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ARCHIVED - 2007-2008 DPRs - Details on Transfer Payment Programs

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Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Advancing Canadian Agriculture and Agri-Food (ACAAF) (Voted)
AgriInvest Kickstart Program (Statutory)
AgriInvest Program (Statutory)
Payments in connection with the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act (Statutory) - Advance Payment Program
Cull Breeding Swine Program (Statutory)
Control of Diseases in the Hog Industry- Circovirus Initiative (Voted) - Phase I - Circovirus Inoculation Strategy
Facilitating the Disposal of Specified Risk Materials (Voted)
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)/Cull Cow (under the BSE Recovery Program Terms and Conditions - Statutory and Voted)
Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS)/AgriStability & CAIS Inventory Transition Initiative (CITI) (Statutory Programs)
Cover Crop Protection Program (Voted)
Canadian Cattlemen's Association Legacy Fund (Statutory)
Canadian Farm Families Options Program (CFFOP) (Voted)
Cost of Production Benefit (Statutory)
Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Environment (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)
ontributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Food Safety and Food Quality (FSQ) (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)
Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Science and Innovation (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)
Production Insurance (under the Agricultural Policy Framework-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Statutory Program)
Plum Pox Eradication Program (PPEP) (Voted)
Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Renewal (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)
Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - International (Canadian Agriculture and Food International) (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)
Contributions in support of Rural Canada and of development in the area of Co-operatives (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)
pring Credit Advance Program (SCAP) and Enhanced Spring Credit Advanced Program (ESCAP) (under the Agricultural Policy Framework (APF) -Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted & Statutory)

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Advancing Canadian Agriculture and Agri-Food (ACAAF) (Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2004
End Date:March 31, 2009

Description:The purpose of the ACAAF program is to position Canada's agriculture and agri-food sector at the leading edge to seize new opportunities. It is based on a three-pillar approach, including:
Pillar I: "Industry-Led Solutions to Emerging Issues";
Pillar II: "Capturing Market Opportunities By Advancing Research Results";
Pillar III: "Sharing Information to Advance the Sector".

In July of 2006, the Biofuels Opportunities for Producers Initiative (BOPI), a two-year, $20.0 million initiative under the ACAAF program was launched. It was designed to help farmers and rural communities conduct feasibility studies and develop sound, viable business proposals to create and expand biofuel production capacity involving significant ownership by agricultural producers. BOPI is delivered by the ACAAF regional Industry Councils. BOPI ended in March 2008.

The ACAAF Program was developed as the successor to the Canadian Adaptation and Rural Development (CARD) II Fund.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
In 2007-08, 376 new projects were approved. Of these, 29 new national projects, 300 new Industry Council regional projects and 47 multi-regional collective outcome projects were funded. The highest increase was in Pillar II projects that increased by 40% over last year. Under BOPI, 36 projects received funding in 2007-08. BOPI was completed in March 2008 with 90% of the funding allocated to projects. Increased efforts on service standards have reduced project review times by 5%.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants 30.3 44.3 35.0 37.7 37.7 (2.7)
Total Contributions 7.1 6.2 3.1 10.5 10.5 (7.4)
Total Transfer Payment Program 37.4 50.5 38.1 48.2 48.2 (10.1)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
At the time of preparation of the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities Treasury Board approval had not yet been received for the Biofuels Opportunities for Producers Initiative and as such, the Planned Spending does not reflect this funding.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: An evaluation of ACAAF was started in 2007-08 and will be completed in the fall of 2008.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: No program audits were done and none are planned.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: AgriInvest Kickstart Program (Statutory)

Start Date: October 25, 2007
End Date: March 31, 2009

Description: The $600 million Kickstart payment was a one-time federal initiative to seed AgriInvest accounts until producers can build up a balance in their accounts.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
The objective of AgriInvest Kickstart was to encourage producer participation in AgriInvest. As of March 30, 2008 the total number of letters to producers with calculated benefits was 154,731, number of responses received 75,030, total value of benefits for responses received $254.8 million.

Where Canada delivers: the number of payments to producers was 48,277, total value of payments to producers $180.8 million, total value of deposits to producer accounts $74 million.

Quebec: Number of payments to producers not available, total value of payments to producers $22.8 million, total value of deposits to producer accounts $27.9 million.

Kickstart payments will continue to be delivered into the 2008-09 fiscal year as the application deadline for new participants is April 14, 2008. and the deadline for receiving responses to letters with calculated benefits is June 30, 2008.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - 484.4 484.4 (484.4)
Total Contributions - - - 95.8 95.8 (95.8)
Total Transfer Payment Program - - - 580.1 580.1 (580.1)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
At the time of preparation of the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities, Treasury Board approval for this program had not yet been received and as such Planned Spending is shown as zero.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: There are no existing or planned evaluations for this program at this time.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: There are no existing or planned audits for this program at this time.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: AgriInvest Program (Statutory)

Start Date: December 19, 2007
End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The AgriInvest program is designed to help producers stabilize their farm income on an individual basis by providing the opportunity for them to deposit money annually into their program savings account and receive matching government contributions. AgriInvest replaces the first 15% margin decline (first tier) coverage of CAIS. AgriInvest will play an important role in the new suite of BRM programs by providing producers with less complexity, more predictability and quicker access to program funding for small losses, thereby improving the predictability, bankability and responsiveness of the entire BRM suite.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
Program Grants & Contributions are recognized here in the year that the related economic event occurs (i.e. the 2007 Program/tax year). However, performance results related to delivery of ensuing payments to producers will not be available until the 2008/09 fiscal year, once the 2007 tax/program year is complete and applications are received.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - 165.6 165.6 (165.6)
Total Contributions - - - 1.7 1.7 (1.7)
Total Transfer Payment Program - - - 167.3 167.3 (167.3)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
At the time of preparation of the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities, Treasury Board approval for this program had not yet been received and as such Planned Spending is shown as zero.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: There are no existing or planned evaluations for this program at this time.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: There are no existing or planned audits for this program at this time.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments in connection with the Agricultural Marketing Programs Act (Statutory) - Advance Payment Program

Start Date: 1997
End Date: On-going under the AMPA legislation

Description: The Advance Payments Program (APP) guarantees provides cash advances to eligible producers (recent amendments to AMPA increased the interest free portion of advances from $0.05 to $0.1 million, and the maximum advance from $0.25 to $0.4 million) to enable them to produce and market their agricultural products when market conditions are most ideal. Amendments now also allow livestock producers the ability to receive an advance under AMPA.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
Legislative amendments on the AMPA were tabled in Parliament in May 2006, and the Enhanced Spring Credit Advance Program was announced as an interim measure. The AMPA received royal assent in June, 2006, and came into force in November, 2006.

On February 28th, 2006 AAFC launched the APP/SCAP Electronic Delivery System allowing producer organizations to submit producer level data electronically. AAFC now has greater access to more accurate reporting of advances and repayments across provinces and producer organizations.

As of April 1st, 2007, the first full production period for the new APP was launched (new APP 2007-08 production period). During the 2007-08 production period, $1.581 billion was advanced to 36,653 producers. The 18 month production period allows for advances and repayments during the first 12 months, and for repayments only during the final 6 months of the production period.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity:
Business Risk Management
           
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 9.2 10.6 138.7 44.1 44.1 94.6
Total Transfer Payment Program 9.2 10.6 138.7 44.1 44.1 94.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
Due to the overlap of the old APP program and the New APP, statutory alloment was increased to $138.7M for the 2007-08 fiscal year only. Actual spending for the New APP for fiscal year 2007-08 was less than planned due to the implementation of the New APP program along with old APP still being completed, and we also were offering the interim ESCAP program concurrently. This allowed for 3 different programs in which producers could choose from in order to receive an advance, which were being run concurrently. Uptake for all 3 programs was less than planned, but only due to a 3rd program being offered during the same time period.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluation of the new APP program was completed during the 2007-08 fiscal year. As per AMPA legislation, a full evalution is to be completed every 5 years. With the last amendments completed to AMPA during 2007-08, the next evaluation is planned for 2012-13.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
No audit of the NAPP program was completed during the 2007-08 fiscal year.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Cull Breeding Swine Program (Statutory)

Start Date: March 6, 2008
End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The purpose of the Cull Breeding Swine Program program is to assist in restructuring the Canadian swine industry by facilitating a reduction of the breeding herd. This $50 million initiative is a grant to the Canadian Pork Council (CPC). The objective is to reduce the national breeding herd size by up to 10% over and above normal annual reductions.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
Financial assistance is provided to the hog industry to assist producers that wish to downsize or exit the industry. $38 million has been transfered to the CPC in 2007-08 for reimbursement of slaughter and disposal costs and payment of $225 per breeding animal. As of June 13, 2008, 477 claims have been received for a total of 105,292 animals.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - 38.0 38.0 (38.0)
Total Contributions - - - - - -
Total Transfer Payment Program - - - 38.0 38.0 (38.0)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
At the time of preparation of the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities, Treasury Board approval for this program had not yet been received and as such Planned Spending is shown as zero.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: There are no existing or planned evaluations for this program at this time.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: There are no existing or planned audits for this program at this time.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Control of Diseases in the Hog Industry- Circovirus Initiative (Voted) - Phase I - Circovirus Inoculation Strategy

Start Date: September 27, 2007
End Date: March 31, 2009

Description: The Circovirus Inoculation Strategy (CIS) is an Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) initiative aimed at providing assistance in minimizing the overall potential effect of the Porcine Circovirus Associated Diseases (PCVAD) on the Canadian hog herd. AAFC is to provide financial assistance towards the identification and mitigation of the virus.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
The delivery process of this program has now been fully automated in order to provide timely allocation of payments. We have processed over 1000 applications and dispersed over $11.5M to producers to inoculate the hog herd against PCVAD. In collecting the data through the application process, we have been able to map and demonstrate the occurances of CIP in Canada. This will further our ability to administer future swine health initiatives.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - - - 14.3 14.3 (14.3)
Total Transfer Payment Program - - - 14.3 14.3 (14.3)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
At the time of preparation of the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities, Treasury Board approval for this program had not yet been received and as such Planned Spending is shown as zero.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: This program has not been subject to an evaulation, and there is not one planned.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: This program has not been subject to an audit, and there is not one planned.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Facilitating the Disposal of Specified Risk Materials (Voted)

Start Date: December 14, 2006
End Date: March 31, 2009

Description:
The federal government continues to provide BSE related assistance to Canada's cattle industry to support its efforts to recover from the impacts of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) first discovered in Canada in May 2003. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has implemented an enhanced feed ban, which is a significant step towards eliminating BSE from the national cattle herd.

This program will help the beef industry mitigate the cost of adapting to the July 12, 2007 enhancements to the feed ban enforced by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. The enhancements regulate the disposal of specified risk material (SRM) for which adequate disposal infrastructure is required.

Cost-shared federal-provincial programs are in place and offer $127.5 million in financial assistance to the industry (federal: $76.5 million; provincial: $51 million). The program is administered provincially and federal funds are used to support projects that have been approved through the provincial government process.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
As of March 2008, approximately 216 infrastructure project and research iniatives were approved for a total commitment of $91 million to help the beef industry adapt to the enhanced feed ban. Facilities such as federal and provincial abattoirs, SRM rendering plants, research institutions are participating in the program. Further more, various technologies are being explored to seek value added options for SRM.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - 4.4 - 22.8 22.8 (22.8)
Total Transfer Payment Program - 4.4 - 22.8 22.8 (22.8)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
At the time of preparation of the 2007-08 Main Estimates, Treasury Board approval for this program had not yet been received and as such Planned Spending is shown as zero.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: This program has not been subject to an evaluation, and there is not one planned.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: This program has not been subject to an audit, and there is not one planned.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)/Cull Cow (under the BSE Recovery Program Terms and Conditions - Statutory and Voted)

Start Date:
June 2003
End Date:
March 31, 2008

Description:
Purpose of Transfer Payment Program: The purpose of this program is to deal with the sudden impacts of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) on the beef industry. The aim of the program was to get the domestic market moving again and to improve returns to producers following border closure to Canadian cattle and beef.

Old programs included the BSE Recovery Program, which ran in 2003-04, and offered several price incentives to help keep the domestic market moving and provided improved returns to feedlots and processors to move product through the chain in light of severely depressed prices caused by the USA border closure;

The Cull Animal Program, which ran in 2003-04, made a payment to producers for each eligible older animal sold for slaughter; and; The Fed Cattle Set-Aside Program, the Feeder Calf Set-Aside Program, and the Managing Older Animals program ran in 2004-05 to 2005-06 and assisted balance animals supply and demand until normal trade patterns resumed and/or slaughter capacity increased.

To assure the future of the industry, additional funding has been provided for marketing assistance, increasing slaughter capacity and enhancing traceability.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
Ruminant Slaughter Loan Loss Reserve Program:
In 2007-08 four projects were approved under the Ruminant Slaughter Loan Loss Reserve Program, for a total commitment of $29.1 million of the $41.7 million available through the program. Of that total, $24.9 million has been disbursed to lending institutions involved with the projects.

Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA):

In FY 2007-08 the CCIA integrated its old Cattle Tracking System (CTS) with a new internet-based system called the Canadian Livestock Tracking System (CLTS). The system tracks age verification (AV), premises identification and movement and sighting, and allows for new value-added services to be added to further enhance the CCIA's traceability program. Since its release, the CLTS has provided the cattle industry with a reliable and integrated method of information-keeping to re-open and keep international and domestic markets open to Canadian beef exports.

CCIA successfully completed and fully implemented a $3.7 million project - the Canadian Livestock Traceability System (CLTS) and has continued to be recognized, both domestically and internationally, as a multi-species leader in Animal Identification and Traceability. CCIA has reported that the program is industry supported, sustainable and has proven invaluable through the BSE and TB animal health investigations.

Canadian Integrated Traceability Program (CITP):

17 Pilot projects supported animal identification, tracking of animal movements and the tracking of meat products through the food value chain. Communicating the results of these 17 projects by the Recipients to interested public stakeholders was a key aspect of CITP. These projects will help to refine the traceability system for various commodities.

Canadian Livestock Identification Agency (CLIA):

The original mandate of the CLIA was to move forward as the administrator responsible for the development, administration and maintenance of a national traceability system for the livestock sector in Canada. However in the fall of 2007, CLIA changed its strategic direction as follows:
- Redefining CLIA's abiding purpose to provide the leadership that will build consensus across the livestock and poultry sectors specific to industry and government needs associated with individual animal and group identification.
- Establish two distinct divisions: (i) Technical Services that builds on the investment and capability already established by the CCIA that can in turn provide traceability and value added services to other livestock/poultry sectors; (ii) The Industry Forum that facilitates and encourages all livestock/poultry sectors to meet and
form policies specific to emerging traceability requirements (both private and public sector).

The total funding for the CLIA project was $1.1 million, however in light of the mandate changes the amount contributed was $765,000.

Canadian Radio Frequency Identification Reader Program (CRFID):

The objective of CFRID was to subsidize the purchase of radio-frequency identification Readers. These Readers are used to capture tracing and tracking information to facilitate recalls and quarantines in the event of a disease outbreak and reduce the negative economic and health effects associated with an outbreak. Organizations such as slaughter and processing plants, veterinarians, and commercial feedlots working in the cattle and/or bison industry beyond the farm gate were eligible. This program was established in April 2005 and expired in February 2008. Over the life of the program, 460 applicants were reimbursed for a total of $738,162.

Marketing Assistance

In the final year of the Genetics Marketing Program and the Other Ruminants Market Development Program $219,390 supported industry association projects to implement marketing strategies targeting traditional and non-traditional markets.
The Other Ruminants Market Development Program has been very successful for the bison industry. New markets were developed for the bison industry. There is now a need to identify ways to generate more returns from bison carcasses, and to identify production and risk management strategies that will assist in increasing industry returns to encourage investment for the industry to grow.
Hurdles in international market development included obtaining protocol regarding the health requirements of other countries, suitable air transportation to countries of destination and the cost of air freight.
Shipment of goats and rabbits were sent to Trinidad and Tobago in the Fall of 2007. Orders of Boer goats have been received from Antigua, and enquiries for over 100 Boer goats to the Azores were received.
In the final year (2007-08) of the Sustaining the Genetic Quality of Ruminants Program provided $56,926 in support of industry association projects to help maintain Canada's reputation for genetics and the marketability of genetic ruminant products. A number of herds signed up under the New Herd Enrolment Program. An assessment to identify strategies to strengthen business development activities were undertaken under the Harmonization of Classification Program. Preliminary work has been completed on the Electronic Animal OwnerShip Transfer (E-Paper) Program. Marketing and Business Resource staff conducted an analysis to redesign the website.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 59.5 23.1 12.4 (6.6) (6.6) 19.0
Total Transfer Payment Program 59.5 23.1 12.4 (6.6) (6.6) 19.0

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
In 2007-2008, it was anticipated that $12.4 million was required to fund various BSE programs. These programs initially were ending in fiscal year 2006-2007, however received a program extension to fiscal year 2007-2008. Approximately $3.4 million was spent. The remaining program authority that was not spent is mainly due to some projects that were to be initially funded through the Ruminant Slaughter Loan Loss Reserve Program did not materialise or were funded through a different program.

Also the reversal of accruals of older BSE Recovery programs in the amount of $9.7 million contributes to the negative spending amount. These accruals were for programs which are complete. Therefore the outstanding estimated accruals are no longer necessary. In addition, provincial compliance audits results concluded that a minor reimbursement to Canada was required in the amount of approximately $220,000.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
An evaluation has been completed, but not yet finalized at this time.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
An audit for the first three phases of the program has been completed, but not yet finalized at this time.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program : Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS)/AgriStability & CAIS Inventory Transition Initiative (CITI) (Statutory Programs)

Start Date: CAIS/AgriStability (April 1, 2003) CITI (May 18, 2006 )
End Date: CAIS/AgriStability (March 31, 2012) CITI (September 30, 2008 )

Description: CAIS was a margin-based program that integrated stabilization and disaster protection into a single program under the previous Agricultural Policy Framework (APF) (2003/04 - 2006/07). The program assisted the producers in protecting their farming operations from small and large drops in income. This was a whole-farm program available to eligible farmers regardless of the commodities they produced. Producers were eligible if they reported farm income or loss to Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), had at least six months of farming activity and completed a production cycle in the program year. Producer margins are based on their eligible income less their eligible expenses for a program year and payments were triggered under the program when a producer’s margin for a program year dropped below their average historical margin for the past five years (less the highest and lowest years).

Repeated producer and industry concerns prompted the government to commit, in the 2006 Speech from the Throne and Budget, to replacing CAIS with more responsive, predictable and bankable programs. As a result, federal-provincial-territorial governments agreed to replace CAIS with a new suite of Business Risk Management (BRM) programs. In December 2007, the government announced the implementation of AgriInvest (income stabilization) which replaces the top tier (first 15% of margin decline) of CAIS and the implementation of AgriStability for the 2007 program delivery year. AgriStability is an improved margin-based program that provides producers with assistance for larger income declines. The program compensates producers when their margin in the program year is more than 15 percent lower than their reference margin from previous years (the second and third tiers of CAIS covering the disaster component of the program). AgriStability includes several enhancements to address industry concerns, including a better method for valuing producer inventories, expansion of the criteria for negative margin coverage to allow deeper coverage for back-to-back disasters and an automatic Targeted Advance Payment for when disasters occur. In addition to these parameter changes, governments have also worked to improve the service delivery of the program by introducing automatic sign-up for previous participants, more flexible deadlines, simplified forms and electronic filing, online calculators, national service standards, and clearer program statements.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
CAIS (2006 Program Year - see note below)
Of the 92.7% of 2006 program year applications processed the estimated out-going accuracy rate is 98.13% as of end of March, 2008.
Federal Delivery: 47,281 complete applications received. Total value of producer payments was $353,875,438 million as of end of March, 2008.
National Delivery: 125,092 complete applications received. Total value of producer payments was $822,655,450 million as of end of March, 2008.
AgriStability 2007 Program Year reporting had not begun as of end of March, 2008.
CITI Program National Delivery: A total of 147,463 producer payments have been paid for all program years. Total value of producer payments was $856.2 million for all program years as of end of March, 2008.
2003 Program Year - Federal Delivery: total value of producer payments was $214.1 million as of end of March, 2008.
2004 Program Year - Federal Delivery: total value of producer payments was $128.6 million as of end of March, 2008.
2005 Program Year - Federal Delivery: total value of producer payments was $59.9 million as of end of March, 2008.

Enhancements have been made to the AgriStability program including a better method for valuing producer inventories (CITI), expansion of the criteria for negative margin coverage to allow deeper coverage for back-to-back disasters and an automatic Targeted Advance Payment for when disasters occur. In addition, work has been done to improve the service delivery of the program by introducing things such as automatic sign-up for previous participants, more flexible deadlines, simplified forms and electronic filing, online calculators, national service standards, and clearer program statements.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants (CITI) - 431.0 - (0.7) (0.7) 0.7
Total Contributions (CITI) - 442.0 - - - -
Total Contributions (CAIS/AgriStability) 1,068.7 933.3 570.5 377.3 377.3 193.2
Total Transfer Payment Program 1,068.7 1,806.3 570.5 376.6 376.6 193.9

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
Year to year G&C payments are directly related to the needs of the agriculture industry as CAIS/AgriStability is demand-driven rather than being funded from a set allocation for each fiscal year. As such, in good years, the program will cost governments less, while in bad years (i.e., years with dropping commodity prices, disasters, etc.) the costs of the program will be higher. The program does, however, include a payment cap of $3 million per participant per program year in order to control costs for governments and prevent larger operations from capturing a large share of program benefits.

Notably, 2007-08 G&C expenditures varied widely from previous years largely due to record market pricing in the Grains and Oilseed sectors during the 2006 program year.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
The Chapter Evaluation of the BRM programs was prepared to meet reporting requirements as stipulated in the Implementation Agreement. As the report had no targets, the OAG recommended targets be developed by December 31, 2007. These targets have been developed.

The Office of Audit and Evaluation reached an agreement with the ADM of Programs Branch to delay the CAIS evaluation until 2010. The delay is expected to allow program officials to act on the OAG recommendations and to develop performance information as well as establishing baseline information.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
The Office of the Auditor General released their report on the CAIS program in May 2007. The report and its findings can be found at:
http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/aud_parl_oag_200705_e_18289.html

Note: Program Grant & Contribution spending are recognized here in the year that the related economic event occurs (i.e. the 2007 Program/tax year). However, performance results related to delivery of ensuing payments to producers will not be available until the 2008/09 fiscal year, once the 2007 tax/program year is complete and applications are received. Therefore, results achieved are reported for the 2006 Program year.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Cover Crop Protection Program (Voted)

Start Date: June 8, 2006
End Date: March 31, 2011

Description: The Cover Crop Protection Program (CCPP) is a Federal only program aimed at assisting producers whose lands are adversely affected by excess soil moisture and flooding with the added costs of improving and protecting the soil until a commercial crop can be planted. Under this program, a fixed amount per acre is provided to assist in planting and maintaining a cover crop (a crop not intended for commercial sale that stabilizes the soil and helps to limit weeds and environmental degradation). Target clients are producers in the affected areas.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
There were 6,909 payments made to producers who where affected by excess moisture or flooding covering 852,031 acres in 2007/08. Of the 100% of known eligible recipients, those who had not applied were contacted and encouraged to apply which resulted in a participation rate of 95.5% of eligible applicants receiving a payment. Although no workshops/information sessions were held in 2007/08, 100% of eligible applicants received information describing best management practices related to soils with excess moisture or flooding.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - 78.0 - 22.1 13.2 (13.2)
Total Contributions - - - - - -
Total Transfer Payment Program - 78.0 - 22.1 13.2 (13.2)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
At the time of preparation of the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities, Treasury Board approval for this program had not yet been received and as such Planned Spending is shown as zero. In terms of the variance between actual spending and authorities, the designated area requirement limited the eligible acres and as a result lowered the overall program expenditures and commitments to $13.2M from the authorities of $22.1M as provided per TB submission. The impact of designated areas was unknown at the time the authorities were obtained. As well, 2007/08 was drier than previous years.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Office of Audit and Evaluation is planning to initiate an evaluation of the CCPP in July 2008 for the 2005, 2006 and 2007 program years with completion by December 2008.

Significant Audit findings and URL to last Audit: This program has not been subject to an audit, and there is not one planned.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Cattlemen's Association Legacy Fund (Statutory)

Start Date: June 27, 2005
End Date: March 31, 2015

Description: The purpose of the Legacy Fund is to support to the Canadian beef sector to develop markets for beef cattle, beef cattle genetics, beef and beef products in a post-BSE environment. A grant totalling $50 million over 10 years will be provided to the Canadian Cattlemen's Association on behalf of the beef sector.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
Industry is struggling to manage the ongoing impact of BSE and simultaneously regain its competive position given the rapid appreciation in the value of the Canadian dollar, increased feed prices and under utilization of packing capacity. Notwithstanding these challenges, Legacy Funds enabled the Beef Information Centre, Canada Beef Export Federation and Canadian Beef Breeds Council to undertake significant market development programs focussed on key Canadian, US and Asian beef markets. In 2007, beef exports totalled $1.2 billion, down slightly from $1.3 billion in 2006. Sales of beef cattle genetics in 2007 were $7.2 million compared to $0 in 2006.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants 0.1 4.9 5.0 7.0 7.0 (2.0)
Total Contributions - - - - - -
Total Transfer Payment Program 0.1 4.9 5.0 7.0 7.0 (2.0)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
In developing the spending profile for the Legacy Fund annual expenditures were estimated by spreading the available funding over the ten year time frame in equal annual increments. However, funds are allocated based on the requirements outlined in an annual business plan which reflects the priorities of the three marketing groups. As such the funds needed in any particular year will vary depending on the marketing program developed in that year. These forecasts are made even more difficult by challenges in predicting when a market might actually open to imports of Candian beef.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: An interim evaluation is expected to be finalized by August 2008 and a final evaluation will be completed by June 30, 2015.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: An audit has recently been completed by CCA which reported no significant findings. There is currently no URL for this audit.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Farm Families Options Program (CFFOP) (Voted)

Start Date: June 23, 2006
End Date:March 31, 2010

Description: The Options Program is a two-year pilot program that provides short-term financial assistance to low-income farm families and provides eligible clients with access to farm business assessment and training services that could help them increase their long-term on- and off-farm income opportunities. Income payments are issued to eligible applicants based on information on the 2005 and 2006 tax years. Eligible applicants commit to completing a Renewal activity, either a Farm Business Assessment or Canadian Agricultural Skills Service, or an approved equivalent activity by November 20, 2008.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
As of March 31, 2008, $205.7 million was distributed to farmers and farm families, including the 2005 program year payments and the initial payments for the 2006 program year. With the final payment for the 2006 program year, the total payments will increase to $221 million for both program years. Of the 15,278 individuals and farm families who received a year 1 options payment, 9,019 of the participants in the first year of the program re-applied for funds in year 2. Approximately 80% of the 2005 Options applicants who received a payment have completed or are in the process of completing business planning and skills development activities. In 2007-08, a total of 9,101 farmers/farm families participated in business planning and skills development. Of these 9,101 farmers/farm families, 5,759 participated in Farm Business Assessment (FBA) and 2,951 in Canadian Agricultural Skills Service (CASS).

Results from Canadian Farm Families Options client feedback forms received between July 1, 2007 and February 28, 2008 show that 73.4% of respondents were satisfied with the payment they received; 48% reported that the payment reduced financial pressures to a great or very great extent; and 88.3% reported that the payment received made it easier to participate in a Renewal program.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - 145.0 157.5 76.0 76.0 156.3
Total Contributions - - 86.0 11.2 11.2 74.8
Total Transfer Payment Program - 145.0 243.5 87.2 87.2 156.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
At the time of preparation of the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities, the amount allocated for CFFOP had not been finalized. On May 31, 2007 changes to the program were approved by Treasury Board. These changes resulted in the original $550.0 million budget being reduced to $304.0 million. Approval was obtained to reprofile the remaining funding to other intiatives.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
Findings relating to CFFOP have not been included in the Renewal Chapter Evaluation, as the program had not been in place long enough and there weas insufficient data to provide a basis for evaluating it. The report on the evaluation of the Renewal Chapter will be finalized by October 2008.

There is no summative evaluation of Renewal or the Options program scheduled for completion by March 31, 2008. Between November 2007 and March 2008, two Planning Studies were completion in preparation for future evaluations. Each study addressed selected and diferent Renewal programs. No decision has been taken yet as to when these evaluations will take place, as a new five-year plan is in development and has not yet been approved.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: No Program audit was conducted in 2007-08 and none is planned for 2008-09.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Cost of Production Benefit (Statutory)

Start Date: April 1, 2008
End Date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Cost of Production Direct Payment was intended to partially compensate producers for the decline in incomes experienced over the past four years due to production costs increasing at a faster rate than output prices. The payment was based on a percentage of their historical average net sales of eligible commodities.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
Reduced producers income loss through participation in Business Risk Management programs. As of March 2008:

Applications received was 165,413
Number of zero payments 3,591
Number of payments 160,689
Applications remaining to be processed 1,133

Total value of payments were $343,857,477 not including the $44.4 million transferred to Quebec.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - 353.5 353.5 (353.5)
Total Contributions - - - 44.7 44.7 (44.7)
Total Transfer Payment Program - - - 398.3 398.3 (398.3)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
At the time of preparation of the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities, Treasury Board approval for this program had not yet been received and as such Planned Spending is shown as zero.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: There are currently no existing or planned evaluation for this program.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: There are currently no existing or planned audits for this program.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Environment (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extension until March 31, 2009)

Description: The purpose of the Environment programs is to support the adoption of management practices on farms across Canada, which are beneficial to the environment and economically sustainable.

Strategic Outcome: Health of the Environment

Results Achieved:

  • EFP - As of March 31, 2008 over 56,700 reviewed Environmental Farm Plans (EFPs)/Equivalent Agri-Environmental Plans (EAEPs) have been completed under the Agricultural Policy Framework (APF). This represents 25% of all farms across Canada and approximately 34% of the agricultural landscape. This is compared with over 45,600 reviewed EFPs/EAEPs completed under the APF as of March 31, 2007.
  • NFSP - National Farm Stewardship Program - approximately 35,000 BMP Projects completed as of March 31, 2008.
  • Greencover Canada - As of March 31, 2008 approximately 7,000 BMP projects, 572,393 acres converted to long-term perennial cover and 230 technical assistance projects were completed.
  • National Water Supply Expansion Program (NWSEP) - Approximately 6,200 Tier 1 projects completed; 240 Tier 2 projects completed; 430 Tier 3 projects completed.
  • Agri-Environmental Standards - Developed standards in the areas of water, biodiversity, pesticides and air
  • Water Quality Surveillance Program (WQSP) - Conducted pilot studies at several test sites
  • Information Gaps in Water Quality and Nutrients (GAPS) Study on Regulations- Funded 11 R&D projects.
  • Study on Regulations- Released Phase 1 report in February 2006.
  • National Agri-Environmental Health Analysis and Reporting Program (NAHARP)- Released agri-environmental indicator report

  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Environment            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 48.6 97.0 111.0 198.8 198.8 (87.8)
Total Transfer Payment Program 48.6 97.0 111.0 198.8 198.8 (87.8)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
Initial delays in signing provincial implementation agreements resulted in delays in project start up with consequential impacts on resource requirements. This required on-going reprofiling over the 5 year program which resulted in a significant variance in the final year as projects were completed.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: An evaluation was conducted of the Environment Chapter in 2007-08 and will be made official in the 2008-09 fiscal year.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: An internal audit of the Greencover Canada program was conducted in 2007-08 and officially signed off on June 10, 2008 by the AAFC Audit committee. This is currently not posted online.

The Office of the Auditor General is conducting an audit of the Environment Chapter Programs. It began in 2007-08 and will continue through to the 2008-09 fiscal year.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Food Safety and Food Quality (FSQ) (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extension until March 31, 2009)

Description:The objective of the program is to assist industry in developing and implementing government-recognized food safety, traceability and quality process control systems throughout the agri-food continuum, in order to:

  • protect human health by reducing exposure to food hazards;
  • increase consumer confidence in the safety and quality of food produced in Canada;
  • increase industry's ability to meet or to exceed market requirements for food safety and food quality; and to
  • provide value-added opportunities through the adoption of food safety and food quality systems

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
The Canadian Food Safety and Quality Program is made up of three components: 1) Systems Development 2) On-Farm Implementation and 3) Food Safety Initiative.

The Systems Development component has three elements 1) Systems Development (On-Farm & Post-Farm), 2) Traceability and 3) Food Quality.

In 2007-08:

  • Under Systems Development: 16 of 19 eligible industry commodity organizations were at various stages of system development. Of those 16 organizations, 12 have completed the first part of a three-part Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) recognition process; three have completed the second part of the process. In all, four projects worth $186,128 were approved.
  • 13 of 28 eligible post-farm organizations participated in CFSQP and have systems at various stages of development. Four projects were approved for a total of $182,982 in funding; and
  • Traceability element: three projects were approved for a total of $235,060.
  • Food Quality element: one project worth $155,806.67 was approved. A food quality policy is still being developed.

Under the On-Farm Implementation component, seven national commodity organizations offered workshops and technical support directly to producers to assist them to implement Food Safety systems. Three new projects worth $4.42M were approved.

Under the Food Safety Initiative component, PEI joined the initiative bringing the approved funding under this component to $50.4M for the seven provinces involved (BC. AB., SK., MB, ON, NS & PEI). All seven provinces participated in Outreach, Implementation and/or Research & Development (R&D).

As of March 31, 2008, $89.9M (46.8 percent of a total of $190.0M) of Agricultural Policy Framework funding for CFSQP has been approved for projects and $67.0M (74.5 percent of the $89.9M) has been spent.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Food Safety & Food Quality            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 6.1 10.5 71.4 45.9 45.9 25.5
Total Transfer Payment Program 6.1 10.5 71.4 45.9 45.9 25.5

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
The planned amount for 2007-08 was $71.4M which included $22.8M carried forward from unspent 2006-07 funding as well as $16M reallocated from the Canadian Farm Families Options Program. The initial planned amount in the TB submission for 07-08 was $36.08M. Actual expenditures for the year were $45.9M.

The overall increase in actual expenditure in 2007-08 of $35.4M over 2006-07 included $28M in the Food Safety Initiative component.

Under On-Farm Implementation, seven national organizations increased their spending from $2.2M in 2006-07 to $6.0M in 2007-08, an increase of about 276%, for workshops and technical support (services or equipment purchase) to farmers.

Systems Development (SD) is a 4-phase approach, most organizations developing post-farm food safety systems were at the later stages of developing systems or providing training which are more expensive than the beginning of Systems Development. These post-farm projects expenditures were about $2M (accounting for over 200% of the increase within the SD component) in 2007-08 compared to $0.6M in 2006-07. On the part of the on-farm food safety element, $2.7M expenditure was reported in 2007-08 compared to $1.9M in 2006-07, an increase of about 45% within the on-farm food safety element.

The CFSQP is a demand-driven program, and CFSQP projects typically take place over a 3-6 year period which is the length of time that most organizations typically require to complete development of their food safety or traceability system. Unlike short-term projects (less than 12 months - e.g. pilot projects), spending can often vary significantly from one year to the next, making program forecasting more difficult.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: According to the FSQ Chapter evaluation for Progress on Results undertaken in 2007, "food safety has remained very relevant and perhaps even more relevant today than at the beginning of the FSQ priority. At the project level, case studies showed that some important achievements and successes were made in individual projects funded by FSQ. But overall, progress in the Chapter was limited and slowed relative to original outcome goals and the emerging market requirements."

Lessons learned from the Evaluation include:

  1. FSQ Chapter outcomes were not realistic regarding industry state or readiness and the time required (10-15 years) to achieve objectives;
  2. A voluntary approach has limitations because associations do not have a mandate to impose the use of food safety systems by their members and do not cover all commodities;
  3. Under APF, some performance indicators proved difficult to measure. Under Growing Forward, AAFC is taking great care to ensure that we identify meaningful measurements with appropriate and viable baseline data;
  4. Some national associations lack the necessary capacity to efficiently and effectively implement food safety systems;
  5. There is on-going interest in development and implementation of government recognized on-farm and post-farm HACCP-based systems; and
  6. Provincial partners commented on the late start of the FSI agreements and the cumbersome AAFC program delivery infrastructure; and the Provincial delivery of the FSI component was efficiently and effectively delivered.

There is currently no URL for this evaluation.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: No Program audit was conducted in 2007-08 and none is planned for 2008-09.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Science and Innovation (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extension until March 31, 2009)

Description: The purpose of the Science and Innovation Transfer Payments Programs (TPP) is to accelerate innovation adoption in agriculture. Science and innovation are the cornerstone of efforts to make the Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector the world leader in food safety, innovation and environmentally responsible production and to support its future success and prosperity. The programs are designed to bring together a full spectrum of organizations to develop ideas that will accelerate the adoption of innovation and the commercialization of products. The three major objectives of the program are; realigning of public science resources; co-ordination along the whole value chain; and the creation of an innovation climate. Advances in agri-food science and technology are accelerating the development of a wide range of new industrial, health and nutritional products obtained from plants, animals and micro organisms.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:

  • By the end of 2007-2008, 29 Contribution Agreements were in place for the Broker and Agri-Innovation Programs, as well as 4 Collateral Agreements under the Science and Innovation Division, utilizing the balance of the funds available. A number of "lessons learned" have become visible that will be considered in future programming.
  • By the end of 2007-2008, 23 contracts were utilized to support the re-alignment of public science resources in the agri-food sector, coordinate activities along the whole agri-food value chain, create an innovative agri-food business climate as well as to support the development of Broker and Agri-Innovation projects.

Funded sector-led projects to implement alternative value-added strategies for existing commodities and new products and markets

  • In 2007-2008 the Science and Innovation programs provided funding which enabled nine commodity associations to develop and implement new value-added strategies/plans to increase profitability for Canadian producers, processors and other members along the value chain. This reflects a significant increase over the 2006-2007 fiscal year in which one strategy was developed and implemented to increase the value of an existing commodity.

Improved collaboration along value chains to identify risks, opportunities and new markets.

  • During the 2007-2008 period, Science and Innovation programs funded projects that developed 42 innovation networks, workshops and forums that identified risks, opportunities and new markets to increase profitability of the sector. This is a moderate increase to the approximate 30 collaboration activities held in the 2006-2007 fiscal year.

Funded support for the development and start-up costs for centres of innovation and/or incubators or business mentoring.

  • The Science and Innovation programs provided funding to assist the acceleration of the development of commercial success of bio-based businesses, commercialization, formalizing strategic plans and building knowledge networks. 26 business mentoring opportunities with private Canadian companies were initiated that resulted in 6 companies that successfully launched new bio-based products.

Number of domestic and world agri-food research opportunities created.

  • 763 new research opportunities were created in 2007-2008 from Science and Innovation Contribution/Collateral Agreements. In 2006-2007, 323 opportunities were created. Funded projects assisted towards achieving increased value for research investments by focusing efforts on industry led opportunities. In addition, funding increased research capacity to exploit Canada's natural advantage in biomass by allowing combined efforts of public and private research to explore new economic opportunities.

  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 3.1 54.0 48.8 73.5 73.5 (24.7)
Total Transfer Payment Program 3.1 54.0 48.8 73.5 73.5 (24.7)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
In the last two years of the Programs (2006-2007 and 2007-2008), unspent funds from other programs were reallocated to support the demand under the Science and Innovation Programs.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:

  • The Science and Innovation Division lacked sufficient human resources, especially early on, to develop a transparent and consistent delivery structure to facilitate streamlined application, selection and approval process and reporting systems.
  • The Broker Program was viewed as cutting edge. No other programs like it exist within AAFC and it is favored by the industry.
  • The current regulatory framework for submission processes for agri-food products is a major barrier to new bioproducts and bioprocesses market entry and development.
  • Innovation is a horizontal issue which cuts across the department and impacts the activities of a significant number of branches.

Note: The Evalutation has not been posted to date

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: No audit of the Science and Innovation Transfer Payment Program has been conducted to date.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Production Insurance (under the Agricultural Policy Framework-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Statutory Program)

Start Date: April 1, 2003 for APF-Business Risk Management (BRM)
End Date: March 31, 2008 for APF-Business Risk Management (BRM) funding

Description: The purpose of the program is to seek to stabilize farm income through cushioning the producer against the economic impact of production losses arising from natural hazards like drought, hail, frost and diseases.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
Producer participation in PI has a targeted participation rate of 70% and for forage 50% as measured by a comparison of crops grown to crops insured. For the main crop groups (excluding forage), Manitoba has the highest participation rate at 80% followed by Quebec at 71.2%. The national average was 57.9% which is lower than the target but considered good based on the wide range of uptake across provinces. Quebec has the highest participation rate for forage at 79%, while the other provinces range from 0% to 20% bringing the national average participation rate for the forage programs to approximately 19%. Overall, numerous enhancements were made this year and will continue to be made to the PI program including improvements for forage, horticulture, potato storage, new crops and available coverage levels.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 345.9 343.1 407.0 416.4 416.4 (9.4)
Total Transfer Payment Program 345.9 343.1 407.0 416.4 416.4 (9.4)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
The actual expenditures for 2007/08 are higher than what was originally planned due to a rise in grain and oilseed prices which have increased total premium costs. In addition, the overall higher federal cost-share has also contributed to the increase in premium costs.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:
An evaluation that assessed the relevance, implementation, success and cost effectiveness of the PI program from 2003/04 to 2005/06 has been completed. The evaluation recommended the following for each item assessed:

  1. Relevance: the federal government continue to support the program
  2. Implementation: AAFC work with commodity associations and provincial agencies to improve the flow of information on PI to all producers, particularly regarding recent changes and options that have been introduced;
  3. Success: the intent to place livestock insurance under PI be reviewed given the differing basis on which insurance risk is assessed; and
  4. Cost effectiveness: The governance model for PI be reviewed in the context of BRM governance systems to ensure future delivery of PI demonstrates more consistency, equity, sharing of information and best practices.

