youth offenders with unique needs including mental health issues, such as FASD. Other projects encourage partnerships, information sharing and training on how to provide support for youth with FASD involved in the criminal justice system. There were also projects that targeted interventions during reintegration or during custody and supervision orders, such as court ordered volunteer programs, work experience opportunities, mentoring and skill development for youth.

Youth Justice Fund: National Anti-Drug Strategy: Youth Justice Anti-Drug Component

  • A total of 11 projects were funded in 2008-2009 to enhance capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services and programs targeted at young persons in conflict with the law who have illicit substance abuse issues. Of the 11 projects, 5 new projects were funded through contributions, 5 through grants and 1 was an on-going contribution from 2007-2008.
  • The total value of these projects in 2008-2009 was $549,429 ($462,740 in contributions and $86,689 in grants).
  • Projects were undertaken in Manitoba, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, British Columbia and New Brunswick. The projects were with 6 provincial government departments, 3 were with front line community organizations and 2 were with National organizations.
  • The projects undertaken in 2008-2009 included the development and/or implementation of programming models (MB and ON), supporting participation of youth justice system representatives in the development of a provincial wide anti-drug strategy and program development (PEI), evaluation of existing drug treatment programs (BC), the development and delivery of an Atlantic conference to support the sharing of information and best practices and support for two national conferences on the issue of youth with illicit substance abuse issues in the justice system.
Program Activity:
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Program Activity Justice policies, laws and programs
Total Grants $790,325 $519,890 $1,080,000 $730,000 $384,169 $695,831
Total Contributions $2,880,238 $2,415,577 $3,925,000 $4,275,000 $2,805,596 $1,119,404
Total Program Activity $3,670,563 $2,935,467 $5,005,000 $5,005,000 $3,189,765 $1,815,235

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Funding criteria was established, posted on the internet and sent to Provincial/Territorial representatives. A number of proposals submitted did not meet program criteria or required extensive development work which resulted in lapsing funds. Also, despite reasonable delivery against government priorities relating to youth justice and guns, gangs and drugs generally, uptake on the new funds allocated for drug treatment as part of the NADS initiative was slow. Once this issue was identified by management, a request was made in September 2008 to reprofile some of the NADS funding. While other NADS partners succeeded in reprofiling NADS funds, the Youth Justice requests were not approved by Justice. Strategies are being developed and implemented to ensure that the variance is addressed.

Audit completed or planned: N/A


Top of Page

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Table 5: Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

1) Program activity: Development of communities

2) Name of program: Community Diversification (voted item)

Description:

This program helps Quebec regions maintain and develop their economic activity base. A community’s vitality depends on its ability to develop, grow and thrive by building on its own assets.

This program has three objectives:

  • foster communities’ development and increase their mobilization by drawing up visions and projects of local and regional scope
  • assist communities through support for entrepreneurship and through creation or maintenance of viable enterprises
  • increase communities’ capability to attract tourists and skilled individuals.

3) Start date: April 1, 2007

4) End date: March 31, 2012

5) Strategic outcome: Dynamic and revitalized communities that have a better socio-economic outlook and are developing their economic activity base

6) Results achieved:

  • Communities are pursuing a development vision and implementing resulting initiatives.
  • Enterprises are contributing to community economic growth and maintenance.
  • Communities are recognized for their distinctiveness, brand image and outreach.

(in thousands of dollars) 7) Actual expenditures1
2006-2007
8) Actual expenditures 2007-2008 9) Planned spending 2008-2009 10) Total authorities 2008-2009 11) Actual expenditures 2008-2009 12) Variance between 9) and 11)
13) Program activity:
Development of communities
14) Grants 60 600 288 22 (578)
14) Contributions 75,160 64,182 67,685 67,685 3,503
15) Program activity total 75,220 64,782 67,973 67,707 2,925

16) Comments on variance:
The variance between planned spending and total authorities is primarily attributable to the funding received during the year for the Social Economy Initiative in Quebec ($2.9 million).

17) Significant audit findings and URL to latest audit(s):
Audit of compliance with contractual linguistic obligations by designated Business Development Centres and Community Futures Development Corporations.

Electronic link: www.dec-ced.gc.ca/eng/publications/agency/audit/115/about.html

Management audit of Canada Economic Development business offices
Electronic link:
www.dec-ced.gc.ca/eng/publications/agency/index.html

Note:

1 This table is presented in line with the new Program Activity Architecture. Actual revenue from 2006-2007 has not been categorized.


1) Program activities:
Competitiveness of enterprises (SMEs)
Competitive positioning of sectors and regions

2) Name of program: Business and Regional Growth (voted item)

Description:

This program reinforces conditions conducive to the sustainable growth of regions and SMEs, and has three objectives:

  • help enterprises improve their performance, become more competitive and engage in more innovation to facilitate their sustainable development
  • support the transfer of technology and research outputs to enterprises
  • create the right conditions to attract foreign investment and international organizations.

3) Start date: April 1, 2007

4) End date: March 31, 2012

5) Strategic outcome: Presence of conditions favourable to sustainable growth and the competitive positioning of SMEs and regions

6) Results achieved:

  • Assisted enterprises are using their strategic capabilities.
  • Products and services derived from R&D are being commercialized.
  • New enterprises and strategic capital investments are consolidating the economic base of the regions.
  • Competitiveness poles are being developed and consolidated.
  • Clusters and networks of enterprises in the same sector or region are better structured.
  • The innovation commercialization process is generating medium- and long-range social and economic spinoffs.
  • Competitive regions are attracting direct foreign investment and international organizations.

(in thousands of dollars) 7) Actual expenditures
1

2006-2007
8) Actual expenditures 2007-2008 9) Planned spending 2008-2009 10) Total authorities 2008-2009 11) Actual expenditures 2008-2009 12) Variance between 9) and 11)
13) Program activity: Competitiveness of enterprises (SMEs)
14) Grants 100 100 (100)
14) Contributions 53,642 64,960 40,432 40,432 (24,528)
15) Program activity total 53,642 65,060 40,532 40,432 (24,628)
13) Program activity: Competitive positioning of sectors and regions
14) Grants 100 100 (100)
14) Contributions 38,431 38,166 29,191 29,191 (8,975)
15) Program activity total 38,431 38,266 29,291 29,191 (9,075)
15) Program activities total 92,073 103,326 69,823 69,623 (33,703)

16) Comments on variance:
The variance between planned spending and actual expenditures is attributable to the fact that, in the economic downturn, enterprises put their investment projects on hold, using fewer program resources than expected. It was decided to reallocate the funding for Competitiveness of enterprises (SMEs) and Competitive positioning of sectors and regions. Thus, additional investment was made in infrastructure projects and economic diversification of communities.

17) Significant audit findings and URL to latest audit(s):

Management audit of Canada Economic Development business offices Electronic link: www.dec-ced.gc.ca/eng/publications/agency/index.html


1) Program activity: Development of communities

2) Name of program: Community Futures Program (CFP) (voted item)

Description:

This Canada-wide program provides support for communities in all parts of the country to help them take charge of their own local economic development. In Quebec, the CFP financially supports 57 Community Futures Development Corporations, as well as 15 Community Economic Development Corporations and ten Business Development Centres.

3) Start date: May 18, 1995

4) End date: October 2, 2010

5) Strategic outcome: Dynamic and revitalized communities that have a better socio-economic outlook and are developing their economic activity base

6) Results achieved:

  • Communities are pursuing a development vision and implementing resulting initiatives.
  • Enterprises are contributing to community economic growth and maintenance.

(in thousands of dollars) 7) Actual expenditures 2006-2007 8) Actual expenditures 2007-2008 9) Planned spending 2008-2009 10) Total authorities 2008-2009 11) Actual expenditures 2008-2009 12) Variance between 9) and 11)
13) Program activity: Development of communities
14) Grants
14) Contributions 34,263 40,206 32,000 41,733 41,733 9,733
15) Program activity total 34,263 40,206 32,000 41,733 41,733 9,733

16) Comments on variance:

The variance between planned spending and actual expenditures is attributable to the fact that additional investment was made under this program, including the establishment of the Business Support Fund, making it possible to continue catering to SMEs’ needs in these hard economic times.

17) Significant audit findings and URL to latest audit(s): N/A


1) Program activity: Infrastructure

2) Name of program: Infrastructure Canada Program – Canada-Quebec Agreement 2000 (voted item)

Description:

Within the framework of the pan-Canadian Infrastructure Program under Treasury Board Secretariat responsibility, a Canada-Quebec Agreement was signed in October 2000. The objective of this agreement was to upgrade urban and rural municipal infrastructure in the province and improve Quebecers’ quality of life. The Agency acts on behalf of the Government of Canada as the federal department responsible for implementation in Quebec. This agreement was amended in July 2005 to postpone to March 31, 2009 the deadline for disbursements. Since December 2005, under the terms of the agreement, no more new projects may be approved under the program.

3) Start date: October 2000

4) End date: March 31, 2011

5) Strategic outcome: Dynamic and revitalized communities that have a better socio-economic outlook and are developing their economic activity base

6) Result achieved:

  • Rural and urban communities have quality public infrastructure.

(in thousands of dollars) 7) Actual expenditures 2006-2007 8) Actual expenditures 2007-2008 9) Planned spending 2008-2009 10) Total authorities 2008-2009 11) Actual expenditures 2008-2009 12) Variance between 9) and 11)
13) Program activity: Infrastructure
14) Grants
14) Contributions 91,117 46,032 24,448 50,018 50,018 25,570
15) Program activity total 91,117 46,032 24,448 50,018 50,018 25,570

16) Comments on variance:

The variance between planned spending and actual expenditures is attributable to the fact that actual expenditures depend on progress in completion of infrastructure projects. The Government of Quebec is responsible for management of infrastructure projects.

17) Significant audit findings and URL to latest audit(s):

Internal audit of the Infrastructure Canada Program
Electronic link:
www.dec-ced.gc.ca/eng/publications/agency/index.html

External audit of Canada-Quebec Agreement relative to the Infrastructure Program
Electronic link:
http://www.dec-ced.gc.ca/eng/publications/agency/index.html


1) Program activity: Development of communities

2) Name of program: Grant to the Québec Port Authority for the 400th anniversary of Québec in 2008 (voted item)

Description:

The project is the Government of Canada’s legacy to Québec in commemoration of its 400th anniversary in 2008. It includes three major initiatives:

  • developing the Baie de Beauport nautical park with a view to reinforcing its vocation as a year-round activity site while preserving and enhancing the quality of the environment
  • redeveloping Pointe-à-Carcy with a view to improving the port interface and developing the site’s public spaces and waterfront
  • developing Brown Basin into a public park with a view to highlighting the traces of the past and improving access to the river.

3) Start date: November 1, 2005

4) End date: September 30, 2008

5) Strategic outcome: Dynamic and revitalized communities that have a better socio-economic outlook and are developing their economic activity base

6) Result achieved:

  • Communities are recognized for their distinctiveness, brand image and outreach.

(in thousands of dollars) 7) Actual expenditures 2006-2007 8) Actual expenditures 2007-2008 9) Planned spending 2008-2009 10) Total authorities 2008-2009 11) Actual expenditures 2008-2009 12) Variance between 9) and 11)
13) Program activity: Development of communities
14) Grants 10,350 25,000 9,750 9,750 9,750
14) Contributions
15) Program activity total 10,350 25,000 9,750 9,750 9,750

16) Comments on variance: No variance

17) Significant audit findings and URL to latest audit(s): N/A


Note:

1 This table is presented in line with the new Program Activity Architecture. Actual revenue from 2006-2007 has not been categorized.

Top of Page

Environment Canada

Table 5: Details on Transfer Payment Programs


1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to support environmental and sustainable development initiatives

2. Start Date: August 1999

3. End Date: March 31, 2010

4. Description: The purpose of this class contribution is to enable Canadian groups, associations and organizations to become actively involved in environmental and sustainable development initiatives while accommodating regional ecosystem and socio-economic considerations. Contributions enable recipients to plan, manage and complete environmental and sustainable development initiatives at the regional or ecosystem level. This funding also serves to increase awareness and understanding of environmental and sustainable development issues and to encourage environmentally responsible action.

