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ARCHIVED - 2007-2008 DPRs - Horizontal Initiatives

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Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Table 10: Horizontal Initiatives

A "horizontal initiative" is an initiative in which partners from two or more organizations have agreed under a formal funding agreement (e.g. Memorandum to Cabinet, Treasury Board submission, federal-provincial agreement) to work toward the achievement of shared outcomes.

The objective of reporting on horizontal initiatives is to provide Parliament and the Canadian public and government with an overall picture of public spending and results achieved by departments working together.

Horizontal initiatives listed below were led by AAFC and were allocated federal funds that exceed $100 million (counting all federal partners) for the duration of the program, or were allocated less than $100 million in federal funds but still considered to be key to the achievement of government priorities, or had a high public profile.

Following is a summary list of horizontal initiatives for 2007-08. More complete information on each initiative, including spending and results, is available on the Treasury Board Secretariat's Horizontal Results Database.

  1. Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization program (CAIS)
  2. Canadian Agricultural Skills Service (CASS)
  3. Co-operatives Secretariat
  4. Farm Business Services
  5. MOU with Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) on Food Safety and Quality
  6. AAFC-Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) MOU on Agri-Food Specialists Positions Abroad
  7. MOU with Environment Canada (EC) on the National Agri-Environmental Standards Initiative (NAESI)
  8. MOU with Health Canada (HC) on Food Safety and Quality and Environment
  9. Production Insurance
  10. Rural Development

Horizontal Initiative

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:
Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization (CAIS) (transition to AgriStability/ AgriInvest)

2. Name of Lead Department(s):
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity:
Business Risk Management

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
April 1, 2003
For Agricultural Policy Framework (APF) - Business Risk Management funding, which covers CAIS.

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
March 31, 2008
For APF-Business Risk Management funding, which covers CAIS.

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):
$2.4 billion over five years.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
Under the Agricultural Policy Framework (APF) 2003/04-2007/08, CAIS was one of two core business risk management (BRM) programs, together with Production Insurance. CAIS was a margin-based program that integrated stabilization and disaster protection into a single program, helping producers protect their farming operations from small and large drops in income. This was a whole-farm program available to eligible farmers regardless of the commodities they produced.

As a result of producer and industry concerns with the responsiveness, timing of payments and predictability of the program, the government committed, in the 2006 Speech from the Throne and Budget, to replacing CAIS with more responsive, predictable and bankable programs. After consultations with industry and the provinces and territories, federal-provincial-territorial governments agreed to replace CAIS with a new suite of BRM programs which includes AgriStability, AgrInvest, AgriInsurance and AgriRecovery. Transition to the new programs began in the 2007-08 fiscal year. The application deadline for the 2007 program year is the fall of 2008.

AgriStability is an improved margin-based program that provides farmers with assistance for larger income decline. The program compensates producers when their margin in the program year is more than 15 percent lower than their reference margin from previous years (the second and third tiers under CAIS). While AgriStability is similar to CAIS, it includes a number of enhancements which have long been requested by industry leaders, including a better method for valuing producer inventories, expansion of the criteria for negative margin coverage to allow deeper coverage for back-to-back disasters and an automatic Targeted Advance Payment for when disasters occur. In addition to these parameter changes, governments have also worked to improve the service delivery of the program by introducing enhancements such as automatic sign-up for previous participants, more flexible deadlines, simplified forms and electronic filing, online calculators, national service standards, and clearer program statements.

The new AgriInvest program will allow producers to self-manage the first 15 percent of their losses (the first tier under CAIS), through producer-government savings accounts. Annual producer deposits will be matched by government contributions (cost-shared 60:40 by federal and provincial governments) into the producer's account. Producers will have full access to use their AgriInvest money to address their farm income losses or for investments to mitigate on-farm risks or otherwise enhance profitability. In addition, to ensure that AgriInvest accounts are effective in the first years of the program, before producers have had a chance to build up their AgriInvest balances, the federal government provided one-time "kick-start" contributions into accounts (which did not require a matching producer deposit).

Program costs, including program payments and administrative costs, are cost shared by the federal government and the provinces on a 60:40 basis, respectively as identified in the following authorities:

  • Farm Income Protection (FIPA): Section 4
  • inet:
    • Action Plan for the Agricultural Sector: Part II (June 2006);
    • Action Plan for the Agricultural Sector: Part III (Oct. 2006)
    • Amendments to Farm Income Stabilization Programming (March 2007)

The program links to the departmental strategic outcome Security of the Food System.

8. Shared Outcome(s):
To assist producers in protecting their farming operations from drops in income due to circumstances beyond their control.

Performance measures are:

  1. Percentage target of 80% of the 5-year average program margin that eligible participants achieve overall as a result of the program payments.
  2. Percentage target of 80% of farm market receipts covered by the program.

9. Governance Structure(s):
The CAIS program is part of the comprehensive APF developed by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture, and falls under the Business Risk Management priority. Funding is 60% federal and 40% provincial/territorial.

The CAIS program is delivered in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Yukon by a federal administration. In Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and Prince Edward Island, the CAIS program is delivered provincially.

Governance structure consists of the following:

  1. The Senior Administrator's Delivery Committee consists of select ADMs and Senior Administrators from the delivering CAIS administrations (Canada, Alberta, Ontario, and Prince Edward Island) with the purpose of strategically looking at how Administrations can work together to create national efficiencies and make strategic decisions on delivery.
  2. The Federal/Provincial/Territorial (FPT) Business Risk Management (BRM) Policy Working Group examines overarching BRM policy issues including performance measurement and future direction. The federal government has two voting representatives and each participating province/territory has one voting representative. The FPT BRM Policy Working Group is co-chaired by one federal official appointed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and one provincial/territorial representative elected from the FPT BRM Policy Working Group to a one year term.
  3. The FPT CAIS Administrators Working Group consists of officials from FPT levels of government who are policy or subject matter experts of business risk management programs and report to the Business Risk Management Working Group through its chair. The purpose of the Working Group is to develop the program guidelines and evaluate program parameters and processing issues. The group discusses issues related to program administration, file processing, administrative policy, finance, communication and any other related program issues.
  4. The National CAIS Committee (NCC) assists in the administration of the program as specified in Section 5(3) of the Farm Income Protection Act (FIPA). Each participating province and territory appoints one provincial and one producer (maximum 3 year term) representative. The Minister appoints 10 producer representatives, one producer who is an aboriginal person and four federal officials. The chairperson is named by Canada from the four federal official members. The Committee monitors the operation of the CAIS Program and ensures national consistency in program delivery. The NCC was replaced by the National Program Advisory Committee (NPAC) in December 2007. The mandate and composition of the NPAC remains the same as that of NCC.

A similar structure is utilized for the new BRM programs AgriStability and AgriInvest.


10.
Federal Partners
11.
Federal Partner Program Activity
12.
Names of Programs for Federal Partners
13.
Total Allocation (from start to end date)
14.
Planned Spending for 2007-2008
15.
Actual Spending for 2007-2008
16.
Expected
Results for
2007-2008
17.
Results
Achieved
in 2007-2008
1. AAFC (lead) Business Risk Management CAIS / AgriStability $2.4 billion (for fiscal years 2003/04 to 2007/08) $610.5 million $433.6 million Producers better supported and able to manage business risks

Increased sector viability and profitability

A number of program enhancements have been implemented to better serve producers including: a better method for valuing producer inventories, expansion of the criteria for negative margin coverage to allow deeper coverage for back-to-back disasters and an automatic Targeted Advance Payment for when disasters occur. In addition, improvements have been made to service delivery by introducing automatic sign-up for previous participants, more flexible deadlines, simplified forms and electronic filing, online calculators, national service standards, and clearer program statement.
AgriInvest $172.5 M
for fiscal year 2007-08 (This amount was diverted from the CAIS $2.4B as AgriInvest replaces the top 15% of CAIS)
  $168.3 M Producers better supported and able to manage business risks

Increased sector viability and profitability

Fiscal year 2007-08 was a transition year for the AgriInvest program. As such, program development was the focus and actual program payments to producers were not made. However, Program Grants & Contributions are recognized in the year that the related economic event occurs (ie 2007 Program/tax year). Payments to producers happen the year following the program/tax year (2008-09).

To help producers build their AgriInvest accounts, the federal government provided a one-time only initiative to seed AgriInvest accounts. The $600 million Kickstart payment was delivered to producers in the 2007-08 fiscal year (not included in spending figures).

Total $2.4 billion $610.5 million $601.9 million    

18. Comments on variances:
Although the Administration costs remain relatively constant, the variance in year to year G&C payments is directly related to the needs of the agriculture industry. CAIS/AgriStability is demand-driven rather than being funded from a set allocation for each fiscal year. As such, in good years, the program will cost governments less, while in bad years (i.e., years with dropping commodity prices, disasters, etc.) the costs of the program will be higher. The program does, however, include a payment cap of $3 million per participant per program year in order to control costs for governments and prevent larger operations from capturing a large share of program benefits.

The AgriInvest variance between planned and actual spending was due to the timing of the program approval which occurred after the preparation of the 2007-08 RPP.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)
Joint planning and execution (federally and provincially) so provincial results are consistent.

The BRM Working Group has been working towards developing national performance indicators for program delivery. A national processing service standard for CAIS 2006 program delivery year was agreed upon. This was a key achievement and responded to the Treasury Board policy requiring departments to establish and monitor service standards. Ongoing discussions on the expectation of administrations for regular service standard reporting will be taking place.

20. Contact Information
Michele Taylor
Director General
Farm Financial Programs Branch
204-984-5645

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates.

Horizontal Initiative

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative
Canadian Agricultural Skills Service (CASS)

2. Name of Lead Department(s)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity
Innovation and Renewal

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative
April 1, 2003

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative
March 31, 2008 (extended to March 31, 2009)

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)
$74.58 million over six years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)
Farmers and/or their spouses are offered assistance for skills development and access to training that could result in increased on or off-farm income. Assistance is provided to access training in areas such as improved farm practices and farm business management including accounting, finance, human resource management; training for other employment; or training to acquire skills for starting a new business. To access training, financial support such as tuition fees for courses, supplies for courses as well as travel and accommodation is provided. By providing assistance for skills development and training, this horizontal initiative contributes to the strategic outcome of innovation for growth. Further details can be found at the following web link: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1176222540186&lang=e

8. Shared Outcome(s):
(a) Farmers' profitability increased;
(b) Improved choices about sources of income; and
(c) Production of farm products based on market and consumer demands respecting food safety and food quality and environmentally-responsible production, and opportunities from science and innovation captured.

9. Governance Structure(s)
Program development with Renewal federal/provincial/territorial working group. Program delivery by Service Canada (Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC)), Provincial Governments and Third Party delivery agents.


10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) 14. Planned Spending for 2007-2008 15. Actual Spending for 2007-2008 16. Expected Results for 2007-2008 17. Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Please note that expected results are different from the ones expressed in the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities. Expected results presented here are consistent with those for Renewal Programs within the recently approved Performance Measurement Framework of the Management Resources and Results Structure. They also better reflect the outcomes of the program.
1. AAFC
Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC)
Innovation and Renewal a. Canadian Agricultural Skills Service $74.58 million (for fiscal years 2003/04 to 2008/09) $29.4 million $40.8 million Farmers and farm families meet their financial goals In 2007-2008, 4,638 producers participated (2,951 of these through the Canadian Farm Families Options Program), bringing the cumulative total to 13,807; 80% of CASS CIA respondents reported that the skills and/or knowledge they developed through participation in CASS helped them in reaching their most important business goal (60% of most important goals reported by CIA CASS respondents were financial goals).
Total $74.58 million $29.4 million $40.8 million Farmers and farm families meet their financial goals. Of total 2007 NRS respondents 30% reported that their top business goal is maximizing return on investment, up from 26% in 2004; 96% reported to be meeting this goal to some extent in 2007.

18. Comments on Variances
The delivery of CASS was in its third year in 2007-08. Increased awareness of the program, combined with the CASS cross compliance requirement under the Options program has resulted in higher uptake than originally anticipated for 2007-08.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)
CASS is delivered through agreements with five provinces (Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Prince Edward Island) and through Service Canada in the remaining four provinces and the Yukon (CASS is not available in Quebec and only available on demand in Nunavut and North West Territories). Of the 4,638 producers who participated in 2007-08, 4,449 were in the provinces with provincial delivery arrangements and 189 were in the provinces/territories served by Service Canada. In the provinces with provincial delivery arrangements, participation was as follows: Ontario (841), Manitoba (739), Saskatchewan (2,070), Alberta (764), and PEI (35). In provinces covered by Service Canada, participation was as follows: British Columbia (125), New Brunswick (25), Nova Scotia (37) and Yukon (2). Overall, analysis to date indicates that 79% of CASS participants from provinces with provincial delivery were satisfied or very satisfied with the services provided for the development of their individual learning plan.

20. Contact Information:
Johanne Métayer, Director
Renewal Division, Farm Financial Programs Branch
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
613-759-6689

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates.

Horizontal Initiative

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative
Co-operatives Secretariat

2. Name of Lead Department(s)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariats

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative
April 1, 2003

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative
March 31, 2008 (extended to March 31, 2009)

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)
$22.0 million over six years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)
The Co operatives Secretariat was established in 1987 to help the Government of Canada respond more effectively to the concerns and needs of Canadian co-operatives. The Secretariat advises the government on policies affecting co-operatives, co-ordinates the implementation of such policies, promotes co-operatives within the federal government, and provides a link between the co-operative sector and the many federal departments and agencies with which they interact.

8. Shared Outcome(s)
The end outcome of the Government of Canada with respect to co operatives is the expanded use of the co-operatives model to enhance the economic growth and social development of Canadian rural and urban society. The objectives are to:
-raise awareness of the co operative model and of the role that co operatives can play in both social and economic development;
-promote policies, programs and legislation that support co operatives development to achieve federal policy objectives, and greater harmonization of efforts; and
- encourage the growth of existing co operatives and the creation of new co-operatives to meet the social and economic needs of Canadians.

9. Governance Structure(s):
The Co-operatives Secretariat was created to improve the relationship between Canadian co operatives and the 17 federal departments and agencies currently known to have legislation, policies or programs affecting co operatives. Formal mechanisms for collaboration include the Interdepartmental Committee on Co operatives, dialogue with provincial collaborators and sector working groups. The Co-operatives Secretariat, working closely with the Minister responsible for co-operatives, acts as a coordinator for interaction between the government and the co operative sector. The Secretariat is headed by an Executive Director, and administrative services for the Secretariat are provided by AAFC. More details on the functions of the Secretariat are available.


10. Federal Partners Involved 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) 14. Planned Spending for 2007-2008 15. Actual Spending for 2007-2008 16. Expected Results for 2007-2008 17. Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Co-operatives Secretariat/ AAFC   

A listing of the 17 departments and agencies with legislation, policies and programs affecting co-operatives is available at: http://www.agr.gc.ca/rcs-src/coop/index_e.php?s1=leg&page=intro#CIC.

Rural and Co-operatives Secretariats Co-operative Development Initiative (CDI):
- Advisory
  Services
- Innovation & Research
$22.0 million
(for fiscal years 2003/04 to 2008/09)
$4.1 million $9.3 million Enhanced capacity for development of co operatives. Network of 20 provincial, regional and sectoral partners involved in the delivery of CDI - Advisory services
Increased opportunities, barriers mitigated and enhanced capacity of co-operatives development through government policies, programs and services. During 2007-08, the Ag-CDI was extended for 2 years which will enable partnership with the co-op sector to assist farmers who want to explore the co-op approach to capture new agricultural value-added opportunities, including biofuels.
Total $22.0 million $4.1 million $9.3 million    

18. Comments on variances:
The Ag-CDI funding renewal during the year increased available funding by $1M which was essentially expended.

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:
Not applicable

20. Contact Information:
Donna Mitchell
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariats
613-759-7113

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates.

Horizontal Initiative

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:
AAFC-Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) MOU on Agri-Food Specialists Positions Abroad

2. Name of Lead Department(s):
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity:
Markets and International

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
2003-04 fiscal year

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
2007-08 fiscal year (extended to March 31, 2009)

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):
$44.4 million over six years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative:
This MOU was established under the 5 year Agricultural Policy Framework (APF) which ended in 2007/2008. The APF was extended for one year in order to facilitate the transition to Growing Forward, AAFC's new policy framework. The MOU establishes the operational principles, management practices and performance measurement criteria for the 34 agriculture and agri-food specialist positions abroad. The objective is to enhance the delivery of the services to Canadian exporters in areas such as agriculture and agri-food business development, investment promotion, market access and advocacy, through Canadian Embassies and High Commissions located in key export markets.

8. Shared Outcome(s):
(a) Improved capacity within DFAIT's Trade Commissioner Service (TCS) to deliver in-market support to Canadian agriculture and food exporters;
(b) Increased recognition in targeted markets of Canada's ability to supply high quality, safe and innovative agriculture and food products produced in an environmentally responsible manner; and
(c) Improved market access in key markets for Canadian agriculture and food products.

9. Governance Structure(s):
The MOU Governance Model includes three levels:
(1) The Joint Management Committee (JMC) which approves costed work plans with milestones, targets and indicators; reviews expenditures; and reports semi-annually on results to the Deputy Ministers' Committee;
(2) Deputy Ministers who review and recommend the annual release of funds that are held in frozen allotment by Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), and recommend the Ministers' approval of changes, where objectives of this MOU change materially; and
(3) Ministers who approve changes where objectives of this MOU change materially and who constitute the last resort dispute resolution.

A TBS official sits as an ex-officio member on the JMC.
This MOU Governance Structure was supported in 2007-08 by the International Markets Coordination Unit (IMCU), which will evolve in 2008-09 into the Agriculture and Food Trade Commissioner Service (AFTCS) at AAFC. Operating under the guidance of the relevant Directors General of AAFC and DFAIT and the Senior Director at TBS, IMCU consults with appropriate AAFC and DFAIT officials from the geographic, trade policy, investment, performance measurement, and human resources teams.


10.
Federal Partners
11.
Federal Partner Program Activity
12.
Names of Programs for Federal Partners
13.
Total Allocation (from start to end date)
14.
Planned Spending for 2007-2008
15.
Actual Spending for 2007-2008
16.
Expected
Results for
2007-2008
17.
Results
Achieved
in 2007-2008
1. AAFC Markets and International a. International Team Program Delivery $13.8 million $2.5 million $1.7 million 1. Recognition gained and markets built through the implementation of Canada's branding strategy. Agri-food specialists contributed to branding Canada abroad through timely information provided to potential customers, trade show participation, missions abroad, incoming buyer missions, etc. Examples include: participation in 5 international food shows in Russia, including the International VIV Show in Moscow; Foodex in Japan; the European Seafood Exposition in Brussels; HoFex in Hong Kong; Mexican buyers mission to Boston Seafood Show.
2. Improved market access Market access improvements have been made at several posts abroad. Key achievements include: Partial beef market opening in Indonesia; full beef access restored in the Philippines; maintained beef market access for under-thirty-months boneless beef to Hong Kong despite more BSE outbreaks in Canada; in June 2007 the market for Canadian beef was re-opened in Taipei, with conditions (de-boned meat from animals over 30 months of age).
3. Technical barriers overcome Overcame technical barriers for some key agri-food products. Examples of achievements: Korean Food and Drug Administration added the specifications for oxygenated products in its regulations. This has effectively removed an obstacle preventing access for Canadian oxygenated water; for salmon roe in Taipei export certificates are no longer required to certify that the wild fish from which the roe is taken are free of a number of several diseases endemic to the species; the EU reduced the end-use restriction on the cooked and peeled shrimp quota, increasing it to 20,000 tonnes. This change significantly opens the market to greater volumes of Canadian shrimp.
  b. Agricultural Policy Framework (For 10 additional positions and regularizing the 6.5 existing positions transferred) $15.8 million (involves funds transferred from AAFC to DFAIT for work that supports AAFC and DFAIT Strategic Outcomes) $3.2 million (involves funds transferred from AAFC to DFAIT for work that supports AAFC and DFAIT Strategic Outcomes) $3.2 million 1. Workplans developed for all agri-food positions abroad, harmonized as much as possible with DFAIT's planning and reporting requirements. Workplans and reports developed. They will continue to be refined and updated as the work progresses. Progress has been made to integrate processes of both departments.
2. Vacant positions staffed. Candidates selected for New Delhi, Dubai and Singapore.
Temporary duty assignments filled for Moscow, New York and Miami.
3. Training and pre-posting tour arranged for new agri-food specialists Outreach and training provided for India and Moscow trade commissioners.
4. Review of agricultural and food positions abroad in line with priority markets. Review completed.
5. Re-integration strategy developed for returning agri-food specialists. Returning officers successfully reintegrated according to new processes, however, a formalized strategy is to be developed.
  c. Annual Reference Level Update (ARLU) (for original positions) $9.5 million (involves funds transferred from AAFC to DFAIT for work that supports AAFC and DFAIT Strategic Outcomes) $1.9 million $1.9 million    
2. DFAIT Investment, Innovation and Sectors Client Service Fund (for general expenditures in support of the positions) $5.3 million $1.1 million $1.1 million    
Total $44.4 million (for fiscal years 2003/04 to 2008/09 $8.7 million $7.9 million    

18. Comments on variances:
n/a

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):
n/a

20. Contact Information:
Bruce Howard, Director - Agriculture and Food Trade Commissioner Service
Room 1059A
935 Carling Ave. Ottawa, ON K1A 0C5
613-759-6284
howardb@agr.gc.ca

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts identified in Estimates.

Horizontal Initiative

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative
Farm Business Services

2. Name of Lead Department(s)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity
Innovation and Renewal

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative
April 1, 2003

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative
March 31, 2008 (extended to March 31, 2009)

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)
$109.0 million over six years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)
These services will provide eligible farmers access to financial consultants who will help them assess their finances and develop succession, action plans and business plans (financial, marketing, value-added). By providing access to financial consultants, this horizontal initiative contributes to the strategic outcome of innovation for growth.Further details can be found at the following web link: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1177623682220&lang=e

8. Shared Outcome(s)
(a) Farmers' profitability increased;
(b) Improved choices about sources of income; and
(c) Production of farm products based on market and consumer demands respecting food safety and food quality and environmentally responsible production, and opportunities from science and innovation captured.

9. Governance Structure(s)
Program development and performance measurement by Renewal federal/provincial/territorial working group.


10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) 14. Planned Spending for 2007-2008 15. Actual Spending for 2007-2008 16. Expected Results for
2007-2008
17. Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Please note that expected results are different from the ones expressed in the 2007-08 Report on Plans and Priorities. Expected results presented here are consistent with those for Renewal Programs within the recently approved Performance Measurement Framework of the Management Resources and Results Structure. They also better reflect the outcomes of the program.
1. AAC Innovation and Renewal a. Farm Business Assessment (FBA). This included for the beginning period of the FBA program, in cases where provinces had not yet signed their respective APF Implementation Agreements, the Farm Consultation Service (FCS), which was an existing program similar to FBA. Costs to deliver FCS have been included in FBA allocations. $55.8 million $15.3 million $14.3 million Farmers and farm families meet their financial goals. In 2007-2008, 8,086 producers participated in FBA, 5,759 of these through Options.

55% of FBA Client Impact Assessment (CIA) respondents indicated that the FBA had been helpful in reaching their most important farm business goal. Of all FBA CIA respondents approximately 77% of most important goals reported were financial goals.

b. Specialized Business Planning Services (SBPS) $26.5 million $5.5 million $7.2 million Farmers and farm families meet their financial goals. 643 producers participated in SBPS in 2007-2008, with a cumulative total of 1,817. 71% of SBPS CIA respondents reported that the SBPS program had assisted them in reaching their most important business goal. Of all SBPS CIA respondents 49% of most important goals reported were financial goals.
c. Planning and Assessment for Value-added Enterprises (PAVE) $26.7 million $1.5 million $0.6 million Farmers and farm families meet their financial goals. 28 producers participated in PAVE during 2007-2008, with a cumulative total of 161.
Total $109.0 million (fiscal years 2003/04 to 2007/2008) $22.3 million $22.1 million Farmers and farm families meet their financial goals. The 2007 National Renewal Survey (NRS) results show that 41% of farmers and farm families are meeting their business and personal goals; up from 37% in 2004. In addition, 30% reported that their top business goal is maximizing return on investment, up from 26% in 2004.

From 2003-2008 21,144 producers participated in FBA, SBPS, or PAVE


18. Comments on Variances
Increased awareness of the FBA program, combined with the FBA cross compliance requirement under the Options program has resulted in higher uptake than originally anticipated for 2007-08. Further, uptake of the SBPS program was similar to 2006-07, and a slight decline in PAVE program uptake occurred in 2007-08.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)
Planning and execution done jointly (federally and provincially) so provincial results do not differ.

20. Contact Information
Johanne Métayer, Director
Renewal Division, Farm Financial Programs Branch
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
613-759-6689

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates.

Horizontal Initiative

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative
MOU with Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) on Food Safety and Quality

2. Name of Lead Department(s)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity
Food Safety and Food Quality

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative
April 1, 2003 for both initiatives

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative
March 31, 2008 for Medicated Feeds initiative and
March 31, 2009 for On-Farm Food Safety Recognition initiative

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)
$29.4 over six years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
To establish minimum standards, as well as inspection and enforcement strategies for manufacturers of medicated feed for food producing animals. Also to establish the On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program (OFFSRP), which provides for government recognition of HACCP - based food safety systems developed and implemented by national producer associations.

Specific activities under the medicated feeds initiative will:
- promulgate and implement medicated feed regulations establishing minimum standards for manufacturers of medicated feed for food producing animals; and
- establish standards and policies supporting the design and implementation of an inspection and licensing system for these feed mills and farms by evaluating their manufacturing procedures and records.

Specific activities under the on-farm food safety recognition initiative will:
- establish a recognition system for on-farm food safety programs, which will ensure that adequate government oversight mechanisms are in place to maintain the confidence of Canada=s trading partners and facilitate open access to marketplace.

8. Shared Outcome(s) (MOU, section 1.2)
(a) protect human health by reducing exposure to hazards; and
(b) increase consumer confidence in the safety and quality of food produced in Canada

9. Governance Structure(s)
The MOU Governance Model includes three levels:
(1) the Joint Management Committee (JMC) which approves costed work plans with milestones, targets and indicators; reviews expenditures; and reports semi-annually on results to the Deputy Ministers' Committee;
(2) the Deputy Ministers' Committee which reviews and recommends the annual release of funds that are held in frozen allotment by Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), and recommends the Minister's approval of changes, where objectives of this MOU change materially; and
(3) the Ministers who approve changes where objectives of this MOU change materially and who constitute the last resort for dispute resolution.
A TBS official sits as an ex-officio member on the first committee.


10.
Federal Partners
11.
Federal Partner Program Activity
12.
Names of Programs for Federal Partners
13.
Total Allocation (from start to end date)
14.
Planned Spending for 2007-2008
15.
Actual Spending for 2007-2008
16.
Expected
Results for
2007-2008
17.
Results
Achieved
in 2007-2008
1. AAFC (work performed by CFIA) Food Safety and Food Quality (AAFC)

2007-08 Food Safety and Public Health (CFIA)

a. On-Farm Food Safety Recognition Program (OFFSRP) $ 10.0 million for 2003/04 to 2007/08 plus $2.4 million for 2008/09 totalling $12.4 million over 6 fiscal years.(APF plus first year of Growing Forward) $1.98 million $1.5 million OFFSRP Development
- The requirements, criteria, and procedures for the 3rd party audit accreditation process developed and finalized
- 3rd party audit accreditation process finalized.
- Assessment process implemented (industry management system)
- On-going monitoring process. Conduct
- Pilots on accreditation and implementation assessment processes conducted
- Training to industry and government partners on the details of the above processes provided
- The latter stages of the OFFSRP developed in consultation with industry and FPT governments.
OFFSRP Implementation
- Ongoing technical review of industry-submitted generic HACCP models and producer manuals
- Pilot on management system conducted.
- Technical reviews completed on 2 more industry-submitted generic HACCP models and producer manuals, and 4 more were initiated.
- Pilot completed on industry management system
- Ongoing technical review of industry procedures manual, management system documents and manuals.

Expanded Activities (from re-profiled funding)
Hazard Data Base (HDB)
- The existing information and supplemental information for the Hazard Data Base (HDB) updated and reviewed.

- No additional industry management systems were submitted for review.

- The existing information & supplemental information for the HDB were reviewed and updated.

- The web-based application for the provision of the HDB technical information to stakeholders developed and implemented. - The web-based application has been developed and implemented.
Generic Models
- On-farm and / or post-farm HACCP generic models for identified products developed.

Guidelines
- A reference document that will serve as a tool for industry regarding the safety of fresh fruit and vegetables developed.
- A training module related to the reference document developed and delivered.

- HACCP generic models and Food Safety Practices Guidance documents for Sprouts, RTE Fresh Cut Vegetables, and Spices were fully developed and released to stakeholders

- Work done in this area conducted through other activities

Enhanced knowledge skills
- Work continued with provinces and stakeholders to identify knowledge and information gaps and integrate into generic plans and hazard data base as appropriate.

Post Farm Recognition
- Stakeholder needs and OFFSRP tools and methodology integrated into the Post Farm Recognition Program (PFFSRP).

- Work done in this area conducted through other activities.

- Analysis on stakeholder need and OFFSRP completed. Preliminary work conducted on the conversion of OFFSRP manuals for use with the proposed PFFSRP

- Implementation strategy developed - Program development and implementation plan created
- Technical review process for HACCP plans and participant manuals piloted - Pilot will be conducted following identification of both government and industry bodies to participate
- Technical review process related to management systems developed - Preliminary work conducted on the conversion of OFFSRP manuals for use with the proposed PFFSRP
Technical Advice
- Timely scientific and technical advice to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders provided.
- Timely scientific and technical advice provided to AAFC and AAFC stakeholders.
Information gathering and sharing
- Workshop conducted with provincial partners to identify information needs, objectives and information management options.
- work done in this area conducted through other activities.
Surveillance
- Current knowledge on the prevalence of E. coli 0157:H7, Salmonella and Campylobacter in food-producing animals and meat products marketed in Canada assessed.

- Critical gaps in industry food safety plans that require action are identified.

Strengthening Food Safety Programs

- Key food safety, traceability and quality strategies development through work with interdepartmental colleagues as well as consultation with P/T Governments and external stakeholders.

- Risk modelling tool to evaluate risk profiles development.

The Survey design for the Surveillance study was completed.

- CFIA participation and input on various intradepartmental and interdepartmental committees and working groups - e.g. the FPT Food Safety Committee, FPT Strategy for Safe Food sub-committee and working groups, FPT HACCP Recognition sub-committee, AAFC's Growing Forward development, and the proposed Agriculture-Health Agenda.

2. CFIA b. Animal and Plant Resource Protection Medicated Feed Regulations $ 17.0 million
for 2003/04 to 2007/08.
$ 3.36 million $2.6 million Development of the Proposed Regulations

- Regulatory text developed and finalized, including Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement and other required documents; Regulatory proposal published in Publish Gazette I and II

Development of the Proposed Regulations

After consultations with stakeholders the regulatory text was developed and is currently with the Department of Justice for review. It is anticipated that the regulations may be published in Gazette Part 1 in late 2008.

The Regulatory Impact Assessment Statement was reviewed and revised.

- Continued participation in bilateral and multi-lateral stakeholder meetings and conferences to discuss the regulatory proposal Stakeholder meetings held to determine the controls necessary to meet regulatory outcomes and develop the Manual of Procedures outlining how to implement and assess the proposed controls,

Twelve information sessions held across the country to inform stakeholders about the proposed regulation.

- Environmental scan prepared on effective licensing options

- Functional licensing office opened

A risk ranking model to assist in determining the risk of carryover medication residues to animal and human health. The draft model was presented to stakeholders, USFDA and gFARAD. Work is ongoing.

A decision was made not to spend significant amounts of funds evaluating options and open an office until the final the regulations were approve

Lab Accreditation

- Development continued on a lab accreditation system for medication guarantees and residues

Lab Accreditation
Ongoing work to support ISO 97025 accreditation through SCC

Development of new methodologies to determine trace levels of medicating ingredients.

Development of Training Program/Inspector Certification

-National documented training and assessment program for feed inspection staff developed

Development of Training Program/Inspector Certification

A series of Training Manuals, E-Learning Courses and Workshop Templates were developed. The Launch of the Training Program is tentatively scheduled for July 2008.

Facility Inspection
Inspection facility protocols continue to be adjusted and piloted to support the regulations.

Computer Applications

- IT system to ensure availability of accurate, comprehensive electronic compliance information is improved

A Compliance Verification System for feed facility inspection was developed.

Computer Applications

Medicated Feed Team Staff coordinated Feed Program Submission for the improvements to the MCAP System, including reporting capabilities.

Total $29.4 million (for fiscal years 2003/04 to 2008/09; (funds transferred from AAFC to CFIA) $5.34 million $4.1 million    

18. Comments on variances:
OFFSRP development is still on-going since further discussions to be held with industry and FPT governments regarding need and scope of latter stages of recognition process. As part of the Quality Assurance process, the web-based application and user acceptance testing is being conducted for the Hazard Database. OFFSRP development is continuing under a Memorandum of Understanding for 2008-09. Under the Medicated Feed Regulations a decision was made not to spend a significant amount of funds evaluating licensing options and opening an office until the final regulations are approve.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)
Not applicable

20. Contact Information
Anita Stanger
Director
Food Safety and Quality Programs Division
613-759-6054

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates.

Horizontal Initiative

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative
MOU with Health Canada (HC) on Food Safety and Quality and Environment

2. Name of Lead Department(s)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity
Food Safety and Food Quality

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative
April 1, 2003

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative
March 31, 2008

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)
$56.5 million over six years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)
To conduct research-related work in support of standard setting, on-farm food safety standards, national integrated enteric pathogen surveillance, and human health impact of on-farm anti-microbial use.

Specific activities will include:

  • development of on-farm food safety standards related activities that support industry-developed food safety programs (i.e., information collection and analysis; the conduct of risk assessments; consultation with industry, federal, provincial and territorial colleagues and other relevant and interested parties; decision-making; communication; and information dissemination);
  • research that addresses hazards of public health significance and supports on-farm food safety standards;
  • development of a national integrated pathogen surveillance program to link human exposure to pathogens from animal and other food sources to the occurrence of human enteric illness in the population;
  • development of an integrated antimicrobial resistance program that can measure the impact of agri-food and aquaculture sector antimicrobial use, and other management factors on the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in human pathogens at the farm level;
  • develop a better understanding of the impact of agriculture on the prevalence, levels and sources of microbiological (faecal) contamination at drinking water supply intake points and recreational beaches; and detection, characterization and control of microbial and chemical hazards through the entirety of the food continuum to insure the safety of foods during production, processing, storage and distribution by using an integrated approach from the farm to the consumer.

8. Shared Outcome(s):
(a) protect human health by reducing exposure to hazards;
(b) increase consumer confidence in the safety and quality of food produced in Canada; and
(c) reduce agricultural risks to the environment and provide benefits to health and supply of water, with key priority areas being nutrients, human pathogens, pesticides and water conservation. [MOU, section 1.2]

9. Governance Structure(s)
The MOU Governance Model includes three levels:
(1) the Joint Management Committee (JMC) which approves costed work plans with milestones, targets and indicators; reviews expenditures; and reports semi-annually on results to the Deputy Ministers' Committee;
(2) the Deputy Ministers' Committee which reviews and recommends the annual release of funds that are held in frozen allotment by Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), and recommends Ministers' approval of changes, where objectives of this MOU change materially; and
(3) Ministers who approve changes where objectives of this MOU change materially and who constitute the last resort for dispute resolution.
A TBS official sits as an ex-officio member on the JMC.
This MOU Governance Structure is supported by the Interdepartmental Director General Working Group, whose members are the relevant Directors General from AAFC, HC, and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and a Senior Director from TBS.


10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) 14. Planned Spending for 2007-2008 15. Actual Spending for 2007-2008 16. Expected Results for
2007-2008
17. Results Achieved in 2007-2008
1. HC, PHAC and AAFC Food Safety and Food Quality a. HC On-Farm Food Safety Standards $11.9 million $2.5 million $2.5 million Increased quality, quantity and availability of information relevant to on-farm food safety issues.
Policies and risk management strategies applicable on-farm
- Developed CANLINE, a centralized, searchable database on levels of chemical contaminants in food: data generated by the HC and NCR will be readily accessible for use in health risk assessments and policy development activities within the department.
Industry developed on farm food safety programs are recognized by on-farm food safety recognition programs

Ongoing collaborations with F/P/T governments on issue identification, gap analysis and data collection in support of research and or policy development.
Work to be done by HC to pursue AAFC, HC and PHAC Strategic Outcomes)

- Completed Strategy for Safe Food and obtained agreement in principle from the FPT Food Safety Committee to use the Strategy to identify key activities and priorities for the consideration of FPT ADMs of Agriculture and Health.
b. HC Research in Support of Standard Setting $9.2 million $2.0 million $2.0 million Increased capacity to identify and monitor key foodborne pathogens and chemical contaminants in food and food inputs at the farm level.

Increased scientific knowledge of key pathogens and chemical contaminants in food and food inputs at the farm level.

Increased scientific contribution to the development of evidence-based on-farm food safety intervention strategies

Established and/or strengthened partnerships among government policy makers, government researchers, academia and industry associations to optimize coordinated on-farm food safety research.

(Work to be done by HC to pursue AAFC and HC Strategic Outcomes)

- Conducted surveillance of raw agricultural products, animal feeds and composted manure from farms to better understand the transmission of Shigella, Salmonella, viruses such as the noroviruses, and other key pathogens through the food system. This will allow identification of key areas of interventions to manage microbiological risks, and to develop Codes of Practice and educational materials.
- Contributed to finding that human strains of noroviruses can be found in animals and be transmitted to humans through the food chain. Discovery could have a huge impact on policy.
- Discovered a high prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (human parasites) on farms and the potential zoonotic transmission of these pathogens through direct contact, water or foods. This discovery could have a huge impact on policy.
- Determined residue levels in single serving commodities at the farm level to establish the impacts of composting. These data provided knowledge of chemical contamination and residue drift within a growing operation, and to occupational exposure to these contaminants.
- Conducted a large review on allergens and produced an Information Update document on the safety of including limited amounts of pure oats in the diet of Celiac patients.
- Reviewed current risk assessment of dioxins, furans and dioxin-like PCBs. As a result, the HC's tolerable daily intake (TDI) for dioxins (and dioxin-like PCBs) has been revised and reduced almost 5-fold.
c. PHAC - National Integrated Enteric Pathogen Surveillance $3.3 million $0.7 million $0.7 million An integrated enteric pathogen sentinel site surveillance program is operational in one sentinel site (human, food, food animal, water) Data synthesis and analysis with respect to trends / emerging issues.

(Work to be done by PHAC to pursue AAFC, HC, and PHAC Strategic Outcomes)

- Developed Framework for National Sentinel Surveillance
- Consulted with National and International Stakeholders
- MOUs and Agreements developed and signed.
- Implemented and Maintained Pilot Sentinel Site using the region of Kitchener-Waterloo.
- Reports, Publications, Presentations
d. PHAC - Human Health Impact of On-Farm Antimicro-bial Use $3.3 million $0.7 million $0.7 million Farm level studies on antimicrobial use and development of resistant pathogens. Data synthesis and analysis with respect to trends / emerging issues.

(Work to be done by PHAC to pursue AAFC HC, and PHAC Strategic Outcomes)

- Consensus obtained among stakeholders contributed to the establishment of a sentinel vet/farm-based framework design where herd biosecurity and data confidentiality are protected. - This national program is active in the 5 major pork producing provinces, involving 28 veterinarians and 108 sentinel farms.
- Additional support from BC, AB and SK provided better data in those provinces. Support included funds and in kind contributions. - On-farm surveillance provides the only usable data on antimicrobial use (AMU) in animals that is currently available in Canada.
- Provincial, federal and industry funding agencies have funded on-farm research that will direct the expansion of this surveillance program to other commodities.
- This infrastructure provides a platform to address new issues as they arise, e.g. methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in farmers.
- This pilot will provide direction on the activities that contribute to core public health surveillance of the food-chain.
e. HC - Water Quality Surveillance $4.8 million ($4.0 million for HC; $0.8 million for AAFC) $0.7 million $0.7 million Define whether agriculture is a contributor of microbiological (faecal) contamination at drinking water supply intake points in three distinct watersheds; which will, in turn, contribute to the development of policies/strategies that will reduce human exposure to faecal contaminants (refer to logic model and HC PAA).

(Work to be done by HC and AAFC to pursue AAFC and HC Strategic Outcomes)

- Strategic planning meetings held each year; finalized study activities for years 1 through 5.
- Sampling using optimized MST methods (water and faecal) conducted on South Nation Watershed from 2004 to November 2007.
- Comprehensive science reports completed annually.
- Results presented at national and international fora, thereby contributing to the advancement of the field of MST.
- Mining of data continues
2. AAFC (work performed by AAFC)   AAFC - Research in Support of APF Priorities $24.0 million $4.0 million $4.0 million Scientific knowledge advanced and data on food safety provided. Research activities were conducted on the effect of antimicrobial use in foods, alternative strategies to reduce antibiotic use in animals, improved detection and control of food borne viruses, bacteria and chemical toxicants including mycotoxins, enhanced knowledge of biochemical mechanisms and processes as they affect sensitivity to allergens and development of a comprehensive understanding of microbial interactions during food production from the farm to the plate and the impact of these interactions on the safety of food
Methodologies developed to detect and quantify foodborne viruses, food borne pathogens, allergens and mycotoxins in food nutrices. - Allergic reactions appear to be on the rise in Canada. The impacts of AAFC research in this area include:
AAFC scientists supplied control allergen reference materials for use in method development, evaluation and validation in support of Health
- Canada's allergen policy development for detection of peanut allergens in chocolate. Identification of the potential sources of allergen cross-contamination during food processing was evaluated to provide allergen free product to sensitive consumers.
- Samples of allergenic materials were provided to European scientists to be used in a human double blind food allergy challenge study by Europrevall.
- North American study (26 Canadians and Americans) was completed and 13 allergens (5 novel) were identified and the frequency among the population of patients with soybean allergy was determined. In addition, over 2,500 soy lines were screened for hypo-allergenic material and antibodies developed against one. Detailed characterization of allergenic proteins continues as soy allergens are considered as one of the 10 allergens most frequently affecting people.
Continue to design and evaluate strategies to control pathogenic agents in food matrices, through food productive, processing, distribution, continuum. - Through partnerships with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Health Canada and provincial organizations, the food virology group has made breakthroughs in the methodology to detect and quantify food-borne pathogenic viruses in complex food matrices.
Jointly, AAFC, HC, CFIA, and PHAC initiated a 4 year integrated national project to provide potential solutions to recurring incidents of contamination of fresh horticultural products including the detection and control of verotoxigenic E.coli (VTEC; includes E.coli O157:H7 and similar strains). Of special interest, research into the effect of beneficial bacteria - probiotics - on virulence of E. coli O157:H7 (bacteria responsible for "hamburger disease") produced results that indicate a role for probiotics in the treatment of E. coli O157:H7 infections.
- An integrated study of the impact of pathogens and antibiotic use in beef and swine on the safety throughout the farm to food continuum progressed. Results will provide insight into potential of decreasing antibiotic use in animals therefore decreasing antibiotic resistance.
Total $56.5 million (portions where AAFC is listed as a partner and work is performed by HC and/or PHAC involves funds transferred from AAFC to HC - see note) $10.6 million (portions where AAFC is listed as a partner and work is performed by HC and/or PHAC involves funds transferred from AAFC to HC) $10.6 million    

18. Comments on variances:
MOU ended March 31, 2008. All funds were dispersed. HC and PHAC are looking forward to further collaboration.

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):
Not applicable

20. Contact Information:
Dr. Maria Nazarowec-White
Program Coordinator
Research Branch
Food Safety and Quality
613-759-6378

Note: Planned Spending and total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates. Total Allocation for 2008-09 and beyond is dependent upon finalization of an extension MOU with PHAC, and is therefore not included in the Total Allocation.

Horizontal Initiative

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative
MOU with Environment Canada (EC) on the National Agri-Environmental Standards Initiative (NAESI)

2. Name of Lead Department(s)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)
Environment Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity
AAFC: Environment
EC: Sustainable Agricultural Landscapes Program

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
April 1, 2004

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative
March 31, 2008

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)
$25.0 million over four years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)
This initiative involves the development of non-regulatory agri-environmental "performance standards" (i.e., outcome-based standards) that will address both desired levels of environmental quality, and the levels that are considered achievable based on available technology and practice. These standards will act as benchmarks and targets against which environmental performance can be assessed. They may also help guide development of practices used by producers and industry to help reduce environmental risks and provide benefits to the health and supply of water, the health of soils, the health of air and the atmosphere, thus ensuring compatibility between biodiversity and agriculture. Standards will be developed in four theme areas: Air, Water, Biodiversity and Pesticides.

Funding for NAESI was allocated to EC under the APF and allotments were released to EC annually following the Deputy Ministers Committee decision based on the recommendation of the Joint Management Committee.

8. Shared Outcome(s)
(a) Consistent national agri-environmental standards are available to support, assess, and demonstrate progress towards the goal of environmentally sustainable agriculture in Canada;
(b) Recognition of Canada's role as a world leader in environmentally responsible agricultural production is advanced;
(c) Environmental farm planning and the move towards environmental farm certification is supported;
(d) Uptake of national standards to benefit the health and supply of water, soil, air and atmosphere; and
(e) Compatibility between agriculture and biodiversity is ensured.

9. Governance Structure(s)
The MOU Governance Model includes three levels:
(1) the Joint Management Committee (JMC) which approves costed work plans with milestones, targets and indicators; reviews expenditures; and reports semi-annually on results to the Deputy Ministers' Committee;
(2) the Deputy Ministers Committee which reviews and recommends the annual release of funds that are held in frozen allotment by Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), and recommends Ministers' approval of changes, where objectives of this MOU change materially; and
(3) Ministers who approve changes where objectives of this MOU change materially and who constitute the last resort for dispute resolution.

A TBS official sits as an ex-officio member on the first committee.

This MOU Governance Structure is supported by the Interdepartmental Director General Steering Committee, whose members are the relevant Directors General from AAFC and EC and an Executive Director from TBS.


10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) 14. Planned Spending for 2007-2008 15. Actual Spending for 2007-2008 16. Expected Results for 2007-2008 17. Results Achieved in 2007-2008
AAFC Environment MOU with EC on NAESI $25.0 million (for fiscal years 2004-05 to 2007-08) $4.3 million $4.3 million - Completed protocols and standards for the water, biodiversity, air and pesticide themes
- Completed science assessment for the air theme
- Recommendation for standards use and draft implementation plan prepared
- Stakeholder communication materials prepared and workshop held
- EC developed approximately 90 metric-specific environmental performance standards related to water (nutrients, pathogens, sediments, in-stream flow, availability), biodiversity (habitat), pesticides (ideal and achievable standards for high risk pesticides, risk-based standards, meteorological standard for spray application, mixture and commodity based standards) and air (agricultural ammonia emissions and its role in PM formation).
- Ammonia science assessment completed.
- Analysis of the maturity of standards for use to be completed this fiscal year.
- Two newsletters and 2007 technical reports published.
EC Sustainable Agricultural Landscapes Program MOU with AAFC on NAESI       Same as above Same as above
Total $25.0 million (work to be done by EC to pursue joint EC/AAFC Strategic Outcomes) $4.3 million $4.3 million    

18. Comments on Variances

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:
There are no non-federal partners involved in NAESI.

20. Contact Information:
Sarah Kalff
Manager, Biophysical Information and Analysis
Agri-Environmental Policy Bureau
613-715-5195

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates.

Horizontal Initiative

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative
Production Insurance (PI)

2. Name of Lead Department(s)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity
Business Risk Management (BRM)

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
April 1, 2003

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative
March 31, 2008

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date)
$2.0 billion estimated over five years.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement)
Under the Agricultural Policy Framework (APF), PI is one of two core federal-provincial-territorial BRM programs available to Canadian Producers. PI is designed to stabilize producers' incomes by minimizing the economic impacts of production losses arising from natural hazards like drought, hail, frost, and excessive moisture, as well as uncontrollable pests and diseases. The program is cost-shared by producers and governments. It is delivered by the provinces, with the federal government contributing a portion of total premiums and administrative costs. By stabilizing producers' income, this horizontal initiative contributes to AAFC's strategic outcome "Security of the Food System".

8. Shared Outcome(s)
Expand production loss protection to a broader range of agricultural commodities to further reduce the need for ad hoc compensation.

9. Governance Structure(s)
PI is a provincial-territorial program to which the federal government contributes financially under federal-provincial-territorial APF Implementation Agreements. Governance structure includes various national standards outlined in federal PI Regulations and federal-provincial committees (Production Insurance and BRM Working Groups as well as Policy Assistant Deputy Ministers).


10. Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) 14. Planned Spending for 2007-2008 15. Actual Spending for 2007-2008 16. Expected Results for 2007-2008 17. Results Achieved in 2007-2008
1. AAFC Business Risk Management Production Insurance $2.0 billion (for fiscal years 2003/04 to 2007/08) $407.2 million $422.1 million 1. Increased number of new programs and options available to farmers, including new plans for horticulture, forage and livestock sectors. 12 new plans, programs and options.
2. Increased producer participation in provinces and territories that have amended existing plans and that are implementing new plans and options. 2,047 new contracts
Total $2.0 billion (see note) $407.2 million (see note) $422.1 million    

18. Comments on Variances
Total expenditures for 2007/08 were higher than what was planned due to rise in grain and oilseed prices which have increased total premium costs.

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:
N/A

20. Contact Information:
Michel Massé
A/Director
Production Insurance and Risk Management Division
Farm Financial Programs Branch
613-759-6179

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates. Planned spending includes Production Insurance premiums, Production Insurance administration expenses, Wildlife Damage Compensation, and Wildlife Damage Compensation administration expenses.

See also the related horizontal initiative: Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization program

Horizontal Initiative

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:
Rural Development

2. Name of Lead Department(s):
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

3. Lead Department Program Activity:
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariats

4. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
April 1, 2003

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
March 31, 2008 (extended to March 31, 2009)

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):
$69.4 million over six years

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):
The Government of Canada has mandated the Rural Secretariat with developing, coordinating, and implementing a national, coordinated, cross-government approach to better understand the issues and concerns of rural Canadians and to encourage federal departments and agencies to make adjustments to their policies, programs and services to reflect the unique needs of rural communities. In conjunction with 34 federal departments and agencies - the Canadian Rural Partnership - the Government of Canada aims to integrate its economic, social, environmental and cultural policies to enhance the quality of life for rural Canadians.

8. Shared Outcome(s):
The outcome is enhanced access by rural Canadians to opportunities which will allow them to contribute to and benefit from Canada's prosperity and success. It is based on the following six guiding principles:

  • community is the cornerstone of rural development;
  • collaboration across and among governments;
  • flexible government approach to address rural diversity;
  • multi-faceted/integrated approach to realize a community's potential;
  • local leadership underpins the community's capacity; and
  • business and entrepreneurship are essential components of building strong rural communities

9. Governance Structure(s):
The federal partnership - the Canadian Rural Partnership - is managed by the Rural Secretariat based in AAFC in cooperation with an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and an Interdepartmental Working Group with representatives from 34 federal departments and agencies involved in the rural agenda. Horizontal coordination and leadership are provided by the Rural Secretariat under the direction of the Minister. This collaborative effort is reinforced by Rural Teams in each province and territory comprised of the federal government in the region with most teams also including members from the provincial or territorial government and/or sectoral stakeholders. At the Federal/Provincial/Territorial (F/P/T) level there is an Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee and a Working Group reporting to FPT Ministers responsible for the Rural file.


10. Federal Partners Involved
in each program
11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) 14. Planned Spending for 2007-2008 15. Actual Spending for 2007-2008 16. Expected
Results for
2007-2008
17. Results
Achieved
in 2007-2008
Rural Secretariat

A listing of the 34 departments and agencies of the Canadian Rural Partnership isa available at http://rural.gc.ca/part_e.phtml.

Rural and Co-operatives Secretariat 1. Rural Dialogue
2. Rural Lens
3. Rural Research and Analysis
4. Outreach
5. Rural Programs
$69.4 million (for fiscal years 2003/04 to 2008/09) $11.3 million
(for all program elements)
$18.2 million
(for all program elements)
A stronger rural voice More than 300 regional initiatives (including learning events, workshops, dialogues and research projects) were achieved
Enhanced capacity for development of rural communities The Community Information database (CID) has shown continued strong usage (800-1,000 visits per month – comparable to last year)
Increased opportunities, barriers mitigated and rural development capacity enhanced through Government policies, programs and services. Rural Development Network (RDN) involves members from 29 depts - held 18 inter-departmental activities. Consolidated membership (24 depts last year).
Total $69.4 million $11.3 million $18.2 million    

18. Comments on variances:
Models for Rural Development program had unused funding in 2006/2007 which was carried over into the 2007/2008 fiscal year.

19. Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners:
Not applicable

20. Contact Information:
Donna Mitchell
Executive Director
Rural and Co-operatives Secretariats
613-759-7113

Note: Planned Spending and Total Allocation figures represent the amounts included in Estimates.