There is currently no URL for this evaluation.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audience: Management has addressed the recommendations contained in the PI audit finalized in 2004.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Plum Pox Eradication Program (PPEP) (Voted)

Start Date:September 2004
End Date: March 31, 2011

Description: The purpose of this seven-year program (2004-05 to 2010-11) is to eradicate the Plum Pox Virus (PPV) in Canada while ensuring the viability of the industry. This program is a follow-up of the expired three-year program (2001-02 to 2003-04) which showed that the eradication of PPV was possible. 2007-08 was year 4 of the 7-year program. Additional funding for the PPEP program in the amount of $5.811M was approved by Treasury Board in September 2007. This additional funding will be used to continue intensive sampling activites of trees and to compensate producers for the removal of infected trees in the quarantine area. This additional funding has increasing planned contributions for 2007-08 from the original $3.1M to $8.9M.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System/Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
2007-08 was year 4 of the 7-year program. Surveillance for the virus continued by sampling trees in the quarantine area. Infected trees and trees in infected blocks that met the removal threshold were removed. Producers were financially assisted for the loss of trees.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Business Risk Management            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions - - - 6.9 6.9 (6.9)
Total Business Risk Management - - - 6.9 6.9 (6.9)
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 8.1 5.5 3.1 - - 3.1
Total Innovation and Renewal 8.1 5.5 3.1 - - 3.1
Total Transfer Payment Program 8.1 5.5 3.1 6.9 6.9 (3.8)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
At the time of preparation of the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities Treasury Board approval had not yet been received for additional funding for this program and as such Planned Spending does not reflect this funding.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: The PPEP has not been subject to an evaluation, and there is no evaluation planned.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: The PPEP has not been subject to an audit, and there is no audit planned.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - Renewal (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extension until March 31, 2009)

Description:Through Renewal programming, AAFC aims to provide producers with the tools and skills they need to make business decisions based on good knowledge. Renewal programming is built on the concept of continuous learning, and is designed to help producers assess their situations and plan for the future during critical transition times. Renewal programs enhance producers' access to information, advice and training, and enable them to pursue on- and off-farm income opportunities.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
Canadian Agricultural Skills Service (CASS) - Three Renewal indicators were developed to measure the results of Renewal programs. Using baseline data from the 2004 National Renewal Survey (NRS), provincial working groups developed targets for each of the 3 Renewal indicators. The 2007 NRS was used to determine if producers have increased their level of knowledge and use of beneficial management practices, and if targets are being met.

  1. The percentage of farmers and farm families who have knowledge and understanding of beneficial business management practices increased from 52% in 2004 to 59% in 2007 (the target was set at 65%).
  2. The percentage of farmers and farm families that use beneficial business management tools, services, practices and/or improved skills increased from 66% in 2004 to 69% in 2007 (the target was set at 74%).
  3. The percentage of farmers and farm families that are meeting their business and personal goals increased from 37% in 2004 to 41% in 2007 (the target was set at 48%).

In addition, 4,638 applications were received for Canadian Agricultural Skills Service (CASS) in 2007-08 (1,687 renewal applicants and 2,951 Options clients). 80% of CASS respondents to a Client Impact Assessment (CIA) survey conducted in 2007 reported that the skills and/or knowledge they developed through participation in CASS helped them in reaching their most important business goal. In 2007-08, 8,757 producers across Canada applied to participate in the Canadian Farm Business Advisory Service (CFBAS) and Planning and Assessment for Value-Added Enterprise (PAVE). Of those, 8,086 were for Farm Business Assessment (FBA), 643 were for SBPS, and 28 were for PAVE (6,150 of the 8,086 FBA applicants were Options clients). 55% of FBA CIA respondents and 71% of SBPS CIA respondents indicated that the program had been helpful in reaching their most important farm business goal.

Three Renewal indicators were developed to measure the results of Renewal programs. Using baseline data from the 2004 National Renewal Survey (NRS), provincial working groups developed targets for each of the 3 Renewal indicators. The 2007 NRS was used to determine if producers have increased their level of knowledge and use of beneficial business management practices, and if targets are being met.

On average, 70% agreed that these programs were beneficial in increasing understanding of the factors most critical to the success of the enterprise and creating the potential for increased profitability. To help producers acquire the skills they need to adapt to rapid changes in the industry, AAFC continued to work strategically with the agriculture and agri-food sector in 2007-08 to identify the new skills and learning opportunities needed in a knowledge-intensive economy.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Innovation and Renewal            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 15.3 31.6 5.6 55.0 55.0 (49.4)
Total Transfer Payment Program 15.3 31.6 5.6 55.0 55.0 (49.4)

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
The actual spending is higher than Planned due to the following:
1) A substantial number of applications received in late 2006-07 and which were paid in 2007-08;
2) Pressure by consultants to complete the work by March 2008 since there was uncertainty as to program availability and funding for fiscal year 2008-09; and
3) APF Renewal receives the majority of its funding as operating funding, and therefore contribution funds is reallocated from other APF initiatives during the fiscal year to meet requirements.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
A Renewal chapter evaluation has been completed and a draft report is currently receiving internal review at the Office of Audit and Evaluation. A final evaluation report is expected to be completed by September 31, 2008. The summative evaluation scheduled to be completed by March 31, 2010 is under review; decisions regarding evaluations will be completed once Growing Forward programs have been determined.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: 5 compliance audits were undertaken in 2007/2008, including:

  1. The Canadian Agricultural Skills Service under the Canada-Alberta Implementation Agreement. The auditor reported that as at March 31, 2008 the Program is in compliance, in all material respects, with the criteria established in the Agreement. Through the compliance audit it was determined that the Agreement was administered in accordance with the purposes of the CASS program for eligible activities; the Federal-Provincial Working Group was established in accordance with the Agreement and had adequate control and reporting systems to enable them to monitor and track activities and objective; policies and administrative procedures developed were appropriate and operating effectively for the program; roles and responsibilities of the Responsible Officer were clearly defined; performance information was documented; and administrative expenses were in accordance with the Agreement.
  2. The delivery of the Canadian Agricultural Skills Service under the Canada-Saskatchewan Implementation Agreement. The auditor reported that as at March 31, 2007, the Program is in compliance, in all material respects, with the criteria established in the Agreement. The auditor reported that the procedures and systems in place and used by the Province’s Responsible Officer were appropriate and well documented; and the procedures used by the delivery agent to ensure that the Colleges applied the terms and conditions of the agreement to their assessment and individual learning plan development assistance appeared to be appropriate, documented and operating properly.
  3. The Collateral Agreement for Renewal under the Canada - Alberta Implementation Agreement. The auditor noted that with the exception of non-compliance with section 4.14, 6.1, and A.1 and Article 9 of the agreement, as at March 31, 2007 and for the years ended March 31, 2006 and 2007, the Province of Alberta, as represented by the Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, is in compliance, in all material respects, with the criteria established by the administrative procedures described in the Agreement. The auditor reported that during the audit they noted adequate internal, financial, and administrative controls exist and meet the needs of the Program. Also, there were adequate controls with respect to the calculation, collection, payment and recording of federal contributions by the Province.
  4. The Renewal element of the Agriculture Framework Canada - Quebec Collateral Agreement on the management of Federal-Provincial implementation measures. The auditor reported that as at March 31, 2007, the Province of Quebec is in compliance, in all material respects, with the terms and conditions set out by AAFC. The auditor reported that during the audit they noted that approved expenditures are subject to controls, responsibilities are specified, allocations are adequate and calculations are properly applied for the admissible activities specified in the Agreement; funds are subject to appropriate tracking and verification; the management reporting systems are appropriate for administering the program; Canada and the province appear to share equal visibility on public documents; and administrative expenditures were found to be in compliance with the Agreement.
  5. The delivery of the Canadian Agricultural Skills Service in the Canada - Manitoba Implementation Agreement. Draft copies of the audit report and the detailed report for discussion purposes with the project authority are scheduled to be completed by July 18, 2008; and the Final Report to be delivered July 31, 2008.

The compliance audit on the Canadian Agricultural Skills Service under the Canada-Ontario Implementation Agreement is on-going; and compliance audits for CASS-PEI and 4-H have been deferred.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions for Agriculture and Agri-food Sector Assistance - International (Canadian Agriculture and Food International) (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extension until March 31, 2009)

Description: The purpose of the CAFI program is to provide support to industry to gain and expand international recognition for Canada and enhance market opportunities for Canadian agriculture and food products. The program replaces and improves on AAFC's Agri-Food Trade Program (AFTP).

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System/Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
In 2007-08, the CAFI Program supported industry initiatives in targeted markets that aim to gain international recognition for Canadian agriculture, agri-food, beverage, and seafood products.

The CAFI program provides funding for industry initiatives designed to increase international sales of Canadian agriculture and food products, by building upon Canada's reputation as a provider of high-quality, safe and innovative agriculture, agri-food, beverage, and seafood products.

For example, in 2007-08, through initiatives funded under the CAFI program:
During 2007 the first major shipments of purebred Canadian cattle, since the discovery of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in 2003, were delivered to Russia, which imported more than 5000 head of Canadian cattle. Two further shipments, amounting to 3800 head in total took place during the first half of 2008 and additional orders are under negotiation. Canadian swine exporters are also experiencing success in the Russian market. In 2006, over 2,000 breeding swine were exported to Russia valued at $1.8 million, while 10,447 breeding swine were exported in 2007 with a value of $9.1 million, making Russia the largest off-shore market for Canadian breeding swine in 2006 and 2007.

Pulse Canada efforts to reduce the risks of market access barriers has resulted in the transition to a tariff and quota-free environment, and access of beans to Mexico in January 2008.

Part of the strategy involved working with Mexico's bean sector on areas of mutual interest including research collaboration and increasing demand initiatives. Although continued monitoring of the market access situation is required, Pulse Canada is ready to shift focus to increasing demand initiatives in 2008-2009. The partnerships developed with Mexico industry and government through market access activities have paved the way for transition to take place.

The main objective of the Canadian Special Crops Association export market growth strategy was to create a vibrant business environment that promotes and facilitates export success for Canadian exporters of pulses and special crops. The total export value of mustard seed, sunflower seed, canary seed and buckwheat increased 80% from approximately $147M in 2005 to nearly $264M in 2007.

The Health and Antioxidant Super-fruit message continues to drive the demand for Blueberries and Wild Blueberries around the world, but winter damage and poor weather during pollination resulted in less production than anticipated. The industry will need 50-60 million pounds of Wild Blueberries to fulfill the strong demand worldwide. Processors are receiving excellent returns for their fruit, and this has put them in a stronger position to invest in the growth of the industry.

The Canadian Aquaculture Industry Alliance Long Term International Strategy created the opportunity for industry members to network and gain valuable contacts from all aquaculture and seafood industries within the U.S. and other international markets. Contacts made at a CAFI funded marketing activity led to the selection of Canadian farmed Arctic Char as a sustainably farmed species featured at the Monterrey Bay Aquarium 6th Cooking for Solutions Gala Event.

Increased recognition of Canadian products and capabilities.

AAFC continued to work in 2007-08 to generate greater recognition for Canada by branding its achievements in food safety, traceability, animal health and environmental sustainability to maximize exports and generate greater sales for Canadian agriculture and agri-food products. The CAFI Program assists industry associations in undertaking activities with these objectives.

Canadian Pork International is the export promotion agency for the Canadian pork industry representing producers, processors and trading houses. In 2007, despite challenges, pork exports remain strong. Promotional campaigns, including retail promotions, have nearly doubled the sales of chilled pork over the last few years with a wider distribution in more than 20% of Japanese supermarkets. Chilled pork exports comprise of 30% of all pork exports to Japan along with a 225% growth in the same product to Korea. The launch of a promotional campaign in Singapore contributed towards exports of chilled pork increasing 250% over the previous year and accounting for 7% of exports to Singapore in 2007 versus 2% in 2006.

The CAFI Program is also committed to increasing international recognition of Canada's capabilities an exporter of agriculture, agri-food, and seafood products. To this end, the CAFI Program supported numerous incoming missions of international delegations interested in learning about the superior capabilities of the Canadian industry first-hand. The Canadian Swine Exporters Association considers incoming missions a significant building block in their quest for increasing sales and developing new markets. In 2007 over 300,000 breeding swine were exported to 26 countries.

The challenges the pork sector faced were the increasing competitive export market, the increasing number of non-tariff barriers impacting market access, a strong Canadian dollar making Canadian product more expensive internationally and particularly less competitive versus US pork products, increasing hog cost of production contributing to uncertainty and rationalization in the sector and competitiveness challenges at processing (labour cost and availability, plant scale) contributing to the rationalization in hog processing.

The CAFI program is also committed to increasing international recognition of Canada's capabilities as a net exporter of agriculture, agri-food, and seafood products. To this end, the CAFI program supported numerous incoming missions of international delegations interested in learning about the superior capabilities of the Canadian industry first-hand. The Canadian Swine Exporters Association (CSEA) considers incoming missions a significant building block in their quest for increasing sales and developing new markets. In August 2006 two Chilean veterinary inspectors came to Canada on an incoming mission and inspected approximately 20 farms in four provinces. As a result of the inspections several hundred breeding swine were shipped to Chile.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Markets and International            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 24.2 22.1 24.7 17.9 17.9 6.8
Total Transfer Payment Program 24.2 22.1 24.7 17.9 17.9 6.8

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
The variance between actual and planned spending for 2007-08 is due in part to the withdrawal / rejection of three proposals primarily due to delays in implementation.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
An evaluation was requested in 2006-2007 fiscal year, but could not be accommodated in the evaluation plan. The program is currently drawing on an evaluation from its predecessor program and observations from the evaluation of the APF International Chapter. Industry associations benefits from CAFI Program funding, and this demonstrates a positive impact on their members' export performance.

As a result of close and ongoing consultation, which also take place with industry, numerous adjustments have been made to the Program.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: No audits have been completed and none are planned.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions in support of Rural Canada and of development in the area of Co-operatives (under the Agricultural Policy Framework - Non-Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted)

Start Date: April 1, 2003
End Date: March 31, 2008 (extension until March 31, 2009)

Description: The purpose of the programs is to carry out plans for Rural and Co-operative development. The programming covers the following three initiatives:

  • the renewal and strengthening of the Canadian Rural Partnership, which includes the transfer payments program "Models for Rural Development", and "The Rural Partnership Development Program" (formerly the Networking Initiative), both of which focus on approaches to rural development, and building partnerships.
  • the Rural Community Capacity Building Program, which places a focus on tools, services, knowledge, and processes.
  • the Co-operatives Development Initiative (CDI) ($12.4 million from 2003-04 to 2007-08). In 2006, additional funding was provided to CDI to provide support for co-op development projects to enable farmers to capture new biofuels and other value-added opportunities - Ag-CDI funding (G&Cs): $3.75 million for 2006-07 to 2008-09.

Strategic Outcome: Innovation for Growth

Results Achieved:
Models for Rural Development -In 2007-2008, the 23 models were able to be replicated in more than 60 sites across rural Canada, involving more than 270 communities. Final Participatory Evaluation reports are being submitted which will serve as the basis for the body of knowledge regarding rural development. Most models completed their projects by March 31, 2008, however certain models and/or sites, due to external factors beyond their control, did not have the opportunity to reach their full potential. Some short term incremental funding in 2008/2009 will allow them to achieve the best results possible. The Networking Initiative provided funding for over 253 projects to rural communities.

Co-operatives Secretariat - In 2007-08, a network of 20 provincial, regional, and sectoral partners delivered the Advisory Services component across the country. At the end of the third quarter, Advisory Services had assisted three new co-operatives to incorporate and provide technical assistance to 76 existing co-operatives in order to cope with internal issues or support business expansion. Under the Innovation and Research component, the Secretariat approved 41 new projects for a total of $1.4 million that addressed the six priorities of the program.

Also, the Agriculture Co-operative Development Initiative (Ag-CDI) was renewed for two years and for 2007-2008 a total of 28 biofuel and value-added co-op projects and other activities to enhance the co-operative sector development capacity were funded for a total value of $1.0 million. In both CDI and Ag-CDI, the expected result to commit 100% of our G & C budget was met. In 2007-2008, all budget for CDI was used. For Ag-CDI, 90.4 % of the budget was spent; the late start of the program (september 2007) explains the variance in results.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity: Rural and Cooperatives Secretariat            
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 8.6 9.1 7.8 10.6 10.6 (2.8)
Total Transfer Payment Program 8.6 9.1 7.8 10.6 10.6 (2.8)

Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The variance between Actual and Planned spending is due in part to additional funding received subsequent to the publication of the 2007-2008 RPP, specifically for Ag-CDI. Secondly, due to delays in the development of the Models for Rural Development in 2006-2007, funding was reallocated to other initiatives. This funding was then reallocated back to Rural Development in 2007-2008.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: The Models for Rural Development Program is still receiving final evaluation reports and is therefore unable to provide any significant findings at this time. Audited financial statements from the proponents are due this year as well, which will faciliate the conclusion of the initiative.

In 2006 the Co-operative Development Initiative in 2006 conducted a mid-term evaluation and found that the program conformed to the mandate and was well received by communities as the demand for assistance exceeded the level of resources. Further information can be found at http://www.agr.gc.ca/info/audit-exam/pdf/cdi_idc_e.pdf or http://www.agr.gc.ca/info/audit-exam/index_e.php?page=cdi_idc

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Models for Rural Development and Networking Initiative: No evaluation is planned at this time; however this may be reconsidered if variances are noted on the submitted audited financial statements.

Co-operatives Secretariat: the CDI and Ag-CDI programs were not part of the Department Audit Plan for 2007-2008 and were not identified in 2008-2009 plan. An internal evaluation at the end of programs will be conducted, but an audit will be performed only if the finding of the evaluation indicates a requirement of further investigation.

Details on Transfer Payments Programs for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

($ millions)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Spring Credit Advance Program (SCAP) and Enhanced Spring Credit Advanced Program (ESCAP) (under the Agricultural Policy Framework (APF) -Business Risk Management Terms and Conditions - Voted & Statutory)

Start Date: April 1, 2003 For APF-Business Risk Management (BRM)
End Date: 2007-2008 concurrent with the end of the APF

Description:The SCAP program has been in place since 2000. The Spring Credit Advance Program (SCAP) provides producer organizations and their lenders with a repayment guarantee for advances of up to $0.05 million which are issued to producers in the spring. The objective of the program is to assist producers with their spring production input costs.

The ESCAP program was put in place in 2006 as a transitional program to increase the amount of interest free benefit to $0.1 million while amendments were being made to Agricultural Marketing Programs Act (AMPA). The objective of ESCAP is to allow producers to make decisions based on sound production or marketing rationale rather than on the availability of operating cash. Such objectives will contribute to the overarching goal of the APF.

The benefits of ESCAP include:
- Minimizing the distortion of producers' marketing and production decisions; and
- Facilitating short-term cash flow and long-term planning by producers.

Strategic Outcome: Security of the Food System

Results Achieved:
Legislative amendments on the AMPA were tabled in Parliament in May 2006, and the Enhanced Spring Credit Advance Program was announced as an interim measure. The AMPA received royal assent in June, 2006, and came into force in November, 2006.

On February 28th, 2006 AAFC launched the Advance Payments Program (APP)/SCAP Electronic Delivery System allowing producer organizations to submit producer level data electronically. AAFC now has greater access to more accurate reporting of advances and repayments across provinces and producer organizations.

The ESCAP production period ended on September 30th, 2007. The ESCAP was an interim program while legislative changes were made to the AMPA in regards to the APP program. In total, $1.021 billion was advanced under the ESCAP to 29,625 producers. The average advance was $34,494 per producer, with an average interest savings of $915.41 per producer. With this access to capital, and interest savings, the ESCAP achieved it's expected results to provide producers with greater access to credit in the spring to assist with input costs; Improved cash flow; and allow for better farming practices by providing greater access to working capital.


  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
  Actual Spending Actual Spending Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Variance between
Actual and Planned
Program Activity:
Business Risk Management
           
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 15.3 27.4 26.1 26.7 15.7 10.4
Total Transfer Payment Program 15.3 27.4 26.1 26.7 15.7 10.4

Comment(s) on Variance(s)
Actual cost of ESCAP for 2007-08 was less than planned due to the implementation of the New APP program along with old APP still being completed. This allowed for 3 different programs in which producers could choose from in order to receive an advance, which were being run concurrently. Uptake for all 3 programs was less than planned, but only due to a 3rd program being offered during the same time period.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:
No evaluation of the ESCAP program was completed during the 2007-08 fiscal year. As the ESCAP program is now complete, no evaluation of the program will be pursued in the future.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit:
No audit of the ESCAP program was completed during the 2007-08 fiscal year. As the ESCAP program is now complete, no audit of the program will be pursued in the future.

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Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency


1)  Transfer Payment Program:

Atlantic Innovation Fund (AIF) – Voted

2)  Start Date:

3)  End Date:

May 10, 2001

March 31, 2010

4)  Description of Transfer Payment Program:

The AIF focuses on increasing research and development linked to economic development and commercialization objectives in areas that are of strategic importance to the region, particularly those that support the growth of strategic sectors/clusters.

The AIF emphasizes building Atlantic Canada’s system of innovation, including components that bridge the gap between research institutions and the marketplace. It also encourages synergies among the various components of this system through partnerships, alliances and networks.

The AIF supports research and development projects that focus on the areas of natural sciences, applied sciences, and social sciences and humanities, where these are linked explicitly to the development of technology-based products, processes or services, or their commercialization, thereby strengthening the region’s system of innovation.

More information on the AIF can be found at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/e/financial/aif/index.shtml.

5)  Strategic Outcomes:

The AIF is linked to the strategic outcome, Competitive and sustainable Atlantic enterprises, with emphasis on those of small and medium size.

6)  Results Achieved:

The AIF focuses on accelerating the development of the knowledge‑based industry and facilitating transition within traditional industries by increasing the region’s capacity to carry out leading-edge research and development, thereby contributing to the development of new technology-based economic activity in Atlantic Canada. Clients of the AIF include businesses and institutions such as universities and research institutes. One of the key accomplishments for 2007-2008 was the successful approval of 31 R&D projects for over $80 million in ACOA assistance (29 projects under AIF Round V and 2 projects under the AIF Strategic Initiative process). As a result of these projects, the Agency was able to leverage an additional $83 million from other sources, including the private sector, universities and other research institutions, provincial governments, and national programs.

The AIF facilitates the development of strategic sectors characterized by regional clusters of firms.  Under AIF Round V, 21 of the 29 approved projects, accounting for more than $45 million in AIF funding, will augment development of the IT, life sciences/biotech, and oil and gas/oceans technology clusters and complement the National Research Council’s Atlantic Cluster initiative.

ACOA encourages AIF project proponents to seek opportunities for collaboration in such areas as research and development, project management, marketing or commercialization expertise in order to help maximize the economic benefits and enhance the likelihood of commercialization success. In 2007-2008, there were over 100 meaningful partnerships on AIF-funded projects.

Given that the level of privately funded R&D in Atlantic Canada is well below the national average, the AIF has focused on increasing the level of participation by commercial entities in innovation activity. For example, the percentage of approved projects from commercial proponents was 55% in 2007-2008, while over 90% of approved institutional projects had private sector partners (up from 85% in 2006-2007).



 


Program Activity

($ millions)

7)  2005‑2006
Actual Spending

8)  2006‑2007
Actual Spending

2007‑2008

9)
Planned Spending

10)
Total Authorities

11)
Actual Spending

12)
Variance (9‑11)

13)  Fostering the development of institutions and enterprises, with emphasis on those of small and medium size

- Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- Total Contributions

43.6

59.3

65.0

57.0

57.0

8.0

- Total Other Types of TPs

 

 

 

 

 

 

14)  Total for PA

43.6

59.3

65.0

57.0

57.0

8.0

15)  Total for Transfer Payment Program

43.6

59.3

65.0

57.0

57.0

8.0

16)  Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Actual spending under the AIF was less than planned due to complex contribution agreements being negotiated and signed later than planned following the approval of projects.

17)  Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit and/or evaluation:  If an evaluation or audit is planned, but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.

An Impact Evaluation of Innovation, which includes the Atlantic Innovation Fund (AIF) and the Business Development Program (BDP), is under way and the final report will be completed in May 2009. An internal audit of the Atlantic Innovation Fund was concluded in March 2007. The audit results show that the Agency has exercised due diligence in the delivery of the program, and has substantially complied with the terms and conditions of the program and with the Treasury Board Policy on Transfer Payments. More information can be found at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/e/library/audit.shtml.




1)  Transfer Payment Program:

Business Development Program (BDP) – Voted

2)  Start Date:

3)  End Date:

June 25, 1995

March 31, 2010

4)  Description of Transfer Payment Program:

The program helps set up, expand or modernize businesses, and focuses on small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). More information on the BDP can be found at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/e/financial/business.shtml.

5)  Strategic Outcomes:

The BDP is linked to the following strategic outcomes: Competitive and sustainable Atlantic enterprises, with emphasis on those of small and medium size; Dynamic and sustainable communities for Atlantic Canada; Policies and programs that strengthen the Atlantic economy.

6)  Results Achieved:

During 2007-2008, the BDP invested in 32 new business establishments and in 125 projects to help companies expand and/or modernize their facilities, thereby improving their productivity and preserving long-term prospect of employment.  This important program continues to focus on innovation, skills development and trade activities.  This results in enhancing the business environment in Atlantic Canada.  The program serves to fill gaps in the financing continuum for SMEs and entrepreneurs in Atlantic Canada.

Program Activity

($ millions)

7)  2005‑2006
Actual Spending

8)  2006‑2007
Actual Spending

2007‑2008

9)
Planned Spending

10)
Total Authorities

11)
Actual Spending

12)
Variance (9‑11)

13)  Fostering the development of institutions and enterprises, with emphasis on those of small and medium size

- Total Grants

0.4

0.2

1.0

0.2

0.2

0.8

- Total Contributions – BDP Regular

127.8

89.8

64.0

76.5

76.5

(12.5)

- Total Contributions – AIP (Trade, Investment, EBSD*)

29.3

22.2

21.0

20.8

20.8

2.0

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

157.5

112.2

86.0

97.5

97.5

(11.5)

13)  Fostering the economic development of Atlantic communities

- Total Grants

0.2

0.6

1.0

0.3

0.3

0.7

- Total Contributions

25.3

25.3

24.0

21.3

21.3

2.7

- Total Contributions – AIP (Trade, Investment, EBSD*)

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

(0.1)

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

25.5

25.9

25.0

21.7

21.7

3.3

13)  Policy

- Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- Total Contributions

0.7

0.6

2.0

0.4

0.4

1.6

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

0.7

0.6

2.0

0.4

0.4

1.6

13)  Advocacy

- Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- Total Contributions

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

(0.1)

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.1

(0.1)

15)  Total for Transfer Payment Program

183.7

138.7

113.0

119.7

119.7

(6.7)

* EBSD = Entrepreneurship and Business Skills Development

16)  Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Spending levels for the BDP were adjusted upwards by $6.7 million, from $113.0 million to $119.7 million to meet increased programming requirements for innovation projects and entrepreneurship and business skills development projects under the activity, Fostering the development of institutions and enterprises. The increase of $11.5 million in this activity and the $0.1 million under Advocacy were funded from decreased requirements of $8 million from the Atlantic Innovation Fund and lower than anticipated costs of $3.3 million and $1.6 million respectively under the activities, Fostering the economic development of Atlantic communities, and Policy.

17)  Significant audit and evaluation findings (including URL(s) to last audit and/or evaluation). If an evaluation or audit is planned, but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.

Components of the BDP are being evaluated under both an Impact Evaluation of Innovation and an Impact Evaluation of Community Investment/Community Development Resources to be completed by the end of May 2009. An internal audit of the BDP was concluded in November 2006. The audit results show that the Agency has exercised due diligence in the delivery of the program, and has substantially complied with the terms and conditions of the program and with the Treasury Board Policy on Transfer Payments.  An internal audit of the Entrepreneurship and Business Skills Development area of the BDP was concluded in 2008.  The audit results show that on an overall basis, the Agency exercised due diligence in the delivery of the Entrepreneurship and Business Skills Development elements of the BDP.  More information can be found at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/e/library/audit/bdp_qaa.shtml and at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/e/library/audit/ebsd.shtml.




1)  Transfer Payment Program:

Community Futures Program (CF) – Voted

2)  Start Date:

3)  End Date:

May 18, 1995

October 2, 2010

4)  Description of Transfer Payment Program:

Community Futures is a program that supports community economic development and builds the capacity of communities to realize their full sustainable potential. The program provides financial support to CF organizations (e.g. Community Business Development Corporations in Atlantic Canada) that, in collaboration with other partners and stakeholders, can assess their situation and develop strategies to meet their needs. It also provides support to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and social enterprises, and for undertaking appropriate community economic development initiatives.

5)  Strategic Outcomes:

The program is linked to the strategic outcome: Dynamic and sustainable communities for Atlantic Canada.

6)  Results Achieved:

In 2007-2008, ACOA invested $12.6 million through the CF program to support operational costs of the 41 Community Business Development Corporations (CBDCs) and to their provincial and Atlantic associations to assist in their work of filling the gap in providing access to capital and counselling for rural SMEs in Atlantic Canada.

This support allowed the CBDCs to provide over 7,600 counselling sessions to clients throughout the Atlantic region. The CBDCs also provided 1,050 loans for a total investment of $48.1 million in rural communities and leveraged an additional $37 million from other sources.

Additionally, the CF financial assistance allowed the CBDCs and their provincial and Atlantic Canadian associations to become active partners in the economic development within their communities by participating in the planning process and delivering important activities and programs. The Agency’s support provided the opportunities for the CBDCs to be active members of the many provincial, regional and pan-Canadian networks that work together in their communities with key industry leaders and all levels of governments to provide advice, direction and share best practices in order to ultimately develop and support community development of SMEs within the region. This has resulted in a better understanding of the issues and challenges that can be addressed and a more strategic focus on projects that will overcome challenges within rural communities.

Program Activity

($ millions)

7)  2005‑2006
Actual Spending

8)  2006‑2007
Actual Spending

2007-2008

9)
Planned Spending

10)
Total Authorities

11)
Actual Spending

12)
Variance (9‑11)

13)  Fostering the economic development of Atlantic communities

- Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- Total Contributions

11.4

14.2

12.6

13.7

13.7

(1.1)

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

11.4

14.2

12.6

13.7

13.7

(1.1)

15)  Total for Transfer Payment Program

11.4

14.2

12.6

13.7

13.7

(1.1)


16)  Comment(s) on Variance(s):

The increased expenditures related to an infusion of additional investment capital in order to address a community adjustment issue (i.e. allowing the community of Digby through a not for profit organization to acquire ownership of a critical piece of infrastructure related to the fisheries sector.)

17)  Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit and/or evaluation. If an evaluation or audit is planned, but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.

A follow-up audit of the CF Program is planned for 2008-2009. The previous audit was concluded in 2005 and indicated that the Agency has exercised due diligence in the delivery of the program.  More information can be found at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/e/library/audit/cfs.shtml. A Pan-Canadian Community Futures Program Impact Evaluation is underway and includes individual Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) evaluations. The Pan-Canadian Community Futures Impact Evaluation Roll-Up Report due date is November 2008.  The previous Community Futures Program Formative Evaluations were completed in fiscal year 2002-2003 by the RDAs. They addressed issues with respect to program rationale, success and cost-effectiveness, and pointed to the need to improve the measurement and management of performance. The roll-up report found the CF Program to be relevant and concluded that there was continuing need for the program.




1)  Transfer Payment Program:

Innovative Communities Fund (ICF) – Voted

2)  Start Date:

3)  End Date:

April 1, 2005

March 31, 2010

4)  Description of Transfer Payment Program:

The program is designed to make a non-repayable contribution in support of strategic initiatives that respond to the economic development needs of communities. To effectively address the wide range of challenges and opportunities of regions, communities and sectors, the ICF takes a comprehensive approach to working with communities at various stages along the economic development continuum, while ensuring sustainable economic outcomes.

There are two distinct components of the ICF. The first (strategic community capacity) is designed to support non‑commercial/non‑profit strategic initiatives that target the economic development needs of rural communities. The second component (proactive investments) is intended to stimulate transformative change. This component will support proactive identification and implementation of strategic opportunities with local partners. The program is designed to respond to the unique and varying needs of communities, and within this flexible approach there will be clear links to sustainable economic development outcomes. This focus on outcomes will ensure the program has the desired impact on the Atlantic region’s economy.

5)  Strategic Outcomes:

The ICF is linked to the strategic outcome, Dynamic and sustainable communities for Atlantic Canada.

6)  Results Achieved:

During 2007-2008, the ICF committed a total of $52.4 million to 150 projects across the region. In 2008-2009, ACOA will conduct an impact evaluation of the Community Investment sub-activity, which includes the ICF.

Program Activity

($ millions)

7)  2005‑2006
Actual Spending

8)  2006‑2007
Actual Spending

2007‑2008

9)
Planned Spending

10)
Total Authorities

11)
Actual Spending

12)
Variance (9‑11)

13)  Fostering the economic development of Atlantic communities

- Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- Total Contributions

7.9

38.8

42.3

46.9

46.9

(4.6)

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

7.9

38.8

42.3

46.9

46.9

(4.6)

15)  Total for Transfer Payment Program

7.9

38.8

42.3

46.9

46.9

(4.6)

16)  Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Actual spending under the ICF was higher than planned due increased take-up under the program.

17) Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit and/or evaluation. If an evaluation or audit is planned, but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.

An Impact Evaluation of Community Investment/Community Development Resources Impact, which includes the ICF and the BDP, is underway and the final report is to be completed in May 2009. An audit of the program was completed in 2007 and indicated that the Agency exercised due diligence in the delivery of Community Development programming, including the ICF.  More information can be found at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/e/library/audit/ced.shtml.




1)  Transfer Payment Program:

Infrastructure Canada Program (ICP) – Voted
Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Agreement
Canada-Prince Edward Island Agreement
Canada-Nova Scotia Agreement
Canada-New Brunswick Agreement

2)  Start Date:

3)  End Date:

December 12, 2000

March 31, 2009

4)  Description of Transfer Payment Program:

The Infrastructure Canada program is a federal-provincial/territorial cost-shared initiative that improves urban and rural municipal infrastructure in Canada. Program objectives include improving Canadians’ quality of life through investments that enhance the quality of the environment, support long-term economic growth, improve community infrastructure, and build 21st century infrastructure.

5)  Strategic Outcomes:

The program is linked to the strategic outcome, Dynamic and sustainable communities for Atlantic Canada.

6)  Results Achieved:

Since agreements were signed with the four Atlantic Provinces, from 2000 to 2006, over $180 million of federal funds has been committed to close to 700 approved projects under the ICP. The program’s first priority is green municipal infrastructure (i.e. projects that improve the quality of the environment and contribute to Canada's goal of clean air and clean water). ACOA is well ahead of target on green objectives, with 91% of federal funds having been directed to projects in this category.

Program Activity

($ millions)

7)  2005‑2006
Actual Spending

8)  2006‑2007
Actual Spending

2007‑2008

9)
Planned Spending

10)
Total Authorities

11)
Actual Spending

12)
Variance (9‑11)

Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Agreement
13)  Infrastructure Programming

- Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- Total Contributions

11.4

8.6

0.9

2.9

2.9

(2.0)

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

11.4

8.6

0.9

2.9

2.9

(2.0)

Canada-Prince Edward Island Agreement
13)  Infrastructure Programming

- Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- Total Contributions

1.2

0.4

0.0

0.0

0.0

(0.0)

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

1.2

0.4

0.0

0.0

0.0

(0.0)

Canada-Nova Scotia Agreement
13)  Infrastructure Programming

- Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- Total Contributions

10.6

9.2

2.1

5.9

5.9

(3.8)

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

10.6

9.2

2.1

5.9

5.9

(3.8)

Canada-New Brunswick Agreement
13)  Infrastructure Programming

- Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- Total Contributions

5.9

1.6

0.5

0.7

0.7

(0.2)

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

5.9

1.6

0.5

0.7

0.7

(0.2)

15)  Total for Transfer Payment Program

29.1

19.8

3.5

9.5

9.5

(6.0)

16)  Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Actual spending in 2007-2008 was higher than planned due to carry forward of commitments from previous years as projects under the ICP are finalized with the winding down of the program.

17) Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit and/or evaluation:

An audit of the program will be completed in 2008-2009.  A management audit of the Infrastructure Canada Program in 2005-2006 was positive, with no substantial issues noted. More information can be found at http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/e/library/audit/icp.shtml.




1)  Transfer Payment Program:

Saint John Shipyard Adjustment Initiative (SJSAI) – Voted

2)  Start Date:

3)  End Date:

May 28, 2003

May 31, 2010

4)  Description of Transfer Payment Program:

The Saint John Shipyard Adjustment Initiative was approved with the objective of addressing overcapacity at the Saint John shipyard, which was a recurring problem for the industry. The SJSAI funding is designed to address the lack of manufacturing activities at the former shipyard site and the impact of the shipyard’s closure on New Brunswick’s economy.

5)  Strategic Outcomes:

The initiative is linked to the strategic outcome, Dynamic and sustainable communities for Atlantic Canada.

6)  Results Achieved:

In 2007-2008, ACOA continued to deliver the SJSAI. This initiative was designed to ensure the transition from the closure of shipyard operations in Saint John, New Brunswick, to redevelopment of the site for other economic development use, through $55 million in total available funding.

In the past year, this initiative has seen the conclusion of the former shipyard’s refurbishment into a green industrial park that is now poised to accept tenants.  In this regard, it is one of the few North American examples of the successful transformation of a former shipyard site. 

The first project approved under the Shipyard Redevelopment Program (SRP) included a feasibility study to identify the best use for the former shipyard site as well as site improvements, in order to remove impediments for future development. The total provisionally repayable contribution for this project is $9.95 million and was fully disbursed by the end of fiscal 2007-2008.

The SRP led to an initial application under the SJSAI’s Industrial Diversification Program (IDP) to assist in the establishment of a gypsum wallboard manufacturing facility on the former shipyard site. This project was allocated $35 million in provisionally repayable funding and was completed during fiscal 2007-2008. This plant employs 56 people with a monthly forecasted volume of 12-18 million square feet. The site’s owner, The Irving Group, is currently evaluating several proposals to utilize the balance of the SJSAI; these include additional manufacturing facilities that will create synergies with the wallboard plant.

Program Activity

($ millions)

7)   2005‑2006
Actual Spending

8)  2006‑2007
Actual Spending

2007‑2008

9)
Planned Spending

10)
Total Authorities

11)
Actual Spending

12)
Variance (9‑11)

13)  Special Adjustment Measures

- Total Grants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

- Total Contributions

1.1

13.0

40.2

29.5

29.5

10.7

- Total Other Types of TPs

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

14)  Total for PA

1.1

13.0

40.2

29.5

29.5

10.7

15)  Total for Transfer Payment Program

1.1

13.0

40.2

29.5

29.5

10.7

16)  Comment(s) on Variance(s):

Actual spending was less than planned due to extension of the program beyond original timelines.

17)  Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit and/or evaluation:

An evaluation of the SJSAI will be conducted at a future time, once the initiative is completed. An internal audit was concluded in March 2006. The audit results show that the Agency has exercised due diligence in the delivery of the program, has complied with the terms and conditions of the program and with the Treasury Board Policy on Transfer Payments.
More information can be found at
http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/e/library/audit/sjsai.shtml.


 

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Canada Revenue Agency

Table 7 Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Three Transfer Payment Programs with payments in excess of $5M were administered by the Agency in 2007-2008:

  • Children’s Special Allowance Payments (CSA) (Statutory)
  • Energy Cost Assistance Measures Expenses (Statutory)
  • Transfers to Provinces under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006 (Statutory)

Table 7.1 Children’s Special Allowance Payments (CSA) (Statutory)


Implementation Date: Aug. 28, 1995[Footnote 1] 
End Date: Ongoing
Total Expenditures: $1,529,508,000 to date including 2007-2008
Description of Transfer Payment Program:
Tax-free monthly payments made to agencies and foster parents who are licensed by provincial or federal governments to provide for the care and education of children under the age of 18 who physically reside in Canada and who are not in the care of their parents. CSA payments are equivalent to Canada Child Tax Benefit payments. CSA payments are governed by the Children’s Special Allowances Act which provides that this allowance be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Objective(s), expected result(s) and outcomes:
The Canada Revenue Agency’s second strategic outcome states that “eligible families and individuals receive timely and correct benefit payments”. In this context, the specific objective of the CSA is to ensure that children in care receive their rightful share of entitlements. According to the CSA Act, the CSA payments “shall be applied exclusively toward the care, maintenance, education, training or advancement of the child in respect of whom it is paid.”
Achieved results or progress made:
Monthly payments were made to 293 agencies and foster parents on behalf of 56,255 children. Payments were issued on schedule, no delays were reported.
 
Actual Spending 2005-2006
Actual Spending 2006-2007
Planned Spending 2007-2008
Total Authorities 2007-2008
Actual Spending 2007-2008
Variance(s) Planned/Actual
Program Activity
(in thousands of dollars)
Benefit Programs
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Grants*
169,611
197,768
205,000
208,163
208,163
(3,163)
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total Program Activity
169,611
197,768
205,000
208,163
208,163
(3,163)
Total
169,611
197,768
205,000
208,163
208,163
(3,163)
Comment(s) on variance(s): N/A
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): N/A

[Footnote 1] Responsibility for CSA Statutory Vote payment was transferred effective August 28, 1995 from Human Resources and Social Development Canada (P.C. Order 1995-342)
* A grant is an unconditional transfer payment where the government chooses to further policy or program delivery by issuing payments to individuals or organizations. Eligibility criteria and applications received in advance of payment provide sufficient assurance that the objectives of payment will be met, therefore specific conditional agreements with the recipient are not required. The government must list a grant in the Estimates but may withhold the grant(s) if eligibility criteria are not met.

Table 7.2 Energy Cost Assistance Measures Expenses (Statutory)


Implementation Date: Fall 2005
End Date: December 31, 2008
Total Expenditures: $362,719,000 to date
Description of Transfer Payment Program:
The Energy Cost Benefit (ECB) Program is a one-time payment issued to low-income families with children and to seniors. Families entitled to receive the National Child Benefit (NCB) supplement will receive $250 and seniors entitled to receive the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) will receive $125 or $250 for senior couples. It is estimated that 3.1 million payments will be effected under the ECB consisting of 1.5 million payments by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) to families receiving the NCB and 1.6 million payments by Human Resources and Social Development Canada to seniors receiving the GIS.
Objective(s), expected result(s) and outcomes:
The CRA’s second strategic outcome states that “eligible families and individuals receive timely and correct benefit payments”. In this context, the specific objective of the ECB is to ensure that eligible recipients receive their rightful share of entitlements.
Achieved results or progress made:
ECB payments administered by the CRA were issued by cheque starting on January 12, 2006, or will be issued after the assessment of the prospective recipients 2004 tax returns, whichever is the latest.
 