5. Strategic Outcomes

  • Canada's natural capital is restored conserved and enhanced
  • Weather and environmental predictions and services reduce risks and contribute to the well-being of Canadians
  • Canadians and their environment are protected from the effects of pollution and waste

6. Results Achieved: The progress made is reflected through the delivery of Environment Canada's programs and results reported in Section II of the 2008-2009 Departmental Performance Report. This class contribution facilitates access, on a national level, to existing knowledge, tools and methods for making good decisions on the environment and sustainable development that are appropriate, given the social, cultural and economic contexts.



($ millions)
13. Program Activity: 7. Actual
Spending
2006-07
8. Actual
Spending
2007-08
9. Planned
Spending
2008-09
10. Total
Authorities
2008-09
11. Actual
Spending
2008-09
12. Variance(s)
Biodiversity is conserved and protected 7.3 13.0 16.1 14.6 11.2 4.9
Water is clean, safe and secure 0.2 2.8 0.5 0.5 3.0 (2.5)
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes 6.6 5.0 5.4 4.9 5.2 0.2
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.2
Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions 1.2 0.1 1.3 1.2 0.6 0.7
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced 2.6 - 3.2 2.9 0.4 2.8
Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches 0.1 4.3 0.9 - 1.4 (0.5)
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are reduced - 1.1 3.2 1.7 4.1 (0.9)
14. Total Contributions 18.2 26.3 30.8 25.9 25.8 4.9
15. Total Program Activities 18.2 26.3 30.8 25.9 25.8  4.9
Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

16. Comment(s) on Variance(s): This is one of the Department's class authorities. A number of projects implemented in 2008-2009 fell more correctly into the class "Contributions to support environmental research and development."

17. Audit Completed or Planned: Currently at the reporting stage; findings to be tabled internally to the Departmental Evaluation Committee in 2009-2010.


1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Habitat Stewardship Contribution Program

2. Start Date: August 20, 2000

3. End Date: March 31, 2014

4. Description: The purpose of this contribution is to contribute to the recovery of endangered, threatened, and other species of concern, and to prevent other species from becoming a conservation concern, by engaging Canadians in conservation actions to benefit wildlife; and to enable non-governmental organizations, landowners, the private sector, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, community groups and other levels of government to plan, manage and complete projects that will achieve the program goal.

5. Strategic Outcome: Canada's natural capital is restored, conserved and enhanced

6. Results Achieved: From April 2008 to March 2009, the Habitat Stewardship Program (HSP) contributed $11.9 million to 215 projects addressing terrestrial and aquatic species-at-risk issues in all provinces and territories. The HSP directed $46 million (HSP plus matching funds) to projects addressing both habitat conservation and threat mitigation issues. These stewardship activities benefited more than 350 species at risk designated by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). Activities such as monitoring, surveys and inventory work as well as the collection of traditional ecological knowledge, evaluation, and program planning and development activities directly involved more than 19 000 people, and 11 000 people participated in projects aiming at reducing or mitigating threats to species at risk. More than 1900 landowners participated in conservation activities leading to the protection of 24 200 ha of habitat through legally binding protection measures and to an additional 311 000 ha through non-binding protection measures. Moreover, 19 000 ha of habitat and 250 km of shoreline were improved, thanks to the involvement of 6000 people.




($ millions)
13. Program Activity 7. Actual
Spending
2006-07
8. Actual
Spending
2007-08
9. Planned
Spending
2008-09
10. Total
Authorities
2008-09
11. Actual
Spending
2008-09
12. Variance(s)
Biodiversity is conserved and protected 8.9 9.6 13.0 12.8 11.8 1.2
14. Total Contribution 8.9 9.6 13.0 12.8 11.8 1.2
15. Total Program Activity 8.9 9.6 13.0 12.8 11.8 1.2
Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

16. Comment(s) on Variance(s): The first round of project proposals was undersubscribed. Approval of the second round of project proposals was delayed until late fall 2008 such that it became too late to implement the projects within the 2008-2009 fiscal year. Simplified approval processes and targeted promotion will lead to the full utilization of the funds in 2009-2010.

17. Audit Completed or Planned: Summative evaluation initiated in 2008-2009. Findings and recommendations to be available in June 2009.



1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to EcoAction Community Funding Initiative

2. Start Date: 1998

3. End Date: March 31, 2010

4. Description: Provides financial support to non-profit organizations to undertake environmental projects that yield positive, measurable results and increase public capacity and awareness at the community level.

5. Strategic Outcome: Canada's natural capital is restored conserved and enhanced

6. Results Achieved: The not-for-profit sector is able to leverage funding from other partners, including provinces, territories, the private sector and other non-governmental organizations to deliver projects that produce real environmental results and engage Canadians in protecting the environment. On average, funded projects leverage contributions from partners worth $2.26 for every dollar invested by the Department.

Since the creation of the EcoAction program in 1995:

  • 2070 projects have been completed, with EcoAction providing $65,386,605 in funding for these projects;
  • projects have collectively reduced greenhouse emissions by approximately 3.0 Mt;
  • 3.3 million kg of other air pollutants have been reduced;
  • 7.5 million native plants, trees and shrubs have been planted;
  • 112 710 ha of wildlife habitat have been enhanced or restored;
  • 245 000 ha of riparian habitat or ecosystem have been created, restored, preserved or protected;
  • 101 000 ha of habitat have been permanently protected;
  • 3 million L of pesticides, fertilizers, toxic substances or hazardous waste have been diverted from use or reduced;
  • 2 million kg of pesticides, fertilizers, toxic substances or hazardous waste have been diverted from use or reduced;
  • 297 824 volunteers have been directly involved in projects; and
  • 751 jobs have been created.



($ millions)
13. Program Activity 7. Actual
Spending
2006-07
8. Actual
Spending
2007-08
9. Planned
Spending
2008-09
10. Total
Authorities
2008-09
11. Actual
Spending
2008-09
12. Variance(s)
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes 4.6 3.9 5.0 5.0 4.3 0.7
14. Total Contribution 4.6 3.9 5.0 5.0 4.3 0.7
15. Total Program Activity 4.6 3.9 5.0 5.0 4.3 0.7
Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

16. Comment(s) on Variance(s): The 2008-2009 variance in contribution spending is a result of departmental funding delays.

17. Audit Completed or Planned: A program evaluation covering the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 fiscal years was completed in 2008-2009, as required by Treasury Board for program renewal. The evaluation examined the program's relevance, success, cost-effectiveness, and design and delivery. Overall, the evaluation of the program was positive. Key findings indicated that the program is aligned with federal priorities; there is a continued need for the program; the program is successful in reaching its intended audiences; the program is working towards achieving its intended outcomes; the program provides good value for money (leveraging $2.26:$1); and has achieved high client satisfaction. The evaluation noted that some areas required improvement: addressing confusion among program staff on the decision-making process; improving program monitoring activities; and assessing the long-term impact of funded projects. The evaluation acknowledged that high administrative costs of the program are a result of program design and the focus on client service; however, some improvements could be made to increase cost-efficiency.

Recommendations focused on improving program forms and tools, examining roles, responsibilities and processes, and improving the program's ability to demonstrate results. The program agrees with the recommendations. The action plan to implement these improvements was approved by the responsible senior management board.


1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to Support Canada's International Commitments

2. Start Date: June 1999

3. End Date: March 31, 2010

4. Description: The purpose of this class contribution is to sustain and enhance Canada 's participation in international multilateral and bilateral environmental organizations, agreements and protocols; ensure that Canadian interests are represented in international forums relating to environmental issues; facilitate the participation of developing countries in global environmental and sustainable development issues; and build, strengthen and maintain Canada's links with the international community on global environmental and sustainable development issues.

5. Strategic Outcomes

  • Canada's natural capital is restored conserved and enhanced
  • Weather and environmental predictions and services reduce risks and contribute to the well-being of Canadians
  • Canadians and their environment are protected from the effects of pollution and waste

6. Results Achieved: The results achieved and progress made are reflected through program delivery. This class contribution facilitates access on a national level to existing knowledge tools and methods for making good policy decisions on the environment and health that are appropriate, given the social, cultural and economic contexts.




($ millions)
13. Program Activity 7. Actual
Spending
2006-07
8. Actual
Spending
2007-08
9. Planned
Spending
2008-09
10. Total
Authorities
2008-09
11. Actual
Spending
2008-09
12. Variance(s)
Biodiversity is conserved and protected 0.8 0.7 0.3 0.8 1.5 (1.2)
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making - 0.2 - - 0.9 (0.9)
Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions 0.4 3.5 2.0 4.9 4.2 (2.2)
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced - 0.3 0.1 0.3 0.7 (0.6)
Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches - 3.6 - - - -
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are reduced 0.3 0.2 0.51 1.2 - 0.5
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes 0.7 - - - - -
14. Total Contributions 2.2 8.5 2.9 7.2 7.3 (4.4)
15. Total Program Activities 2.2 8.5 2.9 7.2 7.3 (4.4)
Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

16. Comment(s) on Variance(s): Opportunity to advance contribution agreements before the end of the fiscal year was available resulting in spending more than planned in this grants and contributions program.

17. Audit Completed or Planned: Currently at the reporting stage; findings to be tabled internally to the Departmental Evaluation Committee in 2009-2010.


1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to support environmental research and development

2. Start Date: June 1999

3. End Date: March 31, 2010

4. Description: The purpose of this class is to stimulate, increase or improve scientific knowledge and information, to support the promotion and coordination of research and development in areas that support Environment Canada's objectives, such as wildlife, toxicology, climate change and atmospheric studies.

5. Strategic Outcomes

  • Canada's natural capital is restored conserved and enhanced
  • Weather and environmental predictions and services reduce risks and contribute to the well-being of Canadians
  • Canadians and their environment are protected from the effects of pollution and waste

6. Results Achieved: Environment Canada continued ongoing relationships with a number of Canadian universities on a wide variety of initiatives, resulting in increases in knowledge in atmospheric sciences, toxic chemicals, water and the impacts of pollutants on water, wildlife and the impacts of pollutants on wildlife.




($ millions)
13. Program Activity 7. Actual
Spending
2006-07
2
8. Actual
Spending
2007-08
9. Planned
Spending
2008-09
10. Total
Authorities
2008-09
11. Actual
Spending
2008-09
12. Variance(s)
Biodiversity is conserved and protected 3.0 2.6 1.0 2.5 2.2 (1.2)
Water is clean, safe and secure 0.3 0.4 0.2 0.4 0.7 (0.5)
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making 0.0 0.6 0.3 0.8 0.7 (0.4)
Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions 0.0 0.4 - - 1.1 (1.1)
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced 0.7 0.2 - - 0.2 (0.2)
Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches 0.0 0.1 0.8 2.0 0.5 0.3
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are reduced - 0.1 - - 0.3 (0.3)
14. Total Contributions 4.2 4.4 2.2 5.7 5.7 (3.4)
15. Total Program Activities 4.2 4.4 2.2 5.7 5.7 (3.4)
Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.


1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Harbourfront Centre Funding Program

2. Start Date: March 2006

3. End Date: March 31, 2011

4. Description: The primary objective of the Harbourfront Centre Funding Program (HCFP) is to provide operational funding support to the Harbourfront Centre until March 31, 2011. Such support will assist the Centre in covering its fixed operational costs. It will also facilitate its ability to leverage funding from other levels of government and pursue other revenue-generating strategies that will allow the organization to provide the general public with continued access to cultural, recreational and educational programs and activities in Toronto's Waterfront Area.

5. Strategic Outcome: Sustainable urban development and infrastructure renewal in the Toronto Waterfront Area

6. Results Achieved: 2008-2009 was a transitional year for the HCFP, since responsibility for the program was transferred from the Minister of the Environment to the Minister of Finance, as of October 30, 2008. The program fulfilled the planned results set out in Environment Canada's 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities, since it provided a stable foundation for the Harbourfront Centre's administration and operations, and ongoing community access to the site and capital facilities. The Centre spent 100 percent of the $5 million federal contribution it received in 2008-2009 and remained open, providing community and cultural programming for the general public in Toronto Waterfront Area.




