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2007-08
Departmental Performance Report



Transport Canada






Supplementary Information (Tables)






Table of Contents




Table 4: Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue


($ thousands)

Respendable Revenue1

Actual 2005‑06

Actual 2006‑07

2007-08

Main Estimates

Planned Revenue

Total Authorities

Actual

Policies, rulemaking, monitoring and outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system
Canadian aviation regulation user fees

8,291

8,090

8,375

8,375

8,375

8,362

Aircraft maintenance and flying services

29,700

34,369

23,770

23,770

33,770

35,260

Marine safety regulation user fees

8,313

8,170

7,621

7,621

7,621

8,240

Revenues from the Registrar of Imported Vehicles Program

2,423

4,600

755

755

6,256

7,460

Inspections and certifications

2,119

1,751

379

379

379

1,307

Lease payments from the Motor Vehicle Test Center2

290

257

280

280

155

-

Rentals and concessions

840

981

808

808

808

273

Sales and training

1,071

823

812

812

812

783

Research and development

-

1,117

-

-

-

252

Miscellaneous

698

632

75

75

184

84

Sub-total

53,746

60,790

42,875

42,875

58,360

62,019

Policies, programs and infrastructure in support of a market-based framework
Air services forecasts revenues

235

221

160

160

160

239

Public port revenues from user fees and wharf permits

9,032

8,553

8,415

8,415

8,643

8,265

Airport revenues from user fees and service contracts

5,038

4,991

5,150

5,150

5,150

5,230

Airports Authorities – lease and chattel payments

288,320

302,513

298,048

298,048

298,048

295,386

Research and development

2,550

1,406

1,154

1,154

1,154

759

Rentals and concessions

8,124

6,895

7,105

7,105

7,105

6,632

Sales and training

112

129

110

110

110

105

Inspection and certification

-

3

-

-

-

11

Miscellaneous

263

146

120

120

63

76

Sub-total
313,675
324,857
320,262
320,262
320,433
316,702
Policies and programs in support of sustainable development
Rentals and concessions
39
78

102

102

102

184

Sales and training -
6

-

-

-

-

Miscellaneous

8

13

10

10

10

-

Sub-total

47

97

112

112

112

184

Total Respendable Revenue

367,468

385,745

363,249

363,249

378,905

378,905



($ thousands)

Non-Respendable Revenue 3

Actual 2005‑06

Actual 2006‑07

2007-08

Main Estimates

Planned Revenue

Total Authorities

Actual
Non-navigational assets – St. Lawrence Seaway 4

10,385

7,461

5,200

5,200

8,078

8,078

Canada Port Authority stipends

11,698

12,033

12,986

12,986

12,826

12,826

Royalties from research and development

61

23

-

-

50

50

Hopper cars (leases, damage settlements and demurrage charges)

17,701

12,716

15,000

15,000

33,332

33,332

Return on investments- Crown Corporations5

-

87,865

-

-

56,170

56,170

Return on investments – Others 6

5,882

70

-

-

34

34

Refunds of previous year’s expenditures

16,225

426

-

-

2,358

2,358

Adjustments to previous year’s payables

6,794

7,234

-

-

20,708

20,708

Permits for transportation of explosives

37

33

-

-

54

54

Fines and penalties

893

898

-

-

1,527

1,527

Proceeds from disposal of surplus Crown assets

963

1,369

-

-

3,040

3,040

Proceeds from sale of real property

5,059

6,614

-

-

1,059

1,059

Interest revenue from divested airports

20

-

-

-

-

-

Gift to the Crown7

-

-

-

-

3,000

3,000

Miscellaneous

410

545

-

-

354

354

Total Non-Respendable Revenue

76,128

137,287

33,186

33,186

142,589

142,589


Due to rounding, columns may not add to total shown.

Notes:

  1. For consistency with amounts published in the Public Accounts (Details of Respendable Amounts), the respendable revenue categories include a share of departmental administration’s respendable revenue.
  2. Due to an oversight in the revenue recording process, the Motor Vehicle Test Centre revenues ($258,274) were not recorded as respendable revenues.  Corrective measures have been taken to avoid this situation from occurring again in the future.
  3. Respendable revenues are on a modified cash basis and do not necessarily correspond to Public Accounts, Form E, which is prepared on an accrual basis.
  4. Revenues from the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation for managing Real Property Operations.
  5. Dividends received from Canada Post Corp. $47.67M, Canada Lands Co. $7.5 million and Royal Canadian Mint  $1.0M.
  6. Remittance from Andrew Ferry on the St. Lawrence Seaway.  The 2005-06 actual revenues included remittances from Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Corp for the proceeds from the disposal of fixed assets ($5.85 million).
  7. The Pearson Airport Authority purchased the Highway 409 lands and subsequently transferred the lands to  the Crown in order to have the permission to build the runway


Table 6-A: 2007-08 User Fee Reporting  – User Fees Act


A. User Fee Fee Type1 Fee Setting

Authority

Date Last
Modified B

2007-08

Planning Years

Forecast Revenue 3
($000s)

Actual Revenue3
($000s)

Full Cost 2
($000s)

Performance
Standard 4

Performance
Results 4

Fiscal
Year

Forecast Revenue 3
($000s)

Estimated Full Cost2
($000s)

Aviation Safety - Regulatory Fees

(Note 5)

R

Aeronautics Act
(http://laws.
justice.gc.ca/en/A-2/
index.htm
),  

Canadian Aviation Regulations
(CARs)CARS fees located at:
www.tc.gc.ca/civilaviation/
regserv/affairs/cars/menu.htm
 

and fees in Part I subpart 4
http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/
Regserv/Affairs/cars/Part1/Subpart4.htm

July 15, 2000

8,375

8,218

respendable

239,341

http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/
servicestandards.htm
1) Service Charter:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/
publications/tp14790/menu.htm

2) Aircraft Registration and Leasing Service Levels :
http://www.tc.gc.ca/aviation/activepages/
ccarcs/aspscripts/en/levelsearch.asp

3) Pilot project - Ontario Region: results for Services with Fees:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/
levelOfServiceWithtFees.htm

4) Other performance results under development

FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

8,540

8,553

8,566

237,175

233,582

233,579

Marine Safety - Regulatory Fees for inspections, surveys, services, etc.

(Note 6)

R

Various regulations under the Canada
Shipping Act, 2001
(http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/showtdm/
cs/C-10.15
 ) incl. the Board of Steamship
Inspection Scale of Fees;(http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C.R.C.-c.1405/) and Ships
Registry and Licensing Fees Tariff;

http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/SOR-2002-172/

6 June, 1995

(Overall Fee Increase)

May 1, 2002 (Specific Fees)

7,412

7,858

respendable

100,601

http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/
service-standards/menu.htm
Progress was made in 2007/08 to electronically track performance.  Some performance results will be available for 2008/09 DPR. FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

7,389

7,389

7,389

96,594

95,491

95,464

Marine Safety - Office of Boating Safety - Construction Standard Compliance Labels

(Note 7)

R

Canada Shipping Act /Small Vessel Regulations / TP 1332 incorporated by reference

http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C.R.C.-c.1487/

TP 1332:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/MarineSafety/
TP/TP1332/menu.htm

1995

210

202

respendable

775

http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/
service-standards/fees.htm#OBS
_Compliance_Labels
Performance results updated annually.

9 months of performance was tracked during 2007-08.  On average, performance against these standards were achieved in 85% of cases.

FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

210

0

0

638

0

0

Marine Safety - Ship Radio Inspection Program

(Note 8)

R

Canada Shipping Act /Ship Radio Inspection Fees Regulations  http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C.R.C.-c.1472/

1978

48

39

respendable

1,073

Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) full cost share included above:

343

http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/
service-standards/menu.htm
Progress was made in 2007/08 to electronically track performance.  Some performance results will be available for 2008/09 DPR. FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

48

48

48

1,073

1,073

1,073

Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) full cost share included above:

343

Airports – Air Services Charges Regulations (ASCR) fees:  General Terminal Fees, Landing Fees, Aircraft Parking Charges, Emergency response services charges.

(Note 9)

O

Section 4.4 (2) of the Aeronautics Act
(http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-2/index.html ), 

and Section 2 of the Ministerial Regulations Authorization Order - Air Services Charges Regulations
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/SOR-85-414/  

January 1, 2003

4,937

4,936

respendable

13,056

www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/
standards.htm
www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/
standards.htm
FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

4,913

4,913

4,913

11,638

11,836

11,836

Airports - Annual Registration of Mobile Equipment used at Airports

(Note 9)

O

Government Property Traffic Act and Airport Traffic Regulations - Part III Section 57 to 60 
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C.R.C.-c.886/

February 24, 2004

1.0

0.2

respendable

0.5

www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/
standards.htm
www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/
standards.htm
FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

<1

<1

<1

<1

<1

<1

Airports - Vehicle Parking Charges

(Note 9)

O

Section 4.4(2) of the Aeronautics Act
(http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-2/index.html )

 and Section 2 of the Ministerial Regulations Authorization Order, Airport Vehicle Parking Charges Regulations
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/SOR-87-543/

November 19,1998

209

270

respendable

1,339

www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/
standards.htm
http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/
standards.htm
FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

213

213

213

1,194

1,214

1,214

Ports - Public Port Revenues:   Utility Charges, Wharfage, Berthage, Storage and Harbour Dues

O

Canada Marine Act
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C-6.7/index.html  

Fees at:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/ports/
menupublicportfees.htm

Jan 1, 2004

8,525

8,289

respendable

31,687

http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/
ports/standards.htm
http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/ports/
standards.htm
FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

8,165

8,032

8,096

30,477

28,527

28,154

Permits for Vehicles used for the Transport-ation of Explosives

(Note 10)

R

Explosives Act Section 7 :  http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/e-17/56595.html#rid-56631 

and  Explosives Regulations Part III Section 31. (1) i

http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/e-17/
C.R.C.-c.599/99425.html#rid-99518

1993

30

28

non respendable (CRF)

38

95% of the time, will deliver:

a) a decision accepting or rejecting a complete new factory application within 60 days after receipt, and

b) a decision accepting or rejecting any other type of complete application within 30 days after receipt.  

service standard met 100% of time

service standard met 100% of time

FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

0

0

0

0

0

0

 Access to Information Requests - Fees

(Note 11)

O Access to Information Act and Regulations :  http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-1/index.html

1992

6

5

non respendable (CRF)

2,158

Service Standards are included in the Access to information Act, Section 7:    http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-1/
218072.html#rid-218084
Statutory deadlines have been met for 80% of requests. 100% of extension notices were sent within 30 days following the receipt of the request . 100% of transfer notices were sent within 15 days. FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

6

6

6

1,500

1,500

1,500

Total Regulatory Services (R)    

Sub-Total (R)

16, 075.0

16,345.0

341,828.0

  Sub-total R:

Sub-total R:

Sub-total R:

FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

16,187.0

15,990.0

16,003.0

335,480.0

330,146.0

330,116,0

Total Other Goods and Services (O)     Sub-Total (O)

13,678.0

13, 500.2

48,240.5

  Sub-total O:

Sub-total O:

Sub-total O:

FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

13,297.0

13,164.0

13,228.0

44,809.0

43,077.0

42,704.0

Report Total     Total

29,753.0

29,845.2

390,068.5

  Total

Total

Total

FY 08/09

FY 09/10

FY 10/11

29,484.0

29,154.0

29,231.0

380,289.0

373,223.0

372,820.0


B. Date Last Modified:

Subsequent amendments to regulations and/or fee reductions did not trigger the User Fee Act. 

C. Other Information 12

In addition to complaint mechanism included in various Acts and Regulations (eg ATIP  http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-1/218072.html#rid-218118 ), several complaint mechanisms have been developed and implemented for service standards related to user fees at public ports:  http://www.tc.gc.ca/Programs/Ports/standards.htm  and TC operated airports http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm for the Canadian Aviation Regulations (Civil Aviation Issues Reporting System (CAIRS)   http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/ManagementServices/QA/cairs.htm ).  A complaint mechanism policy "Handling of Complaints Related to Marine Safety User Fees and Applicable Service Standards" is now available on the web at:http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/service-standards/handling-complaints.htm

Due to rounding, columns may not add to totals shown.

The Internet links in this report may change following publication, since the various websites are updated regularly.

Notes: 

  1. The department collects two types of fees: Regulatory Service (R) and Other Goods and Services (O).
  2. Full Costs (Actual and Estimates) are reported on an accrual basis.   Represent the full cost of providing service, good, facility or privilege.  Full cost is not necessarily the cost attributed to fee-paying clients and a lower cost recovery level may be required based on the economic impact on stakeholders, stakeholders paying capability, the degree to which a price may affect the achievement of public policy objectives, etc.

    Consistent with instructions for the Departmental Performance Report (DPR), Full Costs are calculated according to costing principles identified in the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Guide to the Costing, revised in May 2008

    Full Costs are defined as: "The sum of all costs, direct and indirect, incurred by the government in the supply of a good, service, property, or right or privilege, including: services provided without charge by other departments (e.g., accommodation, legal services); costs financed by separate authorities (e.g., some employee benefits); the financing costs of inventories; and annualized capital costs, including financing.  However, since the primary focus of this guide is full costing for cost recovery, transfer payments have not been included."

    Note:  As the revised Guide now clarifies that financing costs apply to revolving funds, financing costs of capital assets and inventories are now excluded from the Transport Canada Full Cost base.

  3. The Forecast Revenues identified for the 2008-09, 2009-10 and 2010-11 fiscal years were those reported in the Report on Plans and Priorities for 2007-08, unless specifically noted and, are reported on a cash basis as for Actuals.
  4. According to prevailing legal opinion, where the corresponding fee introduction or most recent modification occurred prior to March 31, 2004 the: 
    • Performance standard, if provided, may not have received Parliamentary review; and
    • Performance standard, if provided, may not respect all establishment requirements under the User Fee Act (e.g. international comparison; independent complaint address)
    • Performance result, if provided, is not legally subject to the User Fee Act section 5.1 regarding fee reductions for failed performance.
       