Actual Spending 2005-2006
Actual Spending 2006-2007
Planned Spending 2007-2008
Total Authorities 2007-2008
Actual Spending 2007-2008
Variance(s) Planned/Actual
Program Activity
(in thousands of dollars)
Benefit Programs
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments*
357,654
4,073
992
992
(992)
Total Program Activity
357,654
4,073
992
992
(992)
Total
357,654
4,073
992
992
(992)
Comment(s) on variance(s): N/A
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): N/A

* Other Transfer Payment is a transfer payment based on legislation or an arrangement that normally includes a formula or schedule as one element used to determine the expenditure amount. However, once a payment is made, the recipient may redistribute the funds among several categories of expenditure in the arrangement.

Table 7.3 Payments to Provinces under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006 (Statutory)


Implementation Date: October 12, 2006
End Date: October 12, 2013 with an option for an additional 2 years
Total Expenditures: $603,601,579 to date
Description of Transfer Payment Program:
The export charge, to be levied by Canada on exports of softwood lumber products to the United States, will be collected and administered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) with support from the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) on behalf of the provinces. Under the Softwood Lumber Products Export Charge Act, 2006 (Act), the CRA is responsible for making disbursements to the provinces of a portion of the charge collected over the course of the application of the Softwood Lumber Agreement, 2006. These payments will be reduced by several factors: refunds paid to the industry, costs for the administration and implementation of the Agreement and the Act as well as the costs incurred for certain litigation resulting from the Agreement or Act. The Act applies to the following regions: BC Interior, BC Coastal, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. Exports from the remaining provinces and territories are excluded.
Objective(s), expected result(s) and outcomes:
Softwood lumber is a significant economic generator in all provinces. The Canada – US Softwood Lumber Agreement, supported by the majority of industry members and the major lumber producing provinces, provides for long-term and predictable market access to the United States, which is of significant benefit to the Canadian industry. The CRA’s first strategic outcome is that “Taxpayers meet their obligations and Canada’s revenue base is protected”. In this context, one of the CRA’s goals in administering the Act is to ensure that softwood lumber exporters in regions covered by the Act comply with their registration, filing, reporting, and remittance obligations. The CRA’s ability to maintain continued compliance with the Act will demonstrate to U.S. authorities that Canada’s obligations are met and the Agreement will be maintained.
Achieved results or progress made:
The first payment covering revenues collected, minus costs for the period between the entry into force on October 12, 2006 and September 30, 2007, was made to the provinces on January 11, 2008. A second payment was made on March 31, 2008 covering the calendar quarter from October 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007. Payments will continue on a quarterly basis until the termination of the Agreement, unless lumber market prices increase to the point where no export charge is applicable for that period.
 
Actual Spending 2005-2006
Actual Spending 2006-2007
Planned Spending 2007-2008
Total Authorities 2007-2008
Actual Spending 2007-2008
Variance(s) Planned/Actual
Program Activity
(in thousands of dollars)
Taxpayer and Business Assistance
Total Grants
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments*
603,602
603,602
(603,602)
Total Program Activity
603,602
603,602
(603,602)
Total
603,602
603,602
(603,602)
Comment(s) on variance(s): N/A
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): N/A

* Other Transfer Payment is a transfer payment based on legislation or an arrangement that normally includes a formula or schedule as one element used to determine the expenditure amount. However, once a payment is made, the recipient may redistribute the funds among several categories of expenditure in the arrangement.
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Canadian Food Inspection Agency


Table 3–5: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)
1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Statutory Compensation Payments
2) Start Date: N/A 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Compensation payments in accordance with requirements established by regulations under the Health of Animals Act and the Plant Protection Act, and authorized pursuant to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act.
5) Strategic Outcomes: To compensate Canadians, in accordance with the appropriate regulations, for animals or plants ordered destroyed for the purpose of disease control.
6) Results Achieved: Over 500 Canadians were compensated for animals and plants ordered destroyed.
($ Millions) 7) Actual Spending 2005–2006 8) Actual Spending 2006–2007 9) Planned Spending 2007–2008 10) Total Authorities 2007–2008 11) Actual Spending 2007–2008 12) Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13) Animal and Plant Resource Protection            
14) Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
14) Total Contributions 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
14) Total Other Types of Transfer Payments 9.5 3.8 1.5 10.6 10.6 9.1
15) Total Animal and Plant Resource Protection 9.5 3.8 1.5 10.6 10.6 9.1
16) Comment on Variance: Actual compensation payments made to Canadians were $9.1 million higher than the $1.5 million that was earmarked in Planned Spending. This increase is due to Sudden Oak Death $7.1M (Plant Diseases), Chronic Wasting Disease $1.2M (Animal Diseases) and Emerald Ash Borer $0.7M (Plant Diseases).
17) Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit and / or Evaluation: N/A

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Canadian Heritage

Table 6: Details of Transfer Payment Programs, Department of Canadian Heritage 2007–2008

All these transfer payments programs are voted, which means that each year the Parliament of Canada votes annual Appropriation Act or Acts to grant expenditure authority to the Crown for the departments and agencies. This spending authorization lapses at year-end.

Citizenship and Heritage Sector

Cutural Affairs Sector

International and Intergovernmental Affairs and Sport Sector

Public and Regional Affairs Sector

Table 6: Details of Transfer Payment Programs, Department of Canadian Heritage 2007–2008
Citizenship and heritage Sector

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Aboriginal Peoples' Program
2. Start Date:  1971–1972 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description:  The Aboriginal Peoples' Program focuses primarily on encouraging full Aboriginal participation in Canadian life and supporting the continuation of Aboriginal living cultures as key elements of the Canadian cultural landscape. Specifically, the Aboriginal Peoples' Program
  • strengthens Aboriginal cultural identity and languages,
  • facilitates the inclusion of Aboriginal people in Canadian society in a manner that recognizes their cultures and fosters their contribution to Canada,
  • provides Aboriginal peoples living off-reserve with a representative voice, and
  • ensures that Aboriginal perspectives are reflected in government decisions.

The program has three components:

  • Aboriginal Organizations supports key national, provincial, territorial, and regional Aboriginal organizations to ensure that Aboriginal perspectives are reflected in the development of government policies and programs.
  • Aboriginal Communities supports the efforts of Aboriginal communities to strengthen Aboriginal cultural identity and participation in Canadian society.
  • Aboriginal Living Cultures supports the efforts of Aboriginal communities to preserve, revitalize, and promote Aboriginal languages and cultures as living cultures.
5. Strategic Outcomes:

Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.
6. Results Achieved:

The Aboriginal Peoples' Program aims to support and enhance Aboriginal cultural participation and inclusion, which ultimately enhances broader social and economic outcomes. Gaps exist between the life experience of Aboriginal peoples and that of non-Aboriginal people. Research suggests that without programs to preserve and promote Aboriginal cultures, programs aimed solely at improving the economic or social conditions of Aboriginal peoples is insufficient. Health, education, and labour market outcomes for Aboriginal peoples are best achieved when culture and social inclusion are supported.

Key risk factors that influenced the program were capacity issues, including financial, human resource, and capital resource issues; delivery models, including third-party delivery and accessibility to organizations and beneficiaries; late payment of funds, which can result in the loss of trained or experienced workers and cancelled or compromised projects.

Key results achieved by the Aboriginal Peoples' Program included:
  • The transfer agreement between the National Association of Friendship Centres (NAFC) and Canadian Heritage provided operational support (stable core funding) to 116 friendship centre organizations across Canada. As a result, a network of friendship centres across Canada served the urban Aboriginal population with over 900 programs. Key activities focussed on social development and community engagement.

  • Contribution agreements provided funding for 13 national, provincial, and regional Aboriginal organizations and 83 local community organizations. Eighteen Aboriginal Youth Advisory Committees helped administer the Urban Multipurpose Aboriginal Youth Centres programming. Aboriginal youth across Canada had access to over 220 projects with culturally relevant programs and activities that improved skills, knowledge, and leadership.

  • Grants and contribution agreements with Aboriginal women's organizations gave Aboriginal women access to 45 projects in communities across Canada that focussed on cultural development, social development and community engagement, Aboriginal self-government, and family violence.

  • A contribution agreement with the NAFC to administer Young Canada Works provided employment to 285 summer students across Canada. These summer jobs helped create projects in over 100 communities that focussed on cultural development, social development, and community engagement.

  • Grants and contribution agreements with 35 community organizations and the National Aboriginal Day Committee provided funding for National Aboriginal Day events in the National Capital Region and in communities across Canada.

  • A contribution agreement with the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation funded 49 bursaries for Aboriginal post-secondary students. Career fairs, which included 88 seminars and 70 booths, were held in Yellowknife and Halifax. They attracted some 600 students in grades 9 through 12.

  • The contribution agreement with the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation supported the production and television broadcast of the National Aboriginal Achievement Awards, which were presented to 14 recipients. The awards show, attended by 2 400 people, was broadcasted on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) and the Global Television network.

  • Contribution agreements with 13 Aboriginal communications societies enabled the production of original television and radio programs, which included 35 000 hours of radio programming and 900 hours of television programming in 19 Aboriginal languages, in addition to English and French. Broadcasted television and radio programming was accessible to over 250 000 Aboriginal people in northern Canada.
In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity:  Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions - - - 4.9 - -
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
13. Program Activity:
Preservation of Canada's Heritage
           
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 19.9 20.2 21.6 16.8 19.5 2.1
14. Total Program Activity 20.4 20.5 21.9 17.1 19.8 2.1
13. Program Activity:
Community Development and Capacity Building
           
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 21.6 5.5 8.7 11.8 0.2 8.5
14. Total Program Activity 252.8 227.0 230.7 247.7 234.0 (3.3)
13. Program Activity:
Participation in Community and Civic Life
           
Total Grants 0.3 0.6 1.4 1.4 0.5 0.9
Total Contributions 24.6 39.6 34.7 24.4 39.4 (4.7)
14. Total program Activity 107.9 149.7 145.3 143.2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $12.4 million is explained as follows:
  • A permanent transfer of $6.9 million was made to Indian and Northern Affairs Canada through the Supplementary Estimates A to enable Aboriginal organizations to develop a more focussed and streamlined core funding relationship with the Government of Canada.

  • The residual $5.5 million is due to transfers made to other departmental programs to meet emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Aboriginal Friendship Centre Program (May 18, 2005) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of Aboriginal Representative Organizations Program (May 18, 2005)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of Aboriginal Women's Program (February 24, 2005)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of the Aboriginal Languages Initiative (October 20, 2004)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of the Canada/Territorial Co-operation Agreements for Aboriginal Languages (October 20, 2004) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of the Urban Multipurpose Aboriginal Youth Centres Initiative (UMAYC) (February 25, 2004)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of the Aboriginal Friendship Centres Program (AFCP) (February 25, 2004)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of the Urban Multipurpose Aboriginal Youth Centres Initiative (UMAYC) (October 22, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Summative Evaluation of the Northern Native Broadcast Access Program (NNBAP) & Northern Distribution Program (June 25, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Follow-Up Audit of the Aboriginal Representative Organizations Program (June 25, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Follow-Up Audit of the Aboriginal Women's Program (June 25, 2003) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Summative Evaluation of the Aboriginal Languages Initiative (February 26, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Community Historical Recognition Program
2. Start Date:  2006–2007 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description: 
In 2006–2007, the Community Historical Recognition Program replaced the Acknowledgement, Commemoration, and Education Program. It funds eligible community-based commemorative and educational projects that promote awareness of the historical war measures and/or historical immigration restrictions/prohibitions related to ethno-cultural communities. It aims to highlight the contributions these communities have made to Canada and to educate Canadians about these historical experiences and contributions.
5. Strategic Outcome:
Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.
6. Results Achieved:
The Community Historical Recognition Program was not implemented in 2007–2008. The program was redesigned and all grant and contribution funding was reprofiled to the following year to enable the program to meet its objectives.
In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total grants - - 1.6 1,6 - 1.6
Total contributions - - 7.7 7,7 - 7.7
14. Total Program Activity 107,9 149,7 145.3 143,2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $9.3 million is explained as follows:
  • In 2007–2008, the program was redesigned and all grant and contribution funding was reprofiled for implementation in 2008–2009.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

This new program has not yet been audited or evaluated.

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Development of Official-Language Communities Program
2. Start Date:  2003–2004 3. End Date:  2008–2009
4. Description:  The Development of Official-Language Communities Program fosters the vitality of Canada's English- and French-speaking minority communities and enables them to participate fully in all aspects of Canadian life. Partnerships and agreements with community organizations, provinces, territories, municipalities, and federal departments and agencies, enhance the capacity of minority official-language communities to have greater access to quality education and different programs and services in their language in their communities.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.
6. Results Achieved:

The activities funded through the program contribute to standardizing French or English usage in minority official-language communities. The program funds initiatives brought forward by community organizations, and education and services in the minority language provided by provincial and territorial governments. In 2007–2008, Canadian Heritage invested over $233 million in the program.

According to the 2006 census, the number of Francophones (persons with French as their first language) outside Quebec is relatively stable at 997 000 individuals, compared to 988 000 in 2001. For the first time since 1976, the number of people in Quebec whose first official language spoken is English has increased from 919 000 in 2001 to 995 000. Even language transfers towards English among Francophones in minority communities has slowed, although the rate is still significant: 39% of Francophones in minority communities speak English at home more often, compared to 38% in 2001. (Statistics Canada, 2007, First Official Language Spoken (7), Mother Tongue (10), Age Groups (17A), and Sex (3) for the Population of Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2006 Census, No. 97-555-XWF200603.)

Despite the relatively stable linguistic growth in recent years, major challenges have yet to be overcome to develop living environments in minority official languages. In spite of the modest rise in the number of Francophones living in a minority situation, their share of the population decreased from 4.4% to 4.2% due to the arrival of immigrants, most of whom do not have French as their first official language spoken. The Survey on the Vitality of the Official-Language Minorities confirmed that outside of Québec only in some parts of New Brunswick and Ontario do French-speaking adults speak French predominantly every day. Also, outside of Québec, 56% of children of eligible parents are enrolled in French elementary schools and 47% in French secondary schools. (Statistics Canada, 2007, Minorities Speak Up: Results of the Survey of the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities, No 91-548–;X, p. 16, p. 21, p. 28, p. 30, p.55)

Recognizing the challenges ahead, the Government of Canada announced $30 million in additional funding over two years, from 2007–2008 to 2008–2009, in the March 2007 federal budget to show its commitment to linguistic duality and the development of these communities. Of this total, $26 million is dedicated to cultural and extracurricular activities and community centres in official‑language communities. 

In 2007–2008, investments increased the number of opportunities for young members of official-language minority communities to live daily in their language. The funding was invested in capital projects such as the School Community Centre in Dubreuileville, Northern Ontario; the second phase of Cité francophone in Edmonton, Alberta; and a Collège Boréal campus in Timmins, Ontario.
Additional investments support community initiatives that will allow young people to live and grow in their language and to improve their leadership skills. These skills will enrich not only minority communities, but also Canadian society. For instance, the funding was used to organize

  • the Jeux de la francophonie canadienne (August 2008);

  • the "C'est MA! Communauté" project of the Fédération des jeunes francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick, which aims to establish mechanisms for young people to participate in Francophone school community centres and communities in the Atlantic region;

  • and the Youth Project of the Quebec Community Groups Network, which seeks to enhance leadership among young Anglophones in minority communities and the retention of young people in the province's urban and rural areas.
In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Community Development and Capacity-Building            
Total grants 5.0 5.2 35.6 33.8 7.2 28.5
Total contributions 226.2 216.3 186.3 202.1 226.7 (40.3)
14. Total Program Activity 252.8 227.0 230.7 247.7 234.0 (3.3)
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $11.8 million is explained as follows:
  • During the 2007–2008 fiscal year, the program received additional funds toward initiatives dedicated to cultural and extracurricular activities and community centres in official-language communities. Funds were provided through the 2007 federal budget, departmental reallocations, and transfer of operating funds to grants and contributions.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Formative Evaluation of the Interdepartmental Partnership with Official Language Communities (IPOLC) Component of the Promotion of Official Languages Program (October 22, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of the Intergovernmental Cooperation Component of the Promotion of Official Languages Program (October 22, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of the Support for Official Language Communities Program (A component of the Promotion of Official Languages Program) (June 25, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of the Official Languages in Education Program (June 25, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit Official Languages in Education and the Intergovernmental Collaboration Component of the Promotion of the Official Languages Program (June 25, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Enhancement of Official Languages
2. Start Date:  2003–2004 3. End Date:  2008–2009
4. Description: The Enhancement of Official Languages program promotes among Canadians a better understanding and appreciation of the benefits of linguistic duality. It achieves this through partnerships and agreements with the provinces and territories, and with non-governmental organizations to support second-language learning and initiatives that foster understanding between Anglophone and Francophone Canadians, and encourage the public to recognize and support linguistic duality as a fundamental value of Canadian society.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.
6. Results Achieved:

In 2007–2008, Canadian Heritage invested close to $118 million in the program, primarily for cooperation with the provinces and territories to improve core and immersion second-language programs, recruit and train teachers, and encourage the continuation of second-language learning at the post-secondary level. The Department also supported promotional and outreach activities to foster a better understanding of the advantages of knowing both official languages.
  • Between 2001 and 2006, knowledge of French grew in Canada, increasing from 9.0% to 9.4% for Anglophones, and from 11.8% to 12.1% in allophones. The number of individuals able to hold a conversation in French as a second language rose from 2.4 million to 2.6 million. (Statistics Canada, 2006. First Official Language Spoken (7), Mother Tongue (10), Age Groups (17A) and Sex (3) for the Population of Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions, 2006 Census, No. 97-555-XWE200603.) 

  • While knowledge of French is rising, young people in majority communities need initiatives that provide them with interactive experiences in their second language. Since few of them have any tangible contact with the other language in public spaces outside the classroom, providing such opportunities would increase appreciation of the second-language culture and improve their language skills. The 2007 federal budget allocated an additional $30 million over 2007–2009 in support of linguistic duality and official-language minority community development. Of this amount, $4 million over two years is designated for initiatives to improve young Canadians' working knowledge of both official languages. These initiatives include activities that complement regular teaching programs. As an illustration, these funds supported the Linguistic and Cultural Discovery Through a Summer Volunteer Program of the Society for Educational Visits and Exchanges in Canada with cooperation from Canadian Parents for French and the Commission nationale des parents francophones. This program offers young people an opportunity to practice second-language skills by living in a group situation and participating in a structured, community-based volunteer program in communities where their second language (English or French) is spoken. As a further example, the Alliance des radios communautaires du Canada received support for its "Ma radio en français" project, which provides young Anglophones in immersion with an opportunity to speak on the radio in their second official language.
In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Promotion of Inter-Cultural Understanding            
Total grants 0.4 0.2 5.6 5.6 0.5 5.1
Total contributions 106.5 115.1 102.5 104.5 117.8 (15.2)
14. Total Program Activity 106.8 130.3 108.1 110.1 118.3 (10.2)
13. Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total grants - - -   - -
Total contributions 3.5 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.5 (0.1)
14. Total Program Activity 107.9 149.7 145.3 143.2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of ($10 million) is explained as follows:
  • During the 2007–2008 fiscal year, the Enhancement of Official Languages Program received additional funds toward initiatives that would, over the long term, increase young Canadians' working knowledge of both official languages. Funds were provided through the 2007 Budget and departmental reallocations.
17 and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Audit of the Support for Linguistic Duality Program and the Program for the Integration of Both Official Languages in the Administration of Justice (September 18, 2002 ) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Exchanges Canada Program
2. Start Date:  2000–2001 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description:  The Exchanges Canada Program allows young Canadians to participate in exchanges and forums with other youth from across the country. The program also allows youth to obtain information about other kinds of exchanges possible in Canada and abroad.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.
6. Results Achieved:

In 2007–2008, Exchanges Canada provided opportunities for approximately 13 900 youth to
  • learn about Canada, its history, geography, industry, institutions, citizenship, communities, cultures, and languages;

  • connect with one another; and

  • develop employability skills by participating in reciprocal exchanges, forums, and summer work opportunities.
Feedback obtained through questionnaires indicated that participation had a positive impact. Participants said that they learned new things about Canada, created ties with other youth, increased their desire to get involved in their own community, and enhanced their knowledge about cultural communities other than their own.
In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total grants - 0.1 0.1 0.1 - 0.1
Total contributions 18.3 22.4 16.8 17.2 17.4 (0.6)
14. Total Program Activity 107.9 149.7 145.3 143.2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of ($0.5 million) is explained as follows:
  • ($200,000) received, via Supplementary budget, from Human Resources and Social Development Canada for Action Canada Initiative

  • ($100,00) received, via Supplementary budget, from Industry Canada for Action Canada Initiative

  • ($200,000) received from other departmental programs to respond to emerging priorities.
17. and 18.  Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Internal Audit of Exchanges Canada Program (February 2008)
http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/assurnc/2008/2008-01/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of Exchanges Canada Program (February 24, 2005)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of Exchanges Canada (February 26, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Katimavik Program
2. Start Date:  1997–1998 3. End Date:  2008–2009
4. Description:  The mission of Katimavik is to foster the personal development of young Canadians through their participation in a challenging 39-week program, performing volunteer community work, training, and group interaction. Katimavik contributes largely to the personal, professional and social development of participants, aged 17 to 21, by promoting community service and offering a unique experience that promotes a better understanding of Canada's diversity.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.
6. Results Achieved:
In 2007–2008, Katimavik allowed 972 young Canadians to engage in communities across the country in a unique service-learning and training program that fostered the development of their personal, social and professional skills and built their knowledge of Canada's geography, culture, and linguistic duality. Through their participation, they made a positive impact on about 95 communities, where projects took place, and enabled the partner organizations to better serve community needs.
In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 16.7 17.5 19.8 19.8 18.0 1.8
14. Total Program Activity 107.9 149.7 145.3 143.2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $1.8 million is explained as follows:
  • Funds were reallocated to other departmental programs to meet emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Summative evaluation of the Katimavik Program (May 19, 2006). http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Multiculturalism Program
2. Start Date:  1982–1983 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description:  Derived from the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the objectives of the Multiculturalism Program, supported by grants and contributions,are
  • Ethno-cultural/racial minorities participate in public decision-making (Civic Participation);

  • Communities and the broad public engage in informed dialogue and sustained action to combat racism (Anti-Racism, Anti-Hate, Cross-Cultural Understanding); and

  • Public institutions eliminate systemic barriers (Institutional Change).
The program implements these objectives through research and policy development, support to public institutions, public education and promotion activities, and support to civil society. It aims to help people overcome barriers related to race, ethnicity and cultural, or religious background that prevent their full participation in Canadian society.

In 2007–2008, the emphasis of the program was shifted to adddress
  • economic, social and cultural integration;

  • mentorship, volunteerism, leadership, and civic education; and

  • intercultural understanding and Canadian values.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.
6. Results Achieved:

New priorities were developed with the Secretary of State (Multiculturalism and Canadian Identity) for the grants and contributions program, and new funding application guidelines were subsequently published in March 2008. Since this was a transition year, results were only partially met. Examples of projects approved in 2007–2008 include:
  • Stepping up: Tools and Action to Support Visible Minority Women's Full Participation in Communities, (Power Camp National/D'Action), which will bring together young girls (aged 9 to 18) and women (aged 19 to 25) to develop tools and training for community involvement.

  • The Muslim Project, (Centre for the Faith and Media), which will bring together Muslim leaders and organizations in eight cities across Canada for media training workshops that will help combat stereotyping by providing accurate information on Muslim ethno-cultural/racial communities across the country
In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Access and Participation in Canada's Cultural Life            
Total grants* - - - 2.3 - -
Total contributions - - - - - -
14. Total Program Activity 118.4 115.1 127.7 130.6 123.5 4.2
13. Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total grants 0.8 0.6 7.7 5.2 0.3 7.4
Total contributions 9.7 8.6 9.5 9.5 6.8 2.7
14. Total Program Activity 107.9 149.7 145.3 143.2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
* The $2.3 million in grants listed under (10) Total Authorities 2007–08 and attributed to the Program Activity: Access and Participation in Canada's Cultural Life, should have been attributed to the Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life. The attribution is due to a departmental technical adjustment.
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $10.1 million is explained as follows:
  • The variance is due in part to the time taken to establish new priorities for the program.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Multiculturalism Program (June 28, 2006)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Museums Assistance Program
2. Start Date:  1972–1973 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description:  The Museums Assistance Program (MAP) helps current and future generations of Canadians gain access to and develop a better appreciation of their heritage. The program provides financial support for activities related to the development and circulation of domestic travelling exhibitions around the country; the preservation, management, and presentation of Aboriginal cultural heritage; the enhancement of professional practices with respect to key museological functions; and the development of resources or services for multiple museums.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.
6. Results Achieved:

In 2007–2008, MAP received 181 applications and funded 107 new projects. When multiyear projects are taken into consideration, 175 projects received funding for an estimated $6 million.

Note: These numbers do not include actual expenditures for MAP in 2007–2008, as final project reports are still being submitted by recipients. Final figures will be provided by the third quarter of 2008–2009.

Through the Young Canada Works in Heritage component, some 1 650 summer students and graduate interns found work in heritage organizations in 2007–2008, a hiring rate that exceeded the annual program target by 10 percent. Over 850 more summer jobs were created this year as a result of the additional $5 million funding from Budget 2007, more than doubling the number of jobs.
In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 0.6 0.5 0.5 - 0.5 -
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
13. Program Activity: Access and Participation in  Canada's Cultural Life            
Total grants 2.0 1.6 2.5 2.5 1.2 1.3
Total contributions 5.4 4.7 3.7 4.6 4.3 (0.6)
14. Total Program Activity 118.4 115.1 127.7 130.6 123.5 4.2
13. Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 3.4 3.0 3.0 7.7 6.6 (3,6)
14. Total Program Activity 107.9 149.7 145.3 143.2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of ($2.9 million) is explained as follows:
  • $0.7 million for the Museums Assistance Program (Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation and Access to Canada's Culture): Transfers were made to other departmental program to meet emerging priorities.

  • ($3.6 million) for Young Canada Works in Heritage (Participation in Community and Civic Life) resulted from additional funding that was received as part of Budget 2007 for summer internships in heritage organizations.
17. and 18.  Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation

Summative Evaluation of the Museums Assistance Program and Canadian Museums Association Program (May 18, 2005)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of the Museums Assistance Program (June 23, 2004)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Table 6: Details of Transfer Payment Programs, Department of Canadian Heritage 2007–2008
Cultural Affairs Sector

All these transfer payments programs are voted, which means that each year the Parliament of Canada votes annual Appropriation Act or Acts to grant expenditure authority to the Crown for the departments and agencies. This spending authorization lapses at year-end.

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Arts Presentation Canada
2. Start Date:  2001–2002 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description:  Arts Presentation Canada (APC) supports arts presenters in the performing arts, arts festivals, and their service organizations to help them strengthen their presentation practices by encouraging diverse programming, organizing audience development, diversification and outreach activities, developing initiatives that bring professional artists into contact with residents of their community, and supporting networking and professional development for presenters. It also supports the emergence of presenters and presenter networks for under-served communities or artistic practices. Its objective is to give Canadians direct access to a diversity of artistic experiences.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:
In fiscal year 2007–2008, the program funded over 600 arts organizations, including festivals and series presentations. Through these activities and events, APC has increased access for Canadians to artistic experiences, to outreach programs, and to a greater diversity of arts. These are the percent of funded organizations that presented: dance (49%), literature (19%), music (72%), theatre (45%), media arts (18%), and visual arts (31%). 
The program has helped organizations expand and diversify their audiences. In the Arts Presentation Canada/Cultural Spaces Canada Client User Satisfaction Survey (conducted in 2007–2008), 90% of the organizations surveyed reported more diversified audiences. For example: 
  • 84 % noted increased attendance by people from different economic strata;

  • 71% noted increased attendance by people from a variety of cultural backgrounds;

  • 77% of clients noted more attendance by youth;

  • 65% noted more attendance from within the immediate community; and

  • 34% recorded more attendance by Aboriginal people. 
Over the last three years, the program has entered a stabilization phase, contributing annual funding to about half of identified presenters in the country in nearly 250 communities that range in size from small and rural municipalities to large urban centers. It is estimated that these arts organizations also coordinate outreach activities in over 450 communities.
In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005-06 8. Actual Spending 2006-07 9. Planned Spending 2007-08 10. Total Authorities 2007-08 11. Actual Spending 2007-08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Access to and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total grants - - 7.0 7.0 3.1 3.9
Total contributions 20.7 22.1 13.6 13.3 20.2 (6.6)
14. Total Program Activity 118.4 115.1 127.7 130.6 123.5 4.2
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of ($2.7 million) is explained as follows:
  • Transfers received from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation

Audit of the Arts Presentation Canada Program (October 20, 2004) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Joint Formative Evaluation of Arts Presentation Canada, Cultural Spaces Canada, and the Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program (October 22, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of the Cultural Initiatives Program (September 19, 2001)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Book Publishing Industry Development Program
2. Start Date:  1980–1981 3. End Date:  2010–2011
4. Description:  The Book Publishing Industry Development Program (BPIDP) supports the Canadian book industry to ensure access to a diverse range of Canadian-authored books in Canada and abroad. The BPIDP aims to meet this objective by fostering a strong and viable Canadian book industry that publishes and promotes Canadian-authored books.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:
In 2007–2008, the BPIDP supported 230 Canadian-owned publishers in more than 75 Canadian towns and cities. It also supported a broad range of collective projects in all regions aimed at bringing Canadian-authored books and readers together. It also supported building skills and knowledge in the Canadian book industry.

BPIDP-supported publishers produced 5 672 new Canadian-authored titles and books by nearly 1 000 first-time authors. Support for publishers, coupled with broad support for domestic and international marketing activities, ensured the continued broad dissemination of these Canadian stories. Publishers funded by BPIDP in 2007–2008 realized $350 million in book sales in Canada and $98 million in export sales for a total of $448 million. This high level of sales, and the 13% growth in recipients’ sales over the last three years, indicates that Canadian and international readers continue to seek and consume Canadian books in strong and growing numbers.

BPIDP continued to invest in building industry knowledge, skills, and capacity to ensure that these successes continue. Among the important 2007–2008 results: BPIDP funding helped 181 Canadian-owned publishers to achieve bibliographic data quality certification, expanding the industry’s capacity to benefit from technological efficiencies in the book industry supply chain.
 In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 26.7 26.2 27.5 27.5 27.1 0.4
14. Total Program Activity 300.8 320.8 301.3 299.6 304.1 (2.8)
             
13. Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 5.8 7.7 4.0 4.0 2.9 1.1
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
13. Program Activity: Access to and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 6.1 3.0 6.7 6.7 6.9 (0.2)
14. Total Program Activity 118.4 115.1 127.7 130.6 123.5 4.2
15. Total TPP ,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $1.3 million is explained as follows:
  • Funds were transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.
17. and 18.  Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Book Publishing Industry Development Program (2004)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of the Book Publishing Industry Development Program (2003) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada New Media Fund
2. Start Date:  2000–2001 3. End Date:  2008–2009
4. Description:  The Canada New Media Fund (CNMF), administered by Telefilm Canada, supports the development, production, marketing and distribution of high-quality, original, interactive, Canadian new media cultural products, in both official languages, that are intended for the general public.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:
Canadian Heritage transferred $11.5 million to Telefilm Canada for the CNMF, of which $9.4 million supported 153 projects.
  • $7.9 million supported 121 content creation projects (Product Assistance component).

  • $1.5 million supported 32 projects that facilitated the competitiveness of the Canadian interactive media sector (Sectoral Assistance component).

The CNMF supported a broad range of products, which attract different types and sizes of audiences.

Results are available for those products and websites that were completed in 2007–2008.

Through various digital platforms, Canadians have access to more innovative interactive products developed by Canadian companies. Some of these products have attracted broad audiences, particularly those associated with television programming. Examples include:

  • Odd Job Jack, created by Smiley Guys Studios, is an animated, interactive comedy about one guy's continuing misadventures in temporary employment and his quest to get a full-time life. This website received more than 1.9 million visits between July 2007 and March 2008.

  • thisisdanielcook.com, created by Marblemedia, is the companion website to This Is Daniel Cook, a preschool television show that follows its young host in his discovery of the world. This website received more than 900 000 visits between July 2007 and March 2008.

  • Shipwreck Central, created by the Ghostship Studio, is the Web home of the television series The Sea Hunters and contains the largest selection of shipwreck footage on the Internet. This website received more than 300 000 visits between July 2007 and March 2008.

A majority of the projects reported more modest traffic statistics, which can be expected from websites that often target niche audiences, such as Contact, l’encyclopédie de la création, produced by Contact TV Inc. This website, an evolving encyclopaedia, exceeds the content of its companion television program, which presents interviews with notable creators. This website received 63 000 visits between July 2007 and March 2008.

The CNMF Sectoral Assistance component supports activities designed to increase the competitiveness of the Canadian interactive media sector. These activities gave interactive media companies access to workshops, internships, conferences, and other networking events. For example, the Montréal International Game Summit, an annual event serving Canadian and international members of the video and electronic game industries, fosters learning, networking, and building partnerships.

In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 14.0 14.0 14.0 14.0 11.5 2.5
14. Total Program Activity 300.8 320.8 301.3 299.6 304.1 (2.8)
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $2.5 million is mainly explained as follows:
  • A reprofile of $3 million to 2008–2009, due to delays in signing contribution agreements.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Audit of the Canada New Media Fund (June 23, 2004)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program
2. Start Date:  2001–2002 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description:  The Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program (CAHSP) is designed to strengthen organizational effectiveness, build operational and financial capacity within the arts and heritage sectors, and ensure that those organizations operate in communities that value their existence, see them as a key asset, and support them. There are six components: Stabilization Projects, Capacity Building, Endowment Incentives, Limited Support to Endangered Arts Organizations, Networking, and Cultural Capitals of Canada.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:

Endowment Incentives

During the past three years, the number of requests to the Endowment Incentives component has increased steadily. In 2007–2008, 97 requests totalling $14.8 million were approved. Private sector donations increased by $5 million, from $23 million to $28 million, between 2006–2007 and 2007–2008. This steady increase in community support means that the matching incentive of the Department has gone from $0.64 for each dollar raised in 2006–2007 to $0.53 in 2007–2008. Since the launch of the component, the federal government’s contribution of $73.4 million has leveraged $102.6 million in donations from the private sector for a total of $176 million invested in arts organizations’ endowment funds. In provinces with similar programs, there is a marked increase in the number of applications received by the Department. Program clients report the key role this program plays in assisting them to attract private sector resources and build an important supplementary revenue stream.

Capacity Building

In 2007–2008, the CAHSP Capacity Building component provided support totalling $4.4 million to 165 projects of which 106 were with arts organizations and 59 with heritage organizations. These projects included business, strategic, and human resources plans, new financing and ticketing systems, employee training, and marketing strategies. Clients continue to report the positive impacts of these projects on organizational strength.

Cultural Capitals of Canada (CCC)

In 2007–2008, $5.9 million in contributions were approved under CCC. Since 2002–2003, there have been 129 eligible applications to CCC. Of these, 34 Cultural Capitals of Canada designations have been awarded, for a total of $21 million.

A survey of CCC applicants and recipients, completed in 2007–2008, assessed its impact. It confirmed that recipients were pleased with the positive outcome of their designation. Many municipalities felt that the mere act of applying for the CCC designation led communities to think more extensively about arts and culture. This prompted a number of communities to proceed with activities even without the designation.

For recipient communities, the designation contributed significantly to implementing cultural activities that tended to be larger in scope than originally planned.

Other results of the CCC survey show:

  • greater recognition by municipal officials that arts and culture play a vital role in enhancing quality of life and fostering civic identity and pride,
  • greater financial support for arts and culture from the community, and
  • increased public awareness of local arts and cultural programs.  

Caraquet, New Brunswick, is the first community to have been designated a Cultural Capital of Canada twice: first in 2003 then again in 2009. New applications by previous winning municipalities indicate that results already achieved through CCC are encouraging further municipal support, involvement, and interest in arts and heritage activities.

Networking Initiatives Component 

Funding of $310,000 was approved through the Networking Initiatives component (Creative City Network and Les Arts et la Ville) in 2007–2008. Both networks support their members in furthering municipal involvement and investment in cultural development.

Les Arts et la Ville engages Francophone communities and organizations outside Québec through new membership from Manitoba, Yukon, and British Columbia.

The Creative City Network (CCN) furthered local cultural development by hosting its sixth annual conference, which offered professional development sessions, study tours, and networking opportunities. CCN is expanding its outreach to rural and remote communities by organizing regional caucus meetings that include a professional development component tailored to the communities.

In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants 15.4 15.4 16.9 16.9 16.3 0.6
Total contributions 5.1 4.9 5.3 5.3 3.8 1.5
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
13. Program Activity:
Access to and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life
           
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 1.6 3.2 4.9 4.9 5.7 (0.8)
14. Total Program Activity 118.4 115.1 127.7 130.6 123.5 4.2
13. Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions - 0.2 0.2 0.2 - 0.2
14. Total Program Activity 107.9 149.7 145.3 143.2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $1.3 million is explained as follows:
  • Transfers were made to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Formative Evaluation of Two Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program Components: Cultural Capitals of Canada and Networking Initiatives (June 22, 2005)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of the Canadian Heritage Arts and Sustainability Program (February 24, 2005)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Canadian Culture Online Program
2. Start Date:  2001–2002 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description:  Canadian Culture Online Program (CCOP) includes three sub-components: Access and Content, Research and Development, and New Media Sector Development.

The objectives of the program are to provide Canadians access to and participation in interactive digital resources that reflect our diverse heritage, cultures, languages, and history, and to ensure that the program contributes to a supportive environment for the new media sector in Canada.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:

In 2007–2008, the CCOP provided $16.1 million in funding for 66 projects, including:

  • $8.6 million in support of 55 access and content creation projects (Gateway Fund and Partnerships Funds) that allow Canadians of all ages to access content that reflects our diverse cultures and heritage, and

  • $7.5 million in support of 11 research and development projects and initiatives (New Media Research Networks Fund and New Media R&D Initiative) that are developing cutting-edge technological tools to create, manage, and distribute Canadian digital cultural content.

The CCOP supported a broad range of projects, in both official languages, all of which attract different audiences.

The following results are for websites and research projects that were completed in 2007–2008.

A broad range of projects reached audiences of varying sizes. The Canadian Tamil Youth Development Centre’s CanTYD website, a community-developed project, received 11 000 visits over six months. As an example of a larger project, the CBC/Radio-Canada Archives, received 3.9 million visits in a year. The Virtual Museum of Canada continued to be a popular destination, generating nearly 13.3 million visits in 2007–2008.

Support for interactive media research and development projects helped create a stimulating environment conducive to creating and distributing yet more dynamic cultural content. Thematic research networks and partnerships have brought together 60 Canadian research institutions and interactive media organizations to collaborate on developing 35 innovative tools.

Note: Resources allocated for New Media Sector Development were transferred to Telefilm Canada in 2007–2008. For results, see Sectoral Assistance component in Table 6: Details of Transfer Payment Programs: Canada New Media Fund

 In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants - 0.6 0.8 0.8 - 0.8
Total contributions 4.3 5.0 2.2 3.1 3.6 (1.4)
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
13. Program Activity:
Access to and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life
           
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 8.3 9.5 8.3 7.4 7.5 0.8
14. Total Program Activity 118.4 115.1 127.7 130.6 123.5 4.2
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $0.2 million is mainly explained as follows:
  • Transfers were made to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Formative Evaluation of Canadian Culture Online (October 20, 2004)
http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of Canadian Culture Online Program (June 23, 2004)
http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Canada Magazine Fund
2. Start Date:  1999–2000 3. End Date:  2010–2011
4. Description:  The Canada Magazine Fund (CMF) supports Canadian magazine publishers and not-for-profit organizations representing periodical publishers to: maintain Canadian editorial content in Canadian magazines, increase Canadians’ access to Canadian magazines, enhance the quality and diversity of Canadian magazines, and strengthen the infrastructure of the Canadian magazine industry.

The fund achieves these goals by
  • providing formula funding for magazines to support and enhance their editorial content,

  • supporting business development projects for small magazine publishers, and

  • helping the development of the periodical industry as a whole.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:
In 2007–2008, the CMF contributed $10.7 million towards the costs of producing Canadian editorial content in Canadian magazines. Canadian content made up over 127 000 pages, or over 92 percent of the total editorial content in these magazines. These figures are similar to last year’s figures.

The CMF also helped strengthen the industry’s infrastructure through 31 collective projects that dealt with professional development, promotion and marketing, newsstand sales building, research, and new technology.

Canadian readers had access to a wide range of Canadian magazines in 2007–2008 as 63 Canadian magazines were launched, while only 19 magazines folded. There were 15 percent fewer launches than the year before. Of the new titles, 49 were consumer magazines in 11 different subject categories. (Source: Masthead, March–April 2008)

In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 11.0 11.0 10.9 10.9 10.7 0.2
14. Total Program Activity 300.8 320.8 301.3 299.6 304.1 (2.8)
13. Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.7 3.9 0.8
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $1 million is explained as follows:

  • Transfers were made to other departmental programs to adjust to emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Canada Magazine Fund (June 2006)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Post- Implementation Audit of the Canada Magazine Fund (February 26, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Canada Music Fund
2. Start Date:  2001–2002 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description:  The Canada Music Fund (CMF) offers a comprehensive range of both innovative and proven funding components designed to support diversity, capacity, and excellence in the Canadian sound recording industry at every level, and for all participants from creators to audience. Activities supported include song writing development, CD and video/DVD production, marketing, touring, distribution, public awareness, industry training, awards shows, archiving, preservation, providing access, and industry infrastructure development. Through these activities, the CMF contributes to developing Canada’s stars of tomorrow; ensures access to diverse Canadian music choices, both in Canada and abroad; and positions Canadian music for success in the digital age.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:
The Canadian sound recording industry has experienced sharp sales declines this decade, due in large part to the Internet and the rapidly changing retail landscape. Despite this decline, Canadians continue to purchase and access more Canadian music. Since the inception of the CMF, the market share of Canadian artist albums sold in Canada increased from 16% in 2001 to 25.95% in 2007. The number of Canadian songwriters has also increased during that time, with 22 093 Canadian songwriters receiving performance royalties from SOCAN in 2006, up from 17 645 in 2001.

In 2007–2008, CMF support continued to ensure the production of varied Canadian music and the development of Canadian talent at home and abroad. The New Musical Works and Canadian Musical Diversity components provided funding for the production of over 350 albums by Canadian artists. To ensure the broad dissemination of these and other Canadian works, over 700 projects received marketing, touring, or showcasing support.