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Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership (ACTP)

International Business Development Program (IBDP)

Team Canada Atlantic (TCA)

 

Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership (ACTP)


1.  Name of Horizontal Initiative

2.  Name of Lead Department

Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership (ACTP)

ACOA

3.  Start Date of Horizontal Initiative

4.  End Date of Horizontal Initiative

5.  Total Federal Funding Allocation

April 1, 2006

March 31, 2009

$9.95 million

6.  Description of Horizontal Initiative

Tourism offers significant opportunities for economic growth and social development in Atlantic Canada. The sector is far more important to the economic prosperity of Atlantic Canada than it is in other Canadian jurisdictions. Visitor spending injects $3.24 billion into the regional economy. Tourism employs over 110,000 Atlantic Canadians and represents 5.5% of the region’s GDP, compared with 2.5% nationally. For the past 15 years, ACOA has worked with provincial and industry partners to maximize the economic benefits of this sector.

The Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership (ACTP) was established in 1991 to promote the entire Atlantic region as a tourism destination in targeted markets. The ACTP is a nine‑member, pan‑Atlantic partnership comprising ACOA, the four provincial tourism industry associations and the Atlantic provincial government departments responsible for tourism.

To continue making inroads in key markets, and to continue to bolster the region’s tourism industry, the ACTP launched its fourth consecutive international tourism marketing initiative. This three‑year project (fiscal years 2006‑2007 to 2008‑2009), valued at $19.95 million, supports integrated, research‑driven consumer, trade and media relations campaigns to attract more visitors to Atlantic Canada from key markets in the United States, Europe and Japan.

The ACTP initiatives are:
          United States Marketing Initiative – to effect greater tourism returns from the New England market; and
          Overseas Marketing Initiative – to pursue the United Kingdom, German and Japanese markets through integrated marketing techniques.

The cost‑sharing for this partnership is 50% ($9.975 million) from ACOA, 30% ($5.985 million) from the Provinces, and 20% ($3.99 million) from the provincial industry associations. Contributions from ACOA and the Provinces are in the form of cash; contributions from industry associations include cash, in‑kind and other cash investments in relation to partnership‑related activities (e.g. trade registrations and trade partnerships).  See the ACTP website at http://www.actp-ptca.ca/.

7.  Shared Outcomes

The goal of the ACTP exemplifies the strategic outcomes for ACOA's priority of increasing revenues, profits, investment and wages.

The ACTP’s outcomes aim to:
          increase Atlantic Canada’s competitiveness in targeted markets;
          promote regional co‑operation (federal/provincial/industry);
          promote incremental marketing activities;
          achieve economies of scale in marketing;
          raise awareness of Atlantic Canada as a “top‑of‑mind” destination; and
          increase tourism arrivals and tourism revenues for the four Atlantic Provinces.

8.  Governance Structure

The activities of the ACTP are managed by a management committee comprising the presidents of the four tourism industry associations, the four provincial deputy ministers responsible for tourism, and two representatives of ACOA. The management committee is responsible for the administration and management of the partnership agreement, approving work plans and budgets, program evaluation, and overseeing the work of its marketing committee. The marketing committee undertakes activities that are coordinated by federal, provincial and industry representatives, and is responsible for implementing ACTP initiatives. A secretariat (annual budget $300,000) oversees the day‑to‑day operations of the ACTP and is responsible for implementing a communications strategy, as well as annual and end‑of‑agreement evaluations of the partnership.

9.  Partners involved in each program

ACOA is the sole federal funding department. The ACTP partners with the Canadian Tourism Commission on international research and marketing initiatives, on an ad‑hoc basis.

Federal Departments/Agencies:
          Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (50% of funding)
          Canadian Tourism Commission (may partner on marketing initiatives on an ad‑hoc basis)

Provincial Governments: (30% of funding)
          Province of New Brunswick – Business New Brunswick and the Department of Tourism and Parks
          Province of Nova Scotia – Department of Tourism and Culture
          Province of Prince Edward Island – Department of Tourism and Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture
          Province of Newfoundland and Labrador – Department of Tourism, Culture and Recreation

Private Sector Organizations: (20% of funding)
          Hospitality Newfoundland and Labrador
          Tourism Industry Association of Nova Scotia
          Tourism Industry Association of New Brunswick
          Tourism Industry Association of Prince Edward Island

10.  Name of Program

11.  Total Allocation

12.  Planned Spending for 2007-2008

13.  Actual Spending for 2007-2008

United States Marketing Initiative

$8.30 million

$2.77 million

$2.76 million

Results for 2007‑2008

14. Expected Results for 2007-2008

15.  Results Achieved in 2007-2008

Return on Investment (ROI): measurable tourism revenues generated per partner dollar invested in integrated marketing/media campaigns

$14 to $1

$19.45 to $1

Number of visitor parties related to the marketing program

30,000

55,385

Dollar amount of visitor spending on goods/services relate to the marketing program

$38.78 million

$82.9
million

16.  Comments on Variances

The ACTP developed an Internet conversion model to assess the impact of travellers who download tourism information directly from the Internet, rather than request literature through traditional means. The inclusion of these inquiries into its conversion research enabled the ACTP to measure the incremental impact of the Internet on media‑generated information requests, party visits and related visitor spending/revenues.  Consumer media campaigns generated $82.1 million in incremental revenues for tourism SMEs in Atlantic Canada, and a ROI of $26.52 to $1.00.  US Tour Wholesaler Partnerships generated an additional $900,000 in revenues, and an ROI of $10.17.  The inclusion of several non‑ROI generating activities (e.g. travel trade shows, media relations program, consumer website development research) resulted in an overall ROI of $19.45.

10.  Name of Program

 

11.  Total Allocation

12.  Planned Spending for 2007-2008

13.  Actual Spending for 2007-2008

Overseas Marketing Initiative

$1.2 million

$0.4 million

$0.4 million

Results 2007‑2008

14. Expected Results for 2007-2008

15.  Results Achieved in 2007-2008

Return on Investment: measurable tourism revenues generated per partner dollar invested in integrated marketing/media campaigns

$6 to $1

$4.74 to $1

Partnerships formed with Overseas Tour Wholesalers

20

14

Dollar amount of visitor spending on goods/services resulting from the Overseas Tour Wholesaler partnerships

$2.4 million

$3.7 million

16.  Comments on Variances

The ACTP refocused its European Tour Wholesaler Partnership (ETWP) program on those partnerships having the greatest potential to generate the highest return. The number of partnerships was reduced from 20 (target) to 14 (achieved). These generated $3.7 million in incremental revenues for tourism SMEs in Atlantic Canada, and an ETWP-ROI of $15.58 to $1.00. The ACTP also invested in several non‑ROI‑generating activities (e.g. travel trade shows, media relations program, consumer website development, research). These investments resulted in an overall ROI of $4.74, versus the $6.00 target.

17.  Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)

N/A

18.  Contact Information

Rob McCloskey, Director General,
Tourism Atlantic
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Telephone:  902-626-2479
E-mail: rob.mccloskey@acoa-apeca.gc.ca


 

International Business Development Program (IBDP)


1.  Name of Horizontal Initiative

2.  Name of Lead Department

International Business Development Program
(also/formerly known as International Business Development Agreement)

ACOA

3.  Start Date
of the Horizontal Initiative

4.  End Date
of the Horizontal Initiative

5.  Total Federal Funding Allocation

April 11, 2005

March 31, 2010

$7.0 million

6.  Description of the Horizontal Initiative

The International Business Development Program (IBDP) involves four Atlantic provincial governments and three federal departments: ACOA, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and Industry Canada. The previous International Business Development Agreement (IBDA) was first signed in May 1994 for three years and $3 million, and was extended in March 1997 for a further three years and $2 million. A second extension, for $8 million, involved the seven partners in international business development for a further four years from 2000 to 2004.

The new $10‑million IBDP will continue the work of the partners until 2010. Funding for the agreement is shared 70/30 by the federal and provincial governments. The IBDP’s mandate is: to undertake specific measures to optimize regional coordination on a pan‑Atlantic scale and combine limited resources to coordinate trade‑related activities. The commitment to this IBDP, with the increased funding allocation, attests to both the IBDA’s positive results and its significance for the future of the region’s international business development (see http://www.acoa-apeca.gc.ca/e/ibda/index.shtml).

7.  Shared Outcomes

The shared outcomes for the IBDP partners are as follows, and support ACOA’s priority for trade:
       increased number of new exporters;
       existing exporters reporting sales to new markets; and
       existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets.

Since the original IBDA commenced in 1994, the Agency and its partners have administered over 200 projects involving some 3,500 Atlantic Canadian companies. The IBDA assisted 182 companies to begin exporting, 380 exporters to increase their export sales, and 259 exporters to expand into new markets.

8.  Governance Structure

ACOA is the lead organization for this initiative and houses the secretariat responsible for administering the agreement. A management committee, comprising a representative from each of the partners, is responsible for the planning and management of the agreement’s programs and the evaluation of projects.

9.  Federal Partners involved in each program

Federal departments and agencies (70% funding)
          ACOA (lead department)
          Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada – non‑funding partner
          Industry Canada – non‑funding partner

Provincial governments (30% funding)
          Business New Brunswick
          Nova Scotia Business Inc.
          Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development
          Prince Edward Island Business Development Inc.

 

10.  Name of Programs

11.  Total Allocation

12.  Planned Spending
for 2007-2008

13.  Actual Spending
for 2007-2008

International Business Development Program (IBDP)

$7.0 million

$1.8 million

$2.1 million

Results for 2007‑2008

14. Expected Results for the Life of the Agreement (2005‑2006 through 2009‑2010)

15.  Results Achieved in
2007‑2008

Increase the number of new exporters

40 companies

5

Existing exporters reporting sales to new markets

75 companies

17

Existing exporters reporting increased sales to existing markets

150 companies

33

16.  Comments on Variances

Expected results are for the lifetime of the agreement, and data collection continues for two years after the term of the agreement. The target date to fully achieve these expected results is 2012.

17.  Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)

N/A

18.  Contact Information

Michel Têtu, Director General,
Trade and Investment
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Telephone: 506-851-6496
E-mail: michel.tetu@acoa-apeca.gc.ca


 

Team Canada Atlantic (TCA)


1.  Name of Horizontal Initiative

2.  Name of Lead Department

Team Canada Atlantic

ACOA

3.  Start Date
of the Horizontal Initiative

4.  End Date
of the Horizontal Initiative

5.  Total Federal Funding Allocation

April 1999

March 31, 2010

$11.14 million

6.  Description of the Horizontal Initiative

Team Canada Atlantic (TCA) is a partnership of ACOA and the four Atlantic Provinces, with support from Agriculture and Agri‑Food Canada, Industry Canada, and Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. TCA is committed to strengthening the trade and investment relationship between Atlantic Canada and the United States. From 1999 to 2008, approximately $6.5 million was spent on TCA missions; as of June 2008, mission participants reported actual sales of nearly $45 million.

The core of the TCA approach is the trade mission, which enables small and medium‑sized businesses from across Atlantic Canada to meet with potential buyers, agents, distributors and strategic partners in the United States. The mission format features a comprehensive program that equips private sector participants with the knowledge, contacts and advice they require to make the best of their international opportunities before, during and after their ventures abroad. Missions also provide the Government of Canada and the Atlantic provincial governments with crucial opportunities to promote the region as a tremendous location for foreign investment. See the TCA website at http://www.teamcanadaatlantic.ca/.

7.  Shared Outcomes

The TCA trade missions are focused on small to medium‑sized enterprises (SMEs) in Atlantic Canada and are intended to assist SMEs to increase exports and attract investments in key markets.  The mission objectives are to:
          increase export‑readiness for Atlantic Canadian SMEs;
          develop new partnerships/alliances between Atlantic Canadian SMEs and companies in target markets; and
          increase Atlantic Canadian SME export sales to new and established markets, as well as raise awareness of Atlantic Canada in these markets.

As of June 2008, Team Canada Atlantic had completed 14 missions to United States markets, involving 531 companies and more than 3,665 business meetings, and resulting in more than $44 million in actual sales.

8.  Governance Structure

A management committee, comprising senior officials of ACOA, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and provincial governments is the decision‑making body that directs and oversees the coordination and implementation of the TCA missions.  The TCA organizing committee is responsible for organizing the missions, and includes representation from the four provincial trade departments in Atlantic Canada, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, Agriculture and Agri‑Food Canada, and the Team Canada Atlantic Secretariat.  The secretariat, housed at ACOA, is responsible for the overall coordination and implementation of the TCA missions.

9.  Federal Partners involved in each program

          ACOA
          Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada – non‑funding partner
          Agriculture and Agri‑Food Canada (AAFC) – $7,000/mission

10.  Name of Programs

11.  Total Allocation

12.  Planned Spending
for 2007-2008

13.  Actual Spending
for 2007-2008

Team Canada Atlantic

ACOA    $11.14 million

AAFC     $132,000

ACOA    $356,000 (G&C)
            $  75,000 (O&M)
AAFC     $    7,000

ACOA $337,829 (G&C)
ACOA $73,000 (O&M)
AAFC $7,000

Results for 2007‑2008

14. Expected Results for 2007-2008

15. Results Achieved in 2007-2008

SMEs that have increased export‑readiness

40

41

New exporters

5

8

Exporters developing new markets

5

16

Forecasted export sales by SMEs

$30 million

$15 million

16.  Comments on Variances

 

17.  Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable)

N/A

18.  Contact Information

Michel Têtu, Director General,
Trade and Investment
Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Telephone: 506-851-6496
E-mail: michel.tetu@acoa-apeca.gc.ca


Top of Page

Canada Border Services Agency

Horizontal Initiatives

Supplementary information on the CBSA’s participation in horizontal initiatives can be found on the TBS Web site.

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Canadian Heritage


Table 8: Horizontal Initiative, Action Plan for Official Languages, Canadian Heritage,
2007–2008

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Action Plan for Official Languages
2. Name of lead department:
Department of Canadian Heritage
3. Lead department program activity:
Corporate (Internal) Services
4. Start Date: April 1, 2003 5. End Date: March 31, 2008
6. Total Federal Funding Allocation:  $787.3 M (In April 2005, a 3-year allocation (2005-08) in the amount of $36.0 M was added to the original amount of $751.3M, for the Enabling Fund, a program administered by the Department of Human Resources and Social Development.)
7. Description: The Action Plan is a policy statement of the Government of Canada that strengthens the implementation obligations under the Official Languages Act and includes a number of initiatives aimed at the enhancement and promotion of linguistic duality in Canadian society. Ten (10) federal institutions received funds for sectoral programs and activities related to official languages (OL). Another key component of the Action Plan is the implementation of an accountability framework and the establishment of overall coordination of government-wide processes relating to official languages.  The implementation of the Action Plan is a component of the wider Official Languages Program (OLP) as it has been defined and approved by the Committee of Deputy Ministers on Official Languages (CDMOL) in December 2004.
8. Shared Outcomes: Three levels of results have been identified for the Official Languages Program:Ultimate ResultCanadians enjoy the benefit of linguistic duality; live and work in communities that reflect Canadian values with respect to the use of English and French, and have access to government services in the language of their choice.Intermediate Results 
  • Increased proportion of Canadians are aware of the benefit of linguistic duality and have access to the services that support it.

  • Enhanced capacity of Canadians, English-speaking in Quebec and French-speaking across Canada to live and work in vibrant communities in their language of choice.
Immediate Results
  • Improved access to justice in both languages.

  • Increased participation in and improved access to education and learning in support of linguistic duality.

  • Improved access to health and social services in the language of their choice.

  • Enhanced cultural activities in support of Canadian identity.

  • Strengthened community economic development and language industries.

  • Enhanced community vitality.

  • Linguistic duality is reinforced in the institutions of Canadian society and reflected abroad.

  • Federal institutions respect the Official Languages Act (OLA) and the Constitution.
9. Governance Structures (within Canadian Heritage):
The Minister responsible for Official Languages has specific responsibility for the implementation of the Action Plan for Official Languages. The Official Languages Branch (OLB) of Intergovernmental Affairs (IGA) became the Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) when it was transferred to the Department of Canadian Heritage on February 6, 2006.  The OLS will continue to support the Minister responsible for Official Languages and the activities related to the horizontal coordination of the Official Languages Program, including implementation of the Action Plan.  OLS will also support the overall governance of the Official Languages Program through various mechanisms and committees.

List of Federal Partners

  1. Canadian Heritage
  2. Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada (Formerly with Treasury Board Secretariat
  3. Canada School of Public Service (Formerly with Treasury Board Secretariat
  4. Health Canada
  5. Human Resources and Social Development Canada
  6. Industry Canada
  7. National Research Council Canada
  8. Justice Canada
  9. Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Detailed sub-tables are included for each federal partner:

A.
10. Federal Partners Canadian Heritage
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA 8: Corporate services
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners a. Accountability and Coordination Framework
(Formerly with Privy Council Office)
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $13.5M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$2.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$1,715,768
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Better horizontal communication between federal institutions.

Increased exchanges and improved communication between federal institutions and official language minority communities (OLMCs).

Increased exchanges and improved cooperation between the federal government and the provinces and territories.

Better scientific and empirical knowledge of linguistic duality in Canada.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 The Official Languages Secretariat (OLS) held two regular meetings of the three interdepartmental committees on policy, evaluation and research, and ensured successful horizontal communication among federal institutions.

Public consultations on linguistic duality and official languages were held in seven cities in Canada in December 2007 and January 2008, under the leadership of Mr Bernard Lord.

The OLS provided support to multilateral meetings, such as the Ministerial Conference on Canadian Francophonie in 2007. It also served as a facilitator, and maintained continuous dialogue with the provinces and territories.
The SLO held a symposium in January 2008 in Ottawa to clarify official languages research issues. It was attended by 165 stakeholders from the academic community, and community and government representatives. A document was published following the symposium. In December 2007, a preliminary report was published by Statistics Canada on the Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM). The Survey was funded by a number of departments and the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, and will lead to the publication of new reports based on SVOLM data
 
10. Federal Partners Canadian Heritage
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA 6: Community development and capacity building
PA 5: Promotion of intercultural understanding
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners b. Education –minority language & second-language
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $346.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$86.4M (does not include operating funds)
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$94,716,587
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Implementation by provinces and territories of agreements and action plans'
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 The multi-year education agreements with the Council of Ministers of Education (CMEC) and the provinces and territories were implemented in 2007–2008.

In minority language education, Action Plan spending to date has been concentrated mainly in four areas:
  • Primary- and secondary-level consolidation 
  • Capital costs;
  • Access to education;
  • Early childhood.
In addition to making new minority language education resources available to provincial and territorial governments, the Action Plan has made it possible to articulate a shared vision of appropriate strategies in that area. Each provincial or territorial government has taken action to address specific needs that is consistent with the broader framework based on the Action Plan's objectives.  In second-language instruction, activities funded to date by the Action Plan involved three main fields:
  • Expansion of second-language programs (core and immersion);
  • Consolidation of existing programs;
  • Support for teaching staff.
All provinces and territories have benefited from resources designed for second-language instruction, and their activities systematically support the three objectives of the Action Plan in that area. These activities have generated a snowball effect at the national level in second-language instruction.
 
10. Federal Partners Canadian Heritage
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA 6: Community development and capacity building
PA 5: Promotion of intercultural understanding
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners c. Bursary Program
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $24.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$7.2M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$7.2M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Continue the implementation and promotion of the new programs Destination Clic and Explore.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Continued implementation and promotion of the programs Explore and Destination Clic, which provide language learning and development bursaries for Canadian students.

During the first four years of implementation of the Action Plan, the federal government has increased the number of bursary program participants by 23% and the value of each bursary by 9%.
 
10. Federal Partners Canadian Heritage
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA 6: Community development and capacity building
PA 5: Promotion of intercultural understanding
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners d. Official Languages Monitor Program
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $11.5M
14. Planned Spending for 2007–2008 $3.6M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$3.6M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Continue the implementation and promotion of the new programs Accent and Odyssey.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Continued implementation and promotion of the Accent and Odyssey programs. These programs provide educational institutions with full- and part-time language monitors to assist teachers with language and learning and development by Canadian students, enabling the monitors to practise their second language or their mother tongue and deepen their appreciation for Canada's cultural diversity.
 
10. Federal Partners Canadian Heritage
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA 6: Community development and capacity building
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners e. Support to minority communities
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $19.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$4.05M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$4,057,025
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Investment in priority areas for the communities, i-e, culture, communication and promotion of community activities.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 The Department of Canadian Heritage targeted community radio stations, cultural outreach and participatory activities. Funds were allocated to community organizations to help them offer a range of activities contributing to increased use of their official language by Canadians living in OLMCs. Regular use of a language is one way of preserving it.
 
10. Federal Partners Canadian Heritage
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA 6: Community development and capacity building.
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners f. Intergovernmental Cooperation
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $14.5M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$4.05M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$4,164,582
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Foster the development of provincial and territorial services in priority areas
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 The provinces and territories play a key role in the development and vitality of OLMCs. Through the Action Plan, Canadian Heritage has increased support to the provinces and territories for intergovernmental cooperation in minority language services. This funding has made it possible to assist the development and implementation of concrete measures to improve the level of service available in areas of provincial jurisdiction, other than education, considered priorities for OLMCs.
 
10. Federal Partners Canadian Heritage
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA 5: Promotion of intercultural understanding
PA 6: Community development and capacity building
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners g. Research and administration
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $0.0
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$9.7M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$9.7M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Program administration and special research initiatives.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Funds were allocated to program administration and specific research initiatives. The latter contribute to policy and program orientation. For example, during the years covered by the Action Plan, funding made it possible to contribute to the SVOLM and to research on the factors contributing to the vitality of OLMCs in northern communities.
B.
10. Federal Partners Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada (Formerly with Treasury Board Secretariat
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) N/A
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners a) Investing in Innovation
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $14 M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$0.0
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
N/A
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 N/A
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 N/A
 
10. Federal Partners Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada (Formerly with Treasury Board Secretariat
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA 1: Strategic orientation, partnership and integration program
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners b. Centre of Excellence
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $12.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$3.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$3.0M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Continue improving accountability for official languages and service to Canadians; progressively promote the emergence of a shared and consolidated vision of the concepts of a bilingual workplace.

Carry out the information campaign to promote the emergence of a shared and consolidated vision of the concept of a bilingual workplace.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 PA 1: Strategic orientation, partnership and integration program –SA1, SSA4: Official languages policy The Agency:
- ensured that OL policy instruments were up to date and consistent with current circumstances, and allowed relatively uniform government-wide application of the provisions of the OLA respecting service to the public, language of work, equitable participation by both communities, equal employment and promotion opportunities within institutions, the setting of language requirements and access to language training;
- launched an information campaign, in conjunction with eight departments, agencies and Crown corporations, designed to establish official languages more firmly among the core values of Canadian society (respect, fairness and inclusion); to inform employees of their rights and obligations, and the federal government's responsibilities towards OLMCs; and to promote linguistic duality. The purpose of the campaign is to prepare the way for a change of culture and exert a positive influence on employee attitudes and behaviour.
- provided federal institutions with an interpretation service for OL policy instruments.
- provided institutions with support, opinions and advice to assist them in applying the provisions of the policy instruments.
- prepared and distributed Determining the linguistic profile of bilingual positions, a tool to assist managers.
- arranged meetings and workshops to give persons responsible for official languages in federal institutions a better understanding of the requirements of the OLA and the policy instruments.PA 1: Strategic orientation, partnership and integration program – SA 3
(Partnerships and alignments) SSA 1 (Champions, networks and communities of interest)
The Agency held two regular meetings and a retreat for each of the two OL advisory committees. The work of these committees makes it possible to ensure that the persons responsible for official languages in institutions are better equipped to carry out their duties under the OLA by giving them an opportunity to learn about the latest developments, take part in consultations, exchange information, and broaden their knowledge of the OLP;
- held its third annual forum on best practices. The theme of the 2007 edition was "Official Languages Enhanced by Good Practices." Some 300 people attended;
- held the 2007 edition of the annual conference of OL champions in Summerside, PEI. The theme for this event was Les langues officielles : au cœur de nos valeurs fondamentales. Participants shared ideas, learned about the circumstances of the Acadian community and discussed OL challenges in general.  
- held four briefings for newly-appointed OL champions, attended by some 40 champions and co-champions;
- participated as an active member in the six meetings of the Council of the Network of Departmental Official Languages Champions, and related activities.
PA 3 (Integrity and sustainability program) – SA 3 (Reports), SSA 2 (Report on official languages)
The Agency: 
- regularly monitored OL management controls and practices by establishing regular contact with the persons responsible for official languages in institutions.
- analysed the performance of each institution through the annual review exercise, using a risk-management approach, and reported to institutions any potential risks or areas for improvement.
- collected information for the annual report on official languages (including the collection of outstanding best practices and those leading to economies of scale).
- designed and used a new electronic tool for the horizontal analysis of annual OL reviews provided by institutions. The tool greatly simplifies horizontal analysis and makes it even more systematic, since the information is compared with data from information systems, general knowledge of the files and information gleaned from the Agency's support and monitoring activities.
- assessed the performance of institutions in the context of the Management Accountability Framework (MAF).
- conducted five audits on: active offer in the NCR; supervision at Export Development Canada; supervision at the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions; new obligations respecting communication with the public and service delivery (Saskatchewan and Manitoba); active offer and service to the public in bilingual offices (Saskatchewan and Manitoba).
C.
10. Federal Partners Canada School of Public Service (Formerly with Treasury Board Secretariat)
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) N/A
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners Rebuilding Capacity
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $38.6M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$0.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
N/A
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 N/A
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 N/A
D.
10. Federal Partners Health Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Canadian health system
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners a. Networking
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $14.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$3.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$6.3M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Improved access to health services in the language of choice.

Improved health of Canadians in OLMCs.

Increased networking among health professionals and policy makers with respect to OLMC health care access issues.

Implementation of information-exchange mechanisms between health partners and OLMC members.

Increased commitment by health partners to improve health care services.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 French-Speaking Official Language Minority Communities

Since the launch of Community Networking Support in 2003, seventeen networks have been established and are operational in all provinces and territories where Francophones are in a minority situation.

These networks bring together representatives of each of the five main partners involved in improving access to French-language health services, i.e., health professions, managers of health institutions, political decision-makers, academic institutions and the communities.

Educating and bringing these partners together in order to get their concrete support and commitment has been one of the networks' key activities, and probably their greatest success to date. Many of the activities have resulted in mobilizing the various stakeholders, for example, meetings every four to twelve weeks of committees composed of representatives of the five stakeholder groups, training workshops for health care professionals, the organization of conferences, and the launch of initiatives relating to access to health services. Networks have been recognized, to varying degrees according to province and territory, as key stakeholders. Seven networks in four provinces

(Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario and Manitoba) have received formal recognition by their respective provincial departments of health. Over half the networks have established informal relations with the provincial/territorial governments in their jurisdictions, and with other health partners.

Each network has:
  • adopted a governance model that reflects this representation and has established specific objectives;

  • launched planning initiatives to provifr of health services in French, in collaboration with their provincial or territorial health departments and other regional health authorities; and
  • taken steps to engage and build consensus among stakeholders through mechanisms such as conferences, training workshops, formal meetings, and consultations.
For more information regarding the achievements of these networks, please consult the web site of the Société Santé en français at

http://santefrancais.ca

English-Speaking Official Language Minority Communities

Eleven formal networks are bringing together English-speaking minority communities and service providers at the local, regional and provincial levels. Most of these networks are working to integrate primary health care initiatives and language training, retention and distance service projects. This strategy has ensured that community participants in each network have a vital minimum capacity to mobilize and create networks with public partners.

Two of these networks have been established to address sector and provincial needs. The Fraser Recovery Program provides programs to prevent youth and adult substance abuse. The Community Health and Social Services Network (CHSSN) fosters projects and initiatives through partnership and network building to promote access to English-language health and social services and support the vitality of English-speaking minority communities.

The provincial network (CHSSN) has linked all the network units.
  • Knowledge and best practices are shared between networks through stakeholders' forums such as conferences and retreats.

  • A newsletter communicates network activities to all constituencies.

  • The provincial network has also produced a knowledge base to provide baseline information on health determinants and demographics to support the development of the individual networks. Through the networks, English-speaking minority communities have built relationships with health and social services institutions. The interactions have led to community participation in committees, projects and activities. This has increased the participation of English-speaking people in the health and social services system and sensitized public partners to community needs.

    The evaluation of the 2007–2008 CHSSN initiative entitled Soutien au réseautage du système de santé et des services sociaux pour les personnes d'expression anglaise du Québec identifies a number of outputs and success factors for this $1.1 M initiative which was conducted over the months of December 2007 to March 2008. Activities funded included the following:

  • English-language training assessments for employees of selected health and social services centres.

  • English-language training provided to employees of health and social services centres.

  • Translation to English of relevant primary care documents in 8 regions of Québec.

  • Provision of health awareness and prevention information services in English-language schools of Québec (e.g., information on the adverse effects of tobacco use).

  • Production of English-language brochures to inform residents of available English-language health and social services.
For more information regarding the achievements of these networks, please consult the website of the Community Health and Social Services Network at http://www.chssn.org
 
10. Federal Partners Health Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Canadian health system
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners b. Training and Retention
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $75.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$20.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$25.0M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Improved access to health services in the language of choice.

Improved health of Canadians in official language minority communities.Increased capacity for training of health professionals within OLMCs.Increased number of health professionals to meet the needs of OLMCs.Improved quality and quantity of health care services available to OLMCs.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 French-Speaking Official Language Minority Communities
The summative evaluation of the Health Care Training and Research Project of the Consortium national de formation en santé (CNFS) identifies a number of success factors for the project's 5-year history (2003 to 2008).
  • The project generated 3 181 new registrations in the 10-member institutions of the Consortium over five years, which represents a 38% increase over projected registrations.

  • The actual number of graduates from the project was 230, or 27% higher than the expected outcome.

  • CNFS member institutions succeeded in creating 35 new French language health care programs, which is a 75% increase over the initial commitment of 20 programs.

  • Over the 5-year-period, the CNFS project supported 109 health care programs in the member institutions.

  • The CNFS project also funded 158 research projects, of which 54 resulted in published findings.

  • The summative evaluation also conducted a study of the placement of 228 students who graduated from CNFS programs in 5 institutions in

    2005–2006. Of these graduates, 86% were working for institutions providing health care to Francophone and Acadian communities and 79% were employed in their home province.

For more information regarding the achievements of the Training and retention activities for French-speaking minority communities, please consult the website of the Consortium national de formation en santé at http://www.cnfs.net
English-Speaking Official Language Minority Communities
McGill University was allocated $11.5M for its Training and Human Resources Development Project. The project consists of four measures that are being implemented over a 3.5-year period (October 2004–March 2008).
  • language training program

  • retention and distance support program

  • seminars and conferences

  • innovation fund.
These measures are intended to ensure that English-speaking Quebeckers have equitable access to the full range of health and social services in their own language, wherever they live.
In 2005–2006, English language training was provided to 1 427 workers in 15 of Quebec's health and social services regions. In 2006–2007, 1 993 workers received English-language training in 17 regions. The latter represents 93% of the target which was set by McGill for 2006–2007. The target number of French-speaking health professionals for which English-language courses will be provided in 2007–2008 has been targeted at 2 000. For more information regarding the achievements of the Training and retention activities for English-speaking minority communities, please consult the website of the McGill Training and Human Resources Development Project at http://www.mcgill.ca/hssaccess/
 
10. Federal Partners Health Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA)  
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners c. Primary Health Care Transition Fund
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $30.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$0.0
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
N/A
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 This $30M component of the Action Plan for primary health care initiatives was originally funded until March 2006 and later extended to September 2006. Additional program funds of $10M were approved for projects in 2006–2007. There is currently no provision to fund these activities in 2007–2008.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 N/A
Total  
E.
10. Federal Partners Human Resources and Social Development Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Learning and Workplace Skills
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners a. Literacy
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $7.4M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$1.1M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$1.3M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 The integration of a results-based management approach by partner organizations in the Family Literacy Initiative.

An increased number of family literacy activities in OLMCs.Training for family literacy for practitioners operating in a minority-francophone context.Implementation of a network of family literacy practitioners among literacy trainers in OLMC context.Réseau d'experts en alphabétisation familiale –Annual activities report.Summative evaluation of the family literacy initiative in OLMCs.Hosting a family literacy conference:
  • Two inter-departmental meetings concerning family literacy;
  • Two meetings of the Family Literacy Research Steering Committee
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 A summative evaluation of the Centre de leadership en évaluation was undertaken at the request of the Fédération canadienne d'alphabétisation en français.
1 237 people have completed family literacy training sessions.36 new family literacy trainers and stakeholders participated in the training.11 provincial/territorial francophone literacy organizations members of the Fédération canadienne d'alphabétisation en français continued to maintain links with diverse community stakeholders (associations of parents, daycares, libraries, municipalities, etc.)The annual report for 2007–2008 of the Fédération canadienne d'alphabétisation en français was released in May 2008.Evaluation completed by the Office of Literacy and Essential Skills and submitted to the Department of Canadian Heritage in September 2007.
A 2e Colloque en alphabétisation familiale from the Fédération canadienne pour l'alphabétisation en français (FCAF) was held on March 6 and 7, 2008 in Ottawa.Meetings of the Family Literacy Research Steering Committee were held to prepare a conference on the development of a francophone literacy research network from April 23 to 25, 2008 in Montreal: L'alphabétisation en français à l'heure des réseaux et des communautés d'échanges en ligne.
 
10. Federal Partners Human Resources and Social Development Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Labour Market
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners b. Internships
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $7.3M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$0.0
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$1.7M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 $7.3M comes from the Summer Work Experience program.  This funding is the commitment as stated in the Action Plan for Official Languages for the period of 2003 to 2008.  To date the number of internships (650) expected has been largely exceeded.  As per the last report (May 2006) a total of 1 144 young people received an employment experience for OLMCs.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 1 865 internships in OLMCs through the Youth Employment Strategy
 
10. Federal Partners Human Resources and Social Development Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA)  
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners c. enabling fund
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $36.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$12.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$11.8M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Continued viability of the infrastructures and networks as mechanisms for government supporting OLMCs.

Improved knowledge of official language minority communities from community profiles; the information will be used to guide funding decisions, benchmarking and assessing progress and future evaluation.Increased OLMCs' capacity, at the organization and network levels, to produce community development plans and projects.Increased capacity of local human resources in official language minority communities to promote and implement their own development.Increased community vitality, including economic and job growth in OLMCs.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 The Enabling Fund was renewed for 2008–2009 and the program will also be considered for the future federal strategy on official languages

An independent evaluation showed notable progress in the capacity of the networks in creating partnerships and initiatives for community economic and human resources developmentEach community benefits from a community profile and a plan for economic development.The program managed to leverage $14.1M from non federal sources for a total of $24M.Furthermore, each permanent employee of the provincial and territorial RDÉEs generated an average of 24 indirect jobs that would otherwise not be created without their involvement.
 
10. Federal Partners Human Resources and Social Development Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Policy, Research and Communication
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners d. Pilot Projects for Child Care
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $10.8M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$3.1M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$2.5M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Implementation of the pilot-child project in five minority Francophone communities
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 The pilot project has been implemented in six minority Francophone communities
 
10. Federal Partners Human Resources and Social Development Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Social Investment
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners e. Development of NGO Capacity
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $3.8M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$0.68M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$0.65M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Production of French language learning materials to enable parents and community-based parent organizations to promote French language early childhood development programs in official language minority communities by making investments in national francophone non-government organizations
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 The National Table on Early Childhood Development (ECD) developed an ECD Framework for francophone OLMCs. The Framework establishes the vision of the various sectors operating in early childhood and sets out an implementation strategy for advancing ECD. The Framework was approved by all sectors that are part of the National ECD Table, and a strategic link was made particularly with four sectors: education, health, justice and immigration.

Production of materials such as a guide for identity building in the home for parents, a hands-on cross-sector collaboration guide and a study on the implementation costs of centers for integrated early childhood development  services
F.
10. Federal Partners Industry Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) SPA: Section 41, Official Languages Act

SPA: Language Industry Program and Canadian Apparel and Textile Industries Program

SPA: Virtual Francommunities
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners a. Outreach  and Counselling
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $8.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$1.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$2.2M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Maintain established Industry Canada network of at least one full-time counsellor per region to liaise and assist Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs).

Continue to increase presence and understanding of Industry Canada programs and services to OLMCs in all Industry Canada regions.

The outreach and communications activities are geared towards levering the OLMCs to increase their participation in Industry Canada's existing programs
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Outcome achieved:The Network of Counsellors and Coordinators continued operating until March 31, 2008

Outcome achieved - Action taken:

- Joint consultations with Industry Canada (IC), the regional development agencies (RDAs) and OLMC representatives

- Regional briefings and participation in meetings and conferences by officials from the Network of Counsellors and Coordinators

Outcome achieved - Action taken:

- development of new communication and marketing products

Indicator:

- a study of participation by OLMCs in IC and RDA programs shows that OLMCs receive funding proportional to their representation in the Canadian community
 
10. Federal Partners Industry Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) SPA: Section 41, Official Languages Act
SPA: Language Industry Program and Canadian Apparel and Textile Industries Program
SPA: Virtual Francommunities
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners b. Internships
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $2.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$0.8M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$0.8M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Continue developing partnerships for internship initiatives to support an increase in the number of skilled workers, new or enhanced businesses and the adoption of emerging technologies to meet the targets set out in the Treasury Board submission to invest $2M over 4 years to create 200 internships
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Outcome achieved 
45 internships completed in 2007–2008
 
10. Federal Partners Industry Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) SPA: Section 41, Official Languages Act
SPA: Language Industry Program and Canadian Apparel and Textile Industries Program
SPA: Virtual Francommunities
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners c. Pilot Projects   (Tele-Training; Tele-Learning)
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $10.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$1.5M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$1.6M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Develop partnerships with universities, colleges and non-profit corporations to initiate pilot projects to bring leading-edge technologies to OLMCs as per the $10M allocation over 5 years identified in the Treasury Board submission to expand the content and applications for tele-education and for tele-training.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Outcome achieved: 16 pilot projects funded in 2007–2008.
 
10. Federal Partners Industry Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) SPA: Section 41, Official Languages Act
SPA: Language Industry Program and Canadian Apparel and Textile Industries Program
SPA: Virtual Francommunities
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners d. Francommunautés virtuelles
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $13.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$4.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$4.5M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Support up to 50 new projects under the current competition for funding.
Carry out a summative evaluation of the program.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Outcome achieved: 26 new projects supported in 2007–2008; 12 projects begun in 2006–2007 and completed in 2007–2008
Outcome achieved: The evaluation report will be studied by the IC Audit and Evaluation Committee in June 2008.
 
10. Federal Partners Industry Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) SPA: Section 41, Official Languages Act
SPA: Language Industry Program and Canadian Apparel and Textile Industries Program
SPA: Virtual Francommunities
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners e. Canadian Network of Language Industries
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $5.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$1.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$1.0M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Representative Association recognized by governments and the industry.

Support the development and the adoption of Canadian quality standards for translation services and language training schools.

Consolidation of language training sector.

Exit strategy implemented.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Outcome achieved: AILIA made representations to the Standing Committee on OL, the Lord consultations and several departments (IC, PWGSC, DFAIT, PCH). In an inquiry, AILIA members acknowledged the importance of the work completed.

Through hard work by the various partners, standards for translation services are now awaiting approval by the Standards Council of Canada. There is now a single standard for public and private schools.

Outcome achieved: Since March 2008, a single association has represented the sector.

A strategy was developed and implemented. It covers four aspects: communication, human resources, finance and information management
 
10. Federal Partners Industry Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) SPA: Section 41, Official Languages Act

SPA: Language Industry Program and Canadian Apparel and Textile Industries Program

SPA: Virtual Francommunities
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners f. Marketing and Branding
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $5.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$1.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$0.6M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Maximize use of the funding for the language industry program.

Increased knowledge of and access to national and international markets.

Continued support for the development and promotion of the industry.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Outcome achieved : 75% of total funding was awarded to industry, and used.

Four market studies have been completed or published.

Continued support for the activities of AILIA, and program management. Promotion of the industry to the various stakeholders: governments, organizations and corporations.
G.
10. Federal Partners National Research Council Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Information technology
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners Institute for Information Technology - Language Technologies Research Group
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $10.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$2.6M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$2,579,436
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Our aim is to create scientific and technological advances for the benefits of our clients.  In 2007–08, we will continue to drive forward our technology in statistical machine translation (SMT), securing its highly competitive status on the international scene.  We will protect these gains with patents and we will publish the results in top ranking journals and conferences.  Our SMT technology will be deployed in smart user-oriented applications, providing translators and terminologists with a range of novel aids.  These will include: assistance for the development and maintenance of multilingual terminology, aids for translation capture (e.g. translation dictation), aids for translation authoring (e.g. SMT-enriched translation memory systems) as well as aids for translation checking.  These efforts will be done jointly with our partners at the LTRC, our national partners (i.e. universities) and several international partners.  Lastly, we aim to produce this year at least one technology transfer to the private industry.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Nightingale consortium, GALE research program of the DARPA agency (U.S. Department of Defence)

This activity has helped us ensure and demonstrate that our machine translation technology is world-class.

Jointly with some of our Nightingale partners, we have continued to provide competitive Chinese-to-English machine translation technology to the satisfaction of the client (DARPA). As a result, our funding was not only renewed for the upcoming third year but also increased by 50% with the previous year.

SMART consortium, IST program from the European community

The SMART consortium has started to test the applicability of new machine learning methods (such as kernel regression techniques) to the problem of machine translation. Preliminary results are very encouraging.

Collaboration Systran/NRC

A hybrid system combining Systran and NRC's Portage has yielded excellent results in international competitions.

Business discussions have been initiated.
H.
10. Federal Partners Justice Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Services to government
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners a. Accountability and Coordination Framework
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $2.5M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$0.35M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$0.37M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Federal institutions use legal tools to meet their duties under the OLA.

Legal services on language rights are improved.

Federal institutions have improved knowledge of their duties under the law.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 A guide to the implementation of Part VII was developed jointly with the OLS.

The DOJ evaluation found that legal services had improved.

Awareness activities for federal public servants were offered once again in 2007–2008.
 
10. Federal Partners Justice Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Justice, policy, legislation and programs
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners b. Legal Obligations

(i) Contraventions
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $27..0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$4.7M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$1.6M$
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Amendments have been made to the agreements and regulations with Ontario, British Columbia, Manitoba and Nova Scotia.  New agreements are expected with Saskatchewan, Alberta, Newfoundland and Labrador and the City of Mississauga.

These amendments will provide that services will be accessible and that there will be an active offer of service in both official languages wherever demand is sufficient.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Discussions were undertaken with Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador. No agreement reached in 2007–2008.
 
10. Federal Partners Justice Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Services to government
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners b. Legal Obligations

(ii) Bill S-41: The Legislative Instruments Re-Enactment Act
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date)  
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$0.4M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$0.6M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 In conformity with subsection 9(1) of the Act the Minister of Justice has completed a review of the implementation and operation of s. 4 of the Act.  As well, under s. 9 of the Act, the Minister of Justice also has to submit a report on the review to each House of Parliament by June 13, 2008.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Between December 2007 and June 2008, 259 legislative instruments were re-enacted through five regulations

The review report on the implementation of s. 4 of the Act is scheduled to be tabled in both Houses of Parliament on June 12, 2008.
 
10. Federal Partners Justice Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA: Justice, policy, legislation and programs
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners c. Access to Justice
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $18.5M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$4.1M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$3.7M
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Increased capacity to respond to issues related to access to justice in both official languages.

Better informed public and legal communities.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 The summative evaluation of the Support Fund indicates that it is relevant and effective and that the projects funded have helped improve access to justice in both official languages and the ability of those concerned to provide such services.

The Support Fund has helped associations of French-speaking jurists to discharge their mandate more effectively, contributed to the development of language tools for lawyers and the training of jurists, and made it possible for stakeholders to come together to combine their efforts.

Activities undertaken through the Support Fund have achieved significant successes. First, while it was expected that partnerships would develop between participants, the power of the networks and the cooperation that resulted were not expected. Second, the associations of French-speaking jurists enjoy greater prominence within their respective community networks and have credibility as advocacy agencies. Third, jurilinguistic centres have been able to develop internationally-recognized expertise in their field.
I.
10. Federal Partners Citizenship and Immigration Canada
11. Federal Partner Program Activity PA) PA1: Immigration Program

PA 2: Temporary Resident Program

PA 4: Refugee Program

PA 5: Integration Program
12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners Support to Communities
13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) $9.0M
14. Planned Spending for
2007–2008
$2.0M
15. Actual Spending
for 2007-08
$1,965,750
16. Expected Results for 2007–2008 Implement the Strategic Plan to Foster Immigration to Francophone Minority Communities (FMC).  Promote immigration abroad, improve the reception capacity of Francophone minority communities, and strengthen their reception and settlement infrastructures for Francophone newcomers to facilitate their social and cultural integration.  Coordinate the Steering Committee and the Implementation Committee, and support research on the FMCs.
17. Results achieved in 2007-08 Implementation of the Strategic Plan to Foster Immigration to Francophone Minority Communities and coordination of the Steering Committee and the Implementation Committee

CIC – FMC Steering Committee met in September 2007 and approved three additional priorities to those presented in its strategic plan to foster immigration to FMCs and the annual report presented by the Implementation Committee.

Regional sub-committees on francophone immigration continued to work on the implementation of the Strategic Plan.

Promotion abroad

Small- and large- scale promotion and recruitment events were organized and promotional material was developed. For example, "Destination Canada" took place in November 2007 in Paris, Lyon, Brussels and Tunis. 

Improvement of the absorption capacity of FMCs and reinforcement of intake and settlement structures for French-speaking newcomers to assist their social and cultural integration.

Several networks were implemented across Canada to ensure coordination of immigration of French-speaking immigrants to FMCs.

Awareness activities were organized in schools and in the community.

Initiatives and tools to facilitate the social and economic integration of French-speaking immigrants to FMCs were also funded.

Support for research

CIC funded and participated in events that furthered a better understanding of factors surrounding the immigration and integration of French-speaking newcomers to Canada. For example the Journée de réflexion sur l'immigration francophone was organized by CIC Metropolis in Toronto in March 2007 and in April 2008 in Moncton and CIC contributed to an article in the spring 2008 edition of the magazine Canadian Issues on immigration and diversity in FMCs.
  Total Allocation (from start to end date Planned Spending for
2007–2008
Actual Spending
for 2007-08
Total : $787.4 M $183.0M $198.9M
18. Comments on the variance : N/A
19. Results to be achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A
20. Contact : olslo@pch.gc.ca http://www.pch.gc.ca/slo-ols/ Approved by:Jérôme Moisan
Date approved: June 20th, 2008

Table 8: Horizontal Initiatives, 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games – Delivering on our Commitments, Department of Canadian Heritage, 2007–2008

1. Name of horizontal initiative:2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games – Delivering on our Commitments
2. Name of lead department(s):Department of Canadian Heritage 3. Lead department program activity:
PA2 – Sustainability of cultural expression and participation
PA7 – Participation in community and civic life
4. Start dateof the horizontal initiative:
Fiscal Year 2003–2004
5. End date of the horizontal initiative:
March 31st, 2012
6. Total federal funding allocation (start to end date): $622.1M (2004–05 to 2011–12)
7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative: 
To monitor and report on the Government of Canada's contribution to the 2010 Winter Games, which engage Canadians from across the country; reflect Canadian values and priorities in their planning, delivery, and international profile, and promote opportunities to advance public policy goals and to make strategic investments that support long-term tangible economic benefits, and sport, social, cultural and environmental legacies for all Canadians. (http://www.pch.gc.ca).

The Government of Canada is a key partner in the 2010 Winter Games. The 2010 Federal Secretariat within the Department of Canadian Heritage works horizontally to support and promote federal engagement in the planning and delivering the Games, which includes providing high quality essential federal services, as well as capital and legacy funding. The 2010 Federal Secretariat works with its partners and stakeholders to leverage the Games as an opportunity to advance public policy objectives, establish lasting legacies, and derive maximum benefit for all Canadians.  (www.canada2010.gc.ca).
8. Shared Outcomes:
  • Canadian excellence and values will be promoted nationally and internationally;
  • Sport, economic, social and cultural legacies will be established for the benefit of all Canadians, in alignment with federal policy objectives;
  • Early planning and seamless, cost-effective delivery of mandated federal responsibilities, including federal essential services (security, entry of individuals, etc.) will contribute to high quality 2010 Winter Games.
9. Governance Structures (within the Department of Canadian Heritage)

2010 Federal Games Secretariat

Representative Working Group (RWG)

The 2010 Federal Secretariat, under the leadership of the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage, supports the Framework for Federal Coordination (FFC). The FCC is the primary mechanism for promoting horizontal management of the Winter Games. This governance structure consists of three levels:

  • A Deputy Ministers and Heads of Agency Coordination Committee facilitating interdepartmental and intergovernmental consultation and coordination of Games-related issues and commitments;
  • An Assistant Deputy Minister-level Representative Working Group (RWG) reporting on the progress of essential federal service delivery; and,
  • Working-level Issue Clusters supporting intergovernmental coordination and information sharing.
In addition, an Essential Federal Services Committee (EFS Committee) has been established under the authority of the RWG to support, promote, coordinate and monitor seamless planning of essential federal services.

10.
Federal
Partners
11.
Federal
Partner
Program
Activity (PA)
12.
Names of
Programs for
Federal
Partners
13.
Total
Allocation
(from
start to
end date)
14.
Planned
Spending
for 2007–08
15.
Actual
Spending
for 2007–08
16.
Expected
Results for
2007–08
17.
Results
Achieved in
2007–08
1. Canadian Heritage Strategic Outcome 1 :1
Canadians express and share their diverse cultural experiences with each other and the world.

PA2: Sustainability of cultural expression and participation
  $ $122.7M $ Increased opportunities for federal visibility on 2010 activities;
Improved relations with partners and with the 2010 Federal Framework for Coordination (FFC); Diligent spending on all aspects of federal funding.
Pursued activities to foster positive domestic and international exposure and to help make these 'Canada's Games'

Protecting Canadian investment by monitoring progress and performing due diligence on the venue construction program. 

Ensuring effective coordination and delivery of essential federal services and strategic opportunities through various coordinating mechanisms such as Issue Clusters and the Government Operations Steering Team.
Strategic outcome 2 Canadians live in an inclusive society built on intercultural understanding and citizen participation.

PA 7: Participation in community and civic life
 
B. Royal Canadian mounted Police (RCMP),
Public Safety Canada,
Department of National Defence (DND),
Canadian Security Intelligence Agency (CSIS)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
N/A Police and Security $87.5M For reasons of national security, the Security Group has asked that the information not be released For reasons of national security, the Security Group has asked that the information not be released Partners and stakeholders are engaged in developing intelligence-led strategic and operational plans Strategic and operational plans are being developed in consultation with partners and stakeholders

Agreements have been put  in place and several Memorandum of Understanding have been completed while others are currently being developed

New partners have recently joined the Vancouver Integrated Security Unit in Vancouver.