  5. Aviation Safety - Regulatory Fees:  Revision to standards, performance measurement is ongoing with the National Working Group on Services Standards.The Full Cost base reported in the table above represents the Total Direct and Indirect Beneficiary Costs. Per the last review completed, only 27% of the Full Cost base was considered as direct beneficiary costs i.e. attributable to paying stakeholders. Costs (or a portion) of services such as monitoring compliance, enforcement of safety operational standards, the establishment of legislation, regulations and standards, etc. were considered benefiting the general tax payer. Only the costs associated with the issuance of Transport Canada safety documents (certificate, license, permit, etc.) were considered a private benefit attributable to the document recipient.
  6. Marine Safety - Regulatory Fees for inspections, surveys, services, etc. - Per the last regional survey carried out, 34% of the Full Cost base was considered non attributable to paying stakeholders. Costs (or a portion of) of services such as enforcement of safety and security standards, pollution prevention, etc. were also considered benefiting the general taxpayer.
  7. Marine Safety - Construction Standard Compliance Labels - Following consultations held as part of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 regulatory reform process, Marine Safety has concluded that the Single Vessel Label Program should be discontinued.

    The single vessel label program deals with one-of-a-kind vessels, most often home-built.  In order to minimize any inconvenience to pleasure craft owners, the single vessel label program was discontinued in 2008-09 in advance of the upcoming update (2009) to the Small Vessel Regulations.  The nature of business will change once the Small Vessel regulations come into force (early 2009).  At that point, the fees charged for all compliance notices will discontinue.  See http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/debs/obs/news/discontinuation/menu.htm for more information.

    The Revenue Forecast identified for 2008-09 is as reported in the Report on Plans and Priorities for 2007-08.  Cost and Revenue Forecasts are nil for following years based on the expected repealed date (early 2009) for these fees.

  8. Marine Safety - Ship Radio Inspection Program - Revenues from user fees represent the full cost recovery of overtime and travel costs.  Full Costs include also the costs for the program manager, a share of internal services costs and amortization costs of ship radio inspection equipment. 
  9. Airports User Fees - Exclude revenues and costs from divested and leased airports.
  10. Permits for vehicles used for the Transportation of Explosives:  Natural Resources Canada entered into an agreement with Transport Canada for the issuance of these permits.  Transport Canada collects these revenues.  The Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations were amended on Feb 20, 2008 (SOR/2008-34). As a result, the vehicle permit process used for the transportation of explosives has subsequently returned to Natural Resources Canada.

    2007-08 actual revenues reported in public accounts Form E and DPR Revenue table are overstated due to coding discrepancies.

  11. Access to Information Requests - Fees:  The Access to Information Act has provisions to waive fees.
  12. Main achievement in improving service - The Treasury Board Secretariat Policy on Service Standards for External Fees does not include any specific requirement for measuring client satisfaction other than the need for service standards to be developed in consultation with paying and non-paying stakeholders.

    However, Transport Canada, in its commitment to provide quality services and client satisfaction, has implemented dispute mechanisms that apply to services, use of facilities and provision of goods for which user fees are charged.  This initiative ensures that stakeholders’ concerns and complaints are handled immediately by the various Groups and redress mechanisms undertaken as appropriate.  Internet web site links to various Groups dispute mechanisms are identified under "Other Information" in the two Tables for User fee (Table 6-A) and External Fee reporting (Table 6-B).


Table 6-B: 2007-08 External Fee Reporting: Policy on Service Standards for External Fees


A. External Fee

Service Standard 1

Performance Result 1

Stakeholder Consultation

Aviation Safety – Regulatory Fees http://www.tc.gc.ca/
CivilAviation/
servicestandards.htm
1) Service Charter:

http://tcwwwdev/
CivilAviation/
publications/
tp14790/menu.htm

2) Aircraft Registration and Leasing Service Levels : http://www.tc.gc.ca/
aviation/activepages/
ccarcs/aspscripts/en/
menu.asp

Consultations with stakeholders were last undertaken in 1997 for all fees and in 2000 and 2004 for specific fees.   Fees published in Canada Gazette, in Dec. 1997, June 2000, and Sept. 2004 respectively. The June 2000 and September 2004 Amendments did not trigger the User Fee Act.
    3) Pilot project - Ontario Region: results for Services with Fees:
http://tcwwwdev/
CivilAviation/
levelOfService
WithtFees.htm
The Canadian Aviation Regulation Advisory Committee (CARAC) was consulted in December 2006 to seek agreement on the consultation methodology in the future which was agreed to.  Stakeholders’ feedback now sought through the Civil Aviation Issues Reporting System (CAIRS).
    4) Other performance results under development In 2008, during the CARAC Plenary Meeting, a progress report was made on the development of the New Service Charter and the intent of TCCA to reaffirm their committment on service delivery. 
Marine Safety - Regulatory Fees for inspections, surveys, services, etc. http://www.tc.gc.ca/
marinesafety/
service-standards/
menu.htm
Progress was made in 2007/08 to electronically track performance.  Some performance results will be available for 2008/09 DPR. Consultation process completed in May 2006; comments received were favourable; no written comments received.

Ongoing feedback via TC Website.  All proposals for changes are subject to public consultations via TC Website, Canada Gazette and CMAC meetings.

Marine Safety - Office of Boating Safety - Construction Standard Compliance Labels http://www.tc.gc.ca/
marinesafety/
servicestandards/
fees.htm#OBS_
Compliance_Labels
Performance results updated annually.

9 months of performance was tracked during 2007-08.  On average, performance against these standards was achieved in 85% of cases.

Consultation process completed in May 2006; comments received were favourable; no written comments received.

Ongoing feedback via TC Website.  All proposals for changes are subject to public consultations via TC Website, Canada Gazette and CMAC meetings.

Marine Safety - Ship Radio Inspection program http://www.tc.gc.ca/
marinesafety/
service-standards/
menu.htm
Progress was made in 2007-08 to electronically track performance.  Some performance results will be available for 2008-09 DPR. Consultation process completed in May 2006; comments received were favourable; no written comments received.

Ongoing feedback via TC Website.  All proposals for changes are subject to public consultations via TC Website, Canada Gazette and CMAC meetings.

Airports – Air Services Charges Regulations (ASCR) fees:  General Terminal Fees, Landing Fees, Aircraft Parking Charges, Emergency response services charges. www.tc.gc.ca/programs/
airports/standards.htm
www.tc.gc.ca/programs/
airports/standards.htm
Stakeholder feedback was managed through existing channels at the various sites during Jan/Feb 2006. Stakeholder relationships are important and valued. Stakeholders were also consulted through TC websites.  There are no outstanding issues for stakeholders.
Airports - Annual Registration of Mobile Equipment used at Airports www.tc.gc.ca/programs/
airports/standards.htm
www.tc.gc.ca/programs/
airports/standards.htm
Stakeholder feedback was managed through existing channels at the various sites during Jan/Feb 2006. Stakeholder relationships are important and valued. Stakeholders were also consulted through TC websites.  There are no outstanding issues for stakeholders.
Airports - Vehicle Parking Charges www.tc.gc.ca/programs/
airports/standards.htm
www.tc.gc.ca/programs/
airports/standards.htm
Stakeholder feedback was managed through existing channels at the various sites during Jan/Feb 2006. Stakeholder relationships are important and valued. Stakeholders were also consulted through TC websites.  There are no outstanding issues for stakeholders.
Ports - Public Port Revenues:   Utility Charges, Wharfage, Berthage, Storage and Harbour Dues http://www.tc.gc.ca/
programs/ports/
standards.htm
http://www.tc.gc.ca/
programs/ports/
standards.htm
Last official consultations were completed by letters to the industry in January 2006. Ongoing feedback is possible through TC website. Stakeholder relationships are important and valued. There are no outstanding issues for stakeholders
Permits for Vehicles used for the Transportation of Explosives 95% of the time, will deliver:

a) a decision accepting or rejecting a complete new factory application within 60 days after receipt, and       

b) a decision accepting or rejecting any other type of complete application within 30 days after receipt. 





-service standard met 100% of time




-service standard met 100% of time

Consultations with stakeholders were successfully undertaken by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) in 1993
Access to Information Requests - Fees Service standards are in the Access to information Act, Section 7:  http://laws.justice.gc.ca/
en/A-1/218072.html#rid-218084
Statutory deadlines have been met for 80% of requests. 100% of extension notices were sent within 30 days following the receipt of the request. 100% of transfer notices were sent within 15 days. The service standard is established by the Access to Information Act and the Access to Information Regulations.  Consultations with stakeholders were undertaken for amendments done in 1986 and 1992.

B. Other Information  5:

In addition to complaint mechanism included in various Acts and Regulations (eg ATIP http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/A-1/218072.html#rid-218118 ), several complaint mechanisms have been developed and implemented for service standards related to user fees at public ports http://www.tc.gc.ca/Programs/Ports/standards.htm  and TC operated airports www.tc.gc.ca/programs/airports/standards.htm for the Canadian aviation regulations (Civil Aviation Issues Reporting System (CAIRS) http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/ManagementServices/QA/cairs.htm ). A complaint mechanism policy "Handling of Complaints Related to Marine Safety User Fees and Applicable Service Standards" is now available on the web at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/service-standards/handling-complaints.htm

The Internet links in this report may change following publication, since the various websites are updated regularly

 Notes:

  1. As established pursuant to the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees:                                        
    • service standards may not have received parliamentary review; and 
    • service standards may not respect all performance standard establishment requirements under the User Fee Act (e.g. international comparison; independent complaint address).  
    • Performance results are not legally subject to section 5.1 of the User Fee Act regarding fee reductions for unachieved performance.
  2. Aviation Safety - Regulatory Fees:  Revision to standards, performance measurement is ongoing with the National Working Group on Services Standards
  3. Marine Safety - Construction Standard Compliance Labels - Following consultations held as part of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 regulatory reform process, Marine Safety has concluded that    the Single Vessel Label Program should be discontinued.

    The single vessel label program deals with one-of-a-kind vessels, most often home-built.  In order to minimize any inconvenience to pleasure craft owners, the single vessel label program will be discontinued in advance of the upcoming update (2009) to the Small Vessel Regulations. The nature of business will change once the Small Vessel regulations come into force (early 2009).  At that point, the fees charged for all compliance notices will be discontinued.  See http://www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/debs/obs/news/discontinuation/menu.htm for more information.

  4. Permits for vehicles used for the Transportation of Explosives:  Natural Resources Canada entered into an agreement with Transport Canada for the issuance of these permits. The Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations were amended in Feb 20, 2008 (SOR/2008-34). As a result, the vehicle permit process used for the transportation of explosives has subsequently returned to Natural Resources Canada.  
  5. Main achievement in improving service - The Treasury Board Secretariat Policy on Service Standards for External Fees does not include any specific requirement for measuring client satisfaction other than the need for service standards to be developed in consultation with paying and non-paying stakeholders.

    However, Transport Canada, in its commitment to provide quality services and client satisfaction, has implemented dispute mechanisms that apply to services, use of facilities and provision of goods for which user fees are charged.  This initiative ensures that stakeholders’ concerns & complaints are handled immediately by the various Groups and redress mechanisms undertaken as appropriate.  Internet web site links to various Groups dispute mechanisms are identified under "Other Information" in the two Tables for User fee (Table 6-A) and External Fee reporting (Table 6-B).



Table 9: Details on Transfer Payment Program (TPPs)

In 2007-2008, Transport Canada administered the following Transfer Payment  Programs (TPP) in excess of $5 million:


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grant to the Province of British Columbia in respect of the provision of ferry and coastal freight and passenger services.
2) Start Date: 1977 3) End Date: ongoing
4) Description: The Province of British Columbia assumes the entire responsibility for the operation of ferry and coastal freight and passenger services.
5) Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada’s economic growth and trade objectives.
6) Results Achieved: The ferry service was maintained allowing the transportation of coastal freight and passenger.
  ($ thousands)

7) Actual Spending 2005-06

8) Actual Spending
2006–07

9) Planned Spending 2007–08

110) Total Authorities
2007–08

11) Actual Spending
2007–08

12) 
Variance(s) Between 9
and 11

13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework 
14) Total Grants

24,890 

25,309

25,909

25,856

25,856

53

14) Total Contributions            
14) Total Other Types of TPs            
15) Total PA

24,890 

25,309

25,909

25,856

25,856

53


16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): Planned spending based on estimate of BC consumer price index.  Final spending reflects actual consumer price index.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

The evaluation completed in 2005 found that the grant agreement in its current form is somewhat contrary to the National Marine Policy. There is no constitutional obligation for the federal government to support the service provided. There would be a justification if there was a clear definition of a remote community and if the grant were directed specifically towards ferry routes serving these communities. Since the terms of the agreement are not open for amendment, the cost of the grant has not been reduced as mandated by the National Marine Policy. Also, BC Ferries required the grant in the past when it was a Crown corporation. As an independent, regulated, and self-financing company, BC Ferries is viewed as more efficient and business-like by many of its stakeholders. It is too early to determine whether this will continue under BC Ferries new management structure. Interview data suggests that if the federal grant were withdrawn, there could be negative impacts, particularly on the northern communities in BC. Finally, by providing the grant, TC is achieving positive outcomes with minimal administration costs and little risk of negative outcomes as responsibility for West Coast ferry services lies with others.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/2005/bcpfs/menu.htm


18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

Transport Canada did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2007-08. TC will determine whether an internal audit will be conducted, based on its risk-based audit planning process.Copies of audit reports approved by the department’s Audit and Review Committee may be found at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/menu.htm



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grade Crossing Improvement Contribution Program (approved under Railway Safety Act)
2) Start Date: 1989 3) End Date: ongoing
4) Description: Payments made to railway companies, municipalities to improve the safety at public road/railway grade crossings.
5) Strategic Outcomes: A safe and secure transportation system that contributes to Canada’s social development and security objectives.
6) Results Achieved: Since 1989, over $100 million has been spent by Transport Canada to fund improvements at public road/railway grade crossings (approximately 80 sites per year).  It is conservatively estimated that the program is responsible for 53% of the reduction in collisions at grade crossings.
  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending 2006–07 9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending 2007–08 12) Variance(s) Between 9
and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system
14) Total Grants

200 

140

300

155

155

145

14) Total Contributions

11,045 

3,505

7,145

7,290

7,280

(135)

14) Total Other Types of TPs            
15) Total PA

12,245 

3,645

7,445

7,445

7,435

10


16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variances between planned and actual spending are due to cash flow adjustments to accommodate pressures in the Departmental G and C Vote.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

A 2005 Departmental Evaluation Services study found that the program is consistent with the federal government’s priorities and contributes to TC’s strategic outcome of a safe and secure transportation system.  There is an ongoing need for the program and there is little likelihood that provinces will play a larger role in Grade Crossing Improvement Contribution Program (GCIP).  It also found that GCIP has been successful in reducing the risk of accidents at grade crossings.  Over the evaluation period, GCIP has contributed significantly to the decline of collisions at grade crossings.  It is conservatively estimated that the program is responsible for 53% of the reduction in collisions at grade crossings. 