The Music Entrepreneur Component (MEC) supported 22 established Canadian sound recording firms in 2007–2008. The funding helps ensure the existence of a diverse range of compelling Canadian musical choices as these companies become increasingly competitive nationally and internationally and position themselves for success in a global economy. The 2007–2008 MEC recipients released 207 albums by Canadian artists in the past year, up from 188 in 2005–2006. Sales of physical albums by Canadian artists outside of Canada rose by 8.5%. They continued to make head way into the online market with sales of downloaded music representing 10.2% of their total sales, up from 1.9% two years ago.

In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 15.2 11.5 9.4 9.2 10.8 (1.4)
14. Total Program Activity 300.8 320.8 301.3 299.6 304.1 (2.8)
13. Program Activity:  Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 4.5 9.4 11.5 11.5 10.3 1.2
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
13. Program Activity:  Preservation of Canada’s Heritage            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 -
14. Total Program Activity 20.4 20.5 21.9 17.1 19.8 2.1
13. Program Activity: Access and Participation in  Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 2.7 2.1 1.8 1.8 2.4 (0.6)
14. Total Program Activity 118.4 115.1 127.7 130.6 123.5 4.2
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of ($0.6 million) is explained as follows:
  • Transfers were made to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of Canada Music Fund (October 2007) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/evaltn/2007/2007-04/index-eng.cfm

Audit of the Canada Music Fund  (June 23, 2004)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of the Canada Music Council  (May 18, 2005) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Formative Evaluation of the Canada Music Fund  (February 25, 2004)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:Contribution in Support of the Canadian Television Fund
2. Start Date:  1996–1997 3. End Date:  2008–2009
4. Description:  The Canadian Television Fund (CTF) supports the creation and broadcast of high-quality prime-time Canadian programs in both official languages and in Aboriginal languages, and builds audiences for these programs. The CTF supports dramas, youth and children’s programs, documentaries, variety shows, and performing arts. It also supports Aboriginal and Francophone productions in minority situations.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:
In 2007–2008, the CTF invested over $252 million in Canadian productions, which generated over 2 000 new hours of Canadian television programming.* Since its inception in 1996, the CTF has invested more than $2.5 billion, which generated the production of 25 000 hours of Canadian programs.

*Data is not final until the release of the CTF annual report.

In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 99.6 120.0 120.0 120.0 120.0 -
14. Total Program Activity 300.8 320.8 301.3 299.6 304.1 (2.8)
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

n/a
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Canadian Television Fund Program (October 19, 2005)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of the Canadian Television Fund (June 23, 2004)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Cultural Spaces Canada
2. Start Date:  2001–2002 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description:  The Cultural Spaces Canada (CSC) program supports the construction, renovation, and improvement of not-for-profit facilities dedicated to arts and heritage. As a complement to the programs offered by Infrastructure Canada, it helps improve the physical conditions that foster creativity and artistic activity within community life. 
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:
Since its inception in 2001–2002, the CSC program has supported over 630 projects, in more than 230 communities across Canada. In 2007–2008, the CSC program contributed to 98 infrastructure improvement projects. These included funding to
  • 46 construction and renovation projects;

  • 44 projects devoted specifically to purchasing and installing specialized equipment; and

  • 8 projects to assist organizations with the costs of feasibility studies for creating or renovating an arts or heritage facility. 

For every dollar invested by the program since its inception in 2001–2002, close to six additional dollars are raised from diverse sources, public or private.

These projects improve infrastructure, which facilitates greater creativity, access, and artistic innovation. For instance, a $2.4 million-contribution from CSC was approved in 2007–2008 for significant renovations and equipment purchases for Théâtre Denise-Pelletier, a leading presenter of theatre for young people in Quebec. This project resulted in the Théâtre being able to meet mechanical, technical, and electrical standards. It will have a significant impact on the organization, allowing it to expand its activities and improve conditions for artists. The upgrades will also provide a safe environment for nearly 100 000 youth who attend its performances each year.

Similarly, in 2007–2008, CSC approved a total of $186,794 for the Citadel Theatre in Edmonton for the third phase of its modernization of the theatre's technical capacity. Lighting, sound, and other specialized equipment was purchased, enabling the theatre to present larger, more sophisticated productions, co-productions, and touring companies. CSC also contributed a total of $235,750 to earlier phases of the Citadel’s upgrading.

In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Access to and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total grants - 0.3 3.0 3.0 0.4 2.6
Total contributions 12.5 19.8 26.6 27.4 22.9 3.7
14. Total Program Activity 118.4 115.1 127.7 130.6 123.5 4.2
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $6.3 million is explained as follows:
  • $3.3 million could not be spent in 2007–2008 due to project delays; a request has been made to reprofile to 2008–2009.

  • $3 million was transferred to other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Audit of the Cultural Spaces Canada Program (October 20, 2004)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Joint Formative Evaluation of Arts Presentation Canada, Cultural Spaces Canada and the Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program (October 22, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: National Arts Training Contribution Program
2. Start Date:  1997–1998 3. End Date: 2012–2013
4. Description:  The National Arts Training Contribution Program (NATCP) is designed to assist independent Canadian not-for-profit organizations that specialize in training Canadians who seek a professional career in the arts. 
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:

Since the inception of the program in 1997–1998, through 2007–2008, the NATCP has disbursed almost $146 million in operating funding to national training schools in various artistic disciplines.

In 2001, the NATCP budget was increased from $6 million to $16.7 million enabling the program to support institutions that train in non-European based arts forms and Aboriginal based art forms. Prior to the new investment, the program funded 18 institutions, which included only one Aboriginal institution and no institutions that trained in non-European based art forms. Today, the NATCP supports nine culturally diverse institutions and eight Aboriginal institutions, which train artists for professional careers in Canada and internationally in a wide variety of art forms that range from Korean dance to Aboriginal theatre. The 37 institutions currently supported by the program reflect and express Canada’s diverse society.

A summative evaluation of the program was completed in March 2007 and posted on the departmental website in early 2008. It found that there is a need for continued federal support in national arts training and that the program is meeting its overall objective to provide arts training of the highest calibre. It also found that the NATCP has an “invaluable” and “significant” impact on Canadians’ access to high-quality artistic and cultural products.

Institutions receiving NATCP funding support 3 500 artists each year who complete their training program. Of these, 80% are working professionally, of whom 20% work internationally. Nearly 50% of graduates of NATCP-funded institutions received an award in their first three years after graduation, and are more likely to receive honours, distinctions, and awards than graduates of unfunded institutions.

 In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 17.4 17.0 15.9 15.9 19.4 (3.5)
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $3.5 million is explained as follows:
  • Transfers received from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation

Summative Evaluation of the National Arts Training Contributions Program (May 2007)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/evaltn/2007/2007-03/index-eng.cfm

 

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Publication Assistance Program
2. Start Date:  1996–1997 3. End Date:  2009–2010
4. Description:  The Publication Assistance Program (PAP) is delivered in partnership with the Canada Post Corporation and decreases the costs to eligible Canadian periodicals of mailing copies to Canadian readers. Assistance is provided to more than 800 publishers of almost 1 200 different Canadian periodicals, supporting the delivery of 210 million eligible copies of periodicals. These include: general or special interest paid circulation magazines, non-daily community newspapers, unpaid request circulation periodicals, and religious, scholarly, Aboriginal, ethno-cultural, farm, and official language minority periodicals. 
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:

In 2007–2008, the program provided Canadian magazines and non-daily newspapers with postal subsidies of over $58 million, representing an average of about 64.8% of their total mailing costs. The program funded 1 153 different publications and supported the distribution of over 187 million copies of Canadian periodicals through the mail.

Canadian readers had access to a wide range of Canadian magazines in 2007–2008 as 63 new Canadian magazines were launched, while only 19 magazines folded. There were 15% fewer launches than the year before. Of the new titles, 49 were consumer magazines in 11 different subject categories. (Source: Masthead, March–April 2008).

In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007–08 11. Actual Spending 2007–08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Access to and Participation in Canada’s Cultural Life            
Total grants 45.4 45.4 45.4 45.4 45.4 -
Total contributions - - - - - -
14. Total Program Activity 118.4 115.1 127.7 130.6 123.5 4.2
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

n/a
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Publications Assistance Program (June 22, 2005)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm


Table 6: Details of Transfer Payment Programs, 
Department of Canadian Heritage
2007–2008
International and Intergovernmental Affairs and Sport Sector

All these transfer payments programs are voted, which means that each year the Parliament of Canada votes annual Appropriation Act or Acts to grant expenditure authority to the Crown for the departments and agencies. This spending authorization lapses at year-end.

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Athlete Assistance Program
2. Start Date: 1971 3. End Date: 2011
4. Description: The Athlete Assistance Program (AAP) contributes to the pursuit of excellence through its support for improved Canadian athlete performances at major international sporting events, enabling athletes to combine their sport and academic or working careers while training intensively in pursuit of world-class performances. To this end, the program identifies and supports athletes already among or having the potential to be among the top sixteen athletes in the world in their sport.

Athletes who are approved for funding and are financially supported through the AAP are referred to as "carded" athletes. AAP support is referred to as "carding."

The objectives of the program are to
  • financially support Canadian athletes identified by national sport organizations using criteria established by Sport Canada as achieving at or having the greatest potential to achieve a place among the top 16 athletes at Olympic/Paralympic Games and World Championships;

  • assist Canada's carded athletes in preparing to engage in full- or part-time career activities; and

  • enable Canada's carded athletes to participate in year-round national training and competition regimes to further their athletic goals.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:

Although some data may be incomplete, Sport Canada was able to accomplish the following results:
  • Sport Canada supported the continued meaningful offset of the incremental costs of training and competition for Canada's carded athletes. As in the previous year, in 2007–2008 Sport Canada provided over $25 million in AAP grants and funded over 1 700 carded athletes.

  • Sport Canada continued to provide Canada's carded athletes opportunities to prepare for future career activities through access to education and training. In 2007–2008 Sport Canada provided tuition support for 424 carded athletes.

  • Sport Canada has contributed to the opportunity for an increasing number of athletes to advance through the carding system. In 2007–2008, 310 (17.7%) athletes progressed to the next stage of the carding system. In 2006–2007, this number was 326 (19%). This variance of 2% is not significant and reflects a stable situation.

  • Sport Canada worked for Canadian athletes at the highest levels of competition. In summer sports, Canada ranked 19th in the world based on 53 medals won during the rolling four-year period of 2004–2007. This compares with 63 medals won during the 2003–2006 period, also a 19th place ranking. For Winter sports, Canada ranked 2nd based on 94 medals won during the 2004–2007 period, and also ranked 2nd with 88 medals won during the 2003–2006 period.* In the case of Paralympic sports, World Championships are generally held only once every four years, generally in even-numbered years between Paralympic Games. Thus, as 2007 was primarily a non-World Championship year for Paralympic sports, no international ranking was conducted.
* Data based on Sport Canada's Annual Olympic Ranking Index of Nations. The Indexis based on results per nation across all Olympic events at Olympic Games and World Championships, over a four-year timeframe. The Indexis produced annually at the end of each calendar year, once the Olympic Games and/or World Championships of that year have been completed. The results are aggregated with the results of the three previous years to produce a comprehensive four-year cycle of results across all Olympic events. For summer sports, this represents approximately 1000 events over a four-year period; for winter sports, almost 300 events.
(The 2007 edition of the Indexwas produced in January 2008. For summer sports, Canada ranked 19th in the world by finishing with 129 medal points based on 53 medals won (with 5 points awarded for a gold medal, 3 points for a silver medal and 1 point for a bronze medal) from 2004–2007. This compares with 153 medal points earned based on 63 medals won from 2003–2006—also a 19th place ranking.)
In millions of $ 7.
Actual
Spending
2005–06
8.
Actual
Spending
2006–07
9.
Planned
Spending
2007–08
10.
Total
Authorities
2007–08
11.
Actual
Spending
2007–08
12.
Variance(s)
Between
9 and 11
13. Program Activity:
Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence
           
Total grants 24.8 25.3 27.0 27.0 25.3 1.7
Total contributions - - - - - -
14. Total Program Activity 300.8 320.8 301.3 299.6 304.1 (2.8)
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of $1.7 million is explained as follows:
  • Transfers were made to other departmental programs for emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Athlete Assistance Program- Final Report (June 25, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Compliance Audit of the Athlete Assistance Program (AAP)- Administered by Sport Canada, Department of Canadian Heritage (November 28, 2001) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm
1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Hosting Program
2. Start Date:  1967 3. End Date:  2011
4. Description:

The Hosting Program  is a key instrument in the Government of Canada's overall approach to sport development in Canada and aims to enhance the development of sport excellence and the international profile of sport organizations by assisting sport organizations to host the Canada Games and international sport events in Canada. These events are expected to produce significant sport, economic, social, and cultural benefits. The program has four components: International Major Multisport Games, International Single Sport Events, International Multisport Games for Aboriginal Peoples and Persons with a Disability, and the Canada Games.

The Hosting Program offers Canada a planned and coordinated approach to realizing direct and significant benefits from bidding and hosting projects—benefits in sport development and positive economic, social, cultural and community impacts across a broad range of government priorities. The program is characterized by active liaison with collaborators/stakeholders and by a diligent contribution system.

Through contributions to bidding and hosting, the objectives of the Hosting Program are to
  • strengthen the sport excellence and sport development impacts of bidding and hosting the Canada Games and targeted international sport events;

  • increase access and equity for designated under-represented groups through contributions to international bidding and hosting events; and

  • strengthen the associated economic, social, cultural and community impacts of supported bidding and hosting projects, in keeping with the Government of Canada interests and priorities.
A new Hosting Policy was approved in 2007 and came into effect in 2008.

The Treasury Board decision linked to the new policy include a revised description of the program including each change identified:
  • The word legacies is removed.
  • There are new names.
  • The approach of the Hosting Program is based on contributions, not on grants.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:
Sport Canada worked to increase sport excellence and development impacts from planned events. While the data is incomplete, based on the first 11 reports received (of 54), the Hosting Program has provided opportunities for 847 Canadian athletes to participate in international sport events. 

Sport Canada worked to increase opportunities for designated under-represented groups to participate in planned events. While the data is incomplete, based on the first 11 reports (of 54), the Hosting Program has provided opportunities for 397 Canadian athletes with disabilities to participate in international sport events.

Sport Canada worked to increase economic, social, and cultural and community impacts of planned events that support Government of Canada priorities. While data for events under $250,000 are not normally captured by Sport Canada, the economic impact assessment for the FIFA U-20 World Cup was conducted by the Canadian Sport Tourism Alliance. The event contributed approximately $114 million to the GDP and generated an estimated $259.02 million in economic activity throughout the four host provinces. The combined total of the visitor expenditures, operational expenditures, and capital construction costs (of the National Soccer Stadium in Toronto) of the event totaled just over $108 million. These expenditures supported over $74 million in wages and salaries and approximately 1 700 jobs.
In millions of $ 7.
Actual
Spending
2005–06
8.
Actual
Spending
2006–07
9.
Planned
Spending
2007–08
10.
Total
Authorities
2007–08
11.
Actual
Spending
2007–08
12.
Variance(s)
Between
9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 17.7 20.3 10.7 9.2 8.9 1.8
14. Total Program Activity 300.8 320.8 301.3 299.6 304.1 (2.8)
13. Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 33.9 106.2 87.0 127.7 108.7 (21.7)
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
13. Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions - - 1.9 1.9 1.2 0.7
14. Total Program Activity 107.9 149.7 145.3 143.2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of ($19.2 million) is mainly explained as follows:
  • Additional not planned funding of $50 million for Vancouver capital was received through the Supplementary Estimates A, an amount $9.5 million was reprofiled through Supplementary Estimates B and an additional reprofile amount of $18.6M is awaiting approval.

  • Variance of $1.8 million in the "Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence" program activity is mainly explained by the cancellation of the Commonwealth Games in Halifax which resulted in a $1.5 million surplus.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Audit of the Contribution Agreements with the XI FINA World Championships—Montreal 2005 Organizing Committee (March 15, 2006) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Report on the Audit of the Hosting Program (Sport Canada) Assurance Services Directorate (June 15, 2005)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Summative Evaluation of the Department of Canadian Heritage's Sport Hosting Program (February 5, 2004)   http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm
1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Sport Support Program
2. Start Date: 1961 3. End Date:  2011
4. Description:  The Sport Support Program (SSP) is the primary funding vehicle for initiatives associated with the delivery of the Canadian Sport Policy. The SSP funding is aimed at developing athletes and coaches at the highest international levels; providing sound technically-based sport programming for all athletes; increasing the number of Canadians from all segments of society involved in sport; and advancing Canadian interests and values in Canada and abroad. This funding is provided to eligible organizations in support of programming that supports the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy.

Specific objectives of the program are to
  • increase opportunities for all Canadians, including under-represented groups, to participate in quality sport activities;

  • increase the capacity of the Canadian sport system to systematically achieve world-class results at the highest international competitions;

  • contribute to the provision of technical sport leadership within the Canadian sport system; and

  • advance Canadian interests, values, and ethics in sport at home and abroad.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:
Sport Canada continued to provide sport programs and services to the Canadian sport system by supporting National Sport Organizations (NSOs) and Multisport Service Organizations (MSOs). In 2007–2008, Sport Canada supported 56 NSOs, 15 MSOs, 7 Canadian Sport Centres and 7 additional non-government organizations. 

Sport Canada worked to increase opportunities for sport participation among all Canadians, including targeted under-represented groups, by funding Sport Participation Development Initiatives—for persons with and without a disability—for 40 NSOs and 3 MSOs, and. Sport Participation Projects for 5 MSOs and 7 other Non-Government Organizations. About 990 000 participants benefited from these initiatives, an increase over the 490 000 in 2006–2007. In addition, Sport Canada supported 13 FPT Bilateral Agreements to increase sport participation levels as expressed in the Canadian Sport Policy and 10 to encourage and support greater participation of Aboriginal peoples in sport. In 2007–2008, from preliminary reports from P/Ts, an estimated 1.3 million participants (from targeted and non- targeted groups) benefited from these agreements.

Revised national accountability standards for 2006–2012 were introduced in 2006–2007. NSOs receiving Sport Canada funding will be monitored annually for compliance with these standards. First priority standards (which were expected to have been fully met by March 31, 2008) address the following: multi-year planning, official languages services, bilingual websites, harassment and abuse, bilingual communication with national teams, national teams—harassment and abuse awareness, and national teams—athlete/coach leadership. In 2006–2007, the first year of monitoring, 93% of NSOs had at least partially met all seven first priority standards, while 51% of NSOs had fully met at least five. In 2007–2008, 99% of NSOs had at least partially met all seven "first priority" standards and 88% had fully met at least five. Information is available on only 45 of 56 NSOs.

Sport Canada has worked to increase the number of NSOs with a sport-specific Long-Term Athlete Development Model in place. There are now 12 NSOs that have implemented the Model. This is up from 2005–2006 when only one NSO had completed their LTAD model.

Sport Canada worked with partners to increase the number of NSOs that have implemented the revised National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP). In 2007–2008, 26 NSOs had conditional approvals, 12 had final approvals. Fifty-one NSOs have now implemented a new NCCP level.

Sport Canada worked with partners to increase the number of coaches participating in the NCCP. In 2007–2008, 52 467 coaches participated in a NCCP course, bringing the two-year total to almost 95 000.

Sport Canada worked with partners towards support of a full complement of qualified coaches for targeted sports. In 2007–2008, there were 317 NCCP level III, 13 NCCP level IV and 4 NCCP level V certified coaches working with high performance athletes.

Sport Canada worked to advanced Canadian interests, values, and ethics in sport at home and abroad. In 2007–2008, the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport conducted 3 551 doping tests, of which 2 899 were conducted as part of the Canadian Anti-Doping Program. In 2007–2008, 20 Canadian athletes were sanctioned for an anti-doping violation.
In millions of $ 7.
Actual
Spending
2005–06
8.
Actual
Spending
2006–07
9.
Planned
Spending
2007–08
10.
Total
Authorities
2007–08
11.
Actual
Spending
2007–08
12.
Variance(s)
Between
9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Creation of Canadian Content and Performance Excellence            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 91.7 92.6 81.9 81.9 90.0 (8.1)
14. Total Program Activity 300.8 320.8 301.3 299.6 304.1 (2.8)
13. Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 1.3 1.4 0.5 0.5 0.9 (0.4)
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
13. Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions - - 13.8 18.8 12.3 1.5
14. Total Program Activity 107.9 149.7 145.3 143.2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of ($7 million) is explained as follows:
  • ($5.3 million) was brought forward from 2009–2010 to 2007–2008 for the Own the Podium initiative.

  • The remaining variance of ($1.7 million) is related to transfers received from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Formative Evaluation of the Participation Elements of the Sport Support Program-(February 24, 2006)   http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of the National Sport Organization Support Program (February 26, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of the NSO Support Program: National Sport Federation (NSF), Sport Organizations for Athletes with a Disability (SOAD), and Domestic Sport Organization (DSO)

Components (February 20, 2002)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Evaluation of the National Sport Organizations Support Program: Multi-Sport/-Service Organization Component (February 20, 2002)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm
1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  TV5 Contributions
2. Start Date: 1990–1991 3. End Date:  2012–2013
4. Description:  The TV5 Contributions program contributes to the international showcasing of French-language Canadian television programs by participating in TV5MONDE and offers Canadians programming from the international Francophonie by participating in TV5 Québec-Canada.
5. Strategic Outcome:  Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.
6. Results Achieved:
For a contribution of approximately 5% (3% Canada and 2% Québec) to TV5MONDE, Canada has ensured that 6.8% of TV5MONDE's programming is Canadian..

The TV5 Québec-Canada programming consists largely of shows that are created with European and African TV5 partners and that are not usually available on other francophone Canadian channels. These TV5 Québec-Canada shows give the Canadian public access to international francophone culture and bring greater awareness of the cultural diversity of the francophone world. This channel also broadcasts 15% Canadian programming, which further makes available and promotes Canadian French-language television.

By attracting Canadian and international audiences to francophone television programming, Canadian Heritage promotes Canada internationally, showcases the diversity of the Francophone culture among Canadians, and encourages the creation and production of French-language Canadian programming.
In millions of $ 7.
Actual
Spending
2005–06
8.
Actual
Spending
2006–07
9.
Planned
Spending
2007–08
10.
Total
Authorities
2007–08
11.
Actual
Spending
2007–08
12.
Variance(s)
Between
9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Sustainability of Cultural Expression and Participation            
Total grants 4.2 4.1 5.0 5.0 4.7 0.3
Total contributions 2.6 3.0 2.5 2.5 3.0 (0.5)
14. Total Program Activity 108.7 186.9 163.1 209.2 184.6 (21.5)
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):

Overall variance of ($0.2 million) is explained as follows:
  • Transfers were received from other departmental programs to adjust for emerging priorities.
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Evaluation of federal participation in TV5–Final Report (February 20, 2002) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

Audit of Single Recipient Contribution Programs – Summary of Finding TV5 (February 26, 2003)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm  

Table 6: Details of Transfer Payment Programs, 
Department of Canadian Heritage
2007–2008
Public and Regional Affairs Sector

This transfer payments program is voted, which means that each year the Parliament of Canada votes annual Appropriation Act or Acts to grant expenditure authority to the Crown for the departments and agencies. This spending authorization lapses at year-end.

  • Celebration, Commemoration and Learning Program
1. Name of Transfer Payment Program:  Celebration, Commemoration and Learning Program
2. Start Date:  November 2003 3. End Date:  2008–2012
4. Description:  The Celebration, Commemoration and Learning Program is a theme-based dynamic approach to celebrating and commemorating significant people, places, symbols, anniversaries, and events. It is delivered in collaboration with other federal departments, agencies, regional offices, partners, and stakeholders. It provides funding to non-profit organizations and Celebrate Canada committees to commemorate important aspects of Canadian history and to carry out initiatives under the five-year national commemorations plan.
5. Strategic Outcome: Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.
6. Results Achieved:
In 2007, close to 1500 projects received financial assistance to support local and regional activities celebrating Canada Day. Approximately 35 000 people attended the Canada Day Noon Show on Parliament Hill, and nearly 80% of participants responded that the Noon Show contributes to their pride in being Canadian. (Decima Research, 2007) In 2007, more than 15 000 young people across the country participated in the Poster Challenge.

The Interdepartmental Commemoration Committee contributed to the development of the five-year national commemorations plan (2008–2012). The plan will identify the major events that are expected to be commemorated and celebrated across the country in the next five years and that will have impact for or be of special interest to all Canadians. The plan will ensure that annual themes are integrated in the many activities that the government and partners initiate every year. This will facilitate continuity and consistency of initiatives across the government.

All Canadians, including teachers and students, can access information about Canadian protocol and symbols through the Department's website and publications. The program published a new edition of Symbols of Canada, a series of posters on Canada's historic flags, and a new publication, A Crown of Maples.
 In millions of $ 7. Actual Spending 2005–06 8. Actual Spending 2006–07 9. Planned Spending 2007–08 10. Total Authorities 2007-08 11. Actual Spending 2007-08 12. Variance(s) Between 9 and 11
13. Program Activity: Participation in Community and Civic Life            
Total grants 0.9 2.1 5.5 5.5 2.2 3.3
Total contributions 11.9 11.6 16.0 15.0 19.3 (3.3)
14. Total Program Activity 107.9 149.7 145.3 143.2 133.6 11.7
15. Total TPP 1,015.7 1,150.3 1,098.2 1,157.5 1,117.9 (19.7)
16. Comments on variance(s):
n/a
17. and 18. Significant audit and evaluation findings and URL(s) to last audit/evaluation:

Summative Evaluation of the Celebration, Commemoration and Learning Program
(October 2007) http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/evaltn/2007/2007-05/index-eng.cfm
Audit of the Celebration, Commemoration and Learning Program  (January 25, 2006)  http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm
Formative Evaluation of Celebrate Canada!  (October 20, 2004)   http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/em-cr/index-eng.cfm

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Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Table 11: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grants for research projects and personnel support
Start Date: October 2000 End Date: N/A
Description: CIHR administers a large suite of grant programs all of which are listed in its Grants and Awards Guide and/or made available publicly on the web http://www.cihr.gc.ca/. For each program, the website provides a description of the program, eligibility criteria, application guidelines and forms, and policies and procedures governing the use of funds.
Strategic Outcomes: 1.0 - Fund Health Research, 2.0 - Fund Health Researchers and Trainees, 3.0 - Support Activities on Knowledge Translation, Exchange and Use
Results Achieved: Please refer to section II of this DPR (Analysis by Strategic Outcome) for detailed information on the achieved results.
($ millions) Actual Spending
2005-2006
Actual Spending 2006-2007 Planned Spending 2007-2008 Total Authorities 2007-2008 Actual Spending
2007-2008
Variance(s)
[Actual / Planned]
Program Activity 1.1 - Fund Health Research            
Total Grants $ 443.9  $ 476.4 $ 468.7 $ 509.5 $ 514.4  ($ 45.7)
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of TPs
Total Program Activity $ 443.9 $ 476.4 $ 468.7 $ 509.5 $ 514.4 ($ 45.7)
Program Activity 2.1 - Fund Health Researchers            
Total Grants $ 158.5  $ 168.6 $ 185.0 $ 185.3 $ 175.6  $ 9.4
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of TPs
Total Program Activity $ 158.5 $ 168.6 $ 185.0 $ 185.3  $ 175.6 $ 9.4 
Program Activity 2.2 - Fund Research Resources, Collaboration and Other Grants to Strengthen the Health Research Community            
Total Grants $ 66.6  $ 62.7 $ 67.3  $ 66.9 $ 64.2  $ 3.1
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of TPs
Total Program Activity $ 66.6 $ 62.7 $ 67.3 $ 66.9  $64.2 $ 3.1 
Program Activity 2.3 - Develop and Support Strong Health Research Community through National and International Alliances and Priority-Setting            
Total Grants $ 9.1  $ 9.0 $ 10.8  $ 10.8 $ 9.5  $ 1.3
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of TPs
Total Program Activity $ 9.1 $ 9.0 $ 10.8 $ 10.8  $ 9.5 $ 1.3 
Program Activity 2.4 - Inform Research, Clinical Practice and Public Policy on Ethical, Legal and Social Issues (ELSI) Related to Health and Health Research            
Total Grants $ 1.4  $ 1.7 $ 3.8  $ 3.8 $ 1.8  $ 2.0
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of TPs
Total Program Activity $ 1.4 $ 1.7 $ 3.8 $ 3.8  $ 1.8 $ 2.0 
Program Activity 3.1 - Support Activities on Knowledge Translation, Exchange, Use and Strategies to Strengthen the Health System            
Total Grants $ 33.3  $ 32.8 $ 37.7  $ 38.7 $ 37.4  $ 0.3
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of TPs
Total Program Activity $ 33.3 $ 32.8 $ 37.7 $ 38.7  $ 37.4 $ 0.3 
Program Activity 3.2 - Support National Efforts to Capture the Economic Value for Canada of Health Research            
Total Grants $ 24.2  $ 25.4 $ 25.6  $ 28.1 $ 23.4  $ 2.2
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of TPs
Total Program Activity $ 24.2 $ 25.4 $ 25.6 $ 28.1  $ 23.4 $ 2.2 
Comment(s) on Variance(s): The lapsed funding in the Grants and Awards was the result of difficulties experienced by universities in filling Canada Research Chairs at the rate that had been hoped for.

Activities completed in 2007-2008:

Results Based Management Accountability Frameworks (RMAF) Completed:

  1. Draft CIHR/Rx&D RMAF
  2. Draft Clinical Research Initiative RMAF
  3. Update of the Common Evaluation Framework for the 13 Institutes
  4. Institute Support Grant Integrated RMAF/RBAF

Evaluation Reports Completed and Approved in 2007-2008:

STIHR Evaluation:
The evaluation found the STIHR to be important and relevant to the CIHR mandate, the health research community, the federal government and other external stakeholders and that it provided good value added.

Key stakeholders considered the STIHR to be comparable with programs like the Canada Graduate Scholarships, the Doctoral Research Awards, and CIHR Fellowship awards in terms of trainees' disciplinary background; early scholarly productivity; and perceptions of the training environment and trainee experience.

Integrated Report of the Evaluation of CIHR's 13 Institutes:
The issues addressed in the evaluation met the needs of CIHR and Treasury Board requirements for formative evaluations. In brief summation, the issues and the overall conclusions in each area are as follows:

Relevance: To what extent is there still a need for this Institute to support the development of Canadian capacity and research excellence in this field of health research?

CIHR as a whole and each of the 13 Institutes remain a relevant and needed component of support to health research in Canada. Their mandates and strategic priorities are regarded as appropriate and relevant. However, views were expressed for most Institutes that their mandates are very broad given their available resources.

Delivery: What has been the influence of other factors on the overall effectiveness of Institutes?

All 13 Institutes have been successful in establishing effective organizations and program delivery. The evaluation results showed that all 13 Institutes have used strategic and operational planning mechanisms effectively, and that the consultative processes used in these mechanisms have strengthened linkages and engagement of stakeholder communities.

Effectiveness: How effectively has this Institute achieved its objectives, fulfilled its mandate and mission, and achieved its vision? How effectively and uniquely has this Institute contributed to the overall objective of the CIHR?

Overall, the evaluations showed that the Institutes have performed well, making substantial progress in fulfilling their mandates and strategic priorities. The greatest effectiveness was noted in the areas of creating new knowledge, developing health research capacity, and developing partnerships and collaborations through a broad range of innovative initiatives.

Although a priority, knowledge translation has been a significant challenge for the majority of Institutes. Institute evaluations suggested that they have struggled with a lack of clarity on the vision and definition of knowledge translation within CIHR.

Alternatives: Are there alternative ways to achieve the same or better results in terms of research capacity, excellence and impacts in this research domain with greater efficiency?

While the issue was explored through the evaluations, the determination was that no-viable alternative to the Institute model was presented.

Networks of Centers of Excellence (NCE) (Tri-Agency - NSERC lead agency):
Results of the evaluation can be found here: http://www.nce.gc.ca/pubs/reports/2007/evaluation/NCEEvaluationReport2007-eng.pdf

Performance Measurement Studies:
- 13 Institute Performance Reports

Evaluability Assessment:
- Obesity Strategic Initiative

Other Substantive Studies/Reviews:

  1. Development of RRS System
  2. Blue Sky II - CIHR Impact Framework
  3. IHRT/CAHR Evaluation Framework

Activities planned for in 2008-2009:

A Corporate 5-Year Evaluation Plan is being finalized based upon a risk-based 5-year evaluation prioritization exercise and approved schedule. The work for 2008-2009 includes: (1) completion of the Tri-agency Canada Graduate Scholarship evaluation; (2) completion of the Doctoral Research Award Evaluation; (3) completion of STIHR case (4) initiation of an evaluation of Team-Type Programs (5) initiation of studies as part of an Operating Grant Program evaluation (6) initiation of an evaluation study of Randomized Controlled Trials program (7) participation in Tri-Council evaluations of the Indirect Costs Program and of the Tri-Council Panel and Secretariat on Research Ethics

The approved Risk-Based Annual Internal Audit Plan for 2008-2009 includes audits of (1) the Non-Financial Administration of Open Operating Grants and (2) the Financial Administration of Open Operating Grants. These audits are expected to be completed by December 31, 2008.

In addition, the approved Risk Assessment and Risk-Based 5-Year Internal Audit Plan includes audits of the Non-Financial Administration of (1) the Salary Program - in 2009-2010 (2) Training Program - in 2010-2011 and (3) Research Related Activity - in 2011-2012. The timing and scope of these future audits may change as a result of the 2008-2009 audits of Open Operating Grants, the results of audits by the Office of the Auditor General and the Office of the Comptroller General, and TBS priorities.

 

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Institute Support Grants (ISG)
Start Date: October 2000 3) End Date: N/A
Description: Health Research Institutes will assess research priorities in their area, determine gaps and opportunities that present research is not addressing, and will devote resources toward answering these questions and addressing these gaps. Payment of Institute Support Grants will be integrated into CIHR's payment systems currently in place for Research Funding Programs. These Programs are paid in bi-monthly installments and are in compliance with TBS's policy on transfer payments.
Strategic Outcomes: 2.0 - Fund Health Researchers and Trainees
Results Achieved: Please refer to section II of this DPR (Analysis by Strategic Outcome) for detailed information on the achieved results.
($ millions) Actual Spending 2005-2006
Actual Spending 2006-2007 Planned Spending 2007-2008 Total Authorities 2007-2008 Actual Spending
2007-2008
Variance(s)
[Actual / Planned]
Program Activity 2.3 - Develop and Support Strong Health Research Community through National and International Alliances and Priority-Setting            
Total Grants $ 13.0 $ 13.0  $ 13.0  $ 13.0  $ 13.0
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of TPs
Total Program Activity $ 13.0 $ 13.0  $ 13.0  $ 13.0  $ 13.0
Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A
 
The approved Risk Assessment and Risk-Based 5-Year Internal Audit Plan does not include an audit of ISGs.

 

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Graduate Scholarships
Start Date: Fiscal Year 2003-2004 End Date: N/A
Description: The Canada Graduate Scholarships Program administered by CIHR is intended to provide special recognition and support to students who are pursuing a Master's or Doctoral degree in a health related field in Canada. These candidates are expected to have an exceptionally high potential for future research achievement and productivity. This program awards scholarships through national competitions by the granting agencies; NSERC, SSHRC, and CIHR. These awards are intended to sustain recipients while they pursue graduate studies.
Strategic Outcomes: 2.0 - Fund Health Researchers and Trainees
Results Achieved: Please refer to section II of this DPR (Analysis by Strategic Outcome) for detailed information on the achieved results.
($ millions) Actual Spending 2005-2006
Actual Spending 2006-2007 Planned Spending 2007-2008 Total Authorities 2007-2008 Actual Spending
2007-2008
Variance(s)
[Actual / Planned]
Program Activity 2.1 - Fund Health Researchers and Trainees            
Total Grants $ 8.1  $ 10.1 $ 10.5 $ 14.4 $ 13.9 ($ 3.4)
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of TPs
Total Program Activity $ 8.1 $ 10.1  $ 10.5 $ 14.4 $ 13.9 ($ 3.4)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A
A "Tri-Agency" evaluation of the CGS program, led by CIHR, was initiated in Fall 2007-2008 and is expected to be completed in late 2008-2009.
The approved Risk Assessment and Risk-Based 5-Year Internal Audit Plan does not include an audit of CGS.

 

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research
Start Date: Fiscal Year 2007-2008 End Date: 2011-12
Description: The Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research (CECR) Program supports research and commercialization centres capable of achieving global leadership for Canada and translating knowledge into significant commercial advantage. CECR is a joint program of the Tri-council, in partnership with Industry Canada. Through this program, the Federal Government will identify the best initiatives based on international peer review and advice from a Private Sector Advisory Board, and make investments in partnership with others, such as the provinces and businesses.
Strategic Outcomes: 3.0 - Support Activities on Knowledge Translation, Exchange and Use
Results Achieved: Please refer to section II of this DPR (Analysis by Strategic Outcome) for detailed information on the achieved results.
($ millions) Actual Spending 2005-2006
Actual Spending 2006-2007 Planned Spending 2007-2008 Total Authorities 2007-2008 Actual Spending
2007-2008
Variance(s)
[Actual / Planned]
Program Activity 2.1 - Fund Health Researchers and Trainees            
Total Grants $ 73.5 $ 73.5 ($ 73.5) 
Total Contributions
Total Other Types of TPs
Total Program Activity   -   -   - $ 73.5 $ 73.5 ($ 73.5)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A
A "Tri-Agency evaluation was recently completed of the Networks of Centres of Excellence which subsumes the Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research as part of its portfolio. The Centres of Excellence for Commercialization and Research is a new program that was launched in Summer of 2007-2008, therefore no evaluation was completed for this program in 2007-2008.
The approved Risk Assessment and Risk-Based 5-Year Internal Audit Plan does not include an audit of CECR.

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Canadian International Development Agency

Table 5: Details on transfer payments programs


($ millions) Actual Spending
2005-2006
1
Actual Spending
2006-2007
2
Planned Spending
2007-2008
3
Total Authorities
2007-2008
4
Actual Spending
2007-2008
5
Variance (s)
(5-3)
Countries of Concentration  
Total Grants     189.95 205.65 205.56 15.61
Total Contributions     557.43 496.95 486.74 (70.69)
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 0.00 0.00 747.38 702.60 692.30 (55.08)
Fragile States and Countries Experiencing Humanitarian Crisis  
Total Grants     430.62 474.01 473.81 43.19
Total Contributions     146.30 96.77 96.72 (49.58)
Total Other Types of TPs     0.00 110.00 110.00 110.00
Total Program Activity 0.00 0.00 576.92 680.78 680.53 103.61
Selected Countries and Regions  
Total Grants     147.82 98.58 94.03 (53.79)
Total Contributions     406.09 287.36 279.73 (126.36)
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 0.00 0.00 553.91 385.94 373.76 (180.15)
Multilateral, International and Canadian Institutions  
Total Grants     406.95 576.42 576.17 169.22
Total Contributions     205.04 236.78 216.69 11.65
Total Other Types of TPs     259.71 301.85 301.85 42.14
Total Program Activity 0.00 0.00 871.70 1,115.05 1,094.71 223.01
Engaging Canadian Citizens  
Total Grants     4.40 13.01 13.00 8.60
Total Contributions     59.26 31.59 31.58 (27.68)
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 0.00 0.00 63.66 44.60 44.58 (19.08)
Geographic Programs  
Total Grants 402.35 545.11       0.00
Total Contributions 870.42 857.71       0.00
Total Other Types of TPs   40.00        
Total Program Activity 1,272.77 1,442.82 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Multilateral Programs  
Total Grants 630.66 673.49       0.00
Total Contributions 26.39 14.50       0.00
Total Other Types of TPs 566.52 358.28        
Total Program Activity 1,223.57 1,046.27 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Canadian Partnership  
Total Grants 28.87 19.28       0.00
Total Contributions 218.25 228.75       0.00
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 247.12 248.03 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Policy Coherence  
Total Grants 5.64 5.30       0.00
Total Contributions 13.78 8.95       0.00
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 19.42 14.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Engaging Canadians  
Total Grants 1.75 5.05       0.00
Total Contributions 17.82 21.58       0.00
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 19.57 26.63 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 2,782.45 2,778.00 2,813.57 2,928.97 2,885.88 72.31

The variance between the total authorities and the actual spending is $43 million: from the grants and contributions budget, $1 million was not spent and a further $42 million are frozen allotments that will be entirely reprofiled to 2008-2009 for the Canada Fund for Africa.

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Canadian Space Agency

3.3.6) Details on Transfer Payments Programs (TPPs)


Contribution to European Space Agency (ESA)

Start Date: January 1, 2000 End Date: December 31, 2009

Description:

Through key international partnerships, enhance the Canadian industry's technological base and provide access to European market for value-added products and services in the field of EO.

Strategic Outcome:

Canada's presence in space meets the needs of Canadians for scientific knowledge, space technology and information.

Expected Results (Program Activity Level)

Space Based Earth Observation:

Delivery, directly or in partnership, of Space Based EO data, products and services in response to operational and scientific user requirements in the fields of Environment, Resource and Land Use Management, and Security and Foreign Policy, supported by access capacity development.

Space Science and Exploration:

Increased participation in Canadian and international opportunities in order to expand the scientific knowledge base made available to Canadian academia and R&D communities in astronomy, space exploration and solar-terrestrial relations, as well as physical and life sciences.

Satellite Communications:

1) Increased access for Canadians to state-of-the-art space communications systems and services to meet their social and economic needs.

2) Better use of space communications, search and rescue, and global navigation satellite systems and applications to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of other government departments in delivering services to Canadians.

Generic Space Activities in support of EO, SE and SC:

Innovative space technologies, techniques, and design and test methodologies in response to advanced developments required for future space missions and activities.

Expected Accomplishments:

Successful development and demonstration of advanced technologies, systems, components, and studies provided for in the contracts awarded by ESA to Canadian firms under the following ESA EO programs: EOEP, GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) Service Element and GMES Space Component.

Continue do develop the Space Exploration programs ELIPS and Aurora.

Successful development and demonstration of advanced technologies, systems, components, or studies provided for in the contracts awarded by ESA to Canadian firms under the following ESA Telecommunications and Navigation programs: ARTES 1,3,4,5,8 and GalileoSat.

Growing utilization of data obtained from ESA on markets and Earth observation / Telecommunications technologies as strategic information for government departments, agencies and industries in Canada.

Because of our participation in Europe's telecommunication, Earth observation and exploration programs, more demonstration of space-qualified technologies and products developed by Canadian firms for the space markets take place.

Development of new alliances and/or strengthening of established alliances between Canadian and European companies, to diversify Canada's international space partnerships and complement its long-standing relationship with the U.S.