($ millions)
13. Program Activity 7. Actual
Spending
2006-07
2
8. Actual
Spending
2007-08
9. Planned
Spending
2008-09
10. Total
Authorities
2008-09
11. Actual
Spending
2008-09
12. Variance(s)
Harbourfront Centre Funding Program - 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 -
14. Total Contributions - 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 -
15. Total Program Activity 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 -
Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

16. Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

17. Audit Completed or Planned: A March 2009 on-site federal desk audit of the HCFP concluded that the funds were being spent according to the terms and conditions of the program.


1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative

2. Start Date: April 2001

3. End Date: March 31, 2011

4. Description: The Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative is both an infrastructure and an urban renewal investment. The goals of the initiative include positioning Canada, Ontario and Toronto in the new economy and thus ensuring Canada's continued success in the global economy. This includes increasing economic growth and development opportunities, recognizing the intrinsic links between economic, social and environmental health, enhancing the quality of life in Toronto, and encouraging sustainable urban development.

5. Strategic Outcome: Sustainable urban development and infrastructure renewal in the Toronto Waterfront Area

6. Results Achieved: 2008-2009 was a transitional year for the initiative, since responsibility for it transferred from the Minister of the Environment to the Minister of Finance, as of October 30, 2008. Eleven projects receiving federal funding were completed and closed during 2008-2009. Most of these involved preliminary design, with the bulk of the construction expected to occur during the remainder of the initiative, which is currently slated to sunset on March 31, 2011. Projects that were completed and opened for public use during 2008-2009 include the Spadina Wave Deck to enhance pedestrian access to the Lake Ontario waterfront and the 3.6-hectare Cherry Beach Transitional Sports Fields in a brownfield area in Toronto's Port Lands district. Capital work is ongoing on several other projects receiving federal funding.



($ millions)
13. Program Activity 7. Actual
Spending
2006-07
3
8. Actual
Spending
2007-08
9. Planned
Spending
2008-09
10. Total
Authorities
2008-09
11. Actual
Spending
2008-09
12. Variance(s)
Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative 34.5 39.4 85.0 85.7 77.4 7.6
14. Total Contributions 34.5 39.4 85.0 85.7 77.4 7.6
15. Total Program Activity 34.5 39.4 85.0 85.7 77.4 7.6
Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

16. Comment(s) on Variance(s): Due to the nature and environment in which the Initiative works (e.g. construction delays due to labour disputes and bad weather; challenges of getting all three levels of government to approve and sign certain contribution agreements), the entire budget was not spent within the fiscal year. All lapsed funding has been reprofiled to future years to be spent in its entirety.

17. Audit Completed or Planned: Evaluation completed; posted on Environment Canada's website at http://ec.gc.ca/doc/ae-ve/2008-09/638/toc_eng.htm. An external audit of the Western Beaches Watercourse Facility and an internal desk audit of the Port Lands Preparation Contribution Agreement were carried out in 2008-2009 as per the annual federally led tri-governmental audit plan.


1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

2. Start Date: April 1, 2007

3. End Date: September 30, 2027 (the last appropriation by Parliament will be in fiscal year 2014-2015, with the last disbursement to Sustainable Development Technology Canada [SDTC] by March 31, 2017)

4. Description: The Foundation will provide grants with conditional repayment terms to eligible recipients for the establishment of first-of-kind, large, demonstration-scale facilities producing next-generation renewable fuels. These facilities must involve both non-conventional technologies and non-traditional feedstocks and be built in Canada, using representative Canadian feedstock. Selection will be based on an in-depth due diligence process developed to assess applications for funding using a roster of biofuels experts and a project review committee.

Since next-generation technologies are capital-equipment-intensive, they constitute a greater debt financing risk. The support provided by the NextGen Biofuels Fund will encourage the retention and growth of technology expertise and innovation capacity for next-generation renewable fuels production in Canada.

Of the $500 million in total funding, $200 million is statutory, with the remaining $300 million being appropriated funding spread over seven fiscal years, beginning in 2008-2009 and ending in 2014-2015.4

5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians and their environment are protected from the effects of pollution and waste

6. Results Achieved: To date, SDTC has received one formal application for funding under the NextGen Biofuels Fund. SDTC is tracking approximately 100 companies as potential applicants both from Canada and abroad. Of these, four have expressed a strong interest in submitting an application in 2009.

The NextGen Biofuels Fund adopted a project assurance process based on best practices used by multinational companies. From end to end, there are seven phases and five decision gates. The Fund also assembled a roster of biofuels experts to assist with the in-depth due diligence exercises required to assess applications for funding. The Project Review Committee was created to support the review of applications. The SDTC Board of Directors approved the NextGen Biofuels Fund Evaluation Framework.



($ millions)
13. Program Activity 7. Actual
Spending
2006-07
8. Actual
Spending
2007-08
9. Planned
Spending
2008-09
10. Total
Authorities
2008-09
11. Actual
Spending
2008-09
12. Variance(s)
Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches - 1.6 12.5 31.5 31.5 (19.0)
14. Total Grants** 1.6 12.5 31.5 31.5 (19.0)
15. Total Program Activity - 1.6 12.5 31.5 31.5 (19.0)
Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

16. Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is due to a statutory payment of $19.0 million issued over and above the planned $12.5 million included in Environment Canada's Main Estimates.

17. Audit Completed or Planned: No audit was planned or performed; performance will be assessed through the departmental Science and Technology Plan that is being completed.

Notes:

* Actual spending by SDTC was significantly less than the payments made to SDTC (based on the estimates provided in SDTC's Cash Flow Statements), because the anticipated payments to projects have been delayed (no new projects have been announced yet). The NextGen Biofuels Fund had an opening balance of $65.3 million, as of December 31, 2008. Accordingly, SDTC will have on hand the funds that it has estimated as its requirements for the period from January 1, 2009, to March 31, 2010.

** These grants are Environment Canada's portion of payments made to SDTC based on Cash Flow Statements received from the Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology. Funding is divided equally between Natural Resources Canada and Environment Canada.


1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Vehicle Scrappage

2. Start date: April 1, 2007

3. End date: March 31, 2011

4. Description: The National Vehicle Scrappage Program will provide incentives to encourage Canadians to retire their old vehicles sooner than planned. These incentives will promote sustainable transportation and will provide Canadians with an opportunity to take concrete actions to reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians and their environment are protected from the effects of pollution and waste

6. Results Achieved

  • Retire Your Ride/Adieu bazou was launched in all provinces by the Clean Air Foundation, the national not-for-profit organization that is delivering the program with a network of local organizations.
  • 17 000 vehicles were retired. Canadians chose among a suite of incentives as a reward for retiring their older (model year 1995 and earlier) vehicles, including transit passes, car share memberships, bicycle coupons, new vehicle discounts or $300 cash.
  • Program results, including emissions reductions and selection of incentives, are tracked through a database that is updated daily as new program participants decide to retire their vehicles.
  • Advertising and outreach activities by program delivery agents communicated the impacts of old vehicles on the environment and the reasons for Canadians to scrap them.
  • A national code of practice for responsible recycling of vehicles was developed, printed and distributed to vehicle recyclers, who must adhere to the code to participate in the program.
  • A baseline survey of owners of older vehicles was conducted to measure awareness of vehicle scrappage programs and the impacts of older vehicles on the environment.



($ millions)
13. Program Activity 7. Actual
Spending
2006-07
8. Actual
Spending
2007-08
9. Planned
Spending
2008-09
10. Total
Authorities
2008-09
11. Actual
Spending
2008-09
12. Variance(s)
Risks to Canadians, their health, and their environment from air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are reduced - 0.2 23.0 23.0 4.6 18.4
14. Total Contributions - 0.2 23.0 23.0 4.6 18.4
15. Total Program Activity - 0.2 23.0 23.0 4.6 18.4
Totals may differ between and within tables due to rounding of figures.

16. Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual spending in 2008-2009 was lower than planned due to a delay in program launch. Of the approved funding of $23 million, $12.8 million was reprofiled to fiscal years 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. 3.8 million of expenditures are reflected in the class "Contributions to support environmental and sustainable developmental initiatives", since the Department obtained permission to use the two authorities for this program for this year.

17. Audit Completed or Planned

  • Joint audit and evaluation scheduled to begin in 2011-2012.
  • Recipient audit planned to be completed in December 2009.


1. The Planned Spending figure in the 2008-2009 Report on Plans and Priorities is incorrect. The figure in the table above is the revised figure.

2. In 2006-2007, responsibility for the HCFP was with the Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada.

3. In 2006-2007, responsibility for the Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative was with the Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada.

4. The funding is equally divided between Natural Resources Canada and Environment Canada.
Top of Page

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


  • Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management
  • Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management

Start date: 2005-2006

End date: Ongoing

Description: Launched in October 2004, the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management (AAROM) Program provides for Capacity Building and Collaborative Management initiatives that supports the involvement of Aboriginal groups, working together, to obtain access to technical, scientific and administrative expertise in order to facilitate their participation in multi-stakeholder and other decision-making processes used to manage aquatic resources and ocean spaces.

Aboriginal groups transition from Capacity Building into Collaborative Management.

Provisions of Contribution Agreements under AAROM may include:
  • establishing AAROM collaborative management structures or AAROM bodies;
  • accessing skilled professional, administrative and technical expertise from within the Aboriginal community or other external sources but excluding public office holders;
  • participating in aquatic resource and oceans management planning — through development of resource and oceans management plans and coordination of community input into the development of plans;
  • developing or providing input into the development of models, structures and processes to guide the interactions of external bodies and agencies with the respective Aboriginal group;
  • planning and holding consultation sessions with member communities on AAROM-related issues;
  • participating in various government technical committees and other multi-stakeholder fora;
  • developing, implementing and monitoring AAROM capacity building strategies;
  • developing enforcement capacity including Aboriginal Fishery Officers and upgrading the skills of Aboriginal Guardians;
  • collaborating in scientific research efforts related to aquatic resource and oceans management;
  • participating in and providing input to various aquatic and oceans resource policy and management processes;
  • undertaking scientific research activities to support appropriate watershed/ecosystem-based management efforts, including the collection and gathering of Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge (ATK);
  • conducting community outreach, stewardship and awareness activities;
  • conducting liaison activities with other relevant/interested parties;
  • developing protocols on ATK — dealing with new and innovative approaches to collect, analyze and integrate this information into environmental and habitat assessments and management practices;
  • ongoing program planning, administration and reporting activities of the AAROM Collaborative Management body; and
  • negotiations and implementation of related AAROM agreements (and associated protocols) for which DFO is a signatory.

AAROM is applicable in areas where DFO manages the fishery, and where land claim agreements addressing those matters covered under AAROM are not in place. Where the Aboriginal group has signed a comprehensive land claims agreement, and one or more of the matters covered by the AAROM Program are not dealt with in the agreement, the group would be eligible to apply for support in those matters not covered.

Strategic Outcome: Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Results Achieved: In 2008-09, DFO had 11 Capacity Building Agreements, and 21 Collaborative Management Agreements and one Umbrella Agreement. These agreements encompass approximately 319 Aboriginal communities nationally as well as three Native Councils in Atlantic Canada. AAROM agreements have increased collaboration amongst Aboriginal communities and strengthened the relationship between communities and DFO. While the structure of the Collaborative Management agreements varied between Aboriginal organizations, the majority of the agreements focused on enhancing core scientific, technical and administrative capacity of the Aboriginal organizations allowing them to obtain competencies that will enable them to strengthen their ability to participate in aquatic management and oceans resources decision making. Under the AAROM program Aboriginal Organizations have created approximately 263 full time positions. AAROM has also provided approximately $9.5 million to Aboriginal Organizations for commercial access including licenses, quotas, vessels and gear.


Program Activity: Fisheries Management
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-081
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants
Total Contributions 14.7 25.8 22.8 16.2 16.2 6.6
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total Program Activity(ies) 14.7 25.8 22.8 16.2 16.2 6.6

1 The figure for Actual Spending for 2007-08 in the 2007-08 DPR was incorrect ($25.6 million). The correct amount ($25.8 million) is reported here.

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance is due to re-profile of Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative of $4.99 million and movement between AFS and AAROM.

Audit Completed or Planned: An evaluation is planned for 2013-14.


 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy

Start date: 1992

End date: Ongoing

Description: Launched in 1992, the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) provides for negotiated arrangements with Aboriginal groups around the harvesting, use and management of Aboriginal food, social and ceremonial fisheries and, where applicable, communal commercial fisheries.