Formal channels for exchange of information have been established.
C. Canadian Border Services Agency Access Security $15.8M $1.2M $1.5M Operational and logistics planning  Input to the design, development and implementation planning for the Olympic Identity and Accreditation Card Process Integrated Operational framework, planning teams and HR strategic planning initiated. Olympic Accreditation Working Group formed, Accreditation Process conceptual design consultation initiated, detail design initiated, Government of Canada approach and partnership agreement achieved. Olympic Federal Coordination Issue Clusters participation
D. Citizenship and Immigration Maximum contribution to Canada's economic, social and cultural development from migration Temporary Resident Program $5.0M $0.3M $0.25 Operational planning and logistics planning.  Input to design and creation of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) card Operational and logistical planning underway.  Input to design and handling of IOC card in progress.  Regulatory amendments in development.
E. Human Resources and Social Development Canada Enhanced Canadian productivity and participation through efficient and inclusive labour markets, competitive workplaces and access to learning. Foreign workers and immigrants $1.3M $0.2M $0 Operational planning and logistics of planning on entry of foreign workers The entry of foreign workers is incorporated into the larger nationwide Foreign Worker Program.
F. Health Canada Reduced health and environmental risks from products and substances, and safer living and working environments. Healthy environments and consumer safety Health Protection of Foreign DignitariesHealth Protection of travelling publicHealth Protection of Public Servants $2.6M  - $0 Planning of activities to be undertaken in 2008-09. Continue strategic planning to ensure the delivery of  health services to foreign dignitaries attending the 2010 Winter Games and undertake measures to ensure the health and safety of federal employees working on location. Met with stakeholders to identify requirements and establish the basis for collaboration.Ongoing planning to provide public health services related to conveyances and ancillary services to protect the health of the traveling public.
G.G.Environment Canada Weather and environmental predictions and services reduce risks and contribute to the well-being of Canadians. Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision-making. $9.3M $0.8M $0.8M Infrastructures and supporting technologies for Olympic weather services are developed Completed Olympic surface weather observing network (32 observing platforms), as well as a profiling microwave radiometer.
Produced meteorological studies pertinent to the Games' operations. Trained 32 meteorologists on local winter weather conditions for Games' operations.
Canada's natural capital is restored, conserved and enhanced. Canadians adopt approaches that ensure the sustainable use and management of natural capital and working landscapes. $1.5M $0.5M $0.43M Sustainability investments and agenda advanced Strategic leveraging of partnerships with VANOC, the Province of BC and Environmental non-governmental organizations to move sustainability initiatives forward. Continued collaboration with federal government departments and external partners to identify opportunities to showcase innovative approaches to sustainability.Revitalization of the Environment and Sustainability Issue Cluster committee to focus initiatives in three priority areas: footprint reduction, sustainability innovation and education and awareness.
Environmental Assessment is integral part of program and policy decision-making. Efficient and effective environmental assessments $2.6M $0.4M $0.2M Environmental Assessments Completed Environmental Assessments Completed Participation in EA follow-up programs.
H. Fisheries and Oceans Canada   Healthy and productive aquatic eco-systems. Habitat management $0.6M $0.1M $0.1M Environmental assessment work completed Completed Environment Assessments on the Whistler Nordic Centre.
Provided expert Federal Authority advice on 5 projects.
Issued 12 Fisheries Act authorizations.
18. Comments on variances:

The CBSA's negative variance as reported above is a result of functions accomplished in 2007–2008 that were originally forecasted for 2006–2007.The funding difference for Fisheries and Oceans for the total allocation reflects lapsed funds in previous years that will not be sought.HRSDC has incorporated the entry of foreign workers into the larger nationwide Foreign Worker Program and therefore will not be seeking funds.
19. Results to be achieved by non–federal partners (if applicable):
Activities undertaken by non-federal partners are critical to the success of the Games. Each partner has provided information on the results of its activities on its respective websites.  Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games  (http://www.vancouver2010.com/en)Government of British Columbia  (http://www.gov.bc.ca/ )City of Vancouver (http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/)Resort Municipality of Whistler  (http://www.whistler.ca/) Canadian Olympic and Paralympic Committees (http://www.olympic.ca/EN/)
20. Contact information: Tenille Hoogland 613-949-7987

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Department of Finance Canada

Table 10: Horizontal Initiatives


Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada's Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime—formerly the National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering (NICML)
Name of Lead Department: Department of Finance Canada Lead Department Program Activity: Financial Sector Policy
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:June 2000 End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:2009–10
Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):$433,700 (thousands)
Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering (NICML) was formally established in 2000 as part of the government's ongoing effort to combat money laundering in Canada. Legislation adopted that year, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act (PCmlA), created a mandatory reporting system for suspicious financial transactions, large cross-border currency transfers, and certain prescribed transactions. The legislation also established the Financial Transactions Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) to collect and analyze these financial transaction reports and to disclose pertinent information to law enforcement and intelligence agencies. In December 2001, the PCmlA was amended to include measures to fight terrorist financing activities and was renamed the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act (PCMLTFA).

The NICML is now known as Canada's Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing (AML/ATF) Regime. In December 2006, Bill C-25 amended the PCMLTFA to ensure that Canada's legislation remains consistent with international AML and ATF standards as set out by the Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering (FATF) and is responsive to areas of domestic risk. Amendments include enhanced client identification requirements, the creation of a registration regime for money services businesses, and the establishment of an administrative and monetary penalties regime to deal with lesser infractions of the PCMLTFA.

Shared Outcome:To detect and deter money laundering and the financing of terrorist activities and to facilitate the investigation and prosecution of money laundering and terrorist financing offences
Governance Structure:Canada's AML/ATF Regime is a horizontal initiative comprising both funded and non-funded partners. The funded partners include the Department of Finance Canada, the Department of Justice Canada, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, FINTRAC, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)—Immigration and Customs, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP); non-funded partners include Public Safety Canada (PS), the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada (OSFI), and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS). An interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)–level group and working group, consisting of all partners and led by the Department of Finance Canada, direct and coordinate the government's efforts to combat money laundering and terrorist financing activities. In addition, a public-private sector advisory committee was established to facilitate input from the private sector participants in the AML/ATF Regime.

 


Federal Partners Federal Partner Program Activity Names of Programs for the Federal Partners Total Allocation (from start to end date)
(in thousands)
Planned Spending for 2007–08
(in thousands)
Actual Spending in 2007–08
(in thousands)
Expected Results for 2007–08 Results Achieved in 2007–08
Department of Finance Canada Financial Sector Policy Canada's Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime $3,000 $300 $296 1. Consultations with public and private sector stakeholders to refine regulatory proposals 1. Consultations with the public and private sectors are ongoing. A public-private sector advisory committee was established to facilitate discussions among private and public sector members of the Regime.
          2. Published regulations pursuant to the amended PCMLTFA 2. Three sets of regulations pursuant to Bill C-25 were published in final form over the course of FY 2007–08. These regulations enhance customer due diligence, record keeping, and reporting requirements for financial institutions and intermediaries; create a registration scheme for money services businesses; bring three new reporting sectors under the Regime; and create an administrative monetary penalties scheme.
          3. Finalizing of the FATF mutual evaluation of the AML/ATF Regime 3. The FATF finalized its evaluation of Canada's AML/ATF Regime and released its findings in February 2008.
          4. Effective oversight of Canada's AML/ATF Regime 4. The Department of Finance Canada continues to lead the Regime and make available avenues to address policy and operational issues to ensure Canada has an effective AML/ATF Regime.
          5. Support for the 2006–07 Canadian presidency of the FATF 5. Canada successfully concluded its one-year presidency of the FATF on June 30, 2007. During this time, six countries underwent assessment, membership of the FATF grew, and communications with the private sector were strengthened.
Department of Justice Canada (JUS) The National Initiative to Combat Money Laundering Canada's Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime $9,300 $100 $100 The Criminal Division of JUS plays a significant role in the regime. For 2007–08, it is anticipated that the Criminal Division will use the resources it receives to carry out work related to the FATF, including attending FATF-related international meetings, which will total five (5) over the relevant period. Attendance at the meetings is of particular importance during 2007, as Canada's AML/ATF Regime is being evaluated this year against the FATF's 40 and 9 Special Recommendations, and the presence of JUS is necessary to ensure proper discussions of the Canadian evaluation report. In addition, the Criminal Division will be the relevant authority to respond to all legal issues that develop out of that evaluation. Resources will also be allocated to ensure the Criminal Division's continued involvement in policy development relating to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, the Human Rights Law Section will receive money to deal with any ancillary constitutional issue raised during the prosecutions. Canada's AML/ATF Regime was evaluated by the FATF, and Criminal Division counsel fully participated in all domestic discussions surrounding the evaluation report and attended two FATF meetings and an intercessional meeting with the evaluators. Division counsel attended a Caribbean Financial Action Task Force (CFATF) Plenary meeting, working with the Department of Finance Canada in preparatory and plenary meetings. Division counsel also participated as an FATF legal expert, as part of the FATF assessment team in an evaluation of Japan's Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism Regime. In addition, the Criminal Division was the relevant authority to respond to all legal issues that develop out of the evaluation of Canada. Resources were also expended to ensure the Criminal Division's continued involvement in policy development relating to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, the Human Rights Law Section dealt with any ancillary constitutional issue raised during the prosecutions.
Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC) Addressing criminal issues to contribute to a safer world for Canada Canada's Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime $6,900 $2,300 $2,000 PPSC plays a significant role in the Regime. For 2007–08, it is anticipated that information provided to law enforcement by FINTRAC will result in more prosecutorial legal advice's being provided to law enforcement. It will also result in additional charges' being laid for money laundering and terrorist financing offences and thus result in an increased workload for prosecutors. The PPSC also has responsibilities related to the PCMLTFA. The planned work includes applications for production orders, increases in border seizure and forfeiture work associated with suspected proceeds of crime, and prosecutions related to offences created within the PCMLTFA. In addition, resources will be used to provide training to law enforcement personnel and prosecutors and for the development and coordination of policy as it relates to money laundering and terrorist financing. Finally, PPSC personnel will carry out work related to the FATF, including attending the FATF international meeting. For 2007–08, PPSC opened 51 files with, among other charges, a charge of either money laundering or a charge under the PCMLTFA. These 51 files contained 6 charges of money laundering and 62 charges under the PCMLTFA, for a total of 68 charges. In addition, Crown counsel worked on 83 carry-over files with, among other charges, a charge of either money laundering or a charge under the PCMLTFA. These files contained 16 charges under the PCMLTFA and 285 charges of money laundering, for a total of 301 charges. Over this time period, PPSC counsel also obtained 11 production orders under section 60 of the PCMLTFA.
FINTRAC Collection, analysis, and dissemination of financial information Canada's Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime $269,085 $38,595 $35,800 Technology-driven financial intelligence analysis and case disclosures that are widely used by law enforcement and intelligence agencies with a program that fosters compliance by the reporting entities

Implementation of amendments contained in Bill C-25

FINTRAC continued to make case disclosures of financial intelligence to law enforcement agencies and national security agencies. The increasingly complex cases that were disclosed pinpointed new suspects and financial transactions and triggered new investigations or provided significant input to ongoing investigations or prosecutions.

FINTRAC continued to expand ongoing compliance activities and outreach efforts, which include conducting over 370 presentations, meetings, and seminars with reporting entities and associations.

Through macroanalysis of its case disclosures and the associated transaction reports, FINTRAC continued to gather valuable insights into suspected money laundering cases and suspected terrorist financing activity. By sharing strategic information, FINTRAC supported the work of policy makers, domestic partners in law enforcement and national security, the financial community, and international partners.

FINTRAC also undertook to implement and integrate into its operations the changes resulting from Bill C-25. Among other actions, this included the development of a registration system for money service businesses, as well as an administrative monetary penalty regime designed to serve as a complementary tool to bring contraveners into compliance.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) Security Canada's Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime $55,952 $7,525 $7,500 The CBSA is responsible for administering Part 2 of the PCMLTFA, "Reporting of Currency and Monetary Instruments." The Cross-Border Currency Reporting (CBCR) Program requires that travellers report the importation and exportation of currency and monetary instruments equal to or greater than CAD$10,000. Part 2 also provides for the enforcement element of the CBCR Program, which includes conducting searches, questioning individuals, and seizing non-reported or falsely reported currency and suspected proceeds of crime. Since January 2003, the CBSA has assumed new responsibilities for administrating and enforcing Part 2 of the PCMLTFA. Under this legislation, all imported or exported currency or monetary instruments valued at more than CAD$10,000, must be reported to the CBSA. During 2007–08, the CBSA participated in more than 2,000 seizures under the PCMLTFA, the value of the seizures totalling over $39 million. Approximately $6 million of this total was forfeited to the Crown.
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Special Enforcement Program Canada's Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime $11,000 $2,200 $2,228 Projected number of audits is 105, with a projected federal tax recovery of $8,956,905 Total number of audits is 99 with a federal tax recovery of $11,304,163
RCMP—Money Laundering Units Money Laundering Units Canada's Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime $57,103 $7,117 $6,704 Enhanced national and international opportunities for the detection and investigation of money laundering activities

Development of FINTRAC disclosures, as well as other intelligence, to a point where resources from Integrated Proceeds of Crime (IPOC) units or elsewhere in the RCMP could then be directed toward investigations in an effort to increase seizures

Increased resource level in Canada's three major urban centres (Vancouver, Toronto, and Montreal) to help build up the investigative capacity in those centres to conduct investigations on leads related to Canada's AML/ATF Regime

The money laundering branch continues to investigate numerous opportunities for criminals to launder their illicit money both domestically and internationally. These include a report on Canada's casinos, e-currency, white label automatic teller machines (ATM), and pre-paid credit cards.

The money laundering units continue to receive intelligence from a number of sources, which include FINTRAC disclosures and CBSA cross-border currency reporting information. The units are referring this intelligence over to the IPOC units where the intelligence received has contributed to ongoing investigations, prompted the commencement of new investigations, and provided information for potential future use. In 2007–08, IPOC units seized over 400 assets valued at $15,070,923.

Resource levels have increased in Vancouver, Montreal, and Toronto. These money laundering units now have 10 investigators.

RCMP—Anti–Terrorist Financing Team (ATFT) Anti–Terrorist Financing Units Canada's Anti–Money Laundering and Anti–Terrorist Financing Regime $21,360 $5,340 $3,258 Through the gathering and analysis of financial intelligence, the ATFT will focus on converting that intelligence into proactive investigations, thus enhancing the RCMP's ability to detect and deter terrorist financing activities. The ATFT continues to provide support to seven project status investigations of terrorist financing across Canada, support to 15 various investigations, and assistance in response to other agencies' requests.

ATFT continues to provide training to the RCMP and partner agencies. The RCMP and CRA jointly delivered four seminars on the use of the Charities Registration (Security Information) Act (CRSIA) legislation to field units in Ottawa, Halifax, Montreal, and Toronto. The RCMP, CSIS, and CRA have formed a working group to identify charities linked to terrorist financing and utilizing the "certification process" under the CRSIA.

The RCMP assisted with drafting responses to the FATF evaluation of Canada completed in February 2008. The RCMP will continue to assist in FATF typology working groups on terrorism financing and proliferation. Representatives from ATFT recently returned from the CFATF Plenary held in Haiti in May 2008.

Total $433,700 Total $63,477 Total $57,886
Comments on Variances

RCMP—Anti–Terrorist Financing Team: The shortfall in the spending is due to the fact that six regular member positions have yet to be staffed. The field units are up to strength and are not experiencing any exceptional expenditures. Staffing of these vacancies is anticipated by September or October 2008.

Results to be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): Not applicable
18. Contact Information:

Lynn Hemmings
Chief, Financial Crimes Section,

Phone: 613-992-0553

19. Approved by:

Jeremy Rudin
A/Assistant Deputy Minister, Financial Sector Policy Branch

Phone: 613-992-5885

20. Date Approved:

July 2008



[1]     In addition to the transfer payments listed, Wait Times Reduction payments (Part V.1, Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act) were made to a third-party trust fund on behalf of provinces and territories in 2004 for the 2004–05 to 2008–09 period and therefore were not identified as charges against the 2007–08 appropriations. Beginning in 2009–10, a Wait Times Reduction Transfer will provide annual cash transfers to provinces and territories until 2013–14, which will be reported starting in the 2009–10 Departmental Performance Report.

[2]      “Sustainable development” is a continually evolving concept based on the integration of social, economic, and environmental concerns. It may be achieved by, among other things, the following:

        (a) the integration of the environment and the economy;

        (b) protecting the health of Canadians;

        (c) protecting ecosystems;

        (d) meeting international obligations;

        (e) promoting equity;

        (f) an integrated approach to planning and making decisions that takes into account the environmental and natural resource costs of different economic options and the economic costs of different environmental and natural resource options;

        (g) preventing pollution; and

        (h) demonstrating respect for nature and the needs of future generations.

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Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Table 9.1: Horizontal Initiatives


1) Name of Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)
2) Name of Lead Department: Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada 3) Lead Department Program Activity: International Security 1
4) Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: Initiated October 3, 2005; operationalized September 18, 2006 5) End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2013
6) Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): As per Table 8.19, overall DFAIT or lead partner spending to date totals $235.9 million, while horizontal funding to non-DFAIT entities (below) provides support to initiatives that fall outside of funding transferred at reference levels. GPSF funds are therefore not earmarked for other government departments or federal partners on an allocation basis. Planned spending levels to these entities reflect GPSF preparedness to respond to appeals in a given year, under umbrella arrangements, from the RCMP, CSC, etc.
7) Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): Funded from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, the GPSF fills a funding gap by providing dedicated resources for activities that are necessary for a timely response with respect to countries in or at risk of crisis, but that are not properly the responsibility of the Department of National Defence and are outside Canada's traditional official development assistance program. Examples of these activities are supporting peace operations and peace processes, supporting justice and security system reform, enhancing transitional justice and reconciliation, and improving the peace enforcement and peace operations capacities of military and police in Africa and the Americas. Major recipients of funding are Afghanistan, Sudan and Haiti.

The GPSF is both a responsive and directive program, established to provide timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges. DFAIT works closely with a range of government departments including RCMP, DND, CSC, CBSA and Justice Canada. Among other assistance, these partnerships provide critical expertise in the area of justice and security system reform to the civilian components of UN peace operations. In 2007-2008, the GPSF entered into arrangements with several major implementing partners from the federal government. DFAIT’s contribution of $ 86.3 million was supplemented by $82.4 million in spending by partners for total spending of $ 168.7 million (see Column 15 below). Of particular note was support to peace operations in Sudan through the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the implementation of stabilization and reconstruction projects in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan.

8) Shared Outcome(s):
  • Rapid, integrated and better-coordinated Canadian responses to international requirements for short- and medium-term conflict prevention, stabilization, peacebuilding and reconstruction;
  • Improved Canadian contributions to the mitigation of natural disasters and complex emergencies and the restoration of peace, security, the rule of law and legitimate government in fragile states; and
  • Expanded global and regional capacity for peace operations.
9) Governance Structure(s): The GPSF is managed by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) Secretariat in the context of a whole-of-government approach coordinated through the START Advisory Board. Chaired by the Director General of the START Secretariat and comprising senior officials from across government, the START Advisory Board is responsible for establishing, within the framework of individual departmental authorities, whole-of-government strategic policy as well as priority setting and direction with respect to fragile states and complex emergencies. It is also responsible for providing a platform for information exchange to ensure that program-related activities are complementary and avoid duplication. The START Secretariat is located in the International Security Branch of DFAIT and is accountable to DFAIT, which is responsible for the financial, human and physical resource services for START.
10)
Federal Partners

Federal Partner Program Activity
11)
Names of Programs for Federal Partners 2
12)
Planned Spending for 2007-
2008

($ millions)
13)
Actual Spending for 2007-
2008

($ millions)
14)
Expected Results for 2007-2008
15)
Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT)

International Security (Interim PAA, Diplomacy and Advocacy new PAA)
Global Peace and Security Program; Global Peace Operations Program; Glyn Berry Program for Peace and Security 89.0 3 86.3 3 Timely, coordinated and cost-effective whole-of-government responses to natural and human-made crises abroad 200 projects were funded through the GPSF, supporting conflict prevention, crisis response, post-conflict peacebuilding and stabilization initiatives
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

PA 1: Federal and International Operations
Canadian Police Arrangement 11.4 4 5.8 Implementation of RCMP International Police Peacekeeping Projects Supported the deployment of serving members to fragile states including Haiti, Afghanistan, etc.
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

PA 1: Geographic Programs
Peace Support Operations in Sudan - - Support to Sudan AMIS Support to Sudan AMIS
Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC)

PA: N/A
Peace Support Operations in Sudan 96.0 73.0 Logistical support to Sudan peace operations (AMIS/UNAMID) Provided logistical support to Sudan peace operations (AMIS/UNAMID)
Correctional Service of Canada (CSC)

PA 1: Correctional Interventions
Operations in Afghanistan and Stabilization and Reconstruction in Haiti 0.5 1.5 Support to the deployment of Correction Advisers to the PRT in Afghanistan Supported the deployment of Correction Advisers to the PRT in Afghanistan
Department of Justice

PA 1: Justice policies, laws and programs
Operations in Afghanistan and peacebuilding support in Sudan 0.7 - Support for implementation of GPSF projects and START activities Supported implementation of GPSF projects and START activities
Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

PA 1: Security
Operations in Afghanistan (Pakistan-Afghanistan border); Canada’s support to the Middle East Peace Process; and Stabilization and Reconstruction in Haiti 0.7 - Provision of technical assistance Provided technical assistance
Department of National Defence (DND)

PA 1: Contribute to Canada and the international community
Operations in Afghanistan 6.4 2.1 Support for implementation of projects in Kandahar Province Supported implementation of projects in Kandahar
Totals: 5   204.7 3 168.7 3    
16) Comments on Variances:
Where significant variance exists between planned and actual disbursements, it is due to difficult programming environments, as the GPSF operates in crisis and fragile states. For example, programming through CBSA in support of the Middle East Peace Process had to be cancelled due to security concerns on the ground. Further, the level of spending of the GPSF through federal partners varies in response to the needs that are expressed by partner countries and multilateral agencies. As such, planned levels constitute notional estimates.
17) Results to Be Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): The GPSF works with a wide variety of implementing partners, including international and regional organizations, such as the United Nations and its bodies, as well as with non-governmental organizations, academic institutions, foreign governments and other legal entities.
18) Contact Information: Robert Derouin, Director General, START Secretariat, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, Tel.: 613-665-6689, Fax: 613-944-5911, Email: robert.derouin@international.gc.ca

1. This program activity relates to DFAIT’s interim PAA, which was used for the 2007-2008 RPP. Under the current PAA, approved by Treasury Board on June 7, 2007, the program activity for this table is Diplomacy and Advocacy.
2. Names of Programs for Federal Partners refer to support to GPSF activities and do not necessarily reflect the name of a department’s official program. Often departments working with the GPSF do not have an official program name for this activity.
3. Includes grants.
4. This does not include funding transferred at reference levels. It is solely funding to cover incremental costs of the RCMP to deploy police officers in support of international peacekeeping operations.
5. Total Allocation (from start to end date) for Federal Partners not available.

Table 9.2: Horizontal Initiatives


1) Name of Horizontal Initiative: Enhanced Representation Initiative (ERI)
2) Name of Lead Department: Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada 3) Lead Department Program Activity: Bilateral Relations and International Business Development 1
4) Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: September 17, 2003 5) End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: March 31, 2008 2
6) Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $118.2 million
7) Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement): The ERI was a partnership of seven federal departments and agencies. The ERI provided a coordinated and integrated approach and direction to managing and advancing Canada’s advocacy, trade, business development, science and technology, and investment interests in the United States. This was done through the collaboration of ERI partners and consultation with other federal government departments, the provinces and territories, and other stakeholders. The ERI partnership had oversight of a network of 43 U.S. points of contact, including consulates general, consulates, trade offices and honorary consuls.
8) Shared Outcomes: Outcomes reflected total Canadian government efforts respecting advocacy and business development with the United States set in the international economic environment. Specific outcomes were defined by the ERI’s Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF)

Short-term Outcomes:

  • Increased domestic engagement and coordination
  • Raised awareness of:
    • Canada-U.S. interdependence in North American security
    • Canada-U.S. interdependence in the North American economy
    • Canada-U.S. social differences
  • Increased number of export-ready firms
  • Raised awareness in the U.S. of:
    • Investment opportunities in Canada
    • Canadian technological capabilities
  • Increased Canada-U.S. sharing of technologies
  • Raised awareness of U.S. market opportunities for Canadian firms
  • ERI partnership development
  • Increased capacity for advocacy and business development in the U.S.

Medium-term Outcomes:

  • Appreciation of Canada-U.S. interdependence as reflected by:
    • Canadian interests not adversely affected by U.S. legislation, policies, regulations or industry codes
    • Improved settlement of joint Canada-U.S. issues
  • Increased investment development
  • Increased export development
  • Increased commercialization of S&T in Canada
  • Improved coherence of Canadian advocacy and business development interests in the U.S.

Long-term Outcomes:

  • Enhanced influence for Canada on key strategic issues
  • Improved flow of people, goods and services across the Canada-U.S. border
  • Increased business for Canada with the U.S.
9) Governance Structure: The ERI partnership was managed through a formal governance structure consisting of a Deputy Ministers Steering Committee, an Assistant Deputy Ministers Policy Committee, a Directors General Operations Committee and three director-level standing committees: Advocacy and Business Development, Communications and Human Resources. Day-to-day operations were managed by the ERI Secretariat, which was responsible to the ERI partnership, through the governance structure, for planning, implementing and evaluating the ERI’s annual action plan. The ERI Secretariat was accountable administratively to its host department, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, which provided financial, human resources and physical resource services to the Secretariat.
10) Federal Partners
  • Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT)
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)
  • Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA)
  • Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions
  • Industry Canada (IC)
  • National Research Council (NRC)
  • Western Economic Diversification (WD)
11)
Enhanced Representation Initiative Program Components
12)
Total Allocation (from start to end date)
($ millions)
13)
Planned Spending for 2007-
2008

($ millions)
14)
Actual Spending for 2007-
2008

($ millions)
15)
Expected Results for 2007-2008
16)
Results Achieved
in 2007-2008
(a) Representation 78.1 22.4 22.0 Complete staffing and infrastructure Staffing complete except for 3 of 20 honorary consuls

Staffing of ongoing vacancies through partnership process
(b) Advocacy and Business Development 26.7 10.4 9.6 "Whole of government" approach Conducted activities for improved Canada-U.S. relations and increased U.S. opportunities for Canadian firms Utilized 92.3% of allocated funds
(c) Corporate / Governance 6.3 1.4 1.3 Improve governance by implementing formative evaluation recommendations Implemented the accepted recommendations of the formative evaluation; supported the summative evaluation of the ERI, and led the formation of a partnership for the new North American Platform Program (NAPP) to succeed the ERI.
(d) Reserve / un-allocated 7.1 1.5 2.8    
Totals: 118.2 35.7 35.7    
17) Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A
18) Contact Information: Wolf Nowak, Manager, Strategic Planning and Analysis, North American Platform Program (NAPP),Tel.: 613-944-2715, Fax: 613-996-0560, Email: wolf.nowak@international.gc.ca

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Department of Justice Canada

Table 6 Horizontal Initiatives


1. Name of Horizontal Initiative:
National Anti-drug Strategy
2. Name of Lead Department(s):
Department of Justice
3. Lead department Program Activity:
Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy;Youth Justice Fund – Youth Justice Anti-drug Treatment Component; and Drug Treatment Courts
4. Start date of the horizontal initiative:
2007-08
5. End date of the horizontal initiative:
2011-12 and ongoing
6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): : $598 million[1]
7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Anti-Drug Strategy is built on the former Canada’s Drug Strategy, with a clear focus on illicit drugs and a particular emphasis on youth. Its goal is to contribute to safer and healthier communities through coordinated efforts to prevent use, treat dependency and reduce production and distribution of illicit drugs. It encompasses three action plans: prevention, treatment and enforcement.

The prevention action plan supports efforts to prevent youth from using illicit drugs by enhancing their awareness and understanding of the harmful social and health effects of illicit drug use and to develop and implement community-based interventions & initiatives to prevent illicit drug use. The treatment action plan supports effective treatment and rehabilitation systems and services by developing and implementing innovative and collaborative approaches. The enforcement action plan aims to contribute to the disruption of illicit drug operations in a safe manner, particularly targeting criminal organizations.

8) Shared Outcome(s):
  • Reduced demand for illicit drugs in targeted populations and areas;
  • Reduced impacts of illicit drug use through prevention and treatment efforts; and
  • Reduced supply of illicit drugs.
9) Governance Structure(s):

The governance structure of the Strategy consists of an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and working groups on policy and performance, prevention and treatment, enforcement, and communications. The governance structure is supported by the Strategic Initiative Unit of the Department of Justice Canada.

The Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee (ADMSC), which is chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the implementation of the Strategy, making decisions necessary to advance the initiative, where required, and ensuring appropriate and timely outcomes for the initiative and accountability in the expenditure of initiative resources.  The ADMSC prepares questions for the consideration of Deputy Ministers, where appropriate.

The Prevention and Treatment Working Group, chaired by Health Canada, oversees the development and implementation of the Prevention and Treatment Action Plans. The Enforcement Working Group, chaired by the Department of Public Safety Canada, oversees the development and implementation of the Enforcement Action Plan. The Policy and Performance Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees the development and articulation of policy directions and outcomes for the Strategy and the work of the Sub-Committee on Evaluation and Reporting. The communications Working Group, chaired by the Department of Justice Canada, oversees communication of the Strategy including, making decisions necessary to advance communication of the initiative and ensuring coordination of communication.

10) Federal Partners 11. Federal Partner Program Activity 12. Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13. Total Allocation (from start to end date) 14. Planned Spending for 2007–08 15. Actual Spending for 2008–09 16. Expected Results for 2007-2008 17.

Results Achieved in 2007-2008

1. Department of Justice A1 a. Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy
$3.3M
$660,207
$568,388 
Effective leadership of the federal response to concerns around illicit drug prevention, treatment and enforcement through:

•  Assuming overarching responsibility for policy and coordination;

•  Establishing and maintaining a NADS Governance Structure;

•  Assuming the lead for and coordination of all NADS communications activities;

• Taking lead responsibility for accountability – evaluation and performance reporting.
•  Coordinated and contributed to 4 Memoranda to Cabinet which received policy approval in February- March 2007;

•  Established the Governance Structure for the NADS;

•  Coordinated the 3 NADS TB Submissions that were approved by the Board in September 2007;

•  Developed and negotiated all partner participation in and agreement to a Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) that was submitted to Treasury Board at the end of March 2008;

•  Played a leadership role in the policy and performance of the Strategy through the ADM-level Steering Committee and the Policy and Performance Working Group of the Governance Structure;

•  Provided leadership and overall coordination of all communications activities, including the development and maintenance of the NADS website.
b. Drug Treatment Courts
(Treatment Action Plan)
$16.2M
$3.9M
$1.9M
New Drug Treatment Courts operational and reporting as required as per funding agreements Annual workplans and progress reports that are consistent with the DTC Funding Program objectives were received.
c. Youth Justice Fund - Youth Justice Anti-drug Treatment Component (Treatment Action Plan)
$6.9M
$500,000
$259,708
To fund projects on Treatment Services and Program Enhancements

To enhance capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services & programs to targeted populations

A total of 9 proposals were received in 2007-2008.

3 projects funded by the end of the fiscal year (2 completed and 1 on-going as at March 31-08) 4 will be funded in 2008-2009

Of the 3 funded projects, all targeted youth in conflict with the law dealing with illicit drug use issues; all 3 projects enhanced capacity through training and/or research and 1 project provided treatment through a pilot program.
2. Health Canada N/A a. Mass Media Campaign

(Prevention Action Plan)

$29.8 M
4.0M
$4.8M
Increased awareness and understanding of illicit drugs and their negative consequences Radio, print and web advertisements were developed and disseminated to parents.  Tips and tools for parents were also made available at www.drugprevention.gc.ca and in the Talking with Your Teen about Drugs booklet.
3.4 b. Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (DSCIF)
(Prevention Action Plan)
$78.0M
$11.97M[2]
$10.2M
Increased awareness and understanding of illicit drugs and their negative consequences

Enhanced uptake of knowledge in communities to address illicit drug sue and its negative consequences

In 2007/08, Health Canada provided $2.920M in funding for national projects and $3.705M in funding for regional projects. A new DSCIF call for proposals addressing NADS objectives, closed in February 2008. A total of 299 proposals were received for consideration.
c. Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP)

(Treatment Action Plan)

$124.7M
$18.0M
$14.1M
Improved collaboration on responses and knowledge of treatment issues

Enhanced capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations

Enhanced F/P/T commitments to improve treatment systems in targeted areas of need

In 2007/08, consultations were held with provinces and territories to finalize the Drug Treatment Funding Program (DTFP) design. Developmental funding in the amount of $85,000 was provided to 2 provinces to undertake a situational analysis describing the current “state of affairs” in relation to the implementation of evidence-informed practices and performance measurement and evaluation activities. As well, discussions were held with the BC Ministry of Health and Vancouver Coastal Health Authority regarding options for new treatment interventions for drug addicted people living in the Downtown Eastside, in particular women engaged in the sex trade.
4.1.1.2 d. National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP)

(Treatment Action Plan)

$36.0M
$2.4M[3]
$2.2M[4]
Enhanced capacity to plan/deliver a range of treatment services and programs to targeted populations In 2007/08, FNIHB initiated a number of activities to prepare the groundwork for additional NADS investments in 2008/09.  These investments included: establishing a national certification process; enhancing and expanding opportunities for certified, evidence-based training; initiating work on an addictions information data system; producing a detailed report on workforce issues that will help shape future investments.
3.4 e. Office of Controlled Substances

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$12.8 M
$1.6M
$1.6M
Increased capacity to control and monitor controlled substances and precursor chemicals The Office of Controlled Substances (OCS) continued to expand and develop the inspection program for precursor chemicals. Two new inspectors were hired in Alberta and four in Ontario.  Seventy-five inspections were conducted; these comprised of inspections of dealers licensed under the Precursor Control Regulations as well as some pre-license inspections and a small number of targeted inspections under the Narcotic Control Regulations.  Development of tools and processes continues in order to create the appropriate structure for a further expanded inspection program
f. Drug Analysis Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$ 49.2 M[5] $ 3.4 M[6]
$8.0M
$9.0M
Increased capacity to gather, analyze/share intelligence and analyze data

Increased awareness of illicit drug and precursor chemical issues for enforcement

Drug Analysis Services (DAS) Laboratories received more than 107,000 exhibits and issued more than 124,000 certificates of analysis.  Although the average time to analyze exhibits exceeded the performance target (60 days), all received exhibits that indicated a court date were analyzed and reported before that date.  The Destruction Unit processed more than 113,000 requests for authorization to destroy seized controlled substances.  In the administration of Part III Sections 24 (4) to 29 of the CDSA, Health Canada reimburses police services destruction costs. New procedures have been put in place for the reimbursement of these costs. At this time, it is difficult to project the long term impact of these procedures but an increase in claims for reimbursements has been seen.
3. Canadian Institutes of Health Research 1.2.6 Research on Drug Treatment Model

(Treatment Action Plan)

$4.0 M
$100,000
$34,446
Increased awareness and understanding of illicit drugs and their negative consequences On November 8 and 9, 2007, the CIHR Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction held a Consultation Workshop to identify research priorities related to addiction treatment for illicit drug use.  Addiction experts, health professionals and potential partners were invited to the consultation funded by NADS. The priorities established during the consultation constituted the base of two Requests for applications (RFAs).  RFAs were posted on the CIHR web site in April 2008.
4. Department of Public Safety Canada 5 a. Crime Prevention Funding and Programming

(Prevention Action Plan)

$20.0M
$2.0M
$830,013
Enhanced support for targeted at-risk populations.

Enhanced knowledge in communities to address illicit drug use and its negative consequences.

Funded projects are only in the early implementation stage and it is premature to outline firm results or outcomes. The six projects which have been approved for funding thus far implicate individuals and communities in British Columbia, Ontario and Atlantic Canada.  They aim to engage youth-at-risk of becoming involved in substance abuse-related crime in programs which help them acquire employment, interpersonal and other pro-social skills which contribute to reduction in risks factors.  These projects respond to priorities of the National Crime Prevention Centre by addressing substance use among youth and/or Aboriginal people. An additional 21 projects have been developed and are being reviewed. 
3 b. National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.0M
$800,000
$586,000
Safer Communities and more effective policing through strategic national law enforcement policies Led, coordinated and drafted NADS TB Submission with enforcement action plan partners.  Coordinated the 2007 Canada-U.S. Border Drug Threats Assessment and drafted the Canada Drug Policy Section.  Extensive participation in developing the NADS RMAF.  Coordinating sections of the annual report on national drug trends for submission to the UN. Participation in FPT policy forums (CCSO impaired driving and drug issues groups), and international policy forums including the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission.

Funded 8 projects for research, knowledge and information exchange.

5. Royal Canadian Mounted Police 1.1.2.7 a. Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Service (DOCAS)

(Prevention Action Plan)

$15.1 M
$3.0 M
$1.8M
Increased awareness of the nature, extent and consequences of substance use/abuse within the school, and Aboriginal communities and among youth, professionals and the general public. Improved skills / competencies in the delivery of programs The RCMP continued to engage youth and communities with prevention programming aimed at providing information on the negative consequences of drug use and risky behaviours. Also, DOCAS aims to provide awareness services for other agencies who may deal with issues related to illicit drug use or abuse. For 2007/2008, this included the following programs: D.A.R.E., Drugs and Kids, Drug Awareness Officer Training (DOAT). Efforts are also underway to improve the programming material for Aboriginal Shield.
3.5.2 b. National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program

(Treatment Action Plan)

$3.6M
$410,276
$208,681
To establish a team and a workplan for the program Hired 3 full-time employees to start up the program

Developed a comprehensive draft five-year work plan

Organized and/or participated in 30 consultations

1.1.2.7 c. The RCMP Drug Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan

$91.4M
$12.6M[7]
$10.9M
Improved understanding and knowledge of drugs, related trends, and production and diversion methods

Enhanced ability to detect and respond to the supply of illicit drugs and harmful substances

Undertook an initiative to train the Marihuana Grow Operation teams to respond in an ancillary role of Clandestine Drug Laboratory responders.

This initiative was successfully completed with the majority of current members of the MGO Teams being cross-trained in Clan Lab qualifications.  The newly trained members help create a synergistic partnership between the two teams, and target efforts in the prevention of chemical diversion and synthetic drug production. This practice will continue from this point forward, as Divisions have recognized the benefits of having an increased pool of experts in the area of safely investigating and dismantling dangerous labs, in the event of an emergency. Has led to a total 18 officers were trained in 2007/2008.

Funding under the National Anti-Drug Strategy was allocated to Divisions to enhance their Marihuana Grow Operation (MGO) Teams and Clandestine Laboratory Teams. The addition of new members allowed for greater targeting of efforts on larger grow operations, as well as emerging ‘super labs’.

There were 138 MGO seizures, and 22 Clandestine Laboratory seizures made in 2007/2008. For MGOs, this resulted in the seizure of 95,924 plants, and 1,202 kg of marihuana bud seized as part of these disruptions. For Clan labs, over 90 kg of methamphetamine and 95 kg of MDMA were seized as part of these disruptions.  

6. Correctional Service Canada 3.0 Case Preparation and Supervision

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$23.3 M[8]
$0
$0
N/A N/A
7. National Parole Board of Canada Conditional Release and Pardon Decisions

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$7.5 M[9]
$0
$0
N/A N/A
8. Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions 1.1 a. Prosecution and prosecution -related services
$9.9 M[10]
$0
$0
N/A N/A
b. Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$33.5 M[11]
$0
$0
N/A N/A
9. Canada Border Services Agency PA 1 Border Intelligence, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$12.7 M
$1.5 M
$888,639
Commence implementation and hiring of staff.  For the CBSA, the reporting period for the NADS is from September 2007, (the commencement of the Strategy), to March 31, 2008. Funding released to the Regional offices, hiring processes commenced and where applicable, fractional resources were combined based on regional needs analysis and to address gaps/pressures.
10. Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade 1.2 Annual Contributions to UNODC and CICAD

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.5 M
$900,000
$900,000
Enhanced capacity of Member States to implement combat crime and drugs through implementation of key international instruments, and delivery of technical assistance. DFAIT successfully managed projects involving training, equipment, technical and legal expertise resulting in increased capacity of beneficiary states and government entities to prevent and combat international crime and drugs.  Capacity building activities addressed both the supply of, and demand for, illicit drugs and also responded to Canadian policy priorities.
11. Canada Revenue Agency 42400 Special Enforcement Program

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$4.2 M
$825,019
$290,000
Increased capacity to audit MGOs and clandestine laboratories With the additional funding from the Strategy, 44 audits were started in 2007/08. Of these, 25 were completed, resulting in $1.2 M in taxes.
12. Public Works and Government Services Canada 01 Forensic Accounting Management Group (FAMG)

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$1.6 M
$200,000
$200,000
Increased capacity to provide forensic accounting services One full-time employee was hired.  FAMG provided forensic accounting analysis for 3 RCMP projects related to the Strategy.
13. Financial Transactions and analysis Centre of Canada 4881 Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

(Enforcement Action Plan)

$2.5 M
$268,000
$78,250
Enhanced support to Law enforcement

Development of financial intelligence

Ensuring compliance in high-risk reporting sectors

FINTRAC's involvement in the NADS for 2007-2008 has allowed the Centre to augment its capacity to communicate with its law enforcement and intelligence partners through its Liaison Officers' work. FINTRAC also augmented its capacity to analyze the information it receives and to create financial intelligence that is potentially relevant to drug-related cases, with the addition of one FTE dedicated specifically to NADS in the last quarter of 2007-2008. This increase in capacity is the foundation for the work that will support additional case disclosures and intelligence products by FINTRAC
   
Total $598M
Total $73.6M
Total $61.3M
18. Comments on Variances

1.a Justice - Justice Canada Lead Role for the National Anti-Drug Strategy
The funding was not fully utilized due to the late arrival of the funds, and also the complexity of the transition of the leadership role from Health Canada to Justice and the need to develop capacity within Justice to support the leadership role.

1.b Justice - Drug Treatment Courts of Justice:
There are still claims outstanding for this time frame.

1.c Justice - Youth Justice Fund - Youth Justice Anti-drug Treatment Component:
The short time frame (October-March, 2007) impacted the number of proposals received and projects approved.  Funding criteria was established and a call for proposals sent to Provincial/Territorial representatives, but there was slow uptake on the funding.  The short time frame also impacted the number of proposal reviews and agreement negotiations which could take place within the time frame.  The G's and C's allocation was $375 K and projects of a value of $166.7 K were funded over the time frame.

 2.a Health Canada - mass media campaign
Television campaign for parents was added to parent component.  Funding came from Branch surplus.

2.c Health Canada - Drug Treatment Funding Program
Delay in the announcement of DTFP resulted in lapsed funds in 2007/08.

2.f Health Canada - Drug Analysis Services
DAS has been in a chronic deficit since before 2000.  This is funded through internal reallocation.

3. Canadian Institutes of Health Research - Research on Drug Treatment Model
Actual spending was less than the allocation due to the timing of the NADS announcement and the amount of time it requires to prepare and issue RFAs.

4.a Department of Public Safety Canada- Crime Prevention Funding and Programming
The timing of NADS did not coincide well with our call for “Letters of Interest/proposals”, and so most projects were already in development, leaving little opportunity to turn these into NADS projects.  We did identify a certain number of proposals as NADS projects which in fact began their application process prior to 07/08, but most of these projects were for relatively small amounts of funding, meaning we fell short of our financial commitment, notwithstanding that we actually funded more projects than anticipated.

4.b Department of Public Safety Canada - National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation
As NADS funding was received late in fiscal year 2007-2008, there was insufficient time to complete staffing actions, resulting in lapsed funds equivalent to 1 FTE.

5.a RCMP - Drugs and Organized Crime Awareness Service
Actual spending was less than the allocation as a result of the re-orientation of the DOCAS program, and postponement of the Aboriginal Shield Initiative, which updated its programming material to reflect a broader range of Aboriginal cultures (i.e., Métis, Inuit).  Remaining funds that were allocated were returned to Treasury Board for the 2007/2008 fiscal year.     

5.b RCMP - National Youth Intervention and Diversion Program (NYIDP)
Overall, the NYIDP’s actual spending for FY 2007-08 was approximately fifty percent (50%) of the planned spending, which is largely due to the fact that this was the start-up year for the program.   The Director and Manager were hired in the 3rd quarter of the fiscal year; therefore, their salaries do not cover the entire fiscal year as originally calculated in the planned spending. The delays in having employees physically on-site delayed the overall development/implementation schedule for the NYIDP and, therefore, also impacted the operating expenditures.

5.c RCMP - The RCMP Drug Enforcement Program
Actual spending was less than the allocation as a result of funding for the Strategy rolling out in November 2007, and the amount of time required to fulfill human resource plans for additional trained officers.  Funding for 2007/2008 has been allocated to the requisite Divisions, and processes are underway to staff these positions.

9. Canada Border Services Agency - Border Intelligence, Precursor Chemical Diversion, Analysis and Scientific Services
The September 2007 implementation had a significant impact on the CBSA expenditures for the first year of the National Anti-Drug Strategy. Consequently, in 2007/2008 the CBSA was not able to utilize resources to their full extent (for example, procurement delays).

11. Special Enforcement Program of Canada Revenue Agency
The funding was received by the CRA in November 2007. It was not fully utilized because there was only five months to expend it and the majority of the funds are being spent on personnel costs.

13. Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
The funding was not fully utilized as it was received by the FINTRAC only in March of 2008.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): n/a:
20. Contact Information

Catherine Latimer 
General Counsel and Director General
Youth Justice, and Strategic Initiatives & Law Reform
(613) 957-9623

clatimer@justice.gc.ca


[1] It includes funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences, which is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

[2] Original allocation as per RMAF is $15.7M. Variance due to reallocation of $1.79M in contribution dollars to 2008/09, the $1billion reduction exercise conducted in 2005/06 and lapsed funds.

[3] The original allocation of $3.2M for 2007/08 was re-profiled to future program years.

[4] This figure does not include accommodation, EBP and Branch fees.

[5] Original allocation as per RMAF is $62.4M. Variance is a result of internal reallocation to support DAS activities (research, policy, regulatory development).
[6] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent.

[7] This figure does not include accommodation amounts that are transferred to PWGSC.

[8] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent. No funding was available for 2007/08.

[9] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent. No funding was available for 2007/08.

[10] No funding was allocated for fiscal year 2007/08.

[11] This funding to implement MMPs for serious drug offences is held in a frozen allotment, to be released subject to the proposed legislation receiving Royal Assent. No funding was available for 2007/08.

Top of Page

Environment Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Horizontal Initiative: Canadian Group on Earth Observations (CGEO)
Lead Department: Environment Canada
Lead Department Program Activity: Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions.
Start Date: July 2003 End Date: Ongoing
Total Funding Allocated: No new funds - annual multi-departmental contributions
Description: Interdepartmental secretariat established to coordinate Canada's participation in the international intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO) and advance coordinated, comprehensive and sustained Earth observations in Canada. Funded through annual interdepartmental transfers and in-kind contributions.
Shared Outcomes:
  • Enhancing access to global Earth observation data and science to meet Canadian environmental and socio-economic monitoring requirements
  • Maximizing the effectiveness of Canadian investments in Earth observation networks, both domestic and international
  • Improving evidence-based decision-making in operational and policy domains based on coordinated, comprehensive and sustainable Earth observations
Governance Structure :
  • Assistant Deputy Ministers' Steering Committee (Chair: Assistant Deputy Minister for the Meteorological Service of Canada)
  • Directors Generals' Interdepartmental Coordination Committee
  • Canadian Group on Earth Observations Secretariat


Federal Partners Involved in Each Program Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Programs of Federal
Partner
Total Approved Planned Spending for 2007-2008 Actual Spending for 2007-2008 Expected Results for 2007-2008 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Environment Canada Canadians are informed of, and respond appropriately to, current and predicted environmental conditions.

Canadian Group on Earth Observations established to: a) coordinate Canada's participation in the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO), b) advance coordinated, comprehensive and sustained Earth observations in Canada. Transfers and in-kind contributions: a small interdepartmental Secretariat is funded through annual inter-departmental transfers and in-kind contributions.

Weather and Environmental Monitoring Not available 220 salary

110 O&M

38 G&C

25 in-kind

228.2 salary

137.2 O&M

38 G&C

23.5 in-kind

The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) leverages interdepartmental and global partnerships and efforts in science, monitoring, prediction and service to improve access to Earth observations for better-informed decisions leading to societal benefits for all Canadians. - GEO Ministerial Summit Cape Town Accord approved by Minister of the Environment

- Canada provided international leadership in preparation of GEO Report on Progress to the Earth Observation Ministerial Summit

- active interdepartmental engagement in preparation for GEO Plenary and Ministerial Summit in Cape Town

- interdepartmental team engaged to initiate the development of the Federal Earth Observation Strategy

- progress made with CGEO working committees (Soil Moisture Way Forward proposal prepared, Communities of Practice active)

- CGEO actively engaged in GEOSS in the Americas

- bilateral activities with the United States

- active participation of Canadian experts in GEO tasks and activities, committees, working groups and task forces

Natural Resources Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Earth Sciences Sector Not available
20 direct

23.8 in-kind


as above
Canadian Group on Earth Observations Canadian Forest Service Not available


as above
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Science and Technology Not available
20
as above
Canadian Group on Earth Observations National Land and Water Information Service Not available
20
as above
Canadian Space Agency Canadian Group on Earth Observations Earth Observations Not available


as above
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Science and Technology Not available
15 in-kind
as above
Health Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Radiation Not available


as above
Statistics Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Agriculture Not available


as above
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada Canadian Group on Earth Observations Environment Not available
50 G&C
as above
TOTAL



575.7

Comments on variances:
Results to be achieved by non-federal partners: Not applicable
Contact information:

Kenneth Korporal, Coordinator, Canadian Group on Earth Observations Secretariat, 373 Sussex Dr. , Ottawa, ON K1A 0H3 613-995-2466




Horizontal Initiative: An Accelerated Action Plan for Federal Contaminated Sites - FCSAAP (Succeeded by the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), approved March 2005)
Lead Department: Environment Canada and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Lead Department Program Activity: Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced (EC); Management Policy Development and Oversight (TBS)
Start Date: April 1, 2003 (FCSAP in effect since April 2005) End Date: FCSAAP funding to March 31, 2008. Replaced by FCSAP in April 2005, which is expected to be 12 to 15 years. Currently, funding has been approved until March 31, 2010.
Total Funding Allocated (FCSAAP and FCSAP): $1,629.1 million
Description: The Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan (FCSAAP) and its successor program, the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), provide a long-term mechanism to address federal contaminated sites having the highest human health and ecological risks. At the end of March 2004, federal contaminated sites represented a financial liability of approximately $3.5 billion. Although responsibility for the actual management and remediation of federal contaminated sites rests with responsible custodial departments, the overall program is administered jointly by Environment Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.
Shared Outcomes: Reduce federal financial liability and risks to human health and the environment, including fish habitat. Increase public confidence in the overall management of federal real property through the effective risk management or remediation of individual federal contaminated sites.
Governance Structure for FCSAAP and its successor program, FCSAP: Federal Contaminated Sites Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering Committee is supported by the Contaminated Sites Management Working Group (CSMWG) and the FCSAP Secretariat (Environment Canada), which provides overall program coordination.



Federal Partners Involved in Each Program Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Programs of Federal Partner Total Approved (2003-2010) * Total Available Funding for 2007-2008**
Actual Spending for 2007-2008*** Expected Results for 2007-2008 Results Achieved in 2007-2008***
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Enterprise Activities Asset Management $3,446,249 $1,476,000 $1,128,400 Remediation and risk management for 1 project (1 site)

Assessment of approximately 37 sites

Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (1 site)

Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (13 sites)

Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (3 sites)

Partially Assessed (20 sites)

Canada Border Services Agency Corporate Management and Direction Infrastructure and Environment $1,363,040 $341,360 $327,098 Remediation and risk management for 2 projects (2 sites) Rem/RM completed (1 site)

Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (1 site)

Canadian Food Inspection Agency N/A N/A $183,783 $0 $0 Not applicable Not applicable
Correctional Service Canada Internal Services Facilities/Asset Management Services $2,165,850 $1,157,677 $70,070 Remediation and risk management for 2 projects (2 sites) Rem/RM Plans Completed and Awaiting Implementation (2 sites)
Environment Canada

(includes Projects, Expert Support, and FCSAP Secretariat)

Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are reduced Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are assessed

Risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by toxic and other harmful substances are managed

$83,133,187 $16,448,793 $7,614,818 Projects
Remediation and risk management for 8 projects (174 sites)
Assessment of approximately 216 sites

Expert Support
Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the ecological risk evaluation of federal contaminated sites
Provision of ecological risk assessment training and guidance

Secretariat
Supports the Assistant Deputy Ministers Steering committee and CSMWG, administers non-financial aspects of the program including management of project selection process, and development and maintenance of secure website and reporting
Projects
Rem/RM Completed (75 sites)
Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (279 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Completed and Awaiting Implementation (5 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Under Development (6 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (114 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (56 sites)
Partially Assessed (30 sites)

Expert Support
Continued development/revision of guidance materials prepared for the benefit of custodians, practitioners and other regulatory agencies.
Conducted site visits and peer reviews of remediation/risk management projects reports as requested by custodians and during the FCSAP project submission period.
Developed and delivered new training courses
Participated in technical review committees, workshops and symposia related to contaminated sites management within Canada.

Secretariat
Provided ongoing advice and guidance related to the FCSAP program to custodians as required.
Continued development of IDEA and associated training in support of the project submission process and annual program reporting. The infrastructure underlying this critical application was also significantly upgraded.
Coordinated and managed the annual FCSAP reporting exercise, and the 2008 project selection process
Finalized the 2007 FCSAP TB submission and developed the 2008 submission.
Planned and co-chaired six CSMWG meetings and also coordinated one ADM steering committee meeting.
Participated in the development, review, and approval processes related to the Federal Contaminated Sites web portal.
Revised existing program guidance materials and developed new ones, including the FCSAP Manual.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
(includes Projects and Expert Support)
Canadian Coast Guard Aids and Waterways Services

Marine Communications and Traffic Services

$61,633,865 $17,168,801 $11,007,766
Projects
Remediation and risk management for 91 projects (130 sites)
Assessment of approximately 335 sites

Expert Support
Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the risk management of federal contaminated sites
Participation in the project submission process including review of information provided by departments and provision of fish habitat portion of ecological risk evaluation score

Projects
Rem/RM Completed (45 sites)
Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (72 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Completed and Awaiting Implementation (22 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Under Development (90 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (178 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (140 sites)
Partially Assessed (298 sites)

Expert Support
Provided advice and support to custodians related to fish habitat at contaminated sites
Conducted site visits and peer reviews of remediation/risk management projects reports as requested by custodians and during the FCSAP project submission period.
Participation in technical review committees, workshops and symposia related to contaminated sites management within Canada.