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/2005/gcip/menu.htm

In 2006, TBS approval was obtained to renew and extend the program from 2006-07 to 2010-11. The renewal documentation includes a formal Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) and a Risk-Based Audit Framework (RBAF).

The next formal program evaluation in the format outlined in the RMAF will be conducted at the end of the five year program renewal period.


18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):  Not applicable


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Marine Security Contribution Program
2) Start Date: December 1 st, 2004 3) End Date: November 30, 2009
4) Description:

Financial assistance to aid in the speedy implementation of security measures and to help offset the costs of operators who would not have the financial capacity to cover security costs without significantly affecting operating costs.

5) Strategic Outcomes:

A safe and secure transportation system that contributes to Canada’s social development and security objectives.

6) Results Achieved:

Transport Canada provided financial contributions for the implementation of a number of security enhancements.  Transport Canada Regional Inspectors conducted follow-up inspections to verify that funded projects were completed according to submissions. By the end of 2007-08 approximately $108.6 M in funding had been approved for selected marine security enhancement projects.

  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending 2006–07 9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending 2007–08 12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

17,403 

12,559

47,563

35,410

30,806

16,757

14) Total Other Types of TPs            
15) Total PA

17,403 

12,559

47,563

35,410

30,806

16,757


16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is due to the planned G and C level in 2007-08 that included corporate temporary allocation ($16.8 million) in anticipation of the requirement, which was subsequently distributed to other higher departmental priorities.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

The evaluation, completed in 2006, found that Transport Canada’s Marine Security initiatives are aligned with the Department’s strategic outcomes as well as the Government of Canada’s National Security Policy.  There is also a continuing need for the majority of Transport Canada’s Marine Security initiatives.  Specifically, the evaluation found that the Marine Security Contribution Program has increased stakeholder ability to address security vulnerabilities in order to comply with MTSR security requirements.  The program has also contributed to enhanced stakeholder acceptance and confidence in the security of the Canadian marine transportation system.  This initiative has contributed to increased stakeholder ability to integrate security with business and travel needs.  As a whole, Transport Canada is achieving positive outcomes for its investments in Marine Security initiatives.  The Marine Security program results in cost-savings through risk mitigation and harm reduction. The results of the evaluation may be found at the following site: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/menu.htm

18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): An audit of the Marine Security Contribution Program is currently underway.   Copies of audit reports approved by the department’s Audit and Review Committee may be found at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/menu.htm .


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution for ferry and coastal passenger and freight services
2) Start Date: 1941 3) End Date: ongoing
4) Description: Operating funding for two regional passenger and vehicle ferry services, CTMA Traversier Ltee and Northumberland Ferry Ltd.
5) Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada’s economic growth and trade objectives.
6) Results Achieved: The services met the demand and provided transportation of freight and people from the islands to the mainland.
($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending 2006–07 9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities 2007–08 11) Actual Spending 2007–08 12) 
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework 
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

9,355 

11,493

8,649

13,358

13,345

(4,696)

14) Total Other Types of   TPs            
15) Total PA

9,355 

11,493

8,649

13,358

13,345

(4,696)


16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): Mainly due to decrease in traffic and increase in operating and capital expenses considering enhanced safety and regulatory requirements, and fuel price increase.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

The evaluation, completed in 2004, found that while the CTMA service from Cap-aux-Meules, Iles-de-la-Madeleine, Quebec to Souris, Prince Edward Island (PEI) remains relevant since it supports the mandate of Transport Canada and serves a remote community. The Northumberland Ferries service between Wood Islands, PEI and Caribou, Nova Scotia does not directly support TC’s mandate and strategic objectives and there is no constitutional obligation to maintain the ferry service.  Both ferry services were found to provide quality, efficient and affordable services responding to user needs and both contribute to the tourism industry in their local area.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/menu.htm

18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

Audits of the Contribution for ferry and coastal passenger and freight services (CTMA Traversier Ltee and Northumberland ferry Ltd.) were completed in 2004.  Copies of the audit reports can be found at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2003/1577-03-030/menu.htm   (CTMA Traversier)

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2003/1577-03-030B/menu.htm (Northumberland Ferry) 



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program:

Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program – Highway Component

Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program – Border Crossing Transportation Initiative

Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program – Transportation Planning/Modal Integration (TPMI) Initiative

Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program – Intelligent Transportation Systems Initiative

2) Start Date: March 29 th, 2001 3) End Date:

SHIP Highway Component has been extended until March 31, 2009.  Contribution agreement’s extensions were approved by the Minister of Transport for some provinces in order to complete their projects.

SHIP Border Crossing Transportation Initiative has been extended until    March 31, 2009.

SHIP Transportation Planning and Modal Integration (TPMI) Initiative has been extended until March 31, 2009.

SHIP Intelligent Transportation Systems Initiative has been extended until March 31, 2009.

4) Description:

SHIP Highway Component: Provide federal funding under cost-shared contribution agreements with provincial and territorial governments for highway improvement projects to address the needs of Canada’s National Highway System.

SHIP Border Crossing Transportation Initiative and TPMI Initiative: Provide federal funding under cost-shared contribution agreements with provincial, territorial, municipal governments and other partners to improve the access to land border crossings, mobility, modal integration and transportation efficiency. 

SHIP Intelligent Transportation Systems Initiative: Provide federal funding under cost-shared contribution agreements with provincial, territorial, municipal governments and other partners to enable the undertaking of the deployment of intelligent transportation systems.

5) Strategic Outcomes: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada’s economic growth and trade objectives.
6) Results Achieved:

Highways:  9 projects were completed in New Brunswick, British Columbia (2), Alberta (1), Manitoba (1), Ontario (3), and Nova Scotia (1) in 2007-08.  These projects will improve safety and traffic flow on highways that are part of the National Highway System.

Border Crossing Transportation Initiative: The Highway 1 project on Vancouver Island in British Columbia was completed.  This project contributed to the enhancement of safety and efficiency of Vancouver Island highway system.

Intelligent Transportation Systems Initiative: The objective is to enhance the reliability and overall operating performance of the transportation system. In support of this objective, agreements have been concluded for deployment and integration projects. 31 ITS projects were completed, including the installation of over 40 new environmental sensor stations and the upgrade of 36 existing stations, the implementation of remote vehicle inspection stations for commercial vehicles, the completion of a feasibility and design study for a multi-agency centralized transportation management centre.

  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12) 
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework 
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

155,834 

80,407

24,057

39,576

19,755

4,302

14) Total Other Types of   TPs            
15) Total PA

155,834 

80,407

24,057

39,576

19,755

4,302

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

An evaluation of all SHIP components was undertaken in 2006-07.  The evaluation found that SHIP was consistent with federal government priorities and with TC's strategic outcomes and priorities,  that there was an ongoing need/demand for infrastructure funding provided by SHIP and that there was a necessary role for the federal government in the SHIP program.  The evaluation found indications that the SHIP program is contributing to improvement of the national highway system, but could not determine the extent of the contribution.  It was too early in the program to determine the extent to which the program had contributed to improved trade and economic development and a reduction in GHG emissions.  While generally the program was efficient and cost-effective, the evaluation found that there was potential for overlap between SHIP and other infrastructure programs and also made recommendations to improve performance measurement.  The results of the evaluation may be found at the following site: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/menu.htm

18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

Transport Canada (TC) did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2007-08.  TC will determine whether an internal audit will be conducted, based on its risk-based audit planning process.  Copies of audit reports approved by the department’s Audit and Review Committee may be found at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/menu.htm



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Outaouais Road Development Agreement
2) Start Date: January 7, 1972 3) End Date: No sunset clause
4) Description: Contributions to the Province of Quebec related to the Outaouais Roads Agreement toward highway improvements are made to enhance overall efficiency and promote safety while encouraging regional and industrial development and tourism.
5) Strategic Outcomes: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada’s economic growth and trade objectives.
6) Results Achieved: Construction has started on the extension of Highway 5 that prolongs the divided highway (Phase 1); studies are underway to assessment further extension of this highway (Phase 2 and 3).  The McConnell-Laramée project in Gatineau is now complete with the opening of the Boulevard des Allumetières.  Both of these projects are contributing to enhance the safety and the efficiency of the Outaouais road network.
  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA)  Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

14,344 

14,596

18,232

18,999

18,998

(766)

14) Total Other Types of   TPs            
15) Total PA

14,344 

14,596

18,232

18,999

18,998

(766)

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):  The Outaouais Road Agreement is a cost sharing agreement between the federal government and the province of Quebec where the federal government funds up to 50% of eligible costs on infrastructure projects covered under this agreement.  There is no funding ceiling to this agreement; therefore, it is possible that actual expenditures can exceed planned expenditures.  TC ensures that the expenditures cover only eligible costs as well as only up to 50% of the total costs.
 
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

The evaluation, completed in 2005, found that the Outaouais Road Agreement (ORA) projects completed to date are only indirectly aligned with TC’s mandate for the national transportation system and that the ORA objectives are more closely aligned with the National Capital Commission’s mandate.  Although TC has the expertise to manage ORA projects, the evaluation found that its continued role as program manager is not the best fit, as the ORA program is not well aligned with TC’s mandate.  However, the ORA program has contributed to an improvement in the road system in the Outaouais if one accepts the assumption that project completion results in improvements.  It should be noted that concerns regarding the departmental mandate have been addressed through the creation of a Transport, Infrastructure and Communities Portfolio which brings under one Minister all infrastructure programs and the National Capital Commission.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/2005/ora/menu.htm

18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

Transport Canada (TC) did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2007-08.  TC will determine whether an internal audit will be conducted, based on its risk-based audit planning process.  Copies of audit reports approved by the department’s Audit and Review Committee may be found at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/menu.htm



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Airports Capital Assistance Program
2) Start Date: April 1, 1995 3) End Date: March 31, 2010
4) Description: Airports Capital Assistance Program (ACAP) assists eligible applicants in financing capital projects related to safety, asset protection and operating cost reduction. 
5) Strategic Outcomes:  An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada’s economic growth and trade objectives.
6) Results Achieved: In 2007-08, ACAP has assisted 31 airports by financing 33 projects, all of which contributed to airside-safety.  Announcements under the program totalled over $43.5 million.
  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

35,400 

36,277

38,000

38,000

32,306

5,694

14) Total Other Types of   TPs            
15) Total PA

35,400 

36,277

38,000

38,000

32,306

5,694


16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): The current ACAP funding envelope is $190M over five years (April 2005 to March 2010), an average of $38M per year. As large year-to-year variances are not uncommon in major capital programs, TC sought and obtained TB’s approval to have a program ceiling of $190M over five fiscal years rather than an annual ceiling of $38M.  This has given the department more flexibility to maximize the funding available for the program, i.e. the department can reprofile funds to future years.  As an example, in 2007-08, delays in fire truck acquisition projects resulted in G&C lapses; however, the funds were reprofiled to 2008-09 to match delivery of these pieces of safety equipment.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

The evaluation in 2004 found that ACAP is in line with the current objectives of TC and of the Government of Canada, that most airports are not able to self-finance projects funded by ACAP and that there are no other sources of funding available for these projects. Also, ACAP met its objectives as it contributes to safety, asset protection and reduction of operating costs at funded airports. ACAP also contributes to the maintenance of a feeder airport system. The applicant and project eligibility criteria were appropriate. Some improvements to decision-making processes, particularly with respect to timeliness, are warranted. 

Another evaluation of the program began in the spring of 2008 and should be completed in 2009.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/2004/acap/menu.htm  


18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

Transport Canada (TC) did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2007-08.  Audits of selected projects were conducted in 2006-07.  Copies of audit reports approved by the department’s Audit and Review Committee may be found at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/menu.htm



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contribution Program for operating, capital and start-up funding requirement for Regional and Remote Passenger Rail Services
2) Start Date: June 1, 2004 3) End Date: March 31, 2010
4) Description: Provide operating funding for the regional and remote passenger rail services not provided by VIA Rail, for capital and start-up costs for regional and remote passenger rail services, and to address potential costs of transferring regional services. 
5) Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada’s economic growth and trade objectives.
6) Results Achieved: Continuation of safe, reliable and sustainable services.  Two new First Nations railways were created and took-over the services in their area.
  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

25,292 

13,080

8,100

12,670

12,437

(4,337)

14) Total Other Types of   TPs            
15) Total PA

25,292 

13,080

8,100

12,670

12,437

(4,337)


16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance is a result of timing differences between the project approval and the inclusion of the funding in Annual Reference Level Update and Supplementary Estimates.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

The evaluation, completed in 2004, found that the services provided by the Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway and the Algoma Central Railway funded by this program meet the remote access justification as a rationale for federal government financial contributions.  However, the Ontario Northland Transportation Commission service does not.  The evaluation also found that all three services have good safety records and passengers are generally satisfied with the services provided.


18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

Transport Canada completed an audit of this contribution program in 2003.   The report can be found at the following link: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2003/1577-03-007/menu.htm



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Northumberland Strait Crossing subsidy payment (Statutory)
2) Start Date: April 1, 1997 3) End Date: April 1, 2032
4) Description: Subsidy payments are made to bridge operator to honour constitutional obligations to provide a transportation link between Prince Edward Island and the mainland.
5) Strategic Outcomes: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada’s economic growth and trade objectives.
6) Results Achieved: Subsidy payments have been made to the bridge operator and an efficient year-round transportation service was offered.
  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual -Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12)
Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions            
14) Total Other Types of   TPs (Statutory)

52,790 

54,265

55,276

54,897

54,897

379

15) Total PA

52,790 

54,265

55,276

54,897

54,897

379


16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): Nil.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

Evaluation not required.