In 1994, DFO introduced a commercial access component to the AFS, the Allocation Transfer Program (ATP). The ATP facilitates the voluntary retirement of commercial fishing licences and the issuance of communal licences to eligible Aboriginal groups in a manner that does not add to the existing effort on the resource.

Provisions of negotiated fisheries agreements under the AFS may include:

  • a harvest allocation to the Aboriginal group for FSC purposes;
  • terms and conditions pertaining to communal fishing licences;
  • enforcement provisions, including the training and engagement of Aboriginal Fisheries Guardians;
  • arrangements for the co-management and stewardship of fisheries resources and their supporting habitats, including the restoration and protection of species at risk;
  • co-management projects for the improvement of the management of fisheries generally, such as scientific research, stock assessment, fish enhancement and habitat management; and
  • communal commercial fishing arrangements including the transfer of vessels and gear as well as support for fisheries-related economic opportunities (e.g., demonstration fishery projects, aquaculture development, business planning support, etc.).

Where Agreements pertaining to the FSC Fisheries cannot be concluded between DFO and an Aboriginal group, DFO will issue to the group a communal fishing licence that establishes the terms and conditions of its FSC fishery.

The AFS is applicable where DFO manages the fishery and where a fisheries management regime has not already been established under a land claims settlement.

Strategic Outcome: Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Results Achieved: In 2008-2009, DFO entered into approximately 140 AFS Agreements with Aboriginal organizations in all DFO regions. These agreements facilitated economic opportunities as well as Aboriginal participation in the management of their fisheries and other aquatic resource management.

Regarding economic development, DFO acquired 22 Commercial licences in Quebec and Pacific Regions and approximately $2M woth of Halibut Quota in the Pacific Region. In addition DFO provided approximately $1.2M for the acquisition of vessels and gear.

AFS agreements provided for management of the FSC fisheries, largely through the Guardian program which comprised of the enforcement component. In 2008 and 2009, 76 Guardians were retrained by DFO to upgrade skills in carrying out enforcement functions, i.e.; issuing warnings, inspecting fish and gear, catch monitoring.

Participation in other aquatic resource management activities included co-management and science related activities such as stock assessment, fish enhancement, counting fences, habitat related work, and river/stream/brook improvement projects.

These economic related and aquatic management activities from AFS agreements created approximately 1,600 seasonal jobs in areas described above.


Program Activity: Fisheries and Aquaculture Management
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-082
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s)
Total Grants
Total Contributions 32.2 32.9 57.3 60.5 58.3 (1.0)
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total Program Activity(ies) 32.2 32.9 57.3 60.5 58.3 (1.0)

2 The figure for Actual Spending for 2007-08 in the 2007-08 DPR was incorrect ($32.5 million). The correct amount ($32.9 million) is reported here.

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variance is due to movement between AAROM and AFS.

Audit Completed or Planned: The audit of the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy was approved by the Departmental Audit Committee in November 2007. An evaluation is planned for 2013-14.


Top of Page

Health Canada

Details on Transfer Payment Programs


Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Grant for the Territorial Medical Travel Fund - Nunavut

Start date:
April 2005

End date:
March 2010

Description:
To support the medical travel fund

(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Address the significant and immediate pressures facing the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut (the territories) in the area of medical travel expenditures
  • Offset a portion of the territories' medical travel costs; and
  • Enable the territories to redirect resources to alternative sustainable health reform initiatives.

Program Activity: (PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants 10.2 10.2 10.2 10.2 10.2 NIL
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 10.2 10.2 10.2 10.2 10.2 NIL

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Grant for the Territorial Health Access Fund and Operational Secretariat-Yukon

Start date:
September 2005

End date:
March 2010

Description:
Grant for the territorial Health Access Fund and Operational Secretariat.
(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Strengthened, integrated sustainable health promotion and illness prevention strategies;
  • Enhanced alcohol and drug services, programs, and treatment options;
  • Improved public health services and emergency preparedness and response measures and oral health;
  • Reduced frequency of acute care facilities utilization;
  • Enhanced application of e-health and telehealth solutions;
  • Increased out-reach services to outlying communities;
  • Improved health professional recruitment and retention strategies;
  • Improved access to specialized physician and diagnostic services;
  • Supported territorial-based education and training for health professionals and para-professionals
  •  improved in-territory services to population groups with special needs; and
  • Enhanced medical travel information collection and collation capacity.

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants 6.3 6.3 6.3 6.3 6.3 NIL
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 6.3 6.3 6.3 6.3 6.3 NIL

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Payments to First Nations and Inuit Health Services Transfer

Start date:
April 2007

End date:
March 2012

Description:
To increase responsibility and control by First Nations and Inuit for their own health programs and services to improve health conditions for First Nations and Inuit people

Strategic Outcome:
Better Health outcomes and reduction of Health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians.

Results Achieved:

  • Increased control or accountability by First Nations and Inuit for their own of health care programs and services.

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 0 0 233.9 213.7 213.7 20.2
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 0 0 233.9 213.7 213.7 20.2

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The rate at which these complex transfer agreements have been put in place has be slower than anticipated. This is occuring partly as a result of the fact that the government is in a period of rapid change in terms of the funding mechanisms being created.

Due to improvements in coding, the department is better able to identify specific program activity rather than generic Atransfer@ activities.

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Governance and Infrastructure Support

Start date:
April 2005

End date:
March 2010

Description:
Health Governance and Infrastructure Support aims to increase First Nations and Inuit control over health programs and services. Activities include: health planning and management; health research, knowledge and information management; health consultation and liaison; health delivery and infrastructure; integration and adaptation of health services; and health human resources.

(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Improved health status of First Nations and Inuit through strengthened governance and infrastructure

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 87.8 124.3 191.5 148.6 148.6 42.9
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 87.8 124.3 191.5 148.6 148.6 42.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The branch received $5.5M in funds via Supps C through TB 3 834619, Transitioning Towards Better Results.

The continuation of complex Federal/Provincial/First Nations partnering has resulted in some delays in the development of these agreements.

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Community Programs

Start date:
April 2005

End date:
March 2010

Description:
Community programs support child and maternal-child health; mental health promotion; addictions prevention and treatment; chronic disease prevention and health promotion services.

(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Increased participation of First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities in programs and supports
  • Improved continuum of programs and services in First Nations and Inuit communities

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 288.5 315.3 235.7 285.1 285.1 (49.4)
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 288.5 315.3 235.7 285.1 285.1 (49.4)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Due to improvements in coding, the department is better able to identify specific program activity rather than generic Atransfer@ activities.

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Facilities and Capital Program

Start date:
April 2005

End date:
March 2010

Description:
Provides funding to eligible recipients for the construction acquisition, leasing, operation and maintenance of nursing stations, health centres, health stations, health offices, treatment centres, staff residences, and operational support buildings.

(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Increase availability of health facilities, equipment and other moveable assets in First Nations and Inuit communities that support the provision of health services

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 41.7 55.7 46.5 66.1 66.1 (19.6)
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 41.7 55.7 46.5 66.1 66.1 (19.6)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The branch received $9.9M in funds via Supps C through TB # 834619, Transitioning Towards Better Results.

The decision was made to advance some capital projects planned for future years.

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Benefits

Start date:
April 2005

End date:
March 2010

Description:
A limited range of medically necessary health-related goods and services which supplement those provided through other private or provincial/territorial health insurance plans is provided to registered Indians and recognized Inuit. Benefits include drugs, dental care, vision care, medical supplies and equipment, short-term crisis intervention mental health services, and transportation to access medical services not available on reserve or in the community of residence.

(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Access by eligible clients to Non-Insured Health benefits

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 136.5 148.1 135.4 150.0 150.0  (14.6)
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 136.5 148.1 135.4 150.0 150.0  (14.6)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The branch received $12.2M in funds via Supps C through TB # 834833, Transitioning Towards Better Results.

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Protection

Start date:
April 2005

End date:
March 2010

Description:
Communicable Disease and Environmental Health and Research programs facilitate prepardness to implement measures in the control, management and containment of outbreaks of preventable diseases and improve management and control of environmental hazards.

(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Environmental health risk management contributes to improved health status of First Nations individuals, families and communities
  • Improved access to quality well-coordinated communicable disease prevention and control programs for First Nations and Inuit individuals, families, and communities

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 29.0 30.9 11.1 24.4 24.4 (13.3)
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 29.0 30.9 11.1 24.4 24.4 (13.3)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The branch received $8M total in funds via Supps A through TB # 834258 (Water and Wastewater Plan), # 834267 (Clean Air Agenda) and # 834269 (Environmental Contaminants).

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care

Start date:
April 2005

End date:
March 2010

Description:
Primary Health Care services include emergency and acute care health services, Community primary health care services which include illness and injury prevention and health promotion activities. These programs also include: the First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care; and the Oral Health Strategy.

(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Improved access to quality well-coordinated culturally appropriate primary health care programs and services for First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 91.7 92.6 122.2 147.9 147.9 (25.7)
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 91.7 92.6 122.2 147.9 147.9 (25.7)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The branch received $12.6M funds for Nursing via Supps C. Nursing costs continue to increase beyond planned spending.

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Contributions for Bigstone Non-Insured Health Benefits Pilot Project

Start date:
April 2005

End date:
March 2010

Description:
Administration and delivery of benefits with Bigstone Health Commission to registered Indians and recognized Inuit.

(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Improved access to quality well-coordinated culturally appropriate primary health care programs and services for First Nations and Inuit individuals, families and communities

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 9.0 9.5 8.8 10.0 10.0 (1.2)
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 9.0 9.5 8.8 10.0 10.0 (1.2)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
 

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Contributions to the Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People=s Health (OAAPH)

Start date:
April 2005

End date:
March 2010

Description:
To support the Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal People's Health

(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Continued empowerment of Aboriginal peoples through advancements in knowledge and sharing of knowledge on Aboriginal health

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 NIL
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 NIL

Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program

Start date:
November 2006

End date:
March 2013

Description:
This program is to support the mental wellness of former Indian Residential School students, their families and communities by providing:

  • resolution health support services, delivered by Resolution Health Support Workers;
  • Elder support;
  • support during truth and reconciliation and commemoration events;
  • research and communication activities in support of the mental wellness of former IRS
  • students, and an overall increased awareness of and demand for mental health services available to former IRS
  • tudents and their families during the resolution process.

(Voted)

Strategic Outcome:
Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Services which are culturally sensitive, holistic, comprehensive, effective and efficient, ultimately improving emotional and mental wellness of former Indian Residential School students.
  • Services allow former IRS students to disclose accounts of childhood sexual and physical abuses in a safe and effective manner.

Program Activity:(PA)
First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions n/a 8.2 0.0 (18.8) (18.8) (18.8)
Total Other types of TPs            
Total PA n/a 8.2 0.0 (18.8) (18.8) (18.8)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The branch received $7.2M in funding via ARLU 08-09, TB # 833196. In addition a vote realignment to vote 10, contributions, was made in the amount of $11M via Supps C.

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Contribution Program to improve access to health services for official language minority communities

Start date:
June 18, 2003

End date:
June 30, 2009

Description:
The Contribution Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities was created following the 2003 federal budget and the federal Action Plan for Official Languages, announced on March 12, 2003. The budget provided Health Canada with $89 million over five years (2003-2004 to 2007-2008) for the implementation of projects related to training and retention of health professionals and for the creation of community networks designed to improve the access of Official Language Minority Communities -- English-speaking residents of Quebec and Francophones outside of Quebec -- to health services in the language of their choice.

The Program funds networking initiatives as well as health care professional training and retention measures. Within this context, 14 contribution agreements have been signed with recipients in both communities: Société Santé en français and the Quebec Community Groups Network, which originally received $9.3 million and $4.7 million, respectively, over a five-year period to maintain and develop networks for facilitation and co-ordination of activities around health care issues. For training and retention, the Consortium national de formation en santé (10 post-secondary institutions) received $63 million over five years to ensure the availability of health care professionals who can work in French. As well, McGill University received $12 million to organize language training activities to ensure the availability of health care professionals who can work in English in Quebec. Additional funds of $13.7M were allocated during that period.