Small Craft Harbours Maintenance
Program Enablers Corporate Services
Health Canada
(includes Projects and Expert Support)

First Nations and Inuit Health First Nations and Inuit Health Protection $44,539,133 $8,154,451 $7,342,885 Projects
Remediation and risk management for 10 projects (10 sites)
Assessment of 5 sites

Expert Support

Provision of scientific and technical advice to custodial departments with respect to the human health risk management of federal contaminated sites
Provision of human health risk assessment training and guidance
Participation in the project submission process including review of human health related information provided by departments and provision of human health risk score

Projects
Rem/RM Completed (1 site)
Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (5 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Completed and Awaiting Implementation (4 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (1 site)
Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (10 sites)

Expert Support
Continued development and update of guidance documents prepared for the benefit of custodians, practitioners and other regulatory agencies.
Funded and participated in workshops and symposia with the goal of advancing the science of risk assessment in Canada.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Responsible Federal Stewardship

Northern Land and Resources

Contaminated Sites Remediation

Contaminated Sites

$581,440,542 $117,487,455 $ 89,497,481 Northern Affairs
Remediation and risk management for 28 projects (28 sites)
Assessment of approximately 39 sites

Indian and Inuit Affairs
Remediation and risk management at 33 projects (47 sites)
Assessment of approximately 1,042 sites

Northern Affairs
Rem/RM Completed (3 sites)
Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (9 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Completed and Awaiting Implementation (5 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Under Development (17 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (4 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (2 sites)
Partially Assessed (116 sites)

Indian and Inuit Affairs
Rem/RM Completed (12 sites)
Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (28 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Completed and Awaiting Implementation (8 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Under Development (25 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (270 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (49 sites)
Partially Assessed (273 sites)

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated Management of federal bridge, highway and tunnel infrastructure, and properties in the Montreal area N/A $382,000 $92,000 $0 Remediation and risk management for 1 project (1 site) Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (1 site)
National Defence Contribute to Canada and the international community Contribute to the international community in accordance with Canadian Interests and Values $342,801,458 $57,514,473 $48,795,469 Remediation and risk management for 48 projects (66 sites)

Assessment of approximately 164 sites

Rem/RM Completed (6 site)

Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (44 sites)

Rem/RM Plans Completed and Awaiting Implementation (7 sites)

Rem/RM Plans Under Development (56 sites)

Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (36 sites)

Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (45 sites)

Partially Assessed (86 sites)

Natural Resources Canada Corporate Management The provision of relevant and timely policy analysis and advice for decision-making on government priorities and departmental responsibilities $1,257,000 $325,810 $35,428 Assessment of 6 sites Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (4 sites)

Partially Assessed (2 sites)

National Capital Commission Real Asset Management Land and real asset management $1,551,452 $801,670 $758,633 Remediation and risk management for 2 projects (2 sites)
Assessment of 69 sites
Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (2 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (5 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (2 sites)
Partially Assessed (60 sites)
Parks Canada Conserve Heritage Resources Active Management and Restoration $8,929,060 $3,937,491 $2,827,811 Remediation and risk management for 10 projects (12 sites)
Assessment of approximately 34 sites
Rem/RM Completed (6 sites)
Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (4 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Completed and Awaiting Implementation (1 site)
Rem/RM Plans Under Development (3 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (2 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (19 sites)
Partially Assessed (38 sites)
Public Works and Government Services Canada
(includes Projects and Expert Support)

Federal Accommodation & Holdings FCSAP (projects) or FCSAP (expert services) $19,002,194
$5,196,225 $3,951,461 Projects
Remediation and risk management at 16 projects (18 sites)
Assessment of approximately 23 sites

Expert Support
Development of project management tools, dissemination of information on innovative technologies and technologies used at individual projects

Projects
Rem/RM Completed (8 sites)
Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (13 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Under Development (1 site)
Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (2 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (16 sites)
Partially Assessed (9 sites)

Expert Support
Developed project management tools
Provided information on innovative technologies and technologies used at individual projects
Participated in contaminated sites workshops

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Corporate Infrastructure
$12,334,580 $5,429,100 $3,273,168 Remediation and risk management for 12 projects (13 sites)

Assessment of approximately 371 sites
Rem/RM Completed (2 sites)
Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (7 sites)
Rem/RM Plans Under Development (4 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (327 sites)
Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (3 sites)
Partially Assessed (67 sites)
Transport Canada Policies, Programs & Infrastructure in support of Sustainable Development Environmental Programs $69,023,004 $12,519,948 $9,306,411 Remediation and risk management for 15 projects (18 sites)
Assessment of 1 site
Rem/RM Completed (7 site)

Rem/RM Activities Underway/On-Going (9 sites)

Rem/RM Plans Completed and Awaiting Implementation (1 site)

Rem/RM Plans Under Development (2 sites)

Assessment Completed: Requires no further action (1 site)

Assessment Completed: Requires remediation/RM (4 sites)

Partially Assessed (1 site)

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Management Policy Development and Oversight Assets and Acquired Services $2,266,971 $481,363 $429,184 Ensures consistency with Treasury Board policies on management of federal contaminated sites, reviews financial aspects of proposals, administers fund and advises Environment Canada on monitoring of government-wide progress Provided advice on the management of federal contaminated sites to custodian departments and to the Environment Canada Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan Secretariat

Maintenance of the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory
Unallocated program management resources

$1,000,000 ($500,000 in 2008-2009 and 2009-2010) $0 $0 Not applicable
Accommodation charges

$7,117,071 $1,367,467 $1,367,467

TOTALS

$1,243,570,438 $249,900,084 $187,776,587

Comments on variances: $45.9 M will be brought forward into 2008-09 or 2009-10, $13.3 M was lapsed, and $3.0 M was reallocated internally
Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:

* TB approved as of June 13, 2007
** Includes TB approved funding for 2007-08, amounts brought forward from previous years, and interdepartmental reallocations
*** Based on preliminary analysis of 2007-08 FCSAP annual reporting data. Note that custodians have flexibility with respect to activities undertaken and often the number of sites actually worked on will vary from what was planned due to unforeseen delays (weather, difficult access to remote locations, etc.) or changes in custodian priorities.

 


Horizontal Initiative: Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative
Lead Department: Environment Canada
Lead Department Program Activity: COA Delivery
Start Date: April 1, 2005 (GLAPIV resources) End Date: March 31, 2010 (expiry of COA and GLAPIV resources)
Total Funding Allocated : $40 million over five years (GLAPIV resources), plus Departmental A-Base
Description:

The Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative is Environment Canada's mechanism for coordinating and delivering federal commitments to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem, as expressed in the Canada-United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Environment Canada uses the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem (COA) to engage other federal departments and Ontario in delivering Canada's Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments.

Environment Canada's Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative (GLBEI) reflects Budget 2005 investments targeted at continuing the work under the Great Lakes Action Plan to improve the ecological integrity of the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem. A total of $40 million over five years was allocated in GLAPIV to continue the environmental restoration of key aquatic Great Lakes areas of concern. Federal departments also use A-Base resources to support their efforts towards achieving COA results.

Shared Outcomes:

The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement establishes broad, long-term objectives for Canada and the Unites States in restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. The Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem (COA) provides a short-term plan for achieving Canada's Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement commitments. Through the COA, federal and provincial agencies are guided by a shared vision of a healthy, prosperous and sustainable Great Lakes Basin ecosystem for present and future generations. The COA also establishes a common purpose and shared goals, results and commitments in four priority areas: restoration of areas of concern; reduction of harmful pollutants; achievement of lake and basin sustainability; and coordination of monitoring, research and information.

Governance Structure :

Eight federal departments are engaged in delivering GLBEI results under the COA: Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Transport Canada, Infrastructure Canada and Health Canada.

The COA Management Committee is the senior federal-provincial management body responsible for priority setting, establishing strategies to ensure delivery of the COA, and developing common positions and joint action plans for representing Canadian interests and engaging in cooperative initiatives with the United States agencies and the International Joint Commission.

Planning, prioritization and allocation of GLAPIV monies is managed through the federal Great Lakes Executive Committee, which involves the eight federal signatories to COA. The role of the Great Lakes Executive Committee is to approve strategic directions and priorities for GLAPIV work activities, and to coordinate federal positions, strategies and initiatives in support of binational activities and discussions.



Federal Partners Involved in Each Program Federal Partner Program Activity

 

Name of Programs of Federal Partner Total Approved Planned Spending for 2007-2008 Actual Spending for 2007-2008

(see below for variance notes)

Expected Results for 2007-2008

(See Appendix at end of document for COA Results statements)

Environment Canada Sustainable use & management of natural capital and working landscapes COA $37.5 million GLAPIV plus Departmental A-Base. $7,216,000

(GLAPIV)

$4,210,000

(GLAPIV)

All COA results, except Ann. 2-3.2
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Healthy & Productive Aquatic Ecosystems COA $2.5 million GLAPIV, plus Departmental A-Base $608,000

(GLAPIV)

$571,500

(GLAPIV)

plus

$5,484,750

(A-Base)

Ann. 1-2.4; Ann. 1-2.6; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-3.1; Ann. 3-3.2; Ann. 3-4.1; Ann. 3-4.2; Ann. 3-5.1; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2.
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Health of the Environment COA Departmental A-Base Not Available Not Available Ann. 1-1.2; Ann.1-2.2; Ann. 2-2.3; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-2.2; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2
Natural Resources Canada Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources

Ecosystem risk management: Canada understands and mitigates risks to natural resource ecosystems and human health

COA Departmental A-Base; and

C-Base

$1,599,857

(A and C-Base)

 

 

$1,623,489

(A and C-Base)

 

Ann. 1-2.3; Ann. 2-3.1; Ann. 3-1.4; Ann. 3-2.4; Ann. 3-5.1; Ann. 4-2.2
Parks Canada Conserve heritage resources COA Departmental A-Base Not Available

 

Not Available

 

Ann. 3-1.1; Ann. 3-1.2; Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-2.2; Ann. 3-3.2; Ann. 3-3.3; Ann. 4-1.1; Ann. 4-2.2.
Transport Canada Environmental Protection and Remediation; the Canadian Ballast Water Program COA Departmental A-Base $600,000

(A-Base)

$600,000

(A-Base)

Ann. 3-1.3; Ann. 3-2.1; Ann. 3-4.1; Ann. 3-4.2
Infrastructure Canada Infrastructure funding programs CSIF; MRIF; ICP and Building Canada Plan. Funds approved under Building Canada Plan Not Available

 

Not Available

 

Ann. 1-2.1; Ann. 3-6.1
Health Canada Healthy Environments & Consumer Safety COA Departmental A-Base Not Available

 

Not Available

 

Ann. 2-3.2
TOTAL

GLAPIV

 

(plus Departmental funding)




$7,824,000

(GLAPIV)

(plus Departmental funding)

$4,781,500

(GLAPIV)

(plus Departmental funding)


Results Achieved in 2007-2008:

In 2007-2008 progress toward a healthy and sustainable Great Lakes Basin ecosystem continued on many fronts

  • A new Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin was negotiated.
  • Progress was made in completing actions in areas of concern (AOCs). Two AOCs (Wheatley Harbour and Jackfish Bay) began finalizing the scientific evidence required for future announcements of completed actions.
  • The trend of reduction releases continued for many harmful pollutants such as mercury, dioxins and furans
  • The threat of introductions of potentially harmful invasive species was reduced through strict enforcement of the 2006 Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations.

Specific Results by Department :

Environment Canada

Work continued to achieve progress in restoration of Great Lakes areas of concern. Environment Canada contributed $3.44 million towards 34 projects and initiatives including

  • an environmental assessment for the Randle Reef sediment remediation project (Hamilton Harbour AOC);
  • biodiversity Conservation Strategy Implementation (Detroit River AOC); and
  • combined sewer overflow reduction - Home Inspection Program (Niagara River AOC).

Work continued to achieve a better understanding of the state and trends in the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem. Environment Canada worked with universities and other government agencies on many water and wildlife research projects, including:

  • fish health effects in areas of concern;
  • wildlife populations monitoring in Great Lakes areas of concern; and
  • watershed modelling for assessing nutrient loading and water quality.
Work continued to reduce the release of harmful substances. Environment Canada worked with the Great Lakes community on projects, including
  • engaging PCB owners on destruction methods; and
  • updating toxic inventories reports.

Fisheries and Oceans

Work continued to conduct science, enhance fish habitats and control the negative impacts of established invasive species. Projects included

  • assessing the fish habitat availability in Detroit River and St. Clair River;
  • creating the Roger's Creek fish bypass channel (Credit River flowing into Lake Ontario ); and
  • controlling invasive sea lamprey.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Work continued to improve beneficial agriculture management practices with involvement of the Great Lakes farming community in over 13 700 projects, including:

  • improving nutrient management practices;
  • improving water use efficiencies; and
  • improving management of riparian areas including planting of buffers, fencing and alternate watering systems.

Natural Resources Canada

Work continued towards the achievement of sustainable development of Canada's energy, forestry and mineral metals resources within the Great Lakes Basin. Projects included

  • enhancing policies and practices to mitigate forestry impacts on creeks and rivers;
  • confirmation that geotube dewatering is the technology of choice for dewatering Port Hope Harbour sediments so that they can be placed in a long-term waste management facility. Geotube dewatering will reduce the amount of time and effort required to remediate the harbour; and
  • completing, installing and maintaining the prototype Stewardship Tracking System (STS) on-line website, database and mapping tool. This enabled conservation organizations in southern Ontario to enter the location and other information about their stewardship and restoration projects; track and report the success of specific projects; and learn from others about the factors that contribute to successful projects.

Parks Canada

Work continued to manage parks in the Great Lakes Basin and towards the achievement of a viable protected areas network. Projects included

  • the Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area Agreement, establishing the world's largest protected freshwater marine area.
  • educating the public on the importance of our natural heritage through the education and outreach programs for all national parks, national historic sites, national marine conservation areas and the Canada Discovery Centre; and
  • advancing the implementation of the Parks ecological integrity monitoring program for all national parks in the Great Lakes Basin.

 

Transport Canada

Work continued to ensure compliance with the Canada Shipping Act regulations related to the ecosystem health of the Great Lakes. Transport Canada undertook a wide variety of inspection, monitoring and training programs, including such projects as

  • boarding vessels to ensure compliance with ballast water regulations;
  • assessing the role of the domestic fleet in moving aquatic invasive species; and
  • supporting Canadian firms in development of ballast water technology.

Infrastructure Canada

Work continued towards providing funding to infrastructure projects in support of a cleaner environment by improved wastewater treatment for communities located along the Great Lakes. In 2007-2008, in addition to providing funding to already approved wastewater projects, federal funding was also announced for the following wastewater treatment projects in communities situated along the Great Lakes:

  • $17.4 million for the City of Sarnia on July 5, 2007 from the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF), as well as an additional investment of $921,155 on April 23, 2008 from the Gas Tax Fund;
  • $23 million for the City of Brockville on July 5, 2007 from the CSIF; and
  • $650,000 for the City of Orillia on March 26, 2008 from the Gas Tax Fund.

In November 2007, the $33 billion Building Canada infrastructure plan was announced. This funding will be provided over six years until 2014. Wastewater and water projects are key national priority categories of the $8.8-billion Building Canada Fund.

Between February and June of 2008 the Government of Canada announced wastewater projects in the following communities along the Great Lakes as priorities for consideration of federal infrastructure funding under the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF): Parry Sound, Bluewater, Port Rowan and Brockville.

 

Health Canada

Work continued to facilitate research and the exchange of information within the Great Lakes Basin that can be integrated into health policy by all levels of government. Projects included:

  • continued sharing of information with public health units on environmental impacts to human health through the Great Lakes Public Health Network; and
  • advancing the development of a health science framework to guide the work of health scientists.
Comments on Variances :

Dedicated Great Lakes funding (GLAPIV) is received only by Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, each also contributes Departmental A-Base toward achieving results under COA. All other partners to COA (federal and provincial) achieve COA results via departmental funding.

Actual spending by Environment Canada of GLAPIV resources was less than expected in 2007-2008 due to changes in departmental resource allocations following a departmental restructuring exercise. As mentioned above, Environment Canada also spends A-Base funding to achieve COA results; however, exact figures are not available.

For Natural Resources Canada actual spending exceeded planned spending by $23,632 because an additional $30,000 was spent by the CFS Forest Harvesting in Riparian Zones program to repair roads due to flood damage; while the O& M budget for ESS Enhancing Resilience to Climate Change Program was cut by $6,368.

For Parks Canada, exact figures are not available for Total Funding Approved and Planned and Actual Spending for 2007-2008. Parks Canada contributions towards COA objectives are complementary to the Agency's mandated programs and activities and reported via annual Parks Canada Agency departmental performance reports.

For Infrastructure Canada, exact figures are not available for Total Funding Approved, and Planned and Actual Spending for 2007-2008, although under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF), over $100 million has been provided to upgrade wastewater treatment in Sarnia, Brockville, Thunder Bay and Hamilton. Through the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) and the Infrastructure Canada Program (ICP), funding has also been provided in support of many water and wastewater projects in smaller communities along the shores of the Great Lakes.

For Health Canada, exact figures are not available for Total Funding Approved and Planned and Actual Spending for 2007-2008. The projects shown to support work under the 2007-2010 COA are delivered through integrated work with other Health & Environment initiatives within the Department.


Appendix - COA Results Statements

ANNEX 1 - AREAS OF CONCERN

Result 1.1 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial or municipal wastewater to achieve delisting targets in Nipigon Bay and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.2 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources to meet delisting criteria in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC.

Result 1.3 - Contaminated sediment management strategies developed for the Wheatley Harbour AOC and implemented in the St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOC.

Result 1.4 - Plans in place and being implemented to rehabilitate fish and wildlife habitats and populations to meet delisting targets in the Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.5 - Informed, effective collaboration amongst government, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in Nipigon Bay, Jackfish Bay, Wheatley Harbour and St. Lawrence River (Cornwall) AOCs.

Result 1.6 - Environmental monitoring and reporting to document improvements and track environmental recovery.

Result 2.1 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from municipal sewage treatment plants, combined sewer overflows, urban stormwater and industrial wastewater towards delisting targets in St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.2 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural non-point sources towards achieving a remedial action plan (RAP) delisting criteria in St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, and Toronto and Region AOCs.

Result 2.3 - Progress made in developing sediment management strategies to reduce ecological and human health risk from contaminated sediments in Thunder Bay, Peninsula Harbour, St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Port Hope and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.4 - Long-term management plans being developed and priority actions for delisting being implemented for rehabilitation and protection of fish and wildlife habitats and populations in St. Marys River, St. Clair River, Detroit River, Niagara River, Hamilton Harbour, Toronto and Region and Bay of Quinte AOCs.

Result 2.5 - Informed, effective collaboration amongst government, communities and individuals to prioritize and complete actions required for delisting and confirming environmental recovery in AOCs.

Result 2.6 - Identify monitoring needs, undertake required studies and evaluate results to assess environmental recovery and support remediation strategies in AOCs.

ANNEX 2 - HARMFUL POLLUTANTS

Result 1.1 - Reduction n releases of Tier 1 substances beyond the 2005 achievements towards the goal of virtual elimination.

Result 2.1 - Reduction in releases of criteria air pollutants.

Result 2.2 - Coordinated activities to reduce releases from municipal wastewater.

Result 2.3 - Develop and initiate a program for the sound management of chemical substances in the Great Lakes Basin.

Result 3.1 - Improved understanding of the sources, fate and impacts of harmful pollutants in the Great Lakes Basin.

Result 3.2 - Human health risks from harmful pollutants are understood and addressed in the Great Lakes Basin

ANNEX 3 - LAKE AND BASIN SUSTAINABILITY

Result 1.1 - Increased awareness and appreciation of the Great Lakes and their contributions to social, economic and environmental well-being.

Result 1.2 - Increased stewardship actions that work towards a balance between human well-being and prosperity, and healthy aquatic ecosystems.

Result 1.3 - Sustainable use of land, water and other natural resources to provide benefits from the Great Lakes now and in the future.

Result 1.4 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and resources

Result 2.1 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from industrial and municipal wastewater, combined sewer overflows and urban stormwater sources consistent with actions specified in binational Lakewide Management Plans (LaMPs) and binational lake action plans.

Result 2.2 - Reduce microbial and other contaminants and excessive nutrients from rural sources by undertaking actions specified in the binational Lakewide Management Plans and binational lake action plans.

Result 2.3 - Identification of contaminated sediment and development of sediment management plans to reduce the release and impact of sediment-bound contaminants on the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem.

Result 2.4 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes water quality.

Result 3.1 - Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems and habitats are protected, restored and sustained consistent with binational Great Lakes planning.

Result 3.2 - Progress on rehabilitation of Great Lakes native species to restore the health of aquatic ecosystems, consistent with binational Great Lakes planning.

Result 3.3 - Enhanced knowledge about beneficial and harmful impacts of human activities on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, habitats and species.

Result 4.1 - Implementation in the Great Lakes of the National Action Plan to Address the Threat of Aquatic Invasive Species.

Result 4.2: Enhanced knowledge about the harmful impacts of aquatic invasive species on Great Lakes aquatic ecosystems, food webs and species.

Result 5.1 - The impacts of climate change on the Great Lakes ecosystem composition, structure, and function, including biodiversity (organisms and their habitat), water quality and quantity, human health and safety (including access to clean drinking water), social well-being and economic prosperity are understood by governments and the Great Lakes community.

Result 6.1 - The potential risks to Great Lakes drinking water intakes are identified and assessed, and early action to address risks is undertaken.

Result 6.2 - Develop knowledge and understanding of water quality and quantity issues of concern to the Great Lakes as drinking water sources.

ANNEX 4 - COORDINATION OF MONITORING, RESEARCH AND INFORMATION

Result 1.1 - Responsive and comprehensive monitoring and research programs.

Result 2.1 - Improved reporting on environmental conditions, changes and progress.

Result 2.2 - Increased sharing of data and information among governments, organizations and Basin residents.


Horizontal Initiative: Implementation of the Species at Risk Act
Lead Department: Environment Canada
Lead Department Program Activity: Biodiversity and Wildlife Programs
Start Date: 2000 End Date: Ongoing (Current approval of sun-setting resources portion ends in 2011-2012)
Total Funding Allocated : (from 2000-2001 to 2011-2012) $863 million
Description: This horizontal initiative supports the development and implementation of the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk and the Species at Risk Act (SARA) that came fully into force in June 2004. Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada are the departments and agency responsible for the protection of species at risk under federal jurisdiction. The three departments received funds from Treasury Board in 2000 for the "Implementation of the National Strategy for the Protection of Species at Risk and their Critical Habitat", in 2003 for the "Implementation of the Act respecting the protection of wildlife species at risk in Canada" and in 2007 for "Delivering results under the Species at Risk Act ".
Shared Outcomes:
  • Implementation of SARA
  • Protection of species at risk
  • Protection of biodiversity
Governance Structure :

Formal governance structure

  • Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council (CESCC) - federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for wildlife
  • Canadian Council of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers - federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for fisheries and aquaculture
  • Associate Deputy Ministers Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada)
  • Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada)
  • Director General Operations Committee (Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada and others)

Supporting and Advisory Structures

  • Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) - wildlife conservation experts from federal, provincial and territorial governments, wildlife management boards, Aboriginal groups, universities, museums and national non-governmental organizations
  • National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk (NACOSAR)- six representatives of the Aboriginal people of Canada
  • Species at Risk Coordinating Committees (SARCC) (specific to each province/territory that has a committee) - federal, provincial/territory
  • Canadian Wildlife Directors Committee (CWDC) - federal, provincial and territorial directors responsible for wildlife
  • Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC) - various stakeholders groups including industry, agriculture, environmental non-governmental organizations and other members with particular expertise concerned with implementation of the Act.
  • Recovery of Nationally Endangered Wildlife (RENEW) Working Group - federal, provincial and territorial representatives responsible for wildlife
  • National General Status Working Group - federal, provincial and territorial representatives
  • Task Group on Aquatic Species at Risk - federal, provincial and territorial representatives


Federal Partners Involved in Each Program Federal Partner Program Activity Name of Programs of Federal Partner Total Approved Planned Spending for 2007-2008 Actual Spending for 2007-2008 Expected Results for 2007-2008 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Environment Canada Biodiversity and Wildlife Programs Environment Canada Species at Risk Program $535.8 million $59.9 million
$ 47.8 million
  • General administration of SARA
  • Annual Report to Parliament
  • Minister's Roundtable
  • Finalization of supporting policies under the National Framework for Species at Risk
  • Management of listing process
  • Continued implementation of the SARA evaluation action plan
  • Preparation of ministerial response statements
  • Finalization of bilateral agreements with provinces and territories
  • Consultations on listing and recovery strategies
  • Work with COSEWIC to adopt an ecosystem approach to the assessment of species at risk
  • Regulatory amendments
  • Preparation of recovery strategies
  • Development of risk management framework to provide guidance to priority recovery strategies
  • Development of outreach material
  • SARA enforcement and compliance promotion
  • General administration of SARA
  • Annual Report to Parliament is currently being developed (see comments on variance)
  • 2006 Minister's Roundtable report and summary of proceedings were posted in July 2007 and the Minister's response was posted in April 2008 on the SARA Registry
  • 2008 Minister's Roundtable - preparations are underway
  • Supporting policies under the National Framework for Species at Risk currently in development (see comments on variance)
  • Management of listing process
  • Continued implementation of the SARA evaluation action plan
  • Preparation of 53 ministerial response statements
  • Bilateral agreements with British Columbia, Quebec and Saskatchewan have been finalized. Other bilateral agreements are currently in development (see comments on variance)
  • Consultations on listing and recovery strategies
  • Work with COSEWIC to adopt an ecosystem approach to the assessment of species at risk
  • Regulatory amendments - 36 species were added to schedule 1 of the Act and 1 species was reclassified
  • EC, DFO and PCA prepared a total of 6 proposed recovery strategies for 6 species, 67 final recovery strategies for 100 species and 2 final management plans for 2 species, which were posted on the SARA Public Registry
  • Development of risk management framework to provide guidance to priority recovery strategies
  • Development of outreach material
  • SARA enforcement and compliance promotion
Fisheries and Oceans Canada Species at Risk Management Fisheries and Oceans Canada Species at Risk Program $216.2 million $26 million 17.6 million
Parks Canada Heritage Resources Conservation Parks Canada Species at Risk Program $111 million $14.1 million $11.6 million
TOTAL     $863 million $100 million $77 million
   
Comments on Variances:

Environment Canada

  • Actual Spending for 2007-2008
    • The lapsing amount is due to several factors notably: receipt of the incremental funds late in the fiscal year, staff vacancies and lag time in staffing new positions, shift of A-base SARA funds to support complementary activities in other wildlife programs (including protected areas, migratory bird program, ).
  • Results Achieved in 2007-2008
    • A joint 2006 and 2007 annual report to Parliament will be tabled in the summer of 2008
    • Final drafts of supporting policies under the National Framework for Species at Risk have been developed and are in consultation. Finalization of these policies is scheduled for the fall 2008.
    • Bilateral agreements regarding the conservation and protection of species at risk with British Columbia, Quebec and Saskatchewan have now been signed. Negotiations are in their final stages in Alberta and Yukon while negotiations have been completed in Ontario. Five more are in active negotiation (Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Nunavut, Ontario and Prince Edward Island).

Parks Canada

  • Actual Spending for 2007-2008
    • The carrying forward of funds was due to the ramping up of new program planning (including the time lag in staffing new positions).

 

Results to be achieved by non-federal partners:
  • Assessment and reassessment of 62 species, subspecies and populations by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC)
  • The provinces and territories are leading or co-leading development of recovery strategies or management plans for 227 species and have led or co-led development of recovery strategies for 51 species that have now been posted as proposed or final.
  • The Habitat Stewardship Program provided $9,815,536 to194 projects aiming at securing and protecting habitat to protect species at risk and support their recovery, mitigating threats to species at risk caused by human activity, and supporting activities identified in recovery strategies.
  • A total of $500,000 from Environment Canada was awarded to 41 projects through the Endangered Species Recovery Fund in 2007-2008. These funds supported research and education efforts by scientists and conservation advocates working to recovery Canadian species at risk.
  • The Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk (Aboriginal Capacity Building Fund and Aboriginal Critical Habitat Protection Fund) supported 92 projects ($3 million) in 2007-2008 aiming at building Aboriginal capacity for the protection and recovery of species at risk and at the protection of important/critical habitat on Aboriginal lands.
Contact information:

Virginia Poter
Director General
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
(819) 994-1360
Virginia.Poter@ec.gc.ca

For further information: http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca/default_e.cfm

Clean Air Agenda



Agenda-Level Reporting

Theme-Level Reporting:



CARA



Clean Energy



Clean Transportation



Indoor Air Quality



Adaptation



International Actions



Partnerships



Management and Accountability

Program Information by Theme


CARA


Clean Energy


Clean Transportation


Indoor Air Quality


Adaptation


International Actions


Partnerships


Management and Accountability

 


Horizontal Initiative:The Clean Air Agenda Lead Department: Environment Canada
Lead Department Program Activity: 3.3 - Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced Total Funding Allocated: $1.9 billion
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Description
The Government of Canada's Clean Air Agenda (CAA) represents a part of the Government's broader efforts to address the challenges of climate change and air pollution, with a view to building a clean and healthy environment for all Canadians.
In April 2007, the Government announced the details of the regulatory component of the Clean Air Agenda in " Turning the Corner: An Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution." This plan set out the approach for reducing greenhouse gas and air pollution emissions from industry. It also described planned regulatory measures to reduce emissions from the transportation sector, actions on consumer and commercial products and actions to improve indoor air quality.
Budgets 2006 and 2007 provided $1.9 billion 1 in funding over four years (2007/08 to 2010/11) for the Clean Air Agenda, which incorporates the development of both regulations and programming to achieve measurable reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. The Clean Air Agenda represents only a portion of the overall environment strategy of the government.
The Government recognizes the need for a holistic approach to delivering measurable results for the benefit of all Canadians; therefore, to measure investments against results, a horizontal framework known as the Clean Air Agenda Horizontal Management, Accountability and Reporting Framework (CAA HMARF) was developed. The CAA HMARF consolidates forty-four (44) programs that span nine (9) participating departments and agencies into eight (8) themes, each of which is championed by a lead department.
The eight (8) CAA HMARF themes and departmental leads are:
Clean Air Regulations - Environment Canada; Clean Transportation - Transport Canada; Clean Energy - Natural Resources Canada; Adaptation - Environment Canada; Partnerships - Environment Canada; International Actions - Environment Canada; Management and Accountability - Environment Canada; and, Indoor Air Quality - Health Canada.
Through the CAA HMARF governance structure, participating departments are jointly responsible for the management of the Clean Air Agenda. The governance structure encourages coordination, joint management and clear accountabilities. There are three distinct levels within the CAA HMARF governance structure:
  • Deputy Ministers' Committee
  • Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee
  • Director General Theme Lead Coordinating Committee
Environment Canada is designated the lead department for developing and implementing the CAA HMARF, including the responsibility to collectively report to Canadians on the framework.
---
1 Funding increased from $1.7 B to $1.9 B due to inclusion of $200 M in additional funding for clean transportation initiatives
SHARED OUTCOMES
The Government of Canada has committed to tangible improvements in Canada's environment and the health of Canadians by:
  • Reducing emissions of GHG & air pollutants.
  • Reducing health risks due to air pollution.
  • Reducing vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and to the health & safety of Canadians resulting from climate change.
With a focus on regulatory activities and program measures, the Clean Air Agenda will help to fulfill this commitment as part of a broader environmental agenda.

Agenda-Level Reporting

 


Clean Air Agenda
Total Approved $1,891,956,953
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $294,388,611
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $236,675,588
Percent of 2007-2008 funds spent: 80.40%
Preliminary Expected GHG Reductions 2010-2011
The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The preliminary expected GHG reductions for the 2010/11 fiscal year for the Clean Air Agenda include 56.5Mt contributed by Clean Air Regulations, 11.0Mt contributed by Clean Energy, 9.6Mt contributed by Clean Transportation, and less than 1Mt contributed by enabling themes: Indoor Air Quality, Adaptation, Partnerships, International Actions, and Management and Accountability.

The estimated emissions reductions are based on estimates for the individual program measures. Given that the industrial regulations are a large portion of the overall estimated reductions, actual emission levels will depend on compliance options chosen by regulated firms. Reduction estimates from individual program measures have been taken on a case-by-case basis and summed up by theme. Due to interactions and synergies within and between programs and regulations the total emissions impact for a given theme may be less than the sum of the individual program measures.
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
OUTCOMES
This initial year of the Clean Air Agenda saw results attributed towards immediate and intermediate outcomes while developing the foundations towards future results.
Central to the Clean Air Agenda is the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions through the development of clean technologies, the use of clean and renewable energy sources and clean transportation, improved energy efficiency within the industrial sector, and improved use of efficient and environmentally safe practices and products.

A suite of initiatives has been designed to complement the regulatory aspects of the Clean Air Agenda that are under development.
  • Canadians take actions in response to forecasted levels of air quality.
  • International Air Quality agreements are consistent with Canada's interests.
  • Reduction measures for indoor air pollutants and radon exposure have been implemented.
In 2007-08 a new laboratory was constructed to support research and development to improve indoor air quality, in addition to initial stakeholder consultations held on indoor air issues. The completion of a new laboratory is an integral element of reducing indoor air pollutants and radon exposure. Through increasing dissemination of information regarding indoor air quality along with a national radon strategy, Canadians will be in a better position to manage and mitigate indoor air quality risks.

Gains were also made relating to the national radon management strategy including the adoption of new Canadian Radon Guidelines with a reduced action level of 200 Bq/m 3 over the previous value of 800 Bq/m 3 ; a radon public education and awareness strategy was developed and a public fact sheet was produced and distributed; a standard procedure was developed for radon testing; 1000 federal buildings were tested; and, measurements of radon in soil were made at 262 sites across Canada to assess areas with high levels. A national radon laboratory was established at the Radiation Protection Bureau in Ottawa. The Laboratory completed the development of two standard radon measurement procedures for residential homes and large buildings (including schools and hospitals).

Consultations were conducted with stakeholders and industry on the draft list of substances that established a priority list of indoor air contaminants that will serve as the basis for the development of guidelines/regulations. Risk assessments and indoor air quality guidelines were developed for ozone and carbon monoxide.
  • Targeted industrial sectors have reduced emissions of GHGs and air pollutants and improved energy efficiency.
Increased participation of industrial stakeholders regarding the implementation of energy efficiency measures and practices. For example, 156 new Canadian companies have registered their corporate commitment to improve energy efficiency and have become leaders in the Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation. In-depth consultations were held with respect to energy labelling for buildings leading to the development of a new pilot labelling system for buildings.

More than 110 solar thermal systems were installed in Canada's industrial-commercial-institutional sectors. In addition, 13 residential pilot projects were selected which are expected to result in the installation of 8,000 solar domestic water heaters by 2010. Once these solar water heaters are installed, it is estimated that annually through this use of clean energy technology over 8 kilotonnes of greenhouse gas emissions will be reduced.

An amendment known as "amendment 10" (the Energy Efficiency Regulations) is under development which will account for approximately one-third of the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda's Energy Efficiency Regulations' contribution(- 7.29 petajoules and 0.5 megatonne greenhouse gas reduction from business in 2010, rising to 9.7 megatonnes in 2020).
  • Emissions of GHGs and air pollutants have been reduced, and energy efficiency has improved in Canadian homes and buildings.
In terms of pre-retrofit evaluations more than 102,000 Canadian homes were assessed with 12,000 grants being paid to offset the cost of making energy efficiency improvements. Further, 10% of grant recipients included the use of renewable technologies and products in their renovations projects and an additional 96 retrofit projects were funded in small and medium organizations.

Regulations are also under development to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from industrial sources.
  • Emissions of GHG, air pollutants and energy consumption have been reduced from modes of transportation.
Under the EcoAuto Rebate Program, over $71 million was distributed to purchasers of high efficiency and alternate fuel vehicles and a contribution agreement was signed with the Clean Air Foundation to deliver the Vehicle Scrappage Program.

The EcoEnergy for Fleets program funded 6 projects aimed at installing best practices amongst fleet managers and drivers. Under the ecoFREIGHT program over $6 million was allocated to twenty-three freight technology projects.

In 2007-2008, there were over 39 million instances of knowledge transfer to Canadians raising the awareness of how to augment energy efficiency for personal vehicle use. The knowledge transfer occurred through events such as driver training and receipt of information on best practices for drivers as a result of the EcoEnergy for Personal Vehicles Program. In addition, there were 39,000 Canadian transportation professionals informed or trained under the EcoEnergy Fleets Program; 66,000 mail applications processed, 60,000 calls received and 414,000 visits to the web site made under the ecoAuto Rebate Program; and 23,000 people informed about advanced technology vehicles at 22 events under the ecoTechnology for Vehicles Program.

Regulations are also under development to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from motor vehicles.
  • Emissions of GHGs and air pollutants have been reduced and energy efficiency has improved from the use of efficient and environmentally safe practices and products.
Regulations have been developed to reduce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in consumer and commercial products such as paints, varnishes, adhesives and vehicle repair cleaners.
  • Emissions of GHG and air pollutants have been reduced due to the use of clean and renewable energy sources.
In 2007-08, more than 60 partnerships and collaborative agreements were established with multi-stakeholders to promote clean energy activities. For example, a federal-provincial-industrial collaborative agreement is in place on an engineering design project for a proposed clean coal gasification power plant. In addition, two projects have been initiated as part of federal-provincial collaboration on energy management standards and information systems.

The above introduction of new measures that immediately address sources of emissions and the development and deployment of clean energy technologies support the transition to major emissions reduction that will be required by regulation over the longer term.

There were also 10 projects established for 757 megawatts of new electricity capacity from renewable sources, producing 2.4 terawatt hours per year.
  • Canadian communities and user groups use tools and information to assess climate risks and plan adaptation strategies.
Tools and information were developed to help Canadians assess climate change risks and to take protective actions. For example, the Canada's Credit for Early Action Program and Canada's Offset System for Greenhouse Gases were published. The Air Quality Benefits Assessment Tool was further refined to estimate the human health benefits or impacts associated with changes in Canada's ambient air quality. The Health Canada Indoor Air Quality website was updated to reflect new information and continued to be an important vehicle for the dissemination of health advice to the public.

The design of the Clean Air Community Partnerships program was completed including the preparation of communications and program materials. A greenhouse gas calculator was created as an estimation tool that will assist those stakeholders and funding recipients within the Clean Air Community Partnerships program to calculate greenhouse gas reductions for individual Clean Air Community Partnerships program projects. These actions support opportunities to promote the Clean Air Agenda and its initiatives leading to more positive environmental actions.
  • International climate change agreements are consistent with Canada's interests.
Climate change is a global issue and Canada remains engaged within the international community. Canada made its assessed contributions, as well as voluntary contributions, to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Canada also participated in technology-related partnerships including the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership in order to promote and support the development and deployment of clean technologies. Canada obtained membership to the Asia-Pacific Partnership in October 2007. A governance structure to the APP has been operationalized. In this context, consultations were held with key domestic industrial sectors on the APP.

Canada provided support to non-United Nation agencies with the goal of enhancing understanding and assessing options for the development of a future climate change agreement, and worked domestically to develop policy options on a range of climate change issues.

Canada actively participated in the UN and non-UN negotiations and discussions concerning a post-2012 climate change agreement. We ensured that domestic interests and climate change policies were reflected during the formulation and presentation of Canadian negotiating positions. We also advocated our positions within multilateral processes such as the U.S.-led Major Economies Meeting process, the G8, and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation.

Canada participated in the Expert Group on Technology Transfer, established under the UNFCCC, to analyze and identify ways to facilitate and advance technology development and transfer activities.

Canada participated in the Least Developed Countries Expert Group (LEG), established under the UNFCCC to advise least developed countries on the preparation of national adaptation programs of action (NAPAs).
Long-Term Outcomes
  • Health, economic and environmental benefits for Canadians have been realized.
  • Risks to the health of Canadians and the environment resulting from exposure to air pollution have been reduced.
  • Risks to communities, infrastructure and to the health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change have been reduced.
  • Innovations related to reducing air pollution and addressing climate change have maintained Canadian competitiveness and provided economic benefits.
  • Trans-boundary movement of air pollutants has been reduced.
  • Indoor air quality has been improved.
  • Canada 's emission of air pollutants has been reduced.
  • Canada 's emission of GHGs has been reduced.
  • Canadians and communities have taken actions to reduce their vulnerabilities from and have adapted to predicted impacts of climate change.
  • International trends on climate change are consistent with Canada's interests.

Theme-Level Reporting


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda
Clean Energy
Clean Transportation
Indoor Air Quality
Adaptation
International Actions
Partnerships
Management and Accountability

 


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Lead Department: Environment Canada
Federal Partners: Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Health Canada
Total Approved $347,300,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $63,800,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $42,170,653
Percent of 2007-2008 funds spent: 66.1%
Preliminary Expected GHG Reductions 2010-2011 Approximately 55 MT*
*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The main achievement of the 2007-2011 period is the development and implementation of the various components that will drive these reductions. The reductions will progressively begin to be realized to ramp up towards 2020 and to meet the above target.

The preliminary estimate of expected GHG reductions from the Industrial Regulations is calculated from the projected levels (Business as usual) and is derived from lower emission-intensities for the 2010/11fiscal year . Actual emission levels will depend on compliance options chosen by regulated firms.
Description
CARA is an integrated, nationally consistent approach to reduce emissions of both air pollutants and greenhouse gases, intended to protect the health and environment of Canadians, and to avoid falling further behind our trading partners. The regulations and targets to be pursued under CARA are designed to:
a) substantially reduce air pollutant and GHG emissions (20% reduction from 2006 levels by 2020) and air pollutants (20 to 55% reduction from 2006 levels by as early as 2012 and no later than 2015) from major source sectors;
b) provide industry with the long-term certainty and level playing field needed to make significant, synergistic and cost-efficient investments to reduce emissions;
c) strengthen Canada ' s ability to engage effectively in international discussions, such as negotiating additional reductions in the transboundary flow of air pollutants from the US and influencing international GHG negotiations; and
d) control emissions from products that release indoor pollutants.
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Immediate Outcomes

Industrial sectors meet emission levels of air pollutants and GHGs to comply with new or amended regulations by required dates.

Canada's motor vehicles and engines fleet becomes increasingly more fuel efficient and cleaner as a result of new vehicle fuel consumption regulation and new emission control standards applied to regulated modes of transportation and engines used and sold in Canada.

Canadians have access to more environmentally safe and energy efficient products since products sold in Canada are designed and manufactured according to new energy efficiency and environmental regulations.

Improvement of indoor air quality as new federal guidelines for levels of contaminants in indoor air and a national radon risk management strategy are widely deployed and publicized.

Improved reporting for regulatees and compliance facilitated, as these processes are streamlined at the national level, with a single window reporting system and the establishment of flexible compliance mechanisms.
Environment Canada and its federal partners built the foundation of the regulatory and policy infrastructure to achieve CARA objectives.

Released Turning the Corner: An Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution and a Regulatory Framework for Air Emissions which establishes mandatory emission reduction targets for industrial and other emission and pollution sources.

The regulatory framework for industrial greenhouse gas emissions was approved and is being implemented.

Extensive consultations were conducted with industry, provinces, and key stakeholders to validate the air pollutant targets and improve the methodology for calculating the caps.

A Notice was published requiring industry to report their 2006 emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants and other data for the purposes of informing the development of the proposed regulation.

Using the existing transportation regulatory structure an MOU was negotiated and amendments to regulations and standards were drafted.

The Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act was proclaimed in November 2007. Subsequently, consultations on the development of fuel consumption regulations were conducted with stakeholders during the winter of 2008 (ending in March 2008).

An MOU to reduce air pollutants and GHG emissions from the rail sector was signed in April 2007. Subsequently, the first report on locomotive emissions monitoring was issued in December 2007.

In May 2007, regulations were made under the former Canada Shipping Act to incorporate provisions of the Annex IV Regulations for the Prevention of Air Pollution of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) International Convention for the prevention of air pollution from ships. Transport Canada also commenced redrafting the regulations to fit under the new Canada Shipping Act, 2001 , which came into force in July 2007. In addition, Transport Canada is participating at IMO regarding GHG emissions.

Canada actively supported the ongoing development of international standards and recommended practices with the Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) concerning GHG and air pollutant emissions from aviation sources. The government also engaged in ICAO's Group on International Aviation and Climate Change (GIACC) to recommend an aggressive program of action on international aviation and climate change by fall 2009.

Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) concentration limits for automotive refinishing products, architectural coating and certain products were developed and proposed; regulations will soon follow.

Amendment 10 to the Energy Efficiency Regulations was pre-published March 29, 2008. This proposed amendment will account for approximately one-third of the CARA Energy Efficiency Regulations' contribution -7.29 petajoules and 0.5 Mt GHG reduction from business as usual in 2010, rising to 9.7 Mt in 2020.

Following nomination of substances to a priority list of indoor air contaminants which will serve as a basis for guideline/regulation development, consultations were conducted with stakeholders and industry on the draft list.

Completion of risk assessments and indoor air quality guideline development for ozone and carbon monoxide.

A new Canadian Radon Guideline with a reduced action level of 200 Bq/m 3 over the previous value of 800 Bq/m 3 was adopted. Consultations on the need for a target of 100 Bq/m 3 for new home construction were also held with stakeholders and the public.

A National Radon Laboratory was established at the Radiation Protection Bureau in Ottawa. The Laboratory completed the development of two standard radon measurement procedures for residential homes and large buildings (including schools and hospitals).

Work to upgrade the One-Window to National Environmental Reporting System (OWNERS) to an improved platform has been initiated.

Preliminary design of the Domestic Credit Tracking System was proposed.

The Canada's Credit for Early Action Program and Canada's Offset System for Greenhouse Gases were published.
Intermediate Outcomes

Canada 's emissions have been reduced from 2006 levels while maintaining competitiveness of Canadian regulated sectors
  • For targeted air pollutants: mainly PM, NOx , SOx , VOCs and some specific such as NH3 , Hg, benzene, PAHs, fluorides
  • For greenhouse gases (as CO2 equivalent)
Final Outcome

Human health and environmental quality are improved
  • Due to reduced emissions of indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and greenhouse gases.


Clean Energy Lead Department: Natural Resources Canada
Federal Partners: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Total Approved $877,040,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $101,500,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $81,623,693
Percent of 2007-2008 funds spent: 80.42%
Preliminary Expected GHG Reductions 2010-2011 11.0 MT*
*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The above represents the preliminary expected GHG reductions for the Clean Energy theme.

Reduction estimates from individual program measures have been taken on a case-by-case basis and summed up by theme. Due to interactions and synergies within and between programs and regulations the total emissions impact for a given theme may be less than the sum of the individual program measures.
Description
Energy production and use is responsible for the majority of Canada's greenhouse gas and air pollution emissions. While mandatory national regulation is the centerpiece of the Government's Clean Air Agenda, there remains a need to address important energy-related sources of emissions and air pollutants that cannot be effectively addressed through regulation.

As part of the Clean Air Agenda, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) are delivering the ecoENERGY Initiatives - a set of measures to promote smarter energy use, increase clean energy supply, and support the development and deployment of clean energy technologies.

The suite of Clean Energy initiatives has been designed to complement the regulatory aspects of the Clean Air Agenda by highlighting existing government work and introducing new measures that immediately address important sources of emissions and that will facilitate the transition to major emissions reductions that will be required by regulation over the longer term.

As the lead department for the Clean Energy theme, NRCan is responsible for collecting, collating and reporting information on the progress of Clean Energy programming.
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Immediate Outcomes

Partnerships and collaborative agreements with stakeholders to promote clean energy activities that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs.
More than 60 partnerships and collaborative agreements have been established with a variety of stakeholders to promote clean energy activities. For instance, a federal-provincial-industrial collaborative agreement is in place on an engineering design project for a proposed clean coal gasification power plant. In addition, two projects have been initiated as part of a federal-provincial collaboration on energy management standards and information systems.
Involvement by industry in developing and using energy efficiency products, services, and processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs. In 2007/08, industrial stakeholders became increasingly involved in the implementation of energy efficiency measures and practices. In particular, 156 new Canadian companies have registered their corporate commitments to improve energy efficiency and have become leaders in the Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC). Further, in-depth industry consultations were also held in the development of a new pilot labelling system for buildings.
Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs and CACs. More than 110 solar thermal systems were installed in Canada's Industrial/Commercial/Institutional sectors and 13 residential pilot projects were selected which are expected to result in the installation of 8000 solar domestic water heaters by 2010. Once installed, over 8 kilotonnes of GHG emissions will be displaced annually. Also, in 2007/08, 10 projects were established for 757 MW of new electricity capacity, from renewable sources, producing 2.4 terawatt-hours per year. With regards to energy efficiency, more than 102,000 Canadian homes had pre-retrofit evaluations and 12,000 grants were paid to offset the cost of making energy efficiency improvements. Further, 10% of grant recipients included renewable technologies and products in their renovation. An additional 96 retrofit projects were funded in small and medium organizations.
Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs through energy production and use. The activities within the clean energy theme have raised awareness and understanding of clean energy programming through a number of measures targeted at Canadians, including the delivery of specific programming in Aboriginal and northern communities . An ecoENERGY website has been developed and maintained to provide program information and promotional materials/information products have also been produced. Several clean energy networks have been established to engage key stakeholders and to share information and best practices. Representatives from the clean energy theme have participated in a variety of conferences to raise awareness of energy efficiency, renewable energy and clean energy technologies. More than 225 workshops have been held across the country to provide training and information tools to industry and other target audiences. Further, a number of policy studies have been published and reported in peer-reviewed literature.
Policy and monitoring that supports GHG and CAC reductions. NRCan officials have provided policy documents and advice to the Minister of Natural Resources and other senior officials in support of policy development and decision making. Theme representatives worked closely with Environment Canada (the lead department) to finalize the Regulatory Framework for Industrial GHG Emissions and in the development/implementation of the Horizontal Management, Accountability and Reporting Framework for the Clean Air Agenda. In addition, science and policy experts participated in several national and international fora to discuss policy options for achieving Canada's medium and long-term climate change objectives.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Adoption of energy efficient products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Adoption of renewable energy products and services, and strengthened infrastructure, resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs.
  • Availability of innovative, market-ready energy processes, products and services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs.
Final Outcomes
  • Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean energy activities.


Clean Transportation Lead Department: Transport Canada
Federal Partners: Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada
Total Approved $461,716,953
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $98,799,611
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $92,606,718
Percent of 2007-2008 funds spent: 93.73%
Preliminary Expected GHG Reductions 2010-2011 9.6 MT*
*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The above represents the preliminary expected GHG reductions for the Clean Transportation theme.

The estimated emissions reductions are based on the targets outlined in the final Regulatory Framework as well as estimates for the individual program measures. Given that the industrial regulations are a large portion of the overall estimated reductions, actual emission levels will depend on compliance options chosen by regulated firms. Reduction estimates from individual program measures have been taken on a case-by-case basis and summed up by theme. Due to interactions and synergies within and between programs and regulations the total emissions impact for a given theme may be less than the sum of the individual program measures.
Description
The Clean Transportation Theme program measures will work towards: improved management of sustainable transportation infrastructure in communities; improved efficiency and reduced emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHG) from the movement of goods; and improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions from the personal vehicle fleet.
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Immediate Outcomes
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices;
  • Increased uptake of technologies that reduce energy consumption, GHG or CAC;
  • Increased participation by target audience in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities; and
  • Increased capacity by target audience to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC or release of toxic substances.
In 2007-2008, the 12 programs under the Clean Transportation Theme were in their first year of operation. Program managers sought, in the first instance, to complete the design and start-up of the programs, including consulting with stakeholders, preparing documentation and staffing. Consequently, performance under the theme can best be assessed in terms of immediate outputs, rather than outcomes. The main result areas were in terms of financial support, information and decision support, partnerships and networks and research studies.

Financial support in the form of incentives was provided to vehicle purchasers under the ecoAuto Rebate Program, and to commercial freight operators under the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund and the Freight Technology Incentive Program. In 2007-2008, over $71 million was distributed to purchasers of high efficiency and alternate fuel vehicles under the ecoAuto Rebate Program. The first rounds of project selection were completed under the freight programs. A contribution agreement was completed with the Clean Air Foundation to deliver incentives to owners of old vehicles for the Vehicle Scrappage Program. The ecoEnergy for Personal Vehicles program and the ecoEnergy for Fleets program provide financial support for projects geared towards reducing emissions. The ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles program funded five projects committed to promoting driving best practices through outreach. Similarly, the ecoEnergy for Fleets program funded 6 projects aimed at installing best practices amongst fleet managers and drivers.

Even during a period of high fuel prices, it is important that consumers and businesses have access to good information about fuel saving technologies and practices, and training in the use of these technologies and practices. In 2007-2008, there were over 39 million instances of knowledge transfer to Canadians raising the awareness of how to augment energy efficiency for personal vehicle use. The knowledge transfer occurred through events such as driver training and receipt of information on best practices for drivers as a result of the ecoEnergy for Personal Vehicles Program. In addition, there were 39,000 Canadian transportation professionals informed or trained under the EcoEnergy Fleets Program; 66,000 mail applications processed, 60,000 calls received and 414,000 visits to the web site made under the ecoAuto Rebate Program; and 23,000 people informed about advanced technology vehicles at 22 events under the ecoTechnology for Vehicles Program.

Through partnerships and networks, Clean Transportation Programs seek to leverage the federal government's resources and to build public support and impetus for existing programs.

Under the ecoMobility Program, which works primarily with municipal governments and transit authorities, an implementation plan was developed to support Transportation Demand Management (TDM) project implementation and a request for TDM proposals was launched. A national network of TDM practitioners is being developed.

The ecoTechnology for Vehicles Program involves close cooperation with the automotive industry to identify barriers to the introduction of low-emission vehicles.

Under the ecoFreight Partnerships Program, a rail industry conference was organized to inform participants of emission-reduction opportunities, and two conferences sponsored to increase awareness and promote best-in-class carriers and shippers.