18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

In 2007-08, TC conducted a follow-up internal audit, from audit carried out in 2001, of TC’s responsibilities governing the operations of the operation of the Bridge by the Northumberland Strait Crossing.  Overall, TC has effectively discharged its responsibilities as federal custodian of the Confederation Bridge and complied with the financial conditions surrounding the payment of the annual subsidy to Northumberland Strait Crossing and the approval of the toll rates and the toll structure.  Copies of the audit reports approved by the department’s Audit Review Committee may be found at:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/menu.htm



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Urban Transportation Showcase Program (UTSP)
2) Start Date: June 21, 2001 3) End Date: March 31, 2009
4) Description: To test and measure the impacts of strategies to reduce urban Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from urban passenger transportation, so as to lay a foundation for the adoption of effective, integrated GHG reduction strategies in urban centres across Canada.
5) Strategic Outcomes: An environmentally responsible transportation system that contributes to Canada’s sustainable development objectives.
6) Results Achieved:

Implemented showcase demonstration in 8 municipalities across Canada.  As of the end of 2007/08, there were three showcase municipalities that have finished their projects (Halifax, Greater Toronto and Hamilton and Whitehorse) and four projects that are ongoing (Region of Waterloo, Vancouver, Winnipeg and Gatineau-Montreal).  Completed showcase municipalities report that projects are reaching their objectives to change travel behaviour, foster replication, and innovate in the delivering of urban transportation infrastructure and services.  All proponents cite the presence of the program as a critical factor in implementing the projects.  The program’s Information Network supports various learning events that focus on case studies and best practices from Canadian projects and initiatives:

  • Developed 12 case studies and issue papers that highlight sustainable transportation practices and issues;
  • Supported two awards programs: The Transportation Association of Canada's Sustainable Urban Transportation Award and The Federation of Canadian Municipalities' Sustainable Transportation Award;
  • Sponsored the first national Transportation Demand Management Summit by the Association for Commuter Transportation of Canada.

Over eleven hundred stakeholders attended the sessions & workshops supported by the UTSP, which foster knowledge sharing and professional development.  The Information Network has established a comprehensive network for the dissemination of information on successful GHG reduction stretegies, including tools and resources for practioners and decision-makers, such as the Urban Transportation Emissions Calculator. 

For further information on the program including the most recent Annual Review please visit:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/utsp/

  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies and Programs in support of sustainable transportation
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

6,986 

3,841

9,712

9,712

6,687

3,025

14) Total Other Types of  TPs            
15) Total PA

6,986 

3,841

9,712

9,712

6,687

3,025

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Due to various project and construction delays, total planned spending as forecasted in 2007-08 was not attained.


17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

An evaluation of this program is scheduled for 2008-09.


18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

Transport Canada (TC) did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2007-08.  TC will determine whether an internal audit will be conducted, based on its risk-based audit planning process.  Copies of audit reports approved by the department’s Audit and Review Committee may be found at:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/menu.htm



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payment to the Canadian Wheat Board for the acquisition and leasing of hopper cars for the transportation of grain in Western Canada
2) Start Date: March 1981 3) End Date: July 2006
4) Description: Reimburse Canadian Wheat Board for leasing of hopper cars for transfer of Canadian grain to export position.
5) Strategic Outcome: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada’s economic growth and trade objectives.
6) Results Achieved: The Canadian Wheat Board leased cars have been in continuous use transporting western Canadian grain from the Prairies to points of export and to Board customers in Canada.
  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework 
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

12,309

12,007 

-

1,189

1,132

(1,132)

14) Total Other Types of   TPs            
15) Total PA

12,309

12,007

-

1,189

1,132

(1,132)


16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): Actual spending is less than planned spending due to alternative use revenue for rail cars, favourable exchange rates for lease payments made in U.S. dollars, and the sunsetting of one of the leases.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

The evaluation in 2005 found that the program aligned with federal priorities of regional disparity, increasing trade and promotion of social and economic development.  With the removal of the Crow Rate, the federal government role is no longer necessary.  The federal role was necessary when a shortfall in railway capacity to transport grain existed and was expected to increase, as neither the provinces nor the railways could meet demand for investment in the grain transportation system.  It found that the cars ensured the railways could meet commitments to transport grain and the grain shippers could meet peak sales requirements.  The cars increased grain-shipping efficiency and likely contributed to increased sales to overseas markets.  The evaluation also found that the lease of the 2,000 hopper cars was not the most cost-effective option available to the department and the Government of Canada chose this option despite alternate advice.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/2006/hoppercars/menu.htm

18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):
Transport Canada completed audits of the Payment to the Canadian Wheat Board for the acquisition and leasing of hopper cars for the transportation of grain in Western Canada in 2001, 2003 and 2006.

<http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2001/1577-01-005c/menu.htm>



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Port Divestiture Fund
2) Start Date: April 1 st, 1996 3) End Date: March 31 st, 2012
4) Description: Facilitate the divestiture process by providing a new owner with the resources to take over the port.
5) Strategic Outcomes: An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada’s economic growth and trade objectives.
6) Results Achieved: In the period of April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008, Transport Canada divested 3 ports.  Port divestiture negotiations with local interests are ongoing.
  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework 
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

58,665 

513 

0

34,500

16,004

(16,004)

14) Total Other Types of   TPs            
15) Total PA

58,665 

513 

0

34,500

16,004

(16,004)


16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): Divestitures were slower than expected in 2007-2008.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

An evaluation of the Port Divestiture Program was completed in October of 2007. The evaluation found that the program is aligned with federal government and departmental policies and priorities. It also found that it is unlikely that 100% divestiture of regional/local ports will occur. Finally, the report mentioned that there was a lack of data for evaluation, and that in order for future evaluations to occur, this gap of information would have to be bridged. It also recommended that the Guidelines and Directives for Port Divestiturebe revised.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/2007/port/menu.htm


18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

An internal audit will be performed in the coming year.  Copies of audit reports approved by the department’s Audit and Review Committee may be found at:

http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/menu.htm



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transit Secure (formerly Passenger Rail and Urban Transit Security Contribution Program)
2) Start Date: June 22, 2006 3) End Date: March 31, 2009
4) Description: The Program is designed to enhance the security of Canada’s passenger rail and urban transit system by providing incentives to operators of passenger rail and urban transit services to implement new and enhanced security measures rapidly.
5) Strategic Outcomes:A safe and secure transportation system that contributes to Canada’s social development and security objectives.
6) Results Achieved:
  • Passenger Rail and urban transit security in Canada is enhanced with respect to prevention, detection, response and recovery from terrorist attacks;
  • Operators take up guidelines, technical advice and best practices for security enhancements as made available through the program; and
  • Public confidence in the passenger rail and urban transit sector is increased
  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

-

-

67,400

67,400

8,077

59,323

14) Total Other Types of   TPs            
15) Total PA

-

-

67,400

67,400

8,077

59,323


16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):  The program has reprofiled funds in each of the last two fiscal years (the first two of its existence). The internal organization was not fully operational for the first year of the program due to staffing delays and turnover. In addition, the negotiation of contribution agreements proved more time-consuming than anticipated. For example some operators were required to seek provincial endorsement or approval of funding before proceeding, thereby adding to the time required to negotiate agreements, Finally, program recipients had very little time to get projects operational and were stretched between applying to the program and project implementation.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): No evaluation is planned.

18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):  An audit of the Rail and Urban Transit Security Contribution Program will commence in 2008-09.   Copies of audit reports approved by the department’s Audit and Review Committee may be found at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/menu.htm


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund
2) Start Date: October 19, 2006 3) End Date: March 31, 2014
4) Description: Contributions to assist in the establishment of the best integrated multimodal transportation network facilitating global supply chains between Asia and North America. Contributions will target transportation infrastructure investments to address near term capacity problems and build strategically for the future
5) Strategic Outcomes:An efficient transportation system that contributes to Canada’s economic growth and trade objectives.
6) Results Achieved: Project work started on the Pitt River Bridge and Mary Hill Bypass in British Columbia in 2006-07, and in 2007-08 construction commenced on the Simon Fraser Bridge in Prince George and the Rail-Road Grade Separation in Smithers, B.C.  South Fraser Perimeter Road, Delta Port Connector projects commenced multi-year environmental assessments and the Robert Banks Rail Corridor undertook an analysis and established a management board.  Once these projects are completed, the expected result will be to improve the transportation corridors by enhancing safety and security measures; reducing congestion and facilitating the transportation of goods and people.
  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework
14) Total Grants            
14) Total Contributions

-

8,400

43,800

43,800

40,403

3,397

14) Total Other Types of   TPs            
15) Total PA

-

8,400

43,800

43,800

40,403

3,397

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s):

An evaluation is planned for 2010-11.


18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

TC did not conduct an internal audit of this contribution program in 2007-08.  TC will determine whether an internal audit will be conducted, based on its risk-based audit planning process.  Copies of audit reports approved by the department’s Audit and Review Committee may be found at: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/menu.htm



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program:  ecoTRANSPORT Strategy
2) Start Date: March 29, 2007 3) End Date:  March 31, 2011
4) Description: The ecoTRANSPORT Strategy involves a series of initiatives designed to reduce the amount of fuel consumed, improve transportation efficiency and introduce cleaner transportation technologies.  Launched as part of the Government’s Environmental Agenda, this strategy features the ecoMOBILITY program; the ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles Program and the ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles Program; and the ecoFREIGHT program.  The ecoAUTO Rebate Program was introduced separately but is complementary to the programs for personal vehicles. 
  • The ecoMOBILITY program is a $10 million initiative that seeks to work with municipalities to help cut urban-passenger transportation emissions by encouraging commuters to choose public transit or other sustainable transportation options. Working with cities across Canada, this initiative will help develop programs, services and products that improve sustainable transportation options in urban areas.
  • The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles Program includes in-depth testing and showcasing of advanced technologies vehicles in order to raise awareness and foster important new partnerships with the automotive industry and encourage the introduction of a broader range of environmental technologies in Canada.  The ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles Program, delivered by NRCan will provide fuel consumption information and decision-making tools to encourage consumers to purchase fuel-efficient vehicles that are currently available in the market.  Together these two programs have a combined funding of $36 million.
  • The ecoFREIGHT program, with $61 million in funding, features new steps to reduce the environmental and health effects of freight transportation through technology and will be delivered by Transport Canada and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). These steps include addressing regulatory barriers, reducing fuel use and emissions, establishing a Freight Technology Demonstration Fund, providing cost-shared funding for the purchase and installation of proven technologies, building industry partnerships, and supporting up to four pilot projects to demonstrate the installation and use of shore-based power for marine vessels in Canadian ports.
  • The ecoAUTO Rebate Program, announced in Budget 2007 as a two-year initiative of $160M and receiving additional funding for a total of $262.7, is a program to provide performance-based rebates to consumers who purchase fuel-efficient vehicles. It requires eligible vehicles to meet a performance standard or fuel consumption rating.  This is intended as an interim measure to increase consumer purchases of more efficient advanced technology vehicles before the new fuel-efficiency standards take effect with model year 2011.
5) Strategic Outcomes: An environmentally responsible transportation system that contributes to Canada’s sustainable development objectives.
6) Results Achieved:
  • ecoAUTO:  For 6 months of operations in 2007-2008 (October 1 to March 31), over 75,000 applications were received, 66,000 applications were processed and over $71M in rebate payments was disbursed to 61,000 Canadians who purchased fuel-efficient vehicles.  Positive effects can also be seen in the automobile industry, as some manufactures have redesigned their most recent model year vehicles to improve fuel efficiency to meet the fuel consumption thresholds of ecoAUTO.  This has resulted in an increase from 21 to 32 vehicles configurations available in Canada, which qualify under the Program.
  • ecoTechnology for vehicles:  In 2007-08, the eTV program began the procurement process to acquire the next generation of vehicles and technologies for testing and evaluation.  Efforts also focussed on establishing a solid strategic approach to evaluating promising environmental technologies and enhancing program knowledge of cutting-edge technological developments.The eTV technical team completed a global environmental scan of all emerging technologies and developed protocols for testing and evaluation. The outcome of these activities was a comprehensive strategic plan for the eTV program to acquire, test, evaluate and report on an array of advanced technologies over the coming year.   In addition, the program published a series of informative technical articles for the eTV website. Over 3,000 visitors per month accessed the eTV website in 2007-08.  The program showcased vehicles and technologies at over 22 events across the country, ranging from major Canadian international auto shows (in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver) to consumer lifestyle or environmental shows, providing over 25,000 Canadians with information on advanced environmental technology for vehicles.
  • ecoMobility:  In 2007-08, the contribution program for ecoMOBILITY was designed and launched.  Consultations with key stakeholder groups on program implementation were concluded and the Applicant’s Guide for the contribution program was prepared.  In February 2008, a request for proposals (RFP) was issued by Transport Canada for transportation demand management projects.
  • ecoFREIGHT:  Two of the ecoFREIGHT programs (Freight Technology Demonstration Fund and the Freight Technology Incentives Program) were successfully launched in 2007-08 with their first funding rounds resulting in 23 total projects being selected under both programs.  The funding will support the demonstration and testing of technologies that have the potential to reduce emissions as well as the cost-shared installation of proven technologies that reduce emissions.
  ($ thousands) 7) Actual Spending 2005-06 8) Actual Spending
2006–07
9) Planned Spending 2007–08 10) Total Authorities
2007–08
11) Actual Spending
2007–08
12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Program Activity (PA) Policies and Programs in support of sustainable transportation
14) Total Grants

-

146,900 

71,342 

(71,342) 

14) Total Contributions            
14) Total Other Types of   TPs            
15) Total PA

-

146,900 

71,342 

(71,342) 

16) Comment(s) on Variance(s): After several months of Program implementation and an analysis of more current production information from manufacturers, Transport Canada (TC) requested that $74.9 million in Grants be re-profiled from 2007-08 to 2008-09.
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): An evaluation is planned for 2009-10.
18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

TC will determine whether an internal audit will be conducted, based on its risk-based audit planning process.  Copies of audit reports approved by the department’s Audit and Review Committee may be found at:  http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/menu.htm




Table 11-A: Horizontal Initiatives


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative

Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative

2. Name of Lead Department(s)

Transport Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity

Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative

October 19, 2006

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative

March 31, 2014

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)

$1,001,000,000

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

The Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative (APGCI) aims to strengthen Canada’s competitive position in global commerce. It is an integrated package of investment and policy measures that will advance the capacity and efficiency of the Asia‑Pacific Gateway and Corridor and Canada’s ability to take advantage of it.  It reflects the Government of Canada’s undertaking to work in partnership with provincial governments, private sector leaders and other stakeholders to further develop and exploit the Gateway. The Initiative seeks to establish Canada’s Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor as the best transportation network facilitating global supply chains between North America and Asia, and received additional funding through Budget 2007, bringing total federal commitment to over $1 billion.  