In December 2008, the Government of Canada approved the five-year extension of this contribution program under the new name of Official Languages Health Contribution Program, for the 2008-2009 to 2012-2013 period. In addition to the ongoing funding of $23M, additional funds totalling $59.3M will be provided over the five year period, for a total commitment of $174.3M. The new funds are pursuant to the government's Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future, which was announced in June 2008.

Strategic Outcomes:
Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians

Results Achieved:

In 2008-2009, the Training and Retention component of the Contribution Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities generated 822 French-speaking student registrations in post-secondary health care training programs outside Quebec and more than 2000 health professionals received language training in order to better serve the English-speaking community in Quebec.

Networking activities have also continued in 2008-2009, for instance through the organization of meetings and other interactions with provincial/territorial governments and various health care organizations, and through the organization of and participation in research symposiums. Moreover, work was done to develop new networks in Quebec in the Abitibi, Lower St. Lawrence, Laval and North Shore regions.

Further information regarding these projects is available from the websites of Program recipients:

  • Société Santé en français [http://santefrancais.ca/]
  • Community Health and Social Services Network [http://www.chssn.org/]
  • Consortium national de formation en santé [http://www.cnfs.net/]
  • McGill University [http://www.mcgill.ca/hssaccess/]

Program Activity
 
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 24.1 30.6 23.0 27.9 27.9 (4.9)
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 24.1 30.6 23.0 27.9 27.9 (4.9)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
On March 23, 2009, the Government of Canada announced an extra $4M in federal support to the CNFS in order to help the Consortium strengthen its promotion and recruitment efforts, expand the scope of distance learning, strengthen clinical training for students through the purchase of new medical equipment, and strengthen continuous learning and teaching recruits. In 2008-2009, SSF also received an extra $500,000 and the Entente Québec-Nouveau Brunswick B Gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick, $390,977.

Audit completed or planned:



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (voted contribution dollars)

Start date:
April 2004

End date:
March 31, 2010

Description:
The Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund will contribute to reducing drug use among Canadians, particularly among vulnerable populations such as youth, by focussing on health promotion and prevention approaches to address drug abuse before it happens. The objectives of the Fund are to facilitate the development of local, provincial, territorial, national and community-based solutions to drug use among youth and to promote public awareness of illicit drug use among youth. The Program is delivered through Health Canada's regional and national offices and the Northern region.

Strategic Outcomes:
Reduced health and environmental risks from products and substances and healthy, sustainable living and working environments

Results Achieved:

  • Received and reviewed a total of 297 applications for funding.
  • As of March 31, 2009 a total of 64 new projects have been supported under the National Anti-Drug Strategy: British Columbia 6; Alberta 10; Manitoba/Saskatchewan 5; Ontario 18; Quebec 12, Atlantic 6, Northern Secretariat 3, and; National 4.
  • In an effort to enhance evaluation and reporting capacity of funding recipients, new evaluation training workshops, manuals and reporting templates have been developed.
  • Three program level evaluation exercises were completed: a program review; a performance measurement strategy in support of the National Anti-Drug Strategy; and a sample of case studies demonstrating project level impacts.
  • A cluster evaluation plan has been developed to capture project level outcomes as contributors to the objectives/outcomes of the overall program.

Program Activity
Substance Use and Abuse
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 10.7 8.7 11.4 4.9 4.9 6.6
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 10.7 8.7 11.4 4.9 4.9 6.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
In the fall of 2008, $3M was reprofiled from 08/09 to 10/11. Therefore, a total of $8.4M was ultimately planned spending and the program experienced a $6.6M lapse in funding in 2008-2009. Lapses were due to late project start ups (originally intended for October; most of which began in January or February of 2009) for the following reasons: significant demand on DSCIF program staff due to high demand for fund (need to review nearly 300 applications); in the context of greater accountability and a refocused DSCIF, the proposal assessment process was redesigned to be more rigorous with an emphasis on program impact resulting in a longer review period, and the federal election caused a delay in the Health Canada review and approval process.

Audit completed or planned:
A total of 6 project level audits were planned and conducted during the 2008 2009 fiscal year.



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Assessed Contribution to the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO)

Start date:
April 15, 2008

End date:
March 31, 2013

Description:
To support Canada=s membership in PAHO

Strategic Outcomes:
Canada receives direct and indirect benefits from its membership in PAHO. Attendance at meetings of the governing bodies and at expert consultations provides a forum for the wider dissemination of Canadian-based values related to health and the provision of health care services and public health approaches. Participation by Canadian health experts ensures bilateral linkages are created and maintained with key countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Director of PAHO annually reports the Organization's accomplishments and how it has spent its resources to meet stated objectives. Health Canada provides a website link to PAHO's website: (http://www.paho.org/English/gov/govbodies-index.htm).

Results Achieved:


Program Activity
International Health Affairs
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions n/a n/a 0 12.0 12.0 (12.0)
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity n/a n/a 0 12.0 12.0 (12.0)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
As there was no planned spending for the contribution to PAHO in 2008-2009, there was a $12.0M variance between the planned and actual spending.

Audit completed or planned:
None



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Contributions in support of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy

Start date:
July 1, 2007

End date:
March 31, 2012

Description:
The purpose of the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) Contribution Program is to contribute to the achievement of FTCS objectives through assistance to provinces, non-governmental organizations, researchers and other tobacco control stakeholders. In 2007 the Government of Canada announced new goals and objectives for the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy until 2011. These are:

Goal:
Reducing the overall smoking prevalence from 19% (2005) to 12% by 2011. 

The new objectives are to:

  • Reduce the prevalence of Canadian youth (15-17) who smoke from 15% to 9%;
  • Increase the number of adult Canadians who quit smoking by 1.5 million;
  • Reduce the prevalence of Canadians exposed daily to second-hand smoke from 28% to 20%;
  • Examine the next generation of tobacco control policy in Canada
  • Contribute to the global implementation of the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control; and
  • Monitor and assess contraband tobacco activities and enhance compliance.

Strategic Outcomes:
Reduced health and environmental risks from products and substances and healthy, sustainable living and working environments

Results Achieved:

  • Support for the coordination of a practice‑based research project which facilitates the development, testing, and implementation of hospital‑based smoking cessation programs within New Brunswick and British Columbia. The expected results of this project include improved institutional policies and systems related to the systematic identification and treatment of tobacco users at hospitals in Canada.
  • Continued support to organizations to facilitate knowledge transfer and exchange and networking in tobacco control, including support for the 5th National Conference on Tobacco or Health, Edmonton, October 2007.
  • Established a national practice‑based research network to facilitate research and knowledge exchange to inform on the development of tobacco cessation guidelines for use in clinical practice, as well as in population‑based strategies.
  • Strengthened Canadian capacity to support global tobacco control by creating the infrastructure to allow for enhanced Canadian and international tobacco control initiatives through collaboration and information‑sharing with international organizations, and promoting and supporting the implementation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.
  • Support for the development of tobacco control policy including work on emerging issues.

Program Activity
Substance Use and Abuse
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants n/a n/a 0.5 0.5 0.5 NIL
Total Contributions 14.8 2.8 15.8 7.4 7.4 8.4
Total Other types of TPs 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Program Activity 14.8 2.8 15.8 7.4 7.4 8.4

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Lapsed funds due to delays in approval processes.

Audit completed or planned:
None



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Drug Treatment Funding Program

Start date:
October 2007 - Services component
April 2008 - Systems component

End date:
March 31, 2012 (Services component)
March 31, 2013(systems component)

Description:
Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP), under the National Anti‑Drug Strategy, provides $111 million in financial support over five years to provincial and territorial governments to support illicit drug treatment services for at‑risk youth, and to assist in strengthening the quality of drug treatment services. An additional $10M over five years is designated support for a project in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside.

Strategic Outcomes:
Reduced health and environmental risks from products and substances and healthy, sustainable living and working environments

Results Achieved:

  • A total of 6 proposals were funded in 2008‑2009: 4 systems projects (Nova Scotia, Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, Newfoundland and Yukon ‑ the latter two were developmental in nature); and 2 services projects (British Columbia's Downtown Eastside and Nova Scotia).
  • A national level Best Practices workshop, involving 47 participants from across the country, was held providing the opportunity for program planners, policy makers, and front line workers to network and share their experiences in early intervention treatment.
  • Initiated work to develop individual, project specific performance measurement and evaluation plans.
  • Partnered with HECS to build an integrated Planning and Performance Reporting System to capture and report on project and program level performance for the DTFP

Program Activity
 
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants            
Total Contributions n/a n/a 28.7 1.4 1.4 27.3
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity n/a n/a 28.7 1.4 1.4 27.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
While the total authorities for DTFP during the 2008‑2009 fiscal year were $28.7M, a total of $16.6M was reprofiled from 2008‑2009 into subsequent fiscal years. Therefore, planned spending for the year was reduced to $12.1M with a total of $10.8M lapsing due to delays in the rolling out of the program. Reasons for the delay include: the federal election resulted in delays in the program's ability to conduct the required external assessments of treatment services proposals; the reality that the majority of the provincial/territorial governments required more time than planned to prepare comprehensive plans for the systems component; and provincial/territorial counterparts requiring provincial Cabinet or Treasury Board approval to enter into funding agreements with the federal government (sometimes taking up to 4 months).

Audit completed or planned:
None



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Grant to the Canadian Blood Services: Blood Safety and Effectiveness Research and Development

Start date:
April 2000

End date:
Ongoing

Description:
To support basic, applied and clinical research on blood safety and effectiveness issues through the auspices of Canadian Blood Services

Strategic Outcomes:
Access to safe and effective health products and food information for healthy choices

Results Achieved:

  • Continued improvements to basic applied and clinical research on blood safety and effectiveness.

Program Activity
Health Products
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 nil
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 nil

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned: None



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Health Care Policy Contribution Program (Voted)

Start date:
September 24, 2002

End date:
March 31, 2013

Description:
The Program provides policy analysis and advice to support the First Ministers' commitment to a more accessible, high-quality, sustainable and accountable health system that will be adaptable to the needs of Canadians. The core component of the Program was established to support research to identify, assess and promote new approaches, models and best practices that respond to health care system priorities, both emerging and on-going, and to foster strategic and evidence-based decision-making for quality health care. The Program has evolved to include delivery of the Canadian Medication Incident Reporting and Prevention System, the Pan-Canadian Health Human Resources Strategy, the Internationally Educated Health Professionals Initiative, the National Wait Times Initiative and the Patient Wait Times Guarantee (PWTG) Pilot Project Fund.

The Canadian Medication Incident Reporting and Prevention System (CMIRPS) aims to reduce harm caused by preventable medication incidents through activities such as the collection and analysis of standardized incident data and the development and dissemination of information including best practices in safe medication use systems.

The Pan-Canadian Health Human Resources (HHR) Strategy aims to secure and maintain a stable and optimal health workforce that supports overall health care renewal and a decrease in wait times. The federal government committed $20 million annually to joint initiatives through the pan-Canadian HHR Strategy, including: Pan-Canadian Health Human Resource Planning; Interprofessional Education for Collaborative Patient Centred Practice; and Recruitment and Retention.

The Internationally Educated Health Professionals Initiative (IEHPI) is designed to facilitate the integration of Internationally Educated Health Professionals by reducing barriers to practice and assisting them in obtaining licensure within the Canadian health care workforce. This will result in an increased number of health providers to address workforce shortages and support the achievement of Patient Wait Times Guarantees. In the spring 2005 budget, the Canadian government committed $75 million over five years to support IEHPI.

The Patient Wait Times Guarantee (PWTG) Pilot Project Fund is a three-year initiative (2007-08 through 2009-10) to assist provinces and territories to develop and test innovative approaches to inform the establishment of guarantees, including options for alternate care (recourse) when set time frames for specific health services have been exceeded.

The National Wait Times Initiative (NWTI) was a three-year initiative (2006-07 through 2008-2009) to support research, knowledge development and dissemination to inform the development of policies, best practices, programs, and services aimed at improving access to care and reducing wait times.

Strategic Outcomes:
Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians

Results Achieved:
The core component of the Program supports contribution projects that address current and emerging priority health policy issues. In FY 2008-09, this component.......(.Two recent examples of major initiatives that had their beginning within the core component are the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.)