Actual Accomplishments:

Several technologies and skills have been developed and improved through the participation of Canadian companies in ESA programs. Some businesses have integrated these technologies into products, allowing them to sell these products in other than European markets. In addition to generating revenues, the development and improvement of space technologies also created or maintained specialized jobs. In addition, specialized skills were created in the areas of space hardware, ground segment, and space technology applications.

The program served to boost the visibility of Canada in European markets. Canadian contractors see the ESA Contribution program as a means of cultivating business relationships. The program also fosters regional development and access to other markets by virtue of the successes of companies in Europe. Furthermore, Canada expanded its knowledge and technology in fields such as weather and ice movement forecasting, Earth Observation data, satellite communications technologies, environmental monitoring and security.



($ in millions)

Actual Spending 2005-2006

Actual Spending 2006-2007

Planned Spending 2007-2008

Total Authorities 2007-2008

Actual Spending 2007-2008

Variance between Planned vs. Actual

Space Based Earth Observation 17.1 9.9 10.1 12.6 7.3 2.9
Space Science and Exploration 3.7 5.8 8.3 6.9 6.9 1.4
Satellite Communications 9.1 11.0 12.2 13.7 13.7 (1.5)
Generic Space Activities in support of EO, SE & SC   8.7 8.6 7.4 7.3 1.3
Total Contributions 29.9 35.5 39.2 40.6 35.2 4.0
Total Program Activities 29.9 35.5 39.2 40.6 35.2 4.0


Notes:

  • Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown.
  • This table details contribution programs with funding in excess of $5 million per annum.

Comments on Variances:

Several factors explain the year-to year fluctuations in spending under Canada/European Space Agency (ESA) programs: the cash flow requirements of ESA programs which Canada is participating in (the budget requirements vary with the project's delivery phase), the slippage in the disbursements for Canada/ESA programs (the programs and associated contracts to industry are delivered by ESA; hence, the CSA has no direct control on actual project implementation), and the exchange rate fluctuations between Euros and Canadian dollars.

The positive variance of $4.0 million in 2007-2008 is due to: Surplus of $1.4 million related to surplus in the Risk Reserve associated to a lower exchange rates than anticipated between Euros and Canadian dollars during 2007-2008. The balance of $2.6 million is due to an amount reprofiled to future years following delays encountered to start three new optional programs (e.g. Earth Observation - 3, ELIPS - 2 and Aurora Exploration), in which Canada announced its participation at the December 2005 ESA Council. This involves a slippage in the disbursements for those programs to future years.

This variance is in accordance with the objectives and terms and conditions of the 2000-2009 Canada/ESA Cooperation Agreement. The Canadian industry (like that of other member states) is awarded contracts for the implementation of ESA optional programs in direct proportion to Canada's financial contributions to ESA.

Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to the Last Audit and/or Evaluation:

Canada is well thought of by Europeans, as the 28 years of cooperation between ESA and Canada clearly demonstrates. Canadian companies have made a significant contribution to the many technologies developed in the areas of Earth Observation and Satellite Communications.

Several businesses have developed business relationships with Europe thanks to the Agreement, and all stakeholders in the program agree that these relationships could continue, provided that Canada maintains its financial contribution to ESA. Canadian businesses have cultivated alliances with each other to benefit from or facilitate access to European markets through ESA programs under the Agreement.

The program helps diversify and open markets and aids in the achievement of objectives under the Canadian Space Strategy respecting Earth Observation and Satellite Communications. However, it does not lead to the transfer of technologies as much as to the exchange of information on technologies.

Small- and medium-sized companies have difficulty taking part in ESA programs and require greater support, not only to access these markets, but also to develop expertise so that they can continue doing business in these markets after their initial participation in ESA programs.

Source: Evaluation of the Canada/ESA Cooperation Agreement
www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/publications/er-0405-0202.asp




CASSIOPE Mission

Start Date: November 1, 2003 End Date: March 31, 2011

Description:

Support the integration of two payloads on a single generic Canadian small satellite bus the CASCADE telecommunications Ka-Band component and the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) scientific instrument.

Strategic Outcome:

Canada's presence in space meets the needs of Canadians for scientific knowledge, space technology and information.

Expected Results (Program Activity Level)

Space Science and Exploration:

Increased participation in Canadian and international opportunities in order to expand the scientific knowledge base made available to Canadian academia and R&D communities in astronomy, space exploration and solar-terrestrial relations, as well as physical and life sciences.

Satellite Communications:

1) Increased access for Canadians to state-of-the-art space communications systems and services to meet their social and economic needs.

2) Better use of space communications, search and rescue, and global navigation satellite systems and applications to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of other government departments in delivering services to Canadians.

Generic Space Activities in support of EO, SE and SC:

Innovative space technologies, techniques, and design and test methodologies in response to advanced developments required for future space missions and activities.

Expected Accomplishments:

Development and demonstration of the CASCADE Ka-Band telecommunications payload designed and built by Canadian companies. CASCADE is the precursor of communication satellite constellations that will help position the Canadian industry on the international market as a supplier of advanced components and a service provider.

Development of a small Canadian scientific satellite, the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP), which will probe the upper atmosphere and ionosphere region where solar variability influences global change in various time scales.

Development of a generic Canadian small satellite bus that could also be used for future Canadian missions.

Actual Accomplishments:

Continued manufacture of the Cascade payload and preparation for assembly, integration and test in the spacecraft. Continued manufacture of ePOP instruments, data handling units and booms. Planned payload assembly and test and integration into the spacecraft. Continued manufacture, test and integration of the generic small satellite bus.



($ in millions)

Actual Spending 2005-2006

Actual Spending 2006-2007

Planned Spending 2007-2008

Total Authorities 2007-2008

Actual Spending 2007-2008

Variance between Planned vs. Actual

Space Science and Exploration 3.2 2.3 1.2 1.7 1.7 (0.5)
Satellite Communications 14.5 16.2 9.1 8.5 7.0 2.1
Total Contributions 17.7 18.5 10.3 10.2 8.7 1.6
Total Program Activities 17.7 18.5 10.3 10.2 8.7 1.6


Notes:

  • Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown.
  • This table details contribution programs with funding in excess of $5 million per annum.

Comments on Variances:

CASSIOPE: Program delays due to problems with the development of critical components (DSU, C&DH) and the move of the launch date from November 2008 to June 2009 due to delays in the development of the Falcon launch vehicle. After detailed reviews of all the mission components, the schedule and milestones were modified to fit the new program schedule and launch date and the cash flow projections were adjusted accordingly.

ePOP: The additional funding for ePOP was necessitated by the extension of the CASSIOPE schedule and slippage of the launch date, which are beyond the control of the University of Calgary. The schedule extension will require the University of Calgary to stretch instrument development, assembly and test to fit the extended CASSIOPE schedule and maintain the project development teams at the universities and in industry for a longer period. The integration of ePOP with the CASSIOPE spacecraft is MacDonald, Dettwiller and Associates's responsibility, and will be performed at Bristol in Winnipeg and at the David Florida Lab in Ottawa. Synchronization of all program elements and activities, including the ePOP payload development, integration and test, is critical for success.

Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to the Last Audit and/or Evaluation:

Management has adopted systems and procedures that make for appropriate monitoring of the CASSIOPE Contribution Program, particularly with regards to its technical aspect. The various specialists involved in Program monitoring, scrupulously review the monthly reports received from recipients. Moreover, presentations are made to senior management regularly to acquaint them with the advancement of the Program, both in terms of its execution and costs or scheduling. Management has also implemented a Risk-Based Audit Framework (RBAF) as well as a Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF).

Source: www.asc-csa.gc.ca/pdf/ar-0607-0102.pdf


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Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Details on Transfer Payment Programs


Program Activity
($ Millions)

Actual
2005–2006

Actual
2006–2007

2007–2008

Planned
Spending

Total
Authorities

Actual

 
 
Integration Program – Grants
Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord [a] 188.4 193.9 224.4 224.4 198.2  
Institute for Canadian Citizenship 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0  
Total Grants 188.4 196.9 224.4 224.4 198.2  
 
Canada’s Role in International Migration
and Protection – Contributions
Migration Policy Development 0.2 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3  
International Organization for Migration 1.1 1.1 2.0 2.0 1.1  
Integration Program – Contributions  
Host Program [b] 3.3 5.0 10.1 10.1 8.1  
Immigrant Settlement and Adaptation Program [c] 42.9 70.2 173.6 170.2 115.1  
Resettlement Assistance Program [d] 39.7 44.1 49.5 52.9 52.9  
Contributions to Provinces 49.0 82.8 97.6 97.6 97.6  
Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada [e] 93.5 122.3 174.7 174.7 152.7  
Total Contributions 229.7 325.9 507.8 507.8 427.8  
Total Transfer Payments [f] 418.1 522.8 732.2 732.2 626.0  

Notes:

[a] The Grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord and contributions to provinces recognize the importance of settlement services that respond to the growing need to help immigrants integrate.

[b] Host funds are used to match newcomers with Canadian volunteers (individuals and groups), who help them settle in and integrate.

[c] The Immigrant Settlement and Adaptation Program provides funds for services such as orientation, paraprofessional counselling, translation, job-finding help, and Enhanced Language Training.

[d] The Resettlement Assistance Program, formerly the Adjustment Assistance Program, helps pay for temporary accommodations, clothing, household effects and living expenses for up to one year for indigent Convention refugees.

[e] The Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada Program provides funds for basic language training in both of Canada’s official languages to help adult immigrants integrate socially, culturally, economically and politically.

[f] Actual expenditures were lower than total authorities by $106.2 million. The lapse is mostly attributable to lower spending on the Canada-Ontario Immigration Agreement which was $63.4 million. It also includes $26.2 million against the grant payment under the Canada-Quebec Accord, which is the variance between the estimated amount and the final adjustment. Other lapses are due to lower spending of $16.6 million in general settlement programs.

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Department of Finance Canada

Table 6: Details on Transfer Payment Programs

The tables below report, by program activity, the Transfer Payment Programs in excess of $5 million (statutory payments are designated with [S]) that were managed by the Department of Finance Canada in the 2007–08 fiscal year:

Program Activity 9: Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories[1]

  • Fiscal Equalization (Part I, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) (S)
  • Territorial Formula Financing (Part I.1, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) (S)
  • Canada Health Transfer (Part V.1, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) (S)
  • Canada Social Transfer (Part V.1, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) (S)
  • Statutory Subsidies (Constitution Act, 1867; Constitution Act, 1982; and other statutory authorities) (S)
  • Youth Allowances Recovery (Federal-Provincial Fiscal Revision Act, 1964) (S)
  • Alternative Payments for Standing Programs (Part VI, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) (S)
  • Clean Air and Climate Change Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
  • Patient Wait Times Guarantee Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
  • Transition Trust(Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
  • Payment to British Columbia—Spirit Bear Rainforest (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
  • Transfer Payments to Territorial Governments (Northwest Territories) (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
  • Transfer Payments to Territorial Governments (Yukon) (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
  • Human Papillomavirus Immunization Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
  • Child Care Spaces (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
  • Payment to Ontario (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
  • Community Development Trust (S)

Program Activity 10: International Financial Organizations

  • Compensation to Canadian Agencies or Entities Established by an Act of Parliament for Reduction of Debts of Debtor Countries (Vote 5)
  • Debt Payments on Behalf of Poor Countries to International Organizations (Vote 5)
  • Payments to the International Development Association (S)

Note: In addition to the above transfer payments, other transfer payments were committed to in Budget 2008 and had not yet received Royal Assent before the end of the fiscal year and therefore were not identified as charges against the 2007–08 appropriations. As the commitment was established before the end of the fiscal year, however, they were recognized as expenses in the departmental financial statements. The following transfer payments will be reported in the 2008–09 Departmental Performance Report:

  • Canada Social Transfer Transition Protection Program Payment to Saskatchewan(Budget Implementation Act, 2008) (S)
  • Canada Social Transfer Transition Protection Program Payment to Nunavut(Budget Implementation Act, 2008) (S)
  • Payment to Saskatchewan for Carbon Capture and Storage (Budget Implementation Act, 2008) (S)
  • Payment to Nova Scotia for Carbon Storage (Budget Implementation Act, 2008) (S)
  • Police Officers Recruitment Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2008) (S)
  • Public Transit Capital Trust (Budget Implementation Act, 2008) (S)

Program Activity 9: Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Fiscal Equalization (Part I, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) (S)
Start Date: 1957 End Date: Ongoing
Description: Equalization payments are made to provincial governments based on a formula to enable them to provide reasonably comparable levels of public services at reasonably comparable levels of taxation. Equalization payments are unconditional. In 2007–08, seven provinces received payments under this program.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements provided financial support to Canadian provinces to assist them in providing public services.
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $10,900,000 $11,535,064 $11,676,353 $12,924,677 $12,924,677 $(1,248,324)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): The entire variance is due to Budget 2007. Budget 2007 announced a new formula for Equalization. Budget 2007 also provided a status quo formula (the January 2007 announcement) that applies to Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador. These two provinces were given the option of remaining in the status quo system or opting into the new formula. Amounts were included in the Budget Implementation Act, 2007, which received Royal Assent on June 22, 2007.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: An evaluation of this transfer program culminated with the new formula announced in Budget 2007. The evaluation took into account the June 2006 report of the expert panel (the Expert Panel on Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing) that studied the program, which is available on the panel's website at http://www.eqtff-pfft.ca/english/index.asp.

(The evaluation "findings" are described in Section II. They are the parameters of the new program.)

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Territorial Formula Financing (Part I.1, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) (S)
Start Date: 1985 End Date: Ongoing
Description: Transfer payments to territorial governments to support their budgetary revenues
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements provided financial support to Canadian territories to assist them in providing public services.
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $2,000,000 $2,118,264 $2,142,450 $2,221,297 $2,221,297 $(78,847)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): The entire variance is due to Budget 2007. Budget 2007 announced a new formula for Territorial Formula Financing. Amounts totalling $2.221 billion (an increase of nearly $79 million) were included in the Budget Implementation Act, 2007, which received Royal Assent on June 22, 2007.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: An evaluation of this transfer program culminated with the new formula announced in Budget 2007. The evaluation took into account the June 2006 report of the expert panel (the Expert Panel on Equalization and Territorial Formula Financing) that studied the program, which is available on the panel's website at http://www.eqtff-pfft.ca/english/index.asp.

(The evaluation "findings" are described in Section II. They are the parameters of the new program.)

Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Health Transfer (Part V.1, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) (S)
Start Date: 2004 End Date: Ongoing
Description: The Canada Health Transfer (CHT) provides equal per capita support for health care through cash and tax transfers to provincial and territorial governments. The CHT supports the government's commitment to maintain the national criteria and conditions of the Canada Health Act (comprehensiveness, universality, portability, accessibility, and public administration) and the prohibitions against user fees and extra-billing.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements provided financial support to Canadian provinces and territories to assist them in providing health care services reflecting the principles of the Canada Health Act.
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $19,000,000 $20,139,876 $21,348,400 $21,474,272 $21,474,272 $(125,872)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Due to the interaction between the CHT and the Equalization Program, the new formula for Equalization negatively affected some provinces. Budget 2007 included protection for provinces and territories to ensure that their payments were not lower than they would have been before the introduction of Budget 2007 proposals. Remaining variances from planned spending are due to deductions under the Canada Health Act, as requested by Health Canada.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable. An internal audit of the Canada Health and Social Transfer (CHST) was prepared in May 2002 and is available on the Department of Finance Canada website at http://www.fin.gc.ca/toce/2002/audit_transfers-e.html.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Social Transfer (Part V.1, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) (S)
Start Date: 2004 End Date: Ongoing
Description: The Canada Social Transfer (CST) provides equal per capita cash support and tax transfer support to provincial and territorial governments to assist them in financing post-secondary education, social assistance, and social services, including early childhood development, early learning, and child care services. The CST gives provinces and territories the flexibility to allocate payments among supported areas according to their own priorities and supports the government's commitment to prohibit minimum residency requirements for social assistance.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements provided financial support to Canadian provinces and territories to assist them in providing programs and services related to post-secondary education, social assistance and social services, and programs for children.
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $8,225,000 $8,500,000 $8,800,000 $9,590,219 $9,590,219 $(790,219)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Budget 2007 announced additional base funding of $687 million annually beginning in 2007–08 to smooth the transition to equal per capita cash and a long-term funding track to 2013–14, growing at 3 per cent annually as of 2009–10.

Due to the interaction between the Canada Social Transfer and the Equalization Program, the new formula for Equalization negatively affected some provinces and territories. Budget 2007 included protection for provinces and territories to ensure their payments were not lower than they would have been before the introduction of Budget 2007 proposals.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable. An internal audit of the Canada Health and Social Transfer (CHST) was prepared in May 2002 and is available on the Department of Finance Canada website at http://www.fin.gc.ca/toce/2002/audit_transfers-e.html.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Statutory Subsidies (Constitution Act, 1867; Constitution Act, 1982; and other statutory authorities) (S)
Start Date: 1867 End Date: Ongoing
Description: The statutory subsidies provide a source of funding to provinces in accordance with terms of entry into Confederation.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements provided financial support to provinces.
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $31,819 $31,821 $32,000 $31,822 $31,822 $178
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Payments fluctuate due to changes in the population data used in the formula; it is therefore never possible to have a planned spending figure that will exactly match the actual payments.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Allowances Recovery (Federal-Provincial Fiscal Revision Act, 1964) (S)
Start Date: 1964 End Date: Ongoing
Description: The Youth Allowances Recovery is a recovery from the Province of Quebec for an additional tax point transfer (three points) above and beyond the Canada Health Transfer and Canada Social Transfer tax point transfers; in the 1960s, Quebec chose to use the federal government's contracting-out arrangements for certain federal-provincial programs. Taken together, the Alternative Payments for Standing Programs and the Youth Allowances Recovery are known as the "Quebec Abatement." These arrangements ensure that all provinces and territories are treated the same through cash and tax transfers in support of health and social programs.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate recoveries from the Province of Quebec that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $(596,447) $(706,788) $(661,000) $(943,805) $(943,805) $282,805
Comment(s) on Variance(s): The Department of Finance Canada received $335.9 million of funds from the Province of Quebec relating to Youth Allowances Recoveries for the 2008–09 fiscal year on March 31, 2008. The recovery from the Province of Quebec for the 2007–08 fiscal year is therefore overstated. Without the early payment, the recovery would have been shown as $(607.8) million.

The variance between "Planned Spending" of $(661.0) million and "Total Authorities" (not including the early payment) of $(607.8) million is a result of a decrease in the value of personal income tax points resulting in lower amounts to be recovered from Quebec.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Alternative Payments for Standing Programs (Part VI, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) (S)
Start Date: 1977 End Date: Ongoing
Description: The Alternative Payments for Standing Programs are a recovery from the Province of Quebec for an additional tax point transfer (13.5 points) above and beyond the Canada Health Transfer and Canada Social Transfer tax point transfers; in the 1960s, Quebec chose to use the federal government's contracting-out arrangements for certain federal-provincial programs. Taken together, the Alternative Payments for Standing Programs and the Youth Allowances Recovery are known as the "Quebec Abatement." These arrangements ensure that all provinces and territories are treated the same through cash and tax transfers in support of health and social programs.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate recoveries from the Province of Quebec that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $(2,731,180) $(3,177,016) $(3,010,000) $(2,719,889) $(2,719,889) $(290,111)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): This recovery is based solely on income tax data, which are estimated several times per year. The decrease is due to a decrease in the value of personal income tax points compared with the data used at the time the figures for planned spending were estimated.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Clean Air and Climate Change Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
Start Date: 2006–07 End Date: 2007–08
Description: A one-time payment to provide support to provinces and territories for projects designed to achieve reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants. Funding was accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid into a third-party trust in 2007–08 once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent. Funding is notionally allocated over three years (2007–08 to 2009–10) and provinces and territories have the flexibility to draw down funds according to their respective needs and priorities over the lifespan of the trust.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements provided financial support to provinces and territories.
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $0 $0 $0 $1,518,925 $1,518,925 $(1,518,925)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): On February 12, 2007, the Government of Canada announced this new $1.519 billion trust fund. This trust was notionally allocated over three years beginning in 2007–08.

The trust fund has been allocated on an equal per capita basis, and each province has received a base minimum of $15 million while each territory has received a base minimum of $5 million. This funding was paid on June 28, 2007.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Patient Wait Times Guarantee Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
Start Date: 2006–07 End Date: 2007–08
Description: A one-time payment to provide support to provinces and territories for development of patient wait times guarantees in at least one of the five identified priority areas (cancer treatment, heart procedures, diagnostic imaging, joint replacement, and sight restoration). Funding was accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid into a third-party trust in 2007–08 once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent. Funding is notionally allocated over three years (2007–08 to 2009–10) and provinces and territories have the flexibility to draw down funds according to their respective needs and priorities over the lifespan of the trust.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements provided financial support to provinces and territories.
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $0 $0 $0 $612,000 $612,000 $(612,000)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Budget 2007 announced funding of $612 million to assist provinces and territories that made commitments to a patient wait times guarantee with the implementation of those guarantees. All provinces and territories made the necessary commitments.

The first $112 million represents base funding ($10 million to each province and $4 million to each territory), notionally allocated over 2007–08 to 2009–10. The balance, $500 million, was notionally allocated over the same three years on a per capita basis. This funding was paid on June 28, 2007.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transition Trust (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
Start Date: 2006–07 End Date: 2007–08
Description: One-time transitional payments for outstanding commitments to Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan for training and post-secondary education. Funding was accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid into a third-party trust in 2007–08 once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent. Funding is notionally allocated over three years (2007–08 to 2009–10), and the three provinces have the flexibility to draw down funds according to their respective needs and priorities over the lifespan of the trust.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all legislative requirements provided financial support to Ontario, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan.
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $0 $0 $0 $614,038 $614,038 $(614,038)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Budget 2007 announced funding of $614 million to a trust to provide funding of $574 million to Ontario for post-secondary education and training, $21.6 million to Manitoba for training, and $18.4 million to Saskatchewan for training. This funding was paid on June 28, 2007.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payment to British Columbia—Spirit Bear Rainforest (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
Start Date: 2006–07 End Date: 2007–08
Description: A one-time payment to the Province of British Columbia to support sustainable land and resource management development in the Great Bear Rainforest on the central coast of British Columbia
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative and regulatory requirements provided financial support to British Columbia.
 $ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $0 $0 $0 $30,000 $30,000 $(30,000)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): In January 2007 the Government announced one-time funding of $30 million to protect the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. Bill C-42 (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) granted authority to the government to make the payment, which was made in fiscal year 2007–08.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer Payments to Territorial Governments (Northwest Territories) (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
Start Date: 2006–07 End Date: 2007–08
Description: To provide for an adjustment to the Government of the Northwest Territories for the portion of the corporate income tax refund paid out by the territory to date. Funding is accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid in 2007–08 once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements provided financial support to the Northwest Territories.
 $ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $0 $0 $0 $54,400 $54,400 $(54,400)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Budget 2007 announced funding to the Northwest Territories (NWT) of $54.4 million to compensate the NWT for the Territorial Formula Financing entitlement reductions that resulted from Canada Revenue Agency repayments. This funding was paid on July 3, 2007.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Transfer Payments to Territorial Governments (Yukon) (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
Start Date: 2006–07 End Date: 2007–08
Description: To provide for a payment to the Government of the Yukon to satisfy Canada's one-time funding obligations under the Yukon Devolution Transfer Agreement. Funding was accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid in 2007–08 once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements provided financial support to the Yukon Territory.
 $ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $0 $0 $0 $3,500 $3,500 $(3,500)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Budget 2007 announced funding to Yukon of $3.5 million to satisfy all of Canada's one-time funding obligations under the Yukon Devolution Transfer Agreement. This funding was paid on July 3, 2007.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Human Papillomavirus Immunization Trust Fund (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
Start Date: 2006–07 End Date: 2007–08
Description: A one-time payment to provide support to provinces and territories to launch a national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine program to protect women and girls from cervical cancer. Funding was accounted for in 2006–07 and was paid into a third-party trust in 2007–08 once authorizing legislation received Royal Assent. Funding is notionally allocated over three years (2007–08 to 2009–10), and provinces and territories have the flexibility to draw down funds according to their respective needs and priorities over the lifespan of the trust.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements provided financial support to provinces and territories.
 $ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $0 $0 $0 $300,000 $300,000 $(300,000)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Budget 2007 announced an immunization trust to assist provinces and territories with the cost of immunization against HPV, a virus that can lead to cervical cancer.

A third-party trust fund of $300 million was established and notionally allocated for 2007–08 to 2009–10. The trust was allocated to provinces and territories on an equal per capita basis. This funding was paid on June 28, 2007.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Child Care Spaces (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
Start Date: 2007–08 End Date: 2007–08
Description: A one-time payment to provide support to provinces and territories for the creation of child care spaces through a direct payment for 2007–08; funding will be included in the Canada Social Transfer beginning in 2008–09.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements provided financial support to provinces and territories.
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $0 $0 $0 $250,000 $250,000 $(250,000)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Budget 2007 announced funding of $250 million to support the creation of child care spaces, to be provided directly to the provinces and territories on a per capita basis. This funding was paid on June 28, 2007.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payment to Ontario (Budget Implementation Act, 2007) (S)
Start Date: 2006–07 End Date: 2007–08
Description: Direct payments are made to the Government of Ontario to assist the province in the transition to a single corporate tax administration, in respect of the Canada-Ontario Agreement.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Reduced the compliance burden for Ontario businesses by moving to a common federal and provincial tax base as part of the Canada-Ontario Agreement
 $ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $0 $0 $0 $250,000 $250,000 $(250,000)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): The provision to pay Ontario $250 million in 2007–08 was not included in the Main Estimates.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation:Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.

 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Development Trust (S)
Start Date: 2007–08 End Date: 2007–08
Description: The Community Development Trust helps provinces and territories assist communities and workers suffering economic hardship caused by the current volatility in global financial and commodities markets.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments that meet all the legislative requirements provided financial support to provinces and territories.
 $ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories
Total Other Transfer Payments: $0 $0 $0 $1,000,000 $1,000,000 $(1,000,000)
Comment(s) on Variance(s): In accordance with the announcement of January 10, 2008, legislation was introduced to make payments to a trust established to provide provinces and territories with funding to support provincial and territorial initiatives to assist the adjustment of vulnerable communities to international economic volatility.

The first $109 million represents base funding ($10 million to each province and $3 million to each territory), notionally allocated over 2008–09 to 2010–11. The balance, $891 million, was notionally allocated over the same three years on a per capita basis. This funding was paid on April 2, 2008.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: Not applicable.
Total for Transfer Payments to Provinces and Territories $36,829,192 $38,441,221 $40,328,203 $47,211,456 $47,211,456 $(6,883,253)

Program Activity 10: International Financial Organizations


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Compensation to Canadian Agencies or Entities Established by an Act of Parliament for Reduction of Debts of Debtor Countries (Vote 5)
Start Date: 1991–92 End Date: Ongoing
Description: This program compensates Export Development Canada (EDC) and the Canadian Wheat Board (CWB) for reduction of debts of debtor countries.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Timely and accurate payments to the EDC and the CWB to compensate for debt relief to debtor countries
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): International Financial Organizations
 Total grants $579,242 $203,405 $125,000 $125,000 $231 $124,769
 Total contributions $68,799 $66,587 $45,000 $44,990 $42,646 $2,354
Total $648,041 $269,992 $170,000 $169,990 $42,877 $127,123
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Variances between planned and actual spending are due almost exclusively to certain countries' failing to meet the requirements of their International Monetary Fund (IMF) programs, which led to a delay in debt forgiveness for these countries. A small amount of the variance is due to interest rate and currency fluctuations, which could not be anticipated.
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: The Department conducted a review of administrative controls over international obligations and subscription payments. The work undertaken in the review found the following:

- The management framework surrounding the administration of international obligations and subscriptions is effective in meeting the business requirements of the Department;

- Payment schedules and transaction types were compliant with the terms specified in the respective legislative acts and agreements;

- Program officials were experienced in the undertaking of their administrative responsibilities;

- Funding instruments respect the need for accountability to Parliament, while balancing the principles of cost-benefit, risk management, and policy objectives; and

- Departmental reporting demonstrated a good knowledge of program activities and performance.


 


Name of Transfer Payment Program: Debt Payments on Behalf of Poor Countries to International Organizations (Vote 5)
Start Date: 2005–06 End Date: Ongoing
Description: Payments for Canada's commitment to the G8-led Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved: Responsible administration of financial obligations under the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative
$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): International Financial Organizations
 Total grants $16,586 $45,605 $51,200 $51,200 $50,490 $710
Comment(s) on Variance(s):Comoros debt arrears clearance of $600,000 explains the variance between planned and actual spending.

Due to political instability and deteriorating governance, Comoros was no longer eligible for an International Monetary Fund (IMF)–supported program; the Department of Finance Canada therefore did not contribute to its arrears clearance operation.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable.
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: The Department conducted a review of administrative controls over international obligations and subscription payments. The work undertaken in the review found the following:

- The management framework surrounding the administration of international obligations and subscriptions is effective in meeting the business requirements of the Department;

- Payment schedules and transaction types were compliant with the terms specified in the respective legislative acts and agreements;

- Program officials were experienced in the undertaking of their administrative responsibilities;

- Funding instruments respect the need for accountability to Parliament, while balancing the principles of cost-benefit, risk management, and policy objectives; and

- Departmental reporting demonstrated a good knowledge of program activities and performance.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments to the International Development Association (S)
Start Date: 1960–61 End Date: Ongoing
Description: This program provides encashment of demand notes to allow the International Development Association (IDA) to disburse concessional financing for development projects and programs in the world's poorest countries.
Strategic Outcome: A strong and sustainable economy, resulting in increasing standards of living and improved quality of life for Canadians
Results Achieved:

·         Financial obligations to the IDA are responsibly administrated; and

·         The results of IDA operations are detailed in the report on operations under the Breton Woods and Related Agreements Act that is tabled annually in Parliament.

$ thousands Actual Spending 2005–06 Actual Spending 2006–07 Planned Spending 2007–08 Total Authorities 2007–08 Actual Spending 2007–08 Variance(s) (2007–08 Planned-Actual)
Program Activity (PA): International Financial Organizations
Total Other Transfer Payments: $239,741 $318,270 $318,270 $318,270 $318,270 $0
Comment(s) on Variance(s): Not applicable
Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to Last Evaluation: Not applicable
Significant Audit Findings and URL to Last Audit: The Department conducted a review of administrative controls over international obligations and subscription payments. The work undertaken in the review found the following:

- The management framework surrounding the administration of international obligations and subscriptions is effective in meeting the business requirements of the Department;

- Payment schedules and transaction types were compliant with the terms specified in the respective legislative acts and agreements;

- Program officials were experienced in the undertaking of their administrative responsibilities;

- Funding instruments respect the need for accountability to Parliament, while balancing the principles of cost-benefit, risk management, and policy objectives; and

- Departmental reporting demonstrated a good knowledge of program activities and performance.

Total for International Financial Organizations $904,368 $633,867 $539,470 $539,460 $411,637 $127,833

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Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Table 7.1: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Peace and Security Fund and its component programs: the Global Peace and Security Program, the Global Peace Operations Program, and the Glyn Berry Program for Peace and Security
2) Start Date: October 3, 2005;
operationalized September 18, 2006
3) End Date: March 31, 2013
4) Description: The Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF) is a critical component of the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) portfolio. The GPSF and its component programs were initially established at $100 million per year for five years to support crisis response, stabilization and reconstruction in fragile states; to continue to address Canada’s G8 commitments to help build global and regional peace operations capacity; and to shape the international policies, laws and institutions needed to prevent and resolve crises. This was increased, in June 2007, to $235 million for 2007-2008 and $152 million per year for each of 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. In June 2008, the GPSF was extended until 2013 at a level of $146 million per year. Funded from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, the GPSF fills a funding gap by providing dedicated resources for activities that are necessary for a timely response with respect to countries in or at risk of crisis, but that are not properly the responsibility of the Department of National Defence and are outside Canada’s traditional official development assistance program. Examples of these activities are supporting peace operations and peace processes, supporting justice and security system reform, addressing small arms and light weapons proliferation, enhancing transitional justice and reconciliation, and improving the peace enforcement and peace operations capacities of military and police in Africa and the Americas. Major recipients of funding are Afghanistan, Sudan and Haiti.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: International Security 2
7) Results Achieved:
In 2007-2008, over 200 projects were funded through the GPSF supporting conflict prevention, crisis response, post-conflict peacebuilding and stabilization initiatives. The Global Peace and Security Sub-Program focused on three of Canada’s foreign policy priority countries, Afghanistan, Sudan and Haiti, and four fragile states implicating Canadian strategic security interests. The Global Peace Operations Sub-Program focused on development of peacekeeping capabilities with UN and regional organizations, as required, for future missions in Africa and the Americas. Finally, the Glyn Berry Sub-Program continued to advance foreign policy priorities in crisis response and post-conflict situations through interventions at home and abroad.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Grants: - - - 9.9 9.9 (9.9)
15) Total Contributions: 16.4 56.0 114.3 174.6 153.0 (38.7)
16) Total Program Activity: 16.4 56.0 114.3 184.5 162.9 (48.6)
17) Comment on Variance:
The variance is due to the difficult programming environment in which the GPSF operates.
18) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): The GPSF Sudan formative evaluation, covering the period from program inception in May 2005 to May 2007, was conducted in the spring of 2007. DFAIT requested this evaluation to capture lessons learned, to help refine programming efficiencies and management, and to provide input into the subsequent GPSF formative evaluation to fulfill Treasury Board requirements to report on the program’s performance.

The evaluation examined the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency and cost-effectiveness of GPSF support to Sudan and focused on ways to improve future practice for the GPSF.

Although the report noted that some strategy elements of GPSF support to Sudan were underdeveloped and identified the need to review, clarify and document publicly the whole-of-government concept, overall the evaluation found the GPSF to be relevant; filling gaps by providing dedicated resources and a mechanism to deliver assistance rapidly to conflict and post-conflict situations. In particular, it confirmed the value of capacity development plans for future African Union peacekeeping missions and urged development of distinct response mechanisms for all types of programming.

The evaluation report highlighted the challenges of working in complex conflict and post-conflict regions and indicated that GPSF projects reviewed in Sudan had reasonable success in achieving immediate outcomes. The report recommended a clearer strategy for overall GPSF support to Sudan that would identify priorities and objectives, the means and resources required, potential partners and the framework to be used for monitoring and reporting on performance. While it was sensible for Canada to have contributed support to the African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS), the design of GPSF contributions could benefit from a more thorough needs assessment and capacity development plan.

The report will be posted at www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/database/newdeptview_e.asp?id=1161 in accordance with Treasury Board directives.

19) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): In fall 2007, START managed an internal program audit (IPA) of the GPSF in line with the previously completed formative evaluation. The IPA report highlights the significant progress that START has made toward implementing appropriate systems and procedures, and the fact that the program has established good working relationships with other government departments (OGDs) to achieve a whole-of-government approach to its programming efforts. The findings described in the IPA report are consistent with a new program in its infancy. START has made significant efforts to develop appropriate systems and procedures; however, gaps still remain. The most significant findings presented in the IPA report focus on the governance and management structures of START and the GPSF. The IPA report identified a need to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the governance and committee structures of START and the GPSF at the deputy minister and assistant deputy minister levels to ensure appropriate representation from other OGDs. The START Advisory Board should be reviewed, and terms of reference developed and agreed upon by the members. The other major finding concerns the structure of START, the GPSF and the management mechanisms within them. The auditors recommended that DFAIT, in association with relevant stakeholders, document the division of responsibilities between START and the geographic task forces, and between START and the sub-programs drawing on the GPSF (www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/database/newdeptview_e.asp?id=1161).

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.2: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Initiatives related to the destruction, disposition and securing of weapons of mass destruction
2) Start Date: August 12, 2003 3) End Date: March 2013
4) Description: To implement Canada’s commitment to the G8 Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, launched at the 2002 Kananaskis Summit, through projects for the destruction of chemical weapons, the dismantlement of nuclear submarines, the enhancement of nuclear and radiological security, the employment of former weapons scientists, and biological non-proliferation. Canada committed up to $1 billion over 10 years to implement the goals of the Global Partnership. The justification for the Partnership was based on an assessment of threats to Canadian and international security following the terrorist attacks of September 2001. Evaluations at the G8 level have identified the continuing seriousness of the terrorist and weapons of mass destruction (WMD) threats and the ongoing value of the Global Partnership, an international cooperative threat reduction approach. Twenty-three countries have been engaged in projects, and close to US$20 billion has been pledged.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: International Security 2
7) Results Achieved:
A reduced threat from WMD for Canadians and a more secure national and international environment as a result of WMD materials securely stored and expertise redirected, while strengthening the international non-proliferation, arms control and disarmament regime and achieving Canada’s domestic and international security objectives.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 88.4 100.1 77.6 83.1 83.0 (5.4)
15) Comment on Variance: The Global Partnership Program used funds received from other areas of DFAIT to fulfill contractual requirements.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): A summative evaluation of the Global Partnership Program (GPP) was completed and a draft will be presented to the Departmental Evaluation Committee for consideration and approval in 2008-2009.
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): The follow-up audit (FUA) to the 2005-2006 internal audit was completed to assess the progress made in implementing its recommendations. The FUA assessed the level of implementation of 26 recommendations. The recommendations directed at the GPP were assessed as "fully implemented" or "substantially implemented" (subsequently fully implemented). A number of recommendations assessed as "noticeable implementation" concern broader Branch and/or corporate issues, where work is under way. An Action Plan and Management Response was submitted and accepted, and actions have been taken or are under way to address and implement the FUA’s recommendations. The follow-up audit report can be found at www.international.gc.ca/department/auditreports/2007/2007-en.asp.

Recipient audit activity has included financial audits of the nuclear-powered submarine dismantlement project under Implementing Arrangements 1, 2 and 3 with the shipyard in northwest Russia and an initial visit to the Far East to review internal controls at the shipyard there. The audits found that amounts audited align in all respects with the costs claimed by the recipient under the terms and conditions of the Implementation Arrangements and also concluded that the recipient’s accounting systems and policies are consistent with international accounting standards. Recipient audit activity also included audits of the chemical weapons destruction project and the nuclear and radiological security projects. These recipient audits found that the internal processes are sound and in compliance with the terms of the agreements. A recipient audit long-range plan has been developed for the next five years to support the Global Partnership Program.


1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.3: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
2) Start Date: December 19, 1989 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Canada’s assessed contribution to the IAEA is a legally binding obligation of membership. Payment is made to ensure that membership is in good standing and to maintain influence and credibility in a key international body, the aims of which Canada supports. The IAEA is the world’s centre for nuclear cooperation and it works for the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technology. Canada has significant interests at the IAEA, based on our belief in the importance of the Agency’s role in advancing the goals of nuclear non-proliferation, safety and security, our advanced and extensive nuclear energy and radioisotope production industries, and our important uranium sector.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: International Security 2
7) Results Achieved:
The projection of Canadian values abroad, the preservation of Canadian national security, the strengthening of international stability and security, the promotion of world economic growth and prosperity, and support for multilateral institutions and mechanisms, including:
  • effective and efficient implementation of the IAEA’s major programs, as reflected in the Agency’s biannual program and budget;
  • increased profile for Canada in the Agency’s activities;
  • direct and indirect technical and commercial dividends to the Canadian nuclear industry; and
  • IAEA actions and decisions consistent with Canadian foreign policy priorities.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 10.2 11.2 11.6 11.6 11.2 0.4
15) Comment on Variance: The variance was due to foreign currency fluctuations and the IAEA’s transition from the U.S. dollar to the euro.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): The latest annual report is the "2007 Programme Evaluation Report" regarding work undertaken by the Agency’s Office of Internal Oversight Services, which coordinated nine programmatic evaluations by technical experts of member states. The IAEA Board of Governors, which includes Canada, reviewed and commented on this report at its Program and Budget Committee meeting in May 2008. The report also includes follow-up to corrective actions resulting from previous years. While there were some minor recommendations made to the IAEA Secretariat to improve the effectiveness or efficiency of the nine programs studied, there were no significant evaluation findings; this year’s report was generally viewed as a vote of confidence in the work of the Agency. The report is considered a restricted document and is not posted on a public website but is accessible to the Government of Canada through its Permanent Mission to the International Organizations in Vienna.
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): The latest external audit of the IAEA accounts was completed on March 31, 2008, covering the financial period ending December 31, 2007. The audit report, including recommendations, is included in the "Agency’s Accounts for 2007" report by the Director General. This will be made public and released on the Agency’s website for distribution beyond the Board of Governors in time for the September 2008 Annual Regular Session of the General Conference. The German Federal Court of Audit conducted its audit in accordance with the Common Auditing Standards of the Panel of External Auditors of the United Nations, the Specialized Agencies and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Those standards require that the auditors plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The audit included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the Agency’s financial statements. The audit also included assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by the Director General, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. As a result of this examination, the Vice-President of the German Federal Court of Audit certified that, in his opinion:
  1. The financial statements reflect properly the recorded financial transactions for the biennium ended 31 December 2007 and present fairly, in all material respects, the Organisation’s financial position as at 31 December 2007;
  2. The financial transactions reflected in the statements, which auditors have tested as part of the audit, have in all significant respects been in accordance with the applicable Financial Regulations and Legislative Authority; and
  3. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the stated accounting policies and procedures, which were applied on a basis consistent with that of the preceding financial period.