8. Shared Outcome(s)

The following are planned shared outcomes and activities for the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative.

Key areas include: 

  • Gateway’s capacity – strategic infrastructure investments and network improvements.
  • Competitiveness – increase Canada’s share of Asia-Pacific commerce.
  • Efficiency and reliability – improve goods movement throughout the supply chains
  • Security and border efficiency – advance a secure and efficient transportation network between Asia-Pacific region and Canada/North America.
  • 21st century governance & policy renewal – integrative policy frameworks and regulations that better support competitiveness.

Ultimate Outcome:

  • Boost Canada’s commerce with Asia-Pacific region.
  • Increase the Gateway’s share of North American bound container imports from Asia.
  • Improve the efficiency and reliability of the Gateway for Canadian and North American exports.
9. Governance Structure(s)

Two Ministers are jointly responsible for the APGCI.  The Minister for the Pacific Gateway is the political lead, with support in this effort provided by Transport Canada.  As of June 2008, a Secretary of State has been appointed with responsibility for Asia‑Pacific Gateway. The Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities is accountable for the management of the Asia‑Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund.

The APGCI is a horizontal initiative and its development and implementation involves a number of other key federal departments/agencies.  An overall Horizontal Performance Framework was provided to the Treasury Board Secretariat as part of the 2006 APGCI Treasury Board submission, and will be amended to include the components of the APGCI Non‑infrastructure Competitiveness Funds. The Horizontal Performance Framework was prepared in collaboration with all the departments /agencies involved in the APGCI. The Framework has been put in place to provide a sound, coordinated and ongoing performance measurement and evaluation strategy to assess the overall process in implementing the initiative.

While each is ultimately accountable for its own programs/activities and associated resources from the APGCI funding, the implicated federal departments/agencies are also responsible for contributing to the overarching objectives of the APGCI.  All federal partners in this initiative are accountable for the day-to-day management of their respective component of the APGCI.  Furthermore, each department/agency is expected to provide regular updates to the Secretary of State and to the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, via the DG-level Interdepartmental Steering Committee on the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative, which is chaired by Transport Canada.  Partner departments and their role in the Initiative are as follow:

TRANSPORT CANADA

Transport Canada (TC), as the lead department, reports to the Secretary of State and to the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.  TC’s Pacific Gateway Coordination Branch (ACKD) is responsible for the on-going coordination, management, integration, and strategic development and implementation of the Initiative overall.  TC is the chair for the internal steering group as well as for the Interdepartmental Steering Committee on the APGCI, with the ACKD branch as the secretariat for both.  Other federal departments and agencies, the four western provinces, and stakeholders from the private sector are consulted and involved in building consensus on issues related to the Initiative.

TC is responsible for the development and implementation of the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Transportation Infrastructure Fund (TIF), whose primary objective is to address capacity challenges facing the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor.  The projects funded under TIF will enhance the competitiveness, efficiency and capacity of Canada’s multi-modal transportation network and will be focused specifically on the movement of international commerce between the Asia-Pacific region and North America.

While transportation infrastructure is at the core, the Initiative also focuses on interconnected issues that impact on the further development and exploitation of the Asia‑Pacific Gateway and Corridor.  A number of non‑infrastructure/competitiveness measures announced at the October 2006 launch of the initiative have been completed or are ongoing, including:

  • The May 2007 International Conference on Gateways and Corridors to advance understanding of the long-term challenges and opportunities of the gateway by tapping into Canadian and international academic expertise;
  • Amalgamation of the three major ports in British Columbia Lower Mainland as part of efforts to foster new approaches to governance;
  • Establishment of the Lower Mainland Trucking Forum to reach recommendations, on a consensus basis, on methods for improving the efficiency of trucking operations at Vancouver ports; and
  • Studies directly related to the Gateway operations and efficiency, to better understand and improve the multi-modal infrastructure network and increase the productivity of the full supply chain.

As approved by Cabinet in December 2007, TC will also be focusing on non-infrastructure measures under the following thematic categories:  A Smarter Gateway and Corridor (including system analysis and performance measurement, expert outreach, international partnerships) and Pro-active Public Engagement.  A third non-infrastructure theme is Skills and Labour Pressures, for which Human Resources and Social Development Canada will be establishing the APGC Skills Table.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE

Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade(DFAIT) Pacific Gateway and 2010 Winter Olympic Games Co-ordinating Group is responsible for the ongoing development and implementation of an international marketing strategy in co‑ordination with all stakeholders.  The objective is to promote greater use of the Gateway as Asia-Pacific travel and supply chain route of choice for North American and Asia-Pacific importers, exporters, investors and transportation companies.

This strategy, developed in consultation with stakeholders, include targeted communication products, outgoing and incoming missions and showcase the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor’s advantages at key trade, investment and technology shows, conferences and seminars in Canada, Asia-Pacific, Europe and North America. 

Key DFAIT missions abroad are actively engaged in advancing Canada as the gateway and corridor of choice through dialogue with transportation companies, producers, exporters and/or importers in each of their respective regions to showcase the strengths of the Canadian transportation network, encouraging investment and technology transfer, playing an advocacy role on key APGCI issues such as security and border efficiency, providing intelligence back to Canada to support policy development and help determine what messages resonate in their markets.

DFAIT has established a core group of Trade Commissioners from Asia-Pacific, North American and European missions who have been provided with orientation sessions to ensure their understanding of the gateway and the opportunities it presents for Canada's economy and are, thereby, able to support the government's objective of establishing Canada as the gateway and corridor of choice between North America and Asia-Pacific. 

CANADA BORDER SERVICES AGENCY

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) is responsible for the implementation of a marine container inspection operation located at the Port of Prince Rupert, which became operational in Fall 2007.  The marine container inspection operation allows CBSA to develop operations to ensure containers arriving from other countries are properly inspected by means of effective processes and state of the art technology.  

CBSA’s marine container inspection operation plays a vital and strategic role, integrated within the overall Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative.

PARKS CANADA AGENCY

Parks Canada is responsible for the maintenance and recapitalization of highways that pass through national parks, including the Trans Canada Highway (TCH).  The TCH is a major pan-Canadian highway that connects the west coast and its Asia-Pacific linkages to the rest of Canada, especially markets in the western provinces.

Parks Canada is completing process of four-laning (twinning) a 10 km section of the congested TCH through the Banff National Park of Canada that will result in improved capacity and efficiency.  The funding provided by the APGCI has contributed to the timely completion of this section of highway upgrading and hence supports the initiative’s objective of improving the movement of goods through the Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor.

WESTERN ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION

The Western Economic Diversification (WD) is responsible for two elements of the APGCI; a business opportunities and awareness‑raising initiative entitled “Seizing the Gateway Opportunity:  Western Canada and the Asia Pacific Challenge”, and funding dredging work on the Fraser River to maintain a competitive shipping channel. 

As part of “Seizing the Gateway Opportunity”, WD is consulting with provincial governments, business and other stakeholders and sponsoring research on the impacts, challenges and opportunities of Asia-Pacific commerce on Western Canada in areas such as business practices and labour.

To support the APGCI, WD has undertaken a range of activities such as workshops, studies and partnerships to explore topics such as Asian market opportunities by industry sector and an assessment of the needs of western small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) looking to effectively compete against Asian firms.

WD has provided a $4 million grant over two years to the Fraser River Port Authority to support dredging activities on the Fraser River shipping channel.  This funding provided the Fraser River Port Authority with the capacity to maintain its existing business and position itself to attract new business, thereby taking advantage of the Asia‑Pacific Gateway opportunities.  This one‑time only measure will enable the port to accommodate the increasingly large shipping vessels, until a long-term solution is developed that would provide for self-sustaining access to port facilities. 



10.
Federal Partners
11.
Federal Partner Program Activity
12.
Names of Programs for Federal Partners
13.
Total Allocation (from start to end date)
14.
Planned Spending for 2007-2008
15.
Actual Spending for 2007-2008
16.
Expected Results for 2007-2008
17.
Results Achieved in 2007-2008
1 Transport Canada Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs Surface Infrastructure Programs $477,500 $4,400 $4,070
  • Announce infrastructure projects.
  • Negotiations with provinces and private sector.
  • Draw contribution agreements
  • Environmental assessments.
  • Infrastructure projects were announced.
  • Work started on the Pitt River Bridge in BC.
  • Negotiations with provinces and private sector are underway.
  • Contribution agreements are signed.
  • Environmental assessments completed or ongoing.
Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs Strategic Transportation Policy $8,550 $2,300 $2,205
  • Coordination and Management of the APGCI
  • Consultation with private sector
  • Expert Roundtables
  • Coordination with participating departments and TC groups.
  • Management of the APGCI
  • Private sector consultation completed
  • Roundtables carried out as planned in the Prairie Provinces
Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system Security and Emergency Preparedness $250 $200 $9
  • Security Review
  • Strategic context for security review completed
Transportation Policy Development and Infrastructure Programs Strategic Transportation Policy $28,300 $500 $212
  • Explore amalgamation of the 3 BC Lower Mainland ports authorities.
  • Advance discussions at the Lower Mainland Trucking Forum
  • Phase 1 of the Empty Container Study.
  • BC Lower Mainland port integration procedure is ongoing.
  • Lower Mainland trucking forum is making progress.
  • Phase 1 of the empty Container study is completed
2. Foreign Affairs and international   Trade International Policy Advice and Integration Planning, Integration and Coordination on International Policy Issues. $7,000 $1,500 $1,050
  • Targeted communication products
  • Outgoing mission to Asia
  • Engage key missions in APGCI promotion
  • Focused marketing material provided to China
  • APGCI mission to Hong Kong, Beijing and Shanghai
  • Increased APGCI activities by key missions including Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and Hong Kong
  • Established a complement of 30 Trade Commissioners to be the APGCI advocates abroad
  • Increased APGCI related market intelligence from Missions
3. Canada Border Services Agency Security   $26,950 $13,260 $5,750
  • To hire and train new staff on marine environment requirements as well as for Targeting Intelligence, and Investigations work.
  • Ensure that the operation was ready and compulsory equipment was in place for the first container ship.
  • Staff was hired in the areas identified (marine, Targeting Intelligence, and Investigations).
  • Training requirements create a heavy demand on the operation.  Courses will be held to meet the demands of the various programs.
  • The operation and compulsory equipment were in place for the first container ship. 
  • The operation was able to work with the port to have temporary facilities to overcome the significant delays in facility construction.   
  • Vehicles Purchased
Access   $77 $96 $61    
Science & Technology-Based Innovation   $28 $1,080 $84
  • Purchase IT equipment as well as install and support the IT devices needed for this project.
  • MOU with CRA (for shared services)
  • Purchased IT equipment installed IT devices needed for this project.MOU with CRA (for shared services)
4. Parks Canada Agency Throughway Management   $37,000 $10,000 $10,000
  • Construct new Moraine Creek bridge for new eastbound lanes;
  • Crush aggregate for 07/08 & 08/09 program;
  • Clear 3 km of highway ROW;
  • Complete construction drawings and specs and tender 3 km of roadwork c/w associated wildlife overpass structure and westbound Moraine Creek Bridge
  • Eastbound Moraine Creek bridge constructed;
  • Aggregate quantity for 07/08 & 08/09 program 90% crushed;
  • 3 km of highway ROW cleared;
  • Construction drawings and specs completed and 3 km of roadwork c/w associated wildlife overpass structure and westbound Moraine Creek bridge tendered
  • Existing westbound bridge demolished for reconstruction 07/08
5. Western Economic Diversifi-
cation
Collaboration and Coordination   $400 $187 $187
  • Build awareness of Canada-Asia business opportunities current trade and cultural relationships between Canada and Asia through consultations forums and research
  • APGCI funding in the amount of $100,000 supported a WD project with the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada (APFC) for consultations and research.  APFC hosted consultation forums and a summit in major cities, engaging over 800 stakeholders across Canada.  APFC also produced three research papers and a set of case studies on Canada-Asia business opportunities.
Research and Analysis     $121 $121
  • Dredge the Fraser River shipping channel to support Fraser River port operations
  • Fraser River Port Authority undertook the required dredging work
Business Development & Entrepreneurship; Program Market/Trade Development $4,400 $2,000 2,025
18. Comments on Variances :

The lapse was a result of funding being received late in the fiscal year, a need to reduce one of our key initiatives by roughly 30% and missions abroad either absorbing the cost or by having sought the most cost effective way of participating in the orientation session. 

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)
20. Contact Information

Sarah Lauzon 990-9524


Table 11-B: Horizontal Initiatives


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative

Marine Security

2. Name of Lead Department(s)

Transport Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity

Marine Security

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative

Budget 2001

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative

Ongoing

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)

Not Applicable

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)

Marine Security is a horizontal initiative that is linked to the Government’s key priority of a safe and security Canada.  Its aim is to improve the security of Canada’s marine transportation system including territorial waters, inland waterways, and at Canadian ports and marine facilities.  Elements of this initiative include:

  • Increased domain awareness, surveillance and tracking of marine vessels;
  • Improved co-ordination and cooperation on marine security;
  • Security clearance program for marine sector employees;
  • Implementing new detection equipment in Canadian ports to monitor containers;
  • Additional resources for emergency and law enforcement response capacity in the marine environment; and,
  • International initiatives, which will ensure that Canada will meetcurrent international standards and obligations, including those being developed by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).
8. Shared Outcome(s)

The following are planned shared outcomes and activities in marine security.  Please note that for FY 08-09 the new Marine Security Horizontal Performance Framework will be in use by marine security partners.

Key areas include: 

  • Domain awareness – Increased surveillance and tracking of marine traffic;
  • Responsiveness – Additional resources for emergency and law enforcement response capacity to respond to potential public safety and national security threats in the marine environment.
  • Safeguarding – Includes clearance programs for marine sector employees working in restricted areas and new detection equipment in Canadian ports to monitor containers; and,
  • Collaboration – Improved coordination and consultation on marine security.

Ultimate Outcome:

  • To improve marine security at Canadian ports, inland waterways and territorial waters.
9. Governance Structure(s)

The Government of Canada created the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group (IMSWG), chaired by Transport Canada, to identify and coordinate federal government actions in support of Canada’s objectives concerning public security and anti-terrorism in the marine realm, as well as its international marine security obligations.  Under the guidance of the IMSWG, key departments are responsible for the following:

TRANSPORT CANADA

Leads the Government’s initiatives in marine security enhancements, including:

  • Policy coordination;
  • Chairing the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group (IMSWG);
  • Regulatory development in support of marine security initiatives;
  • Marine Security Oversight and Enforcement Program;
  • Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program;
  • Marine Security Contribution Program; and,
  • Participates in the Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOCs).

DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES AND OCEANS/CANADIAN COAST GUARD

DFO/CCG contributes to the enhancement of domain awareness within the Canadian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) through surveillance activities and vessel identification and tracking capabilities. DFO/CCG has increased its airborne surveillance activities, implemented shore-based Automatic Identification System (AIS) infrastructure, and is leading the development of Canada’s Long-Range Vessel Identification and Tracking (LRIT) capability.

In addition, DFO/CCG provides on-water assets and expertise to assist in responding to security incidents in the marine environment, and has increased its level of on-water capacity for this purpose.

DFO/CCG also participates in the Marine Security Operations Centres(MSOCs), contributing departmental data and expertise to enhance domain awareness, and improve coordination and consultation within the marine security community.

PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS CANADA

The mandate of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC) is to keep Canadians safe from a range of risks such as natural disasters, crime and terrorism.  To do this, the Department coordinates and supports the efforts of federal organizations ensuring national security and the safety of Canadians.  PSEPC also works with other levels of government, first responders, community groups, the private sector and other countries.

As Canada's lead department for public safety, PSEPC works with five agencies, including the RCMP and CBSA, and three review bodies.  They are united in a single portfolio and report to the same minister.  The result is better integration among federal organizations dealing with national security, emergency management, law enforcement, corrections, crime prevention and border services/enforcement.

CANADA BORDER SERVICES AGENCY

CBSA’s mandate is to manage the country’s borders at ports of entry by administering and enforcing the domestic laws that govern trade and travel, as well as international agreements and conventions.  The work of the CBSA includes identifying and interdicting high-risk individuals and goods, working with law enforcement agencies to maintain border integrity, and engaging in enforcement activities, including seizure of goods, arrests, detentions, investigations, hearings and removals.  Participates in the MSOCs.

ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE

The RCMP is responsible for enforcing federal statutes, leading national security and organized crime investigations across Canada, both on land and water, and for maintaining border integrity between ports of entry.    Leads the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway MSOC and participates in the coastal MSOC.

DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE

Contributes to enhance domain awareness of Canada’s strategic coastal area.  Leads the MSOC on the coasts and participates in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway MSOC.


Transport Canada


10.
Federal Partners
11.
Federal Partner Program Activity
12.
Names of Programs for Federal Partners
13.
Total Alloca-
tion (from start to end date)
14.
Planned Spen-
ding for 2007-2008
15.
Actual Spen-
ding for 2007-2008
16.
Expected Results for 2007-2008
17.
Results Achieved in 2007-2008
1. Transport Canada B91 – Security of Marine Transportation Systems a.  Marine Security Coordination Fund N/A $2,220,127 $3,473,868
  • Collaboration
Four new Coordination Fund projects were approved in FY 07-08.  The Fund is now fully subscribed until FY 09-10.
B91 – Security of Marine Transportation Systems b. Marine Security Regulatory Oversight Program N/A $10,830,060 $11,749,312
  • Domain awareness
  • Responsiveness
  • Safeguarding
  • Collaboration
Marine Security Operations has been active across the regions of Canada, carrying out various activities, including standard setting, inspection and compliance, Marine Security awareness, education, training and support activities. Continued to carry port/facility/vessel assessment plans and reviews against the International Ship and Port Facility Security/Marine Transportation Security Regulations (ISPS/MTSR)

Continued to work with Department of National Defense and other core partners in establishing coastal Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOCs) both in Halifax and Victoria, and continued the development of the centers to carry out Transport Canada mandate.

Conducted and developed various industry/stakeholder awareness presentations, publications and products.

Completed an Inspection & Enforcement training program for inspectors

B91 – Security of Marine Transportation Systems c.  Marine Security Enhanced Policy Coordination N/A $1,037,087 $1,107,215
  • Domain awareness
  • Responsiveness
  • Safeguarding
  • Collaboration
TC will be developing a survey for stakeholders to determine results achieved.
B91 – Security of Marine Transportation Systems d.  Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program N/A $1,889,747 $2,681,311
  • Safeguarding
9,454 security clearances for Phase I

253 compliance certificates

Continued consultations with affected stakeholders.

Completed Phase 1 (SL-GL Seaway, Vancouver, Montreal and Halifax).

Continued collaboration with the U.S. as they move forward their program.

B91 – Security of Marine Transportation Systems e. Marine Security Contribution Program N/A $31,102,653 $32,208,420
  • Responsiveness
  • Safeguarding
  • Collaboration
Transport Canada  continued to provide financial contributions for the implementation of a number of security enhancements (212 newly approved projects at $19.9 M)

Transport Canada Regional Inspectors continued to conduct follow-up inspections to verify that funded projects were completed according to submissions.

B91 – Security of Marine Transportation Systems g. Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre (GL MSOC) $1,500,000 $497,649 $472,607
  • Domain awareness
  • Collaboration
Continued participation in the Design Team led by RCMP for the implementation phase.
  Total  N/A Total $47,577,323 Total $51,692,733    
18. Comments on Variances :

Marine Security Coordination Fund: $2,674K reprofiled from FY 06/07, increasing funding available for redistribution to $4,674K, most of which ($3,130K) was spent by Transport Canada Marine Safety on a project approved by the IMSWG.

Regulatory Oversight: Variances are TC internal reallocation of approximately $900K to address the high priorities requirements such as Program Delivery and Tracking, Crisis Management, which are not adequately funded. 

Policy Coordination: Begun with only five FTEs, Marine Security had to risk manage a greater number of personnel to accommodate the increased workload to coordinate Canada's marine security policy efforts - both domestically and internationally - with further work continuously evolving.  Additional resources were also required to deliver such activities as the implementation of the ADM-level Marine Security Committee and the Marine Security Gaps Analysis, which explains the overall variance ($70K).

Marine Security Contribution Program: This program was supposed to begin sunsetting in FY 07/08 and began the FY with only three FTEs (plus related salary and other operating allocations).  TC had to reallocate $1M to support the management of this program, which had been extended for another two years in November 2006.  The additional resources were required to maintain the management and control tools already in place to track and deliver the contribution, and other exceptional activities such as the successful completion of the project files for 17 Canada Port Authorities that terminated November 30, 2007, disbursing over $22M to them in 2007-08.

Marine Transportation Security Clearance Program (MTSCP): The scope of the MTSCP changed in that originally the program was funded for 3 major ports, one implementation date, a simple model covering all employees at the ports and the program to be implemented over a 5-year period.  The decision was made to expand the program geographically and implement over 2 years as well as to have two very different regimes for container and cruise ship terminals.  This modification made the project much more complex and more sensitive, increasing the need for national consistency, thus requiring an HQ lead to provide the coordination and oversight for this complex implementation.  As a result, additional funding was required in this new complex program through internal TC reallocation of approximately $800K.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable) Not Applicable
20. Contact Information

Michel Tremblay
Marine Security Directorate
Transport Canada
(613) 949-6575
trembmg@tc.gc.ca


CBSA


10.
Federal Partners
11.
Federal Partner Program Activity
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from start to end date)
($000’s)
14. Planned Spen- ding for
2007-2008
($000’s)
15. Actual Spen- ding for 2007-2008
($000’s)
16. Expected Results for
2007-2008
17. Results Achieved in 2007-2008
a.         

Radiation Detection Equipment Initiative

b.

Passenger and Crew Screening Initiative

c.

Cruise Ship Inspections

Security 1 a.  Radiation Detection Equipment Initiative $31,670 $5,420 $5,420 Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities
Security 1 b. Passenger and Crew Screening Initiative $34,900 $7,224 $6,124 Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities
Security 1 c. Cruise Ship Inspections $2,350 $2,350 $2,350 Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities Increased security measures at ports and marine facilities
18. Comments on Variances:

Passenger and Crew Screening Initiative - Staff shortage during the busy May to October season. Insufficient resources in the targeting unit to conduct queries on all ships in some areas.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): Not Applicable
20. Contact Information:

David Sheehan
Senior Program Advisor
Canada Border Services Agency

Horizontal Initiatives and Enforcement Policy Management

191 Laurier Avenue West, 19th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada
K1A 0L8
Telephone: (613) 954-2271
Fax: (613) 952-2468


PSEPC


10.
Federal Partners
11.
Federal Partner Program Activity
12.
Names of Programs for Federal Partners
13.
Total Allocation (from start to end date)
14.
Planned Spending for 2007-2008
15.
Actual Spending for 2007-2008
16.
Expected Results for 2007-2008
17.
Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada PA 1 -
Emergency Management and National Security
Marine-Based Counter-terrorism Exercises (sometimes referred to as scenario based training) $200,000 (07/08)
Annual ongoing per TBS submission
$200,000 $85,541 To validate and provide feedback to IMSWG on Marine Security and Port Security through development and conduct of exercises and preparation of After Action Report. Marine Security Program is designed to demonstrate improved inter-agency coordination and cooperation through identification of gaps, strengths and weaknesses. Port Security-Consultation and project planning re: development of east coast port security exercise scheduled for fall 09 with key planning partners.

MSOC-Completion of Ardent Sentry 06 After action report-Significant consultation with MSOC Project team, MSOC project training and exercise officer and interdepartmental exercise representatives to bring exercise initiatives inline with project development activities.

PA 2 – Policing and Law Enforcement c. Interim Great Lakes /

St. Lawrence Seaway (GL‑SLS) Marine Security Operations Centre (MSOC)

$420,000

06/2005- 03/2008

$140,000 $167.600 Improve domain awareness in the GL-SLS region

Secure funding for a permanent facility

Improved domain awareness in the GL-SLS region by the interim facility

Funding for the permanent facility was received in Budget 2008

  Total $ Total $ Total $    
18. Comments on Variances:

PA1 – National Exercises Division (NED) undertook consultation with the MSOC Project Team responsible for development of East and West Coast MSOC facilities and related plans and procedures.  During the course of the discussions, the opportunity to participate in upcoming GC exercises was explored but the Project Team determined that it would be premature to participate in the development and conduct of another MS exercise pending modifications and implementation of training related to plans and procedures as identified during Exercises Ardent Sentry 06 and Frontier Sentinel.  NED continues to consult regularly with MSOC Project.  Additionally, the Port of Vancouver was previously committed to exercise participation with other organizations and could not embark on additional exercise activities.  Work was undertaken with key stakeholders within the Port of Halifax for development of a multi-jurisdictional, port securtiy exercise program.

PA2 - In order to achieve the objectives of the GL‑SLS-MSOC $27,000 was reallocated to the initiative at the Directorate level.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): Not Applicable

20. Contact Information:

Anita Dagenais
Director, Border Policy Division
Public Safety Canada
991-4245
anita.dagenais@ps.gc.ca


DFO / CCG


10.
Federal Partners
11.
Federal Partner Program Activity
12.
Names of Programs for Federal Partners
13.
Total Allocation (from start to end date)
14.
Planned Spending for 2007-2008  
15.
Actual Spending for 2007-2008
16.
Expected Results for 2007-2008
17.
Results Achieved in 2007-2008
1. Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canadian Coast Guard a. Additional Fleet Operations

(This is part of the Coast Guard Fleet Services Program Sub-Activity)

$10,000,000 (annually, ongoing) $10,000,000 $10,000,000  Increase number of operational shipdays beyond the baseline level of shipdays prior to the PSAT initiative.  Total number of CCG fleet shipdays increased beyond the baseline.
b. Automatic Identification System (AIS) & Long Range Vessel Identification and Tracking (LRIT)

(Part of the Marine Communications and Traffic Services Program Sub-Activity)

$1,500,000 $2,500,000 $1,449,057 Keep the initiative on-track. The capital project is scheduled for completion in 2009/10. The ongoing system is scheduled to be in place in 2010/11. Completed evaluation of seven compliant bids. Successful bidder selected and contract awarded.
c. Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre

(Part of the Maritime Security Program Sub-Activity)

$360,000 $360,000 $360,000  Identify permanent funding to replace expiring interim funding. Also, participate in design and development of a permanent GL-MSOC facility.   Budget 2008 provided funding to develop a permanent GL-MSOC. Performance measures are being developed.
  Fisheries and Aquaculture Management f. Enhanced Conservation & Protection Air Surveillance Flights

(Part of the Conservation and Protection Program Sub-Activity)

$7,000,000 (annually, ongoing) $7,000,000 $7,000,000 Increase number of aerial surveillance hours beyond the baseline number of hours from before the PSAT funding. Total number of aerial surveillance hours increased beyond the baseline.
  Total $23,287,300 Total $44,116,300 Total $26,604,957    
18. Comments on Variances
  1. Additional Fleet Operations: N/A
  2. AIS & LRIT:
  1. Variance between TB Sub and planned spending: International specifications and standards were approved much later than anticipated at the outset of the Project.
  2. Variance between planned and actual spending: Re-baselining of the project was required due to the amalgamation of Phases 1 and 2.
  1. Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Operations Centre: N/A
  2. Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Marine Security Enforcement Teams:
  1. Variance between planned and actual spending: Additional $570,000 was received from the RCMP. There were additional refit costs on the CCGS Isle Rouge and CCGS Louis M. Lauzier and additional vessel operating costs for the Lauzier, Cape Hurd and Simmonds.
  1. Acquisition of Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels
  1. Variance between TB Sub and planned spending: PWGSC cancelled the original RFP, causing a 6-9 month project delay and a revised Contract Award date of April, 2008. Because the contract was not awarded during FY 2007/08, the cash profile must be reduced from $19.829M to $4.2M. $15.629M will be re-profiled to 2011/12 to reflect the extended delivery dates and closeout of Phase 1 of the project.
  2. Variance between planned and actual spending: The MSPV project forecasted expenditures for travel, consultations, professional services and the hiring of new employees have been deferred to the new FY.
  1. Enhanced Conservation & Protection Air Surveillance Flights: N/A
19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): Not Applicable
20. Contact Information:

Mark A. Henry
Senior Policy Analyst
Maritime Security
Canadian Coast Guard
Tel: (613) 993-4076
Fax: (613) 998-3255
Mark.Henry@dfo-mpo.gc.ca


 

DND


10.
Federal Partners
11.
Federal Partner Program Activity
12.
Names of Programs for Federal Partners
13.
Total Allocation (from start to end date)
14.
Planned Spending for 2007-2008
15.
Actual Spending for 2007-2008
16.
Expected Results for 2007-2008
17.
Results Achieved in 2007-2008
1. DND PA 1 a. MSOC $165,000,000 $11,742,928 $6,760,886
  • Domain Awareness
  • Respon-siveness
  • Safeguarding
  • Collaboration
  • Domain Awareness
  • Responsi-veness
  • Safeguarding
  • Collaboration
PA 1 a. IMIC3 $10,000,00 + 7,000,000 recurring PO&M yearly $435,000 $210,978
  • Completion of Definition phase, issuing of RFP and start of Implementation phase
  • Definition phase delayed
  Total  $173,000,000 Total  $12,177,928 Total  $6,971,864    
18. Comments on Variances: It took longer then anticipated to develop substantive cost estimates and RFP documents.
19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): Not Applicable
20. Contact Information:

Lieutenant Commander Clark Patterson
DMPOR 5
Maritime Security
DND NDHQ
(613) 945-7941 patterson.ch2@forces.gc.ca


RCMP

 
10.
Federal Partners
11.
Federal Partner Program Activity
12.
Names of Programs for Federal Partners
13.
Total Allocation (from start to end date)
14.
Planned Spending for 2007-2008  
15.
Actual Spending for 2007-2008
16.
Expected Results for 2007-2008
17.
Results Achieved in 2007-2008
1. RCMP 1.3.5

The Marine Security Branch strategy is an integrated and strategic approach to prevent, deter and detect illegal activity, cargo or people who may pose a threat to the safety and security of the marine environment in Canada, the United States and the international community. The strategy focuses on reducing the capabilities and vulnerabilities of our marine systems and facilities, with respect to terrorism and organized crime.