With funds from the core component, CMIRPS has engaged 293 hospitals and 27 long-term care centres to participate in medication safety self-assessment which has lead to a greater understanding of medication incidents occurring in our health care system which in turn has influenced more than 50 system-based safeguards incorporated in the 2008 Canadian Council on Health Services Accreditation standards.

The Pan-Canadian Health Human Resource Strategy and the Internationally Educated Health Professionals Initiative enable Health Canada to maintain a leadership role in priority areas of HHR. Some examples include:

  • Mobilizing professionals, professional organizations, employers (such as regional health authorities) and research and educational institutions. For example, in FY 2008-09, 11 interprofessional learning projects across the country helped identify the key components of effective interprofessional education, create learning modules/interventions and build the capacity of educators.
  • Notable accomplishments through the IEHPI include substantial gains in areas such as the development of assessment, bridging, path-finding, orientation and workplace oriented language and communication programs for specific groups of IEHPs. For example, new assessment programs for IENs have been launched in Western and Atlantic provinces, and an innovative off-shore pilot project was implemented to assess IENs prior to immigration. To address orientation needs, an interdisciplinary orientation program to the Canadian health care system is now available, and career support services have been established in new centres in Ontario and British Columbia.
  • Investments in new innovative programs across the country that strengthen recruitment and retention strategies, in FY 2008-09, included 4 pilot recruitment and retention projects, that helped identify interventions that were effective in creating healthier workplaces, reducing injuries and absenteeism, and improving job satisfaction.
  • Building on the F/P/T Framework for Collaborative Pan-Canadian HHR Planning, the Strategy enabled ongoing collaboration with provinces and territories, professional organizations and other key stakeholders to work towards a coordinated, robust, pan-Canadian approach to HHR planning and forecasting.

The PWTG Pilot Project Fund is currently funding 12 pilot projects in 6 provinces and 2 territories, covering a range of clinical areas and approaches to improve wait times management and inform the development of guarantees. Those projects will continue until the end of 2009/2010 and help support provincial/territorial commitments to implement guarantees in at least one clinical area by March 31, 2010.

  • In its last year of operation (2008-09), the NWTI continued to support innovative projects across the country that generate and disseminate new knowledge on wait times management, develop best practices, and complement and lay important groundwork for the implementation of Patient Wait Times Guarantees. A synthesis of lessons learned from the Initiative is currently being completed and will be used to inform future policy directions in the area of wait times and the use of funding mechanisms like the NWTI to achieve federal policy objectives.

Program Activity
Canadian Health System
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants 26.7 43.4 51.9 40.6 40.6 11.3
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 26.7 43.4 51.9 40.6 40.6 11.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Estimates of planned spending reflected promising discussions with provincial/territorial governments and other key partners regarding potential health care policy contribution projects. Lapses resulted from the program's inability to finalize these discussions in time to launch projects during the 2008-09 year.

Audit completed or planned:
The Program initiated financial audits for 3 contribution projects in 2008/09 which are due for completion on or before Fall 2009.



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Named Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI)

Start date:
December 10, 2003

End date:
March 31, 2013

Description:
CPSI is an independent not-for-profit corporation mandated to provide leadership and coordinate the work necessary to build a culture of patient safety and quality improvement throughout the Canadian health system. CPSI promotes leading ideas and best practices, raises awareness and provides advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety.

This named grant provides financial assistance to support CPSI's efforts to implement the provisions in the 2003 First Ministers' Accord on Health Care Renewal towards improving health care quality by strengthening system co-ordination and national collaboration related to patient safety. CPSI's grant agreement was renewed in 2008 for a five-year period, beginning April 1, 2008 and ending March 31, 2013.

Strategic Outcomes:
Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians

Results Achieved:
Increased awareness and national co-ordination of patient safety through several major initiatives:

  • Led, in collaboration with the University Health Network, the Canadian adaptation of the World Health Organization's World Alliance for Patient Safety Safe Surgery Saves Lives campaign, in partnership with a working group representing fifteen Canadian organizations. The resulting Safe Surgery Saves Lives Checklist, with a goal of reducing complications and death associated with surgical procedures in Canada, was endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and made available for use in healthcare organizations across the country;
  • Sponsored the fourth annual Canadian Patient Safety Week with a theme focused on medication reconciliation: Knowledge is the Best Medicine. Ask. Talk. Listen. The 2008 week's goal was to raise awareness of patient safety issues and related programs and projects related to medication reconciliation across Canada;
  • Held the second Canadian Patient Safety Officer Course, a comprehensive course which teaches health care professionals and leaders who have patient safety as part of their portfolio how to build patient safety programs in their organizations;
  • Introduced the first-ever framework of interprofessional patient safety competencies, in collaboration with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. CPSI has undertaken a dissemination strategy to familiarize health care professionals with the Safety Competencies framework, consisting of six core competency domains that are suitable for all health professionals to incorporate into educational programs and professional development activities; and
  • Expanded the number of health care teams and organizations participating in the Safer Healthcare Now! campaign to promote evidence-based strategies aimed at reducing the number of injuries and deaths related to preventable adverse events. Originally launched in 2005 with six evidence-based strategies, CPSI announced on April 2, 2008 that the campaign was moving into Phase II, with the addition of four new interventions to reduce adverse events, with two focussing on long-term care settings.
  • In addition, as set out in its Strategic Plan, CPSI continued to provide leadership and coordination of efforts to prevent and reduce harm to patients, with an emphasis on four key areas: education; interventions and programs; research; and tools and resources.

Program Activity
Canadian Health System
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants n/a 7.6 8.0 8.0 8.0 nil
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity n/a 7.6 8.0 8.0 8.0 nil

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit completed or planned:
Health Canada has not completed an audit of CPSI, and none are currently planned.



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Grant to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Voted)

Start date:
April 1, 2007

End date:
March 31, 2012

Description:
The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer is responsible for implementing the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control, a five-year plan with the following objectives: (1) to reduce the expected number of new cases of cancer among Canadians; (2) to enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer; and (3) to lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer.

The mandate of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer is to provide a leadership role with respect to cancer control in Canada, through the management of knowledge and the coordination of efforts among provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups and Aboriginal organizations to champion change and improve health outcomes related to cancer. The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer will act as a pan-Canadian resource to provide the most up-to-date knowledge across strategic priority areas including prevention, screening/early detection, re-balancing the focus towards patient-centred care, clinical practice guidelines, health human resources, standards, as well as supporting key research activities and facilitating the development of a pan-Canadian surveillance system.

Strategic Outcomes:
Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Over the past year, the Partnership has initiated a number of landmark projects, including CAREX Canada (a project aiming to develop estimates of the number of Canadians exposed to carcinogens in their workplaces and communities), and The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project (a pan-Canadian cancer cohort study involving approximately 300,000 Canadians that will explore how genetics, environment, lifestyle and behaviour contribute to the development of various cancers over time).

Program Activity
Canadian Health System
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants 0 28.8 50.0 58.2 58.2 (8.2)
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 0 28.8 50.0 58.2 58.2 (8.2)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Original plans for spending $50M per year were changed following the reprofiling of 2007-08 funds into future years.

Audit completed or planned:
CPACC will be in the 2011-2012 Health Care Policy Contribution Program, Audit Plan.



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Grant to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) (Voted)

Start date:
April 1, 2005

End date:
March 31, 2013

Description:
CADTH is an independent not-for-profit corporation funded by federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial advice and evidence-based information about the effectiveness of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision-makers. The Named Grant's purpose is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities, namely: the Common Drug Review (CDR), Health Technology Assessment (HTA), and the Canadian Optimal Medication Prescribing and Utilization Service (COMPUS).

Strategic Outcomes:
Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians

Results Achieved:

  • Evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the effectiveness of drugs and health technologies, in terms of health outcomes and cost.

Program Activity
Canadian Health System
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants 17.0 17.2 16.9 16.9 16.9 0.0
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 17.0 17.2 16.9 16.9 16.9 0.0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A  

Audit completed or planned:
An independent evaluation of CADTH's core business activities is required as part of Health Canada's 2008-13 funding agreement with CADTH. The funding agreement stipulates that this evaluation cover April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2011, and be submitted to the Minister by December 31, 2011. The evaluation is intended to assess CADTH's performance in achieving the purpose of the Grant, including CADTH's value-for-money.



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Named Grant for the Mental Health Commission of Canada (Voted)

Start date:
April 1, 2008

End date:
March 31, 2017

Description:
As part of Budget 2007, the Government of Canada announced funding for the establishment of a Mental Health Commission of Canada, an independent, arm's length organization, tasked with a mandate to conduct an anti-stigma campaign, build a pan-Canadian Knowledge Exchange Centre, and facilitate/animate a process to elaborate a national mental health strategy for Canada. The structure and role of the Commission is based on the recommendations of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology, in its comprehensive report on mental health, mental illness and addiction in Canada, entitled "Out of the Shadows at Last".

In serving as a national focal point for addressing mental health and mental illness, the Commission will undertake a more targeted approach to addressing these issues in Canada; foster improved coordination and information sharing among mental health stakeholders and the public health community; and encourage a better public understanding of mental health and mental illness nationally.

Strategic Outcomes:
Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians

Results Achieved:

The Commission has made significant headway over the course of its first year and a half in its ability to build partnerships and bring national awareness to the challenges of mental health and illness. Its organizational successes include the establishment of a Board of Directors and eight Advisory Committees (Children and Youth, Mental Health and the Law, Seniors, Aboriginal, Workplace, Family Caregivers, Service Systems, and Science), hiring a permanent staff, and securing the location of its head office in Calgary. Progress has also been made on mandated activities, specifically:

  • The development of a National Strategy: A draft framework document was developed and used to guide cross-Canada consultations with governmental and non-governmental partners. Consultations were concluded in mid-April and the Commission is in the process of finalizing the document.
  • The anti-stigma reduction Initiative: work to develop and launch an anti-stigma / anti-discrimination reduction initiative is well under-way. To support these efforts, two social-marketing pilot projects targeted at children and youth, and health care providers, are also in development. The Commission plans to roll out the pilot projects in 2009, with concurrent evaluations planned throughout.

Program Activity
Canadian Health System
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants 0 0 7.5 7.5 7.5 nil
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 0 0 7.5 7.5 7.5 nil

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A  

Audit completed or planned:
As outlined in the Grant funding agreement, the Commission must engage an independent auditor to conduct a full audit of its financial statements each Fiscal Year. The 2008-09 audited financial statements have now been completed and were presented at the Board Meeting for approval on May 31, 2009.



Name of Transfer Payment Program:
Grant to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (Voted)

Start date:
April 1, 1999

End date:
March 31, 2012

Description:
CIHI is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1991 by the F/P/T Ministers of Health toaddress significant gaps in health information. CIHI's data and its reports inform health policies, support the effective delivery of health services and raise awareness among Canadians about the factors that contribute to good health.

Since 1999, the federal government has provided funding to CIHI through a series of grants and conditional grants, known as the Roadmap Initiative. More recently CIHI's funding has been consolidated through the Health Information Initiative.

Through the past Roadmap Initiatives I, II and II Plus, CIHI had been provided with about $260 million since 1999. Budget 2005 allocated an additional $110 million over five years (2005-2006 to 2009-2010) to CIHI through Roadmap III. This has allowed CIHI to provide quality and timely health information, including the delivery of data on a variety of important health indicators and other health publications to support health sector decision-making and improve accountability.

Beginning as of 2007/2008, the Health Information Initiative provides grant funding to CIHI, replacing the previous Roadmap II, II Plus, III funding and also provides additional funds for new initiatives. This funding allows CIHI to continue important work under the Roadmap Initiative and to further enhance the coverage of health data systems so Canadians get information on their health care system, including information on wait times, and continued development of comparable health indicators. The funding will also enable CIHI to respond effectively to emerging priorities. Under this initiative, up to $406.49 million will be delivered to CIHI over five years (2007/2008 to 2011/2012).

Strategic Outcomes:
Accessible and sustainable health system responsive to the health needs of Canadians.