Under the Marine Shore Power Program, the advice of the marine and port authorities was sought to design the first round of project selection, to be held in August, 2008.

The Analytical and Policy Support Program held two stakeholder workshops on active transportation.

Under the ecoEnergy for Personal Vehicles Program, five organizations have made formal commitments to engage in emission-reducing activities.

Under the ecoEnergy for Fleets Program, three partnerships were signed with municipalities. These programs are ensuring that Canadians are fully engaged in the task of reducing transportation emissions.

The completion of research studies is essential to inform government, industry and consumer choices on matters ranging from program design to the availability and cost-effectiveness of emission-reduction technologies.

In 2007-2008, the National Harmonization for Trucking Initiative completed six studies to review the implications of a national speed limiter mandate for heavy trucks.

The Analytical and Policy Support Program completed studies on the emission reduction potential and related costs of active transportation, shipping initiatives, transportation emissions trading, fuel efficiency technologies in the heavy-duty truck sector, transportation GHG emissions estimate by mode.

The ecoEnergy for Personal Vehicles Program completed research studies on driver awareness of fuel efficiency choices, EnerGuide label compliance and AutoSmart driver training. The ecoEnergy for Fleets Program completed four research papers on how to reduce emissions from class 8 (heavy duty) trucking.

The launching of these programs in 2007-2008 has laid the foundation for more tangible results, both in terms of outputs and outcomes, in 2008-2009.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Use of transportation technologies and alternative modes that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC; and
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or GHG or CAC.
Final Outcome
  • Reductions in energy consumption or GHG or CAC from transportation.


Indoor Air Quality Lead Department: Health Canada
Federal Partners: National Research Council of Canada
Total Approved $23,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $5,500,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $4,606,147
Percent of 2007-2008 funds spent: 83.75%
Preliminary Expected GHG Reductions 2010-2011 Less than 1Mt*
*The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The above represents the preliminary expected GHG reductions for the Indoor Air Quality theme.
The estimated emissions reductions are based on the targets outlined in the final Regulatory Framework as well as estimates for the individual program measures. Given that the industrial regulations are a large portion of the overall estimated reductions, actual emission levels will depend on compliance options chosen by regulated firms. Reduction estimates from individual program measures have been taken on a case-by-case basis and summed up by theme. Due to interactions and synergies within and between programs and regulations the total emissions impact for a given theme may be less than the sum of the individual program measures.
Description
Health Canada and National Research Council of Canada are responsible for implementation of the Indoor Air theme as an integral element of the government's broader Clean Air Agenda (CAA). This CAA theme consists of two elements; the Indoor Air R&D initiative (National Research Council Canada) and the Radon Program (Health Canada). Together these initiatives will contribute to theme results by supporting the research, development and dissemination of knowledge of indoor air quality risks and ways by which these risks can be managed. By generating and sharing knowledge about indoor air pollutants and how they can be managed, the Indoor Air theme elements will support informed decision-making by governments, industry and consumers on cost-effective means to reduce harmful exposures and, in so doing, reduce health risks. While the findings from these two research-based initiatives can provide useful input to potential regulatory initiatives under the Clean Air Agenda, their utility extends well beyond that, most notably by helping to identify and target non-regulatory measures that address indoor air concerns.
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Immediate Outcomes

Improved awareness by public, property managers, and governments of health risks and causes of reduced indoor air quality and strategies to improve it.
  • 20 % of Canadians are aware of specific technical solutions to improve air quality (2010/11).
Development and support of technological solutions for improved IAQ.
  • Technically sound infrastructure and knowledge in place to support and assess IAQ improvement technologies (2010/11).
Increased knowledge of health impacts and mitigation strategies related to indoor air pollution.
  • One research intervention field study on ventilation, air distribution and health conducted (2011).
National Research Council of Canada

Equipment purchased and commissioned for field work and assessment of selected IAQ solutions.

Shell and building services for new Indoor Air Research Laboratory completed.

Field protocols for the field study in Quebec City - in collaboration with INSPQuebec - completed and approved by ethics board and reviewers.

Three consultation meetings held with stakeholders towards the creation of the National Indoor Air Quality Committee.

Review of technological solutions for IAQ completed.

Communication strategy developed to form and engage advisory and technical committee for the development of improved IAQ solutions.

Health Canada

Completed ground-based analysis of soil gas radon concentrations at 262 sites (in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and southern Ontario). Locations around Sarnia in southern Ontario showed higher than average soil gas radon concentrations, suggesting they are potentially radon-rich.

Developed a fall/winter 2008 radon marketing/communications strategy focusing on homeowners, commercial building owners, the building industry and public health practitioners.

Fourteen radon stakeholder workshops held across Canada as part of strategy to encourage stakeholder involvement in radon testing and remediation.

Developed and distributed a radon fact sheet via stakeholders and industry partners.

Developed a standard procedure for radon testing in large buildings, starting with federal buildings.

Prepared information package on the objectives of the project, the process for testing, and the means by which data and results will be shared.

Tested about 1000 buildings across Canada in 2007/08, representing 5% of the stock estimated to be in high-risk areas.
Intermediate Outcomes

Reduced health risks from poor indoor air quality.

Development and effective application of regulations, guidelines and recommendations related to indoor air quality.
  • 20 % of Canadians consumers are using technologies which are positively assessed to improve IAQ by 2016.
Production and uptake of new products/techniques related to reducing health risks from poor indoor air quality
  • 25 % of Canadian Manufacturers of IAQ solutions offering positively rated IAQ technologies in their line of IAQ products by 2016.
Final Outcome

Adverse effects of poor indoor air on the health of Canadians are reduced.


Adaptation Lead Department: Environment Canada
Federal Partners: Health Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada
Total Approved $115,900,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $7,339,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $5,718,905
Percent of 2007-2008 funds spent: 77.93%
Preliminary Expected GHG Reductions 2010-2011
The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. While this Theme will not likely achieve direct emission reduction, it does play an important complementary role through helping Canadians adapt to the effects of climate change, building partnerships for program delivery or knowledge transfer and placing Canada within the important international environmental community.
Description
The six Adaptation programs will begin to help all Canadians build their capacity to adapt, by developing knowledge, information, tools and/or collaborative arrangements that they need to take action to successfully reduce their risks. These initiatives differ from many of the programs within the Clean Air Agenda as they do not contribute to reductions of greenhouse gases, but rather support the critical complementary activity of adaptation to climate change impacts.
About half of the total funding will build capacity to respond to diverse risks across the country and remain relevant to many economic sectors and regions. The other half will be targeted to address three urgent risks: (i) the North , where impacts of a changing climate are already very visible, vulnerability of communities and infrastructure is high, and the federal government has unique constitutional and land claims obligations toward Aboriginal people and northerners; (ii) human health , which faces particular risks through changing climate conditions and extremes, and the spread of infectious diseases; and (iii) infrastructure , in which governments and firms will invest hundreds of billions of dollars over the next decade, which must be designed to endure climate conditions that will differ from those of the past.
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecasting Program of the Adaptation theme received TB approval in 2007/08, while other programs were not approved until early April 2008 - some results were reported in 2007/08 (see below)

Immediate Outcome
  • Increased availability of adaptation and air quality information and products;
  • Increased awareness and understanding of the risks of climate change and of the impacts of air quality on health and of response strategies;
  • Greater collaboration in place to address adaptation planning and health impacts; and
  • Increased capacity to conduct and apply adaptation and air quality science
A number of Programs within the Theme, funded early in fiscal year 2008-2009, were not able to report on results. Some Departments, however, did undertake activities during this period, accounting for the level of spending reported:
  • Indian and Northern Affairs Canada - "Assist Northerners in assessing key vulnerabilities and opportunities"
  • Environment Canada - "National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program"
  • Health Canada - "National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program"
  • Public Health Agency of Canada - "Climate and infectious disease alert and response system to protect the health of Canadians"
The bulk of the expenditures in 2007 - 2008 were related the National Air Quality Health Index Program. The Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) provides a daily measure of air pollution health impacts and will provide the public with means to make informed decisions to reduce exposure to health risks posed by smog . The AQHI was launched in Toronto and 14 communities in British Columbia. Groundwork to ensure continued implementation in at least six additional communities for fiscal 2008-09 also took place.
Results to be achieved by non-federal partners :
For the PHAC element communities will identify infectious disease vulnerabilities and mitigation strategies that will provide models for replication for communities across the country. Involved universities will develop research and expertise on waterborne and vectorborne disease in relation to climate change effects.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Increased use of adaptation information and products;
  • Increased capacity of Canadians to adapt to climate change and a reduction in health risks related to air quality; and
  • Additional approaches to adapt to climate change are developed in targeted areas.
Final Outcomes
  • Reduced vulnerabilities and risks to communities, infrastructure and health and safety of Canadians resulting from climate change; and
  • Reduced exposure to health risks due to climate change related health risks.


International Actions Lead Department: Environment Canada
Federal Partners: Natural Resources Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Industry Canada
Total Approved $50,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $13,200,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $7,762,978
Percent of 2007-2008 funds spent: 58.81%
Preliminary Expected GHG Reductions 2010-2011
The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. While this Theme will not likely achieve direct emission reductions, it does act as an enabler for those themes which have committed to reduction targets.
Description
This theme aims to advance Canada's international action, improve Canadian air quality and reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Funding in the amount of $50M is required to implement the following:
  1. Engage in the development of a Particulate Matter (PM) Annex and lay the groundwork for a potential cross border emissions trading annex for air pollutants under the Canada-U.S. Air Quality Agreement;
  2. Continue to engage across a number of multilateral fora, on behalf of the Canadian Government, in strategic international climate change discussions and negotiations;
  3. Undertake actions related to compliance with existing treaty obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol, including: payment of assessed contributions, provision of discretionary administrative funding, development of a tradable unit tracking system; and also contribution to other international climate change initiatives.
  4. Seek membership in the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate.
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Immediate Outcomes

Canada satisfies its international treaty obligations related to the accounting of national greenhouse gas emissions and funding for multilateral bodies.

Canadian leaders and senior officials are well-prepared to advance Canada's strategic interests related to climate change and air pollution in multilateral and bilateral fora.

Canada 's domestic and international climate change and air pollution policies & negotiating positions are aligned and reflective of its national circumstances.

Canada 's profile as a provider of climate-friendly technologies is enhanced.
International financial and other obligations

Canada established its national registry.

Canada 's international funding obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) for 2007-2008 were met. Canada also made voluntary contributions to the UNFCCC.

Canada also provided support to non-UN agencies with the goal of enhancing understanding and assessing options for the development of a future climate change agreement.

Canada participated in technology-related partnerships outside of the UN, including the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership in order to promote and support the development of clean technologies needed to reduce GHG emissions and address climate change.

International Participation and Negotiations

All relevant departments worked closely to develop policy options and develop and present positions on a range of climate change issues.

Policy documents and advice to Ministers, Deputy Ministers and other senior officials in support of policy development and decision-making were provided by all relevant departments. In this context, relevancy of and consistency with domestic initiatives to address climate change (e.g., ecoENERGY, Turning the Corner) were referenced in briefing materials prepared for international climate change meetings.

Canada actively participated in the UN and non-UN negotiations and discussions leading to the establishment of a post-2012 climate change agreement. These discussions occurred at the G8, the Major Economies Meeting process, APEC, the Commonwealth, other UN events.

Canada 's network of Embassies and other Missions abroad was also used to advocate Canadian positions on climate change issues, and gather insight into positions of other Parties.

Canada also participated in the Expert Group on Technology Transfer, established under the UNFCCC to analyze and identify ways to facilitate and advance technology development and transfer activities.

Canada participated in the Least Developed Countries Expert Group (LEG), established under the UNFCCC to advise least developed countries on the preparation of national adaptation programs of action (NAPAs).

Canada 's international participation contributed to ensuring that the future agreement on climate change will be consistent with our domestic approach on climate change and will promote Canadian environmental and economic interests.

Asia-Pacific Partnership

Canada obtained membership to the Asia-Pacific Partnership in October 2007. A governance structure to operationalize Canada's participation in the APP has been operationalized.

Canada is participating in the work of all but one of the APP Task Forces, and is facilitating the involvement of the Canadian private sector in the work of the APP.

In this context, consultations with key domestic industrial sectors were held.

Relevant departments provided advice and input to the APP Secretariat and inter-departmental working group in developing Canada's governance structure and operational guidelines. Input and advice on potential project selection criteria were also provided.

Particulate Matter Annex

Negotiations of a PM Annex were launched and two inter-sessional working groups to prepare the second round of negotiations were established.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Canada 's interests and objectives related to climate change and air quality are successfully advanced.
  • Canadian private sector gains exposure to international markets and R&D opportunities that support the transfer and adoption of technologies and activities that address climate change and air pollution.
Final Outcome
  • International action on climate change and air pollution is consistent with Canada's interests and contributes to the global advancement of these issues.


Partnerships Lead Department: Environment Canada
Total Approved $12,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $3,000,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,000,600
Percent of 2007-2008 funds spent: 33.53%
Preliminary Expected GHG Reductions 2010-2011
The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. While this Theme will not likely achieve direct emission reductions, it does act as an enabler for those themes which have committed to reduction targets.
Description
This program was established by the federal government in support of Turning the Corner: A Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution . The main objective is to improve capacity of communities and individuals to take action on clear air and climate change by stimulate the trial of new actions and purchases, which may have lasting benefits and result in significant reductions over the longer-term, which will lead Canadians to take positive environmental actions at home, school and workplace.
Its goal is to ensure that all funded projects have measurable results and can be replicated by other groups or organizations. Projects funded through CACP are designed to engage Canadians to take positive environmental action in the following areas: Home and outdoor energy efficiency - Encourage energy and water efficiency, waste reduction and the replacement or purchase of more energy-efficient products or technologies, including energy-efficient home appliances, lighting, lawn mowers and the purchase of energy from renewable sources; School-based sustainability - Improve the energy efficiency of school operations and facility management by engaging custodians, principals, teachers, students and parents. The program includes an educational component to engage teachers and students in learning about energy efficiency, water efficiency and waste reduction; and Greening the workplace - Inspire employees to adopt environmentally friendly behaviours at work and to encourage business owners and managers to implement measures to reduce energy consumption and associated emissions in their daily operations.
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Immediate Outcomes
  • The Clean Air Community Partnerships Program is launched.
  • Promotional materials for the CACP program (including web site) are developed and distributed to appropriate stakeholders.
  • The Request for Proposals (for funding starting in FY 2008-09) is issued.
  • Contribution Agreements will be in place for Strategic Investments.
  • A contract with a GHG / CAC Valuation Expert is in place to provide results monitoring and measurement support to Strategic Investment projects.
  • Proposals for 2007-2008 Strategic Investment projects are approved and announced.
  • Program assistance to be provided by EcoAction Regional offices (including proposal review, management of contribution agreements and reporting requirements) is determined and communicated clearly with the regional offices.
  • An Inter-departmental Advisory Committee is established for the CACP program.
  • Proposal Review Committee is established and its members are effectively briefed on the program goals, requirements, and evaluation process/tools to be used in proposal assessment.
  • Program materials and tools, including application forms, proposal evaluation tools, project tracking database, and GHG/CAC valuation tools are developed.
  • An RMAF is developed for the CACP program, including the development of an evaluation plan, indicators, performance measures.
Completed the design and start-up of the Clean Air Community Partnerships program. Consulted with stakeholders, prepared documentation and staffing. The main result areas achieved were in terms of implementation:
  • A Program Manager was hired.
  • Communications and program materials were prepared.
  • Performance indicators developed.
  • GHG calculator created. The GHG calculator is an estimation tool that will assist both CACP staff and funding recipients to calculate GHG reductions for individual CACP projects.
  • Contribution to Clean Air HMARF was completed for the Partnerships Theme.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Community initiatives that provide incentives for Canadians to take action on Clean Air and Climate Change are funded.
  • Community initiatives that provide incentives for Canadians to take action on Clean Air and Climate Change are funded.
  • Program Governance Structure is designed and implemented.
  • Program Management Systems and Evaluation Tools and are developed.
Final Outcomes
  • A greater number of Canadians are engaged in protecting our environment, including our air, water, land, climate and nature.
  • Communities and individuals are better able to manage and take a lead on environmental issues.
  • Community Funding Programs are managed effectively to deliver on departmental priorities.


Management and Accountability Lead Department: Environment Canada
Total Approved $5,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $1,250,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,185,894
Percent of 2007-2008 funds spent: 94.87%
Preliminary Expected GHG Reductions 2010-2011
The Government of Canada has established a national target of an absolute 20% reduction in GHGs relative to 2006 levels by 2020. The Management and Accountability Theme coordinates and supports the implementation of the Clean Air Agenda Framework, acting as an enabler for those themes which have committed to reduction targets.
Description
The Management and Accountability Theme sets the path for the Clean Air Agenda, Horizontal Management, Accountability and Reporting Framework (CAA-HMARF) which facilitates management and reporting of financial and non-financial performance information at the program level within 8 themes on a consolidated basis (at the theme and agenda levels) across participating departments and agencies. This them ensures that ongoing monitoring and assessment of progress in achieving objectives and expected outcomes against finanical investments is made; and facilitates the setting of priorities and reallocating of resources, as appropriate ensuring engagement of the governance structure within the CAA-HMARF.
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Immediate Outcomes
  • Clear roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for implementing, managing and reporting on CAA activities
  • Appropriate balance of departmental and horizontal CAA accountabilities
  • Coherent CAA program architecture
  • Effective alignment of resources to CAA priorities
  • Effective and timely collection and reporting of performance information
Final CAA-Horizontal Management Accountability and Reporting Framework completed and submitted to Treasury Board for approval.

Key governance documents completed and approved:
  • Charter
  • Performance Indicators for each CAA-HMARF Theme together with logic model
  • Strategies i.e. risk, reporting, information management, financial management, evaluation
CAA Thematic Program Architecture developed and cross-walked to departmental PAA
  • Reporting structures developed and aligned to CAA PAA
Creation of Clean Air Agenda Results Management Secretariat within EC to facilitate collaboration and oversee implementation of the framework

Key management/reporting documents completed and approved:
  • 06/07 CAA chapter included in Canada's Performance Report
  • Consolidated ARLU Report completed and made available to the public
  • 08/09 Report on Plans and Priorities for the CAA completed and made available to the public
  • 08/09 CAA work plan developed to deliver on RPP
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Active engagement of partner departments and agencies in horizontal aspects of CAA activities
  • Effective decision-making regarding CAA activities
  • Improved accountability of Federal Government to Parliamentarians and Canadians for CAA expenditures and activities
Final Outcome
  • Increased ability to achieve CAA outcomes.

 

Program Information by Theme

 


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Clean Transportation Program 6

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Clean Transportation Program 9a

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Indoor Air Quality

Indoor Air Quality Program 1

Indoor Air Quality Program 2
Adaptation

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International Actions Program 4
Partnerships

Partnerships Program 1
Management and Accountability

Management and Accountability Program 1

 

Program Information by Theme

 

CARA Theme Programs

 


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Environment Canada
CARA Program 1 : Industrial Sector Regulatory Actions Program Activity: 3.3 - Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $60,500,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $11,950,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $5,404,154
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$1,389,443 $3,654,211 $173,900 $186,600

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Regulatory Framework
Development of a regulatory framework for emissions of air pollutants and GHG emissions from all key industrial sectors and in partnership with all responsible jurisdictions, through an integrated, multi-pollutant approach.

Legal Analysis
Regulations are consistent with the authorities in the enabling legislation

Flexible Compliance Mechanisms

Providing firms with a variety of options to comply with the regulations there by reducing the economic impact of the regulations.

Air Emissions Targets
Development of targets that are consistent with leading environmental standards and are at least as rigorous as those in the US;

Reporting System
A rigorous system to ensure that the targets are met, while minimizing the burden on reporting industries and avoiding duplication, where possible, and allowing for transparency of information.
Regulatory Framework
Released in April 2007, Turning the Corner: An Action Plan to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Air Pollution and a Regulatory Framework for Air Emissions which establishes mandatory emission reduction targets for industrial and other emission and pollution sources.

Publication on March 10, 2008 of

1. Turning the Corner: Regulatory Framework for Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions, which sets out the final regulatory framework for industrial greenhouse gas emissions. Translation of the regulatory framework for industrial greenhouse gas emissions into draft regulations is underway with the intent to publish the proposed regulations by December 2008 for public comment

Legal Analysis
Legal review to ensure regulatory framework is consistent with the authorities under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 .

Flexible Compliance Mechanisms:

Publication on March 10, 2008 of:

2. Turning the Corner: Canada's Credit for Early Action Program , which set out the eligibility requirements and process for allocating early action credits.

3. Turning the Corner: Canada's Offset System for Greenhouse Gases which provided an overview of the design of Canada's offset system.

Air Emissions Targets

Officials consulted with industry, provinces/territories, and key stakeholders to validate the target levels and conducted further internal analysis to improve the methodology used to derive the air pollutant caps. Cabinet decided in May 2008 to take more time to finalize the air pollutant framework.

Reporting System

A Notice was published December 8, 2007 requiring industry to report their 2006 emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants and other data for the purposes of informing the development of the proposed regulation. Infrastructure for the emissions reporting database and domestic credit tracking systems are under development.


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Environment Canada
CARA Program 2a: Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions Program Activity: 3.3 - Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $24,200,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $4,350,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,105,004
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$219,512 $845,492 $40,000 0

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Proposed Air Emission Reductions (On and Off Road)

Reduced emissions of air pollutants (NOx, VOC and particulate matter) from vehicles and engines. Emission reductions achieved vary by individual regulations and depend on many factors such as the emission rates of existing products, the stringency of the regulated levels and the attrition rate of particular types of vehicles and engines.
Developed a joint Canada-US workplan to enhance regulatory cooperation with the US EPA under the Canada-US Air Quality Agreement to reduce the cross-border flow of pollution.

Negotiated a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Railway Association of Canada (RAC), that is consistent with U.S. EPA air pollution standards and that ensures that the rail industry continues to improve its greenhouse gas emission performance during the period 2006-2010.
Marine spark-ignition engine and off-road Recreational Vehicles

Total emissions from the in-use fleet of outboard engines, personal watercraft, snowmobiles, off-road motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles will be progressively reduced as cleaner new products replace older, higher emitting vehicles and engines. It is estimated that cleaner marine engines and off-road recreational vehicles will result in a 46% reduction of combined HC+NOx emissions in 2020, compared to having no regulations. Similarly, CO emissions are expected to be reduced by 30%.
Progress has been made on the development of final regulations for the Marine Spark-Ignition Engine and Off-Road Recreational Vehicle Emission Regulations . Consultations with stakeholders pursuant to Part 1 of the Canada Gazette are completed and final publication in Part 2 of the Canada Gazette in scheduled for Fall 08
Off-Road Diesel Engines

Amendments to the Off-Road Compression-Ignition Engine Emission Regulations to ensure alignment with more stringent US EPA "Tier 4" emission standards to be phased-in beginning with the 2008 model year will reduce allowable emission levels from individual engines by between 50-95 percent for PM and between 37-85 percent for HC and NOx, depending on the engine power category. By 2020, it is estimated that the introduction of cleaner Tier 4 off-road diesel engines used in off-road applications such as construction, agriculture, mining and forestry equipment will reduce smog forming emissions from the in-use fleet of off-road diesel engines by 54 percent for PM, 39% for NOx, 21% for VOCs and 54% for CO.
The off-road testing and emissions verification capabilities to the regulations have been initiated. Off-road diesel engines have been purchased for this purpose.

Draft amendments of the Off-Road Compression-Ignition Engine Emission Regulations are completed and initiation of consultations with stakeholders as started. Pre-publication (Gazette 1) is scheduled for Fall 2008.
Large Off-Road Spark-Ignition Engines

New smog-forming emission standards will be introduced for large spark-ignition engines such as those found in forklifts and ice resurfacers. Preliminary estimates suggest that, by the year 2020, the introduction of cleaner large spark-ignition engines will reduce air pollutant emissions from the in-use fleet of these engines by 17% for NOx, 22% for VOCs and 36% for CO.
Draft text for amendment to the Off-Road Small Spark-Ignition Engine Emission Regulations to include large off-road engines is completed. Pre-publication (Gazette 1) is scheduled for Mid 2009.
On-Board Diagnostics Systems for On-Road Heavy-Duty Engines

New regulated requirements for on-board diagnostics (OBD) systems on on-road heavy-duty engines of the 2010 and later model years to align with emerging US requirements. OBD systems monitor emission-related components and detect deterioration or malfunctions and communicate them to the driver and the repair technician, ensuring that the expected air quality benefits from improved emission control technologies will be fully realized throughout the life of new vehicles. The new requirements will ensure that the emission reductions anticipated from 2010 and later heavy-duty engines will be achieved under in-use conditions.
Draft amendments to the On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations for the introduction of on-board diagnostic systems for on-road heavy-duty engines are completed and initiation of consultations with stakeholders has started. Pre-publication (Gazette 1) is scheduled for Fall 2008.
Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Ships)

Initial work will determine the potential for emission reductions, to be followed by efforts to establish international standards. The expected outcome is reduced emissions of air pollutants (SO2, NOx and particulate matter) from marine ships. As regulatory development is on-going, the extent of the reductions that will be achieved have not yet been quantified; however, significant reductions in SO2, NOx and PM emissions are expected to result through the introduction of more stringent international emission standards for engines and marine fuels.
New more stringent international standards have been drafted and are expected to be approved in October 2008


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Transport Canada
CARA Program 2b: Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions Program Activity: 3.1 - Policies and programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $22,500,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $6,000,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,523,491
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$710,656 $812,835 0 0

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Proposed Air Emission Reductions ( Rail)

The expected outcome is reduced emissions of both air pollutants (NOx) and GHG from railway locomotives. Specific targets will be developed through the regulatory process.
Transport Canada intends to develop and implement new regulations coming into effect in 2011 under the Railway Safety Act, 2001 to reduce air emissions from the rail industry in Canada. In March 2008, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced its latest air pollutant emissions standards for rail and marine. These will be taken into consideration in developing Canada's regulatory framework for these sectors.

The Memorandum of Understanding to reduce CAC and GHG emissions from railway locomotives operated by Canadian railway companies in Canada was signed by Transport Canada, Environment Canada and the Railway Association of Canada (RAC) in April of 2007. Transport Canada supported publication of the first annual Report on Locomotive Emissions Monitoring, completed by RAC on December 2007.

Furthermore, Transport Canada began organization of the 2008 Rail Conference, which was held in May 2008. This two-day event was unanimously recognized by the industry, government officials, academia and non-governmental environmental groups as a forum to share and discuss latest technologies, best operational practices and policies to reduce emissions from railways operations.
Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Ships)

Initial work will determine the potential for emission reductions, to be followed by efforts to establish international standards. The expected outcome is reduced emissions of air pollutants (SO2, NOx and particulate matter) from marine ships. As regulatory development is on-going, the extent of the reductions that will be achieved have not yet been quantified; however, significant reductions in SO2, NOx and PM emissions are expected to result through the introduction of more stringent international emission standards for engines and marine fuels.
In the marine sector, the Government is adopting current international standards established by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) for controlling emissions of air pollutants from ships. In May 2007, Transport Canada made regulations under the former Canada Shipping Act to incorporate provisions of the Annex VI Regulations for the Prevention of Air Pollution of the IMO's International Convention for the prevention of air pollution from ships (MARPOL). In 2007-2008, Transport Canada commenced redrafting of the regulations to fit under the new Canada Shipping Act 2001 , which came into force in July 2007. Canada is also working with the IMO on a framework to reduce GHGs from global shipping activity.

In 2007-2008, Transport Canada continued work with Environment Canada and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on a sulphur emissions control area (SECA) feasibility study examining whether North American waters should be designated as such areas.
Proposed Air Emission Reductions (Motor Vehicle)

A measurable reduction in the fuel consumption, in litres/100 km, of the new light duty vehicle fleet in Canada, beginning in 2011. Specific reduction targets will be established by 2008. The program will reduce GHG emissions as more fuel efficient vehicles are introduced into the Canadian fleet each year. Regulations aimed at improving vehicle fuel consumption have the potential to reduce air pollution at the tailpipe as well.
The government has committed to regulating fuel-efficiency for new passenger cars and light trucks that will be sold in Canada beginning with model year 2011 vehicles . The government announced in October 2006, under a Notice of Intent to Regulate, that it would regulate fuel efficiency under the Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act . The Government of Canada signed a Memorandum of Cooperation with the United States on April 26, 2007 to share information on fuel efficiency. In November 2007, the Governor in Council proclaimed the Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act. An issue brief was published in January 2008. Informal consultations were conducted throughout 2007 and formal consultations were conducted between January 17, 2008 and March 15, 2008


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Natural Resources Canada
CARA Program 2c: Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions Program Activity: 1.3 - Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $3,200,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $1,300,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $447,336
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$241,140 $206,196 0 0

Lapsed funding in Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions amounted to $852,664, of which $528,783 was cash managed internally. As a result, the $528,783 will be made available to Transportation Sector Regulatory Actions in 2008-09
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
A measurable reduction in the fuel consumption, in litres/100 km, of the new light duty vehicle fleet in Canada, beginning in 2011. Specific reduction targets will be established by 2008. The program will reduce GHG emissions as more fuel efficient vehicles are introduced into the Canadian fleet each year. Regulations aimed at improving vehicle fuel consumption have the potential to reduce air pollution at the tailpipe as well. Timely delivery of analysis and support to regulatory development process to establish fuel consumption reduction targets by 2008, including:
  • Consultations
  • Issue Brief and supporting documents
Development of modeling tools and parameters, and review/selection of data sources for the analysis of fuel consumption standards.


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Environment Canada
CARA Program 3a: Consumer and Commercial Products Regulatory Actions Program Activity: 3.3 - Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $12,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $2,502,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,053,888
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$605,207 $448,681 0 0

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The expected outcome is reduced emissions of air pollutants from consumer and commercial products. Specific targets are being developed as part of the regulatory process. Pollutants of particular concern include VOCs as well as emissions from residential wood combustion. Development of the proposed Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Concentration Limits for Certain Products Regulations, to be made pursuant to subsection 93(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), to protect the environment and health of Canadians by setting concentration limits for VOCs in 98 categories of certain products.

Three VOC regulations relating to regulating the concentration limits for 1) automotive refinishing products, 2) architectural coating, and 3) miscellaneous products, were proposed and their development initiated.
Initiated verification testing of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) B415.1-00 standard for indoor wood furnaces and boilers and development of a new edition of the CSA B415.1 (planned for completion in 2010)

Ongoing participation in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard development


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Natural Resources Canada
CARA Program 3b: Consumer and Commercial Products Regulatory Actions Program Activity: 1.3 - Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $32,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $7,000,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $6,763,321
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$2,439,630 $3,435,312 $888,379 0

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Energy Efficiency Labelling Program

Estimated annual, aggregate impacts in 2010-2011 are: energy savings of between 13.37 and 14.85 petajoules/yr, which presently convert to annual emission reductions of between 1.4 to 1.6 megatonnes / yr for GHGs and, for air pollutants, the most significant are: 725-1002 tonnes of NOx, 837-3446 tonnes of SO2, 204-1155 tonnes of PM10.
Amendment 10 to the Energy Efficiency Regulations was pre-published March 29, 2008. This proposed amendment will account for approximately one-third of the CARA Energy Efficiency Regulations' contribution -7.29 petajoules and 0.5 Mt GHG reduction from business as usual in 2010, rising to 9.7 Mt in 2020. No estimates for the reduction of other emissions are provided for the proposed amendment due to uncertainties in calculation for the limited number of products. The 2020 results will be significantly higher than the 2.58 Mt originally estimated due to the inclusion of the performance standard for light bulbs which is expected to start to generate savings in 2012.


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Health Canada
CARA Program 4 : Indoor Air Quality Management Actions Program Activity: 3.1 - Healthy Environments and Consumer safety
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $17,500,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $3,522,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $3,430,486
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$585,992 $2,844,494 0 0

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Indoor Air

Health Canada supports and improves risk management actions to address indoor air quality risks to health, including radon, through the development of indoor air guidelines, awareness and prevention programs, and source product regulations to reduce exposure to indoor contaminants.


To implement regulations, guidelines and other measures to reduce indoor air pollution, yielding health benefits for Canadians. Over four years, to address the most important indoor contaminants in the Canadian residential indoor environment by reviewing and consulting on 20 contaminants or groups of contaminants, with follow up information gathering on up to 10 priorities, and developing guidelines and, as required, source product regulations to reduce exposure to these contaminants.

To disseminate relevant health information and advice to Canadians in support of implementation of indoor air quality regulations or other pollution reduction measures.
In 2007-2008, Health Canada collaborated with provinces and territories to nominate substances to a priority list of indoor air contaminants which will serve as a basis for guideline/regulation development. Consultations with stakeholders and industry on the draft list have been completed, with finalization of the list of pollutants to occur in 08-09.

Health Canada completed risk assessments and indoor air quality guideline development for ozone and carbon monoxide. The Department continued to investigate the health impacts of exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide , which will inform work on the development of indoor air quality guidelines for these substances. Health Canada also completed an indoor air quality exposure study in Regina to understand sources and concentrations of air toxics in homes.

With respect to information sharing, the Department continued to engage the federal/provincial/territorial working-group on issues related to indoor air quality.

The Health Canada Indoor Air Quality website was updated to reflect new information, and continued to be an important vehicle for the dissemination of health advice to the public.

Public Opinion Research was also conducted with public health officials who use Health Canada's guidelines to determine their preferences regarding these tools, in order to improve the Department's ability to effectively disseminate health information regarding indoor air quality.
Proposed Radon Exposure Reductions

Radon occurs naturally. The goal is to reduce exposure by reducing infiltration and accumulation into buildings. Activities carried out under this initiative are complementary to those being carried out under the separate Indoor Air Program in order to implement a full radon exposure reduction strategy for residential buildings.

Over four years, to establish a radon exposure guideline and to develop knowledge on susceptible populations and testing protocols. This will be accomplished through: upgrade of facilities to establish a national laboratory to evaluate testing equipment; the development of standards for testing; and research on the health impacts of radon on particular sub-sections of the population.

To disseminate relevant health information and advice to Canadians in support of implementation and a national radon strategy centred on new health-based radon exposure guidelines.
In future years, to introduce new testing techniques including certification programs for testers, and to identify problem areas across the country through a national database.
A new Canadian Radon Guideline with a reduced action level of 200 Bq/m 3 over the previous value of 800 Bq/m 3 was adopted. Consultations on the need for a target of 100 Bq/m 3 for new home construction were also held with stakeholders and the public.

In FY 2007-2008, a National Radon Laboratory was established at the Radiation Protection Bureau in Ottawa. The Laboratory was equipped with a full array of radon detectors and detection systems, as well as a radon calibration chamber to perform in-house calibration of radon detection equipment. The Laboratory completed the development of two standard radon measurement procedures for residential homes and large buildings (including schools and hospitals).

Health Canada worked towards establishing a certification program for service providers of radon testing, and met with two United States-based organizations to explore options for expansion of a Canadian component into their existing certification programs. The Department also negotiated with the Standards Council of Canada to audit the organizations and accredit them as certification bodies for radon testing service providers in Canada. This certification program will help ensure that the providers of radon testing services in Canada are properly qualified to perform this work.

The Department completed a research project to measure soil gas radon concentrations in southern Ontario in order to determine the potential for high indoor radon levels in homes in this heavily-populated area of Canada. Health Canada completed the development of a database for radon measurement data. All data from national radon testing projects as well as data shared with Health Canada by partner provinces will be included in this database and form the basis for mapping areas of high radon potential in Canada.


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Environment Canada
CARA Program 5a: Science in Support of Regulatory Activities and Accountability Program Activity: 3.3 - Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $40,100,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $3,584,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $3,755,159
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$615,210 $1,515,049 $20,000 $1,604,900

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Science in Support of Regulatory Activities and Accountability

To identify and address critical environmental and health-related knowledge gaps in order to provide adequate information to carry out responsibilities under the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda.

To apply research findings to the development of proposed regulations and other air pollution reduction measures associated with the Notice of Intent issued in conjunction with the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda.

Monitoring

To provide measurements, data, and models that describe the impact of air pollution sources to inform scientific assessments and the development and implementation of regulations.

To measure and report on air quality progress, improvements in ambient air quality, and health and environmental benefits and economic valuation achieved, resulting from actions taken under the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda, and to inform the choice and development of future regulations and other pollution reduction measures.

Modelling

To develop, modify, and apply air quality modelling techniques to input into the development and implementation of the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda.

Assessments

To provide science-based information and advice to accurately inform Canadians and decision-makers: to determine if emission reductions result in improved ambient air quality, and ecosystem and human health benefits; to assist in determining whether additional measures may be required; and to provide scientific assessments and advice to develop air quality objectives.
Implemented field study in SW Ontario and prepared a database on emissions from a large urban area and from specific industrial sectors in the region to lead to improved knowledge of exposure to particulate matter, ozone and their precursors.

Sampling in northern Saskatchewan to estimate the chemical and biological sensitivity of lakes potentially affected by oil sands development.

Investigation into the sources and effects of mercury (e.g. on birds) initiated.

National Air Pollution Surveillance network was operated in cooperation with all provinces and territories (296 sites). Speciation of Particulate Matter was determined at 16 sites. Annual Data Summary report for 2005 and 2006 was published.

Contribution to an improved understanding and characterization of the changing atmospheric composition due to emissions from energy production/consumption, industrial activities, transportation and natural sources, in the context of transboundary contributions. A further understanding of the atmospheric dry deposition process, particularly for the nitrogen species, via the publication of 3 peer-reviewed scientific papers and an improvement of methodology for the continuous measurement of smog precursors.

Chemical and biological data were collected to enhance assessments of the acidification and recovery of sensitive lakes in eastern Canada.

Improvements were made to the parameterizations of the chemical reactions of the organic components, to the treatment of dust transport and the cloud processing of aerosols. The model was evaluated with field data and, with some of the improvements included, was used to provide the science support for the development of regulations under CARA.

Over 60 different applications of air quality model provided guidance in support of the development of the Regulatory Framework for Air Pollutant Document. Adapted AQ model to meet shorter turnaround schedules. Improved capacity to link AQ model with human health and ecosystem effects models.

Contributed to the 2008 Smog Science Assessment through the provision of air quality data, analyses, products and scientific input.


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Health Canada
CARA Program 5b: Science in Support of Regulatory Activities and Accountability Program Activity: 3.1 - Healthy Environments and Consumer safety
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $71,300,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $8,478,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $7,692,600
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$2,000,481 $5,692,119 0 0

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Health Canada supports and improves risk management actions to address outdoor air quality risks to health, and works to identify and address critical environmental and health-related knowledge gaps in order to provide information to carry out responsibilities under CARA.

To provide measurements, data, and models that describe the impact of air pollution sources to inform scientific assessments and to input into the development and implementation of the CARA.

To measure and report on air quality progress, improvements in ambient air quality, and health and environmental benefits and economic valuation achieved, resulting from actions taken under the CARA, and to inform the choice and development of future regulations and other pollution reduction measures.

To provide science-based information and advice to accurately inform Canadians and decision-makers: to determine if emission reductions result in improved ambient air quality, and ecosystem and human health benefits; to assist in determining whether additional measures may be required; and to provide scientific assessments and advice to develop air quality objectives.
Health Canada continued research on the development of the Air Health Indicator, and explored additional data requirements for several pollutants to ensure the Indicator is robust and reveals real trends in the relation between pollutants and health endpoints. Currently the indicator focuses on using mortality data but the use of additional endpoints such as hospital admissions and emergency room visits is also being examined.

Health Canada continued to refine the Air Quality Benefits Assessment Tool (AQBAT), which is designed to estimate the human health benefits or impacts associated with changes in Canada's ambient air quality. Using AQBAT, Health Canada performed the initial health economic analysis and provided estimates of the benefits (physical and monetary) of proposed CARA regulations for air pollutants to inform the Regulatory Framework for Air Emissions.

Health Canada continued work on the draft particulate matter and ozone assessments (precursors to smog), which will serve as a basis for setting National Air Quality Objectives in support of CARA. Information derived from the human health risk/benefit assessment associated with the use of leaded gasoline in competition vehicles was published in the Canada Gazette I on December 22, 2007. The Department also finalized a risk assessment for inhalable manganese.


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Environment Canada
CARA Program 6 : Emissions Reporting Program Activity: 3.3 - Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $39,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $8,825,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $7,227,465
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$3,460,172 $3,423,593 $343,700 0

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The emissions reporting program will ensure:
  • the continuation, expansion and enhancement of annual national air emissions inventories, trends, and projections of air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs).
  • that an integrated reporting tool is developed to support compliance with the proposed regulations and a single window reporting system for all emissions and related information is fostered to minimize burden on industries and to provide better linkages with GHG and air pollution strategies.
Canada continued to meet its national system international reporting obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and Kyoto Protocol by producing a UN compliant national inventory of GHGs. thus gaining eligibility to participate in the Kyoto mechanisms.. Canada also met its international obligations on reporting of air pollutants to the UNECE. In addition to the publication and collection of GHG and air pollutant emissions from CEPA section 46 Notices for both the GHG Reporting program and the air pollutant components of the NPRI, an additional S71 Notice was published December 8, 2007 requiring facilities that would be covered by the proposed regulations to report their 2006 emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants and other data. A multi-year project was initiated in 2007-2008 to work towards a single, harmonized system for mandatory reporting of all air pollutant and GHG emissions to Environment Canada programs as well as to other jurisdictions, and an interim reporting system to support the S71 Notice was successfully implemented.


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Environment Canada
CARA Program 7 : Emissions Trading Program Activity: 3.3 - Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $10,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $2,533,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,599,257
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$899,644 $699,613 0 0

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
To establish a greenhouse gas and air pollutant (NOx and SO2) domestic emissions trading systems as well as a domestic greenhouse gas offset system and consideration will be given to establishing a parallel offset system for air pollutants.

To provide a foundation should Canada decide to begin negotiations with the U.S. to join their NOx and SOx trading systems.

To encourage emissions reduction technology development and deployment through market driven financial incentives provided by emissions trading systems.
Consultations with provinces/territories, industry, environmental groups, First Nations and other interested stakeholders on the design of the emission trading system for greenhouse gases, including the Offset System for Greenhouse Gases, the Credit for Early Action Program, and bankability/tradability of the credits.

Policy recommendations accepted by Cabinet on the design of the emission trading system for greenhouse gases, including Canada's Offset System for Greenhouse Gases, Canada's Credit for Early Action Program, and the types of credits to be accepted for domestic compliance from the UN's Clean Development Mechanism.

Advice to Legal Services on drafting the emission trading component of the proposed Greenhouse Gas Regulations.

Preliminary design of the Domestic Credit Tracking System was started (to be completed in 2008-09).

Publication of Canada 's Credit for Early Action Program and Canada 's Offset System for Greenhouse Gases on March 10, 2008.

Canada-US modelling of emission trading of air pollutants in the electricity sector using the Integrated Planning Model was completed.


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Environment Canada
CARA Program 8 : Enforcement Advice and Reporting on Progress Program Activity: 3.3 - Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $7,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $1,756,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $590,220
Salary O&M G&C Capital
$385,659 $204,561 0 0

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
To produce an annual "State of the Air Report", that will inform Canadians on the current status, trends, and factors influencing the quality of air in Canada.

To establish a benchmark against which to monitor national progress and policy effectiveness.

To ensure the "enforceability" of proposed regulations in the drafting stages, as well as preparing for enforcement of the eventual regulations through activities such as the training of enforcement officers.
  • Created a mapping extension that provides Environment Canada staff with the ability to generate detailed emissions (for the 2002 and 2005 EI) maps of the primary precursors of particulate matter and ozone from different source types. This includes the ability to produce similar map layers for U.S. Counties based on the US EPA's 2002 National Emissions Inventory (NEI).
  • Conducted an intercomparison study of Canadian continuous PM 2.5 monitors with co-located NAPS Reference Method monitors to assess their performance and investigate the use of data transformation methods to improve their performance.
  • Co-hosted a PM 2.5 Continuous Monitoring Meeting with NAPS to develop recommendations on performance criteria for continuous PM 2.5 instruments operating across Canada. These criteria will ensure consistent and comparable data for PM 2.5 reporting requirements.


Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA) Environment Canada
CARA Program 9 : Policy Development, Analysis and Coordination Program Activity: 4.1 - Integrated policy advice, communication and information strategies enable effective decision making
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $8,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $2,000,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,578,272
Salary O&M G&C Capital
1,066,173 512,099 0 0

Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
To maintain policy capacity to support decision making within the federal government, by providing sound policy analysis and advice on further elaboration of the clean air/climate change component of the environmental agenda. Economic modeling analysis of key elements of the Industrial Regulatory Framework. The analysis examined impacts of the industrial regulatory on key parameters such as emission reductions, energy prices and economic growth by sector.

Publication on March 10, 2008 of key reports:
  1. Turning the Corner : Detailed Emissions and Economic Modelling - this report provides analysis of the Industrial Regulatory Target and the overall 20% reduction target relative to 2006 levels by 2020.
  2. Turning the Corner : Canada's Energy and GHG Emissions Projections (National Tables and Provincial and Territorial Tables) - this report provides the energy, emission and economy baseline underlying the impact analysis of the Government's Turning the Corner plan.

Clean Energy Theme Programs


Clean Energy Natural Resources Canada
Clean Energy Program 1: ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses Program Activity: 1.3 Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $61,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $13,800,000 Planned Spending post approvals in 2008-09 ARLU and 2007-2008 Supplementary Estimates (Transfer of $649,515 to National Research Council).
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $10,468,518
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Increased energy efficiency of buildings; 25% efficiency improvement of housing.

Development and Implementation of a labelling system for new and existing buildings.

Labelling of 160,000 existing and 30,000 new houses and 400 buildings.

Energy savings of 17.1 to 19.0 Petajoules.

Annual emission reductions of between 1.3 and 1.4 Mt /yr. of greenhouse gases , 0.8 and 1.1 kilotonnes/yr. of SO2, 3.0 to 4.1 kilotonnes/yr. of CO, and other Criteria Air Contaminants.

NRC: The final outcome of the project (March 2011) will be the development of the Model National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings.
Completed industry consultation on the pilot labelling system.

Developed pilot label for buildings, with labelling to occur in 2008-09.

Six provinces have announced changes to building codes to achieve an energy efficiency rating of 80 on NRCan's EnerGuide Rating System.

NRCan issued 102,834 labels for existing houses and 6,661 for new houses.

NRCan transferred funds to NRC to hire two technical advisors for the update process for the Model National Energy Code for Buildings and to establish and fund 5 working level committees and a management committee, the Standing Committee on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. The Standing Committee was established and held its first meeting and the working level groups were created. Staffing began on the hiring of the two technical advisors.

Estimated 0.2 MT of GHG savings.


Clean Energy Natural Resources Canada
Clean Energy Program 2: ecoENERGY Retrofit Program Activity: 1.3 Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $220,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $35,350,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $31,208,000
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Existing Building Initiative (EBI) Extension

It is expected that the extension will result in up to 300 new retrofit projects and energy audits, which will result in reductions in 0.2 Mt of GHGs.
230 implementation proposals were submitted for building retrofit projects.

86 contribution agreements were signed as of July 2008. Estimated 0.07MT GHG savings from signed contribution agreements.

Estimated 0.07 MT of GHG savings.
ecoENERGY Retrofit Initiative - Homes

Reduced energy consumption and lower GHG and CAC emissions.

Reductions of up to 30% in energy use and up 4 tonnes of GHG emissions/year/house.

Anticipated energy savings of 6.08 to 6.75 PJ/yr in 2011.

Reductions of fossil fuels use and electricity generated using fossil fuels that presently convert to annual emissions reductions of between 0.4 and 0.5 Mt/yr of greenhouse gas emissions, 296 to 368 tonnes/yr of NOx, 171 to 625 tonnes/yr of SO2, 0.8 to 1.1 kilotonnes/yr of CO, and the following criteria air contaminants: PM10, 163-611 kt/yr; PM2.5, 149-459kt/yr; VOC 141-221kt/yr.

Increased adoption of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies, systems & products.

Increased awareness of the potential for, and methods of, reducing energy use and emissions in housing.

Improved air quality as a result of lower energy consumption and consequent reduction in emissions.
102,834 homes had a pre-retrofit energy evaluation and 12,000 grants were paid. The average grant was valued at $1064 with average energy savings of 48.4 Gj per house per year.

10% of grant recipients have included renewable technologies and products in their renovation.

293,630 inquiries were made about energy efficiency and 244,836 publication requests received.

Estimated 0.04 MT of GHG savings.
ecoENERGY Retrofit Initiative - Small and Medium Organizations

Intermediate Outcome

Increased activity in small and medium organizations buildings and industry sectors related to energy saving projects.

Final Outcome

Energy savings that result in reduction of GHG emissions and CACs.
96 retrofit projects were funded in small and medium organizations representing fewer than 500 employees or less than 10,000 square metres (buildings).

Estimated 0.03 MT of GHG savings.


Clean Energy Natural Resources Canada
Clean Energy Program 3: ecoENERGY for Industry Program Activity: 1.3 Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $18,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $4,100,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $3,388,000
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Intermediate Outcomes

Industry implements energy efficiency projects and practices.

Final Outcome

Energy savings that result in reduction of GHG emissions and CACs.
156 new companies have registered their corporate commitments to improve energy efficiency and have become CIPEC leaders.

1,200 industrial participants attended Dollars to $ense training workshops - adding to the approximately 14,000 trained since 1997.

Three benchmarking studies were completed or are underway along with six in-depth assessments to find energy savings opportunities.

Two projects were initiated as part of a federal-provincial collaboration on energy management standards and information systems.

Estimated 0.3 MT of GHG savings.


Clean Energy Natural Resources Canada
Clean Energy Program 4: ecoENERGY for Renewable Power Program Activity: 1.3 Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $276,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $21,650,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $17,503,000
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Outcomes

Annual production of 14.3 terawatt-hours of electricity or about 4000 MW of capacity depending on the mix of energy sources, by 2011, which presently convert to annual emission reductions of between 6 and 6.7 Mt for greenhouse gases and, for criteria air contaminants (CACs), the most significant are 2 to 3 kilotonnes of NOx, 3 to 12 kilotonnes of SO2, 0.6 to 4 kilotonnes of PM10, and other CACs.

Greater experience in Canada with more low-impact renewable power generation by utilities, independent power producers and other stakeholders.
12 Contribution Agreements signed for 948 MW of new electricity expected to produce 3 terawatt-hours per year (TWh/yr), out of which 10 are in operation for a total of 757 MW and expected production of 2.4 TWh/yr.

165 Notices of Project Applications were registered as of March 31, 2008.

The 10 projects currently in operation will displace an average of 1.12 MT of GHGs per year.


Clean Energy Natural Resources Canada
Clean Energy Program 5: ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat Program Activity: 1.3 Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $36,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $8,000,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $5,187,000
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Outcomes

The deployment of up to 700 solar thermal technology units in ICI (Industrial, Commercial and Institutional) sectors.

Up to 8 residential sector pilot projects collaborations (each deploying many solar thermal units) are expected to be financially supported.

Energy savings of 0.35 petajoules, which converts to annual emission reductions of about 20 kilotonnes of GHG, 9.8 kilotonnes of NOx, and 19 to 32 tonnes of SO2.

Industry capacity development is expected to result in the development of two standards for renewable thermal technologies, certification of up to 8 solar water systems to standards, two annual industry surveys, development and distribution of at least three new technology publications for public information, development of two renewable energy occupational standards.
111 solar thermal systems installed in Industrial/Commercial/Institutional sectors (91 solar air systems, 20 solar water systems). These installed systems are expected to result in energy savings of 41820 GJ/year and 2.673 kilotonnes of GHGs reduced per year.

13 residential pilot projects were selected in 2007-2008 and are expected to result in the installation of 8000 solar domestic water heaters by 2010. Contribution agreements for the selected pilot projects will be signed in 2008-09.

Development of Standards underway. Agreements signed with 4 companies for the certification of solar water systems.


Clean Energy Natural Resources Canada
Clean Energy Program 6: ecoENERGY for Technology Initiative Program Activity: 1.3 Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $226,440,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $8,710,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $5,194,000
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Outcomes

An improved suite of clean energy technologies and improved regulations to ensure their uptake.

Increased involvement and collaboration of the research community and key stakeholders.

Increased awareness and understanding of technologies and processes associated with reducing air emissions.

Increased capability to develop new and improved energy systems and technologies that contribute to clean air objectives; and a consolidated program.

The new technologies will be expected to lead to significantly reduced emissions of particulates, gaseous pollutants, toxic substances and greenhouse gases from the production and use of energy.

The new knowledge/technology will enable the development of regulations, codes and standards.
Collaborative agreement on front-end engineering design project for a proposed clean coal gasification power plant (federal-provincial-industrial sector).
http://www.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/media/newcom/2007/2007104-eng.php

Co-sponsor of international conference on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (pHEVS) to raise awareness of this emerging technology.

Extensive preparation for the $140M Call for Proposals (announced April 4, 2008) in two areas : 1) technology development to reduce the environmental impact of oil sands; and, 2) carbon capture and storage technologies to reduce GHG emissions from oil sands and coal-fired electricity plants. Selected projects resulting from the call process are anticipated to begin in early 2009.