National Port Enforcement Team (NPET) $ 7,038,000 $6,774,200 $4,815,600  -continue with intelligence gathering and enhancement of law enforcement coordination with partnering agencies   -increase enforcement activity within the port facility, directed at organized crime and  -the intelligence gathering activities of the NPET units have led to numerous contraband seizures, as well as investigations and arrests related to other criminal code offences   - there are currently several key investigations/projects underway related to National Security and Organized Crime activities  
Marine Security Enforcement Team (MSET) $ 5,860,000 $ 6,841,200 $ 4,721,200 -enhance intelligence-led on water presence through effective relationships with the boating community, and border integrity programs such as MSOC, NPET, IBET and  local police on the GL/SLS   -coordinate law enforcement deterrence with CCG and USCG on the GL/SLS  -a marine security training exercise was conducted in conjunction with MSOC and Niagara IBET to enhance Border Integrity Units effectiveness             -a Canadian American Shiprider Training course was delivered and subsequently permitted RCMP & USCG  (US Coast Guard)  to perform a joint operation  in patrolling  the joint waterways along the US and Canada border   -MSET in conjunction with CCG participated in the  Atlantic region seal hunt. MSET provided operational and intelligence in support.
PA  1.3.5 Marine Security Emergency response Team (MS ERT) $ 7,410,000 $ 7,125,400 $ 4,939,400  -establish integrated ERT with marine intervention capability in partnership with provincial and municipal police agencies on the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway   -establish a critical response capacity to marine incidents on the GL/SLS       -conduct regular marine intervention exercises within the GL/SLS region  -procurement of the Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIB) is on-going. One RHIB has been delivered and sea trials continue to be conducted.           -% of members trained in marine operations : 85%   -Marine Security Emergency Response Team s  are nearing full capacity  - staffing continues   - marine intervention  scenarios were conducted  in conjunction with other partners such as DND,  CCG and local police
National Waterside Security Coordination Team $ 900,000 $ 920,600 $ 798,000  -submission of recommendations to government , in concert with Transport Canada, on strategies to mitigate threats related to waterside security such as critical infrastructure, drilling platforms, underwater capacity, visible on water law enforcement presence -participation  in the evaluation exercises on Domestic Vessel Strategy and Major Critical Infrastructure e.g.  nuclear facility   -participation  in various committees/working groups such as the Domestic Vessel Security Strategy and IMSWG Regulatory Affairs Committee   - reviewed various reports such as,  TC Domestic Vessel Security Strategy and TC’s discussion  paper  on container security in Canada
2. RCMP PA  1.3.5     Marine Security Operation Centre (GL/SLS MSOC) $ 1,200,000 $ 1,840,000 $ 1,125,000  -increase capacity in facilitating domain awareness of vessel movement on the GL/SLS   - addition of contributing partners in support of MSOC   -continue developing  the design/implementation team -collection plan developed and distributed to stakeholders         -addition of  a member from the Ontario Provincial Police to the Design Team   -the implementation  model was revised  as a result of  reduced funding identified  in the Federal Budget  2008   -preparation of a TB submission
Marine Security Operation Center (East & West Coast) $1,405,000 $1,211,000 $1,098,000 -increase capacity to analyze and fuse information/

intelligence from the 5 cores federal departments (CBSA,TC,DND,DFO-CCG,RCMP)

work with the Department of National Defence and other core partners in establishing MSOC East/West.  
PA 1.3.5

 

 



PA 7.6.19

 

 

PA 3.6.19

Vehicle and Inspection Cargo System (VACIS) $ 1,080,000 $ 926,000 $ 779,200  -increase enforcement activity  within the port facility, directed at organized crime and national security threats an one of Canada’s major seaports (Halifax)  -there are currently several key investigations/projects underway related to National Security and Organized Crime activities
Restricted Access Clearance Program

------------

Marine Security Intervention Program

$200,000

 


-----------$600,000

$206,000

 


----------- $876,600

$179,600

 


----------$179,600

 -continue to process the fingerprints submitted for  marine security program in a timely manner
-------------------- -provide ongoing training and regional scenarios (exercises) that will enhance emergency Response Teams (ERT) capacity to respond to marine incidents
 -over 45,000 fingerprints submissions from Transport Canada were processed (not all marine related)  
---------------------
- marine interventions scenarios were conducted in conjunction with other partners such as DND,  CCG and various  police forces
  Total $ 25,693,000 Total $ 26,722,000 Total $ 19,127,400    
18. Comments on Variances:
NPET:  there is a difference of $ 263,800.  This amount represents s the funding that was transferred in error to the incorrect fund center. EG. MS ERT.
MSET:  fund transferred from the MS ERT program to repair one of the CCG vessels for the program.
MS ERT:  $2.7 M re-profile and carried forward to 07-08 to cover the purchase of  the Rigid Hull inflatable Boats (RHIBS) National Waterside Security Coordination: Capital Funds were transferred to cover off expenditures for vehicles.
GL/SLS MSOC: $660,000 re-profiled from 06-07.
VACIS: $ 147,000 lapse due to staffing issues.
Marine Security Intervention Program:  Money re-allocated from  NPET.
19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): Not Applicable
20. Contact Information  

Inspector Lori Seale-Irving
Marine and Ports Branch
RCMP HQ
(613) 998-6072
Lori.Seale-Irving@rcmp-grc.gc.ca




Table 12: Sustainable Development Strategy

Transport Canada’s Sustainable Development Strategy 2007-2009 responds to key issues and focuses on areas where the department can make a real difference towards achieving sustainable transportation. The department has chosen to focus its efforts on three themes: urban transportation; commercial freight transportation; and marine transporttion.

The strategy includes an action plan, which is structured around seven strategic challenges:

  1. Encourage Canadians to make more sustainable transportation choices;
  2. Enhance innovation and skills development;
  3. Increase system efficiency and optimize modal choices;
  4. Enhance efficiency of vehicles, fuels and fuelling infrastructure;
  5. Improve performance of carriers and operators;
  6. Improve decision‑making by governments and the transportation sector; and,
  7. Improve management of Transport Canada operations and lands.

For each strategic challenge, Transport Canada has outlined the sustainable development commitments, targets and performance measures the department will use to measure the success.

For further information on Transport Canada’s updated sustainable development strategy, visit http://www.tc.gc.ca/SDS.


SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 1.1 – Active Transportation
Federal SD Goals:
Goal 2 - Clean Air – Clean air for people to breathe and ecosystems to function well. Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Achieve a consensus among federal departments, provinces/territories and municipalities on the value of a national active transportation strategy in 2007-2008. Consensus among federal departments, provinces/ territories and municipalities on the value of a national active transportation strategy as shown by a decision to pursue such a strategy or not. In working towards this commitment, the department hosted two one-day consultation workshops during 2007-2008. The first was held with provinces/territories and other federal departments, and the second with municipal representatives.  In addition, several bilateral meetings were held with provinces and municipalities unable to attend the workshops.  

Stakeholders consistently expressed that there is value in developing a national active transportation strategy.  



SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 1.3 - Green Commute
Federal SD Goals:
Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Goal 4
- Sustainable Communities – Communities enjoy a prosperous economy, a vibrant and equitable society, and a healthy environment for current and future generations.
Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Provide support to enable Commuter Options within other federal departments and agencies across Canada by:

Delivering 3 commuter options workshops per year to interested public and private employers, beginning in 2007-2008.

The number of workshops delivered and their outcomes. One workshop delivered in 2007-2008. The workshop received a very positive evaluation.
SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 1.4 - Explore use of economic measures
Federal SD Goals:
Goal 2 - Clean Air – Clean air for people to breathe and ecosystems to function well.


Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Goal 6 - Strengthen federal governance and decision making to support sustainable development.

Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Improve Transport Canada’s economic instrument modeling framework and enhance Canadian data as it relates to the reaction of consumers and manufacturers to economic instruments, subject to funding, by 2007-2008.

 

Conduct further analysis of a range of economic instruments by 2007-2008.
Transport Canada will, subject to funding, expand its analytical capacities to cover, for example, light duty vehicles fleet wide and new medium- and heavy-duty trucks initiatives.



Consult with stakeholders, including motor vehicle industry NGOs, Alternate energy producers and the academic community about design options and administration / implementation issues ongoing between 2007-2008 and 2009-2010.

Quality, usefulness and timeliness of analysis and data.

 

 

 



Number of analysis and studies completed.

 

 

 

 

Number of consultations conducted.

The development of the feebate assessment model provided the catalyst needed to stimulate the implementation of the ecoAUTO Rebate Program. During the period 2007/08, the feebate assessment model was used to examine various design options, which were essential in implementing the Program.


The key analytical work was the continuing development of the light duty vehicle rebate/feebate model framework. Another important data study was conducted during 2007-08 to provide transportation GHG emissions by mode and type of activity.

 

 

During 2007-08, the department met with the Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) to discuss its EnviroTruck proposal. 

SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 2.2 - Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation
Federal SD Goal:
Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emissions .
Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Preliminary assessment and recommendations aiming to increase the understanding and knowledge of the occurrence of permafrost and of the Kuujjuaq landing strip thermal regime in 2007-2008. Results of the analysis, including number of recommendations identified.   The temperature and weather data recording instruments installed in the runway in 2006-2007 are operating as expected. In 2007-2008, the data was collected and analyzed by the Centre d’études nordiques. Some work and subsequent analyses will be completed in 2008-2009.
SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 3.1 - Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS)
Federal SD Goal:
Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Funding to be provided for research, development and deployment projects in each of fiscal years 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010. Number of deployment projects funded.

 





Number of research and development projects funded.



Number of agreements signed with partners.

In 2007-2008, 36 projects were ongoing, with 12 being completed. Projects include traffic management systems, improvements to transit and commercial vehicle operations, and the provision of traveler information for better planning.


In 2007-2008, 37 projects were ongoing, with 12 completed.

 


A significant number of new agreements, and amendments to existing agreements for the purpose of adding new project work, were concluded in fiscal years 2006-2007 and 2007-2008. In total, 47 new projects were added to the ITS program.

SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 3.4 Mobility Needs of the Aging Population and Persons with Disabilities
 
Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of policy instruments for improving accessibility in the federal transportation system, by 2007-2008. Completed evaluation of the effectiveness of various policy instruments for future policy developments for enhancing accessibility in the federal transportation system. Methodology and peer review have been completed.   Data collection completed, and a final draft report was prepared in March 2008.
SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 4.1 - Promote Advanced Technology Vehicles
Federal SD Goals:

Goal 2 - Clean Air – Clean air for people to breathe and ecosystems to function well.
Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Evaluate the performance of advanced technology vehicles on an annual basis.

 

 

 

 


Conduct activities to raise public awareness on an annual basis that also allows program information to be disseminated.

Number and type of vehicles and technologies tested with results presented in various report formats.

 

 



Number and type of activities attended throughout the year.

The eTV program focused on conducting a global survey of advanced vehicle technologies during the first year of the program. In total, over 34 different advanced vehicles technologies were investigated for their environmental and safety performance. The compiled research and technical documentation can be found on the program’s web site: www.tc.gc.ca/etv. 

The eTV showcasing team attended 22 events throughout this period and provided information to over 20,000 visitors.  In addition to showcasing events, eTV staff have participated in various industry consultations, work groups, conferences and seminars.

SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 4.2 - Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption
Federal SD Goals:

Goal 2 - Clean Air – Clean air for people to breathe and ecosystems to function well.
Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emission s.

Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Collect, verify and report on fuel consumption of new vehicles, on an annual basis.








Maintenance of the Vehicles Fuel Economy Information System (VFEIS) database, on an ongoing basis.
Timely data collection from all manufacturers

 

Audit and verification of data.

 

Annual reporting of results.

As of March 31, 2008, all manufacturers had reported the required data for the 2007 model year.

In 2007-2008, the FCP completed compliance testing on 30 vehicles as part of its confirmatory audit test program.

Annual reporting for FCP results will be available with the September 2008 release of the Vehicles Program Annual Report.

In 2007-2008, the VFEIS application was replicated on an alternate software platform to allow analysts to better identify motor vehicle data integrity errors.

Also in 2007-2008, TC processed 2008 model year data and worked with motor vehicle manufacturers to correct issues with Company Average Fuel Consumption data from 1998 to 2007.

SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 4.3 - Reduction of Emissions from the Rail Industry
Federal SD Goals:

Goal 2 - Clean Air – Clean air for people to breathe and ecosystems to function well.
Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Work with the Railway Association of Canada and Environment Canada to fully implement the commitments negotiated under the Memorandum of Understanding, between 2006-2007 and 2009-2010. Reductions in emissions achieved due to the Memorandum of Understanding. The 2006 Locomotive Emissions Monitoring (LEM) Program Report was published in December of 2007. The Report indicates that the rail industry is progressing well towards the established emission efficiency targets for 2010.
SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 5.1 - Promote Best Practices for Environmental Management in the Transport Sector
Federal SD Goals:
Goal 1 - Water – Clean and secure water for people, marine and freshwater ecosystems.
Goal 2 - Clean Air – Clean air for people to breathe and ecosystems to function well.
Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Complete business case by March 2008.

 

 



With the Transportation Association of Canada (TAC), compile a synthesis of practices on Environmental Management Systems (EMS) and include EMS how-to guidance material by 2007-2008.

With International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP) Working Group 2, develop an Airport Air Quality Guidance Document by September 2008.

Usefulness of business case, including identified incentive opportunities, to advance the prospects of an environmental incentive program.

Number of TAC members that have developed and implemented EMSs for their respective organizations.

 

Publication of the Guidance Document.

Business cases for 9 ports were completed by February 2008.

 

 

 

A 2008 EMS survey of selected TAC members showed that 30 per cent of respondents have an EMS while 30 per cent are in the process of developing a system.  This was based on an email survey of 37 transportation agencies.


Airport Air Quality Guidance Manual is in the process of being drafted and technical experts are finalizing chapters.  The document is expected to be finalized for 2009.

SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 5.2 - Marine Sector Pollution Control
Federal SD Goal:

Goal 1 - Water – Clean and secure water for people, marine and freshwater ecosystems.

Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
HNS spill response regime

Develop the legislative structure required to put a HNS regime in place together with the necessary regulations and standards starting in 2007-2008.

 

 

Create the required HNS response mechanism in order to provide a nationally consistent method of responding to, and managing the response to marine HNS incidents and spills from ships and during the loading and unloading of ships at chemical handling facilities starting in 2007-2008.

National Aerial Surveillance Program

Continue to increase the effectiveness of the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP) by increasing the frequency of patrols and expanding surveillance to areas not normally patrolled, such as the Arctic.


Improve capability for observing, detecting and reporting illegal discharges and identifying the vessels that are responsible for polluting Canada’s marine environment. By 2007-2008, Transport Canada’s modernized Moncton-based Dash 8 aircraft will be fully operational with trained crews and by 2008-2009 an identical capability will be implemented on the West Coast.

Number of regulations and standards developed.

 

 


 


Effectiveness of national HNS incident response framework.

 

 

 


Number of pollution patrol hours flown in each Region - per month, per year.


Number of ship source pollution incidents and number of mystery spills detected - per mission, per month, per year.

Number of vessels visually observed and number identified by the aircraft’s Automatic Identification System – per hour, per mission, per month, per year.

Number of prosecutions resulting from NASP pollution patrols – per year.

In 2007-2008, it was confirmed that TC has the power to put in place the framework, procedures and legislation to ensure an immediate and efficient response to an HNS incident.  Identification of gaps within the Canadian legislation has been identified in order to meet the OPRC-HNS Protocol’s requirements to International commitments and cooperation in responding to HNS incidents.


In 2007-2008, work began on evaluation of the marine chemical transportation industry, evaluation of the response capabilities, role and responsibilities of all stakeholders, equipment and resources needed, including training.

 

In 2007-2008, 2,578 patrol hours were flown.  This equated to a 56 per cent increase when compared to 2006-07. TC also expanded patrols to the Arctic and the Labrador Coast. 

 

Statistics are captured on an annual basis (i.e. per year basis vs. per month). The following was reported in 2007-2008:
Atlantic Region - 1257 hours
Quebec Region - 246.4 hours
Ontario Region - 120.4 hours
Prairie and Northern Region - 170.4 hours
Pacific Region - 784 hours

On January 22, 2008, TC deployed its second fully equipped Dash 8 pollution patrol aircraft.

During 2007-2008, TC also acquired a third Maritime Surveillance System for use in Canada’s Arctic.  This will be installed on TC’s Dash 7 pollution patrol aircraft during Spring 2009 and it is expected to be operational with trained crews by fall 2009.  

SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 6.1 - Transportation Data and Information
Federal SD Goal:

Goal 6 - Strengthen federal governance and decision making to support sustainable development.

Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Conduct, on a regular basis, assessments to identify the most important data gaps with regards to transportation activity and energy use for all modes, between 2006-2007 and 2009-2010.

 

 

 

The department will work with partners, including Statistics Canada, to improve data collection with respect to road vehicle use (including truck freight), by 2007-2008.

Identification of the major data gaps and development of a strategy to address them.

 

 

 

 


Number of data collection initiatives related to road vehicle use.

The Full Cost Investigation helped identify data gaps, in particular in linking activities levels and fuel consumption. Some actions are foreseen to improve this gap, in particular following the adoption of the amendments to the Canada Transportation Act. Several major research studies were launched in 2007-2008 under the Full Cost Investigation that allowed gauging the extent of the data gaps and researching robust methodologies to address the data gaps and produce defensible estimates.

During 2007-2008, collaboration occurred on an ad-hoc basis to provide feedback to Transport Canada colleagues who in turn provide comments to Statistics Canada. A number of methodologies were tested to improve the data gathering from the use of light road vehicles.

SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 6.3 - Funding for Sustainable Development Initiatives
 
Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Beginning in 2006-2007, select projects for funding on an annual basis in accordance with established criteria.

Implement approved projects, beginning in 2007-2008.

Number of projects funded and total investment.



Results of specific projects, including relevant improvements to environmental quality.

In 2007-2008, ten projects were funded with a total investment of $1 million dollars.

 

Nine of the ten 2007-2008 projects funded have been completed and final reports are being submitted by the project managers.

 

SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 7.1 - Transport Canada Environmental Management System
Federal SD Goals and GGO Goals:
Goal 1 - Water – Clean and secure water for people, marine and freshwater ecosystems.

Goal 3 - Reduce greenhouse gas emissions .
Goal 4 - Sustainable Communities – Communities enjoy a prosperous economy, a vibrant and equitable society, and a healthy environment for current and future generations. Goal 5 - Sustainable development and use of natural resources. Goal 6 - Strengthen federal governance and decision making to support sustainable development.

Building Energy
Goal: To be a leader in the reduction of greenhouse gas and other air emissions through the optimization of energy efficiency and conservation, and the implementation of renewable energy technologies.

Vehicle Fleet
Goal: To be a leader in fleet management, so that planning, acquiring, managing and disposing of vehicles minimize negative effects on the environment.

Green Procurement
Goal: To be a leader by integrating environmental performance considerations into procurement including planning, acquisition, use and disposal.

Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Conformance with the environmental management system framework (see Appendix B of the Sustainable Development Strategy) by 2009-2010. Level of conformance with the environmental management system (EMS) framework. Work is progressing to meet the EMS targets.  Reporting results for the 2007-2009 will not be available until Fall 2008.
SDS Departmental Goal: Commitment 7.2 - Pickering Green Space Lands
Department’s Expected Results for 2007-2008 Supporting Performance Measure(s) Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008
Begin development of an Agricultural Management Plan, that will incorporate current best management practices, by 2007/2008. Plan for best management practice for agriculture developed.

Opportunities for participation of tenant farmers identified, and lease agreements reviewed.

Report prepared detailing priority restoration areas and phasing of work identified.
Progress is delayed due to external factors and complexities not foreseen at the time of planning. This project is expected to be back on track in 2009-2010
From Words to Work (Part 7)
SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will highlight key 2007-2009 SDS commitments, targets and indicators in the department’s annual Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

Federal SD Goal:
Goal 6 - Strengthen federal governance and decision making to support sustainable development.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008:
Key 2007-2009 SDS commitments, targets and indicators are included in the RPP on an annual basis.

SDS Departmental Goal:
The department will undertake to ensure that the accountability accords of those senior managers responsible for implementing specific actions in the strategy, reflect their respective 2007-2009 SDS commitments.

Federal SD Goal:
Goal 6 - Strengthen federal governance and decision making to support sustainable development.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008:
In 2007-2008, Transport Canada’s "Ongoing Executive Management Commitments" document was updated to reflect the requirement for Transport Canada’s SDS commitments to be implemented in an effective and timely manner. This will ensure that SDS targets are brought to the attention of senior managers as they develop their accountability accords.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will continue to hold regular meetings (for the 2007-2008 – 2009-2010 period) of the department’s internal Sustainable Development Strategy Committee (SDSC) to oversee and coordinate implementation of the strategy, and to provide a forum for sharing sustainable development information and best practices across departmental groups and regions.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008:
As the development of the next SDS has not yet been initiated, SDSC meetings were not required in 2007-2008. However, the SDS Fund Subcommittee of the SDSC was convened at key stages of the SDS Fund Year 2 funding round.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will also join with other government departments and the Canada School of Public Service (CSPS) to design and deliver Government of Canada Sustainable Development training material. Delivery to begin in 2007-2008.

Federal SD Goal:
Goal 6 - Strengthen federal governance and decision making to support sustainable development.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008:
TC participated in the design and development of the Government of Canada Sustainable Development (SD) course. The first French SD Course was delivered through the CSPS on February 25, 2008 and the first English course on March 13, 2008.

SDS Departmental Goal:
The department will undertake efforts to increase employee awareness and understanding of sustainable transportation as well as the department’s environment and sustainable development programs and activities. This will include learning events and sustainable transportation articles in departmental newsletters on an ongoing basis.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008:
An article on the Sustainable Development Strategy Fund was published on TC’s internal website. During 2007-2008 the department continued to hold its Sustainable Development course, to increase employee awareness of sustainable development and its application within Transport Canada.  The department also developed an on-line version of the Sustainable Transportation Lens, which will be launched in 2008-2009.

SDS Departmental Goal:
Transport Canada will produce an annual SDS Progress Report, supplemental to the Departmental Performance Report. The results of this report will be presented annually to Transport Canada’s senior management committee.

Achieved SDS Departmental Results for 2007-2008:
Transport Canada continues to prepare an SDS progress report that is supplemental to the Departmental Performance Report. A summary will be posted on the Transport Canada internet site.




Table 13: Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits


Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)
2008 March Status Report of the Environment and Sustainable Development – Chapter 6 – Ecosystems – Control of Aquatic Invavise Species

 

This audit is a follow-up to determine whether the two departments (Transport Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada) made satisfactory progress in response to the recommendations from the 2002 audit of the federal government’s management of invasive species. Transport Canada is responsible for regulating and controlling ballast water on commercial ships in Canada.  The 2002 recommendations were for Transport Canada to define best management practices for ship ballast water and establish regulations requiring the application of those practices and to develop and implement a means to monitor, maintain records, and report annually on compliance. http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_cesd_200803_06_e_30132.html

2008 March Status Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development - Chapter 8—Management Tools and Government Commitments—International Environmental Agreements

Canada has signed more than 100 international environmental agreements over the years, the Kyoto Protocol among them, committing it to act on crucial issues such as ocean pollution, fishery conservation, and the protection of endangered species.  For this status report, the OAG examined the federal government’s management of information on international environmental agreements to assess the progress it has made since 2004. Four departments were examined - Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Transport Canada, and Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada.

http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_cesd_200803_08_e_30134.html

 
External Audits (Note: These refer to other external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages)
Public Service Commission (PSC) Audit of the Movement of Public Servants between the Federal Public Service and Ministers’ Offices.

The government-wide audit assessed the extent of movement of public servants between the public service and ministers’ offices; and whether the staffing requirements of the Public Service Employment Act, the Public Service Employment Regulations, PSC policies and other applicable legislation were met for appointments of public servants returning from ministers’ offices.  The audit also assessed the risk to political impartiality.  Transport Canada was one of a number of departments included in this audit.  The audit covered the period April 1990 to September 2006, during which the PSC identified 157 persons who had been public servants before working as a minister’s staff and who returned to the federal public service.  The audit covered staffing practices under the previous PSEA, and the new legislation, which took effect December 31, 2005.

http://www.psc-cfp.gc.ca/adt-vrf/rprt/2007/mbmo-mecm/index-eng.htm#n4




Table 14: Internal Audits and Evaluations

Internal Audits (current reporting period)
Name of Internal Audit Audit Type Status Completion Date Electronic Link to Report
Audit of Departmental Vehicle Use Core Management Controls Completed June 2007 http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2005/1577-05-007/menu.htm
Audit of the Quality Assurance Function
Within Safety and Security
Core Management Controls Completed June 2007 http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2006/1577-06-107/menu.htm
Audit of Airports Capital

Assistance Program (ACAP)

Audit of selected ACAP Projects

Transfer

Payment

Completed December 2007 http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2006/1577-06-101/menu.htm
Audit of Acquisition Cards Core Management Controls Completed December 2007 http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/aas/audit/2005/1577-05-006/menu.htm
Audit of Account Verification Practices Governing payments to CN Pursuant to the Victoria Bridge Contribution Agreement Transfer Payment In Progress 2008-2009 Not applicable
Audit of Information for Decision Making Core Management Controls In Progress 2008-2009 Not applicable
Audit of Travel Core Management Controls In Progress 2008-2009 Not applicable
Audit of Marine Security Contribution Program Transfer Payment In progress 2008-2009 Not applicable
Audit of Rail and Urban Transit Security Contribution Program Transfer Payment In progress 2008-2009 Not applicable

Completed Evaluations (current reporting period)


Name of Evaluation Program Activity Completion Date Electronic Link to Report
Evaluation of the Rail Safety Program Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system April 2007 http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/2007/railsafety/
menu.htm
Marine Security Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system 2007 http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/reports/2007/marine/menu.htm
Confederation Bridge Policing Service Program Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework August 2007 http://www.tc.gc.ca/programevaluation/
reports/confederation/confederation_bridge
_2007.htm
Labrador Coast Airstrips Restoration Program Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework August 2007 http://www.tc.gc.ca/programevaluation/
reports/labrador/menu.htm
Port Divestiture Program Policies, Programs and Infrastructure in support of a market-based framework October 2007 http://www.tc.gc.ca/programevaluation/
reports/port_divestiture/menu.htm
Air Cargo Security Program Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system March 2008 Available soon
Passenger Rail and Urban Transit Security Policies, Rulemaking, Monitoring and Outreach in support of a safe and secure transportation system December 2007 Available soon
Link to Departmental Evaluation Services Reports: http://www.tc.gc.ca/corporate-services/des/menu.htm



Table 15: Travel Policies

Transport Canada follows and uses Treasury Board Secretariat Travel policies.