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.4: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Civil Administration
2) Start Date: January 1, 1989 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to NATO is a legally binding obligation of membership based on the 1949 North Atlantic Treaty. Canada’s contribution furthers its foreign policy goals by funding the administrative budget of NATO, an international organization vital to Canadian defence and security interests. NATO was designed to promote the stability of the North Atlantic area and to safeguard the freedom and security of its people by political and military means, based on the principles of democracy, individual liberty and international law. The NATO civil budget, structured along "output based" lines in response to objectives set annually by the North Atlantic Council, covers the activities of the NATO Secretary General, the NATO headquarters and the NATO international staff. The NATO civil administration supports the process of consensus building and decision making among alliance members and manages NATO’s relations with its partners. The NATO civil budget also supports the work of various NATO agencies with specialized responsibilities. An effective and efficient NATO civil administration assists alliance members in promoting security and stability in the North Atlantic area and in responding effectively to current security challenges, particularly in Afghanistan. The NATO accounts are subject to annual audit by the International Board of Auditors for NATO.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: International Security 2
7) Results Achieved:
The NATO civil budget enables the operations of the NATO Secretariat and agencies. The results include effective decision making by the alliance in pursuit of NATO objectives of stability and security in the North Atlantic region and beyond, support to NATO operations, timely implementation of decisions taken by the North Atlantic Council, appropriate responses to current and emerging defence and security challenges, enhanced relations with NATO partners and cooperation with other international organizations, and proper management of the alliance’s resources.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 20.2 16.7 18.3 18.1 12.8 5.5
15) Comment on Variance: The variance is due to advance payments that were called in 2006-2007 for the civil budget General Account and the new NATO HQ Account, resulting in a credit being carried forward into 2007-2008. In addition, the Canadian dollar to euro exchange rate fluctuated between a monthly average low of 1.388 to a high of 1.597 in 2007-2008. These rate changes affected both the planning figures and expenditures. Note that 2007-2008 was an exception due to the advance payments and that this reduced spending level does not reflect a reduction in the civil budget. We expect the current fiscal year’s expenditures to approximate $18 million, in line with the 2007-2008 planning figure.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): The International Board of Auditors for NATO undertook both performance audits and ad hoc studies in 2007. It finalized the Survey on Corporate Governance in NATO agencies and completed the fieldwork for the performance audits on customer funding at the NATO C3 Agency (NC3A) and on NATO Logistics for Deployed Operations. It carried out ad hoc studies to provide advice to the NATO committees or to improve its own efficiency and working methods. www.nato.int/issues/iban/index.html
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): In 2007, the International Board of Auditors for NATO issued 30 Auditors’ Opinions on the accounts of NATO bodies and associated organizations. www.nato.int/issues/iban/index.html

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.5: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
2) Start Date: January 1, 1993 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the OSCE is an obligation arising out of Canada's commitments as one of the 56 participating states of the organization. Canada's contribution furthers its foreign policy goals by funding programs implemented by the OSCE's institutions and field operations in priority foreign policy areas for Canada related to regional and international security.

The OSCE is a focused regional forum with a comprehensive and cooperative approach to security. Canada's contribution to the organization's unified budget covers the costs associated with the implementation of the organization's work programs and activities in three dimensions: political and military aspects of security; economic and environmental cooperation; and cooperation in humanitarian and other fields. This integrated approach allows the OSCE to make a significant contribution to furthering European security and transatlantic cooperation through non-coercive measures. Canada's contribution also supports stronger partnership with Canadians in developing and implementing Canada's international security policy, through the involvement of members of Parliament in the work of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly, the deployment of Canadians to OSCE field operations, and the contribution of Canadian experts to the organization.

The OSCE unified budget, based on a programmatic approach, is approved by the OSCE Permanent Council on a yearly basis. The OSCE accounts are subject to an annual report by external auditors as well as an internal oversight annual report, which are made available to participating states.

5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: International Security 2
7) Results Achieved:
The OSCE budget supports the programs of the OSCE Secretariat in Vienna, as well as the OSCE institutions (Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights, Representative on Freedom of the Media, and High Commissioner on National Minorities) and the organization's 18 field missions. The results include effective and timely implementation of the decisions of the OSCE Permanent Council; continuous monitoring of the security and stability situation in Europe; concerted programming to actively contribute to conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict institution building; and proper management of the organization's resources.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 17.3 13.2 15.4 15.4 13.3 2.1
15) Comment on Variance: The variance can be attributed to fluctuations in the exchange rate, delays in reaching consensus on the OSCE budget, and board and living allowances for vacant positions.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): N/A
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): Audited financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2006, are located at www.osce.org/item/30465.html.

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.6: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: An Act to Authorize the Minister of Finance to Make Certain Payments, 2005 and Budget Implementation Act 2007
2) Start Date: June 29, 2005 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Support the reform of the Afghan National Police by contributing to the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)-managed Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan (LOTFA), the only instrument responsible for the payment of police and corrections salaries in Afghanistan. Support for the implementation of the Afghan National Drug Control Strategy by contributing to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Afghanistan Counter Narcotics Program, which aims to achieve a sustainable decrease in cultivation, production, trafficking and consumption of illicit drugs.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: International Security 2
7) Results Achieved:
UNODC Contribution: Strengthened coordination among law enforcement officials on the trafficking of precursor chemicals and strengthened law enforcement systems for the exchange of criminal intelligence have led to significant progress to ensure that chemicals in the Central Asia region are not diverted to the illicit manufacture of heroin in Afghanistan. The establishment of a dedicated Counter Narcotics Training Academy for training the Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan (CNPA) and the extension of the Ministry of Counter Narcotics presence into the provinces have led to improved CNPA operational capabilities in the area of interdiction, communication and field drug-testing. The development of a training curriculum and intelligence collection system for the Afghan Border Police has improved Afghan and Pakistani capacities along selected border crossings.

UNDP-LOTFA Contribution: Canada’s financial contribution supported LOTFA in the disbursement of salaries and food allowances to 64,070 Afghan National Police (ANP) in all 34 provinces of Afghanistan. Timely and regular payment of ANP salaries has been identified as a key enabler to ANP retention and anti-corruption efforts, and has a direct impact on the ANP’s ability to support law and order. Ensuring timely and transparent payment of police members has facilitated the advancement of the ANP and Ministry of Interior reform agenda, and helped to identify new areas for future international support to reinforce Afghan capacity and promote further institutional development.

($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: - 25.0 - 10.0 10.0 (10.0)
15) Comment on Variance: No spending was planned for 2007-2008, but $10.0 million was expended. It would not have been possible to have planned for this amount of spending because of the unpredictable nature of programming efforts in Afghanistan.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Most Recent Evaluation:
UNODC Contribution: A program evaluation is planned for the end of 2009, to be conducted in collaboration with the UNODC Vienna and Kabul offices.

UNDP-LOTFA Contribution: The 7th Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board Meeting (JCMB), held in Tokyo, Japan, in February 2008, tasked the International Police Coordination Board (IPCB) with conducting an evaluation of police reform efforts, which will include elements of the LOTFA program, before the 9th JCMB (spring 2009). The IPCB has begun work on this task; however, no preliminary findings are available yet. The UNDP is also planning a comprehensive evaluation of LOTFA Phase IV (which took place from April 2006 to March 2008). Discussions concerning the evaluation terms of reference are currently ongoing; the evaluation should be complete within one year.

17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Most Recent Audit:
UNODC Contribution: No audit date has been set yet.

UNDP-LOTFA Contribution: The 7th Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board Meeting (JCMB), held in Tokyo, Japan, in February 2008, tasked the International Police Coordination Board (IPCB) with conducting an evaluation of police reform efforts, which will include elements of the LOTFA program, before the 9th JCMB (spring 2009). The IPCB has begun work on this task; however, no preliminary findings are available yet. The UNDP is also planning an audit of LOTFA Phase IV (April 2006 to March 2008). Discussions concerning the audit terms of reference are currently ongoing; the audit should be complete within one year.


1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.7: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grants in Aid of Academic Relations
2) Start Date: January 1, 1989 3) End Date: March 31, 2011
4) Description: Grants and contributions in aid of academic relations encompass support for:
  • Canadian Studies abroad;
  • scholarships and fellowships;
  • international education policy within a multilateral framework in cooperation with provincial education ministries; and
  • other international academic-related activities.
The grants and contributions in aid of academic relations aim to:
  • support public diplomacy and advocacy by fostering partnerships, cooperation and linkages between Canadian and international individuals and institutions in the area of education;
  • establish a network of international experts on Canada to advance Canada’s interests abroad; and
  • promote public discussion of key issues through networking, exchanges and conferences; and advance Canada’s global citizenship (in support of the International Assistance Envelope) through scholarships and other programs that promote academic cooperation and mobility with developing countries.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Strategic Policy and Planning 2
7) Results Achieved:
  • Through the new Understanding Canada program, enhanced initiatives were implemented to develop networks of well-informed foreign professionals and leaders with a sustained interest in Canada through a wide range of conferences, research activities and teaching on Canada. The initiatives more effectively engage the academic community, business and government in key countries (such as the United States, Mexico, China, Brazil, India and Russia) on priority themes of mutual interest to Canada and the other countries.
  • Links and exchanges between Canadian and foreign partners (academics, researchers, students and young people) were nurtured, including through scholarships that support Canadian university linkages abroad, awards to foreign academics to develop networks in Canada and pursue joint research interests, study tours and internships by international students as well as by Canadian students abroad, and the facilitation of foreign government and other international awards to Canadian students.
  • Through DFAIT’s scholarship program, more than 325 international students were studying or conducting research in Canada at the college, undergraduate, graduate and post-doctoral level. These scholarships strengthen inter-institutional partnerships, develop human capacity and skills for developing regions and foster greater collaboration between Canadian and international researchers.
  • Canadian education excellence was projected abroad through grants to the Council of Ministers of Education Canada for federal and provincial government representation of Canada at international education events and multilateral collaboration in areas that advance Canada’s educational systems in relation to OECD countries or allow Canada to play a normative role in assisting developing countries to advance their educational systems.
  • Canada's bilateral objectives in key countries were advanced through grants to education-related activities that facilitated cooperation and dialogue and people-to-people exchanges.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Grants: 12.3 13.2 10.5 5.2 5.2 5.3
15) Total Contributions: - 0.5 - 7.9 7.9 (7.9)
16) Total Program Activity: 12.3 13.7 10.5 13.1 13.1 (2.6)
17) Comments on Variances:
  • The division responsible for these programs uses its terms and conditions to support projects requested by other DFAIT divisions (funds are transferred to this division).
  • During the fiscal year, this division received funds from CIDA for expanded scholarship activity in Latin America and the Caribbean.
18) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): An evaluation of the International Academic Relations programs was finalized in July 2005. Two of the key findings were: (1) the Canadian Studies and Scholarships programs advance Canadian interests and foreign policy objectives; and (2) the programs are well managed and leverage resources to enhance efficiency and effectiveness. Further information is available at www.international.gc.ca/department/auditreports/
evaluation/evalAcademicRelations05-en.pdf
.
19) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): Although the official report has not yet been published, an audit was performed in 2007-2008. The four main findings were: (1) program management exercised due diligence in accordance with government policy; (2) program payments were managed in accordance with DFAIT policies; (3) internal controls provided reasonable assurance that recipients complied with the requirements of the grant agreement; and (4) grant agreements complied with financial authorities.

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.8: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grants in Aid of Cultural Relations
2) Start Date: August 7, 2002 3) End Date: March 31, 2009
4) Description: This program aims to:
  • create an awareness abroad of Canadian distinctiveness and culture;
  • articulate Canadian attitudes and positions in official, media, business, cultural and educational circles as well as among the public generally;
  • reflect internationally the growing creativity and scope of Canadians; and
  • develop interest in studies exclusively about Canada in institutions of higher learning abroad.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Strategic Policy and Planning 2
7) Results Achieved: The program assists in creating an image abroad of Canadian culture as innovative and diverse. It encourages foreign opinion leaders to have an informed, well-disposed and sustained interest in Canada. A total of 346 grants were issued in 2007-2008 to cultural groups and individuals in the fields of film and television, visual and media arts, performing arts and literature. These grant recipients represented Canada on the international stage on all five continents.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Grants: - 6.3 4.7 4.7 4.7 -
15) Comment on Variance: N/A
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): Evaluations of select portions of the program that were conducted in 2005 and 2006 concluded that the program had met its original objectives as presented in the 2002 RMAF and that it was efficient and accountable in its operations. These evaluations made a number of recommendations, which did not require an increase in departmental resources. In response, two initiatives were undertaken to align the program more closely with the strategic public diplomacy framework: negotiation of a memorandum of understanding with Canadian Heritage and the Canada Council for the Arts for a systematic exchange of information and coordination of strategy; and the systematic communication to clients of the government’s foreign policy and international priorities. Details of the evaluations are available at www.international.gc.ca/department/auditreports/evaluation/evaluation-en.asp
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): N/A

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.9: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Organization of the Francophonie (OIF)
2) Start Date: March 9, 1972 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: As a member of the OIF, Canada is required to contribute to the operational fees of the organization.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: Canada’s statutory contribution allows the Canadian government to assume a leadership role among member francophone countries and play a determining role in the international Francophonie.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 11.5 14.8 12.0 12.0 12.0 -
15) Comment on Variance: N/A
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): An evaluation is planned in 2010-2011.
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): An audit is planned in 2010-2011.

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.10: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Commonwealth Secretariat
2) Start Date: September 28, 1965 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Canada's assessed contribution to the regular budget of the Commonwealth is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of Canada’s membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to international peace, security and development and, to this end, to enhance relationships among the 53 Commonwealth member countries. For further information, see www.thecommonwealth.org.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: Much of the regular budget is directed to supporting and implementing the decisions of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meetings and a large web of regular meetings of Commonwealth sectoral ministers including, for example, the Commonwealth Ministerial Action Group and ministers of Foreign Affairs, Finance, Health and Education.

Results include diplomatic interventions in the form of good offices and public pressure by the Secretariat and/or coordinated action by Commonwealth ministers to support democratic institutions and procedures; programs to build capacity in democratic and human rights procedures; and enhanced cooperation among Commonwealth countries related to economic, social and political development.

($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 5.4 5.5 5.7 5.8 5.8 (0.1)
15) Comment on Variance: Contributions to the Commonwealth Secretariat are established each year in May by the Board of Governors and assessed in pounds sterling. The variance reflects currency and assessment rate differences.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): www.thecommonwealth.org/document/34293/39128/strategic_documents/
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): www.thecommonwealth.org/document/34293/39128/strategic_documents/

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.11: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
2) Start Date: July 1982 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the FAO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to agricultural development and provide it with a voice in the international community. For further information, see www.fao.org.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: Achieving food security for all is at the heart of FAO efforts: to make sure people have regular access to enough high-quality food to lead active, healthy lives. FAO’s mandate is to raise levels of nutrition, to improve agricultural productivity, to better the lives of rural populations and to contribute to the growth of the world economy. FAO’s objectives, as set out in its constitution, are to promote the common welfare by furthering action for the purpose of raising levels of nutrition and standards of living of the peoples within member nations; to secure improvements in the efficiency of the production and distribution of all food and agricultural products, including fisheries, marine products and forestry products; and to better the condition of rural populations.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 13.1 13.6 12.9 15.0 15.0 (2.1)
15) Comment on Variance: Contributions are assessed in both U.S. dollars and euros. The variance reflects currency and assessment rate differences.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): www.fao.org/aud/activities.html
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): www.fao.org/aud/activities.html

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.12: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Labour Organization (ILO)
2) Start Date: January 1, 1989 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the ILO, a UN specialized agency, is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to international labour and social policy issues and provide it with a voice in the international community. For further information, see www.ilo.org.

Four strategic objectives guide the ILO program and budget:

  1. to promote and realize standards and fundamental principles and rights at work;
  2. to create greater opportunities for women and men to secure decent employment and income;
  3. to enhance the coverage and effectiveness of social protection for all; and
  4. to strengthen tripartism and social dialogue.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: Development and effective supervision of international labour standards and realization of fundamental principles and rights at work. Targeted action against child labour. Contributions to poverty reduction through promotion of coherent economic and social policies that support employment creation. Assistance in the development of skills and employment policies for decent work. Better tools and instruments for policy analysis and formulation that support good governance and the extension of social protections to vulnerable workers. Strengthened dialogue on labour and social policy issues at national and international levels. Improved organizational effectiveness, transparency and accountability.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 9.3 9.8 10.5 10.2 10.1 0.4
15) Comment on Variance: Contribution amounts for the ILO are determined each year at the June conference. The variance reflects currency and assessment rate differences.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): www.ilo.org/eval/Evaluationreports/lang--en/index.htm
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): www.ilo.org/public/english/iao/index.htm

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.13: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
2) Start Date: March 20, 1975 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: To pay the assessed contribution required of Canada for its participation as a member of the OECD. The contribution pays for the Secretariat (professionals and support staff who provide high-quality research and analysis) and maintenance of the headquarters, located in Paris.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: OECD work programs and policy positions that reflect input from across government and support domestic priorities (productivity and competitiveness, climate change, economic impacts related to aging and immigration, foreign investment); continued work to solve economic problems through cooperation with other members (soft law, guidelines, agreements); ongoing Canadian influence on policy development of other members and non-members to improve the functioning of the international economic environment; identification of new and emerging issues for analysis, both domestic and global, that impact our economy and standard of living. Continued sound management of the OECD, including the launch of negotiations to reform its financing structure; institutional reforms to improve the OECD’s ability to cope with new issues and power dynamics; launch of the OECD enlargement process; launch of discussions on enhanced engagement with major emerging economies, reflecting Canadian priorities to increase the long-term effectiveness of the organization and build relationships with China, India and the Americas (Brazil); improved linkages between the G8 and OECD through the Heiligendamm Dialogue Process.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 25.5 12.7 11.9 11.9 11.9 -
15) Comment on Variance: N/A
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): Evaluations are declassified after three years.
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): Audits are performed annually, but results are not declassified for three years. Financial statements can be found at www.oecd.org/document/30/0,3343,en_2649_201185_17367518_1_1_1_1,00.html

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.14: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
2) Start Date: January 1, 1988 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to UNESCO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to culture, science and education, and provide it with a voice in the international community.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: UNESCO has a varied agenda comprising promotion of universal primary education in all countries by 2015; reduction of gender disparities in primary and secondary education; literacy improvements (a UN Literacy Decade and Plan of Action to reach a 50% improvement in levels of adult literacy); broad-based HIV/AIDS education and prevention campaigns; and implementation of various conventions such as the Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions and the Convention against Doping in Sport. UNESCO also promotes increased scientific cooperation to improve management of the planet’s water resources and development of free, independent and pluralistic media.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 10.2 11.0 10.7 11.2 11.2 (0.5)
15) Comment on Variance: Contributions are assessed in both U.S. dollars and euros. The variance reflects currency differences and differences in the assessment rate from the previous year.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=21622&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=21622&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.15: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Organization
2) Start Date: March 27, 1980 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Canada’s assessed contribution to the regular budget of the United Nations is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to international peace, security and development and provide it with a voice in the international community. Assessed contributions are used to finance the organization’s programs toward attainment of the UN’s objectives, as set out in its Charter. For further information, see www.un.org.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: Maintenance of international peace and security, the promotion of sustained economic growth and sustainable development in accordance with the Millennium Development Goals. Promotion of human rights, effective coordination of humanitarian assistance efforts, promotion of international law, progress toward disarmament, and international cooperation for drug control, crime prevention and the combatting of international terrorism.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 65.1 97.9 86.5 76.9 74.8 11.7
15) Comment on Variance: Contributions to the UN, the UN Capital Master Plan and the International Criminal Tribunals are based on General Assembly resolutions in December 2007. Contributions are assessed in U.S. dollars. The variance reflects currency and assessment rate differences.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): www.un.org/depts/oios/
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): www.un.org/depts/oios/

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.16: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: UN Peacekeeping Operations
2) Start Date: October 5, 2000 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Canada’s assessed contribution to UN peacekeeping operations is a legally binding obligation of membership. For further information, see www.un.org.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: In accordance with the purposes and principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations, the UN is dedicated to assisting the member states and the Secretary-General in their efforts to maintain international peace and security. Each peacekeeping operation has a specific set of mandated tasks, but all share certain common aims: to alleviate human suffering, and create conditions and build institutions for self-sustaining peace. Peacekeeping missions may be required to deploy to prevent the outbreak of conflict or the spillover of conflict across borders; stabilize conflict situations after a ceasefire to create an environment for the parties to reach a lasting peace agreement; assist in implementing comprehensive peace agreements; and lead states or territories through a transition to stable government, based on democratic principles, good governance and economic development.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 168.3 147.9 183.4 194.7 192.9 (9.5)
15) Comment on Variance: Contributions for peacekeeping operations are assessed at various times throughout the year, in U.S. dollars. The variance is due to currency differences and the changing costs of various peacekeeping missions. As well, in 2007-2008 two new missions to which Canada contributes were added.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): www.un.org/Depts/oios/annual_reports.htm
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): www.un.org/Depts/oios/annual_reports.htm

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.17: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: World Health Organization (WHO)
2) Start Date: January 1, 1990 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the WHO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to health and provide it with a voice in the international community.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: Enhanced global health security (maintaining a comprehensive outbreak alert and response mechanism supported by new international health regulations, responding rapidly and effectively in crisis situations). Accelerated progress toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals of the UN (reducing maternal mortality, improving child survival, addressing the global pandemics of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, promoting healthy environments, increasing access to essential medicines). Promotion of equity in health (strengthening health systems to reach the poor and disadvantaged). Ensured accountability, by improving organizational effectiveness, transparency and accountability.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 14.2 14.4 18.0 13.9 13.6 4.4
15) Comment on Variance: Contributions to the WHO are based on resolutions made in the annual World Health Assembly. Contributions are assessed in U.S. dollars. The variance reflects differences in the assessment rate from the previous year, a reduction due to a credit for prompt payment, and currency differences.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): N/A. For information on governance, please see www.who.int/governance/en/index.html.
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): N/A. For information on governance, please see www.who.int/governance/en/index.html.

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.18: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: World Trade Organization (WTO)
2) Start Date: January 1, 1995 3) End Date: March 31, 2009
4) Description: The purpose of this program is to pay the assessed contribution for Canada’s membership in the WTO.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: Canada participated in all standing and ad hoc meetings of the WTO in fiscal year 2007-2008. This included regular participation in General Council meetings (which deal with institutional and administrative issues that have a strong trade policy component); the Committee on Budget, Finance, and Administration; the Dispute Settlement Body; the Trade Policy Review Body; WTO informal ministerial meetings; senior official meetings; as well as numerous other councils, committees, working parties and negotiating groups covering the wide range of WTO issues. Other international work by Canada, such as that in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum (APEC) and the Cairns Group, also supports our work at the WTO.

In 2007-2008, Canada was actively involved in all areas of the Doha Development Agenda and continues to work with other WTO members to advance these negotiations. For example, in the high-profile agriculture and non-agricultural market access areas of the negotiations, Canada has been playing a lead role in protecting domestic interests and seeking new market access opportunities for Canadian exporters. In trade facilitation negotiations, which seek to encourage increased trade, growth and investment by reducing costly delays and red tape at borders, Canada continues to work to move the negotiations forward. In the services area, Canada participated actively in several plurilateral and bilateral market access negotiations throughout 2007-2008, acted as coordinator of two plurilateral requests, and continues to act as coordinator of the "Really Good Friends" group of services demandeurs. In the rules area, Canada maintained its participation in the rules negotiations to clarify and improve subsidy disciplines and the rules governing anti-dumping and countervail investigation and, following the release of the Chair’s first draft text in December 2007, continued to intervene strongly to defend its position and interests.

Overall, Canada participated in WTO trade policy reviews (TPRs) of 22 members in 2007-2008, including the TPRs of India and Mexico. The trade policy review is a peer review exercise designed to provide a collective appreciation and understanding of the full range of individual members’ trade policies and practices and their impact on the multilateral trading system.

On accessions, Canada made some further progress on the accession of Russia and Kazakhstan, successfully brought Tonga into the WTO, and paved the way for Cape Verde and Ukraine to complete their accessions in 2008-2009 on terms that will benefit Canadian goods and services exporters.

Canada continued to be an active participant in WTO dispute settlement proceedings. Canada was a complainant in five ongoing disputes: (1) U.S.-Continuing Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act of 2000 (Byrd); (2) European Commission (EC)-Measures Affecting the Approval and Marketing of Biotech Products; (3) China-Measures Affecting Imports of Auto Parts; (4) U.S.-Subsidies and Other Domestic Support for Corn and Other Agricultural Products; and (5) EC-Certain Measures Prohibiting the Importation and Marketing of Seal Products. Canada was a defendant in two cases: (1) Canada-Continued Suspension of Obligations in the EC-Hormones Dispute; and (2) Canada-Tax Exemptions and Reductions for Wine and Beer). Canada was also active as a third party in a number of important disputes, including: U.S.-Continued Suspension of Obligations in the EC-Hormones Dispute; U.S., China-Certain Measures Granting Refunds, Reductions or Exemptions from Taxes and Other Payments; and China-Measures Affecting the Protection and Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights.

($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 6.0 6.2 6.5 6.4 5.8 0.7
15) Comment on Variance: The difference between Canada’s planned spending and actual spending over 2007-2008 can be attributed to the following factors:
  1. the approved 2008 WTO budget increase was smaller than anticipated (1.6% versus the estimated 3.5%);
  2. the increase in the WTO budget was partially offset by a reduction in Canada’s assessed share;
  3. currency fluctuations between the Swiss franc (CHF) and the Canadian dollar; and
  4. the difference between the dates when Treasury Board must be advised of Canada’s estimated assessment (February 2007) and the date when the WTO budget is approved (December 2007).

The approved 2008 WTO budget increased 1.6% over 2007. Canada’s assessed contribution was CHF 6,244,513 based on a 3.526% share and minus interest earned in 2006. This was approximately CHF 904,736 less than the initial estimates presented to Treasury Board in February 2007. The estimates were based on an estimated 3.5% budget increase and a 3.83% share of trade.

Contributions are determined according to each member’s share of international trade, based on trade in goods, services and intellectual property rights, for the last five years for which data are available. A member’s share will change over time with the entry of new members.

In past years, currency fluctuations have played an important role in the variance between planned and actual spending. They continue to do so. Contributions are paid to the WTO in CHF, and as such the cost in Canadian dollars changes depending on the exchange rate. On April 2, 2007, the exchange rate was CHF 1.0 to C$1.0501. By January 2, 2008, when Canada’s assessment was paid, CHF 1.0 equalled C$1.1257.

There have been many pressures on WTO operations, especially in furtherance of the ongoing Doha Round negotiations following the 2005 Hong Kong Ministerial Conference and the relaunching of negotiations in January 2007. The number of WTO meetings is expected to continue to increase. Continued increases in the use of WTO services and the costs of the Dispute Settlement Body are also expected.

16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): N/A
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): The last report of the external auditor is for the financial period 2006 of the biennium 2006-2007. The report can be found in WTO documents WT/BFA/W/157. The external auditor for the period in question was the Austrian Court of Audit.

The auditors examined the Financial Statements in document WT/BFA/W/157 relating to the financial period 2006 including Statements 1 to 6, Schedules A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and an Annex. Furthermore, the auditors have examined the Financial Statements on Extra-Budgetary Funds in document WT/BFA/W/158 relating to the financial period 2006 on a sample basis. Their examination included a general review of the accounting procedures and such tests of the accounting records and other supporting evidence as they considered necessary in the circumstances. As a result of the examination, the opinion is given that these statements, which were prepared in conformity with the accounting policies described in the Annex of the documents WT/BFA/W/157, present fairly the financial position of the World Trade Organization as at the end of the first financial period covering the biennium 2006-2007. The financial statements were prepared in accordance with the stated accounting principles. The transactions were in accordance with the Financial Rules and the Financial Regulations set out in WT/L/157 and WT/L/156/Rev.1 including further instructions in WT/BFA/W/121 and with legislative authority. Expenditure under the WTO Secretariat in 2006 amounted to CHF 168,316,779, leaving a budgetary surplus of CHF 1,957,371. With respect to the Appellate Body and its Secretariat, 2006 expenditure amounted to CHF 4,149,633, resulting in a budgetary surplus of CHF 576,367. The total excess of income over expenditure amounted to CHF 3,922,789 (Statement 2).


1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.19: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organization of American States (OAS)
2) Start Date: May 31, 1990 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: To pay Canada's annual assessed contribution to the OAS, a Charter obligation of membership.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved:
  • Canadian leadership in support of democracy and governance in the Americas was demonstrated by strengthening the role and capacity of the OAS in this key priority area of Canada’s engagement in the Americas. The OAS capacity was increased through Canadian support for developing OAS crisis prevention and mitigation mechanisms.
  • The role of the OAS in support of democracy was reinforced through the adoption of a Canada-led resolution on strengthening democracy in the hemisphere, supported by key partners (Brazil, Chile, Peru).
  • Democracy and security in the region were strengthened through Canadian support for the OAS special missions in Haiti and Colombia.
  • Security-related threats in the Americas, such as narcotrafficking and transnational organized crime, are better dealt with through Canada-supported programs of the OAS.
  • Canada is participating actively in the preparations for the Fifth Summit of the Americas, to be held in Trinidad and Tobago from April 17 to 19, 2009, and is helping to strengthen the OAS Summits Secretariat to ensure a successful event.
  • The efficiency, transparency and accountability of the OAS are improving with Canada’s support for initiatives in the OAS Secretariat to modernize management and improve planning capacity, including the budget preparation process and the presentation of financial statements.
  • Canada’s influence at the OAS was enhanced by the appointment of three Canadians to senior positions (Secretary for External Relations, Legal Adviser to the Secretary General, Director of the Summits Secretariat).
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 11.0 10.7 11.8 11.8 11.3 0.5
15) Comment on Variance: Canada’s quota contribution to the OAS is paid in U.S. dollars. The variance is due to the changes in the exchange rate between the Canadian and U.S. dollars.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): N/A
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): In 2008, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) of the OAS presented its report on internal auditing of the OAS. Of the 74 recommendations for improving management control issued by the OIG, 50% were implemented and 50% are in various stages of implementation. All of the reports on internal auditing submitted by the OIG were approved by the OAS Secretary General. The report of the OIG can be found at http://scm.oas.org/pdfs/2008/CP19370E.PPT.

The Board of External Auditors of the OAS submitted its annual report in May 2008. The independent external auditing firm of Ernst and Young LLP conducted the audits of the 2007 financial statements of the significant funds and entities managed by the OAS and issued unqualified ("clean") opinions, the highest level audit results, on all of the funds and entities it audited. The report of the Board of External Auditors can be accessed at www.oas.org/saf/docs/auditbook2007.pdf.


1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.20: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Criminal Court (ICC)
2) Start Date: April 1, 2005 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: This is an assessed contribution transfer payment to the ICC.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: The ICC has been referred four situations in Africa (Darfur Sudan, northern Uganda, Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of Congo). The ICC has issued 12 arrest warrants, and four indictees have been arrested and have surrendered to the ICC. Pre-trial proceedings have been initiated in all four cases, and the first trial was set to begin in June 2008. The number of States Parties to the Rome Statute (the founding treaty of the ICC) continues to grow. In 2007, Japan acceded to the Rome Statute, becoming the 105th State Party.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 6.4 7.8 7.9 7.9 5.1 2.8
15) Comment on Variance: There has been a change to the assessed contributions for 2007 as a result of Japan’s accession to the Rome Statute of the ICC. Since the number of States Parties to the Rome Statute increased from 104 to 105, the assessed contributions (share of the cost for the budget of the ICC) of each State Party decreased.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): Audits and evaluations are the responsibility of the Committee on Budget and Finance, which comprises various States Parties and meets twice a year. The reports of the Committee for 2006 can be found at www.icc-cpi.int/library/asp/ICC-ASP-6-2_English.pdf and www.icc-cpi.int/library/asp/ICC-ASP-6-12_English.pdf.
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): Audits and evaluations are the responsibility of the Committee on Budget and Finance, which comprises various States Parties and meets twice a year. The reports of the Committee for 2006 can be found at www.icc-cpi.int/library/asp/ICC-ASP-6-2_English.pdf and www.icc-cpi.int/library/asp/ICC-ASP-6-12_English.pdf.

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.21: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Projects and Development Activities Resulting from Francophonie Summits
2) Start Date: March 9, 1979 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: This fund provides funding to cooperation programs and activities undertaken by the International Organization of the Francophonie. It also provides financial support to the Government of New Brunswick to foster its participation in international Francophonie activities.

This fund helps to promote Canadian interests and is consistent with political and economic objectives Canada has set itself for La Francophonie. It also promotes active participation from the Government of New Brunswick in summits, ministerial conferences and other related Francophonie activities.

5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Global Issues 2
7) Results Achieved: Canada’s participation in La Francophonie is within a multilateral context. Canada participated in all programs related to this organization’s decisions in 2007, allowing Canada to have its foreign affairs policies applied.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Contributions: 7.5 7.3 7.5 6.9 6.9 0.6
15) Comment on Variance: Contribution payments are done according to actual expenses (pro rata).
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): An evaluation is planned in 2010-2011.
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): An audit is planned in 2010-2011.

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

Table 7.22: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments in Lieu of Taxes on Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations’ Property in Canada
2) Start Date: January 18, 1979 3) End Date: N/A
4) Description: The purpose of this memorandum of understanding is to outline the relationship between Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada and Public Works and Government Services Canada, National Capital Area, under the Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations’ Property Grants Order (P.C.1979-59, January 18, 1979), the Municipal Grants Act, and successor Orders and Acts. It establishes responsibilities and procedures governing the provision of services related to the payment of grants in lieu of real property and frontage or area taxes with respect to diplomatic property. These procedures are designed to ensure fiscal and operational accountability, while promoting efficient program delivery.
5) Strategic Outcome: CANADA’S INTERESTS ARE ADVANCED INTERNATIONALLY: In partnership with Canadians, Canada and its values are projected to the world, Canada’s interests are pursued abroad and Canadians are better able to interpret the world.1
6) Program Activity: Protocol 2
7) Results Achieved: Although PWGSC is responsible for making payments to taxing authorities by virtue of the MOU, the actual funding is devolved to DFAIT. As a custodial client of PWGSC, DFAIT managed, within its approved spending authorities and in full compliance with legislative and international obligations, to pay the realty taxes on certain designated properties owned by foreign states in Canada. DFAIT also continued, in regard to the Payments in Lieu of Taxes Program, to enhance its sound stewardship, management and policy framework, resulting in greater efficiencies.
($ millions) 8)
Actual Spending 2005-
2006
9)
Actual Spending 2006-
2007
10)
Planned Spending 2007-
2008
11)
Total Authorities 2007-
2008
12)
Actual Spending 2007-
2008
13)
Variance Between 10) and 12)
14) Total Grants: 10.2 10.8 11.4 11.4 11.3 0.1
15) Comment on Variance: The variance between the total authorities and actual spending is attributable to lower than anticipated municipal realty taxes. Changes in the volume and entitlement of grants are other factors in the year-end variance.
16) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s): N/A
17) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s): N/A

1.This strategic outcome relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the strategic outcome for this table is CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA – The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.
2. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA. Under the current PAA, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.

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Department of Justice Canada

Table 5: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Justice Strategy (Voted)
2) Start Date: April 2007 3) End Date: March 31, 2012
4) Description:
Aboriginal people continue to be over-represented in the criminal justice system, both as victims and accused, and under-represented in the judiciary, legal profession and police.  When Aboriginal people come into contact with the justice system as victims or accused, their needs – related to culture, economic positions and social circumstances – must be taken into account to make the system more relevant and effective for them. 

One of the federal government’s key responses to addressing these issues has been the Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS), which co-funds, along with provinces and territories, community-based justice programs offering one, all, or a combination of diversion programs, sentencing circles or panels, family and civil mediation and other justice activities in Aboriginal communities.  In response to recommendations related to justice made by the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, the AJS was established in 1996 and was subsequently renewed in 2001 and again in 2007.  The mandate of the AJS is to:

  • To contribute to decreasing rates of crime and victimization in Aboriginal communities operating AJS programs;
  • To assist Aboriginal communities to take greater responsibility for the local administration of justice;
  • To assist Aboriginal communities to provide better and more timely information about community justice programs funded by the AJS;
  • To reflect and include relevant Aboriginal cultural values in Canadian justice administration.

The AJS is managed by the Department of Justice Canada’s (DOJ) Aboriginal Justice Directorate (AJD).  In collaboration with provincial and territorial counterparts, the AJD pursues the goals of the AJS through program development and support, community-based justice program funding and capacity-building support. The AJS supports programs and activities in all 13 provinces and territories in on-reserve, off-reserve and urban settings.

5) Strategic outcome(s): A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.
6) Results Achieved:
In 2007-2008, the AJS supported 90 community-based justice programs serving approximately 400 Aboriginal communities across Canada, along with 19 capacity-building initiatives. 

A summative evaluation of the AJS 2002-2007 mandate was conducted in 2006-2007 and finalized in April 2007.  This evaluation helped shape the development and implementation of a renewal plan for the AJS, which was due to expire on March 31 2007.

 
7) Actual Spending
2005- 2006
8) Actual Spending
2006–2007
9) Planned Spending
2007–2008
10) Total Authorities
2007–2008
11) Actual Spending
2007–2008
12) Variance(s) Between
9) and 11)
13) Program Activity A1.1.1 Aboriginal Justice Strategy
14) Total Grants
55,000
4,000
0
260,000
96,996
-96,996
14) Total Contributions
7,345,000
7,287,586
6,900,000
11,110,000
9,586,445
-2,686,445
14) Total Other Types of TPs
   
15) Total
7,400,000
7,291,586
6,900,000
11,370,000
9,683,441
-2,783,441
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):
  • Excess funds were transferred to the contribution side of the Program to offset higher funding needs.
  • Supplementary funding of $260k for five years approved at Second Supplementary estimates; only $96k was spent with funding received late in the fiscal year
  • Supplementary funding of $9M for five years approved in two parts at First and Second Supplementary estimates
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation: 
|
A summative evaluation of the 2002-2007 AJS mandate was conducted in 2006-07 and finalized in April 2007. The complete 2007 AJS summative evaluation report is available on the Department of Justice web site at: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/pi/eval/rep-rap/07/ajs-sja/p2.html

The evaluation included a series of case studies and a study on the impact of the AJS on recidivism rates that shows that participants in an AJS program are approximately half as likely to re-offend as are individuals who do not participate in such a program.  Other positive impacts noted in the evaluation report are that AJS programs address victims’ concerns, enable victims to participate in justice processes, contribute to stable communities and contribute to a marked reduction in youth alienation.  The evaluation found that the AJS represents a cost-effective and relevant model for dealing with Aboriginal offenders, which reflect Aboriginal values and beliefs and recommended that: 

  • in the event additional funding for the AJS is secured, increasing the number of, and participation in, community-based justice programs should be an overall funding priority;
  • the AJD should work toward formalizing the selection process for new AJS programs, making the application process more accessible, enhancing communication about the program, and should develop tools to improve AJS program reporting; and
  • the AJD should increase the level of coordination of provincial, territorial, and federal efforts in relation to the implementation of community-based justice programs.
The report concluded that AJS objectives continue to be particularly relevant to Aboriginal people, given the severity of the problems Aboriginal people continue to face in the mainstream justice system.   


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Access to Justice Services Agreements (Voted)
2) Start Date: 1996 3) End Date: March 31, 2009 (ongoing)
4) Description:
The goal of the Access to Justice Services Agreements (AJAs) is to integrate federal government funding support to Canada’s three territories for access to justice services (that is, both criminal and civil legal aid, Aboriginal Courtwork, and Public Legal Education and Information) through ongoing contribution agreements that allow the territories the flexibility needed to provide these services in an extremely challenging environment (vast distances, harsh climate, cultural/linguistic differences). The overarching goal of federal support for Aboriginal Courtwork services is to facilitate and enhance access to justice by assisting Aboriginal people involved in the criminal justice system to obtain fair, just, equitable and culturally sensitive treatment.  With regard to legal aid services in the territories, the federal goal is to enable the territories to provide legal aid services to economically disadvantaged persons involved in serious criminal matters. And, with respect to public legal education and information, the goal is to assist the territories in providing members of the public with the legal information they need to make informed decisions and participate effectively in the justice system. 
5) Strategic outcome(s): A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.
6) Results Achieved:
Territories are enabled to provide access to justice services (legal aid, Aboriginal Courtwork and public legal education and information).  New terms and conditions have been approved and contribution funding agreements signed with all three territories for the two-year period, 2007-2008 to 2008-2009. 
 
7) Actual Spending
2005- 2006
8) Actual Spending
2006–2007
9) Planned Spending
2007–2008
10) Total Authorities
2007–2008
11) Actual Spending
2007–2008
12) Variance(s) Between
9) and 11)
13) Program Activity A1.4.7 Access to Justice Services in the Territories    
14) Total Grants
   
14) Total Contributions
4,856,593
4,856,593
3,356,593
5,156,593
5,156,593
-1,800,000
14) Total Other Types of TPs
   
15) Total Program Activity
4,856,593
4,856,593
3,356,593
5,156,593
5,156,593
-1,800,000
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Supplementary funding of $1.5M annually over next five years approved at first Supplementary Estimates plus $300K for 2007-2008 reallocated from within the Department to meet the territories’ acute need for additional resources.    
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s).
The 2008 Aboriginal Courtwork Program Summative Evaluation report indicates that there is a strong and continuing need for the ACW Program; the ACW Program has been successful in achieving its intended outcomes; the cost of the ACW Program expressed on a per client or per Courtworker basis is very low; and opportunities to further expand the impact of the ACW Program are constrained by resource issues.  According to the results of the recent national survey of Aboriginal accused, 90% of clients are satisfied with the information they received from courtworkers.  For further information, the evaluation report can be found at: http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/pi/eval/rep-rap/07/acw-papa/index.html.  The Legal Aid Program’s evaluation for the current five-year period is planned to be completed early in fiscal year 2011-12.
18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s).
n/a


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Child-centered Family Justice Fund (Voted)
2) Start Date: August 12, 2003 3) End Date: March 31, 2008
4) Description:
The Child-centred Family Justice Fund (CCFJF) is a key component of the Child-centred Family Justice Strategy.  While the federal government does not provide direct services to separated and divorced parents since the provinces and territories are responsible for the administration of justice, the Department of Justice is committed to assisting and promoting the development, expansion and maintenance of such services through the CCFJF.
5) Strategic outcome(s): A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.
6) Results Achieved:
Programs are developed and implemented in response to identified needs and gaps and are integrated with Government priorities and commitments.
 
7) Actual Spending
2005- 2006
8) Actual Spending
2006–2007
9) Planned Spending
2007–2008
10) Total Authorities
2007–2008
11) Actual Spending
2007–2008
12) Variance(s) Between
9) and 11)
13) Program Activity A1.3 Family Justice    
14) Total Grants
23,430
29,950
50,000
0
0
50,000
14) Total Contributions
16,042,102
16,170,761
11,950,027
16,250,027
16,250,027
-4,300,000
14) Total Other Types of TPs
   
15) Total Program Activity
16,065,532
16,200,711
12,000,027
16,250,027
16,250,027
-4,250,000
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):
Supplementary funding of $4M approved at first Supplementary Estimates plus internal transfer of funds to the PLEI/Professional Training component to support projects that address the needs of official languages minority communities.
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s). If an evaluation is planned, but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.
A Summative Evaluation was completed in 2007-2008 and will be posted shortly on the Department of Justice web site.
>18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s):

 


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Court Ordered Counsel in Federal Prosecutions (Voted)
2) Start Date: FY2002-2003 3) End Date: March 31, 2012 (ongoing)
4) Description:
The Department of Justice provides contribution funding to the provinces, territories and their legal aid delivery entities to provide court ordered funded counsel in instances where individuals do not qualify for legal aid in federal prosecutions.  These federal cases (primarily drug cases) involve serious charges and there is a likelihood of incarceration upon conviction. This program reduces the likelihood of a lengthy stay of proceedings until the prosecuting authority arranges court-ordered counsel for the accused. 
5) Strategic outcome(s): A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.
6) Results Achieved:
In fiscal year 2007-08, 38 cases were funded through contribution agreements with either provinces or their legal aid delivery entities. 
 