Clean Energy Natural Resources Canada
Clean Energy Program 7: Policy, Communications, Monitoring and Reporting Program Activity: 1.3 Energy, 1.4 Sustainable Forest
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $24,600,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $6,140,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $5,263,950
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Policy

Outcomes

Climate change and clean air policies are well-analyzed and their implications understood such that policy options can be presented to senior officials and ministers for decision.

Effective coordination of, and participation in, interdepartmental processes ensuring effective government management, preparation of materials for Cabinet and the implementation of Cabinet decisions.

Future emissions trends are understood enabling informed discussion of emission reduction objectives.
Policy

Provided policy documents and advice to the Minister, Deputy Minister and other senior officials in support of policy and program development and decision making.

Analyzed relevant policies being proposed/ implemented in other jurisdictions (i.e. provinces, territories, other countries).

Conducted policy analysis related to CCS technology, including direct support for the Canada-Alberta ecoENERGY Carbon Capture and Storage Task Force to better understand the key challenges and opportunities associated with the wide-scale deployment of carbon capture and storage technologies in Canada.

Worked closely with Environment Canada to finalize the Regulatory Framework for Industrial GHG emissions, consulting with stakeholders including the natural resource industries affected by the new regulations.
Contributed to the development and implementation of the Horizontal Management, Accountability and Reporting Framework to ensure the effective and efficient inter-departmental management and coordination of the climate change/clean air programming.

Collaborated with EC (lead department) and other government departments on the completion of a Treasury Board Submission outlining the finalized HMARF (i.e. governance structure, strategies for performance measurement, financial management, reporting and audit and evaluation).

Worked closely with EC on the Government's modelling activities as part of the Turning the Corner Plan to understand emission trends, and analyze impacts of greenhouse gas and air pollutant mitigation polices.

Collaborated with EC (lead department) and other departments to prepare Clean Air Regulatory Agenda's sectoral economic assessments.

Updated NRCan's MAPLE-C forecasting model. Extended the model's parameters to estimate emissions levels up to the year 2030. Enhanced its capabilities to project emissions of Criteria Air Contaminants (CACs) for the electricity sector. Enhanced its oil and gas, industrial, emissions, residential and commercial sub-modules to reflect new market developments and realities.
Strategic Communications

Outcomes

Targeted audiences understand the government's Clean Energy Agenda and its role in the overall Environmental Agenda.
Provision of high-quality communications advice and consistent messaging supports the implementation and uptake of the policies and programs of the government's Clean Energy Agenda.

Development of a government-wide communications strategy and messaging ensures a consistent approach for communicating government actions on clean energy and the environment.

Outputs

Provision of strategic communications advice and support to the government's environmental agenda.
Effective and consistent messaging in horizontal communications.
Proactive and integrating communications planning.
Strategic Communications

78 announcements were made in support of clean energy programs

Developed and maintained the ecoENERGY website

Speeches and news releases were developed for ecoENERGY announcements

Produced a variety of ecoENERGY information products including information kits, brochures, CCS Task Force report, videos (i.e. CCS) and other promotional materials

Responded to 141 media inquiries regarding the ecoENERGY initiatives
Forest Policy & Monitoring

Outcomes

Forest monitoring and reporting leads to an understanding of the impacts of climate change and other human stresses on Canada's forests.

Provision of improved information covering the entire forest area becomes available, enabling policy development and improved forest management practices and business planning to reduce forest loss.

Outputs

Analysis of policy options, design, and evaluation of emission reduction and adaptation options.

Implementation and maintenance of a flexible forest inventory and related monitoring systems through partnerships with the provinces and territories.

Contributions to international climate change negotiation workshops, to universities for modeling work, and for data acquisition shared with provinces/territories, using the existing departmental class contribution authority.

Reporting on forests, land-use changes and air emissions.
Forest Policy & Monitoring

Annual forest-related GHG emission and removal estimates produced and provided to Environment Canada for inclusion in Canada's National Greenhouse Gas Inventory for the period 1990 to 2006.

Information sharing agreements in place with all provinces/territories (with the exception of non-forest Nunavut).

Two published high-level science-policy notes, two forest management accounting option reports, one forest products carbon modelling report.

A scientific paper was published describing analysis behind Canada's 2007 decision to not include forest management in its Kyoto accounting.

Four studies reported in peer-reviewed literature and two studies in press.

Two studies under review (scientific foundation of the CBM-CFS3 tool, improvement to modeling spruce budworm carbon impacts) and three studies underway (interannual variability in forest GHG balances, climate impacts on forest productivity, comparison of results from multiple models for two forest sites).

CFS science and policy experts participated in numerous presentations/discussion in Canada (e.g. to senior federal, provincial, territorial and industry officials) and internationally on options. A Senior CFS Scientist was a Lead Author of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report on forest mitigation options.


Clean Energy Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Clean Energy Program 8: ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program Activity: 2.4 Health Northern Communities
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $15,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $3,750,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $3,411,225
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Immediate Outcomes

Northern and Aboriginal communities are engaged and participating in the ecoENERGY Program.

Improved northern and Aboriginal technical and management skills for clean energy.

Successfully implemented renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

Intermediate Outcomes

Northern and Aboriginal communities are equipped with knowledge and tools to increase energy efficiency of community infrastructure.

Decrease in emissions of GHG and CAC in northern and Aboriginal communities.

Increased energy efficiency and use of renewable energy in northern and Aboriginal communities.

More reliable infrastructure in northern and Aboriginal communities.

Energy cost savings in northern and Aboriginal communities.

Final Outcomes

Reduced greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air contaminants in northern and Aboriginal communities.

Sustainable and healthy northern and Aboriginal communities.
Website communicating program to staff and external stakeholders in place and maintained.

23 program inquiries received.

Regional and external contacts identified and engaged as part of 'clean energy network.'

3 clean energy conferences attended by program staff.

Over 200 stakeholders made aware of opportunities available through the program.

RFP for Standing Offer Agreement issued for technical feasibility and project management advice for implementation in 2008/09.

20 Aboriginal and northern community projects reviewed and advice provided.

14 renewable energy projects funded, $1,922,449/$3,411,225 = 56% of program funding on renewable energy projects, and 81% of Grants and Contributions.

1 energy efficiency project funded, $100,000/$3,411,225 = 3% of program funding on energy efficiency projects and 4% of Grants and Contributions.

8 community energy plans funded $126,700/$3,411,225 = 4% of program funding on community energy plans and 5% of Grants and Contributions.

Clean Transportation Theme Programs

 


Clean Transportation Transport Canada
Clean Transportation Program 1: ecoMobility Program Program Activity: 3.1 Policies and Programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $9,337,992
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $810,899
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $379,365
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Short-term results include
  • Municipalities implement targeted TDM (Transportation Demand Management) initiatives;
  • TDM project participants are more aware of sustainable transportation options;
  • Tools and program modules to support TDM project implementation developed;
  • TDM practitioners and decision-makers have requisite knowledge to foster ongoing implementation and measurement of TDM policies and programs.
Longer-term expected results include
  • TDM project participants reduce the vehicle kilometres traveled within their jurisdictions;
  • TDM project participants increase the share of trips within their jurisdictions via less energy intense modes;
  • Municipalities incorporate TDM approaches in their plans and operations;
  • Professional expertise for TDM increases.
The ultimate outcomes would be
  • reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air contaminants (CAC) emissions in urban passenger transportation sector and an increase in use of TDM in Canadian municipalities.
  • In 2007-2008, first year of the program, Transport Canada conducted focused research and program implementation consultations with a broad range of stakeholders to maximize the program's relevance and effectiveness.
  • Based on the research findings, Transport Canada developed the Applicant's Guide for the contribution program under ecoMOBILITY.
  • Transport Canada launched a request for proposals (RFP) for transportation demand management (TDM) projects from municipalities and regional transportation authorities.
  • Began to develop an implementation plan for the capacity building component of the program. Specific projects were:
  • The development of an RFP for the creation of standard measurement guidelines for TDM projects, and
  • The development of national networks for TDM practitioners.


Clean Transportation Transport Canada
Clean Transportation Program 2: ecoTechnology for Vehicles Program Program Activity: 3.1 Policies and Programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $14,028,900
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $2,869,726
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,560,704
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Immediate Outcomes
  • Increased knowledge about technologies and vehicles generated.
  • Information on the program, the technologies, and the vehicles effectively disseminated to the Canadian consumer and automotive industry
Immediate Outcomes
  • Increased public awareness.
  • Increased penetration of advanced vehicles in the market place.
Ultimate Outcome
  • Reduced Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from transportation sources in 2010/11.
In 2007-2008, the eTV program
  • Began the procurement process to acquire the next generation of vehicles and technologies for testing and evaluation.
  • Completed a global environmental scan of all emerging technologies and developed protocols for testing and evaluation.
  • The program published a series of informative technical articles for the eTV web site. These articles, program tests and evaluation results were shared with Canadians to promote consumer understanding and acceptance of cutting-edge technologies that reduce the environmental impacts of motor vehicles.
  • Showcased vehicles and technologies at over 22 events across the country, ranging from major Canadian international auto shows (in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver) to consumer lifestyle or environmental shows, providing over 23,000 Canadians with information on advanced environmental technology for vehicles.
  • Continued to work in cooperation with the automotive industry, other government departments, and consumers to better identify barriers to the introduction of advanced vehicle technologies in Canada.


Clean Transportation Transport Canada
Clean Transportation Program 3: National Harmonization Initiative for the Trucking Industry Program Activity: 3.1 Policies and Programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $5,412,565
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $755,246
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $319,530
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
This contribution program is designed to achieve the following objectives.
  • Support the government's platform commitments on the environment and Clean Air Agenda by contributing to modal efficiency and reducing air emissions and energy use in the transportation sector;
  • Support the removal of regulatory barriers to enable the harmonization of provincial/territorial regulations in order to adopt emissions-reducing technologies in the Canadian Trucking Industry; and
  • Support an increase in the freight transportation industry's participation in air emissions reduction initiatives.
Anticipated short-term results of this program include
  • Provinces and territories agree to consider amending their regulations to permit the implementation of emissions-reducing technologies in the trucking industry; and
  • Provinces and territories agree to the removal of regulatory barriers that will enable harmonization of provincial/territorial regulations.
Anticipated long-term results of the program include
  • Removing regulatory barriers and developing best practices in a harmonized approach across Canada, allowing for the implementation of emissions-reducing technologies in the trucking industry; and
  • Achieving the ultimate outcome of a reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants in the trucking industry and indirectly increasing competitiveness.
Completion of a comprehensive set of six studies and assessments to review the implications of a national speed limiter mandate for heavy trucks. A national mandate could realize annual on-road diesel savings of 228 million litres or 0.64 Mt GHG.


Clean Transportation Transport Canada
Clean Transportation Program 4: Freight Technology Demonstration Fund Program Activity: 3.1 Policies and Programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $9,281,901
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $776,120
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $613,172
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The contribution program is a direct response to the rapid growth in freight transportation activity, which is predicted to lead to increased emissions.

This contribution program is designed to achieve the following objectives
  • Support improvements in modal and inter-modal freight efficiency and reduce air emissions and energy use in the freight transportation sector; and
  • Demonstrate and encourage the take-up of innovative environmental technologies and efficient best practices within the freight transportation sector that can reduce GHG emissions and air pollutants.
In the short term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results
  • Support the testing of new and underutilized technologies;
  • Enable the transfer of knowledge from demonstrations to broader industry;
  • Implement pilot projects; and
  • Demonstrate results achieved by industry.
In the medium to long term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results
  • Adoption of environmentally friendly technologies and best practices by the freight industry;
  • Reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants from the transportation sector; and
  • Improved efficiency in the transportation industry.
  • The program staff promoted the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund at a program booth at 10 modal conference and events.
  • The management team also spoke about the ecoFREIGHT program at 15 events through formal and informal presentations. These promotion activities had a positive effect as 47 proposals for demonstration were submitted for the first round of funding. This is a record number of proposals based on the previous programs experience.
  • The selected projects under the Freight Technology Demonstration Fund have good potential to actually reduce emissions and cover all modes. Eight projects were selected for a total funding of $2.4 M, which is around 40% of the program allotted G&C budget.


Clean Transportation Transport Canada
Clean Transportation Program 5: Freight Technology Incentive Program Program Activity: 3.1 Policies and Programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $9,593,027
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $465,460
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $371,344
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The contribution program is a direct response to the rapid growth in freight transportation activity, which is predicted to lead to increased emissions.

This contribution program is designed to achieve the following objectives
  • Support improvements in modal and inter-modal freight efficiency and reduce air emissions and energy use in the freight transportation sector; and
  • Encourage the take-up of innovative environmental technologies within the freight transportation sector by reducing the cost barriers of the technologies.
In the short term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results
  • Provide incentives for the purchase and installation of proven technologies; and
  • Acquisition and installation of equipment by project proponents.
In the medium to long term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results
  • Greater adoption of efficiency enhancing equipment;
  • Reduction of GHG emissions and pollutants from the transportation sector; and
  • Improved efficiency in the transportation industry.
  • The program staff promoted the Freight Technology Incentive Program at a program booth at 10 modal conference and events.
  • The management team also spoke about the ecoFREIGHT program at 15 events through formal and informal presentations. These promotion activities had a positive effect as 62 proposals for incentives were submitted for the first round of funding. This is a record number of proposals based on the previous programs experience.
  • The selected projects under the Freight Technology Incentives Program have excellent potential to reduce emissions. Selected projects cover three modes, air, rail and truck. 15 projects were selected for a total funding of $3.7M, which is almost half of the program allotted G&C budget.


Clean Transportation Transport Canada
Clean Transportation Program 6: ecoFreight Partnerships Program Activity: 3.1 Policies and Programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $6,325,408
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $1,339,883
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $447,078
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
International Partnerships on Emissions Reductions

The International Partnerships on Emissions Reductions will provide for increased presence at International committees, Working Groups, and other fora that develop international approaches in aviation and marine modes. The result of this activity will be more stringent regulations, standards, best practices or guidelines being developed leading to an overall reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants and improved efficiency from the aviation and marine sectors.

Transportation Industry Partnership Initiative

TC will implement and monitor the existing Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Air Transport Association of Canada. TC will also sign, implement and monitor a MOU with the Railway Association of Canada. TC will establish similar partnerships with the marine industry. Program activities will include providing the secretariat function for the various MOU Management Committees; review of annual and progress reports; and oversight audits. TC will also conduct joint studies and initiatives with industry to foster progress towards the emissions targets and continue to play a facilitator role in helping the industry to address barriers to emissions reduction that are beyond the scope of individual industries. This initiative will lead to voluntary agreements where modal associations and their members commit to reduce their air emissions.

Efficiency Program for Freight Shippers and Forwarders

TC will draw upon the results of recent focus groups to establish new partnerships directly with users of the freight systems to improve their transportation decision-making and increase the adoption of more sustainable modal choices and practices. TC will conduct studies, benchmarking and other initiatives to identify and produce the information required by shippers and forwarders to inform their transportation decisions. TC will also work with industry on annual surveys on industry environmental practices and decision-making, and sponsor and/or host conferences, workshops, etc. This program will educate users of the freight systems on the impacts made as a result of their freight transportation selection decisions. With this knowledge, users will be able to include environmental impacts in the decision making process when selecting between modes and carriers during their freight transportation decisions.
  • MOU with the Railway Association of Canada was signed in May 2007
  • First annual report under the Air Transport Association of Canada (ATAC) MOU to confirm attainment of annual target, and the RAC MOU to confirm that the industry is on the path to reach its 2010 target. Both have been published and are available on the Web
  • A rail conference was organized in 2007-2008 to inform representatives from the rail industry, manufacturers, provincial and federal departments of opportunities. The event was held in May 2008.
  • Sponsored two conferences / panels to increase awareness and promote best-in-Class carriers and shippers
  • Sponsored an industry survey to monitor the environmental consideration of shippers and identify trends.
  • Web based information network initiated as the main channel to increase awareness of both carriers and shippers of technology and best practices opportunities, and sustainable transportation choices.
  • The program website was launched with new program information such as program guidelines and application forms. New pages are in the development phase with additional information including case studies of current and previous technology trials.
  • The 2007 Canadian Industrial Transportation Association (CITA) member's benchmarking survey was completed. This is the third survey sponsored by freight program, and this one allows now identifying some trends in the shippers' perception of environmental issues.
  • Sponsored two awards that were presented to shippers' and/or carriers who demonstrate strong environmental leadership and promote green transportation standards. The Supply Chain and Logistics Green Supply Chain Award went to J.D. Smith & Sons and UPM Kymmene in 2007. Novex Delivery Solutions was presented the ecoFREIGHT Transportation Award at the 2008 Globe Awards.


Clean Transportation Transport Canada
Clean Transportation Program 7: Marine Shore Power Program Program Activity: 3.1 Policies and Programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $6,089,617
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $318,620
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $159,006
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The contribution program is a direct response to the rapid growth in freight transportation activity, which is predicted to lead to increased emissions.

This contribution program is designed to achieve the following objectives
  • Support improvements in modal and inter-modal efficiency and reduce air emissions and energy use in the transportation sector; and
  • Demonstrate and encourage the take-up of marine shore power installations in Canadian ports.
In the short term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results
  • Funding of pilot projects for marine shore power;
  • Transfer of knowledge and dissemination of results;
  • Purchase and installation of marine shore power equipment by demonstration proponents; and
  • Increased awareness and understanding of marine shore power opportunities.
In the medium to long term, this initiative is designed to achieve the following results
  • Greater adoption of marine shore power equipment in Canadian ports;
  • Reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants from the marine sector; and
  • Improved efficiency in the transportation industry.
The ultimate outcomes would be
  • To reduce emissions of GHG and air pollutants by 2010/11 in the marine transportation sector.
The delivery of the Marine Shore Power program was placed on hold pending the coming into force of the Canada Marine Act amendments that would remove restriction to the provision of funding to Canadian Port Authorities.

In 2007-2008, Transport Canada consulted with the Association of Canadian Port Authorities and terminal operators in order to promote the program.

Applicants Guide and evaluation criteria were prepared in readiness for the first funding round, once the amendment entered in force.


Clean Transportation Transport Canada
Clean Transportation Program 8: Analytical and Policy Support Program Activity: 3.1 Policies and Programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $3,829,191
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $741,629
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $720,189
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The overarching goal of this initiative is to help ensure the provision of the analytical and policy expertise necessary to support and further develop research, policies and programs related to the federal priorities of sustainable transportation, clean air and climate change. In 2007-2008, the following studies were conducted to provide analytical and policy support:
  • Active transportation;
  • Shipping;
  • Emissions trading;
  • Fuel efficiency technologies in the heavy-duty truck sector;
  • Transportation GHG emission estimates by mode and type of activity;
  • Validation of GHG study estimates.
In addition, two stakeholder workshops on active transportation were conducted.


Clean Transportation Transport Canada
Clean Transportation Program 9a: ecoAUTO Rebate Program (Transport Canada component) Program Activity: 3.1 Policies and Programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $251,818,351
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $74,622,027
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $73,757,589
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The main objective of the ecoAUTO Rebate Program is to pursue incentives to encourage the purchase of more fuel efficient personal vehicles, thereby reducing air emissions and energy use in the transportation sector in support of the Government's Clean Air Agenda.

Reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants from the urban passenger transportation sector.

Increase in advanced fuel efficiency technology penetration into the Canadian vehicle market.

A more networked government providing timely, citizen-centred service to the applicants of the program through an efficient Call Centre, In-Person Network and Processing Centre.
On March 19, 2007, Budget 2007 announced the ecoAUTO Rebate Program. Budget 2007 stated that while the rebate for fuel-efficient vehicles went into effect March 20, 2007, the payment of rebates would be made once administration and delivery systems have been put in place, with a target date of fall 2007. The program was designed, sought the appropriate approvals and was operational on October 1, 2007.

The program encouraged the purchase of NEW fuel-efficient vehicles by offering rebates to eligible recipients that buy or enter into leases of 12 months or more for an eligible vehicle registered for use in Canada. A list of eligible 2006 , 2007 and 2008 model year vehicles was published using a Combined Fuel Consumption Rating (CFCR) of 6.5 L/100km or less for new automobiles, and a CFCR of 8.3 L/100km or less for new minivans, sport utility vehicles and other light trucks. In addition, rebates for the purchase of new flexible-fuel vehicles with combined fuel consumption E85 ratings of 13.0 L/100km or less were issued
  • Over 65,000 ecoAUTO Rebate applications processed.
  • $71,342,000 distributed to eligible participants.
  • 413,932 Web visits
  • The number of eligible vehicle meeting the fuel consumption requirements increased to 32 from 21 for the 2008 model year.


Clean Transportation Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Clean Transportation Program 9b: ecoAUTO Rebate Program (HRSDC component) Program Activity: 3.1 Policies and Programs in support of sustainable development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $11,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $7,000,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $7,000,000
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
ecoAUTO Program activities also include receiving and processing applications for rebates to consumers purchasing eligible vehicles, resulting in eligible recipients receiving rebate cheques in a timely manner. HRSDC administered the processing of ecoAUTO applications for TC.
  • Mail received 74,440 Applications processed 65,958
  • WEB visit 21,359
  • Calls received 59,587


Clean Transportation Natural Resources Canada
Clean Transportation Program 10: ecoENERGY for Personal Vehicles Program Activity: 1.3 Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $21,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $3,950,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $3,886,000
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Final Outcome
  • Reductions in energy consumption or greenhouse gases or criteria air contaminants from transportation.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gases or criteria air contaminants.
Immediate Outcomes
  • Increased capacity to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gases or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances.
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities.
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices.
Outputs
  • Financial support.
Final Outcome
  • In 2007/08, a 0.04 MT GHG reduction was estimated to be achieved as a result of program activities such as driver training and campaigns to improve driver habits. The 0.04 MT GHG reduction excludes the impact of the Memorandum of Understanding with the auto industry, for which measurement methodology is still being finalized.
Immediate Outcomes
  • Capacity to address emissions through better driving practices and more efficient vehicle purchases was enhanced through extensive training and through the provision of information materials such as educational media articles. There were over 39 million such knowledge transfer opportunities.
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities occurred as a result of 5 new organizations committing to engaging in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities.
  • As a result of a research study (a survey of trained drivers), the program team learned how some key messages could be improved and clarified for students. This information was used to update the Auto$mart program materials, and as a result trained drivers are expected to have improved capacity to use the best practices they have been taught.
Outputs
  • Through a competitive process, the program provided financial support to 5 projects in the amount of $401,840, creating partnerships and increasing capacity to undertake transportation energy efficiency initiatives. 38 proposals were received in total.
  • Program staff held 2 meeting events with the auto industry to develop networks to support transportation energy efficiency initiatives.
  • 350,000 student drivers were trained on energy efficient driving practices using program materials.


Clean Transportation Natural Resources Canada
Clean Transportation Program 11: ecoENERGY for Fleets Program Activity: 1.3 Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $22,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $3,650,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $2,659,000
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Final Outcome
  • Reductions in energy consumption or greenhouse gases or criteria air contaminants from transportation.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Use of transportation best practices that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gases or criteria air contaminants.
Immediate Outcomes
  • Increased capacity to undertake initiatives that reduce energy consumption or greenhouse gases or criteria air contaminants or release of toxic substances.
  • Increased participation in emission reducing activities through partnerships and other program activities.
  • Informed positions on policies and programs influencing transportation technologies and practices.
Outputs
  • Financial support.
Final Outcome
  • A 0.01 MT GHG reduction was estimated to be achieved as a result of program activities in 2007/08, such as education for fleet managers and professional drivers and a campaign to reduce unnecessary idling at truck stops.
Immediate Outcomes
  • The capacity of transportation professionals to address emissions through their decision making was enhanced through training and through the provision of decision-support tools and information materials including workshops. There were over 38,500 such knowledge transfer opportunities.
  • As a result of 4 research studies (on aerodynamics, tires, idle-reduction devices and long-combination vehicles), the program team became aware of new opportunities for reducing emissions from the trucking sector. This information is being used to plan outreach initiatives, and as a result the program expects to provide more comprehensive messaging for the trucking sector.
Outputs
  • The program provided financial support to 5 projects in the amount of $254,734, creating partnerships and increasing capacity to undertake transportation energy efficiency initiatives. 6 proposals were received in total.
  • Program staff secured 3 partnerships with stakeholders and developed networks to support transportation energy efficiency initiatives by holding 62 events including presentations, seminars, and workshops.
  • Training and education on fuel efficient driving practices was provided to 503 driving professionals.
  • Program staff developed and produced 3 unique information products containing material to support more energy efficient transportation decisions (e.g. decision support tools, campaigns) targeted at transportation professionals.
  • 4 research studies were conducted (on aerodynamics, tires, idle-reduction devices and long-combination vehicles) and the findings will be used to inform future programming.


Clean Transportation Environment Canada
Clean Transportation Program 12: Vehicle Scrappage Program (Environment Canada component) Program Activity: 3.3 Risks to Canadians, their health and their environment form air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $92,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $1,500,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $733,741
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The Scrappage program will target personal automobiles that are model year 1995 or earlier, in running condition ("live vehicles") and have been registered and insured for at least the past 6 months. Owners of these vehicles will be offered a suite of incentives that could include: a cash incentive; free transit passes; incentives supporting sustainable transportation alternatives (such as a car sharing membership or rebate on a bicycle); or a rebate on a vehicle of model year 2004 and newer to be provided by manufacturers and/or dealers. There will be regional variations in the type and value of incentives depending on the contribution of local partners such as transit authorities.
By the end of four years, the Program will achieve the following results
  • 200,000 in-use vehicles will be scrapped during the four-year life of the Program.
  • Smog-forming emissions will be reduced by a total of nearly 9,000 tonnes of NOx and VOCs, and 214,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions over the life of the Program.
  • Increased use of sustainable transportation alternatives could result in further reductions of greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Increased awareness and understanding among Canadians of the environmental impacts of older vehicles.
  • Responsible recycling of vehicles will prevent the release of toxic substances.
  • The code of practice developed for vehicle recycling through the Program will provide the impetus to raise standards, nationally, and may be adopted by provinces and territories.
Leveraging of federal funding by partners at a ratio of about 3:1 ($3 in incentive value for every $1 in federal funding towards incentives).
  • Consulted stakeholders on program design and delivery
  • Finalized policy development and program design
  • Awarded $79 million contribution agreement to the Clean Air Foundation to deliver the program
  • Focus group research with owners of old vehicles

Indoor Air Quality Theme Programs

 


Indoor Air Quality National Research Council
Indoor Air Quality Program 1: Indoor Air Research and Development Initiative Program Activity: 1.1 Research and development
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $8,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $2,000,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,222,147
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Assessment of the Impacts of Improved Indoor Air Ventilation and Indoor Air Distribution on Human Health and Indoor Air Quality
  • Establishment of one Scientific Steering Committee with Institut national de sante publique du Quebec (INSPQ) on intervention field study on Ventilation, Air Distribution and Health (in Quebec City) in 2007/08.
  • One 'Memorandum of Understanding' (MOU) in place with provincial health partner, to complement field intervention study (2008/09).
  • One research modelling and ventilation research facility built and instrumented (2008/09).
  • Two papers, accepted or published in peer-reviewed journals (one in 2009/10, and one in 2010/11).
Evaluation of Indoor Air Quality Technologies and Solutions
  • Two stakeholder meetings/workshops with Canadian interest groups and manufacturers, to prioritize IAQ technologies to be tested, validate research protocols, and disseminate findings (2008/09).
  • Three protocols developed on the assessment of "Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) improvement solutions"/technologies (2009/10).
  • Two papers, accepted or published in peer-reviewed journals (one in 2009/10, and one in 2010/11).
  • Two test systems built to test different relevant indoor air quality improvement technologies (2010/11).
  • One collaborative agreement in place to support one Indoor Air Quality solution (by 2010/11).
  • Three "Indoor Air Quality improvement solutions"/technologies tested against three respective protocols (2010/11).
  • One publicly available data set available regarding features of IAQ improvement technologies.
  • Report on procedures in support of rating systems in respect to IAQ (2010/11).
Establishment of a National Committee Focusing on Indoor Air
  • Establishment of a consultation/decision-making process to guide industry and relevant stakeholders concerned with Indoor Air Quality (Indoor Air Quality Committee) (2008/09).
  • Two surveys of stakeholders of industry, home owners, general interest groups etc. on awareness of indoor air and improvement strategies (2008/09 and 2010/11).
Scientific Committee established with members of HC, CMHC, INSPQ, and NRC

MOU drafted by INSPQ and NRC with respect to the objectives and responsibilities of the intervention field study.

New Indoor Air Facility
  • 2/3 complete (building shell and services completed).
Survey of scientific literature (in progress); criteria for technology selection drafted.

Technology review paper drafted.

Paper drafted on scope, composition and role of committee.

Held one foundation meeting of stakeholders representing government and industry from across Canada; identified further members and defined scope, mission, and terms reference.


Indoor Air Quality Health Canada
Indoor Air Quality Program 2: Radon Strategy Program Activity: 3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer safety
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $15,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $3,500,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $3,384,000
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Mapping
Systematic surveying, mapping and identification of radon hotspots in all major populated areas of Canada that are known or believed to be at risk because of local geological and climatic conditions associated with elevated radon levels.

Education and Awareness
Heightened knowledge, awareness and sensitivity of all key sectors, as well as Canadian consumers and federal employees and building managers, regarding the nature and extent of risks to human health from exposure to radon and of available prevention and mitigation measures to effectively address those risks.

Testing
Systematic on-site testing and screening of approximately 15,000 federal buildings and facilities for actual radon levels and their comparison against the new radon guidelines, such inventory consisting of all federal facilities located in known and/or potential high-risk areas.
Completed ground-based analysis of soil gas radon concentrations at 262 sites (in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and southern Ontario). Locations around Sarnia in southern Ontario showed higher than average soil gas radon concentrations, suggesting they are potentially radon-rich.

Developed a fall/winter 2008 radon marketing/communications strategy focusing on homeowners, commercial building owners, the building industry and public health practitioners.

Fourteen radon stakeholder workshops held across Canada as part of strategy to encourage stakeholder involvement in radon testing and remediation.

Developed and distributed a radon fact sheet via stakeholders and industry partners.

Developed a standard procedure for radon testing in large buildings, starting with federal buildings.

Prepared information package on the objectives of the project, the process for testing, and the means by which data and results will be shared.

Tested about 1000 buildings across Canada in 2007/08, representing 5% of the stock estimated to be in high-risk areas.


Adaptation Theme Programs


Adaptation Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Adaptation Program 1: Assist Northerners in Assessing Key Vulnerabilities and Opportunities Program Activity: 3.4 Northern Land and Resources
Start Date: April 1, 2008 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $14,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $0
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $338,775
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Northerners and Aboriginal people will have increased their knowledge and resource capacity to adapt to climate change impacts. Program measures are aimed at improving access to information and increasing technical expertise on adaptation to climate change, evaluating climate risks and identifying responses to risks, putting in place collaborative mechanisms to design effective solutions, and developing adaptation actions by aboriginal and northern communities to address key vulnerabilities. The program supports the distribution of information on tools, best practices and project results to enable communities to integrate climate change risk management in their planning, decision-making and project implementation.

Expected results for 2007/08 (from program's RMAF/RBAF)

Long Term Outcome
  • Increased capacity of northerners to adapt to climate change impacts.
Intermediate Outcomes
  • Increased professional and institutional development related to adaptation to climate change
  • Aboriginal and northern communities have access to support to develop and implement adaptation planning actions
  • Guidance material for developing safer and more reliable infrastructure, and,
  • Planning decisions are based on identified risks.
Immediate Outcomes
  • Access to information and increased technical expertise on adaptation to climate change
  • Climate risks evaluated and responses to risks identified and
  • Greater collaboration in place of the design of effective solutions.
(as per RMAF/RBAF performance indicators at output level)
  • 4 Climate change adaptation conferences attended
  • 7 stakeholders aware of the opportunities available through INAC's Adaptation Program
  • Website communicating program to staff and external stakeholders in place and maintained
  • 30 inquiries about INAC's Adaptation Program
  • Climate change Adaptation Program Guide in progress, but not completed
  • 3 projects funded for Adaptation tools (climate change scenarios, risk assessments, outreach materials)
  • 4 projects funded for identification of risks, impacts and risk management strategies related to climate change impacts.


Adaptation Environment Canada
Adaptation Program 2a: National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program (Environment Canada component) Program Activity: 2.1 Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision-making
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $21,300,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $4,500,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $4,088,900
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Air Quality reports and forecasts will be produced by Environment Canada's regional Storm Predictions Centres, supported by Environment Canada's weather and environmental prediction infrastructure and real-time use of data by federal-provincial air quality monitoring programs.
  1. Production and delivery of daily AQI forecasts and advisories/warnings in BC, AB, SK, MB, ON, QC, NB, NS, PEI and NL
  2. Production and delivery of twice daily Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) forecasts and related information in Toronto and 14 locations in BC including Vancouver and Victoria
  3. Planning, technical development and training required for national transition from the AQI to the new AQHI
  4. Production and delivery of ventilation and smoke control forecasts in BC and Yukon
  5. Conduct public opinion surveys in Windsor, Toronto plus focus group research in Halifax, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver to support AQHI implementation


Adaptation Health Canada
Adaptation Program 2b: National Air Quality Health Index and Air Quality Forecast Program (Health Canada component) Program Activity: 2.1 Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision-making
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $8,700,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $1,500,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,039,630
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Within the next four years, the expected outcome is for all 27 census metropolitan areas (communities larger than 100,000), collectively accounting for 80% of the Canadian population in Canada, to receive local AQHI forecasts. The longer-term objective is for full national access to the AQHI in all Canadian communities including the north if the necessary monitoring infrastructure exists to support forecasting. In 2007-2008, Health Canada entered into the implementation phase of the AQHI beginning with Toronto and 14 communities in British Columbia. Groundwork to ensure implementation in at least six additional communities for fiscal year 2008-2009 also took place. The department, together with its partners, laid the foundation to begin implementation in the Greater Toronto Area (Brampton, Burlington, Mississauga, Newmarket, Oakville, and Oshawa), Halifax, NS and Saint John NB in 2008.


Adaptation Environment Canada
Adaptation Program 3: Improved Climate Change Scenarios Program Activity: 2.1 Improved knowledge and information on weather and environmental conditions influence decision-making
Start Date: April 1, 2008 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $15,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $0
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $0
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Accurate climate information and projections are essential to assess impacts and develop robust adaptation strategies and measures. Improved climate change projections and scenarios will be developed by EC particularly on extremes and hazards for vulnerable infrastructure (e.g. bridges and sewers, which require extreme rainfall design information) and for communities across Canada. Key outcomes of this program include: Adaptive decision making, risk reduction and emergency preparedness. As funds under this program were not approved until April 2008, no work was undertaken in 2007-2008.


Adaptation Health Canada
Adaptation Program 4: Climate Change and Health Adaptation in Northern/Inuit Communities Program Activity: 4.1 First Nations and Inuit Health
Start Date: April 1, 2008 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $7,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $295,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $0
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
  • Vulnerable northern communities will have assessed human health risks and impacts related to climate change so as to position themselves to develop locally-relevant contingency plans and adaptation strategies to address priority risks and impacts. As the research will be done by communities - whether individually or as a group - much of this research and the associated mitigation strategies will be transferable to similar communities across the North.
  • Northern communities will have greater capacity/knowledge for development of culturally-sensitive educational and awareness materials on the health impacts of climate change, thereby enabling them to make better local/regional decisions to protect their health.
  • Outcomes will be measured through collection and assessment of media reports, local council meeting minutes, publications and research papers to determine the effectiveness of transferring and applying knowledge on climate change and health adaptation in northern and/or Inuit communities.
There are no results to report for FY 2007-2008 because Treasury Board funding approval was not received until April 3 rd , 2008.


Adaptation Natural Resources Canada
Adaptation Program 5: Innovative Risk Management Tools Program Activity: 1.1 Earth Sciences
Start Date: April 1, 2008 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $5,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $0
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $0
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
  • Information and decision-support tools needed for practitioners (e.g. planners and resource managers) and decision-makers are more readily available;
  • Practitioners and decision-makers use information and decision-support tools to assess risks and opportunities from a changing climate and identify adaptation options; and
  • Strengthened Canadian expertise in development and application of tools for adaptation in Canada.

Completed testing of community tools for adaptation and analyzed needs for supporting information (funding for this activity came from the Climate Change Interim Strategy).


Adaptation Natural Resources Canada
Adaptation Program 6: Regional Adaptation Action Partnerships Program Activity: 1.1 Earth Sciences
Start Date: April 1, 2008 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $30,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $0
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $0
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Information and decision-support tools needed for practitioners and decision-makers to understand risks and opportunities from a changing climate, and identify adaptation options that are available from RAWP members;
  • Practitioners and decision-makers with responsibilities to adapt are engaged on adaptation;
  • Mechanisms to share regional & sectoral information, tools & experiences nationally are used;
  • Improved institutional capacity (meaning staff understanding how to integrate climate change considerations in their organization's decisions in public and private sectors) to address adaptation issues;
  • Strengthened linkages among stakeholders on the issue of adaptation (to share lessons learned);
  • Practitioners (such as engineers and planners) adjust routine practices, guidelines, or codes & standards to respond to the risks and opportunities from a changing climate; and
  • Decision-makers adjust policy, planning, or operations to respond to the risks and opportunities from a changing climate.
Informal meetings were held with provincial and territorial adaptation focal points to discuss possible plans for the Regional Adaptation Collaboratives and determine opportunities for collaboration.

Planning for the process to deliver the RACs Program was initiated (development of call letter, communications planning, etc.)

Discussed a benchmark survey to provide data for theme and program evaluation of the level of adaptation activity in Canada.


Adaptation Health Canada
Adaptation Program 7a: Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System to Protect the Health of Canadians (Health Canada component) Program Activity: 3.1 Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety
Start Date: April 1, 2008 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $7,900,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $550,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $0
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Health Professional Interventions and Training
Canadians and health care professionals will have access to improved knowledge on the health risks of a changing climate in the following key areas:
  • Health professionals and others will have substantially improved understanding of risk factors that make certain vulnerable population groups particularly susceptible to, or at risk from, extreme weather conditions, enabling them to identify and pursue more effective prevention and mitigation measures to protect health.
  • Data collection protocols and reporting frameworks distributed to support reporting on heat-health issues at the provincial and local levels.
Pilot Heat Alert and Response Systems
Canadians and health care professionals will have access to improved knowledge on the health risks of a changing climate in the following key area:
  • Stakeholders and decision-makers have the information and knowledge to both characterize heat-health risks facing communities, as well as develop appropriate alert and response strategies to protect the health of community members - especially vulnerable populations - in response to situations of extreme heat.
There are no results to report for FY 2007-2008 because Treasury Board funding approval was not received until April 3, 2008.


Adaptation Public Health Agency of Canada
Adaptation Program 7b: Climate and Infectious Disease Alert and Response System to Protect the Health of Canadians (Public Health Agency of Canada component) Program Activity: 1.2 Disease Prevention and Control
Start Date: April 1, 2008 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $7,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $494,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $251,600
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Development of a pilot community-based approach to assessing infectious disease risk and effectiveness of response in up to four communities.
  • Canadians will have access to new information to protect their health from risks related to climate change and infectious disease threats; they will be better informed of the actions they need to take to protect themselves and their families through development of new outreach products and response systems.
  • Increased knowledge and ability to predict which areas and sub-populations will be at increased risk as a result of changes to the incidence, prevalence and spread of specified infectious diseases occurring as a result of a changing climate.
  • Further development of Canadian expertise in risk modeling and risk mitigation as it relates to changes in climate and the impact on human health.
  • Tools and recommendations are available to support provinces, territories and local municipalities in the development and provision of social and public health care services in response to infectious disease events.
  • Provinces, territories and local governments, including public health authorities, will be provided with the research, evidence base and risk analysis to develop and implement prevention and mitigation strategies at the local and provincial level.
Program development planning was undertaken and preliminary contact with potential partners was made. Scientific and other equipment were purchased and some training occurred.


International Actions Theme Programs

 


International Actions Environment Canada
International Actions Program 1a: International Obligations (Environment Canada component) Program Activity: 4.2 Relations with other governments and partners are managed in support of environmental priorities
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $2,892,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $1,023,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $962,268
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The establishment of the national registry will protect Canada's international credibility by allowing Canada to remain engaged in the Kyoto Protocol and avoiding a non-compliance proceeding.

Payment of membership dues and active participation in international technology partnerships outside the UN will strengthen Canada's credibility and influence discussions on a future climate change agreement.
Canada established its national registry. Canada made its assessed contributions, as well as voluntary contributions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Canada participated in technology-related partnerships outside of the UN, including the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership in order to promote and support the development of clean technologies needed to reduce GHG emissions and address climate change.

Canada provided support to non-UN agencies with the goal of enhancing understanding and assessing options for the development of a future climate change agreement.


International Actions Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
International Actions Program 1b: International Obligations (Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada component) Program Activity: 1.3 Global Issues
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $1,908,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $477,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $404,316
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Canada , in continuing to meet its funding obligations for the UN Climate Change Secretariat, will contribute to its international reputation and the overall functioning of this organization, assisting to ensure that the Secretariat will be able to continue to organize future meetings. International funding obligations for 2007-2008 were met.


International Actions Environment Canada
International Actions Program 2a: International Participation and Negotiations (Environment Canada component) Program Activity: 3.3 Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $11,400,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $3,000,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $3,247,607
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Given the interdisciplinary and collaborative approach among departments on this component, some expected outcomes of this work are shared across departments. These shared expected outcomes are:
  • Effective coordination of issues, matters and policy perspectives related to international climate change across relevant departments. Ministers are kept apprised of relevant issues affecting their portfolios. Analytically-sound options for Canadian negotiating positions are developed, analyzed and broadly coordinated through the interdepartmental process.
  • Outcomes of international negotiations and initiatives are consistent with Canada's interests and priorities as agreed to inter-departmentally and/or through Cabinet directives. Canadian interests are protected and advanced in both existing and new agreements, and through participation in key bilateral and multilateral partnerships.
EC worked closely with other government departments to develop policy options and positions on a range of climate change issues.

Canada actively participated in the UN and non-UN negotiations and discussions leading to the establishment of a post-2012 climate change agreement.

Canada 's participation contributed to ensuring that the future agreement on climate change is consistent with our domestic approach on climate change and protects Canadian environmental and economic interests.


International Actions Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
International Actions Program 2b: International Participation and Negotiations (Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada component) Program Activity: 1.3 Global Issues
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $6,400,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $1,750,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,525,706
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Given the interdisciplinary and collaborative approach among departments on this component, some expected outcomes of this work are shared across departments. These shared expected outcomes are:
  • Effective coordination of issues, matters and policy perspectives related to international climate change across relevant departments. Ministers are kept apprised of relevant issues affecting their portfolios. Analytically-sound options for Canadian negotiating positions are developed, analyzed and broadly coordinated through the interdepartmental process.
  • Outcomes of international negotiations and initiatives are consistent with Canada's interests and priorities as agreed to inter-departmentally and/or through Cabinet directives. Canadian interests are protected and advanced in both existing and new agreements, and through participation in key bilateral and multilateral partnerships.
Through the provision of substantive analytical and policy input in the formulation and presentation of Canadian views, Canadian interests were defended in the negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and its Kyoto Protocol.

A key outcome of these deliberations was the formal launch of negotiations on a future climate change agreement at the UN Bali Climate Change Conference in December 2007. DFAIT actively participated in the UN process, as well as advocate our positions within other multilateral processes, i.e., the G8, the Major Economies Meeting process, APEC, the Commonwealth, other UN events, and through bilateral channels through DFAIT's network of Embassies and other Missions abroad.


International Actions Natural Resources Canada
International Actions Program 2c: International Participation and Negotiations (Natural Resources Canada component) Program Activity: 2.1 Clean Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $5,200,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $1,400,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $946,922
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The expected outcomes of NRCan's international climate change policy development and continued engagement in international climate change negotiations, both inside and outside the UNFCCC include:
  • Alignment of Canada's international climate change policies and negotiating positions with Canada's domestic energy and other natural resource interests (i.e. as a major natural resources exporter), as well as alignment with Canada's domestic climate change and clean air policies.
  • Highlighting Canadian technologies and activities through international climate change venues that can assist in addressing the global nature of climate change while promoting Canadian technology exports internationally.
  • Providing timely strategic policy advice to the Minister of NRCan, Deputy Minister and senior management on global climate change developments, and the links with energy policy and other natural resource issues.
  • Preparing NRCan's Minister, Deputy-Minister and other senior officials for representing the Department and Canada in a range of strategically selected bilateral and multilateral meetings across a range of fora.
NRCan contributed to the process to ensure that domestic interests and climate change policies were reflected during the formulation and presentation of Canadian negotiating positions.

NRCan participated in the Expert Group on Technology Transfer, established under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to analyze and identify ways to facilitate and advance technology development and transfer activities.

NRCan referenced domestic activities to address climate change (e.g., ecoENERGY) in briefing materials prepared for international climate change meetings.

NRCan officials provided policy documents and advice to the Minister, Deputy Minister and other senior officials in support of policy and development and decision making

NRCan's policy analysis and technical expertise in energy, forestry and climate change adaptation anchored the Government of Canada representatives' participation in international meetings, including the UNFCCC, the U.S.-led Major Emitters Process, the G8 and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation.


International Actions Environment Canada
International Actions Program 3a: Asia-Pacific Partnership (Environment Canada component) Program Activity: 3.3 Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $18,882,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $4,628,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $518,024
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
In the first year, Canada will be in an implementation phase where APP activities will be focused on: 1) obtaining membership; 2) consulting with key domestic industrial sectors, and; 3) developing Canada's governance structure and operational guidelines through the establishment of an APP Secretariat.

In subsequent years, once Canada's membership has been confirmed, the focus will shift from program design to implementation. Domestic activities will shift from promotion and consultation to project selection. Internationally, Canada will seek to influence the scope and direction of the Partnership to ensure alignment with Canada's interests, while leveraging enhanced bilateral relations to shape the role of key large emitting countries in a future climate change agreement.
Canada obtained membership to the Asia-Pacific Partnership in October 2007.

A governance structure to operationalize Canada's participation in the APP has been operationalized.

Canada is participating in the work of all of the APP Task Forces, and is facilitating the involvement of the Canadian private sector in the work of the APP.


International Actions Natural Resources Canada
International Actions Program 3b: Asia-Pacific Partnership (Natural Resources Canada component) Program Activity: 2.1 Clean Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $878,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $272,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $21,436
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
In the first year, Canada will be in an implementation phase where APP activities will be focused on: 1) obtaining membership; 2) consulting with key domestic industrial sectors, and; 3) developing Canada's governance structure and operational guidelines through the establishment of an APP Secretariat.

In subsequent years, once Canada's membership has been confirmed, the focus will shift from program design to implementation. Domestic activities will shift from promotion and consultation to project selection. Internationally, Canada will seek to influence the scope and direction of the Partnership to ensure alignment with Canada's interests, while leveraging enhanced bilateral relations to shape the role of key large emitting countries in a future climate change agreement.
NRCan officials assisted with the effort that led to Canada's invitation and eventual acceptance to membership.

NRCan participated in consultations with key domestic industrial sectors.

NRCan provided advice and input to the Secretariat and inter-departmental working group in developing Canada's governance structure and operational guidelines.

NRCan provided input on potential project selection criteria.


International Actions Industry Canada
International Actions Program 3c: Asia-Pacific Partnership (Industry Canada component) Program Activity: 2.1 Clean Energy
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $240,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $100,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $0
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
In the first year, Canada will be in an implementation phase where APP activities will be focused on: 1) obtaining membership; 2) consulting with key domestic industrial sectors, and; 3) developing Canada's governance structure and operational guidelines through the establishment of an APP Secretariat.

In subsequent years, once Canada's membership has been confirmed, the focus will shift from program design to implementation. Domestic activities will shift from promotion and consultation to project selection. Internationally, Canada will seek to influence the scope and direction of the Partnership to ensure alignment with Canada's interests, while leveraging enhanced bilateral relations to shape the role of key large emitting countries in a future climate change agreement.
Industry Canada's involvement in the APP will result in enhanced participation and liaison with key Canadian sectors and key sectors internationally.
As no funds were spent in 2007-08, no activities were completed during this period.


International Actions Environment Canada
International Actions Program 4: PM Annex Program Activity: 3.3 Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Start Date: April 1, 2007 End Date: March 31, 2011
Total Funding Allocated $2,200,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $550,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $136,699
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The negotiations of a PM Annex (scheduled for completion early summer 2008), will result over the longer-term (i.e. by 2011) in:
  • an enhanced relationship between Canada and the U.S. on a key environmental issue for both countries - clean air as evidenced by their continued interest in pursuing air quality initiatives of common interest;
  • reduced transboundary flow of PM and its precursors based largely on the caps and timelines established by the Clean Air Interstate Rule in the U.S. and by the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda in Canada.
In 2007-2008, Canada and the US launched the negotiations of a PM Annex and established two inter-sessional working groups to prepare the second round of negotiations.


Partnerships Theme Program


Partnerships Environment Canada
Partnerships Program 1: Clean Air Community Partnerships Program Activity:
Total Approved $12,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $3,000,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,000,600
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
Short-term results include
  • Incentives are provided to encourage Canadians to adopt more sustainable behaviours at home, at school, at the workplace.
  • Funding from EC to partners leverages projects and initiatives that provide incentives for Canadians to take action on Clean Air and Climate.
  • Communities and individuals are better able to manage and take a lead on reducing emissions that contribute to climate change and air pollution.
  • Community Funding Programs are managed effectively to deliver on departmental priorities.
Longer-term expected results include
  • Canadians make decisions and take action to enhance environmental quality
  • Canadians adopt sustainable consumption and production behaviours
  • The ultimate outcomes of the CACP will be that greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution is reduced.
Completed the design and start-up of the Clean Air Community Partnerships program. Consulted with stakeholders, prepared documentation and staffing. The main result areas achieved were in terms of implementation:
  • A Program Manager was hired.
  • Communications and program materials were prepared.
  • Performance indicators developed.
  • GHG calculator created. The GHG calculator is an estimation tool that will assist both CACP staff and funding recipients to calculate GHG reductions for individual CACP projects.
  • Contribution to Clean Air HMARF was completed for the Partnerships Theme.

Management and Accountability Theme Program


Management and Accountability Environment Canada
Management and Accountability Program 1: Management and Accountability Program Activity: 3.3 - Risk to Canadians, their health and their environment from air pollutants and GHG emissions are reduced
Total Approved $5,000,000
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 $1,250,000
Actual Spending for 2007-2008 $1,185,894
Expected Results 2007-2011 Results Achieved in 2007-2008
The Government has committed to achieving tangible improvements in Canada's environment, including reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It has also committed to implement a more strategic approach to expenditure management in horizontal priority areas. The HMARF will help address the need to improve governance and accountability in the management of horizontal initiatives that involve a number of departments.

The objectives of the Clean Air Agenda are to improve the health of Canadians and increase environmental benefits by reducing air pollution and GHG emissions. This will be delivered through two main initiatives:
  • The Clean Air Regulatory Agenda, which is intended to provide effective regulation of air pollution and GHG from transportation, key industrial sectors and consumer products; and
  • Program Measures in Support of the Government's Clean Air Agenda, which are intended to provide for a balanced approach to reducing emissions of air pollutants and GHGs to protect the health and environment of Canadians. They will encompass actions in all key areas that cannot be covered by regulation.
Together, these initiatives provide an integrated, nationally consistent approach for areas that can be regulated and addresses important sources of emissions that cannot be effectively regulated. The program measures can also contribute to emission reductions while regulations are being developed. Each of the main initiatives will be delivered through theme areas composed of specific programs.
  • CAA-HMARF Charter was completed and approved
  • CAA-HMARF Strategies were completed and approved (Financial, performance, governance, reporting, risk, information management, evaluation)
  • The final CAA-HMARF strategy and plan was submitted to Treasury Board and accepted
  • Clean Air Agenda chapter for 2006-07 Canada's Performance Report was published
  • CAA-HMARF 2008-2009 RPP was completed and made available to the public
  • A Consolidated ARLU report was submitted to TBS
  • Supported Governance structure meetings
    • 2 DGTLCC meetings
    • 1 ADM meetings

  • Developed the 08-09 workplan for CAA-HMARF

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Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

FINTRAC is involved in the following horizontal initiatives as a partner:

  1. Anti-Money Laundering / Anti-Terrorist Financing Initiative (AML/ATF)
  2. Public Security and Anti-Terrorism Initiative (PSAT)
  3. National Anti-Drug Strategy (NADS)

Supplementary information on horizontal initiatives can be found at http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rma/eppi-ibdrp/hr-rh_e.asp

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Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Horizontal Initiatives

Horizontal initiatives are programs or initiatives in which partners from two or more organizations agree under a formal funding agreement to work toward the achievement of shared outcomes.

DFO is a partner on the following 11 horizontal initiatives led by other federal government departments:


Horizontal Initiative Lead Department
Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products Health Canada
Canadian Biotechnology Strategy Industry Canada
Canadian Group on Earth Observations (CGEO) Environment Canada
Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem Initiative Environment Canada
International Polar Year Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Genomics R&D Initiative Industry Canada
Mackenzie Gas Project (MGP) and induced oil and gas exploration and development activities in the NWT Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Federal Contaminated Sites Accelerated Action Plan Environment Canada and
Treasury Board Secretariat
Implementation of the Act Respecting the Protection of Wildlife Species at Risk in Canada Environment Canada
Marine Security Transport Canada
Interim Strategy on Existing Climate Change Programs Environment Canada

Further information on these horizontal initiatives can be found on the Internet.