Results Achieved:
During 2008-09 CIHI achieved the key objectives of its Operational Plan. These included:

  • CIHI developed a new product line - National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS) Level 1.This new database allows for the submission of a core set of demographic, administrative and wait time data elements for emergency room visits, which will substantially improve the timeliness of reporting of comparative ED wait times.
  • Significant progress was made in expanding jurisdictional uptake of the home and continuing care reporting systems. Five jurisdictions are submitting data to the Home Care Reporting System (HCRS), representing an increase of 4 jurisdictions in the last year
  • On the pharmaceutical front, a total of 6 jurisdictions submitted claim-level data to the National Prescription Drug Utilization Information System (NPDUIS).This enabled CIHI to conduct its first (and second) ever analyses using this data. CIHI also completed a very successful pilot of its Canadian Medication Incident Reporting and Prevention System (CMIRPS), and will be initiating deployment in fiscal 2009/2010.
  • CIHI initiated work on enhancing its Canadian MIS Database (CMDB) to allow for more frequent data submissions starting in fiscal 2009/2010, thus providing jurisdictions with access to more useful and timely data for analysis
  • CIHI completed the development of and launched data collection for two new Health Human Resources databases on medical laboratory technologists and medical radiation technologists
  • In fiscal 2008/2009, CIHI developed a multi-pronged approach to strengthen primary health care (PHC) information in Canada.
  • CIHI hosted a working conference with senior provincial/territorial wait time measurement representatives, which resulted in a renewed commitment, and the development of strategies and action plans, to improve the consistency and comparability of provincial/territorial wait time indicators, with a particular focus on emergency care waits and specialist waits
  • CIHI also initiated the development of a program of work related to community mental health (CMH).
  • CIHI took a leadership role in the area of data content standards and health system uses of electronic health records/electronic medical records (EHR/EMR). Following the Information Summit in February 2008, CIHI worked collaboratively with Canada Health Infoway (Infoway) and other stakeholders (e.g. CIOs) to propose a plan of action, which was approved by the Deputy Ministers and the Infoway Board of Directors.

Relevant and Actionable Analysis:

  • CIHI developed and released over 60 analytical products, including special analytical reports on priority themes (e.g. access and quality of care, wait times, health outcomes, continuity of care) and special studies related to priority health services themes (e.g. costs, patient safety).
  • With regards to case mix grouping methodologies, CIHI has been working closely with the jurisdictions to perform comparative analyses and providing education and workshops to allow stakeholders to understand and use these tools.
  • Improved Use and Understanding:
  • In order to improve access and use of its data, CIHI promoted the adoption and use of its Portal, which provides access to facility-identifiable data on the delivery of services by hospitals across the country. Uptake of the Portal increased significantly this year to include three ministries of health, nine regional health authorities and 23 facilities
  • CIHI also initiated a project to enhance its public web site to make it more user-friendly and improve accessibility to its numerous data and information products, and launched a number of projects and initiatives to improve access to its existing electronic reports and increase the number and functionality of e-reports made available to provider organizations and health system managers

Program Activity
Canadian Health System
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
Total Grants 19.7 51.1 81.7 81.7 81.7 Nil
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 19.7 51.1 81.7 81.7 81.7 Nil

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A  

Audit completed or planned: An audit was conducted by Health Canada internal auditors on the Health Information Contribution Program. Auditors concluded that, in general, the internal controls in place at CIHI to manage the Contribution Agreement were sufficient to meet the terms and conditions of the Agreement with minor exceptions. Risk exposure was not serious.

Top of Page

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Table 3: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Labour Market


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy

Start date: April 1, 1999

End date: March 31, 2010

Description: Transfer payments made under the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy are predominantly in the form of contributions to Aboriginal organizations. The Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy provides support to Aboriginal organizations to design and deliver:

  • Labour market development programs to assist Aboriginal people, including Aboriginal persons with disabilities, prepare for, obtain, and maintain meaningful and sustainable employment;
  • Special programs to assist Aboriginal Youth to make successful transitions from school to work or to support their return to school, and;
  • Child care programs.

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved: There are 80 agreements with aboriginal organizations across Canada. The results achieved are an aggregate total of the results of the 80 agreement holders for 2008-09.

There were 59,782 clients served in 2008-09. Of these, 17,820 were employed and 7,602 returned to school, resulting in unpaid EI benefits of $18,813,372. Total clients served include 1,368 persons with disabilities and 32,005 youth.


Program Activity: Labour Market
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
a) Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
b) Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 266.5 266.0 249.3 257.2 257.2 (7.9)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 266.5 266.0 249.3 257.2 257.2 (7.9)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is mainly due to investments in youth aboriginal projects.

Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:
Formative/Summative evaluation to be completed in 2009-2010.
Summative evaluation planned for Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned: 2013-2014.
When published the report will be posted at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/left_nav/publications.shtml
No Audit completed or planned for the reference period.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership

Start date: October 3, 2003

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership (ASEP) is a nationally managed, opportunity-driven, project based program that promotes increased participation of Aboriginal people in major economic developments through formalized, Aboriginal and private sector partnerships. The provinces and territories must also contribute to the projects and all partners must contribute at least 50% of the total cost of the project. The ASEP program supports multi-year training to employment strategies that are developed and managed by Aboriginal organizations and employers, leading to long-term skilled jobs for Aboriginal people in existing and emerging economic opportunities.

The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership (ASEP) program focuses on sustainable employment for Aboriginal people in major economic industries, leading to lasting benefits for Aboriginal communities, families and individuals. ASEP aims to provide Aboriginal people with the skills they need to participate in economic opportunities such as mining, hydro development, fisheries, tourism, and major construction and infrastructure projects across Canada.

ASEP was initially launched in 2003 as an $85M, five year program supporting nine projects that resulted in over 8,700 Aboriginal people trained and more than 3,200 Aboriginal people found long term sustainable jobs. In 2007, the program was extended to 2012 with an additional $105M supporting sixteen more projects. In Canada’s Economic Action Plan, the Government is investing an additional $100M over three years in ASEP to help Aboriginal people participate in the work force and get the training they need to make the most of employment opportunities.

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved: In 2008-09, 2,505 Aboriginal clients were served under the ASEP program, marking an increase from the 2007-08 result of 1,439 clients. Additionally, 2,646 interventions were completed compared to 2,395 last year; 2,055 clients found employment following an ASEP intervention as opposed to 570 in 2007-08.


Program Activity: Labour Market
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
a) Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
b) Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 14.4 16.1 37.7 27.6 23.9 13.8
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 14.4 16.1 37.7 27.6 23.9 13.8

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is mainly due to re-profiling of funds into future years as there were deferrals of projects to the next fiscal year caused by delays in project proposal start dates.

Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:
Formative evaluation is currently underway. Expected completion date is 2009-2010.
Summative evaluation planned for 2011-2012.
When published the report will be posted at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/left_nav/publications.shtml
A Follow-Up Audit of Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership is planned for 2010-2011.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities

Start date: April 1, 2005

End date: March 31, 2010

Description: The objective of the Enabling Fund is to strengthen community economic and human resources development in official language minority communities. The Enabling Fund provides funding to Official Language Minority Communities (OLMC) designated organizations, the Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité (RDÉE) and Community Economic Development and Employability Committees (CEDEC) through contribution agreements so that these organizations can plan, develop and manage community projects and access additional funding for these projects.

Contributions can be made under the Enabling Fund for the Official Language Minority Communities to support activities such as:

  • Economic and human resources planning, implementing community development plans, research;
  • Creating, implementing and consolidating collaborative projects to enhance the vitality and economic growth of Official Language Minority Communities ;
  • Mobilizing community stakeholders; and
  • Strengthening local and national structures to improve their capabilities to manage and implement community projects.

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved:

  • Fourteen agreements were signed with the delegated organizations in the official languages minority communities (OLMCs): thirteen with the Francophone network Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité (one for each province and territory and one with the umbrella organization) and an agreement with the Community Table as a Quebec Anglophone Network;
  • Community projects were implemented in the OLMCs such as feasibility studies to support employability and entrepreneurship.
  • The Enabling Funds have leveraged resources from other levels of government and of the private and non-profit sectors to support the delivery of the program in OLMCs.
  • Memoranda of Understanding between federal institutions and community partners were signed with both representatives from Anglophone and Francophone minority communities. The Memoranda of Understanding is to help leverage funding and increase cooperation among federal partners to support OLMCs in the areas of human resources and economic development.

Program Activity: Labour Market
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
a) Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
b) Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 11.9 11.8 12.0 12.1 12.1 (0.1)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 11.9 11.8 12.0 12.1 12.1 (0.1)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Not applicable.

Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:
Formative evaluation to be completed in 2009-2010.
Summative evaluation planned for 2011-2012.
When published the report will be posted at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/left_nav/publications.shtml
No Audit completed or planned for the reference period.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Labour Market Agreements

Start date: April 1, 2008

End date: March 31, 2014

Description: In Advantage Canada, the Government of Canada set out the goal to create "the best educated, most skilled and most flexible workforce in the world." In Budget 2007, the Government of Canada delivered on this commitment through a New Labour Market Architecture, which included new, six-year bilateral Labour Market Agreements (LMA) with the provinces and territories supported by $500M/yr of new federal investments to address key labour market challenges at local and regional levels.

The LMAs are intended to increase labour force participation of underrepresented groups, ensure that Canadians have the right skills to compete, and encourage employers to provide more training to their workers. The LMAs will provide labour market training to unemployed Canadians who are not eligible for Employment Insurance (EI) and therefore unable to access programs under Part II of the EI Act. In addition to non EI eligible unemployed, the LMAs will also be available to workers with low skills, including those who lack who lack literacy and essential skills.

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved: Labour Market Agreements were signed with all 10 provinces.


Program Activity: Labour Market
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
a) Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
b) Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments 0.0 0.0 500.0 500.0 459.9 40.1
Total Program Activity(ies) 0.0 0.0 500.0 500.0 459.9 40.1

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is due to amounts re-profiled into future years to allow provinces and territories sufficient flexibility to effectively spend funding while putting new programming in place.

Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:
Labour Market Agreements Summative evaluation planned for 2012-Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:.
When published the report will be posted at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/left_nav/publications.shtml
No Audit completed or planned for the reference period.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities

Start date: April 1, 2004

End date: Ongoing

Description: The goal of the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities is to improve the employment situation of Canadians with disabilities, by enhancing their employability, increasing the employment opportunities available to them, and building on their existing knowledge base.

Under the Multilateral Framework for Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities, transfers to provinces are made as 'other transfer payments'. The Government of Canada contributes 50% of the costs incurred by provinces for funded programs and services up to the amount of the federal allocation identified in each bilateral agreement.

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved: Based on aggregate information from Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities Annual Reports, the program appears to be serving approximately 300,000 clients per year. This may include individuals who have participated in multi-year interventions.


Program Activity: Labour Market
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
a) Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
b) Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments 218.2 218.3 222.0 219.8 218.3 3.7
Total Program Activity(ies) 218.2 218.3 222.0 219.8 218.3 3.7

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The $3.7 million is earmarked for Territorial funding. Although the Multilateral Framework for the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities reflects federal-provincial-territorial consensus, it was not formally endorsed by the territories. The territories have confirmed their support for the principles and direction of the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities but have not signed the agreements. They will continue to provide labour market programs for people with disabilities, and will participate in the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities in the future if outstanding fiscal arrangement issues are resolved. This situation does not represent a change for the territories, which did not participate in Employability Assistance for People with Disabilities initiative, the predecessor to Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities.

Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:
No evaluation findings as yet, but a demonstration evaluation of the Manitoba Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities is planned to be completed in 2009.
When published the report will be posted at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/left_nav/publications.shtml
No Audit completed or planned for the reference period.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities

Start date: April 24, 1997

End date: Ongoing

Description: Transfer payments contribute directly to the program objectives by assisting unemployed persons with disabilities who are not normally eligible for Employment Insurance Part II Employment Programs to find, prepare for and maintain employment or become self-employed. Effective and innovative activities are supported, but not limited to, the following:

  • encouraging employers to provide individuals with work opportunities and experience;
  • working in partnership with organizations for people with disabilities to address barriers to an individual's labour market participation;
  • helping individuals increase their employment skill level and;
  • helping individuals to start their own business.

http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/disability_issues/funding_programs/opportunities_fund/index.shtml

Transfer payments made under the Opportunities Fund are in the form of contribution agreements to individuals, businesses, not-for-profit organizations and other levels of government.