7) Actual Spending
2005- 2006
8) Actual Spending
2006–2007
9) Planned Spending
2007–2008
10) Total Authorities
2007–2008
11) Actual Spending
2007–2008
12) Variance(s) Between
9) and 11)
13) Program Activity A1.4.3 Court Ordered Council in Federal Prosecutions    
14) Total Grants
   
14) Total Contributions
396,437
1,601,039
2,378,000
5,851,000
5,850,842
($3,472,842)
14) Total Other Types of TPs
   
15) Total Program Activity
396,437
1,601,039
2,378,000
5,851,000
5,850,842
($3,472,842)
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):
  • Expenditures for this program are a direct response to Court Orders against the Federal Crown for funded counsel in federal prosecutions.  The number of cases, the complexity of the issues and evidence involved are cost drivers.  Accordingly, predicting expenditures from year to year is difficult.   The Program’s planned-for expenditures on Court Ordered Counsel in Federal Prosecutions were covered using funding identified from other areas of the department.
  • Supplementary funding of $1.65M for next five years approved at First Supplementary Estimates PLUS $4.2M obtained internally to meet  additional needs related to two mega cases
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s).
The Program’s evaluation for the current five-year period is planned to be completed early in fiscal year 2011-12
18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s).
Given that, in all cases, the recipients of contributions are provincial and territorial governments (and their legal aid delivery entities) and that the overall level of risk to the Program has been assessed at low/medium, no audits were conducted.


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Legal Aid (Voted)
2) Start Date: August 17, 1971 3) End Date: March 31, 2012 (ongoing)
4) Description:
Contribution funding in support of criminal legal aid and immigration and refugee legal aid service delivery by provinces, as well as support for funded counsel in PSAT cases involving economically disadvantaged persons and in federal prosecutions.
5) Strategic outcome(s): A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.
6) Results Achieved:
Provinces were enabled to provide legal aid services to eligible persons involved in serious criminal, youth criminal justice, and immigration and refugee matters.  As well, PSAT cases and federal prosecutions involving economically disadvantaged persons were not stayed due to lack of funded defence counsel.
 
7) Actual Spending
2005- 2006
8) Actual Spending
2006–2007
9) Planned Spending
2007–2008
10) Total Authorities
2007–2008
11) Actual Spending
2007–2008
12) Variance(s) Between
9) and 11)
13) Program Activity A1.4.1 access to justice    
14) Total Grants
   
14) Total Contributions
119,775,396
119,827,507
119,827,507
119,827,507
119,827,507
0
14) Total Other Types of TPs
   
15) Total Program Activity
119,775,396
119,827,507
119,827,507
119,827,507
119,827,507
0
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):
The Legal Aid Program does not generally lapse criminal legal aid and I&R contribution funds due to its redistribution formula.  The Program’s planned-for expenditures on PSAT and FCOC cases were covered using funds identified from other areas of the department.
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s).
The Program’s evaluation for the current five-year period is planned to be completed early in fiscal year 2011-12
18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s).
Audits of the provinces’ legal aid programs did not result in significant audit findings.  The issues encountered (such as those related to solicitor-client privilege) will help inform the development of possible approaches to future FPT audits (such as joint audits).


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Victims Fund (Victims of Crime Initiative and Federal Victims Strategy)
2) Start Date:
  • VCI April 1, 2005
  • FVS April 1, 2007
3) End Date:
  • VCI March 31, 2010
  • FVS March 31, 2011
4) Description:
The Victims Fund is a grants and contributions fund with broad terms and conditions designed to raise awareness and enhance services and assistance to victims of crime.  The Victims Fund is administered by the Policy Centre for Victim Issues and provides support to victims of crime as well as to governmental and non-governmental organizations to implement a wide range of victim focused projects and activities.    
5) Strategic outcome(s):
A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values
6) Results Achieved:

In 2007/08 the Victims Fund:

  • Provided funding to 410 victims and 75 support persons to attend NPB hearings (totaling $323,974).  Victims have reported that the funding received was very helpful and increased their ability to participate in criminal justice system. 
  • Provided $70,394 to Canadians victimized abroad
  • Provided $733,989 to P/T governments to implement legislation to benefit victims or to advance the Canadian Statement of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime, including the purchase of testimonial aids, training, salary for service providers, consultations, evaluation and research
  • Provided funding for grants ($254,394) and contribution agreements ($2,590,935) to a wide base of stakeholders including NGOs, government, service providers and victim advocates and stakeholders. The projects and activities funded in 07/08 included such things as training events, evaluation of programs, research, and networking.
  • Provided funding for 24 projects (totaling $92,441) related to National Victims of Crime Awareness Week across Canada
  • Victims Fund recipients report reduced financial hardship, increased willingness to participate in the criminal justice process, and an overall improved experience for victims of crime in the criminal justice process as a result of funding available

In 2007/08 significant enhancements to the Victims Fund were implemented, increasing the Fund from approximately 2M per year to 7.75M per year.  The new resources complimented the broad, general objectives of the existing funds by providing resources for targeted activities and objectives, namely:

  • Financial assistance to Canadians victimized abroad 
  • Expanded support for registered victims to have a support person attend NPB hearing with them
  • Funding for increasing support for victims in northern community justice committees 
  • Increased resources for provincial and territorial government partners to (a) increase services to under-served victims, (b) provide resources for victims to attend sentencing hearings to present a Victim Impact Statement, and (c) respond to the emergency needs of crime victims in the three territories.   

2007/08 was the first year of the enhanced funding and because funds were received late in the fiscal year, full take up was not possible. 

Through 07/08 the PCVI worked closely with provincial and territorial partners to simplify the required application and reporting requirements and developed tools to assist jurisdictions in developing programs and capacity to access the funds.  This assistance and additional measures will continue through 08/09.

 
7) Actual Spending
2005- 2006
8) Actual Spending
2006–2007
9) Planned Spending
2007–2008
10) Total Authorities
2007–2008
11) Actual Spending
2007–2008
12) Variance(s) Between
9) and 11)
13) Program Activity A1.2.5 Victims of Crime Initiative    
14) Total Grants
0
343,023
1,750,000
850,000
239,788
1,510,212
14) Total Contributions
788,813
1,908,150
6,750,000
7,650,000
2,426,494
4,323,506
14) Total Other Types of TPs
   
15) Total Program Activity
788,813
2,251,173
8,500,000
8,500,000
2,666,282
5,833,718
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):
New funding for five years approved at first supplemental estimates (Federal Victims Strategy)
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s).
  • A comprehensive evaluation of the Victims Fund will be completed through the summative evaluation of the Federal Victims Strategy in 2010.  The Formative (Mid-Term) evaluation completed in 2007/08 noted that the Victims Fund grants and contributions were found to be directed to the objectives and anticipated outcomes described in the RMAF, noting that the Victims Fund continues to be considered an effective vehicle to contribute to the improvement of the experience of victims of crime in the criminal justice system. Evaluation findings indicated that the Victims Fund has helped to increase the willingness of victims/witnesses to participate in the criminal justice system by ensuring more support and accommodations and that the financial assistance provided to victims or their family members has reduced the financial hardship of attending early eligibility (homicide) parole hearings and National Parole Board hearings. 
  • The evaluation results from 2005 (Evaluation of the 2000-2004 Victims of Crime Initiative) were very positive.  The evaluation highlighted that a small investment has resulted in significant improvements in victim services, awareness, education, training etc, particularly in the smaller jurisdictions and the North.  The current combinations of policy instruments (PCVI mandate and the Victims Fund) appear to be the most effective methods for federal involvement in the area of victims’ issues.  Provincial/ territorial service delivery has been positively enhanced as a result of the Initiative particularly in managing some of the ongoing increased workload that has resulted from victims’ legislation.  http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/pi/eval/rep-rap/04/vic-vac/tech/tech.pdf
18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s).
n/a


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Justice - Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision Program (IRCS) (Voted)
2) Start Date: April 1, 2002 3) End Date: March 31, 2013 (on going)
4) Description:
The overall objective of this Program is to financially assist provinces and territories in providing the specialized services required for the implementation of the Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision (IRCS) sentence [paragraph 42(2)(r) and subsection 42(7) of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA)] and other sentencing options applicable under the YCJA to serious violent youth offenders with mental health problems. It is expected that these services will reduce violence in those convicted of the most serious violent offences. 
5) Strategic outcome(s):
A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values
6) Results Achieved:
Provinces and territories have the financial capacity to implement sentencing options that involve specialized treatment programs to address the mental health issues of serious violent youth offenders.   
 
7) Actual Spending
2005- 2006
8) Actual Spending
2006–2007
9) Planned Spending
2007–2008
10) Total Authorities
2007–2008
11) Actual Spending
2007–2008
12) Variance(s) Between
9) and 11)
13) Program Activity A1.2.3 Intensive Rehabilitative Custody and Supervision    
14) Total Grants
14) Total Contributions
2,885,475
3,424,450
11,048,000
6,949,487
4,039,250
7,008,750
14) Total Other Types of TPs
   
15) Total Program Activity
2,885,475
3,424,450
11,048,000
6,949,487
4,039,250
7,008,750
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):
  • Supplementary funding of $11M on-going approved at First Supplementary Estimates minus Reallocation of $10.2M; only $4M was spent.
  • The number of IRCS sentences imposed by the courts remained much lower than initially anticipated, leading to actual spending lower than anticipated.
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s).
A Summative Evaluation of this Program is scheduled for 2009-10.
18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s).
Audits are conducted regularly and usually involve the agreements with two or three jurisdictions per year.


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Justice Services Funding Program (Voted)
2) Start Date: April 2, 1984 3) End Date: March 31, 2011 (ongoing)    
4) Description:
The overall objective of this Program is to support the policy directions of the Youth Justice Initiative. The specific objectives of the individual agreements are to support and promote an appropriate range of programs and services that: encourage accountability measures for unlawful behavior that are proportionate and timely; encourage the effective rehabilitation and reintegration of young persons into their communities; target the formal court process to the most serious offences; and target detention and custody to the most serious offences.
5) Strategic outcome(s):
A fair, relevant and accessible justice system that reflects Canadian values.
6) Results Achieved:
The contribution agreements support a sustainable youth justice system that is capable of innovations and supports federal youth justice priorities.   
 
7) Actual Spending
2005- 2006
8) Actual Spending
2006–2007
9) Planned Spending
2007–2008
10) Total Authorities
2007–2008
11) Actual Spending
2007–2008
12) Variance(s) Between
9) and 11)
13) Program Activity A1.2.2 Youth Justice Services    
14) Total Grants
14) Total Contributions
185,302,415
177,302,415
177,302,415
177,302,415
177,302,415
0
14) Total Other Types of TPs
   
15) Total Program Activity
185,302,415
177,302,415
177,302,415
177,302,415
177,302,415
0
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):
n/a
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to Last Evaluation(s).
A Summative Evaluation of this Program is scheduled for 2009-10.  
18) Significant Audit Findings and URL(s) to Last Audit(s).
Audits are conducted regularly, and usually involve the agreements with two or three jurisdictions every year.

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Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Table 9: Details on transfer payment programs (TPP)

1) Program name: Community Diversification (voted item)
2) Start date: April 1, 2007
3) End date: March 31, 2012


4) Description:

This program helps Quebec regions maintain and develop their economic activity base. A community’s vitality depends on its ability to develop, grow and thrive by building its own assets.

The program has three objectives:

  • fostering communities’ development and increasing their mobilization by drawing up visions and projects of local and regional scope
  • assisting communities through support for entrepreneurship and through creation or maintenance of viable enterprises
  • increasing communities’ capability to attract tourists and skilled individuals.

5) Strategic outcome: Vitality of communities

6) Results obtained:

  • Communities are pursuing a development vision and implementing resulting initiatives.
  • Enterprises are contributing to community economic growth and maintenance.
  • Communities are recognized for their distinctiveness, brand image and outreach.

(in thousands of dollars) 7) Actual spending
2005-20061
8) Actual spending
2006-20071
9) Planned spending
2007-2008
10) Total authorities
2007-2008
11) Actual spending
2007-2008
12) Variance Planned 9)/ Actual 11)
13) Program activity: Development of communities 68,195 75,220 75,220 7,025
14) Grants 1,080 60 60 (1,020)
14) Contributions 67,115 75,160 75,160 8,045
15) Total program activity 68,195 75,220 75,220 7,025

16) Comments on variance:
Transfer to other programs. The variance is attributable solely to the projects chosen.

17) Significant evaluation findings and URL to last evaluation(s)
The results can be found at the following address: www.dec-ced.gc.ca/asp/Publications/Doc_verification.asp?LANG=EN&SEL_MENU=VERIF&FICHIER_RETOUR=doc_verification.asp

18) Significant audit findings and URL to last audit(s)
The results can be found at the following address: www.dec-ced.gc.ca/asp/Publications/Doc_verification.asp?LANG=EN&SEL_MENU=VERIF&FICHIER_RETOUR=doc_verification.asp

Note :

1 This table is presented based on the new Program Activity Architecture. Actual spending levels from 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 have not been categorized.

1) Program name: Business and Regional Growth (voted item)
2) Start date: April 1, 2007
3) End date: March 31, 2012


4) Description:

This program reinforces the conditions conducive to the sustainable development of regions and SMEs.

It has three objectives:

  • helping enterprises improve their performance, become more competitive and engage in more innovation to facilitate their sustainable development
  • supporting the transfer of technology and research outputs to enterprises
  • creating the right conditions to attract foreign investment and international organizations.

5) Strategic outcome: Competitiveness of SMEs and regions

6) Results obtained:

  • Assisted enterprises are using their strategic capabilities.
  • Products and services derived from R&D are being commercialized.
  • New enterprises and strategic capital investments are consolidating the economic base of the regions.
  • Competitiveness poles are being developed and consolidated.
  • Clusters or networks of enterprises in the same sector or region are better structured.
  • The innovation commercialization process is generating medium- and long-range social and economic spinoffs.
  • Competitive regions are attracting direct foreign investment and international organizations.

(in thousands of dollars) 7) Actual spending
2005-20061
8) Actual spending
2006-20071
9) Planned spending
2007-2008
10) Total authorities
2007-2008
11) Actual spending
2007-2008
12) Variance Planned 9)/ Actual 11)
13) Program activity: Competitiveness of enterprises (SMEs) 63,037 53,642 53,642 (9,395)
14) Grants 400 (400)
14) Contributions 62,637 53,642 53,642 (8,995)
13) Program activity: Competitive positioning of regions 38,025 38,431 38,431 406
14) Grants 320 (320)
14) Contributions 37,705 38,431 38,431 (726)
15) Total program activities 101,062 92,073 92,073 (8,989)

16) Comments on variance:
Transfer to other programs. The variance is attributable solely to the projects chosen.

17) Significant evaluation findings and URL to last evaluation(s)
The results can be found at the following address: www.dec-ced.gc.ca/asp/Publications/Doc_verification.asp?LANG=EN&SEL_MENU=VERIF&FICHIER_RETOUR=doc_verification.asp

18) Significant audit findings and URL to last audit(s)
The results can be found at the following address: www.dec-ced.gc.ca/asp/Publications/Doc_verification.asp?LANG=EN&SEL_MENU=VERIF&FICHIER_RETOUR=doc_verification.asp

Note:

1 This table is presented based on the new Program Activity Architecture. Actual spending levels from 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 have not been categorized.

1) Program name: Community Futures Program (CFP) (voted item)
2) Start date: May 18, 1995
3) End date: October 2, 2010


4) Description:

This Canada-wide program provides support for communities in all parts of the country to help them take charge of their own local economic development. In Quebec, the CFP financially supports 57 Community Futures Development Corporations, as well as 15 Community Economic Development Corporations and 10 Business Development Centres.

5) Strategic outcome: Vitality of communities

6) Results obtained:

  • Communities are pursuing a development vision and implementing resulting initiatives.
  • Enterprises are contributing to community economic growth and maintenance.

(in thousands of dollars) 7) Actual spending
2005-20061
8) Actual spending
2006-20071
9) Planned spending
2007-2008
10) Total authorities
2007-2008
11) Actual spending
2007-2008
12) Variance Planned 9)/ Actual 11)
13) Program activity: Development of communities 40,304 40,206 40,206 (98)
14) Contributions 40,304 40,206 40,206 (98)
15) Total program activity 24,088 34,263 40,304 40,206 40,206 (98)

16) Comments on variance:
Transfer to other programs. The variance is attributable solely to the projects chosen.

17) Significant evaluation findings and URL to last evaluation(s)
The results can be found at the following address: www.dec-ced.gc.ca/asp/Publications/Doc_verification.asp?LANG=EN&SEL_MENU=VERIF&FICHIER_RETOUR=doc_verification.asp

18) Significant audit findings and URL to last audit(s)
The results can be found at the following address: www.dec-ced.gc.ca/asp/Publications/Doc_verification.asp?LANG=EN&SEL_MENU=VERIF&FICHIER_RETOUR=doc_verification.asp

Note:

1 This table is presented based on the new Program Activity Architecture. Actual spending levels from 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 have not been categorized.

1) Program name: Infrastructure Canada Program–Canada-Quebec Agreement 2000 (voted item)
2) Start date: October 2000
3) End date: March 31, 2009


4) Description:

Within the framework of the pan-Canadian Infrastructure Program under Treasury Board Secretariat responsibility, a Canada-Quebec Agreement was signed in October 2000. The objective of this agreement was to upgrade urban and rural municipal infrastructure in the province and improve Quebecers’ quality of life. The Agency acts on behalf of the Government of Canada as the federal department responsible for implementation in Quebec. This agreement was amended in July 2005 to extend the disbursement deadline to March 31, 2009. According to the terms of the Agreement, as of December 2005 no more new projects can be approved under the program.

5) Strategic outcome: Vitality of communities

6) Result obtained:

  • Rural and urban communities have quality public infrastructure.

(in thousands of dollars) 7) Actual spending
2005-20061
8) Actual spending
2006-20071
9) Planned spending
2007-2008
10) Total authorities
2007-2008
11) Actual spending
2007-2008
12) Variance Planned 9)/ Actual 11)
13) Program activity: Infrastructure 97,358 102,322 53,642 (43,716)
14) Contributions 97,358 102,322 53,642 (43,716)
15) Total program activity 85,724 91,117 97,358 102,322 53,642 (43,716)

16) Comments on variance:
Actual spending depends on how far the infrastructure projects have progressed.

17) Significant evaluation findings and URL to last evaluation(s)
N/A

18) Significant audit findings and URL to last audit(s)
An internal audit is conducted yearly and the resulting reports published on the Agency Website. The results can be found at the following address: www.dec-ced.gc.ca/asp/Publications/Doc_verification.asp?LANG=EN&SEL_MENU=VERIF&FICHIER_RETOUR=doc_verification.asp

Note:

1 This table is presented based on the new Program Activity Architecture. Actual spending levels from 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 have not been categorized.

1) Program name: Grant to the Administration portuaire de Québec for the 400th anniversary of Québec in 2008 (voted item)
2) Start date: November 1, 2005
3) End date: September 30, 2008


4) Description:

This project is the Government of Canada’s legacy to Québec in commemoration of its 400th anniversary in 2008. It includes three major initiatives:

  • developing the Baie de Beauport nautical park in the aim of reinforcing its vocation as a year-round activity site while preserving and enhancing the quality of the environment
  • redeveloping Pointe-à-Carcy in the aim of improving the port interface and developing the site’s public spaces and water areas
  • developing Bassin Brown into a public park in the aim of highlighting the traces of the past and improving access to the river.

5) Strategic outcome: Vitality of communities

6) Result obtained:

  • Communities are recognized for their distinctiveness, brand image and outreach.

(in thousands of dollars) 7) Actual spending
2005-2006
8) Actual spending
2006-20071
9) Planned spending
2007-2008
10) Total authorities
2007-2008
11) Actual spending
2007-2008
12) Variance Planned 9)/ Actual 11)
13) Program activity: Development of communities 30,050 30,050 25,000 (5,050)
14) Grants 30,050 30,050 25,000 (5,050)
15) Total program activity 10,350 30,050 30,050 25,000 (5,050)

16) Comments on variance:
Actual spending depends on how far the projects have progressed.

17) Significant evaluation findings and URL to last evaluation(s)
N/A

18) Significant audit findings and URL to last audit(s)
N/A

Note:

1 This table is presented based on the new Program Activity Architecture. Actual spending levels from 2006-2007 have not been categorized.

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Environment Canada

Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to support environmental and sustainable development initiatives
2) Start Date: August 1999 3) End Date: March 31, 2009
4) Description: The purpose of this class contribution is to enable Canadian groups, associations and organizations to become actively involved in environmental and sustainable development initiatives while accommodating regional ecosystem and socio-economic considerations. Contributions enable recipients to plan, manage and complete environmental and sustainable development initiatives at the regional or ecosystem level. This funding also serves to increase awareness and understanding of environmental and sustainable development issues and to encourage environmentally responsible action.
5) Expected Results:
  • Reduced adverse human impact on the atmosphere and on air quality
  • Understanding, and prevention or reduction of the environmental and human health threats posed by toxic substances of concern
  • Conservation of biological diversity
  • Understanding and reduction of human impacts on the health of ecosystems
  • Conservation and restoration of priority ecosystems
  • Reduced impact of weather and related hazards on health, safety and the economy
  • Adaptation to day-to-day and longer-term changes in atmospheric, hydrological and ice conditions
6) Results Achieved: The results achieved and progress made are reflected through the program delivery. The results are reported in Section II of Environment Canada's 2007-2008 Departmental Performance Report. This class contribution facilitates access, on a national level, to existing knowledge, tools and methods for making good policy decisions on the environment and health that are appropriate given the social, cultural and economic contexts.
($ Million) 7) Actual Spending 2005-2006 8) Actual Spending 2006-2007 9) Planned Spending 2007-2008 10) Total Authorities 2007-2008 11) Actual Spending 2007-2008 12) Variance(s) between 9) and 11)
13) Program Activity:







Biodiversity is conserved and protected 6.8 7.3 11.2 13.0 13.0 (1.8)
Water is clean, safe and secure 0.2 0.2 1.4 2.8 2.8 (1.4)
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes 5.6 6.6 2.0 5.0 5.0 (3.0)
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influences decision-making 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.1
Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions 0.4 1.2 2.3 0.1 0.1 2.2
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced 4.1 2.6 4.2 0.0 0.0 4.2
Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches 0.7 0.1 2.7 4.3 4.3 (1.6)
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are reduced 9.9 0.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.0
14) Total contributions 27.9 18.2 24.9 26.3 26 .3 (1.4)
15) Total Program Activity 27.9 18.2 24.9 26.3 26.3 (1.4)
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s). Collaborative arrangements that had previously been funded through O&M-based agreements were deemed to be contribution agreements, resulting in spending more than planned in this G&C program.
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to last evaluation(s). If an evaluation is planned, but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.
18) Significant audit findings and URL(s) to last audit(s). If an evaluation is planned but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Habitat Stewardship Contribution Program
2) Start Date: August 20, 2000 3) End Date: March 31, 2009
4) Description:

The purpose of this contribution program is to

  • contribute to the recovery of endangered, threatened, and other species of concern, and to prevent other species from becoming a conservation concern, by engaging Canadians in conservation actions to benefit wildlife; and
  • enable non-government organizations, landowners, the private sector, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, community groups, and other levels of government to plan, manage and complete projects that will achieve the program goal.
5) Expected Results:
  • Supporting habitat projects that benefit species at risk
  • Enabling Canadians to become actively and concretely involved in stewardship projects for species at risk that will result in tangible, measurable environmental benefits
  • Improving scientific, sociological, and economic understanding of the role stewardship has as a conservation tool
  • Securing or protecting important habitat to protect species at risk and support their recovery
  • Mitigating threats to species at risk caused by human activities
  • Achieving measurable results that contribute to Environment Canada's program activities
6) Progress Against Expected Results:

From April 2007 to March 2008, the Habitat Stewardship Program (HSP) contributed $9.8 million to 194 projects addressing terrestrial and aquatic species at risk issues in all provinces as well as in Yukon and in Nunavut. The HSP directed $34 million (HSP plus matching funds) to projects addressing both habitat conservation and threat mitigation issues. These stewardship activities benefited over 350 species at risk designated by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). Activities such as monitoring, surveys and inventory work as well as the collection of traditional ecological knowledge, targeted outreach, education and extension and program planning and development activities directly reached over 140 000 people. Conservation activities, including habitat protection, habitat improvement, and direct threat mitigation activities protected 19 700 ha of habitat through legally binding protection measures and an additional 248 000 ha of habitat through non-binding protection measures, improved 16 400 ha of habitat and protected an estimated number of 50 000 individual plants and animals from immediate threats.

($ Million) 7) Actual Spending 2005-2006 8) Actual Spending 2006-2007 9) Planned Spending 2007-2008 10) Total Authorities 2007-2008 11) Actual Spending 2007-2008 12) Variance(s) between 9) and 11)
13) Program Activity:







Biodiversity is conserved and protected
14) Total contribution 9.3 8.9 9.0 9.6 9.6 (0.6)
15) Total Program Activity 9.3 8.9 9.0 9.6 9.6 (0.6)
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s). A Treasury Board Submission request led to an increase in resources available through Supplementary Estimates.
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to last evaluation(s). If an evaluation is planned, but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.
18) Significant audit findings and URL(s) to last audit(s). If an evaluation is planned but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions to EcoAction Community Funding Initiative
2) Start Date: 1998 3) End Date: March 31, 2009
4) Description: The purpose of this contribution program is to p rovide financial support to non-profit organizations to undertake environmental projects that yield positive, measurable results and increase public capacity and awareness at the community level.
5) Expected Results:
  • To support and promote environmental improvements by funding community groups undertaking action, outreach and/or capacity building activities that address the following Government of Canada and Environment Canada priorities: climate change, nature, water quality and air quality
  • To lever monetary and voluntary in-kind support for environmental activities that have measurable environmental benefits
  • To provide Canadians with the tools they need to act on their knowledge and values as individuals and members of communities in support of sustainable development
  • The successful completion of community-based projects that support action, capacity building and outreach on priority environmental issues at the local and regional levels
  • Measurable results that are supportive of the Government of Canada's climate change objectives, as detailed in the Climate Change Plan for Canada and the One-Tonne Challenge
  • Supporting the implementation of other priority activities in recovery strategies or action plans, where these are in place or under development
6) Results Achieved:

EcoAction yields significant leverage for each dollar spent by the Department (1-3 ratio). Using this funding, the not-for-profit sector is able to deliver the projects and leverage significant funding from others, including provinces, territories, the private sector and other NGOs.

EcoAction funding from Environment Canada to partners leverages projects and initiatives that engage Canadians in protecting our environment, including our air, water, land, climate and nature.

Since the creation of the EcoAction program in 1995:

  • 1 776 projects were completed. EcoAction provided $52,776,842 in funding for these projects. For every dollar that EcoAction invested in these projects, the recipients leveraged about three dollars from other sources.
  • 175 projects are currently under way, and 127 projects are either in negotiations or awaiting approval.
  • Since 1995, a reduction of approximately 2.8 Mt of greenhouse gases was achieved; 2.9 million kg of other air pollutants were reduced; 253 000 volunteers were directly involved in projects; 7 million native plants, trees and shrubs were planted; 101 000 ha of wildlife habitat were enhanced or restored; 245 000 ha of riparian habitat or ecosystem were created, restored, preserved or protected; 101 000 ha of habitat were permanently protected; 2.35 million litres of pesticides, fertilizers, toxic substances or hazardous waste were diverted from use or reduced; and 1.5 million kg of pesticides, fertilizers, toxic substances or hazardous waste were diverted from use or reduced.

Since the creation of the Community Interaction Program (CIP) in 2005:

  • 75 projects were funded and 34 completed. CIP provided $1,690,968 in funding for these projects. For every dollar that CIP invested in these projects, the recipients leveraged about $1.35 from other sources.
  • Overall, since 2005, approximately 103.5 km shoreline were restored, cleaned up, and stabilized; 2.3 million individuals were reached; 90 800 native plants, trees and shrubs were planted; and 17 ha of habitat were restored, conserved and enhanced. The program created jobs and involved volunteers; produced 781 scientific documents; created 274 partnerships; picked up 18 t of waste and reduced waste volume by 46 cubic m3.
($ Million) 7) Actual Spending 2005-2006 8) Actual Spending 2006-2007 9) Planned Spending 2007-2008 10) Total Authorities 2007-2008 11) Actual Spending 2007-2008 12) Variance(s) between 9) and 11)
13) Program Activity:





Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes. *
14) Total Contributions 5.0 4.6 5.0 3.9 3.9 1.1
15) Total Program Activity 5.0 4.6 5.0 3.9 3.9 1.1







16) Comment(s) on Variance(s). Several recipients were not able to initiate or complete the planned projects.
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to last evaluation(s). If an evaluation is planned, but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.
18) Significant audit findings and URL(s) to last audit(s). If an evaluation is planned but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.

* Previously reported under another Program Activity




1) Name of Transfer Payment Program : Contributions to Support Canada's International Commitments

2) Start Date: June 1999 3) End Date: March 31, 2009
4) Description:

The purpose of this class contribution is to sustain and enhance Canada's participation in international multilateral and bilateral environmental organizations, agreements and protocols; ensure that Canadian interests are represented in international forums relating to environmental issues; facilitate the participation of developing countries in global environmental and sustainable development issues; and build, strengthen and maintain Canada's linkages with the international community on global environmental and sustainable development issues.

5) Expected Results
  • The class contribution is in support of any of the following departmental key expected results: Reduced adverse human impact on the atmosphere and on air quality; understanding, and prevention or reduction of the environmental and human health threats posed by toxic substances and other substances of concern; conservation of biological diversity; understanding and reduction of human impacts on the health of ecosystems; conservation and restoration of priority ecosystems; reduced impact of weather and related hazards on health, safety and the economy; adaptation to day-to-day and longer-term changes in atmospheric, hydrological and ice conditions; strategic and integrated policy priorities and plans; and a well-performing organization supported by efficient and innovative services
6) Results Achieved: Environment Canada has worked on accelerating and strengthening national and regional risk-based chemical assessment and management efforts;
  • Canada implemented obligations under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and engaged in international discussions on the global control of mercury
  • International cooperation and negotiations contributed to a better understanding and reduction of the adverse impacts of pollution, toxic substances of concern, and unsustainable resource management policies on human health and the environment
  • There was an international exchange of knowledge, tools, best practices, methods, and sound environmental policies aimed at enhancing global protection of human health and the environment
  • Canada contributed to the work of the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol in support of the Bali Action Plan and the development of a post-2012 agreement on climate change. Canada contributed to the international dialogue on climate change through its participation at the G8 Summit and meetings of the Major Economies Process on Energy Security and Climate Change. Canada was granted membership in the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development Climate and supported other technology partnerships including the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership. Canada's involvement in international climate change supported the expected results as it aimed at preventing and reducing pollution and the impact of weather globally
  • Undertook activities with key country partners to protect, enhance and conserve Canada's biodiversity (Canada-Mexico Partnership, Canada-Chile Agreement on Environmental Cooperation, Comission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC), Canada/Mexico/United States Trilateral Committee for Wildlife and Ecosystem Conservation and Management).
  • The Departrment actively participated in international fora in order to advance Canadian objectives and support efforts to conserve biodiversity at home and abroad by, for example, championing the inclusion of species threatened by international trade in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species and removal of those that no longer need CITES protection at CoP 14, and engaging in preparatory meetings for key issues such as protected areas and access and benefit sharing for the Ninth Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity
  • Capacity was built in the areas of wildlife conservation and enforcement (i.e. Coalition Against Wildlife Trafficking)
  • Canada effectively participated in WMO programs and governance bodies that helped advance Environment Canada's science and technology objectives
($ Million) 7) Actual Spending 2005-2006 8) Actual Spending 2006-2007 9) Planned Spending 2007-2008 10) Total Authorities 2007-2008 11) Actual Spending 2007-2008 12) Variance(s) between 9) and 11)
13) Program Activity:







Biodiversity is conserved and protected 1.2 0.8 0.3 0.7 0.7 (0.4)
Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision making 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.2 (0.2)
Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions 1.8 0.4 2.0 3.5 3.5 (1.5)
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced 0.4 0.0 0.1 0.3 0.3 (0.2)
Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production approaches 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.6 3.6 (3.6)
Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are reduced 3.1 0.3 6.0 0.2 0.2 5.8
Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes 0.0 0.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
14) Total contributions 6.6 2.2 8.5 8.5 8.5 0.0
15) Total Program Activity 6.6 2.2 8.5 8.5 8.5 0.0
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s). Shifts in departmental priorities led to a senior management decision to adjust certain plans for contribution agreement.
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL(s) to last evaluation(s). If an evaluation is planned, but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.
18) Significant audit findings and URL(s) to last audit(s). If an evaluation is planned but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.


1) Name of Transfer Payment Program: Harbourfront Corporation
2) Start Date : March 2006 3) End Date : March 31, 2011
4) Description: The primary objective of the Harbourfront Centre funding program is to provide operational funding support to the Harbourfront Centre until March 31, 2011. Such support will assist the Harbourfront Centre in covering its fixed operational costs. It will also facilitate its ability to leverage funding from other levels of government and pursue other revenue-generating strategies that allow the organization to provide the general public with continued access to cultural, recreational and educational programs and activities on the Toronto Waterfront.
5) Strategic Outcome(s) : Sustainable urban development and infrastructure renewal in the Toronto waterfront area
6) Results Achieved: 2007-2008 was a transitional year for Harbourfront Centre Funding Program as the program moved from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat to Environment Canada. Although the program fulfilled its intended purpose, there were no planned results identified in either department's Report on Plans and Priorities.

Harbourfront Centre spent 100% of the budget of $5M and remained open, providing community and cultural programming for the general public on the Toronto Waterfront.


($ Million) 7) Actual Spending 2005-2006 8) Actual Spending 2006-2007 9) Planned Spending 2007-2008 10) Total Authorities 2007-2008 11) Actual Spending

2007-2008

12) Variance(s) Between

9) and 11)

13) Program Activity





Harbourfront Corporation
14) Total Contributions


5.0 5.0 (5.0)
15) Total Program Activity


5.0 5.0 (5.0)
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):
17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Evaluation(s). Evaluation planned for 2010-2011
18) Significant Audit Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit(s).



1) Name of Transfer Payment Program : Revitalization of the Toronto Waterfront
2) Start Date : April 2001 3) End Date : March 31, 2011
4) Description: The Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative (TWRI) is both an infrastructure and an urban renewal investment. The goals of the initiative include positioning Canada, Ontario and Toronto in the new economy and thus ensuring Canada's continued success in the global economy. This includes increasing economic growth and development opportunities; recognizing the intrinsic links between economic, social and environmental health; enhancing the quality of life in Toronto; and encouraging sustainable urban development.
5) Strategic Outcome(s) : Sustainable urban development and infrastructure renewal in the Toronto waterfront area
6 ) Results Achieved: 2007-2008 was a transitional year for Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative (TWRI) as the program moved from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat to Environment Canada. Although progress was made in waterfront revitalization, there were no planned results identified in either department's Report on Plans and Priorities.
($ Million) 7) Actual Spending 2005-2006 8) Actual Spending 2006-2007 9) Planned Spending 2007-2008 10) Total Authorities 2007-2008 11) Actual Spending

2007-2008

12) Variance(s) Between

9) and 11)

13) Program Activity





Revitalization of the Toronto Waterfront
14) Total Contributions
34.5
223.9* 39.4 (39.4)
15 ) Total Program Activity
34.5
223.9* 39.4 (39.4)
16) Comment(s) on Variance(s):

The variance between total authorities and actual spending for 2007-2008 is attributed to the change in the program authorities responsible for the TWRI. The program moved from Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat to Environment Canada. As such, Planned Spending for the TWRI was included in the Report on Plans and Priorities for the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

In April 2007, the TWRI program was extended for three additional years. The new sunset date is March 31, 2011. Through the 2008-2009 Annual Reference Level Update process Environment Canada re-profiled a majority of the $232.8 million transferred from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat into the additional future years.

17) Significant Evaluation Findings and URL (s) to Last Evaluation(s). If an evaluation is planned, but has not yet occurred, indicate when it will be completed.

In 2008, Environment Canada initiated an evaluation of federal participation in the Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative. The draft report, which will be finalized in August 2008, identified the following findings:

1) Design, Delivery and Cost-effectiveness

  • The federal TWRI Secretariat appears to demonstrate value-for-money.
  • The development of a corporation to implement revitalization activities is an effective vehicle for meeting TWRI objectives, but TWRC activities have not met expectations around timelines.
  • The expenditure of federal TWRI funds has been slower than expected.
  • The Intergovernmental Steering Committee was not generally seen as an effective governance body, but TWRI activities were felt to have been well coordinated through an Operations Working Group, which is led and chaired by the federal TWRI Secretariat.
  • While the use of a contribution program to deliver TWRI funding has provided federal oversight of its funding, the contribution program has been perceived as administratively challenging.
  • The additional tri-governmental indemnification requirements for TWRI projects were perceived to have had a negative effect on the timeliness

2) Relevance

  • The revitalization of the Toronto waterfront is consistent with federal priorities (economic leadership and environmental improvement).
  • There is a demonstrated need for federal participation in the TWRI.
  • The TWRI has lacked a consistent and relevant department home for its federal Secretariat.

3) Success

  • Contribution agreements have largely been for planning, design, environmental assessments and land restoration.
  • Projects have suffered from a range of challenges that have resulted in delays. It is too early to measure the extent to which the TWRI has resulted in significant economic benefits.
  • The federal TWRI has demonstrated sound environmental approaches to revitalization. The TWRI has fostered greater community awareness and participation in waterfront planning and implementation.
  • There is some increase in the accessibility of the waterfront as a result of federal participation in the TWRI, and more projects to improve accessibility are planned or under way.
18) Significant Audit Findings and URL (s) to Last Audit(s).
* $8.9M of the $148M requested re-profile from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009 was used to offset Environment Canada's Supplementary Estimates B 2007-2008 appropriations

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Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

 

The following transfer payment programs, in excess of $5 million, were managed during 2007-2008:

  • Aboriginal Aquatic Resources and Oceans Management Program;
  • Fisheries Access Program; and
  • Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (2006-2007 only).

Aboriginal Aquatic Resources and Oceans Management Program
Start Date

August 31, 2004

End Date

March 31, 2009

Description

The Aboriginal Aquatic Resources and Oceans Management (AAROM) Program is designed to help Aboriginal groups participate effectively in multi-stakeholder and other advisory and decision-making processes used for aquatic resources and oceans management. It provides funding to qualifying Aboriginal groups to establish aquatic resource and oceans management bodies. It will enable these groups to obtain access to skilled personnel and related support and to participate effectively in decision-making and advisory processes. AAROM employs a community-driven approach, recognizing that groups are at different stages of capacity development and that not all have the same priorities and goals. The Program will be available only to groups that are located where DFO manages the fishery and that have not signed a comprehensive land claims agreement that addresses the matters under AAROM.

Strategic Outcome(s)

Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Results Achieved

In 2007-2008, DFO entered into AAROM capacity-building and collaborative management agreements with various Aboriginal organizations. Some of the groups entered into more than one agreement.

  Actual Spending
2005-2006
Actual Spending
2006-2007
Planned Spending
2007-2008
Total Authorities
2007-2008
Actual Spending
2007-2008
Difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending
Program Activity (PA) Fisheries Management
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 11,708,623 14,674,107 15,400,000 25,637,509 25,637,509 10,237,509
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total PA 11,708,623 14,674,107 15,400,000 25,637,509 25,637,509 10,237,509
Comment on Difference between Planned and Actual Spending

The Department received new funding under the Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative.

Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL to Most Recent Audit or Evaluation

N/A


 


Fisheries Access Program
Start Date

January 12, 2000

End Date

March 31, 20071

Description

In its R. v. Marshall decision of September 17, 1999, the Supreme Court of Canada affirmed a treaty right to hunt, fish and gather in pursuit of a moderate livelihood stemming from Peace and Friendship Treaties of 1760 and 1761. The decision affected 34 Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations in New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and the Gaspé region of Quebec. The Supreme Court of Canada also affirmed the ability of the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) to regulate the exercise of the treaty right subject to the requirement that any infringement of the treaty right be justified. In response to the Supreme Court of Canada decision, DFO implemented the Marshall Response Initiative (MRI). The MRI is composed of two components, the Fisheries Access Program (FAP) and Capacity Building Initiatives. The FAP component of the Initiative relied on the voluntary retirement of licences of commercial vessels to provide First Nations access to communal commercial licences. The capacity-building component was used to assist First Nations in their efforts to use the access effectively and efficiently. In the Public Accounts, the expenditures for both FAP and Capacity Building are listed under FAP alone.

Strategic Outcome(s)

Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Results Achieved

The Department negotiated various fisheries agreements with various eligible First Nations. The Department has been successful in providing First Nations access to communal commercial licences, vessels and gear.

  Actual Spending
2005-2006
Actual Spending
2006-2007
Planned Spending
2007-2008
Total Authorities
2007-2008
Actual Spending
2007-2008
Difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending
Program Activity (PA) Fisheries Management
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 27,973,656 51,768,161 0 1,248,600 25,953 25,953
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total PA 27,973,656 51,768,161 0 1,248,600 25,953 25,953
Comment on Difference between Planned and Actual Spending

Unused funds are being transferred to the Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative.

Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL to Most Recent Audit or Evaluation

http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/communic/cread/audits/05-06/60250_e.htm

http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/communic/cread/evaluations/05-06/65138_e.htm


1 The Fisheries Access Program expired in 2006-2007. However, Treasury Board allowed the carryforward of funding to complete the Program in 2007-2008.

 


Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy
Start Date

June 11, 1992

End Date

March 31, 2009

Description

The Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) provides for the effective management of the Aboriginal fishery in a manner consistent with the Sparrow decision. In accordance with negotiated, time-limited agreements, Aboriginal groups participate in the management of their fisheries, including opportunities in habitat management, science and enforcement activities. In addition, the Allocation Transfer Program (ATP) supports Aboriginal groups in achieving self-sufficiency through participation in commercial fisheries. ATP facilitates the voluntary retirement of commercial licences to eligible Aboriginal organizations. AFS applies where DFO manages the fishery and where land claims settlements are not in place.