 

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Health Canada

Table 8: Horizontal Initiatives

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Chemicals Management Plan

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Health Canada/Environment Canada

3. Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative: FY 2007-2008

4. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative: FY 2010-2011

5. Total Federal Funding Allocation: $299.2 M

6. Description of the Horizontal Initiative:

The Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) is part of the Government's comprehensive environmental agenda and is managed jointly by Health Canada (HC) and Environment Canada (EC). The activities identified in this plan build on Canada's position as a global leader in the safe management of chemical substances and those chemicals contained in products, and focus upon timely action on key threats to health and the environment.

The CMP also generates a higher level of responsibility for industry through realistic and enforceable measures, stimulate innovation, and augment Canadian competitiveness in an international market that is increasingly focussed on the safety of chemicals and products.

HC and EC manage CMP funding collectively and ensure that it is aligned with the highest priorities for action to protect human health and the environment.

Within the CMP model, the regulatory management of chemical substances can be implemented through a number of legislative instruments including Food and Drugs Act (F&DA), Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), Hazardous Products Act (HPA) and Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) . The first three Acts are administered by Health Canada and CEPA is jointly administered by Health Canada and Environment Canada.

The following program areas are involved in CMP activities:

In Health Canada :

  • Health Products and Food Branch:
    • Food Directorate
    • Policy, Planning, and International Affairs Directorate
  • Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch:
    • Product Safety Programme
    • Safe Environments Programme
  • Pest Management Regulatory Agency

In Environment Canada :

  • Environmental Stewardship Branch
    • Chemical Sectors Directorate
    • Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Directorate
    • Public and Resources Sectors Directorate
    • Public & Resources Sector Directorate
    • Energy and Transportation Directorate
    • Environmental Protection Operations Directorate
  • Science and Technology Branch
    • Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
    • Water Science and Technology Directorate
    • Wildlife and Landscape Science Directorate
    • Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate
  • Enforcement Branch
  • Strategic Policy Branch
    • Economic Analysis Directorate

7. Shared Outcome(s):

High-level CMP outcomes include:

  • Canadians and their environment are protected from the harmful effects of chemicals;
  • Risk identification, evaluation, reduction, elimination, prevention or improved management of chemicals substances and their uses are effectively implemented;
  • Direction, collaboration and coordination of science and management activities are realized;
  • Biomonitoring and environmental monitoring of toxic substances are timely and responsive;
  • Stakeholders and Canadian public are engaged so that they are better informed and can provide information to the Government for more effective risk management approaches.
  • In accordance with the Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation that came into effect on April 1, 2007, the Government is committed to (i) use available international standards, guidelines, and recommendations as a basis for technical regulations and for conformity assessment procedures where they achieve the intended regulatory objective (thereby avoiding making uniquely 'Made in Canada' Regulations to the extent possible and (ii) promote a fair and competitive market economy that encourages industry entrepreneurship, investment, and innovation

8. Governance Structure(s):

Health Canada shares the lead on the CMP with Environment Canada. The CMP consists of five inter-related program elements (listed below) to be planned, delivered and evaluated within an integrated framework, managed jointly by these two Departments

Within the federal government, the CMP governance is to be established through a joint HC/EC Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (ADM Committee) and an interdepartmental Chemicals Management Executive Committee (CMEC).

The mandate of CMEC is to ensure that all chemical management issues are optimally managed and that activities under the CMP are delivered in an integrated manner, using a suite of legislations, including CEPA, PCPA, F&DA and the HPA.

Core work elements focusing on key CMP activities (Risk Assessment, Risk Management, Research/Science, Monitoring & Surveillance and Policy & Program Management) are currently in place to support the above governance structures.


9. Federal Partners Involved in each Program 10. Names of Programs 11. Total Allocation 12. Forecasted Spending for FY 2007-08 13. Actual Spending in FY 2007-08
Health Canada Risk Assessment
$27.0 M
$3.2 M
$3.0 M
Environment Canada
$22.6 M
$2.1 M
$2.1 M
 
$49.6 M (total)
$5.3 M (total)
$5.1 M (total)
Health Canada
Risk Management
$94.9 M
$12.7 M
$12.1 M
Environment Canada
$64.9 M
$9.1 M
$8.4 M
 
$159.8 M (total)
$21.8 M (total)
$20.5 M (total)
Health Canada Research/Science
$30.2 M
$3.3 M
$3.3 M
Environment Canada
$2.1 M
$0.6 M
$0.6 M
 
$32.3 M (total)
$3.9 M (total)
$3.9 M (total)
Health Canada Monitoring & Surveillance
$35.2 M
$3.4 M
$3.4 M
Environment Canada
$16.9 M
$4.4 M
$4.4 M
 
$52.1 M (total)
$7.8 M (total)
$7.8 M (total)
Health Canada Program Management
$5.4 M
$0.9 M
$0.8 M
 
$5.4 M (total)
$0.9 M (total)
$0.8 M (total)
 
Total $299.2 M
Total $39.7 M
Total $38.1

Planned Results for FY 2007-2008 (From FY 2007-2008 Report on Plans and Priorities):

Risk Assessment: Identifying the impact and evaluating the risks of substances to human health and the environment (e.g., complete assessment of about 200 highest priority substances within 3 years)

Risk Management: Effective controls and informed stakeholders and the Canadian public. (e.g., complete implementation of mandatory pesticide incident reporting system and pesticide sales database by 2009)

Research: Understanding of the relative risks of toxic substances (e.g., complete development of human exposure data and trend analysis methodologies)

Monitoring & Surveillance: Information on the effectiveness of control actions (e.g., define scientific information to be collected by 2008)

Program Management: Direction collaboration and coordination of science and management activities (e.g., initiatives implemented by 2009 to ensure proper results to resources management and stewardship )

Achieved Results for FY 2007-2008:

A key component of the CMP is taking immediate action on the highest priority chemicals. Information is being collected that will be used to make decisions regarding the best approach to protect Canadians and their environment from risks that certain substances may pose. The initiative, known as the "Challenge", includes the identification of approximately 200 substances of highest priority that have been divided up into a number of smaller groups of substances, to be addressed sequentially.

Under the Challenge, requests for information under s. 71 of CEPA for Batches 2, 3, 4 and 5 were published. Substance Profiles were developed for Batches 2-5. New regulations have been developed (e.g. 31 CEPA toxics and 3 other chemicals of concern have had their regulations amended) and a work plan for dealing with petroleum stream substances of high concern has also been completed.

The development of risk management options for Challenge substances is on track. Scientific, legal and economic analyses and enforcement advice is being taken into consideration. Consultations with affected industry stakeholders and the Canadian public will continue throughout the program's life-cycle. A Challenge Advisory Panel (Experts) and CMP Stakeholder Advisory Council (NGO / Industry) have also been established. The Panel's mandate is to provide third party advice on the application of the precautionary principle and the weight of evidence during the risk assessment of the Challenge substances. The Council serves as a forum for NGO and industry members to provide advice and other input to the government on various issues related to the implementation of the CMP.

The Domestic Substances List (DSL) is an inventory of approximately 23 000 substances manufactured in, imported into or used in Canada on a commercial scale. It is based on substances present in Canada, under certain conditions. When a proposed activity or use of a certain DSL substance is different from the one identified in its current use/exposure pattern, the Significant New Activity (SNAc) provisions of CEPA provides for information gathering and assessment prior to the commencement of this significamt new activity or use. A notice is developed which defines the new activity or use, the information to be provided, when it is to be provided, and a period within which it is to be assessed. The outcome of that assessment will inform whether any risk management measures may then be appropriate. The implementation of SNAcs for approximately 56 substances that are no longer in commerce in Canada is currently underway.

Plans for the improvement and expansion of the CMP Portal/Web Site have been developed and the development of additional communication products is underway, including documents to translate scientific information to a non-technical audience (Background documents). A joint CMP HC-EC Integrated Management Accountability Framework (IMAF) has also been developed and quarterly tracking of commitments is on-going.

Other CMP activities undertaken in FY 2007-2008 included:

  • identification of consumer products that may contain potentially harmful chemical substances and developing strategies to best manage the risk associated with these products on the Canadian marketplace;
  • significant progress on a draft framework for appropriate Environmental Assessment Regulations for new medicinally active ingredient substances in pharmaceuticals, veterinary drugs, medical devices and radio-pharmaceuticals;
  • important progress on two Scientific and Regulatory Considerations (SARC) documents that serve as a starting point for discussions with respect to the development of appropriate Environmental Assessment Regulations, one SARC for new substances in Cosmetic Products and the other SARC for new substances in Natural Health Products;
  • initiation of draft SARC documents for the remaining commodity groups (Food Additives and Novel Foods, and Biologics) which are expected to be completed by end of FY 2008-09;
  • finalization of draft human pharmaceuticals Best Management Practices (BMP) research paper, significant progress on veterinary pharmaceuticals BMP research paper and the initiated development of Cosmetics BMP research paper;
  • determination of the human health and ecological risk posed by the environmental presence of some 9,000 substances in products subject to the Food and Drugs Act that have entered the Canadian marketplace between 1987 and 2001;
  • participation of the In Commerce Substances Unit (ICSU) in multi-stakeholder consultations on the revision of the In Commence List (ICL) and organization of four face-to-face meetings to develop a framework for the nomination of substances to the revised ICL. The proposed framework was presented to the Environmental Assessment Working Group in June 2008 and received approval The chemical identity of approximately 1,800 substances on the current ICL were and will be placed on the revised list. Requests from industry for the addition of approximately 30 microorganisms to the current ICL were assessed and the companies were informed of the need to submit additional information to complete the reviews. The ICSU is developing a guidance document for industry, a database tracking system, and a communications plan
  • completion of rapid screening assessment of 1200 low-concern substances;
  • amendment of Human Risk Assessments ( HRA) for selected POPs (e.g. PCBs) in support of changes to food standards;
  • progress on the re-evaluation of older pesticide ingredients. As of March 31, 2008, 274 of the 401 of pesticide active ingredients have been addressed;
  • assessment of analytical results of mercury levels in various commercial predatory fish species;
  • an updated risk management strategy for mercury in fish;
  • development of a draft discussion paper on assessment options for genotoxic carcinogens;
  • finalization of the health risk assessment of Bisphenol A from a food packaging perspective, including an international peer review of the assessment document;
  • completion of a Departmental Report on toxicity research studies on Perfluorooctane Sulfonate;
  • activities related to the collection of nationally representative biomonitoring data for the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) and the Maternal Infant Research on Environmental Contaminants (MIREC) to support evidence-based decision-making on identification of vulnerable populations, and understanding of risks and exposures, and how they might best be managed;
  • identification of research priorities and allocation of research funds; and
  • establishment of a horizontal science framework to manage Research funds collectively and align annually to CMP priority research.

16. Comments on Variances:

17. Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners: N/A

18. Contact Information:

Francois Dignard, HC
(613) 941-0590
francois_dignard@hc-sc.gc.ca
Mark Cuddy, EC
(819) 994-7467
mark.cuddy@ec.gc.ca

19. Approved by:

20. Date Approved:

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Federal Strategy on Early Childhood Development for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children (referred to as ECD)

2. Name of Lead Department(s): Health Canada

3. Lead Department Program Activity:

First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

(Additional funding to ECD Programs from:
Enhancing Early Learning and Child Care (referred to as ELCC) for First Nations Children Living on Reserve and Working Towards the First Phase of a Single Window)

5. End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:

ECD - 2006-07 and Ongoing

ELCC Single Window - 2007-08 and Ongoing

6. Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):

As a result of the Federal Strategy on Early Childhood Development for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children (referred to as ECD) announced in October 2002, $320 million over five years (and ongoing) is dedicated to enhancing and expanding various federal ECD programs. In December 2004, Cabinet approved Enhancing Early Learning and Child Care (referred to as ELCC) for First Nations Children Living on Reserve and Working Towards the First Phase of a Single Window which provided an additional $45 million over three years (2005-06 through 2007-08, $14 million ongoing beginning 2008-09) to increase integration and coordination, access and quality of two federal ECD/ELCC programs (Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve and the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative). This funding also included a training component.

7. Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Federal Strategy on Early Childhood Development for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children was announced on October 31, 2002. The strategy provides $320 million over five years to: improve and expand existing ECD programs and services for Aboriginal children; expand ECD capacity and networks; introduce new research initiatives to improve understanding of how Aboriginal children are doing; and work towards the development of a "single window" approach to ensure better integration and coordination of federal Aboriginal ECD programming. In December 2004, as the first phase of a "single window", Cabinet approved an additional $45 million over three years (2005-06 through 2007-08, $14 million ongoing beginning 2008-09) to improve integration and coordination of two ECD programs - Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve and the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative - beginning in 2005-06. The objectives of these funds are to increase access to and improve the quality of ELCC programming for First Nations children on reserve, and improve integration and coordination between the two programs through joint planning, joint training and co-location. Joint planning will also include INAC-funded child/day care programs in Alberta and Ontario.

8. Shared Outcome(s): The Federal Strategy on Early Childhood Development for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children complements the September 2000 First Ministers F/P/T ECD Agreement. It seeks to address the gap in life chances between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children by improving the developmental opportunities to which Aboriginal children (and their families) are exposed at an early age (birth to under 6 years of age).

The funding approved in December 2004 for ELCC for First Nations Children Living on Reserve and Working Towards the First Phase of a "Single Window" complements funding released to provinces and territories under the March 2003 Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Childcare (ELCC) to improve access to ELCC programs and services.

Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Human Resources and Social Development Canada work co-operatively on this horizontal initiative.
10.Federal Partners 11.Federal Partner Program Activity 12.Names of Programs for Federal Partners 13.
Total Allocation over 5 years ($ in Thousands)*
14.
Planned Spending for 2007-2008 ($ in Thousands)
15.
Actual Spending for 2007-2008
16.
Expected Results for 2007-2008
17.
Results Achieved in 2007-2008
1. Health Canada

 

Electronic Links: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnihb-dgspni/fnihb/cp/ahsor/index.htm

 

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fnih-spni/famil/preg-gros/intro_e.html

 

 

 

First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services

 

 

a. Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve (ECD)$107,595 (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07); $21,519 ongoing (ECD)$21,519

(and ongoing) - committed in 2002

$19,595,041 (ECD) Program expansion and enhancement See notes
(ELCC)$21,000(total for 2005-06 through to

2007-08; $6,500 ongoing

(ELCC)

$7,000 in 2005-06 through to 2007-08 with $6,500 in 2008-09 and ongoing -committed in 2004

$5,925,540 (ELCC)

Increase integration, coordination, access and quality, and training

b. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component (ECD)

$ 70,000 (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07) and $15,000 ongoing

(ECD)

$10,000 in 2002-03 and $15,000 thereafter (and ongoing) - committed in 2002

$13,973,500 Program expansion and enhancement See notes
c. Capacity Building and Networks $5,075 (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07); $1,015 ongoing $1,015 (and ongoing) - committed in 2002 $1,099,488

 

Increased capacity See notes
d. Horizontal Training (ELCC) $3,000 (total for 2005-06 to 2007-08) and $1,000 ongoing (ELCC) $500 in 2005-06; $1,300 in 2006-07; and $1,200 in 2007-08 ($1,000 ongoing committed in 2004) $1,150,000 ELCC - increased integration, coordination, access and quality See notes
2. Public Health Agency of Canada

Electronic Link: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/dca-dea/programs-mes/ahs_main_e.html

Child and Adolescent Health Promotion a. Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities $ 62,880 (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07) $12,576 (and ongoing) - committed in 2002 $11,445,000 Program expansion and enhancement See notes
b. Capacity Building $2,500 (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07) $500 (and ongoing) - committed in 2002 $176,000 Increased capacity See notes
3. Human Resources and Social Development Canada Learning and Labour Market a . First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative (FNICCI) (ECD)$ 45,700 (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07) (ECD)$ 9,140 (and ongoing) committed in 2002 $16,140,000 Program expansion and enhancement 8538 spaces in 482 First Nations and Inuit sites through 58 Aboriginal Human Resource Development Agreement Holders
(ELCC)$21,000 (total for 2005-06 through to 2007-08) (ELCC)$7,000 (and $6,500 ongoing) - committed in 2005   Increase integration, coordination, access and quality
  b. Aboriginal Children's Survey (ECD) $17,300 (total for 2003 through to 2007) and $3,440 ongoing. (ECD) $3,540 (and $3,440 ongoing) - committed in 2002 $01 Data processing dissemination strategy; documentation of processes used to develop and implement the survey for 2011; Initial planning for on-reserve component of ACS See details below
c. Understanding the Early Years - Aboriginal Component (ECD) $3,500 (total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07) and $700 ongoing (ECD) $700 (and ongoing) - committed in 2002 $485,000 ECD Research and Knowledge As a result of the 2006 UEY Call for Proposals, one Aboriginal proposal was funded with Prince Albert Grand Council, Saskatchewan. Some funds were also allocated to the management and outreach in several other UEY projects which include Aboriginal children.
4. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Lifelong Learning - Early Learning and Childcare a. "Single Window" Work and Capacity Building (ECD) $5,050 - (Total for 2002-03 through to 2006-07) and $1,010 ongoing $1,010 (and ongoing) - committed in 2002 $592,146 Increased capacity and development of "single window" See notes
      Total - ECD:

$320,000

Total - ECD:

$60,000 in 2002-03 and $65,000 thereafter

Total: $70,581,715    
Total - ELCC:

$45,000

Total - ELCC:

$14,500 in 2005-06;

$15,300 in 2006-07;

$15,200 in 2007-08; and $14,000 ongoing

 

18. Comments on Variances

1Spending figure is $0 as previous years savings were used to cover 2007-08 fiscal year expenses.
2Understanding the Early Years (UEY) Aboriginal component: In late 2004, when the national UEY initiative was announced and assigned to HRSDC's Income Security and Social Development Branch, the management of the Aboriginal component of UEY was also transferred, along with an allocation of $700K on an ongoing basis. The implementation of Aboriginal UEY was intended to coincide with the fielding of the first data collection of the Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). Since the ACS was not fielded until fall 2006, the Aboriginal component of UEY was delayed.

19. Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

20. Contact Information :

Marcia Armstrong, Program Officer,
ECD Strategy Unit,
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch,
Health Canada
Postal Locator 1920D, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa
Telephone: (613) 946-4621
Fax: (613) 952-5244

Aboriginal Head Start on Reserve

The Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve program serves over 9,000 children in over 300 First Nations communities. The majority of AHSOR funding in 2007/08 was used for First Nations community based program service delivery and development including training and minor capital. In 2007/08 work continued in key areas, including:

  • Integration of sites and cooperation between different early childhood programs such as Health Canada's AHSOR, HRSDC's FNICCI, INAC's daycare as well as local and provincial programs at the community, regional, and national levels;
  • Organization of training events based on regional training needs that included workers from other ECD programs to help maintain and improve the quality of AHSOR and other community based ECD programming;
  • Enhancement of AHSOR capital infrastructure (buildings and facilities) through support of minor capital projects;
  • Support for training of AHSOR outreach and home visiting workers for un-served and under-served communities; and
  • Improvement of reporting and communications between HC and communities.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder - First Nations and Inuit Component:

Key accomplishments for 07/08 include: Mentoring projects have been established in 40 sites across Canada (an increase of 10 from last year); 2 National mentor/supervisor training sessions were held; Community Coordinator positions have been established in 18 communities (an increase of 7 from last year); A broad consultation and scan was completed on evidence-based family support programs to inform the Community Coordinator framework development; and, a study was conducted and report written on improving linkages to women's addictions services.

Capacity Building and Networks:

As part of the 2002 Federal Strategy's capacity-building component, Health Canada provides funds annually to the five national Aboriginal organizations: the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, Métis National Council, and Native Women's Association of Canada. As well, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada is providing annual funding to Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada. In 2007-08, this funding enabled these national Aboriginal organizations to contribute to the development of the Federal Strategy through strategic planning and capacity building in their own organizations. Note: the Métis National Council was not funded during 2007-08.

Funding from the Federal Strategy also continued to support the development of an Aboriginal service providers' network, which is called the Aboriginal Children's Circle of Early Learning (ACCEL). During 2007-08, ACCEL was reorganized and new material and web links were added throughout the year. An e-newsletter was distributed three times during the year. Discussions were undertaken with the National Aboriginal Health Organization to assume responsibility for ACCEL in 2008-09.

Horizontal Training:

Most of this funding goes to the regions to support training for ECD workers in AHSOR and FNICCI sites. A working group has been established with representation from AFN, INAC, HC and HRSDC and is working to develop a laddered ECD training strategy that will lead to culturally appropriate certification of providers of early learning and child care programming for First Nations children living on reserve, as well as supporting improved coordination between AHSOR, FNICCI and INAC funded daycares in Alberta and Ontario. A survey of training requirements of ECD workers in communities was completed and the results will inform the development of a training strategy to be completed in 2008-09.

Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities

BC region:
Special needs training and support services.
Development of elder's and language guides. Enhanced Services Assessment.

Alberta Region:
Quality assurance through accredited training and ongoing education of the frontline staff.
Regional training and FASD training.
Improvements to services for children with special needs.

MB/Sask. Region (SK)
Evaluation and Curriculum activities.
Training on Building Capacity, Streamline Reporting and community assessment. Resources on Capacity Building.

MB/Sask. Region (MB)
Accredited training, Ages and Stages pre- and post assessment tools training, educational resources. increase capacity through database technology to streamline reporting requirements.

Quebec Region
Educational training, FASD training and resources for special speech therapy needs.

Atlantic Region:
Accredited training, Knowledge transfer and education initiative led to an increase in community capacity for language and culture, elder involvement

Northern Region:
Pan Territorial training event including CAPC, CPNP and AHS. Longitudinal evaluations,

Capacity Building activities within AHSUNC

Partnering/Collaborating with the Centres of Excellence ECD - Updating on-line encyclopedia
Partnering/Collaborating with the Centres of Excellence - Special needs resources

National Aboriginal Collaborating Centre - ECD curriculum research

Two North of 60 Case Studies on integration of AHSUNC and FNICCI programming to complement the Demonstration Projects in 17 First Nations communities across Canada.

Aboriginal Children's Survey

In fiscal year 2007-08, the majority of the data processing was done and a dissemination strategy was created. Work began to document the processes used to develop and implement the survey for future use in the 2011 survey development process. Initial planning for an on-reserve component of the ACS was undertaken in order to expand the survey to include children on-reserves.

Single Window Work and Building Capacity

In 2007-08, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), and Health Canada (HC) implemented the Early Childhood Development (ECD) Single Window Service Delivery Demonstration Projects. These projects tested three elements including: a single funding mechanism; streamlined reporting and community development coordination/integration.

The ECD Horizontal Working Group sponsored the ECD Success Stories initiative which showcased best practices of coordination and integration of ECD programs in First Nations communities. ECD programs include: HC's Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve, HRSDC's First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative, Public Health Agency of Canada's Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities and INAC funded Ontario and Alberta Day Care programs.

Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products

Lead Department: Health Canada

Start Date: 2002-2003

End Date: 2008-2009

Total Funding Allocated : $155M rounded up from $154.96M

Description:

The initiative is a part of the federal government's commitments as outlined in the Treasury Board submission Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products . The Treasury Board submission and its associated Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) describe the integrated approach by which initiatives will be measured, managed and reported throughout their life cycle. An important element of the commitments made through the Treasury Board submission is that stakeholders and public will be kept informed through a transparent management system. The participating departments will work together for shared outcomes; measure performance on delivery; and review progress achieved. This initiative incorporates efforts of six federal government partners to increase public and stakeholder confidence in the pesticide regulatory system, to protect health and environment, and to increase the competitiveness of the agri-food and forestry sectors. Research and monitoring in the area of pesticides is being coordinated with their regulation.

Under this initiative, the presence and effects of pesticides in the environment, in marine and freshwater ecosystems, and in the forest environment are being monitored. The initiative enhances monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residue limits in foods, in feed, of pesticide residues in fertilizers, and pesticide guarantee verification for fertilizer-pesticide combinations. Reduced-risk pesticides and biological pesticides for forestry are being developed and their use facilitated. Commodity-based risk reduction strategies for the agriculture and agri-food sector are being developed and implemented. Programs improving access to agricultural minor-use pesticides and reduced-risk pesticides for agricultural use are being established. Research to support the introduction of minor-use pesticides that pose a reduced risk to the environment is being conducted. A reporting system to track adverse effects of pesticides has been developed, and information on these effects will be collected and recorded. Collectively, this work is being conducted to achieve public confidence in increased conservation and protection of human health and the environment while contributing to the competitiveness of Canada's agricultural sector.

The information presented in this table has been organized along the following three main themes of this initiative:

  1. Research and Monitoring, carried out by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the Department of Fisheries and Ocean (DFO), Environment Canada (EC), Health Canada's PMRA, and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)
  2. Developing and Implementing of Commodity Specific Risk Reduction Strategies, carried out by AAFC and Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA).
  3. Generation of Data to Support the Registration of Reduced Risk and Minor Use Pesticides for the Agricultural and Agri-food Sector and Reduced Risk Pesticides and Biopesticides for Forestry, carried out by AAFC, HC's PMRA and NRCan

Shared Outcomes:

Immediate Outcomes:

  • Increased knowledge by the PMRA about pesticides and alternatives
  • Registration of reduced-risk and minor-use pesticides
  • Access to safer pest management practices and products
  • Compliance for safer food, feed, fertilizers and fertilizer-pesticide combinations

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • A regulatory system that better protects health and environment and contributes to the competitiveness of the agri-food and forestry sectors
  • Use of safer pest management practices and products
  • Increased transparency of pesticide regulation

Final Outcome:

Increased public and stakeholder confidence in pesticide regulation, protected health and environment as well as increased competitiveness of the agri-food and forestry sectors

Governance Structures:

  • Health Canada -Executive Director of PMRA
  • Environment Canada (HC) - Director General, Conservation Strategies Directorate and Director General, National Programs Directorate
  • Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) -Director General, Fisheries, Environment and Biodiversity Science
  • Natural Resources Cananad (NRCan)-Director General, Science Branch, Canadian Forest Service
  • Agriculture and Agri-Foods Canada (AAFC)-Assistant Deputy Minister of the Farm Financial Programs Branch and Assistant Deputy Minister of Research Branch, Executive Director, Pest Management Centre
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)-Vice President, Programs
  • Deputy Minister Committee-Deputy Minister from Health and AAFC
  • AAFC/PMRA Joint Management Committee: Assistant Deputy Minister of the Farm Financial Programs Branch, AAFC, Assistant Deputy Minister of Research Branch, AAFC, Executive Director, PMRA, Health Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat (ex-officio member)

I. Research and monitoring


AAFC (a) Conducting research to support the introduction of minor-use pesticides that pose a reduced risk to the environment. $8.0 M $3.0M $1.3M Final reports and next steps for technology transfer of research results from 16 projects completed as of March 2007
  • On-going support for 12 projects initiated in April 2006 to be completed March 2008
  • Progress reports from 1 year of research work on these projects initiated in April 2006
  • Support for new projects selected for funding under November 2006 Call for Proposals
  • Continued work and support for activities to improve access to and adoption of low risk minor use pesticides, including biopesticides
  • Continued research planning and coordination with MOU Research WG and Interdepartmental WG on Pesticides
  • Reviewed final reports for 13 projects completed as of March 2007, extended time lines into FY 07-08 for 3 projects in order that work could be satisfactorily completed. Project outputs include: scale up, efficacy & non-target data to support eventual commercialization/ registration of reduced-risk pest control products/applications; bait and kill strategies for key pests; refined laboratory insecticide screening protocols; degree-day models for key pests; and pest biology / behaviour information for pest species.
  • Continued support and oversight for 12 projects initiated April 2006 + 3 projects as noted above (92% of projects have met milestones as of March 2008)
  • Established Statements of Work and initiated funding and oversight of 23 new projects selected under Nov 2006 call for Proposals
  • Biopesticide submission support activities resulted in submissions for registration or label expansion for 4 products
  • Contributed to 6NR integrated work plan and discussions related to 6NR MOU regarding pesticide research and monitoring

Additional Result: Screening trials conducted resulted in identification of potential solutions for 3 key pest issues for which no solutions were known.

CFIA (b) Enhanced monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residue limits in food and feed. $2.7M $0.25M $0.25M Identify food commodities consumed by targeted subgroup (children)

Lab testing of an approximate 1500 samples per year

Follow-up inspections for non-compliant test sample results

Publish annual report of the findings of the National Chemical Residues Monitoring Program (NCRMP)

Food recalls, as required, for risk mitigation and removal of hazardous foods from marketplace

The objectives were to assess the compliance of foods consumed by children aged 3 to 15 years. The foods tested represented a random selection of foods marketed to, consumed in greater quantity by, or first eaten by children in the targeted age group. The pesticide residue results showed a high level of compliance with established limits (>98%). There was no trend observed in pesticide levels with commodity, brand name, residue or country of origin.
CFIA (c) Enhanced monitoring and enforcement of pesticide residues in fertilizers and pesticide guarantee verification in fertilizer-pesticide combinations. $2.4M $0.25M $0.193M Develop monitoring and surveillance policies and processes to guide and advise operational staff on fertilizer-pesticide combinations and pesticide contaminated fertilizers.

Increase interaction with the PMRA to obtain the most up-to-date pesticide safety and labelling information.

Update the Compendium of Fertilizer-Use Pesticides, which contains information regarding registration, guarantees and proper labelling.

Work to develop regulatory changes to facilitate updating of the Compendium more regularly, and, if successful, provide Compendium updates more regularly to the producers of mixtures and to the CFIA's inspection staff.

Inspection Memorandum I-4-93, a document identifying inspection activities and sample quotas for the year, was provided to inspection staff. To facilitate label verification in the field and maintain consistency, a list of all registered fertilizer-pesticides and labels were updated and distributed to inspectors. Inspectors were guided on appropriate non-compliance follow-up when needed.

The pesticide guarantee verification program has been redesigned, with the assistance of stakeholders, in order to improve compliance rates.

CFIA's tolerance for pesticide residues in fertilizers was reviewed and amended.

Enforcement procedures in response to non-compliance were developed through a National Training Initiative to promote consistency in enforcement actions across Canada.

CFIA and PMRA collaborated to develop policies and processes for joint review of products subject to regulation under both the Fertilizers Act and Pest Control Products Act .

CFIA is participating in the Building Public Confidence TB Initiative Evaluation Working Group.

CFIA is participating in the 6NR Pesticides and Pest Management Working Group.

The 3 rd edition of the CFUP is pending publication in Canada Gazette II . CFIA is exploring regulatory changes and expedited mechanisms to allow for more frequent updates. A new format is being created to facilitate public availability, and updates were distributed.

A regulatory change to update the definition of the CFUP so that it references the third edition is currently pending apporval.

Advise CFIA Operations on appropriate follow-up procedures and recommendations regarding the significance of sample analytical results.

Sample fertilizer-pesticide combinations to verify guarantees.

Sample fertilizers suspected to be contaminated with pesticides.

Verify fertilizer-pesticide labels.

Conduct investigation and compliance activities (anticipated based on sampling and inspection frequencies).

Analyze samples submitted by inspectors.

DFO (d) Monitor and research the presence and effects of pesticides in marine and freshwater ecosystems. $7.9 M $1.0M $1.0M DFO will provide the PMRA with final reports on regional National Fund projects. These research projects will be focused to address key research knowledge gaps, as they were in 2006-2007, after consultation with PMRA.
  • DFO will provide the PMRA with a yearly report from DFO's Centre for Environmental Research on Pesticides (CERP).
  • CERP will conduct laboratory and field based studies to quantify impacts of exposure to priority pesticides on fish and fish habitat. Impacts will be quantified in terms of reproductive success, growth and energy metabolism. Priority research will be identified in consultation with PMRA.
  • After consultation with the PMRA and other agencies, DFO will design and initiate new research projects related to the theme "Potential Impacts of Pesticides on Fisheries Resources".
  • Final report is ongoing. Anticipated delivery to PMRA is October 2008 for the 2007-08 projects.
  • CEPR has conducted laboratory exposures of fathead minnows to environmentally relevant concentrations of glyphosate, chlropyralid, chlropyrifos and atrazine. Growth and survival have been measured and fish are being reared to reproductive age to assess reproductive potential. A summary of these studies will be included in the October report to PMRA.
  • After consultation with PMRA, it was determined that DFO could provide useful results regarding the effects of mixtures of chlopyralid, chrlopyrifos and glyphosate on fish and fish habitat. Benthic invertebrates were specified as a useful surrogate measure of fish habitat quality.
EC (e) Monitor and research on presence and effects of pesticides in the environment. $7.16M $1.0M $1.0M EC will:
  • maintain coordination of research and monitoring projects in cycle 2 of the EC-Pesticide Science Fund (PSF)
  • support 10 new research and monitoring project themes to determine the environmental concentrations and impacts of in-use pesticides in the environment;
  • produce an annual report and make it available to the PMRA;
  • provide science advice to meet regulatory data gaps and knowledge deficiency as well as to improve risk assessment methods;
  • provide support and advice to PMRA on pesticide related science policy and issue management

Based on cycle 1 results, EC has set out to deliver on a second cycle of research and monitoring of pesticide presence and impacts in the environment. The EC-Pesticide Program Coordinating Committee (PPCC) was presented with project highlights and advice from PSF recipients of the first cycle of projects (2003-2006). The PPCC (has PMRA membership) then developed a new set of priorities for pesticide science at EC has set out to deliver on 10 new research projects that are linked to regulatory decision-making priorities. In 2007-2008, status updates will be given to the following:

  • Air surveillance: Investigations on low level impacts of compounds that are deemed to have a high toxicity and conducting research in sensitive regions that are closer to emission sources
  • Water surveillance: Focus on high risk priority watersheds. Linking water monitoring to watershed modelling ( i.e ., NAESI) providing for wider results coverage through an increase in predictive power and assisting in the rationalization of water monitoring sampling designs. Focus on specific issues, e.g ., wetlands, urban areas, source waters, agriculture and priority pesticides (through previous monitoring and with interpretation tools such as the modified APPLES, a prioritization tool developed with the PMRA). Establishing trends especially as they relate to performance outcomes ( e.g ., through linking with CESI the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators program)
  • Aquatic effects: Integration of aquatic and terrestrial effects (incl. multitrophic-level) with exposure (incl. fate). Comparative assessments ( e.g ., amphibian and fish). Species, populations and community resiliency. Impacts of mixtures (link to NAESI) and cumulative effects investigations ( e.g ., nutrients). Impact assessments with chronic and pulse exposures. Studies and investigations furthering the amphibian test protocol.
  • Terrestrial effects: For birds and mammals focus on SARA and spp. of concern. Comparisons between non-oral routes and oral routes of exposure (dermal and inhalation). Focus on high exposure areas with "lethal" potential. For plants, focus on risk assessment with validation through in situ research.

In order to better integrate and coordinate EC research with regulation, EC will continue to work with the PMRA in the implementation of the EC/PMRA MOU. The MOU has four components, Science Policy, Knowledge Generation, Issue Management and Compliance Promotion and Enforcement EC will continue working on providing leadership in the development and implementation of a federal, co-ordinated pesticides science strategy for research and monitoring through the Interdepartmental Committee. As well EC will continue to contribute to PMRA's pesticide assessments where appropriate, will coordinate with PMRA on the development of environmental quality guidelines and will continue to provide science/policy advice on key Government of Canada policies as they relate to pesticide management and use in Canada.

EC was able to meet its commitments under the BPC initiative. EC's Pesticide Science Program now resides under the "Risk to Canadians" Result stream while continuing to be coordinated by the EC PPCC. We have maintained and are continuing activities addressing the following areas:
  • science policy;
  • research and monitoring;
  • issue management and communications;
  • enforcement and compliance promotion.
EC:
  • maintained its coordination efforts for the second year in the second cycle of the PSF to further support research and monitoring projects on the presence and effects of pesticides in the environment.
  • Supported the 10 on-going research and monitoring project themes with projects building on existing knowledge from previous and related projects.
  • Negotiated an Interdepartmental Letter of Agreement with the PMRA for additional financial support to ensure the timely completion of ongoing projects for this fiscal year.
  • Produced an annual report of PSF activities with respect to the status and updates of air and water surveillance, as well as aquatic and terrestrial effects. This report was submitted to PMRA.
  • Currently participating in the Building Public Confidence Memorandum to Cabinet - Treasury Board Summative Evaluation.
  • Providing science advice to PMRA to meet regulatory data gaps, reduce knowledge deficiencies, and improve risk assessment methods. EC provided significant input into PMRA's activities regarding:
  • Environmental risk assessment and Track 1 assessment for Trifluralin and Lindane.
  • Re-evaluation note on the uses of Diazinon and Atrazine.
  • Pesticide concentrations in surface water, current monitoring practices, new initiatives, and trends of commonly found pesticides.
  • Coordinated PSF projects with national agri-environmental standards initiative, an initiative under the Agricultural Policy Framework ( NAESI) projects (PSF water monitoring data used with NAESI watershed modelling, NAESI performance standards used to create Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) water quality guidelines).
  • Showcased PSF achievements at national and international venues in order to facilitate the exchange of information that will help achieve PSF objectives and use of this information to inform decision makers and Canadians.
  • Presented PSF at the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry ( SETAC) and the Aquatic Toxicity Workshop at special session on Pesticides
  • Presented PSF to Senior EC management. Several meetings were held between senior management at EC, PMRA and AAFC in an ongoing effort to further efficiencies and coordination between departments.
  • EC hosted a workshop (2007 EC Pacific Yukon Region (PYR) Pesticide Information Exchange) pertaining to communicating pesticide information in the PYR.
  • EC hosted a water monitoring workshop in February 2008 to present current data and to better link with PMRA needs.
  • Assisted the PMRA in the planning and hosting of the 6NR workshop on Protection of Terrestrial and Aquatic Habitats. Several EC escperts were invited as key participants.
  • Met with industry to promote development of Canadian Environmental Quality Guidelines of pesticides.
  • Currently chairs the CCME pesticide sub-committee involving key partners (PMRA, industry and the jurisdictions). Largely through EC's efforts, the sub-committee has proposed a revised water quality guideline for chlorpyrifos and has successfully implemented a streamlined approach for pesticide guideline approval.
  • Drafting of new 6NR MOU and work plans to establish mechanisms that facilitate the exchange of scientific information and advice and to promote strong working relationships among six federal partners.
  • In terms of publications, EC scientists continue to produce a number of scientific peer-reviewed publications and presentations.
HC (PMRA) (f) Linking pesticide regulation and research. $4.2M $0.8M $0.8M Identify PMRA's research and monitoring priorities annually and communicate to 5NR partners through regular meetings and other avenues as needed. Facilitate discussion among the 5NR on identifying actions to address specific priorities, including collaborative research.

Discuss with the 5NR how the results of their research and monitoring are used in regulatory decisions to build better linkages between research and regulation.

Facilitate the two-way communication and coordination between regulation and research between governments within Canada (through PMRA's FPT Committee) and internationally as well as with the private and academic sectors, through presentations linking research and regulation at regional, national and international meetings.(e.g., through SETAC, CSA, IUPAC).

To strengthen the framework in linking pesticide research and monitoring, develop a MOU amongst the 5NR on linking research to regulation.

Continue to improve and expand the use of probabilistic risk assessments.

An integrated research and monitoring workplan was developed among the 6NR partners in 2007-2008. The process involved PMRA identifying the areas of research that would enhance its capacity to effectively regulate pesticides from the point of view of human and environmental health. Areas identified to date include monitoring levels of pesticides in the environment, effects of pesticides on the environment, the development and peer review of the science used in risk assessments of pesticides, and the development of risk reduction strategies. 6NR partners in turn identified the research initiatives to be undertaken over the next several years that would address some of these research gaps. Since many of the research and monitoring gaps identified by the PMRA are being undertaken by 6NR partners as ongoing initiatives, or as part of 3-4 year research cycles, the integrated workplan is considered a living document that will updated, as required, when priorities change among the participating 6NR partners.

The PMRA tracks when results of research and monitoring are used in our regulatory decisions. When the results of 6NR research are pivotal in a regulatory decision the PMRA contacts the partner providing the information to confirm that the information is being used in an appropriate manner, that the results are being interpreted correctly, and to help identify possibilities for future research.

In 2007-2008 the PMRA presented its methodologies and research needs at numerous regional, national and international meetings (e.g., OECD, NAFTA, PMRA FPT Committeee, Conferences, etc) . In addition, the PMRA made presentations to stakeholders explaining how research results are used in pesticide regulation.

A 6NR MOU was developed in 2007-2008 and signed by the responsible Director Generals/ Executive Directors of the 6NR departments/agencies. This MOE clearly delineates the various roles and responsibilities of the partners with respect to information sharing and maintaining the confidentiality of unpublished materials. The MOU also establishes a DG level committee to coordinate an integrated approach to establishing research and monitoring priorities with the aim of strengthening pesticide regulation in Canada.

A probabilistic risk assessment working group has been established within the PMRA. This group has and will continue to receive training in advanced risk assessment methods including probabilistic risk assessments. The group also has and will continue to meet with counterparts in other jurisdictions (EPA, EU) to exchange information, tools, and approaches for advanced risk assessments including the use of probabilistic methods. The working group will act as a resource to other scientists within the PMRA when advanced risk assessment methods are required

HC (PMRA) (g) Conducting research to support the introduction of minor-use pesticides that pose a reduced risk to the environment. $3.5M $1.2M $1.2M Advance risk assessment methodologies (e.g., occupational exposure assessment) through research to support the harmonization of risk assessment methodology with international partners (US EPA; California Department of Pesticide Regulation).

Develop/expand on crop grouping schemes to incorporate additional minor use crops (NAFTA/CODEX Initiative). This will facilitate dietary risk assessment of minor use crops.

Validate recently updated agricultural data that are being used to develop crop field trials for setting Maximum Residue Limits on both major and minor use crops.

In 2007-08, the PMRA participated in meetings with international partners regarding data development for use in further estimating occupational exposures to pesticides. Mixer/loader/applicator exposure data was completed and submitted to the PMRA and other international regulatory partners for use in exposure assessments for agricultural workers.

4 crop grouping schemes were approved in 2007-08. Revisions to other crop grouping schemes are ongoing.

Validation of the agricultural data was completed in 2007-08.

A Regulatory Proposal was issued on Guidelines for the Registration of Low-Risk Biochemicals and other Non-Conventional Pesticides.

NRCan (h) Research and monitor pesticides in the forest environment. $3.5M $0.5M $0.3M Review the final reports and publications of research work for four projects. Provide results to clients/stakeholders and PM RA. The completed research projects are:
  • Potential environmental effects of imidacloprid as a systemic insecticide for control of exotic wood boring insect pests such as the emerald ash borer,
  • Development of a biological treatment for control of root rot pathogen and impact on microbial biodiversity,
  • Monitoring impacts of pest control products on key microbial communities of forest soils,
  • Development and validation of "Spray Advisor"- A Decision Support System for aerial pesticide applications.
Reviewed final reports and publications and provided information to stakeholders and regulators through the 2007 National Forest Pest Forum, SERG-International (Feb 2008) workshops, etc.

The potential environmental effects were conducted on Neem (Azadirachtin) as a systemic insecticide against the emerald ash borer. This was in place of imidacloprid, due to urgency and availability. The results of this study indicate that applications of azadirachtin do not have deleterious effects on aquatic and terrestrial microbial species. An updated final report is pending receipt of additional data on actual azadirachtin concentrations from collaborators.

Current work on the prevention of annosus root rot with the pathogenic fungus Phlebiopsis gigantea is at the licensing stage.

The Enhanced Pest Management Methods (EPMM) funding was focused on environmental impacts of systemic insecticides for invasive insect control. The latest insecticide was azadirachtin. The experimental work is completed and the data have been analysed. The previous work on imidacloprid produced four scientific journal papers and four presentations at conferences.

The technological developments and scientific knowledge generated through the "Spray Advisor" project are captured through reports to funding agencies, journal publications and through direct technology transfer initiatives including a full demonstration site and workshops targeted for transfer of the Decision Support System (DSS) to foresters, aerial applicators and regulators.


II. Developing and implementing commodity specific risk reduction strategies


AAFC (a) Commodity based risk reduction strategies. $19.3M $2.5M $1.7M
  • Stakeholders engaged in priority setting and further development of 3 new commodity specific pesticide risk reduction strategies
  • Up to 10 of the published profiles updated and re-published on public website
  • Collection of data through regional focus groups for the purpose of updating profiles and tracking success of the program.
  • Continue funding implementation projects from 2005 call for proposals
  • Fund implementation projects funded through the 2006 call for proposals
  • Analysis and publication of results from Crop Protection Survey
  • Collect data through the Crop Protection Survey
  • Continued implementation of AAFC/PMRA joint communication plan

 

  • Redirection in work plan of PMRA Risk Reduction team in the area of strategy work for FY 07-08 necessitated refocusing of AAFC Risk Reduction Program efforts in strategy development. The issue-specific strategies under development were evaluated and prioritized in light of PMRA efforts on transition strategies, and 9 were identified for focussed efforts. (Reduced reliance on OPs through alternative technologies: low bush blueberry insect pests, field crop insect pests, grape & tree fruit insect pests, wireworm in potato, wheat & corn; Biopesticide strategy for soil insect pests; White mould in various crops; Apple scab; Late blight of potato; Fusarium headblight of wheat).
  • Updates of 7 profiles were completed and published. Data were collected through focus groups for 4 pulse crops (lentil, chickpea, dry bean, dry pea)
  • Final reports received and reviewed for 13 projects completed as of March 2007. Project outputs include: large scale implementation of classical biological control for leafy spurge management; BMP guidelines and IPM systems for key disease and insect pests; Pesticide Free Production systems for field crops; mechanical tool for ECB control in potato crops.
  • Continued funding and oversight of 19 projects initiated April 2006 or earlier. 89 % of projects have met milestones as of March 2008.
  • Established statements of works and initiated funding and oversight of 19 new projects selected under Nov 2006 call for Proposals
  • Analysis of results of Crop Protection Survey underway, with results to be published FY 08-09.
  • No new data collected through Crop Protection Survey due to resource constraints
  • Communication with stakeholders continued in context of AAFC/PMRA joint communication plan
HC (PMRA) (a) Commodity based risk reduction strategies (RR). $25.7M $4.0M $4.0M Planned staffing actions in 2006-2007, indeterminate positions.

Ongoing consultations with stakeholders. Work share with other government departments and 5NRs.

Work on pesticide risk indicator: consult, build and validate database.

Determine, together with AAFC, the next groupof priority crops for the program. Workshare with AAFC on new crop profiles and issue documents and finalising existing documents. Work with AAFC to define the scope of the program for each commodity, including ways to increase participant buy in and the development of an exit strategy which will promote maintenance of the stakeholder groups after cessation of government involvement.

Risk reduction strategies have been developed for pulse crops and canola. A long term fireblight management strategy has been developed for apples. Steering committee and working groups have been meeting to explore potential solutions to identified priorities and to implement steps to resolve these issues. Substantial progress has been made in the development of strategies and the formation of steering committees to lead the strategies for a number of other crops, particularly, greenhouse vegetables, grape, peach, potato, soybean, strawberry and apple. Working groups have been set up and are building action plans to achieve solutions for identified issues. Consultations will be held this year with stakeholders of raspberry and blueberry (high bush and low bush), followed by steering committee meetings in March.

In addition to work on commodity based risk reduction strategies, PMRA is working with stakeholders to develop strategies to address issues in a number of nonagricultural sectors, including forestry, the heavy duty wood preservatives industry, ornamental and landscaping, structural pest control, food processing, storage pest control and honey production.

Staffed 2 positions.

The Pesticide Risk Reduction Program held consultations with stakeholders of priority crops to gain national consensus on key pest management issues for lowbush blueberry and highbush blueberry, carrot and onion, raspberry, sweet corn and strawberry. A total of 11 Steering Committee meetings were held with 9 of the priority crops and 32 working group meetings were held to build strategies toward low risk solutions for key grower issues. As part of this strategy work, PMRA facilitated communication between stakeholders (registrants, researchers, grower organizations and provincial government) and the agency on 76 products, including 16 biopesticides and 19 low risk pesticides. Through joint work with AAFC under this program a number of new reduced risk pest management practices and products are now available to agricultural growers.

Risk indicator database environment completed at 100%. Database health completed at 95%. 100% expected mid May 08. Model update done at 100%, Technical publication at 70% completion expected end of May and public documentation at 100%

The PMRA provided technical expertise and background information on the regulatory status of products for 15 focus group discussions and held focus group discussions for canola. Information from these focus groups was used by AAFC to develop new crop profiles and update information in existing crop profiles.

Linkages were strengthened with a number of stakeholders, including growers and their associations, provincial extension, registrants, researchers and other national and international government departments through work under the Pesticide Risk Reduction Program and joint work and participation in a number of areas, such as the On Farm Food Safety Program, Canadian General Standards Board Committee on Organic Agriculture and NAFTA. These linkages help to improve stakeholder confidence is pesticide regulation through collaborative efforts and greater understanding of the regulatory framework.

The PMRA is working with the Environmental Protection Agency to coordinate and harmonize North American regulatory activities pertaining to playing field for North American trade of commodities affected by the phase-out of AZM. In addition, the PMRA has begun working with Canadian stakeholders to develop strategies to transition to lower risk products and management practices from key uses being phased out through the re-evaluation process.

Work is progressing in collaboration with stakeholders on the registration of new alternative for the control of bed bugs, the development of a new CSA standard for HDWP, and of a new approach to efficacy based crop grouping for ornamentals.


III. Generation of data to support the registration of reduced-risk and minor-use pesticides for the agricultural and agri-food sector and reduced-risk pesticides and biopesticides for forestry


AAFC (a) Improving access to agricultural minor-use pesticides, and reduced-risk pesticides for agricultural use. $33.7M

$12.0M
A-base

$6.5M

$2.0M
A-base

$5.7M

$2.0M
A-base

  • AAFC national minor use priority setting workshop will be held with stakeholders to prioritize the 2008 minor use research requirements and to select the top 36 research priorities.
  • AAFC will select up to an additional 20 joint AAFC/IR-4 research priorities for the 2008 research season.
  • AAFC will consult with and solicit written support from the pesticide manufactures whose pesticides are chosen for these crop-pest research priorities.
  • AAFC will complete and forward the initial 36 presubmission consultation requests (PSCR 3.1) to PMRA by Nov 24, 2007. These will be followed by the PSCRs for the joint AAFC/IR-4 projects by Jan 31, 2008. Subsequently, data requirements (DACO) for each pest-crop pair will be issued by the PMRA to AAFC (~97 days from receipt).
  • AAFC will convert DACOs to study plans by January 2008 (for the initial 36) and by March 2008 for the remaining DACOs
  • AAFC will assign trials (~400) to contractors and collaborating AAFC personnel across Canada. Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) quality assurance oversight will be provided by AAFC.
  • Data generation will take place during the 2007 growing season followed by laboratory analysis of residues for priorities selected in 2006.
  • Analysis of data from previous years research will occur throughout the year followed by the writing of final reports and submissions to PMRA. The PMRA normally provides a decision on use within 247 days. The total process takes approximately 36 months from priority setting until final report submission to PMRA.
  • AAFC is targeting the completion of 40 MU submissions during the year.
The 2007-2008 Minor Use (MU) Priority Setting Meeting was delayed until April 2008 (2008-2009 FY); however, 38 priorities were selected.

19 joint AAFC/US MU projects were selected during the IR-4's planning meeting (Oct 31 - Nov 1, 2007).

AAFC consulted with and solicit written support from the pesticide registrants whose pesticides were chosen for the crop-pest research priorities selected.

As several of the priorities selected were with unregistered pesticides and the PMRA does not accept PSCR for unregistered pesticides, AAFC could not submit for all selected priorities.

Draft study plans were prepared for all projects in which trial would be conducted in 2008 prior to the 2008 Field RFP (February 2008).

Over 500 field and greenhouse trials were conducted in 2007. All residue trials respected GLP requirements without any significant observations.

45 AAFC MU projects were completed and submitted to either the registrant or PMRA during the 2007-2008 FY.

HC (PMRA) (a) Improving access to agricultural minor-use pesticides, and reduced-risk pesticides for agricultural use. $20.8M $4.0M $4.0M Product evaluation work-review presubmission proposals from AAFC and provincial coordinators and issue data requirements.

Register new minor crop uses, including minor use and reduced-risk products and uses.

Harmonization work and regulatory projects-Joint Reviews in collaboration with the U.S. EPA,

AAFC and U.S. Department of Agriculture IR-4 Program, further work on crop groupings and on Maximum Residue Levels (MRL) promulgation.

Increase communication and provide feedback to AAFC to improve the quality and use of scientific rationales.

No. of D 3.1 Received 129
Passed 90
Reviewed 96

No. of D 3.2 Received 109
Passed 91
Reviewed 93

No. C6.3 Label Review
Received 95
Reviewed 89

The PMRA registered 663 new minor uses through submissions for new or amended pest control products, including 546 food uses and 117 non-food uses, thus helping to reduce the technology gap which exists between Canada and its export markets. This gap was further reduced through the initiation of PMRA/EPA Joint Reviews/Registrations of minor use label expansions which resulted in the registration of the first joint label expansions. PMRA is working with the EPA and regulatory agencies in other jurisdictions to expand the use of joint reviews and work sharing for minor uses.