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved: In 2008-09, through Opportunities Fund programming 4,840 people with disabilities were served, with 1,939 of these either employed or returned to school when their action plan was closed. As well, 2,012 reported having achieved enhanced employability during this reporting period.


Program Activity: Labour Market
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
a) Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
b) Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between a) and b)
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 24.7 25.4 26.7 28.0 27.2 (0.5)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 24.7 25.4 26.7 28.0 27.2 (0.5)

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Not applicable.

Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:
Summative evaluation completed in 2008-2009.
Summative evaluation planned for Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:-2014.
The summative evaluation reports that the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities meets an ongoing need, providing significant intended and positive unintended outcomes to persons with disabilities and the associated employers and workplaces in a cost-effective manner. It estimated that incremental earnings gains exceeded the program costs on a long-term basis ($10,475 over five years versus $4,000 to $8,000 per participant). The evaluation identified room to expand the program as only 51.1% of survey participants were aware of the Opportunity Fund.
When published the report will be posted at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/left_nav/publications.shtml
No Audit completed or planned for the reference period.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Targeted Initiative for Older Workers

Start date: October 17, 2006

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers is a federal-provincial/territorial cost-shared initiative providing support to unemployed older workers in communities affected by significant downsizing or closures, and/or ongoing high unemployment, through programming aimed at reintegrating them into employment. In situations where there is little likelihood of immediate employment, programming may be aimed at increasing the employability of older workers and ensuring they remain active and productive labour market participants while their communities undergo adjustment.

Provinces and territories are responsible for identifying affected communities to target for activities, design and delivery of projects, and monitoring and reporting on projects. To be eligible to participate in the Initiative, older workers must be unemployed, legally entitled to work in Canada, lack skills needed for successful integration into new employment, live in an eligible community, and normally be aged 55 - 64. Projects must include employment assistance activities such as résumé writing, interview techniques, counselling and job finding clubs, and at least two other employability improvement activities such as prior learning assessment, skills training, work experience, or assistance to start a small business. As well, they must offer income support to participants in the form of allowances, wages or wage subsidies, and involve at least 25 hours per week of activity for participants. Where possible and appropriate, activities will support community economic development strategies and activities. As an example, skills development activities may prepare participants for emerging employment opportunities. Cities and towns with a population greater than 250,000 are not eligible for Initiative programming. Targeted Initiative for Older Workers was implemented as a two-year interim program, but has been extended by three years to March 31, 2012.

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved: Agreements have been signed with nine provinces and territories, under which 108 projects have been approved, targeting over 4,000 unemployed older workers.


Program Activity: Labour Market
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
a) Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
b) Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between a) and b)
Total Grants 0.0 5.0 37.3 37.3 23.1 14.2
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 0.0 5.0 37.3 37.3 23.1 14.2

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is due to re-profiling into 2009-2010 to ensure that federal funding committed through agreements with provinces and territories remains available to them to offer older worker programming.

Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:
Formative evaluation to be completed in 2009-2010.
Summative evaluation planned for 2010-2011.
When published the report will be posted at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/left_nav/publications.shtml
No Audit completed or planned for the reference period.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Employment Strategy

Start date: March 18, 1999

End date: Ongoing

Description: Transfer payments made under the Youth Employment Strategy (YES) are predominantly in the form of contributions from participating departments for wage subsidies for participant youth; or for the development and delivery of youth support services. Such support services include client assessment, case management services and the provision of employability tools, which intend to help participants acquire needed skills. Transfer payments contribute directly to the program objectives by encouraging organizations to create meaningful, skill-enhancing, opportunities for youth.

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved:
Total clients served: 16,500
Total clients employed: 6,188
Total clients who returned to school: 1,875


Program Activity: Labour Market
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
a) Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
b) Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between a) and b)
Total Grants     0.1     0.1
Total Contributions 225.3 235.9 239.5 233.8 221.2 18.3
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 225.3 235.9 239.6 233.8 221.2 18.4

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is due to delays in implementing Skills Link and Career Focus projects, as well the inability of some employers to fill all the positions for which they were approved for Canada Summer Jobs funding, and because some students left their jobs early.

Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:
The Summative Evaluation has been completed and is awaiting final approval. Results from this evaluation will be available for the 2009-10 DPR.
A Summative evaluation is planned for Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:-2014.
When published the report will be posted at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/left_nav/publications.shtml
An Audit of Youth Employment Strategy is planned for 2011-2012.

Workplace Skills


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills

Start date: April 1, 2006

End date: March 31, 2011

Description: The goal of the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program (ALLESP) is to facilitate the creation of opportunities for Canadians to acquire the learning, literacy and essential skills they need to participate fully in society and to promote lifelong learning through the removal of nonfinancial barriers. The Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program is administered by the Office of Literacy and Essential Skills (OLES). Through ALLESP funding, OLES builds knowledge and expertise about what works in upgrading adults’ literacy and essential skills, supports the development, testing and dissemination of literacy and essential skills tools and supports funding recipients in the development and maintenance of effective partnerships and networks. The Adult Literacy and Essential Skills Program is funded from the Consolidated Revenue Fund. Funding is administered through non-statutory grants and contributions.

Additional information can be found at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/workplaceskills/oles/olesindex_en.shtml

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved: OLES and its funding recipients work together to ensure that the benefits of literacy and essential skills upgrading are understood, that literacy and essential skills tools and supports are available and used by those who need them and that partners have the capacity to address literacy and essential skills issues.
Results:

  • OLES provided core funding to 22 organizations to help them build their management capacity to ensure they are in a position to address literacy and essential skills issues in their jurisdictions and/or among target groups, such as Aboriginal people and official language minority communities. Recipients are also building and sharing literacy and essential skills expertise, brokering tools, supports and best practices, and developing key partnerships and networks.
  • OLES also provides project-based funding to achieve these direct outcomes. In 2008/09, OLES held three Calls for Proposals in 2008/09 targeted to the key priority areas of workplace, Aboriginal and community-based approaches to literacy and essential skills.
  • OLES works bilaterally with provinces and territories, business, employers, not-for-profit organizations and other partners to explore initiatives for collaboration that improve opportunities for literacy and essential skills upgrading, demonstrate the importance of upgrading and ensure tools and supports are available to those who need them.
  • In 2008-09, OLES published 17 new tools including 10 specifically targeted to Apprenticeships and Skilled Trades. OLES tools make up six of the 10 most ordered HRSDC publications.

Program Activity: Workplace Skills
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
a) Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
b) Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between a) and b)
Total Grants 13.6 12.7 24.9 12.7 7.0 17.9
Total Contributions 11.5 10.6 4.1 16.2 8.1 (4.0)
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 25.1 23.3 29.0 28.9 15.1 13.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is due to delays in financial engagements for several multi-year projects.

Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:
Literacy — Planned for 2009-10
Planned Evaluation: A Formative Evaluation of the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program is currently underway. Results are anticipated in September 2009.
A Summative Evaluation will be completed in 2010-2011.
When published the report will be posted at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml
No Audit completed or planned for the reference period.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Apprenticeship Incentive Grant

Start date: January 1, 2007

End date: December 31, 2012

Description: The Apprenticeship Incentive Grant aims to promote access to apprenticeships and improve labour mobility by providing a $1,000 grant to registered apprentices in the designated Red Seal trades. This taxable cash grant is designed to reward advancement in the first two years of an apprenticeship program in one of the Red Seal trades, building momentum for apprentices to complete their programs and receive their Red Seal endorsement. Registered apprentices who completed their first or second year of their apprenticeship program in a Red Seal trade designated in the province/territory where they are registered as an apprentice, on or after January 1, 2007, are eligible to apply. The Apprenticeship Incentive Grant provides an incentive for more Canadians to pursue apprenticeships and, taken together with the Apprenticeship Job Creation Tax Credit for employers and the Tradesperson's Tool Deduction, is intended to meet the future need for skilled trades people that is crucial to the sustained growth of the economy. By focusing on the Red Seal trades, for which there are national occupational and training standards, the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant will also support inter-provincial mobility.

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved: During 2008-2009, the Department completed the second full year of implementation of the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant, processing 73,416 applications (39% increase over the previous year results) and issuing 53,271 grants to eligible apprentices (73% increase over the previous year results). The Department began developing the Apprenticeship Completion Grant in collaboration with the provincial/territorial apprenticeship authorities.


Program Activity: Workplace Skills
($ millions)
  Actual
Spending
2006-07
Actual
Spending
2007-08
a) Planned
Spending
2008-09
Total
Authorities
2008-09
b) Actual
Spending
2008-09
Variance(s) between a) and b)
Total Grants 0.7 30.9 99.0 99.0 53.4 45.6
Total Contributions            
Total Other types of transfer payments            
Total Program Activity(ies) 0.7 30.9 99.0 99.0 53.4 45.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is mainly due to lower take-up than what was initially projected based on the 2003 Registered Apprenticeship Information System. Take-up issues were identified and reviewed in the recent formative evaluation of the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant program.

Audit and/or Evaluation completed or planned:
Formative evaluation to be completed in 2009-2010.
Summative evaluation planned for 2010-2011.
Summative evaluation of the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant and Apprenticeship Completion Grant planned for 2011-2012.
When published the report will be posted at: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/gateways/nav/left_nav/publications.shtml
No Audit completed or planned for the reference period.


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Foreign Credential Recognition Program

Start date: February 2, 2004

End date: May 25, 2010

Description: The Foreign Credential Recognition (FCR) Program provides financial and strategic support to provincial and territorial partners and stakeholders, including Sector Councils, regulatory bodies, immigrant serving organizations and post secondary educational institutions, to develop a pan-Canadian approach to assessing and recognizing foreign credentials within targeted occupations and sectors of the economy to facilitate entry into, and mobility within, the Canadian labour market. The Foreign Credential Recognition Program supports the research and project-based activities of partners and stakeholders to develop tools and processes to assess and recognize foreign credentials in targeted occupations and sectors. The goal of the program is to deliver on its mandate of improving the labour market outcomes of internationally trained workers in targeted occupations and sectors.

Strategic Outcome: Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved: At the intergovernmental level, the FCR Program has engaged all ten provinces in discussions about strengthening their FCR capacity. Agreements have been negotiated with 7 provinces, the Canada-Alberta working group still functions, and discussions continue with Quebec and Ontario.

A First Ministers meeting in January 2009 directed the Forum of Labour Market Ministers (FLMM) to develop a Foreign Qualifications Recognition (FQR) framework. As such, an ad hoc Federal-Provincial-Territorial working group co-chaired by HRSDC was formed. Representation comprised of membership from federal departments (HRSDC/CIC), provincial and territorial partners. Additional engagement work has been most evident with assessment agencies, post secondary education institutions, national associations and in enhancing provincial/territorial relations. On October 7, 2008, the FCRP held a one-day Federal-Provincial-Territorial Workshop on Immigrant Labour Market Integration (ILMI) in Ottawa. Participants included: director-level representatives from PT ministries responsible for immigration and/or labour market integration; federal representatives--from the HRSDC-FCRP, Citizenship and Immigration, the Foreign Credentials Referral Office, Health Canada, and the Privy Council Office as well as, academics and policy experts in ILMI issues.

The interdepartmental Director General Forum on Immigrant Integration, met twice in FY 2008-2009 (June 26, 2008 and September 25, 2008). The Forum discussed Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s (CIC) Foreign Credentials Referral Office’s (FCRO) overseas strategy and committed to ongoing collaboration and coordination in terms of its development. CIC also shared initial work on the development of a diagnostique/framework for understanding a federal approach to enhancing immigrant integration.

The program’s approach of engagement, diagnostic, tool development, implementation, and follow-up enables the involvement and buy-in of all stakeholders to help address emerging priorities and pressures. FCRP funded 40 projects in occupations that are classified as regulated, 21 in non-regulated and 49 in non-occupation specific projects. Investments have been made with various organizations including the Canadian Nurses Association, Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators, Canadian Council of Professional Engineers, Canadian Foundation for Economic Education, Eco Canada, Maytree Foundation, Textile Human Resources Council and the Medical Council of Canada