Strategic Outcome(s)

Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture

Results Achieved

The Department negotiated various fisheries agreements with eligible First Nations. The Department has been successful in providing First Nations access to communal commercial licences, vessels and gear. It is estimated that in excess of 99% of all Fisheries Access Program (FAP) commitments have been met and that 1,200 seasonal jobs have been created in areas such as processing, monitoring and enhancement activities, habitat restoration, stock assessment, fisheries enhancement, and consultation and economic development.

  Actual Spending
2005-2006
Actual Spending
2006-2007
Planned Spending
2007-2008
Total Authorities
2007-2008
Actual Spending
2007-2008
Difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending
Program Activity (PA) Fisheries Management
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 31,466,647 32,177,511 30,400,000 32,552,163 32,546,476 2,146,476
Total Other Transfer Payments            
Total PA 31,466,647 32,177,511 30,400,000 32,552,163 32,546,476 2,146,476
Comment on Difference between Planned and Actual Spending

DFO received new funding under the Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries initiative and the Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative.

Significant Audit and Evaluation Findings and URL to Most Recent Audit or Evaluation

To be undertaken in 2008.


 

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Health Canada

Table 6: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)
Health Policy, Planning and Information
Health Care Strategies and Policy Contribution Program
Contribution Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities
Grant to Health Council of Canada
Named Grant to Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health
Grant to Canadian Patient Safety Institute
Grant to Canadian Partnership Against Cancer
Health Products and Food
Grant to Canadian Blood Services: Blood Safety and Effectiveness and Research and Development
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety
Payments to provinces and territories to assist in ensuring access for Canadians to effective alcohol and drug treatment and rehabilitation programs and services
Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund
Grant to the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse
First Nations and Inuit Health
Nunavut Medical Travel Fund 
Grant for Territorial Health Access Fund and Operational Secretariat
Payments to Indian bands, associations or groups for control and provision of health services
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Governance and Infrastructure Support
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Community Programs
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Facilities and Capital Program
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Benefits
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Health Protection
Contributions for First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care
Contributions for Bigstone Non-Insured Health Benefits Pilot Project
Contributions to the Organization for the Advancement of Aboriginal Peoples' Health
Contribution for the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program

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Human Resources and Social Development Canada

TABLE 6: Details of Transfer Payment Programs


 
Human Resources and Social Development Canada has a number of transfer payment programs. These programs support individuals, communities, labour, other governments and Aboriginal organizations. Human Resources and Social Development is subject to the revised policy on transfer payments, which was introduced on June 1, 2000. That policy requires departments to report on those payment programs that are worth at least $5 million. In so doing, the Department helps to demonstrate sound management of, control over, and accountability for our transfer payments.

Consistent with this policy, the Department has developed descriptive material on each program including stated objectives, expected results and outcomes, and milestones for achievement. The following is a list of the active transfer payment programs over $5 million. A fact sheet for each of these can be found at the corresponding URL below.

Note: Actual figures reflect program costs and exclude operating resources necessary to deliver the programs.
  1. Youth Employment Strategy
  2. Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
  3. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships
  4. Aboriginal Human Resources Development Program - the Joint Voisey's Bay Employment and Training Authority
  5. Targeted Initiative for Older Workers
  6. Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities
  7. Sector Council Program
  8. Foreign Credential Recognition Program
  9. Apprenticeship Incentive Grant
  10. Workplace Skills Initiative
  11. Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program
  12. Canada Study Grant / Canada Access Grant
  13. Canada Student Loans Program - Direct Financing Arrangement
  14. Canada Student Loans Program - Interest Payments and Liabilities
  15. Canada Student Loans Program - Liabilities
  16. Canada Education Savings Program -Canada Education Savings Grant
  17. Canada Education Savings Program, Canada Learning Bond
  18. Social Development Partnerships Program
  19. Guaranteed Income Supplement
  20. Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities
  21. New Horizons for Seniors Program
  22. Old Age Security
  23. Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities
  24. Allowance
  25. Universal Child Care Benefit
  26. Homelessness Partnering Strategy


 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Youth Employment Strategy
Start Date:
April 1, 2003
End Date:
March 31, 2009
Description:

Transfer payments made under the Youth Employment Strategy are predominantly in the form of contributions from participating departments for wage subsidies for participant youth; or for the development and delivery of youth support services. Such support services include client assessment, case management services and the provision of employability tools, which intend to help participants acquire needed skills. Transfer payments contribute directly to the program objectives by encouraging organizations to create meaningful, skill-enhancing, opportunities for youth.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

In 2007-2008 HRSDC with Service Canada Youth Employment Strategy programs assisted 56,584 youth clients of whom 6,804 became employed or self-employed and approximately 42,955 returned to school. This includes the Youth Employment Strategy Summer Work Experience Program, and the principal component of this program, Canada Summer Jobs, which assisted approximately 42,000 youth clients.

Human Resources and Social Development Canada Sectoral Council Programs assisted 879 Youth clients in the Career Focus Program of whom 371 became employed or self-employed and 12 returned to school since the beginning of this series of agreements.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Labour Market
           
Total Grants 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.1
Total Contributions 210.9 225.3 211.6 253.3 235.9 (24.3)
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 210.9 225.3 211.7 253.4 235.9 (24.2)
Comment on Variance :

Actual spending was higher than planned spending mainly due to additional funding received through the Supplementary Estimates (A) for the Canada Summer Jobs program

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Summative evaluation is planned to be completed in Fall 2008. Another summative evaluation is planned for 2011-2012.

When published the reports will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audit completed for the reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy
Start Date:
April 1, 1999
End Date:
March 31, 2009
Description:

Transfer payments made under the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy are predominantly in the form of contributions to Aboriginal organizations. The Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy provides support to Aboriginal organizations to design and deliver:

  • Labour market development programs to assist Aboriginal people, including Aboriginal persons with disabilities, prepare for, obtain, and maintain meaningful and sustainable employment;
  • Special programs to assist Aboriginal Youth make successful transitions from school to work or to support their return to school, and;
  • Child care programs.
Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

Since 1999, the AHRDS has provided service to over 430,000 clients. More than 140,000 clients (including 59,000 youth and 10,000 persons with disabilities) found meaningful, productive jobs and 45,000 clients returned to school.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Labour Market
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 263.6 266.5 250.2 266.5 266.0 (15.8)
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 263.6 266.5 250.2 266.5 266.0 (15.8)
Comment on Variance :

The variance is mainly due to an agreement with the Cree Regional Authority and investments in youth aboriginal projects.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Formative and summative evaluations are planned to be completed in Fall 2008. A summative evaluation is planned for 2011-2012.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

Audit of the Financial and Activity Monitoring of the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy is planned for completion in fall 2008.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Skills And Employment Partnerships
Start Date:
October 3, 2003
End Date:
March 31, 2012
Description:

The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership initiative is a targeted Aboriginal skills development program designed to promote maximum employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments through a collaborative partnership approach. It is designed to address a broad spectrum of skills and learning needs and provide access to jobs.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

The existing Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership projects run from 3-5 years.

Results for 2007-08 are:

  • 1,439 Aboriginal clients served;
  • 2,395 interventions completed;
  • 570 Aboriginal clients returned to employment following an Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership intervention;

A total of 9 Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership partnerships managed projects in 2007-2008 which included 90 partners from private sector, Aboriginal communities, the provinces and territories, other federal departments and other stakeholders.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Labour Market
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 24.7 14.4 19.0 19.9 16.1 2.9
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 24.7 14.4 19.0 19.9 16.1 2.9
Comment on Variance :

Variance due to delays in project proposals start dates which will occur next fiscal year.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Formative and summative evaluations are planned to be completed in Fall 2008. Another summative evaluation is planned for 2011-2012.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

The Audit of Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership is underway. Audit results will be presented to the Departmental Audit Committee in fall 2008.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Aboriginal Human Resources Development Program - The Joint Voisey's Bay Employment and Training Authority
Start Date:
September 16, 2003
End Date:
March 31, 2008
Description:

The purpose of the Joint Voisey's Bay Employment and Training Authority is to promote maximum employment opportunities for Aboriginal people at the Voisey's Bay mine / concentrator site as well as in related spin-off activities.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

The contribution agreement with Joint Voisey's Bay Employment and Training Authority ended March 31, 2006, as the Voisey's Bay Nickel/Mine site was in Operation. The jobs now available at the Voisey's Bay site will be through attrition, and as such longer term planning and more effective programming is required to ensure that Aboriginal people have the appropriate skill sets for areas of demand with Voisey's Bay Nickel Company as well as other employers, as appropriate. Formal results for this project will be finalized in 2008-2009.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Labour Market
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 4.0 0.0 1.2 0.0 0.0 1.2
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 4.0 0.0 1.2 0.0 0.0 1.2
Comment on Variance :

The Joint Voisey's Bay Employment and Training Authority program has been completed, and the 2007-2008 funding was transferred to the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Formative evaluation is planned to be completed in Fall 2008.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Targeted Initiative for Older Workers
Start Date:
October 17, 2006
End Date:
March 31, 2009*
Description:

The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers is a federal-provincial/territorial cost-shared initiative providing support to unemployed older workers in communities affected by significant downsizing or closures, and/or ongoing high unemployment, through programming aimed at reintegrating them into employment. In situations where there is little likelihood of immediate employment, programming may be aimed at increasing the employability of older workers and ensuring they remain active and productive labour market participants while their communities undergo adjustment. Provinces and territories are responsible for identifying affected communities to target for activities, design and delivery of projects, and monitoring and reporting on projects.

To be eligible to participate in the Initiative, older workers must be unemployed, legally entitled to work in Canada, lack skills needed for successful integration into new employment, live in an eligible community, and normally be aged 55 - 64. Projects must include employment assistance activities such as résumé writing, interview techniques, counselling and job finding clubs, and at least two other employability improvement activities such as prior learning assessment, skills training, work experience, or assistance to start a small business. As well, they must offer income support to participants in the form of allowances, wages or wage subsidies, and involve at least 25 hours per week of activity for participants.

Where possible and appropriate, activities will support community economic development strategies and activities. As an example, skills development activities may prepare participants for emerging employment opportunities. Census Metropolitan Areas with a population greater than 250,000 are not eligible for Initiative programming.

* The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers was announced as a two-year program scheduled to end on March 31, 2009. In Budget 2008, it was announced that the initiative would be extended until 2012 and enhanced by $90 million.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

All nine provinces and territories that have indicated they will participate in the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers have now signed agreements with the Government of Canada.

Throughout the 2007-2008 timeframe, agreements were signed with Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Northwest Territories. Agreements were signed with Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Yukon in the previous year.

Participant results will be measured in 2008-2009.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Labour Market
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 0.0 0.0 45.0 34.5 5.0 40.0
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 0.0 0.0 45.0 34.5 5.0 40.0
Comment on Variance :

Variance is due in part, to delays in Provincial and Territorial implementation of The Targeted Initiative for Older Workers. Also due to provinces and territories incurring lower expenses this fiscal year, than they had forecasted $24.3 million was re-profiled into 2008-2009.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Formative evaluation is planned for 2008-2009
Summative evaluation is planned for 2010-2011.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities
Start Date:
April 1, 2005
End Date:
March 31, 2009
Description:

The objective of the Enabling Fund is to strengthen community economic and human resources development in official language minority communities. The Enabling Fund provides funding to Official Language Minority Communities designated organizations, the Réseaux de développement économique et d'employabilité and Community Economic Development and Employability Committees through contribution agreements so that these organizations can plan, develop and manage community projects and access additional funding for these projects.

Contributions can be made under the Enabling Fund for the Official Language Minority Communities to support activities such as:

  • Human resources planning, research, preparing and adopting community development plans;
  • Creating, implementing and consolidating partnerships;
  • Mobilizing community stakeholders;
  • Developing and coordinating projects that foster the development and enhance the vitality and economic growth of those communities;

Developing human resources and strengthening local and national structures to improve their capabilities in terms of governance, policy and support program development, the expansion of services to the community for community capacity building, and organizational administration and management.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

The Réseaux de développement économique et d'employabilité and Community Economic Development and Employability Committees continue to work proactively with Official Language Minority Communities to develop local labour markets and improve their economic vitality. Every year, each community develops its own community plan and develops projects for community economic development and labour market development. Two joint national committees with Federal and Community representatives provide strategic direction and relevant information to the Réseaux de développement économique et d'employabilité and Community Economic Development and Employability Committees, supporting them in accessing relevant programs and services from the Government of Canada. Evidence to date clearly shows that, through the Réseaux de développement économique et d'employabilité and Community Economic Development and Employability Committees, the Enabling Fund allows Official Language Minority Communities to leverage significant amounts of funding for partnerships dedicated to community economic development and human resources development. Preliminary results for 2007-2008 show a stable return on investment of over $20 million in financial contributions and an increase to over $5 million of in-kind contributions that were leveraged from partnerships.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Labour Market
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 11.9 11.9 12.0 12.0 11.8 0.2
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 11.9 11.9 12.0 12.0 11.8 0.2
Comment on Variance :

Not applicable.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Formative evaluation is planned to be completed in Fall 2008.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Sector Council Program
Start Date:
April 1, 2002
End Date:
Ongoing
Description:

Sector Councils are formal, national partnerships of businesses and workers that address human resources and workplace skills development on a sectoral basis ("Sectoral" refers to a defined area of economic activity, as in a sector of the Canadian economy. Since there are many sectors of the economy that are not defined in pure industrial terms, the term "sectoral" is the encompassing term used to represent those economic sectors of the Canadian economy in which sector councils work). Contribution payments under the Sector Council Program support research and project based activities proposed by Sector Councils and other national organizations (sector-like) working on skills and learning issues.

Sector Council Program supports sector council activities that include:

  • Labour market forecasting and analysis
  • National occupational standards;
  • Curriculum tailored to industry needs;
  • Skills development tools, including e-learning;
  • Literacy and essential skills initiatives;
  • Integration of foreign trained workers; and
  • Targeted recruitment and retention initiatives.
Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

Human Resources and Social Development Canada worked to improve the capacity of Sector Councils to better align with the work of other government departments and pursue a unified or "whole of government" approach to address national skills and labour market issues. For example, initiatives were undertaken with Natural Resources Canada, Transport Canada and Industry Canada to address the challenges of key sectors of the economy. As such, the Program designed and implemented cross-sectoral, multi-partners models (skills tables) to better support Government of Canada initiatives of other departments. The Program continued to strengthen linkages, increasing collaboration and sharing best practices with national and provincial sector councils. For example, Canadian Council of Professional Fish Harvesters realigned projects in support of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans priorities. The Department also strengthened the network of Sector Councils and improved program responsiveness through annual performance review of the Councils, and indicators show that council-sponsored training programs have increased over the past three years. During 2007-2008, the target for percentage of Sector Councils that would meet or exceed the expected level of performance was 90%, while the result was even higher (95%).

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Workplace Skills
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 22.6 22.7 28.1 28.5 26.9 1.2
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 22.6 22.7 28.1 28.5 26.9 1.2
Comment on Variance :

The variance of $1.2 million between Planned Spending for 2007-2008 and Actual Spending 2007-2008 is mainly due to a reprofile to future years due to delays in implementing the Forestry Sector Council.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Phase I of summative evaluation to be completed in 2008-2009.
Another summative evaluation is planned for 2011-2012.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Foreign Credential Recognition Program
Start Date:
February 02, 2004
End Date:
May 25, 2010
Description:

The Foreign Credential Recognition Program provides financial and strategic support to provincial and territorial partners and stakeholders, including Sector Councils, regulatory bodies, immigrant serving organizations and post secondary educational institutions, to develop a pan-Canadian approach to assessing and recognizing foreign credentials within targeted occupations and sectors of the economy to facilitate entry into, and mobility within, the Canadian labour market. The Foreign Credential Recognition Program supports the research and project-based activities of partners and stakeholders to develop tools and processes to assess and recognize foreign credentials in targeted occupations and sectors. The goal of the program is to deliver on its mandate of improving the labour market outcomes of internationally trained workers in targeted occupations and sectors.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

Short-term:

To increase the understanding, consensus, collaboration and commitment among stakeholders and partners on issues and potential solutions related to foreign credential recognition

As of March 2008, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program staff have met with 37 stakeholders and held 44 meetings to raise FCR awareness and understanding. In addition, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program continues to participate and/or financially support activities (e.g. dialogues, conferences, symposiums) that complement program delivery and forward the Foreign Credential Recognition agenda.

To increase promotion, knowledge sharing and transfer of best practices in developing Pan-Canadian foreign credential recognition processes

The Foreign Credential Recognition Program addresses this through its work to engage provincial partners and stakeholders. To date, engagement work has been most evident with assessment agencies, post secondary education institutions, national associations and in enhancing provincial/territorial relations. On November 2007, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program organized a Federal-Provincial-Territorial Workshop on foreign credential recognition in Ottawa. The workshop focussed on four main themes: (1)the relationships and roles between FPT Government and employers; (2)increasing awareness, engagement and collaboration; (3)fostering successful practices and applying 'what works'; and (4) identifying knowledge gaps. Work with provincial agencies to standardize their Foreign Credential Recognition processes also continues.

To enhance national coordination among stakeholders and partners on foreign credential recognition

The interdepartmental Director General Forum on Immigrant Integration, met four times over the past year. The Forum initiated work on a government wide policy framework for immigrant integration by developing a comprehensive program inventory and an analysis of the interactions and contributions of federal initiatives to integration objectives. At the intergovernmental level, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program has engaged all ten provinces in discussions about strengthening their Foreign Credential Recognition capacity. Agreements have been negotiated with 7 provinces. The Canada/Alberta working group is still in operation and discussions continue with Quebec and Ontario.

Medium and long term:

To increase standardization of Pan-Canadian Foreign Credential Recognition processes and tools in targeted occupations and sectors

The program's approach of engagement, diagnostic, tool development, implementation, and follow-up enables the involvement and buy-in of all stakeholders to help address emerging priorities and pressures. Out of approximately 100 projects, 34% were funded in occupations that are classified under regulated occupations, 53% in non-regulated occupations and 10% in non-occupation specific initiatives. Investments have been with various organizations including the National Alliance of Respiratory Therapists, the Construction Sector Council, the Bio-talent sector council, the Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science, the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers and the Medical Council of Canada.

To increase availability of tools and processes to assess and recognize foreign credentials among relevant organizations

By March 31, 2007, the Foreign Credential Recognition program had made investments that account for approximately 50% of the immigrant labour market. By March 31, 2008, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program support had increased to 53.7%. 45 of regulated and non-regulated professions represent over 85% of the immigrant labour market.

To reduce the barriers to entry into the labour market for foreign trained individuals in targeted occupations and sectors

The program has invested in pilot projects to examine overseas interventions to help address issues associated with Foreign Credential Recognition processes prior to immigrants arriving in Canada. The program continues to receive positive results from the three operational offices in Philippines, India and China. In addition, enhancement to the Working In Canada Tool, developed as part of the Going to Canada Immigration Portal, enables users to make informed labour market choices.

To increase use of tools and processes by relevant organizations to assess and recognize foreign trained individuals

The Foreign Credential Recognition Program has made substantial investments with partners while also encouraging knowledge sharing and promotion. By March 31, 2008, the Foreign Credential Recognition Program had invested in approximately 100 projects of which 43% have the objective to develop and disseminate information. Out of 100 projects, about 64% have been completed and 33% are still in progress.

The Program continues to work with provincial partners and stakeholders to achieve these short, medium and long-term outcomes in order to meet its ultimate objective of enhancing labour market outcomes of foreign trained individuals in targeted occupations and sectors.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Workplace Skills
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 6.8 12.6 17.6 16.2 14.3 3.3
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 6.8 12.6 17.6 16.2 14.3 3.3
Comment on Variance :

The variance is due to the deferral of project activities to next fiscal year and the re-profiling of funds to a future year to fully develop projects with stakeholders related to the launch of the Foreign Credential Referral Office.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:
  • A formative evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program that was completed in 2006-07 made six recommendations for the Foreign Credential Recognition Program.
  • All six recommendations have either been addressed or are currently being addressed.
  • The Evaluation report concluded that the Foreign Credential Recognition Program is progressing well towards accomplishing its objectives and outcomes.
  • The Management Response to the Evaluation report was approved by the Management Audit and Evaluation Committee on February 28, 2007.

URL:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/2007/sp_ah_687_02_07/sp_ah_687_02_07e.pdf

A summative evaluation is planned for 2008-2009.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Apprenticeship Incentive Grant
Start Date:
January 1, 2007
End Date:
Ongoing
Description:
  • The Apprenticeship Incentive Grant aims to promote access to apprenticeships and improve labour mobility by providing a $1,000 grant to registered apprentices in the Red Seal trades.
  • This taxable cash grant is designed to reward advancement in the first two years of an apprenticeship program in one of the Red Seal trades, building momentum for apprentices to complete their programs and receive their Red Seal endorsement.
  • Registered apprentices who completed their first or second year of their apprenticeship program in a Red Seal trade designated in the province/territory where they are registered as an apprentice, on or after January 1, 2007, are eligible to apply.
  • The Apprenticeship Incentive Grant provides an incentive for more Canadians to pursue apprenticeships and, taken together with the Apprenticeship Job Creation Tax Credit for employers and the Tradesperson's Tool Deduction, is intended to meet the future need for skilled trades people that is crucial to the sustained growth of the economy.
  • By focusing on the Red Seal trades, for which there are national occupational and training standards, the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant will also support inter-provincial mobility.
Strategic Outcome:

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

The Department continued to implement the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant, and also worked with provinces and territories under the Trades and Apprenticeship Strategy to strengthen and harmonize apprenticeship systems better enabling them to meet the demands of the growing economy. During 2007-2008, the Department completed the first full year of delivering the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant including the completion of the national advertising campaign, processing 52,697 applicants and issuing 30,781 grants.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Workplace Skills
           
Total Grants N/A 0.7 91.0 91.0 30.9 60.1
Total Contributions            
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity N/A 0.7 91.0 91.0 30.9 60.1
Comment on Variance :

2007-2008 represented the first full year of program delivery and thus eligible applicants were just becoming aware of the program and the application process. Key activities associated with the National Awareness Campaign were delayed by a few months impacting awareness and take-up of the grant.

The forecasted take-up was based on the 2003 Registered Apprentice Information System data, due to a lack of other benchmark data. The forecast is being adjusted to reflect the most recent Registered Apprentice Information System data and new input from provinces and territories.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Formative evaluation is planned for 2008-2009.
Summative evaluation is planned for 2010-2011.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Workplace Skills Initiative
Start Date:
July 1, 2005
End Date:
March 31, 2010
Description:

The Workplace Skills Initiative funds projects that test and evaluate promising, partnership-based, outcomes-focused approaches to skills development for employers and employed Canadians:

  • Central to these projects is the development of human capital in and for the workplace.
  • Projects will vary in scope and scale (e.g. firm vs. sector).
  • Small and medium-sized enterprises will be a key audience.
  • Projects will generate cumulative knowledge around skills development and best HR models and practices.
Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :
  • The second Workplace Skills Initiative Call for Proposals closed on April 18, 2007. The Call focused on three critical but underutilized groups - older workers, low-skilled workers and newcomers to Canada, and allowed WSI to fund additional projects which test and evaluate promising, outcomes-focused approaches to skills development for employers and employed Canadians;
  • To date, WSI has funded a total 25 projects which focus on enhancing workplace skills development and improving HR practices;
  • 2007-2008 saw the development of a third Call for Proposals which was launched on April 23, 2008. This Call, while maintaining its focus on improving workplace skills development and HR practices, with a view to addressing skill shortages, also looks at innovative approaches to organizational changes to workplace environments that contribute to the improved productivity of Canadian firms;
  • An extensive engagement strategy was also initiated in order to increase the awareness, visibility and uptake of the WSI and better position the Department for increased collaboration with workplace stakeholders. Since the Fall, discussions have taken place with a wide array of workplace stakeholders (including provincial and territorial officials) in various jurisdictions;
  • To enhance the communication and knowledge base regarding WSI activities and objectives, and share preliminary project information and results, a Project Recipients Workshop was held March 17-18, 2008.
$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Workplace Skills
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions 0.0 1.1 23.3 17.8 9.7 13.6
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 0.0 1.1 23.3 17.8 9.7 13.6
Comment on Variance :

The variance of $13.6M between Planned Spending for 2007-2008 and Actual Spending 2007-2008 is due to the deferral of projects to the next fiscal year, of which $4.9M was reprofiled into future fiscal years.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

A targeted evaluation is planned for 2009-2010.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No audits completed for the reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program1
Start Date:
April 1, 20061
End Date:
March 31, 2011
Description:

The Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program works through non-statutory grants and contributions. The key objectives of the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program are:

  • to promote lifelong learning by reducing non-financial barriers to adult learning;
  • to facilitate the creation of opportunities for Canadians to acquire the learning, literacy and essential skills they need to participate in a knowledge-based economy and society.

The Adult Literacy and Essential Skills Program aims to improve awareness and application of literacy and essential skills knowledge and information among partners, stakeholders, and employers, as well as the development of tools and mechanisms to support literacy and essential skills in the workplace.

The Adult Literacy and Essential Skills Program supports the generation, transfer, and application of knowledge; by contributing to the development of innovative approaches; by strengthening capacity of the adult learning, literacy and essential skills sectors, and by promoting the integration of adult learning, literacy and essential skills in and for the workplace and within families and communities. The Adult Literacy and Essential Skills is funded from the Consolidated Revenue Fund. Funding is administered through non-statutory grants and contributions. This Program works to reduce non-financial barriers related to adult learning, literacy and essential skills.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

In 2007-2008, the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program supported 268 projects to develop literacy and essential skills knowledge, tools and supports and disseminate them to those who need them. This includes support to 16 provincial or territorial literacy coalitions and 7 national literacy organizations.

Under the newly established Office of Literacy and Essential Skills, a Call for Proposals under the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program was issued and closed on October 31, 2007. Projects were solicited under two streams: 1) Literacy and essential skills for work and 2) Family and community literacy. There were 225 project proposals received under the Call.

Projects eligible under each of the streams included those that would broaden the knowledge base, develop tools and support mechanisms, and undertake outreach activities to build partnerships and share best practices. Priority target groups were identified as Aboriginal people, immigrants, Official Language Minority Communities, and low skilled workers.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Learning
           
Total Grants 22.8 13.6 22.0 21.7 12.7 9.3
Total Contributions 6.1 11.5 21.8 23.6 10.6 11.2
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 28.9 25.1 43.8 45.3 23.3 20.5
Comment on Variance :

The variance of $20.5M between Planned Spending for 2007-08 and Actual Spending 2007-08 is due to the deferral of projects, of which $19.0M was reprofiled into future fiscal years.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Formative evaluation is planned for 2008-2009.
Summative evaluation is planned for 2010-2011.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.

1The Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program came into effect April 1, 2006 and integrates three former programs, the National Literacy Program, the Office of Learning Technologies, and the Learning Initiatives Program.


 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Study Grant / Canada Access Grant
Start Date:
August 1, 1995
End Date:
Ongoing
Description:

Since 1995, the Government of Canada has offered the Canada Study Grant for: high need part-time students; students with dependents; the accommodation of students with permanent disabilities; and women pursuing doctoral studies in certain disciplines. These grants encourage participation in post-secondary education by providing additional non-repayable assistance or reducing debt.

In August 2005, the Government of Canada introduced two Canada Access Grants, which provide up-front non-repayable assistance intended to improve access to post-secondary education and reduce financial barriers for students from low-income families and students with permanent disabilities.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

Provided targeted grants for eligible borrowers to increase access to post-secondary education by reducing financial barriers.

The value of Canada Study Grants and Canada Access Grants disbursed in 2007-2008 was $161.5 million.

In 2007-2008 approximately 58,500 Canada Study Grants and approximately 34,777 Canada Access Grants were awarded.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Learning
           
Total Grants
(Statutory)
129.7 146.4 136.1 161.5 161.5 (25.4)
Total Contributions - - - - - -
Total Other Types of TPs - - - - - -
Total Program Activity 129.7 146.4 136.1 161.5 161.5 (25.4)
Comment on Variance :

The difference between planned spending and actual spending is a combination of two factors: higher than expected up-take in the Canada Access Grant Program and extraordinary payment to one of the participating provinces regarding the Canada Study Grant.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Not Applicable.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Student Loans Program - Direct Financing Arrangement
Start Date:
August 1, 2000
End Date:
Ongoing
Description:

Provinces and territories may choose not to participate in the Canada Student Loans Program. These provinces and territories receive an alternative payment to assist in the cost of delivering a similar student financial assistance program. This transfer payment provides Alternative Payments to non-participating jurisdictions, Interest Relief and Debt Reduction in Repayment benefits to borrowers, and the value of loans forgiven according to prescribed criteria.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

As a result of these alternative payments, post-secondary education students in the province of Québec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut continue to access financial assistance similar to the assistance provided to students in those jurisdictions that participate in the Canada Student Loans Program.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Learning
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions
(Statutory)
211.2 165.2 269.0 207.6 207.6 61.4
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 211.2 165.2 269.0 207.6 207.6 61.4
Comment on Variance :

The difference between the planned spending and the actual is mainly due to a lower then anticipated Alternative payment to the non-participating provinces. The alternative payment calculation is based on net program costs. The overall net program costs have decreased over the last years. The reduction of cost variable is due to a massive decline of accounts returned to the Government over the past year: It has been observed that direct loans default rates are much lower than originally forecasted; consequently there are fewer loans that require collection action resulting in a reduction of net program costs.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Not Applicable since this transfer payment is for accounting purposes (see Description).

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

Canada Student Loans Program - Consulting Engagement is underway and will be completed in fall 2008.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Student Loans Program - Interest Payments and Liabilities
Start Date:
August 1,1995
End Date:
Ongoing
Description:

From August 1, 1995 to July 31, 2000 the Canada Student Loans Program operated on a shared risk model with Canadian banks. This transfer payment represents Interest Subsidy, Interest Relief benefits, Debt Reduction in Repayment benefits, the amount of loans forgiven, risk premium and put-backs and administrative costs related to students who borrowed under the risk-shared regime.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

As a result of this transfer payment, students who borrowed under the risk-shared regime continue to receive in-study student financial assistance and debt management assistance in repayment. Canada also meets its obligations as set out under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act and in agreements with financial institutions.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Learning
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions
(Statutory)
70.1 53.8 52.9 36.3 36.3 16.6
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 70.1 53.8 52.9 36.3 36.3 16.6
Comment on Variance :

The main explanation behind the recorded variance is lower than expected utilization of the debt management measure Debt Reduction in Repayment as well as the outstanding balance of the in-study portfolio being lower than previously forecasted resulting in lower disbursement of interest subsidy. Also, the actual spending is presented net of recoveries on Put-Backs while the planned spending represents the forecasted expenditure of Put-Backs.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

No evaluation completed for the reference period

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for the reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Student Loans Program - Liabilities
Start Date:
August 1, 1964
End Date:
Ongoing
Description:

From 1964 to 1995, the Canada Student Loans Program operated a Guaranteed Loan regime with Canadian banks. This transfer payment tracks claims submitted by financial institutions related to the remaining Guaranteed Loan Portfolio.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

The amounts equal claims for payment on Guaranteed loans held by Financial Institutions for Interest Relief, Debt Reduction in Repayment, In-Study Subsidy and Permanent Disabilities benefits minus the recoveries made by Canada Revenue Agency Collections against returned loan amounts.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Learning
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions
(Statutory)
(27.7) (17.8) 8.2 (19.1) (19.1) 27.3
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity (27.7) (17.8) 8.2 (19.1) (19.1) 27.3
Comment on Variance :

The variance between planned spending and actual spending can be explained by the fact that the actual spending is presented net of recoveries on claims while the planned spending represents the forecasted expenditure of claim payments

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Not Applicable since this transfer payment is for accounting purposes (see Description).

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Education Savings Program - Canada Education Savings Grant
Start Date:
January 1, 1998
End Date:
Ongoing
Description:

The Canada Education Savings Program encourages Canadians to use Registered Education Savings Plans to save for a child's post-secondary education. It offers matching funds of 20-40 cents on the dollar invested in an RESP, depending on income levels. It also administers the Alberta Centennial Education Savings Grant on behalf of the Province of Alberta and the Education Savings Community Outreach Initiative.

Further information regarding the Canada Education Savings Grant can be found at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/learning/education_savings/public/cesg.shtml

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

In 2007, 215,343 (about 192,240 in 2006) beneficiaries used $1.3 billion ($1.07 billion in 2006) of their Registered Education Savings Plan savings to fund their post-secondary education.

As of December 2007, 37% of children under 18 years of age had received a Canada Education Savings Grant with the highest participation rate (42%) found in Alberta. Families are also saving for their children's post-secondary education at a younger age - since 1998, the average age at which children receive their first Canada Education Savings Grant has dropped from 8 years of age to 4.2 by December 31, 2007. Since its inception in 1998, $3.8 billion in Canada Education Savings Grant have been paid to 3.2 million children under the age of 18. As of December 2007, there were $23.5 billion in Registered Education Savings Plan assets.

Thus the Canada Education Savings Grant has helped to increase the financial capacity of families to attend and participate in post-secondary education. Having more skilled and knowledgeable Canadians who are able to fully participate in the workforce and society will result in enhanced Canadian productivity and participation in the economy and society.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Learning
           
Total Grants (Statutory) 462.5 505.0 540.0 579.7 579.7 (39.7)
Total Contributions            
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 462.5 505.0 540.0 579.7 579.7 (39.7)
Comment on Variance :

The variance is mainly due to changes announced in the 2007 budget that increased the maximum annual contribution qualifying for the 20 per cent basic Canada Education Savings Grant from $400 to $500 as well as the Department's efforts to publicize the program.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

In April 2003, a formative evaluation of the Canada Education Savings Grant was completed to assess the relevance, design and delivery, and early impacts of the program. Among its positive findings were: (a) the program had a positive impact on the savings behaviour of Canadian families for their children's post-secondary education; and (b) administrative data systems, developed in coordination with promoters' systems, provided secure, quick and efficient delivery of grants.

Some of the areas in need of improvement were: (a) the lack of awareness of the program among non-subscribers; and (b) the need for clarification of the roles and responsibilities of the promoters and partners. For more information see, http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/cs/sp/hrsdc/edd/reports/2003-002509/SP-AH-200-04-03E.pdf

A formative evaluation of the new Canada Education Savings Grant and the new Canada Learning Bond was delayed from 2006-2007 and is now scheduled to be completed in 2008-2009.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Education Savings Program - Canada Learning Bond
Start Date:
July 1, 2005
End Date:
Ongoing
Description:

The Canada Learning Bond was introduced to encourage low-income families to open Registered Education Savings Plans and save for their children's post-secondary education. The Government of Canada will put $500 into a child's Registered Education Savings Plan in the first year, and $100 more in each of the following years if:

  1. the child was born after December 31st, 2003; and
  2. the family receives the National Child Benefit Supplement.
Further information regarding Canada Learning Bond can be found at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/learning/education_savings/public/clb.shtml
Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning.

Results Achieved :

As of December 31, 2007, 11.8% of eligible children have received a Canada Learning Bond (up from 5.8% in 2006). Since its inception, over $50 million in Canada Learning Bond payments have been made to over 75,000 children. Despite the fact that personal savings are not required, 95% of families who received the Canada Learning Bond in 2007 also saved (94% in 2006). The contributions made to a Registered Education Savings Plan by all Canada Learning Bond beneficiaries rose dramatically to nearly $67 million in 2007 from $23.5 million in 2006, and the average amount contributed was $1,095 ($932 in 2006).

By increasing families' financial capacity to attend post-secondary education, the Canada Learning Bond contributes to access to learning. Having more skilled and knowledgeable Canadians who are able to fully participate in the workplace and society will result in enhanced Canadian productivity and participation in the economy and society.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Learning
           
Total Grants
(Statutory)
2.2 21.8 25.0 35.8 35.8 (10.8)
Total Contributions* 0.0 0.0 3.6 3.6 1.2 2.4
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 2.2 21.8 28.6 39.4 37.0 (8.4)
Comment on Variance :

The variance is mainly due to the Department's efforts to publicize the program to the Canada Learning Bond's target population.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

A formative evaluation of the Canada Education Savings Grant and the new Canada Learning Bond was delayed from 2006-2007 and is now scheduled to be completed in 2008-2009.

A summative evaluation of the Canada Learning Bond is planned for 2010-2011.

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.

* Referring to the Education Savings Incentive


 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Social Development Partnerships Program 1
Start Date:
April 1, 2003
End Date:
March 31, 2008
Description:

The Social Development Partnerships Program provides grants and contributions funding to non-profit organizations working to meet the social development needs of persons with disabilities, children and their families, and other vulnerable or excluded populations in Canada.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Results Achieved :

In 2007-2008, 59 projects across Canada were approved. Funded projects generated knowledge on emerging social issues; disseminated information and knowledge and increased public awareness; established and maintained sustainable partnerships; and increased public dialogue and consultations.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Social Investment
           
Total Grants1 9.9 9.5 14.3 8.7 7.1 7.2
Total Contributions1 19.4 16.3 12.4 18.1 16.7 (4.3)
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 29.3 25.8 26.7 26.8 23.8 2.9
Comment on Variance :

Variance of $2.9 million mainly due to; re-profiles of funds to future years, administrative delays in issuing Call for Proposals, delayed start dates for new projects and lapsed funding by project recipients.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Summative Evaluation will be completed in Fall 2008.

When published the report will be posted at:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

Internal Audit Services Branch conducted an Early Implementation Review of the Understanding the Early Years (UEY) Initiative in 2006-2007. It was approved by Management Audit and Evaluation Committee on October 2007.
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/audit/2007/sp_796_07_07e/page00.shtml

Note: 1 Note that funds for the Voluntary Sector Strategy, Understanding the Early Years and Early Childhood Development for Official Language Minority Communities are administered through the Social Development Partnerships Program Terms and Conditions. Operating costs are not included.


 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Guaranteed Income Supplement
Start Date:
1967
End Date:
N/A
Description:

The Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) is a monthly benefit paid to residents of Canada who receive a basic, full or partial Old Age Security pension and who have little or no other income. The GIS benefit is a non-taxable benefit.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Results Achieved :

For fiscal year 2007-2008, the number of recipients averaged 1.6 million per month. Benefits were indexed in July and October to reflect changes in the cost of living as measured by the Consumer Price Index.

To maximize the GIS benefits retained by low-income seniors who choose to work, Budget 2008 replaced the current $500 maximum GIS earnings exemption with an annual earnings exemption of $3,500, which represents the average earnings of working GIS recipients.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Social Investment
           
Total Grants
(Statutory)
6,476.5 6,901.1 7,413.0 7,406.7 7,406.7 6.3
Total Contributions            
Total Other Types of TPs            
Total Program Activity 6,476.5 6,901.1 7,413.0 7,406.7 7,406.7 6.3
Comment on Variance :

The number of beneficiaries decreased from 1,634,112 to 1,591,623 accounting for a decrease of $921.7 million. The number of GIS recipients constantly fluctuates from year to year based on a number of factors, including fluctuations in a client's income, the death of the client, or a change in the client's residence status.

This decrease is offset by an increase in the average monthly rate from $378.03 to $387.80 resulting in an increase of $915.4 million.

This resulted in an overall decrease of GIS expenditures of $6.3 million from the planned estimates.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

Summative evaluations of Guaranteed Income Supplement Take-up Measures and of Guaranteed Income Supplement Outreach are planned to be completed in Summer 2009.

When published the evaluation report will be posted at the following address:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.


 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: Labour Market Agreements for Persons With Disabilities
Start Date:
April 1, 2004
End Date:
March 31, 2009
Description:

The goal of the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities is to improve the employment situation of Canadians with disabilities, by enhancing their employability, increasing the employment opportunities available to them, and building on their existing knowledge base.

Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Results Achieved :

Reporting under the Agreements includes selected societal indicators (employment income, educational attainment and employment rate of working age people with disabilities) as well as the number of participants in various programs and services, number of participants completing a program or service where there is a specific start and end point to the intervention, and number of participants who obtained or were maintained in employment where the program or service supports this activity. The 2007-2008 Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities results are released annually by the provinces on December 3 (International Day of Person with Disabilities) of each year and are therefore not yet available for inclusion at this time.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(A) and (B)
Program Activity :
Social Investment
           
Total Grants            
Total Contributions            
Total Other Types of TPs 219.8 218.2 222.0 222.0 218.3 3.7
Total Program Activity 219.8 218.2 222.0 222.0 218.3 3.7
Comment on Variance :

The $3.7 million is earmarked for Territorial funding. Although the Multilateral Framework for the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities reflects federal-provincial-territorial consensus, it was not formally endorsed by the territories. The territories have confirmed their support for the principles and direction of the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities but have not signed agreements. They will continue to provide labour market programs for people with disabilities, and will participate in the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities in the future if outstanding fiscal arrangement issues are resolved. This situation does not represent a change for the territories, which did not participate in Employability Assistance for People with Disabilities initiative, the predecessor to Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities.

Significant Evaluation Findings and URL to last Evaluation:

A demonstration evaluation of the Manitoba Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities is planned to be completed in Fall 2008. A demonstration evaluation of the Nova Scotia Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities is planned for 2008-2009.

When published the evaluation report will be posted at the following address:
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/en/publications_resources/evaluation/index.shtml

Significant Audit Findings and URL to last Audit:

No Audits completed for reference period.



 
Name of Transfer Payment Program: New Horizons For Seniors Program
Start Date:
October 1, 2004
End Date:
September 30, 2009
Description:

This program supports local projects across Canada that help seniors participate in social activities, pursue an active life and contribute to their communities.

The specific objectives are:

  • harness the skills, experience and wisdom of seniors to help themselves and their community;
  • reduce the risk of social isolation of seniors;
  • strengthen social foundations at the community level and invest in social wellbeing;
  • ensure all seniors are able to benefit from, and contribute to, the quality of life in their community through social participation and lifelong active living.
Strategic Outcome :

Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Results Achieved :

In 2007-2008, the Community Participation and Leadership component of the New Horizons for Senior Program contributed $16.5M in total funding for 917 projects across Canada. These projects reached approximately 91,700 participants.

In addition, the new Capital Assistance component of the Program contributed $9.6M in total funding for 854 projects across Canada to upgrade non-profit organizations' facilities or equipment used for existing seniors' programs and activities.

$ Million
  Actual
Spending
2005-2006
Actual
Spending
2006-2007
Planned
Spending
2007-2008 (A)
Total
Authorities
2007-2008
Actual
Spending
2007-2008 (B)
Variance(s)
Between
(