NRCan (b) Develop and facilitate the use of reduced-risk pesticides and biological pesticides for forestry. $4.1M $0.5M $0.4M Review final reports of five projects funded for one year only, and plan strategy and priorities for future funding.

NRCan will continue work to integrate and coordinate activities with the other 5NR partners and stakeholders. Collaborate in the development of the "National Forest Pest Strategy".

The NRCan-CFS Minor Use Advisor hired under this fund will continue to work in collaboration with AAFC at the to facilitate registration of reduced risk/minor use pest control products against pest on outdoor woody ornamentals and forests. Coordinate and report on six projects for minor use pesticides in Canada.

Support for the 2007 National Forest Pest Management Forum at the Ottawa Congress Centre.

Support for a new round of forest projects on reduce risk pest control products.

Results of the following projects funded under NRCan pesticides program were:

The synthetic pheromone (called fuscumol) of the brown spruce longhorn beetle was formulated in biodegradable Heron flakes, and release rates were quantified. A patent application was submitted for "fuscumol" aggregation pheromone of the spruce longhorn beetle.

Development and testing pheromone formulations for use in early intervention pest management strategies of the spruce budworm - The spruce budworm pheromone product, "Hercon Disrupt Micro-Flake SBW", for suppression is nearing registration. A demonstration trial was designed to familiarize end- users with the spruce budworm pest management potential of the Disrupt Micro-Flake SBW formulation and the Hercon Pod dispersal system.

The Development of a Bacillus thuringiensis product for control of sawflies - Efforts to establish a laboratory colony from field-collected Diprion similis sawfly larvae was unsuccessful due to the low availability of larvae in the field. Isolates from the culture collection were obtained and cultured spore-crystal suspensions are being held until there is a sawfly colony for bioassays.

Calibration of a sex pheromone monitoring and trapping system for the blackheaded budworms - In 2007, the budworm populations were very low resulting in low trap catches and very low egg deposition. Therefore, the basic trap calibration could not take place and the project is terminated until higher population levels are found. However, the pheromone lures did prove effective in detecting low numbers of the budworms.

Studies are underway on the use of the pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana against white pine weevil and other bark beetles. The team has developed an expertise in molecular and morphological identification of fungi.

The Enhanced Pest Management Methods S&T Program (EPMM) is now integrated into the National Forest Pest Strategy.

The NRCan-CFS Minor Use Advisor continued to collaborate with AAFC to facilitate registration of reduced risk pest control products against pest on outdoor woody ornamentals and forests. The Advisor is involved in 17 AAFC national minor use "A" priority projects - all forestry and ornamentals related 4 uses of pesticides have been registered and another 3 were submitted to the PMRA for final review.

Provided financial and research support for the 2007 National Forest Pest Management Forum which consists of stakeholders, managers, regulators, and others interested in pest management. Presentations and posters were presented on projects funded under this program.

TOTAL   $154.96M $27.5M $23.843M  

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners: n/a

Contact Information:
Grace Lewis, Project Officer
Policy, Communications and Regulatory Affairs Directorate, PMRA
613-736-3592

Approved by:
Jason Flint, A/Director General
Policy, Communications and Regulatory Affairs Directorate, PMRA
613-736-3914

Date Approved: 21 July 2008

1. Name of Horizontal Initiative: Federal Tobacco Control Strategy 2007-2011

2. Name of Lead Department: Health Canada

3. Start Date: 2001

4. End Date: 2011

5. Total Federal Funding Allocation: $361.0 M

6. Description:

The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) establishes a framework for a comprehensive, integrated, and multi-faceted approach to tobacco control. It focuses on four mutually reinforcing components: protection, prevention, cessation and product regulation.

The FTCS 2007-2011 is driven by the Government's longstanding commitment to reduce the serious and adverse health effects of tobacco use. The Strategy is led by Health Canada (HC) and involves several federal partners.

7. Shared Outcome:

The goal is to reduce overall smoking prevalence from 19% in 2005 to 12% by 2011.
Objectives:

  • Reduce prevalence of Canadian youth (15-17) who smoke from 15% to 9%;
  • Increase number of adult Canadians who quit smoking by 1.5 million;
  • Reduce prevalence of Canadians exposed daily to second-hand smoke from 28% to 20%;
  • Examine the next generation of tobacco control policy in Canada;
  • Contribute to global implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC); and
  • Monitor and assess contraband tobacco activities and enhance compliance.

8. Governance Structure:

Resources for implementation of the FTCS were allocated to a number of departments and agencies. HC is responsible for regulating the manufacture, sale, labelling and promotion of tobacco products, as well as developing, implementing and promoting initiatives that reduce or prevent the negative health impacts associated with smoking.

Partner departments and agencies are:

  • Public Safety Canada (PS) (formerly Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada) - administers funding for monitoring levels of contraband tobacco activity. The Department also provides policy advice and support on smuggling issues and leads Canada's delegation that is negotiating an international protocol on illicit trade in tobacco products.
  • Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (formerly Department of Justice) - is responsible for monitoring federal fines imposed in relation to tobacco and other types of offences, and for enforcing and recovering outstanding fines.
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) - is responsible for enforcement of laws in relation to international movement of tobacco products including illicit manufacture, distribution or possession of contraband tobacco products.
  • Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) (formerly Canada Customs and Revenue Agency) - is responsible for ensuring assessment and collection of tobacco taxes and monitoring tobacco exports.
  • Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) (previously part of former Canada Customs and Revenue Agency) - is responsible for monitoring and assessing the contraband tobacco market in Canada and internationally, as well as improving the administration of assessment and collection of new tobacco taxes on imported tobacco.

9. Federal Partners Involved in each Program 10. Names of Programs 11. Total Allocation for 2007-2011 12. Forecasted Spending for 2007-2008 13. Actual Spending in 2007-2008 14. Planned Results for 2007-2008 15. Achieved Results in 2007-2008
1. HC FTCS $284.2 M $56.8 M $55.1 M See text below. See text below.
2. PS FTCS $3.0 M $0.6 M $0.6 M See text below. See text below.
3. ODPP FTCS $11.2 M $2.2 M $2.1 M See text below. See text below.
4. RCMP FTCS $8.6 M $1.7 M $0.8 M See text below. See text below.
5. CRA

Assessment and Client Services (previously Assessment and Collections)

Excise and GST/HST Rulings Directorate/ Legislative Policy and Regulatory Affairs Branch

FTCS $4.0 M

($54.0 M total allotment to CRA, includes $50.0 M to Customs/CBSA and $4.0 M to CRA)

$0.8 M

($10.8 M allocated between Customs/ CBSA

($10.0 M) and two CRA areas ($0.8 M)

$0.2 M

$0.6 M

See text below. See text below.
6. CBSA Intelligence Directorate and Travellers Division FTCS $28.5 M for activities plus

$21.5 M for loss of duty-free licensing

$5.7 M for activities plus $4.3 M for loss of duty-free licensing $5.7 M for activities plus $4.3 M for loss of duty- free licensing See text below. See text below.
Total 2007-2011   Total

$361.0 M

Total

$72.2 M

Total

$69.4 M

   

16. Comments on Variances:

As part of the September 2006 expenditure review, the HC, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch portion of the FTCS funding was eliminated. This reduced HC's overall budget by $8.3 M in 2007-2008, $10.8 M in 2008-2009 and ongoing.

17. Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners:

Through funding provided by the FTCS, the Akwesasne Mohawk Police (AMP) have been able to increase their surveillance and monitoring of tobacco smuggling. The AMP have reported participating in Joint Forces Operations that have led to charges and seizures, including tobacco. All tobacco seizures made by the AMP are turned over to the RCMP for prosecutions and reported through the RCMP Cornwall Detachment.

The AMP have enhanced their capacity in intelligence development and specialized criminal investigation techniques through work with Canadian and U.S. law enforcement partners in the Integrated Border Enforcement Team in the Cornwall area. In addition, they have had an opportunity to lead and participate in Joint Forces Operations related to cross-border criminal activities and organized crime.

18. Contact Information:

Brenda Paine
(613) 941-9826

19: Approved By:

20. Date Approved:


  14. Planned Results for 2007-2008 15. Results Achieved in 2007-2008
1. Health Canada 1) Protecting Canadians from inducements to smoke through development of regulations to restrict the display at retail of tobacco products, branded accessories and signs on the availability and price of tobacco products.

2) Toxicological testing of tobacco products and bio-markers of exposure to tobacco products will be undertaken.

3) The FCTS will combine an ongoing evaluation strategy built on its approved Results-based Management Accountability Framework, with cost-effectiveness studies and econometric modelling.

4) Health Canada will explore innovative risk assessment methodologies to assess whether modified tobacco products are more or less toxic than products now on the market.

5) The signing of the WHO FCTC is an opportunity to ensure that international policy and Canada's policy are mutually reinforcing.

6) Monitor the impact of tobacco control initiatives through the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS).

Provinces and territories enacted legislation banning display at retail, therefore, Health Canada did not continue its regulatory requirement.

The Department undertook development work on bio-markers. Results will be available in 2010.

Cost-effectiveness and econometric modelling for 2007-2008 was completed.

A variety of products were looked at, including smokeless tobacco and cigars, and their toxicity against cigarettes was assessed. Like cigarettes, these products are mutagenic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic.

Canada participated at WHO FCTC Conference of Parties and assisted other countries with their implementation of the FCTC.

Results from the CTUMS for data collected between February and June 2007, reveal that 19% of the population (just under five million Canadians) aged 15 years and older were smokers. Among youth aged 15-19 years, 15% were current smokers. The prevalence of smoking among young adults aged 20-24 years was reported at 24%.

2. PS Enhanced partnership arrangement with Akwesasne Mohawk Police. See Results Achieved by Non-federal Partners above.

In February 2008, Public Safety led Canada's delegation that participated in the first International Negotiating Body to develop a protocol on illicit trade in tobacco products. The objective is to develop a protocol, for adoption in 2010, that will create international standards to curb illicit trade in tobacco products.

3. ODPP 1) Prioritize fine recovery for fines ordered under cigarette contraband and tobacco sales to youth convictions.

2) Increase the number of fines satisfied by a minimum of 15 percent.

3) Analyze trends and prioritize the most effective and least costly recovery methods.

4) Prioritize payment of fines over incarceration, but enhance enforcement measures when appropriate.

5) Reduce costs to client departments in regards to fees incurred for Crown counsel attending motions for extensions in the delay to pay a fine.

The Fine Recovery Program continued to focus on these priorities, adjusting its enforcement focus in accordance with changes in the volume and nature of contraband activity, resultant convictions and fines ordered.

2) Rigorous and effective pursuit of outstanding fines in all regions resulted in a significant increase in amounts collected.

3) Priority is given to the most cost-effective methods of recovery, in particular, demand letters, telephone calls and negotiating payment agreements. In addition, progress was made toward a new tool for more efficient fine collection in partnership with CRA (refund set-off).

4) Emphasis was placed on fine payments rather than incarceration, including through use of negotiated payments and civil measures to seize assets when appropriate and necessary.

5) Crown counsel assigned to Fine Recovery Units continued to oppose all motions for payment extensions heard at court, resulting in a decrease in counsel fees to client departments for these hearings, and contributing to greater compliance with fine orders.

4. RCMP 1) Provide the Department of Finance, HC and other partners with updates on illicit tobacco trade activities.

2) The RCMP monitors illegal activities at and along the Canada/U.S. border through use of strategic detection and surveillance equipment.

3) Expand cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners.

1) Regular reports on the illicit tobacco situation were provided to Finance and HC. Reports are provided to other partners and key Ministerial entities upon request. Tobacco analysts attend regular meetings to brief the Department of Finance and provided the Department with the 2006 Strategic Intelligence Assessment. The 2007 Strategic Intelligence Assessment will be submitted in August 2008.

Release of the RCMP 2008 Contraband Tobacco Enforcement Strategy, whose overall goal is to nationally reduce the availability of and decrease the demand for contraband tobacco, while supporting government health objectives.

2) Improved border security through use of sophisticated technology which permits detection and monitoring of illegal border intrusions, resulting in vital intelligence and eventual enforcement actions. Joint Canada/U.S. Shiprider Operation in 2007 in Cornwall/St. Lawrence Seaway region targeted cross-border smuggling and intelligence gathering.

3) Co-hosted the 2008 Joint U.S./Canada Tobacco Diversion Workshop with American and Canadian agencies. Broad participation in the Interprovincial Tax Investigators Conference focused on contraband tobacco and other illicit tobacco issues. Involved as participant with the Department of Public Safety Task Force on Contraband Tobacco to identify potential concrete measures that will disrupt and reduce trade in contraband tobacco. Participated in 2008 at an information-sharing workshop with the U.S. Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Agency on current contraband tobacco investigations. Participated in February 2008 at the WHO-FCTC negotiations on a Protocol for Tobacco Control.

5. CRA 1) Systems adjustments and maintenance to reflect legislative changes that affect rates, reporting and refunds, as well as program changes to include duty-free shops and ships' stores. 1) Systems and reporting capabilities were maintained as required to meet program requirements.
Assessment and Benefit Services (previously Assessment and Collections) 2) Verify export activity. 2) The Tobacco Enforcement Verification Program (field) effectively monitored movement of exported tobacco products.
Excise and GST/HST Rulings Directorate/ Legislative Policy and Regulatory Affairs Branch 3) Ensure compliance with legislative requirements imposed on the manufacture, sale and possession of tobacco products in Canada. 3) Excise duty officers performed audits and regulatory reviews of licensed manufacturers to ensure compliance with legislative requirements.
  4) Work with stakeholders to monitor and assess effectiveness of measures used to reduce contraband tobacco. 4) Participated on a number of committees dealing with monitoring and control of tobacco products, including those dealing with interprovincial issues. Co-hosted the Tobacco Diversion Workshop with Canadian and U.S. participation.
  5) Provide Department of Finance with advice to assist in development of policy and determination of the magnitude and timing of future tax increases. 5) Met with Department of Finance as required. Provided industry and product information.
  6) Support RCMP enforcement activity. 6) Supported RCMP enforcement activity by providing information about specific tobacco transactions as well as expert testimony and affidavits.
6. CBSA

Intelligence Directorate

1) Provide advice to Department of Finance on matters that will impact the future tax structure on tobacco. 1) Attended monthly meetings with Department of Finance and partners to discuss and serve as a reference for questions on tobacco issues.
  2) Monitor and report on the contraband tobacco situation in Canada. 2) Provided monthly analysis of the national contraband situation by compiling reports received from the Regions. Partnered with RCMP in annual risk assessment of the nature and extent of tobacco contraband activity. Coordinated development of tobacco intelligence in the Regions.
  3) Expand cooperation with international and national law enforcement partners. 3) Actively participated in Joint Force Operations with law enforcement partners across the Regions. Co-hosted the Joint U.S./Canada Tobacco Diversion Workshop 2008 with American and Canadian agencies. Developed and maintained contact with international tobacco enforcement personnel.
Travellers Division Collection of tobacco duties imposed on personal importations of returning Canadians. CBSA front-line officers collected duties and taxes from previously exempted personal importations of tobacco.
Top of Page

Human Resources and Social Development Canada

TABLE 8: Horizontal Initiatives

During fiscal year 2007-2008 Human Resources and Social Development Canada was involved in the following horizontal initiatives. Unless otherwise mentioned in the list, Human Resources and Social Development Canada acts as the lead department for these initiatives.


  • Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program
  • Youth Employment Strategy
  • Canada Student Loans Program
  • Homelessness Partnering Strategy
  • National Child Benefit
  • Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care
  • Early Childhood Development Agreement


 
Name of Horizontal Initiative: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership Program
Name of Lead Department:
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Lead Department Program Activity:
Labour Market
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
October 3, 2003
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
March 31, 2012
Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): $199.5M
Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership program was initially an $85 million initiative beginning in 2003 to 2009. Budget 2007 expanded and extended the program through an additional investment of $105 million for 2007-2012. The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership is targeted at developing the skills of Canada's Aboriginal workforce, promoting maximum employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments across Canada and providing lasting benefits for Aboriginal communities, families and individuals.

The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership program is an opportunity driven initiative that is implemented through formalized partnerships between the private sector and Aboriginal communities (and others such as the province and training institutions). The partnerships are responsible for jointly developing and managing comprehensive, multi-year skills development plans that will ensure long-term highly skilled sustainable employment as a result of the projects. The comprehensive Aboriginal training-to-employment plan covers a broad continuum ranging from basic skills, literacy and academic upgrading, through job-specific training and apprenticeships to retention counselling and other on-the-job supports. The plan must have a commitment from the employers to provide at least 50 long-term (sustainable) jobs for Aboriginal people. The partnership must also make a significant financial contribution to the training plan and must develop a governance model that will manage and oversee the project.
http://srv119.services.gc.ca/AHRDSInternet/general/public/asep/asep_e.asp

Shared Outcome(s) :
  • Long term sustainable employment for Aboriginal people on major economic developments.
Governance Structure(s):
  • Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership is a national, centrally managed program. It promotes the maximum employment of Aboriginal people through a collaborative approach.
  • The implementation of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership projects requires the participation of Aboriginal organizations the private sector, provincial governments and others as appropriate and may involve collaboration with regional Service Canada officials. Formalized incorporations are formed to develop and manage training to employment plans to ensure that Aboriginal people are trained for the targeted long-term jobs.
  • Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership proponents receive direct support through a multi-year contribution agreement negotiated by Human Resources Social Development Canada based on a human resources development plan. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnership proponents are responsible for interim and final financial and performance reports.
$ Million
Federal
Partners
Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
Planned
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Actual
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Expected
Results for
2007-2008
Results
Achieved in
2007-2008
Human Resources and Social Development Canada PA 1 a. Aboriginal Skills Employment Partnership $190.0M

(program and operating)

$20.8M

(program and operating)

$17.5M

(program and operating)

  • 1,750 Aboriginal clients served
  • 1,000 interventions completed
  • 340 clients returned to employment following ASEP intervention
  • 1,439 Aboriginal clients served
  • 2,395 interventions completed
  • 570 clients returned to employment following ASEP intervention
National Resources Canada PA 1 a. ASEP - New Brunswick Project $0.4M $0.0M $0.1M n/a n/a
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada PA 2 (a) ASEP Manitoba Hydro Northern $3.3M $0.0M $0.0M    
(b) Nunavut Fisheries Training $0.3M $0.0M $0.0M    
(c) Mine Training Society $5.5M $0.0M $0.9M    
  Total
$199.5M
Total
$20.8M
Total
$18.5M
 
Comment(s) on Variance(s) :

Variance due to delays in project proposals start dates which will occur next fiscal year

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):

n/a

Contact Information:

Keith Conn,
Director General,
Aboriginal Affairs
(819-997-8551)
Skills and Employment Branch
keith.conn@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca

Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec


 
Name of Horizontal Initiative: Youth Employment Strategy
Name of Lead Department:
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Lead Department Program Activity:
Labour Market
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
April 1, 2003
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
Ongoing
Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date): On-going Funding
Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Youth Employment Strategy supports Canadian youth as they move into the world of work. The Strategy plays a role in developing Canada's workforce by providing young Canadians with access to programs and services to help them gain the skills, knowledge, career information and work experience they need to find and maintain employment and make a successful transition into the labour force.

The Youth Employment Strategy is designed to respond to labour market challenges facing youth, aged 15 to 30. The Strategy has three program streams: Skills Link, Career Focus and Summer Work Experience, which includes the Canada Summer Jobs initiative. Skills Link provides youth-at-risk with opportunities to develop skills they need to find work or return to school. Career Focus helps post-secondary graduates find work in their area of specialization. Summer Work Experience helps secondary and post-secondary graduates acquire career-related skills and financing for their education through summer jobs.

The Government of Canada's support to young Canadians is a shared responsibility and a partnership effort among many departments and organizations. Human Resources and Social Development, along with 11 other federal government departments, work cooperatively with other levels of government, Aboriginal organizations, educational institutions, and private sector, not-for-profit and voluntary sector organizations to deliver Youth Employment Strategy initiatives.
http://www.youth.gc.ca/index.jsp

Shared Outcome(s) :

The shared outcomes of partners for the common key results are:

  • Number of youth served
  • Number of youth employed / self-employed
  • Number of youth returning to school
Governance Structure(s):

The Youth Employment Strategy has in place an umbrella Results-based Management and Accountability Framework (RMAF) that represents a commitment among the twelve participating federal departments to undertake ongoing collection of common performance management data to ensure effective overall performance management of the program.

As lead department, Human Resources and Social Development Canada with Service Canada chairs and is responsible for the coordination and management of an Interdepartmental Operations Committee that is responsible for reporting on the implementation of the Youth Employment Strategy. The Evaluation Steering Committee is another Youth Employment Strategy interdepartmental committee. There is also a Communications Sub-Committee reporting to the Operations Committee.

Youth Employment Strategy initiatives are delivered nationally, regionally and locally using a variety of funding instruments, such as contribution agreements and some direct delivery methods. Transfer payments are provided primarily by participating departments through contribution agreements and service delivery agreements in support of participants' remuneration and overhead costs. Youth Protocols for joint planning mechanisms have been signed with Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Manitoba.

$ Million
Federal
Partners
Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
Planned
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Actual
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Expected
Results for
2007-2008
Results
Achieved in
2007-2008
1. Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Service Canada PA 1 a. Career Focus On-going 13.0 11.6* HRSDC - Sectoral Career Focus
  • Clients Served: 454
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 90% or 408
  • Return to School: 10% or 45
  • Contribution Agreements: 14
  • Funds Leveraged: $10.8M
HRSDC - Sectoral Career Focus
  • Clients Served: 879
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 371
  • Return to School: 12
Service Canada
  • Clients Served: 400-600
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 300 - 375
  • Return to School:10-30
  • Contribution Agreements: 80 - 110
  • Funds Leveraged: $2-4 M
Service Canada
  • Clients Served: 530
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 356
  • Return to School: 25
  • Contribution Agreements: 80
  • Funds Leveraged: $2,102,480
b. Skills Link   167.5 141.0* HRSD with Service Canada
  • Clients Served: 14,000-16,000
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 5,950- 6,250
  • Return to School: 1,250-1,350
  • Contribution Agreements: 1,100-1,300
  • Funds Leveraged: $65-80M
  • Clients Served: 14,763
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 6,448
  • Return to School: 1,359
  • Contribution Agreements: 960
  • Funds Leveraged: $31,702,264
PA 2 c. Summer Work Experience   54.2 107.4* HRSD with Service Canada
No targets set (program under review as part of government's commitment to on-going program expense review)
  • Clients Served: 41,571
  • Employed or Self-Employed: n/a
  • Return to School: 41,571
2. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada PA 1 a. Career Focus   1.1 0.8 Targets are not set by HRSDC for other Government departments
  • Clients Served: 126
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 118
  • Return to School: 8
3. Canadian Food Inspection Agency PA 1 a. Career Focus   0.1 0.1  
  • Clients Served: 3
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 3
4. Canadian International Development Agency PA 1 a. Career Focus   6.4 5.5  
  • Clients Served: 576
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 131
  • Return to School: 25
(179 out of 576 participants provided CIDA with current employment status)
5. Canadian Heritage PA 1 a. Career Focus   0.9 0.9  
  • Clients Served: 86
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 23
  • Return to School: 4
b. Summer Work Experience   9.8 7.2  
  • Clients Served: 1,865
  • Return to School: 911
6. Environment Canada PA 1 a. Career Focus   3.3 1.6  
  • Clients Served: 156
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 133
  • Return to School: 8
7. Industry Canada PA 1 a. Career Focus   9.8 8.1   (CFS-TWEP)
  • Clients Served: 257
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 39
  • Return to School: 15
(CAP YI)
  • Clients Served: 838
b. Summer Work Experience   10.0 5.5   (CAP YI - Summer)
  • Clients Served: 394
  • Return to School: 394
(Student Connections)
  • Clients Served: 391
  • Return to School: 391
8. National Research Council PA 1 a. Career Focus   5.4 5.0  
  • Clients Served: 331
9. Natural Resources Canada PA 1 a. Career Focus   0.6 0.6  
  • Clients Served: 79
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 63
  • Return to School: 16
10. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation PA 1 a. Skills Link   1.0 1.0  
  • Clients Served: 101
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 19
  • Return to School: 10
11. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada PA 1 a. Skills Link   14.0 15.4  
  • Clients Served: 11,332
  • Employed or Self-Employed: 38
  • Return to School: 150
b. Summer Work Experience   10.0 9.8  
  • Clients Served: 18,697
  • Employed or Self-Employed: n/a
  • Return to School: 6,195
12. Parks Canada PA 1 a. Summer Work Experience   2.0 2.0  
  • Clients Served: 280
  • Return to School: 280
  Total
On-going
Total
309.1
Total
323.5
 
Comment(s) on Variance(s) :
Actual spending was higher than planned spending due to funding received by HRSDC through the 2007-2008 Supplementary Estimates (A) for the Canada Summer Jobs program in the Summer Work Experience YES stream, offset by delays in implementation of Skills Link and Career Focus projects as well as the inability of some employers funded under the Canada Summer Jobs to fill all the positions for which they were approved for funding and because some students left their jobs early.
Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):
n/a
Contact Information:

John Atherton,
Director General,
Active Employment Measures
(819) 994-6916
Skills and Employment Branch
john.atherton@hrsdc-rhdsc.gc.ca

Place du Portage, Phase IV
140 Promenade du Portage
Gatineau, Quebec

*Note - HRSDC's actual spending in 2007-2008 includes estimated operating resources of $23.9 million.


 
Name of Horizontal Initiative: Canada Student Loans Program
Name of Lead Department:
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Lead Department Program Activity:
Learning
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
August 1, 1964
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
Ongoing
Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):
Ongoing
Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The purpose of the Canada Student Loans Program is to promote accessibility to post-secondary education for individuals with demonstrated financial need by lowering financial barriers through the provision of loans and grants and to ensure Canadians have an opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills to participate in the workplace and community. Since 1964, the Canada Student Loans Program has assisted millions of students in their pursuit of post-secondary education.

In August of 2000, the Canada Student Loans Program shifted from the risk-shared financing arrangements that had been in place with financial institutions between 1995 and 2000 to a direct student loan financing regime. This meant that the Program had to redesign the delivery mechanism in order to directly finance student loans and two private sector service providers were engaged in 2001 to administer the loans. Effective March 2008, the contract for loan administration was awarded to a single selected service provider.

Information for the public on saving, planning and paying for post-secondary studies and specific information for Canada Student Loans Program clients (including information on learning opportunity selection, financial planning, and how to apply for, maintain and repay student loans) can be accessed at: http://www.canlearn.ca

Shared Outcome(s):

Maintain the Government's commitment to accessible post-secondary education by:

  • lowering financial barriers to post-secondary education through the provision of financial assistance to eligible Canadians
  • ensuring a more manageable debt burden for borrowers.
Governance Structure(s):

The Government of Canada has entered into Integration Agreements with four provinces (Ontario, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador) in order to create a "one-student-one-loan" service approach. These four integrated provinces accounted for over 60% of the Canada Student Loans Program borrowers.

The administration of the current Program is the product of a co-operative effort between Human Resources and Social Development Canada, Service Canada, Canada Revenue Agency, participating provinces and the Yukon Territory, one Service Provider and Public Works and Government Services Canada. These agents are responsible for conducting one or more activities during the loan lifecycle. Program documents and communications tools are typically prepared with the input and approval of both federal and participating provincial and territorial governments. Quebec, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut do not participate in the Canada Student Loans Program. These jurisdictions receive an alternative payment to assist in the cost of delivering a similar student financial assistance program.

Effective management of the Program and of relations with third-party agents is the primary responsibility of the Canada Student Loans Program. Program activities include, for example, client relations for escalated cases and comptrollership.

The application and needs assessment for the Program is delivered by provincial student assistance offices, which also administer provincial aid. The participating provinces and the Yukon Territory:

  • determine individual eligibility for loans and Canada Access Grants based on federal criteria;
  • assess students' financial needs based on federal criteria;
  • issue loan certificates;
  • administer and deliver Canada Study Grants; and
  • designate educational institutions that students may attend with Canada Student Loans Program assistance.

While the Canada Student Loans Program provides the guidance and direction on how the Program is to be delivered, the Service Provider assumes responsibility for managing the loans once the loan agreement is signed and submitted for processing. Service Provider's responsibilities include:

  • verifying loan agreements;
  • managing the in-study interest-free period;
  • negotiating and handling loan repayment; and
  • debt management, including counselling borrowers on debt management options, receiving and assessing applications, and managing the loans.

Public Works and Government Services Canada is responsible for disbursing loans from files previously approved by Canada Student Loan Program to the borrowers and to Educational Institutions, for any funds directed to pay for tuition.

Canada Revenue Agency Non-Tax Collection Services is the agent responsible for debt collection. Delinquent guaranteed and risk-shared loans become debts to the Crown when the Government of Canada buys back the debt from financial institutions. Canada Revenue Agency Non-Tax Collection Directorate becomes responsible for directly financed loans after the Service Provider has attempted collection of a set period of time and the borrower has either not made payments on their loan or is unwilling to repay. These activities may also be conducted by private collection agencies under contract to Canada Revenue Agency. These private collection agencies must abide by Canada Revenue Agency collection guidelines when carrying out the recovery of Crown debts.

$ Million
Federal
Partners
Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of Programs for Federal Partners Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
Planned
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Actual
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Expected
Results for
2007-2008
Results
Achieved in
2007-2008
1. Human Resources Social Development Canada
Public Works and Government Services Canada
Canada Revenue Agency
N/A Ongoing statutory funding 790.4

Loans Disbursed under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act $2.0B

572.2
  • Estimated number of Canadians to benefit from the Canada Student Loans Program (includes loans, grants and non-repayable in-study interest subsidies): 455,000 a
  • Estimated number of Canadians to benefit from Canada Study Grants and Canada Access Grants: 80,000 b
  • Actual number of Canadians to benefit from the Canada Student Loans Program (includes loans, grants and non-repayable in-study interest subsidies): 460,000
  • Actual number of Canadians to benefit from Canada Study Grants and Canada Access Grants: 93,277
  Total Total
790.4
Total
572.2
 
Comments on Variance(s) :

The bulk of the variance ($218.2M) is due to higher then expected Interest Revenues on Direct Loan ($107.1M), Bad Debt Expense adjustment ($48.8M) due to a combinations of change in the methodology of calculating the expense by the Office of the Chief Actuary and accelerated repayment, as well as a major decrease in the alternative payments ($58.7M) resulting from a decrease in defaulted loans. Moreover, other variances, for a total of ($3.6M) are the combination of minor variances related to other components of the program.

Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):
Contact Information:

Barbara Glover
Director General
Canada Student Loans Program
(819) 994-2377

Approved by:

David MacDonald
Assistant Deputy Minister
Learning
(613) 957-7444

Date Approved:
For information regarding your loan or loan repayment, please visit:
http://osap.gov.on.ca/eng/not_secure/general.htm#NSLSC or http://www.canlearn.ca
a Please note that the number is estimated as loans are awarded based on client eligibility and demonstrated need.
b Please note that the number is estimated as grants are awarded based on client eligibility and demonstrated need.


 
Name of Horizontal Initiative: Homelessness Partnering Strategy
Name of Lead Department:
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Lead Department Program Activity:
Housing and Homelessness
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
April 1, 2007
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
March 31, 2009
Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):
$269.6M over two years which include $6M for Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative and is administrated by Public Works and Government Services Canada.
Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy (which replaced the National Homelessness Initiative) makes strategic investments in community priorities and includes a planning process that encourages cooperation between governments, agencies and community-based organizations to find local solutions for homeless people and those at-risk. The Homelessness Partnering Strategy is designed to provide supports to 61 designated communities and some small, rural, northern and Aboriginal communities to develop community-based measures that assist homeless individuals and families move toward self-sufficiency.

Under the Homelessness Partnering Strategy, the Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative is more flexible to allow land exchanges. Community groups can exchange, under certain conditions, a federal property received under the Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative for another similar, and more suitable, property. In addition, the control period has been extended to 15 years (from five under the National Homelessness Initiative) to ensure long-term, lasting benefits to the recipients and the communities. Both enhancements were contained in the new Terms and Conditions for the program.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy continued to:

  • help communities build on their successes and focus on interventions to help prevent and break the cycle of homelessness;
  • achieve results for Canadians by focusing on attaining self-sufficiency and not just temporary measures;
  • require that federal money be targeted more at the development of transitional and supportive housing and at improving programs that help homeless people become self-sufficient such as skills training, health and substance abuse treatment;
  • enhance the partnership approach with provinces and territories, communities and the private and voluntary sectors to strengthen capacity and build sustainability;
  • carry out research to foster a better understanding of homelessness as well as collect and disseminate best practices to assist in designing the most effective responses.

For more information, please visit the Homelessness Partnering Strategy website:

http://www.homelessness.gc.ca

Background

In December 1999, the Government of Canada launched the National Homelessness Initiative, a three-year initiative with a budget allocation of $753 million to develop new programs and to enhance existing programs to address the issue of homelessness in Canada. In February 2003, the Government extended the National Homelessness Initiative for an additional three years with a budget allocation of $405 million. In November 2005, the Government announced a one-year extension (2006-2007) of the National Homelessness Initiative with a budget allocation of $134.8 million to sustain communities through investments in successful homelessness initiatives. On December 19, 2006, the Government announced the new Homelessness Partnering Strategy which took effect on April 1, 2007 and continues until March 31, 2009 with a budget allocation of $269.6 million.

Shared Outcome(s):

Enhanced income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities.

Governance Structure(s):

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy community-based stream - the Homelessness Partnership Initiative - is delivered via two models:

  • community entity model: Under this model, the Community Advisory Board recommends projects to the community entity (an incorporated organization) which is the decision-making body responsible for approving project proposals and determining the eligibility of projects. Human Resources Social Development Canada is responsible for managing the contribution agreement and all related activities. The community, in consultation with Service Canada, has designated responsibility for program delivery to a specific local organization; and
  • shared delivery model: Under this model, the Community Advisory Body reviews project proposals and makes recommendations to HRSDC which manages the contribution agreement and all related activities. Both Service Canada and the community work in partnership to support funding priorities, resulting in a joint selection and decision-making process. The Minister approves the project proposals.

In Quebec, unlike other provinces and territories, the Homelessness Partnership Initiative is delivered under a formal Canada-Quebec agreement, in collaboration with the Province of Quebec. Under this model, the Québec Agences de la santé et des services sociaux are responsible for the community planning process as well as the selection and recommendation of projects. These "Agences" are the delivery arm of the Quebec Health and Social Services Department, much like Service Canada is to HRSDC. A Joint Management Committee, composed of federal and provincial representatives, reviews each project and recommends successful projects for approval by the Government of Canada.

The Homelessness Partnering Strategy recognizes that the prevention and reduction of homelessness requires collaboration among all levels of government, particularly the federal and provincial and territorial governments. Provinces and territories will be invited to enter into bilateral agreements with the federal government. The Canada-Quebec Agreement serves as a model that will be adapted for other jurisdictions. Partnering agreements will offer provinces and territories the opportunity to participate in community planning and priority-setting at the outset. Agreements will support the alignment of federal, provincial and territorial investments to enhance linkages between social services and housing and address the operational sustainability of community projects. This partnering approach will ensure that all of the necessary tools and supports are in place for homeless people to secure housing and supports that effectively meet their needs and for those at-risk of homelessness to attain housing stability.

The Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative is a Homelessness Partnering Strategy program co-managed by Public Works and Government Services Canada and Human Resources and Social Development Canada, with advice and support from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.

$ Million
Federal
Partners
Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
Planned
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Actual
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Expected
Results for
2007-2008
Results
Achieved in
2007-2008
  1. Human Resources and Social Development a. Homelessness Partnership Initiative 259.9 129.9 87.6
  • Homelessness Partnership Initiative communities will be required to demonstrate cost matching with other partners.
  • Increased availability and access, for homeless people, to a range of services and facilities along the continuum (i.e., emergency, transitional and supportive housing).
  • The ratio of total HPI funding investments versus funding by types of partners for each province and territory has not only continued but increased for the 2007-2008 fiscal year.
  • Under the HPI, investments in transitional, supportive and longer-term housing facilities and services continued.
b. Homelessness Accountability Network 3.7 1.9 1.0
  • Increased knowledge (e.g., best practices, research findings) exchanged among community service providers, researchers, and all levels of government working on issues of homelessness
  • Hosted the HPS National Forum and delivered six national telephone forums.
  • A Call for Proposals resulted in 28 Homelessness Knowledge Development Program projects being approved in principle.
  • Interdepartmental knowledge and research exchange between HPS and other HRSDC research was enhanced through participating in four HRSDC Policy Research Coordination Groups.
2. Public Works and Government Services Canada a. Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative [Surplus Federal Real Property for Homelessness Initiative - funding is administered by Public Works and Government Services Canada] N/A N/A
  • Enhanced capacity of communities to provide facilities to homeless individuals and families
  • Completed the transfer of 8 properties initiated in previous years.
  Total
263.6
Total
131.8
Total
88.6
 
Comments on Variance(s) :
The variance between the Planned and Actual Spending of $43.2M has been partially re-profiled in 2008-2009 ARLU ($17.5M). The remaining will be requested for re-profile in Supplementary Estimates (B) to ensure that funds will be available for proposals that are developed for activities to prevent and reduce homelessness.
Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):
Contact Information:

Jim Young
Director of Corporate Affairs and Accountability
Homelessness Partnering Secretariat
Telephone: (819) 956-6857

Approved by:

Bayla Kolk
Associate Assistant Deputy Minister
Income Security and Social Development Branch

Date Approved:


 
Name of Horizontal Initiative: National Child Benefit
Name of Lead Department:
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Lead Department Program Activity:
Children and Families
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
1998
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
Ongoing
Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):
Statutory
Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The National Child Benefit1 contributes to a larger federal, provincial and territorial strategy, the National Children's Agenda, designed to help Canadian children.

Through the National Child Benefit, the Government of Canada is working with provincial and territorial governments to provide income support, as well as benefits and services, for low-income families with children. The initiative also includes a First Nations component.

Shared Outcome(s):

The National Child Benefit initiative has three goals:

  • Help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty;
  • Promote attachment to the labour market by ensuring that families will always be better off as a result of working; and
  • Reduce overlap and duplication by harmonizing program objectives and benefits and simplifying administration.
  • Annual National Child Benefit Progress Reports include information on the level of spending by all jurisdictions. There is a data collection process to which all participating jurisdictions contribute in order to present comparable information on National Child Benefit initiatives. The data submitted by each jurisdiction is reviewed jointly to ensure consistency in reporting. To obtain the most recent Progress Report or for further information, please visit the federal, provincial and territorial National Child Benefit website: http:\\www.nationalchildbenefit.ca.

    Federal Spending:

    The Government of Canada contributes to the National Child Benefit initiative through a supplement to its Canada Child Tax Benefit. In addition to the base benefit of the Canada Child Tax Benefit, which is targeted to both low- and middle-income families, the National Child Benefit Supplement provides extra income support to low-income families with children. Federal spending on the Canada Child Tax Benefit is tracked by the Canada Revenue Agency, which is responsible for the delivery of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

    The federal government provided $3.5 billion through the National Child Benefit Supplement in 2006-2007. By 2007-2008, total annual federal support delivered through the Canada Child Tax Benefit system, including the National Child Benefit Supplement, is projected to reach $9.5 billion, including a projected $3.7 billion through the National Child Benefit Supplement.

    Provincial and territorial and First Nations Spending:

    Under the National Child Benefit, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2006, reports that in 2005-2006, provinces, territories, and First Nations spent $873.9 million in programs and services in key areas such as child/day care initiatives, child benefits and earned income supplements, early childhood services and children-at-risk services, supplementary health benefits, and youth initiatives. This includes First Nations reinvestments in programs and services which are estimated to be $58.0 million in 2005-2006.

    Indicators and Impacts:

  • The National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2006 includes an analysis of both societal level indicators, which measure areas such as low income and labour force attachment and do not infer that any changes are the result of the initiative, and direct outcome indicators, which measure only those changes that are directly attributed to the National Child Benefit. With respect to societal level indicators, the report shows that the proportion of families with children living in low income has declined significantly since the mid-1900s, decreasing from 17.6 percent in 1996 to 11.6 percent in 2004, based on Statistics Canada's post-tax low-income cutoffs. During this period, the number of children living in low income decreased from 1,304,000 in 1996 to 877,300 in 2004, a decrease of approximately 426,700 children. Further, the report estimates that in 2004, as a direct result of the National Child Benefit:
  • 125,000 children in 59,000 families were prevented from living in low income, a reduction of 12.1 percent. This means that in 2004, there were 12.1 percent fewer families with children living in low income than there would have been without the National Child Benefit.
    - These families saw their average disposable income increase by an estimated $2,400, or 9.3 percent.
  • For those families with children who remained in low income, the National Child Benefit improved their disposable income by an average of $1,600 (9.1 percent). This means that the low-income gap (the additional amount of income needed by low-income families to reach the low-income line) was reduced by 18.5 percent in 2004.

In addition, in June 2005, federal, provincial and territorial governments released a synthesis report of a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the National Child Benefit initiative (1998-99, 1999-00, 2000-01). The evaluation compiled evidence from a number of studies and showed that the National Child Benefit is meeting its goals. In addition, a process to launch further evaluation has begun.

For a complete discussion of indicators, please see Chapters 5 and 6 of the National Child Benefit Progress Report: 2006. For a discussion of evaluation results, please see the Evaluation of the National Child Benefit Initiative: Synthesis Report. These reports are available free of charge on the National Child Benefit website, at: http:\\www.nationalchildbenefit.ca

Governance Structure(s):

The National Child Benefit Governance and Accountability Framework outlines the key characteristics of the federal, provincial and territorial partnership: cooperation, openness, flexibility, evolution and accountability. As a co-operative effort among governments, the National Child Benefit combines the strengths of a national program with the flexibility of provincial and territorial initiatives designed to meet the specific needs and conditions within each jurisdiction.

With respect to accountability, under the Governance and Accountability Framework, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services have committed to sharing data on reinvestment initiatives and reviewing results and outcomes achieved in order to identify best practices. Federal, provincial and territorial governments have also agreed to report annually to the public with a primary focus on performance of the initiative. To date, six annual progress reports have been published, as well as a synthesis report on a comprehensive evaluation of the first three years of the initiative.

The Federal Role:

Under the National Child Benefit, the Government of Canada provides additional income support to low-income families with children via the National Child Benefit Supplement component of the Canada Child Tax Benefit. Canada Revenue Agency delivers these benefits to families.

Human Resources and Social Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, and the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development represents the Government of Canada in this federal/provincial/territorial initiative.

The Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.

The Provincial and Territorial Role:

Under the National Child Benefit, provinces, territories and First Nations provide benefits and services that further the goals of the initiative. The National Child Benefit is designed so that provinces, territories and First Nations have the flexibility to develop and deliver programs and services that best meet the needs and priorities of their communities. As part of this flexibility, provinces and territories may adjust social assistance or child benefit payments by the full or partial amount of the National Child Benefit Supplement. This approach has resulted in families on social assistance being no worse off in terms of their level of benefits, while providing additional funds for new or enhanced provincial and territorial programs benefiting low-income families with children.

It is important to note that, as the National Child Benefit initiative has matured, the majority of provinces and territories no longer recover increases to the National Child Benefit Supplement. This means that the vast majority of children living in low-income families, including those on social assistance, are currently receiving some or all of the National Child Benefit Supplement.

Under the National Reinvestment Framework, provincial and territorial governments, along with First Nations, have committed to re-allocating available social assistance funds into benefits and services for children in low-income families that further the goals of the initiative. Jurisdictions have focused reinvestments primarily in five key areas:

  • Child Benefits and Earned Income Supplements;
  • Child Care;
  • Early Childhood Services and Children-at-Risk Services;
  • Supplementary Health Benefits;
  • Youth Initiatives, and
  • Other Benefits and Services.

First Nations Role:

The federal government is responsible for ensuring programs for First Nations children on reserve are comparable to those available to other Canadian children. Under the National Child Benefit, First Nations have the flexibility to reinvest savings from adjustments to social assistance into programs and services tailored to meet the needs and priorities of individual communities. Some 500 First Nations participate in the National Child Benefit and implement their own programs.

$ Million
Federal
Partners
Federal
Partner
Program
Activity2
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
Planned
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Actual
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Expected
Results for
2007-2008
Results
Achieved in
2007-2008
1. 1. Canada Revenue Agency a. National Child Benefit Supplement Ongoing $3.5 billion Not available Continued progress on the goals of the National Child Benefit initiative, as described in "Shared Outcomes", above. Not available
Comment(s) on Variance(s) :
N/A
Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):
Contact Information:

Carole Vallerand
Assistant Director
Economic Security
Strategic Policy and Research
Phone (613) 957-9865
Approved by:

Shawn Tupper
Director General, Social Policy Development
613-957-4707
Date Approved:
Notes :
1 The Government of Quebec has stated that it agrees with the basic principles of the National Child Benefit. Quebec chose not to participate in the initiative because it wanted to assume control over income support for children in Quebec; however, it has adopted a similar approach to the National Child Benefit. Throughout this text, references to joint federal, provincial and territorial positions do not include Quebec.
2 While Human Resources and Social Development Canada is responsible for policy development with respect to the National Child Benefit initiative, the Canada Child Tax Benefit (including the National Child Benefit Supplement) is a tax measure, and is administered by Canada Revenue Agency. In addition, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada have roles in reinvestments and investments.


 
Name of Horizontal Initiative: Multilateral Framework on Early Learning And Child Care
Name of Lead Department:
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Lead Department Program Activity:
Children and Families
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
March 2003
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
Ongoing
Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):
$350 million in 2007-2008
Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

In March 2003, federal, provincial and territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services, reached agreement on a framework for improving access to affordable, quality, provincially and territorially regulated early learning and child care programs and services. Under the Multilateral Framework, the Government of Canada is providing $1.05 billion over five years through the Canada Social Transfer to support provincial and territorial government investments in early learning and child care. This initiative complements the September 2000 Early Childhood Development Agreement.

The objective of this initiative is to further promote early childhood development and support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.

Early learning and child care programs and services funded through this initiative will primarily provide direct care and early learning for children in settings such as child care centres, family child care homes, preschools, and nursery schools. Types of investments can include capital and operating funding, fee subsidies, wage enhancements, training, professional development and support, quality assurance, and parent information and referral. Programs and services that are part of the formal school system are not included in this initiative.

Governments also committed to transparent public reporting that will give Canadians a clear idea of the progress being made in improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services, beginning with a baseline report in November 2003.

Information about the initiative, including the text of the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial Web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at http://www.ecd-elcc.ca

Shared Outcome(s):

The objectives of the initiative, as outlined in the Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care are:

  • to promote early childhood development; and
  • to support the participation of parents in employment or training by improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services.
Governance Structure(s):

The Multilateral Framework for Early Learning and Child Care recognizes that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early learning and child care programs and services.

Implementation of the commitments outlined in the Multilateral Framework has been tasked to a Working Group comprised of officials from all jurisdictions (including Québec, which participates as an observer). This Working Group reports to Deputy Ministers Responsible for Social Services, and is jointly chaired by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Saskatchewan.

$ Million
Federal
Partners
Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
Planned
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Actual
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Expected
Results for
2007-2008
Results
Achieved in
2007-2008
Not applicable. The Multilateral Framework on Early Learning and Child Care is a federal-provincial-territorial initiative. In 2007-2008, the Government of Canada transferred $350M via the Canada Social Transfer to provinces and territories for investment in programs and services related to early learning and child care.

All governments agreed that investments in early learning and child care should be incremental, predictable and sustainable over the long term. All governments committed to make incremental investments in regulated early learning and child care.

The Canada Social Transfer is a block transfer to provinces and territories, which does not require them to report to the Government of Canada on the results achieved.
Total

$350M via the Canada Social Transfer

Comment(s) on Variance(s) :
N/A
Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):

Provincial and territorial governments have agreed to invest the funding provided in regulated early learning and child care programs for children under the age of six. Early learning and child care programs and services funded through this initiative will primarily provide direct care and early learning for children in settings such as child care centres, family child care homes, preschools, and nursery schools. Investments can include capital and operating funding, fee subsidies, wage enhancements, training, professional development and support, quality assurance, and parent information and referral. Programs and services that are part of the formal school system are not included in this initiative.

Governments also committed to transparent public reporting that will give Canadians a clear idea of the progress being made in improving access to affordable, quality early learning and child care programs and services, beginning with a baseline report in November 2003 and annual reporting in November 2004.

The Government of Quebec supports the general principles expressed in the Early Learning and Child Care Initiative but did not participate in developing the Initiative because it wants to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Contact Information:

Lynne Westlake
Acting Director
Children's Policy
613-957-4610

Approved by:

Shawn Tupper
Director General
Social Policy Development
613-957-4707

Date Approved:


 
Name of Horizontal Initiative: Early Childhood Development Agreement
Name of Lead Department:
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Lead Department Program Activity:
Children and Families
Start Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
September 2000 with funding beginning April 2001
End Date of the Horizontal Initiative:
Ongoing
Total Federal Funding Allocation (start to end date):
$500 million for 2007-2008
Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

In September 2000, First Ministers reached agreement on the federal, provincial and territorial Early Childhood Development Agreement, to improve and expand early childhood development supports for young children (prenatal to age 6) and for their parents.

The Government of Quebec supports the general principles expressed in the Early Childhood Development Initiative but did not participate in developing the Initiative because it wants to retain sole responsibility for social matters. However, it receives its share of funding granted by the Government of Canada and makes significant investments in programs and services that benefit families and children.

Information about the Agreement, including the text of the First Ministers' communiqué on Early Childhood Development, is available on the federal, provincial and territorial web portal on early childhood development and early learning and child care at http:\\www.ecd-elcc.ca.

Shared Outcome(s):

The objectives of the initiative, as outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement are:

  • to promote early childhood development so that, to their fullest potential, children will be physically and emotionally healthy, safe and secure, ready to learn, and socially engaged and responsible; and
  • to help children reach their potential and to help families support their children within strong communities.
Governance Structure(s):

In the Early Childhood Development Agreement, First Ministers recognized that provinces and territories have the primary responsibility for early childhood development programs and services.

Federal, provincial and territorial Ministers Responsible for Social Services and Ministers of Health are responsible for implementation of the commitments in the Agreement. Implementation has been tasked to a Working Group comprised of officials from all jurisdictions (including Quebec, which participates as an observer). The Working Group reports to Deputy Ministers Responsible for Social Services. The Working Group is jointly chaired by Human Resources Social Development Canada and Saskatchewan.

$ Million
Federal
Partners
Federal
Partner
Program
Activity
Names of
Programs
for Federal
Partners
Total
Allocation
(from start
to end date)
Planned
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Actual
Spending
for 2007-
2008
Expected
Results for
2007-2008
Results
Achieved in
2007-2008
Not applicable. The Early Childhood Development Agreement is a federal-provincial-territorial initiative In 2007-2008 the Government of Canada transferred $500M via the Canada Social Transfer, to provinces and territories for investment in programs and services related to early childhood development. The Canada Social Transfer is a block transfer to provinces and territories, which does not require them to report to the Government of Canada on the results achieved.
Total

$500M via the Canada Social Transfer

Comment(s) on Variance(s) :
N/A
Results to be Achieved by Non-federal Partners (if applicable):

Provincial and territorial governments are investing the funds transferred to them by the Government of Canada in any or all of the following four areas of action outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement:

  • promoting healthy pregnancy, birth and infancy;
  • improving parenting and family supports;
  • strengthening early childhood development, learning and care, and;
  • strengthening community supports.

All participating federal, provincial and territorial governments have committed to three reporting requirements:

  • Each government released a first report on Early Childhood Development programs and expenditures for the 2000-2001 fiscal year, providing a baseline against which new investments can be tracked.
  • In fall 2002, governments began annual reporting, using a shared framework with comparable program indicators, to track progress in improving and expanding early childhood development programs and services within the four areas for action.
  • In fall 2002, governments began regular reporting on children's well-being, using a common set of outcome indicators.

Within the Government of Canada, responsibility for implementation of the commitments outlined in the Early Childhood Development Agreement is shared jointly between Human Resources and Social Development Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Contact Information:

Lynne Westlake,
Acting Director
Children's Policy
613-957-4610

Approved by:

Shawn Tupper,
DG
Social Policy Development
613-957-4707

Date Approved:
 
Top of Page

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Canadian Polar Commission

Horizontal Initiatives

First Nations Water Management Strategy

Lead Department(s): Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Start Date: May 2003 (official announcement)
End Date: 2008 (end of funding)
Total Federal Funding Allocation: $1.6 billion over 5 years

Description
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and Health Canada (HC) have developed a seven-part First Nations Water Management Strategy (FNWMS) to be implemented over a five-year period, beginning in 2003–2004. The strategy allows for the development and implementation of: (1) a plan to upgrade and build water and waste-water facilities to meet established design, construction and water quality standards with a priority on identified facilities; (2) an effective water quality monitoring program combined with a comprehensive and coordinated compliance and reporting regime that will improve the detection of drinking water problems in a timely manner, thereby reducing the possibility of risk to health; (3) an effective and sustainable operation and maintenance (O&M) program designed to ensure the safety of the residents and the protection of the assets with a priority on identified high-risk facilities; (4) a plan for the continued expansion and enhancement of training programs, to ensure that all operators have the skills, knowledge and experience required to fulfill their responsibilities, supported by the introduction of mandatory certification requirements for all operators; (5) a set of integrated water quality management protocols with clearly defined roles and responsibilities consistent with national